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Sample records for myocardial fluoro-18 2-deoxyglucose

  1. The comparison of 2-18F-2-deoxyglucose and 15-(ortho-123I-phenyl)-pentadecanoic acid uptake in persisting defects on thallium-201 tomography in myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Henrich, M.M.; Vester, E.; von der Lohe, E.; Herzog, H.; Simon, H.; Kuikka, J.T.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1991-07-01

    The myocardial uptake of glucose and fatty acids into 201Tl redistribution defects were studied in 32 patients with myocardial infarction by tomography using 2-18F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) and 15-(ortho-123I-phenyl)-pentadecanoic acid (oPPA). A total of 1153 segments were analyzed, 408 (35%) of which showed a persistent thallium-defect in stress-redistribution images. Of the segments with a decreased 201Tl uptake in these redistribution tomograms, 50.5% had a decreased uptake of both FDG and oPPA; in 21.8% FDG as well as oPPA uptake was within normal range. Normal FDG uptake but decreased oPPA uptake was detected in 17.4%, whereas 10.3% of the segments had normal oPPA uptake but decreased FDG uptake (chi-square test, p less than 0.001). A significant correlation of FDG and oPPA uptake (r = 0.51) was found in the segments with persistent 201Tl defect. Thus, a substantial fraction of persistent thallium-defects after healed myocardial infarction exhibit FDG as well as oPPA uptake, probably due to residual fatty acid metabolism in partially ischemic regions.

  2. 2-Deoxyglucose uptake during vocalization in the squirrel monkey brain.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Uwe; Ehrenreich, Ludwig; De Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2002-11-15

    In the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), the cerebral 2-deoxyglucose uptake was compared between animals made to vocalize by electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal grey and animals stimulated in the same structure, but sub-threshold for vocalization. A significantly higher 2-deoxyglucose uptake in the vocalizers than the non-vocalizers was found in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary and pre-supplementary motor area, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, primary motor cortex, claustrum, centrum medianum, perifornical hypothalamus, periaqueductal grey, intercollicular region, dorsal mesencephalic reticular formation, peripeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra, nucl. ruber, paralemniscal area, trigeminal motor, principal and spinal nuclei, solitary tract nucleus, nucl. ambiguus, nucl. retroambiguus, nucl. hypoglossus, ventral raphe and large parts of the medullary reticular formation. The study makes clear that vocalization, even in the case of genetically pre-programmed patterns, depends upon an extensive network, beyond the well-known periaqueductal grey, nucl. retroambiguus and cranial motor nuclei pathway. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Genetic Analysis of Resistance and Sensitivity to 2-Deoxyglucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, Rhonda R.; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini G.; Zhang, Bob B.; Schmidt, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is a metabolic pathway utilized by human cancer cells and also by yeast cells when they ferment glucose to ethanol. Both cancer cells and yeast cells are inhibited by the presence of low concentrations of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG). Genetic screens in yeast used resistance to 2-deoxyglucose to identify a small set of genes that function in regulating glucose metabolism. A recent high throughput screen for 2-deoxyglucose resistance identified a much larger set of seemingly unrelated genes. Here, we demonstrate that these newly identified genes do not in fact confer significant resistance to 2-deoxyglucose. Further, we show that the relative toxicity of 2-deoxyglucose is carbon source dependent, as is the resistance conferred by gene deletions. Snf1 kinase, the AMP-activated protein kinase of yeast, is required for 2-deoxyglucose resistance in cells growing on glucose. Mutations in the SNF1 gene that reduce kinase activity render cells hypersensitive to 2-deoxyglucose, while an activating mutation in SNF1 confers 2-deoxyglucose resistance. Snf1 kinase activated by 2-deoxyglucose does not phosphorylate the Mig1 protein, a known Snf1 substrate during glucose limitation. Thus, different stimuli elicit distinct responses from the Snf1 kinase. PMID:25116136

  4. 2-deoxyglucose as a selective agent for derepressed mutants of Pichia stipitis

    Treesearch

    Hassan K. Sreenath; Thomas W. Jeffries

    1998-01-01

    The glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) has been used to obtain mutants derepressed for pentose metabolism. Some researchers have used 2-DOG alone whereas others have used it in the presence of a glucoserepressible carbon source. We examined both methods and screened mutant strains for improved use of xylose in the presence of glucose. Pichia stipitis mutants...

  5. Expression of LKB1 tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer determines sensitivity to 2-deoxyglucose.

    PubMed

    Inge, Landon J; Coon, Keith D; Smith, Michael A; Bremner, Ross M

    2009-03-01

    Targeted therapy promises to improve patient outcome in non-small cell lung cancer. Biomarkers can direct targeted therapy toward patients who are most likely to respond, thus optimizing benefit. A novel agent with antineoplastic potential is the glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose. 2-Deoxyglucose targets tumor cells, owing to their increased glucose uptake, inhibiting cellular metabolism and inducing energetic stress, resulting in decreased cellular viability. The tumor suppressor LKB1 is activated by energetic stress, and cells that lack LKB1 fail to respond and undergo cell death, suggesting that LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer may have an increased susceptibility to 2-deoxyglucose. Inasmuch as somatic loss of LKB1 is a frequent event in non-small cell lung cancer, LKB1 expression could be used as a biomarker for directing 2-deoxyglucose therapy in patients with this type of cancer. LKB1-positive and LKB1-negative non-small cell lung cancer cell lines were evaluated for cell viability, markers of apoptosis, and gene expression after 2-deoxyglucose treatment and compared with vehicle control. LKB1-negative cells treated with 2-deoxyglucose displayed a significant decrease in cell viability compared with LKB1-positive cells. Gene expression profiles of 2-deoxyglucose treated cells revealed changes in apoptotic markers in LKB1-negative cells, correlating with activation of apoptosis. Re-expression of LKB1 prevented 2-deoxyglucose mediated apoptosis, demonstrating the critical role of LKB1 in mediating 2-deoxyglucose toxicity. LKB1 loss increases susceptibility to 2-deoxyglucose treatment in non-small cell lung cancer lines, even at low doses. Thus, determination of LKB1 status may help direct therapy to those patients most likely to benefit from this novel approach, making it useful in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. Testosterone enhances C-14 2-deoxyglucose uptake by striated muscle. [sex hormones and muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toop, J.; Max, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of testosterone propionate (TP) on C-14 2-deoxyglucose (C-14 2DG) uptake was studied in the rat levator ani muscle in vivo using the autoradiographic technique. Following a delay of 1 to 3 h after injecting TP, the rate of C-14 2DG uptake in experimental animals began to increase and continued to increase for at least 20 h. The label, which corresponds to C-14 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate, as demonstrated by chromatographic analysis of muscle extracts, was uniformly distributed over the entire muscle and was predominantly in muscle fibers, although nonmuscular elements were also labeled. The 1 to 3 h time lag suggests that the TP effect may be genomic, acting via androgen receptors, rather than directly on muscle membranes. Acceleration of glucose uptake may be an important early event in the anabolic response of the rat levator ani muscle to androgens.

  7. Placental Transfer of Lactate, Glucose and 2-deoxyglucose in Control and Diabetic Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Beryl B.; Lowy, Clara

    2001-01-01

    Placental transfer of lactate, glucose and 2-deoxyglucose was examined employing the in situ perfused placenta. Control and streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were infused with [U14C]-glucose and [3H]-2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The fetal side of the placenta was perfuseci with a cell free medium and glucose uptake was calculated in the adjacent fetuses. Despite the 5-fold higher maternal plasma glucose concentration in the diabetic dams the calculated fetal glucose metabolic index was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Placental blood flow was reduced in the diabetic animals compared with controls but reduction of transfer of [U14C]-glucose and [3H]-2-deoxyglucose and endogenously derived [14C]-Lactate to the fetal compartment, could not be accounted for by reduced placental blood flow alone. There was no significant net production or uptake of lactate into the perfusion medium that had perfused the fetal side of the placenta in either group. The plasma lactate levels in the fetuses adjacent to the perfused placenta were found to be higher than in the maternal plasma and significantly higher in the fetuses of the diabetic group compared with control group. In this model the in situ perfused placenta does not secrete significant quantities of lactate into the fetal compartment in either the control or diabetic group. PMID:12369714

  8. Relationship between Tl-201, Tc-99m (Sn) pyrophosphate and F-18 2-deoxyglucose uptake in ischemically injured dog myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Sochor, H.; Schwaiger, M.; Schelbert, H.R.; Huang, S.C.; Ellison, D.; Hansen, H.; Selin, C.; Parodi, O.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that enhanced glucose utilization in reperfused myocardium as assessed by F-18 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) and positron tomography predicts functional recovery. In this study, we compared segmental uptake of F-18 FDG with that of Tl-201 and Tc-99m (Sn) pyrophosphate (Tc-99m PPi) as conventional markers of tissue viability in seven dogs after a 3-hour intracoronary balloon occlusion and 20 hours of reperfusion. Myocardial blood flow was determined with microspheres. Regional retention fractions were calculated from tracer tissue concentrations, the arterial input function, and blood flow. Ischemic injury was assessed by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and histologic analysis. At 24 hours, blood flow was 22% lower in reperfused than in control myocardium (p less than 0.05). Uptake of Tl-201 was related linearly to blood flow (r = 0.92), while glucose utilization and Tc-99m PPi were 2.9 (p less than 0.01) and 4.7 (p less than 0.05) times higher in reperfused than in control myocardium. Retention fractions of Tc-99m PPi increased with the degree of ischemic injury, while F-18 FDG uptake was highest in segments with mild cell injury. Thus, in ischemically injured myocardium, Tl-201 primarily reflects blood flow. F-18 FDG as a marker of glucose utilization identifies ischemically injured but viable tissue. The admixture of necrotic cells can be determined with Tc-99m PPi. Our results indicate that a dual tracer approach might best characterize the presence and extent of reversibly and of irreversibly injured tissue in a given myocardial region.

  9. Novel analysis for improved validity in semi-quantitative 2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Ferrington, Linda; Olverman, Henry J; Kelly, Paul A T

    2008-10-30

    The original [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic imaging technique allows for the quantitative determination of local cerebral glucose utilisation (LCMRglu) [Sokoloff L, Reivich, M, Kennedy C, Desrosiers M, Patlak C, Pettigrew K, et al. The 2-deoxyglucose-C-14 method for measurement of local cerebral glucose utilisation-theory, procedure and normal values in conscious and anestherized albino rats. J Neurochem 1977;28:897-916]. The range of applications to which the quantitative method can be readily applied is limited, however, by the requirement for the intermittent measurement of arterial radiotracer and glucose concentrations throughout the experiment, via intravascular cannulation. Some studies have applied a modified, semi-quantitative approach to estimate LCMRglu while circumventing the requirement for intravascular cannulation [Kelly S, Bieneman A, Uney J, McCulloch J. Cerebral glucose utilization in transgenic mice over-expressing heat shock protein 70 is altered by dizocilpine. Eur J Neurosci 2002;15(6):945-52; Jordan GR, McCulloch J, Shahid M, Hill DR, Henry B, Horsburgh K. Regionally selective and dose-dependent effects of the ampakines Org 26576 and Org 24448 on local cerebral glucose utilisation in the mouse as assessed by C-14-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. Neuropharmacology 2005;49(2):254-64]. In this method only a terminal blood sample is collected for the determination of plasma [(14)C] and [glucose] and the rate of LCMRglu in each brain region of interest (RoI) is estimated by comparing the [(14)C] concentration in each region relative to a selected control region, which is proposed to demonstrate metabolic stability between the experimental groups. Here we show that the semi-quantitative method has reduced validity in the measurement of LCMRglu as compared to the quantitative method and that the validity of this technique is further compromised by the inability of the methods applied within the analysis to appropriately determine metabolic

  10. [14C]2-deoxyglucose uptake in ground squirrel brain during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Kilduff, T S; Sharp, F R; Heller, H C

    1982-02-01

    Autoradiographic patterns of [14C]2-deoxyglucose uptake are described throughout the brains of hibernating and euthermic ground squirrels. Autoradiographs of the brains of hibernating animals are generally homogeneous in comparison to euthermic animals; hence, the relative 2-deoxyglucose uptake (R2DGU) of gray to white matter for the majority of the 85 neural structures examined decreases during hibernation. Two categories of structures are identified as potentially important in hibernation: (1) structures that have the highest R2DGU during hibernation (cochlear nucleus, paratrigeminal nucleus, and superior colliculus) and (2) structures that undergo the least reduction in R2DGU in the transition from euthermia to hibernation (suprachiasmatic nucleus and lateral septal nucleus). The percentage of reduction in R2DGU that a structure undergoes in the transition from euthermia to hibernation is proportional to the R2DGU of that structure during euthermia. The suprachiasmatic, paratrigeminal, and cochlear nuclei undergo less of a reduction than would be predicted from this relationship and may be particularly important during hibernation. Sensory nuclei that receive primary afferent projections are among the structures with the highest R2DGU during hibernation. These metabolically active structures may be responsible for the sensitivity of the hibernator to environmental stimuli.

  11. (14C)2-deoxyglucose uptake in ground squirrel brain during hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, T.S.; Sharp, F.R.; Heller, H.C.

    1982-02-01

    Autoradiographic patterns of (14C)2-deoxyglucose uptake are described throughout the brains of hibernating and euthermic ground squirrels. Autoradiographs of the brains of hibernating animals are generally homogeneous in comparison to euthermic animals; hence, the relative 2-deoxyglucose uptake (R2DGU) of gray to white matter for the majority of the 85 neural structures examined decreases during hibernation. Two categories of structures are identified as potentially important in hibernation: (1) structures that have the highest R2DGU during hibernation (cochlear nucleus, paratrigeminal nucleus, and superior colliculus) and (2) structures that undergo the least reduction in R2DGU in the transition from euthermia to hibernation (suprachiasmatic nucleus and lateral septal nucleus). The percentage of reduction in R2DGU that a structure undergoes in the transition from euthermia to hibernation is proportional to the R2DGU of that structure during euthermia. The suprachiasmatic, paratrigeminal, and cochlear nuclei undergo less of a reduction than would be predicted from this relationship and may be particularly important during hibernation. Sensory nuclei that receive primary afferent projections are among the structures with the highest R2DGU during hibernation. These metabolically active structures may be responsible for the sensitivity of the hibernator to environmental stimuli.

  12. Hemiballismus: Study of a case using positron emission tomography with 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinsky, R.M.; Greenberg, M.; Di Chiro, G.; Baker, M.; Hallett, M. )

    1989-01-01

    A 64-year-old man had right-sided persistent hemiballismus. Cerebral computed tomography (CT) and 0.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities, but 1.5-T MRI showed decreased signal intensity of the putamina, greater on the left than on the right. The subthalamic area was normal on CT and MRI. Positron emission tomography with 18fluoro2-deoxyglucose showed marked hypometabolism of the left putamen (60% of the right) and hypermetabolism of the left parietal lobe (138% of the right). The decreased metabolism of the left putamen may indicate a reduction in neuronal firing. The pathophysiology of the hemiballismus in this case may be loss of tonic inhibition of the lateral globus pallidus from the putamen, leading in turn to greater inhibition of the subthalamic nucleus, less excitation of the medial globus pallidus, and less inhibition of the thalamus and motor cortex, and thus allowing expression of the ballistic movements.

  13. Sequential metabolic changes in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion: A 2-deoxyglucose study

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, K.; Sharp, F.R.; Simon, R.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The distribution and time course of altered cerebral metabolism following permanent focal ischemia was studied in rat using the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique. Increased 2DG uptake preceded decreased 2DG uptake and infarction in the caudate putamen and cortex. Decreased 2DG uptake without infarction was observed for 72 h in thalamus and for 24 h in hippocampus (areas remote from the ischemic zones). This study supports the concept of cell excitation as a pathophysiologic process in permanent focal ischemia. The time course of increased metabolism may demarcate the time window of opportunity for the previously demonstrated attenuation of stroke size with inhibition of cell excitation by pharmacologic blockade of excitatory amino acid neurotransmission.

  14. Mapping of odor-related neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb by high-resolution 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lancet, D.; Greer, C.A.; Kauer, J.S.; Shepherd, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The spatial distribution of odor-induced neuronal activity in the olfactory bulb, the first relay station of the olfactory pathway, is believed to reflect important aspects of chemosensory coding. We report here the application of high-resolution 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography to the mapping of spatial patterns of metabolic activity at the level of single neurons in the olfactory bulb. It was found that glomeruli, which are synaptic complexes containing the first synaptic relay, tend to be uniformly active or inactive during odor exposure. Differential 2-deoxyglucose uptake was also observed in the somata of projection neurons (mitral cells) and interneurons (periglomerular and granule cells). This confirms and extends our previous studies in which odor-specific laminar and focal uptake patterns were revealed by the conventional x-ray film 2-deoxyglucose method due to Sokoloff and colleagues (Sokoloff, L., Reivich, M., Kennedy, C., DesRosiers, M. H., Patlak, C. S., Pettigrew, K. D., Sakurada, O. and Shinohara, M. (1977) J. Neurochem. 28, 897-916). Based on results obtained by the two methods, it is suggested that the glomerulus as a whole serves as a functional unit of activity. The high-resolution results are interpreted in terms of the well-characterized synaptic organization of the olfactory bulb and also serve to illustrate the capability of the 2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic technique to map metabolic activity in single neurons of the vertebrate central nervous system.

  15. Demonstration of prosthetic activation of central auditory pathways using ( sup 14 C)-2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.A.; Niparko, J.K.; Altschuler, R.A.; Frey, K.A.; Miller, J.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The cochlear prosthesis is not applicable to patients who lack an implantable cochlea or an intact vestibulocochlear nerve. Direct electrical stimulation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) of the brain stem might provide a method for auditory rehabilitation of these patients. A penetrating CN electrode has been developed and tissue tolerance to this device demonstrated. This study was undertaken to evaluate metabolic activation of central nervous system (CNS) auditory tracts produced by such implants. Regional cerebral glucose use resulting from CN stimulation was estimated in a series of chronically implanted guinea pigs with the use of ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Enhanced 2-DG uptake was observed in structures of the auditory tract. The activation of central auditory structures achieved with CN stimulation was similar to that produced by acoustic stimulation and by electrical stimulation of the modiolar portion of the auditory nerve in control groups. An interesting banding pattern was observed in the inferior colliculus following CN stimulation, as previously described with acoustic stimulation. This study demonstrates that functional metabolic activation of central auditory pathways can be achieved with a penetrating CNS auditory prosthesis.

  16. Correlation of PET and AMS analyses for early kinetics of 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Miyaoka, Teiji; Theeraladanon, Chumpol; Oka, Takashi; Matsui, Takao; Inoue, Tomio

    2010-04-01

    The draft of the guidelines for microdosing in clinical trials was published in Japan in 2008 following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It recommends utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring drug metabolites in preclinical studies. In this study, we clarified the correlation in measuring result between PET and AMS. The AMS measurement was undergone by using AMS system of Institute of Accelerator Analysis Ltd. (IAA, Kawasaki, Japan). First the back ground 14C level of blood in mice was measured by AMS. Second, we clarified the relationship between AMS and PET by using 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). The correlation coefficient ( r) of the measurements using PET ( 18F-FDG) and AMS ( 14C-FDG) were quite high at 0.97 ( Y = 7.54 E - 05 X + 0.02, p < 0.001). The blood clearance profile of 18F-FDG was nearly identical with that of 14C-FDG. These results indicate that the AMS analysis has excellent correlation with the PET method.

  17. Characterization and performance of a near infrared 2-deoxyglucose optical imaging agent for mouse cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Kovar, Joy L.; Volcheck, William; Sevick-Muraca, Eva; Simpson, Melanie A; Olive, D. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms exhibit an elevated rate of glycolysis over normal cells. This characteristic can be exploited for optical imaging of tumors in mice. A near infrared fluorophore, IRDye® 800CW, emission maximum 794 nm, was conjugated to 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). An immunofluorescent cell-based assay was used to evaluate specificity and sensitivity of the conjugate in cultured cell monolayers. Dose dependent uptake was established with increasing concentrations of IRDye 800CW 2-DG for epithelial and prostate carcinomas. IRDye 800CW 2-DG was specifically blocked by an antibody against GLUT1 glucose transporter, and by excess unlabeled 2-DG or D-glucose. Signal was increased by a phorbol ester activator of glucose transport. Fluorescence microscopy data confirmed localization of the conjugate in the cytoplasm. Subsequent in vivo studies optimized dose, clearance, and timing for signal capture in nude mouse xenografts. In all cases, tumors were clearly imaged with good signal to noise characteristics. These data indicate that IRDye 800CW 2-DG is a broadly applicable optical imaging agent for in vivo imaging of neoplasms in mice. PMID:18938129

  18. Inhibition of glioblastoma tumorspheres by combined treatment with 2-deoxyglucose and metformin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Yoonjee; Koh, Ilkyoo; Shim, Jin-Kyoung; Park, Junseong; Choi, Junjeong; Yun, Mijin; Jeon, Jeong Yong; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Pilnam; Kang, Seok-Gu

    2017-02-01

    Deprivation of tumor bioenergetics by inhibition of multiple energy pathways has been suggested as an effective therapeutic approach for various human tumors. However, this idea has not been evaluated in glioblastoma (GBM). We hypothesized that dual inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation could effectively suppress GBM tumorspheres (TS). Effects of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and metformin, alone and in combination, on GBM-TS were evaluated. Viability, cellular energy metabolism status, stemness, invasive properties, and GBM-TS transcriptomes were examined. In vivo efficacy was tested in a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. GBM-TS viability was decreased by the combination of 2DG and metformin. ATP assay and PET showed that cellular energy metabolism was also decreased by this combination. Sphere formation, expression of stemness-related proteins, and invasive capacity of GBM-TS were also significantly suppressed by combined treatment with 2DG and metformin. A transcriptome analysis showed that the expression levels of stemness- and epithelial mesenchymal transition-related genes were also significantly downregulated by combination of 2DG and metformin. Combination treatment also prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice and decreased invasiveness of GBM-TS. The combination of 2DG and metformin effectively decreased the stemness and invasive properties of GBM-TS and showed a potential survival benefit in a mouse orthotopic xenograft model. Our findings suggest that targeting TS-forming cells by this dual inhibition of cellular bioenergetics warrants expedited clinical evaluation for the treatment of GBM.

  19. Androgens enhance in vivo 2-deoxyglucose uptake by rat striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Toop, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that testosterone propionate (TP) causes a striking increase in the in vivo uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by the levator ani muscle of immature male rats, which was found to be uniformly distributed over the entire muscle. After a single subcutaneous injection of TP, no enhancement of 2-DG was observed before 3.5 hr, at which time uptake was increased 2-fold; maximum enhancement (4-fold) was attained at 12 hr. At 72 hr, 2-DG uptake remained elevated at twice the control value. It was determined that the effect of TP probably is mediated by specific androgen receptors. In addition, it was found that the effect of TP was blocked by the simultaneous administration of an androgen antagonist, cyproterone acetate. TP also was found to enhance the uptake of 2-DG in the bulbocavernosus (253 percent over control) and extensor digitorum longus muscles (150 percent over control), but not in the biceps brachii or soleus. It is suggested that the increased uptake of glucose may be an important early step in the anabolic response of muscle to androgens.

  20. Androgens enhance in vivo 2-deoxyglucose uptake by rat striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Toop, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that testosterone propionate (TP) causes a striking increase in the in vivo uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) by the levator ani muscle of immature male rats, which was found to be uniformly distributed over the entire muscle. After a single subcutaneous injection of TP, no enhancement of 2-DG was observed before 3.5 hr, at which time uptake was increased 2-fold; maximum enhancement (4-fold) was attained at 12 hr. At 72 hr, 2-DG uptake remained elevated at twice the control value. It was determined that the effect of TP probably is mediated by specific androgen receptors. In addition, it was found that the effect of TP was blocked by the simultaneous administration of an androgen antagonist, cyproterone acetate. TP also was found to enhance the uptake of 2-DG in the bulbocavernosus (253 percent over control) and extensor digitorum longus muscles (150 percent over control), but not in the biceps brachii or soleus. It is suggested that the increased uptake of glucose may be an important early step in the anabolic response of muscle to androgens.

  1. 2-Deoxyglucose conjugated platinum (II) complexes for targeted therapy: design, synthesis, and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Mi, Qian; Ma, Yuru; Gao, Xiangqian; Liu, Ran; Liu, Pengxing; Mi, Yi; Fu, Xuegang; Gao, Qingzhi

    2016-11-01

    Malignant neoplasms exhibit an elevated rate of glycolysis over normal cells. To target the Warburg effect, we designed a new series of 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) conjugated platinum (II) complexes for glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1)-mediated anticancer drug delivery. The potential GLUT1 transportability of the complexes was investigated through a comparative molecular docking analysis utilizing the latest GLUT1 protein crystal structure. The key binding site for 2-DG as GLUT1's substrate was identified with molecular dynamics simulation, and the docking study demonstrated that the 2-DG conjugated platinum (II) complexes can be recognized by the same binding site as potential GLUT1 substrate. The conjugates were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity study with seven human cancer cell lines. The results of this study revealed that 2-DG conjugated platinum (II) complexes are GLUT1 transportable substrates and exhibit improved cytotoxicities in cancer cell lines that over express GLUT1 when compared to the clinical drug, Oxaliplatin. The correlation between GLUT1 expression and antitumor effects are also confirmed. The study provides fundamental information supporting the potential of the 2-DG conjugated platinum (II) complexes as lead compounds for further pharmaceutical R&D.

  2. Glycolytic inhibitors 2-deoxyglucose and 3-bromopyruvate synergize with photodynamic therapy respectively to inhibit cell migration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Pan; Liu, Quanhong; Zhang, Ting; Mai, Bingjie; Wang, Xiaobing

    2015-06-01

    Most cancer cells have the specially increased glycolytic phenotype, which makes this pathway become an attractive therapeutic target. Although glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) has been demonstrated to potentiate the cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT), the impacts on cell migration after the combined treatment has never been reported yet. The present study aimed to analyze the influence of glycolytic inhibitors 2-DG and 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) combined with Ce6-PDT on cell motility of Triple Negative Breast Cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. As determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltertrazolium-bromide-Tetraz-olium (MTT) assay, more decreased cell viability was observed in 2-DG + PDT and 3-BP + PDT groups when compared with either monotherapy. Under optimal conditions, synergistic potentiation on cell membrane destruction and the decline of cell adhesion and cells migratory ability were observed in both 2-DG + PDT and 3-BP + PDT by electron microscope observation (SEM), wound healing and trans-well assays. Besides, serious microfilament network collapses as well as impairment of matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were notably improved after the combined treatments by immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that 2-DG and 3-BP can both significantly potentiated Ce6-PDT efficacy of cell migration inhibition.

  3. The Glycolytic Inhibitor 2-Deoxyglucose Activates Multiple Prosurvival Pathways through IGF1R*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Diansheng; Xiong, Li; Liu, Tongrui; Liu, Xiuju; Liu, Xiangguo; Chen, Jing; Sun, Shi-Yong; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Zong, Yaping; Zhou, Qinghua; Zhou, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Recent molecular studies indicate that aerobic glycolysis plays an important role in tumorigenesis and is a valid target for cancer therapy. Although 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) is well characterized as a glycolytic inhibitor, we recently discovered that it activates a prosurvival oncoprotein, AKT, through PI3K. In this study, we discovered that 2-DG treatments disrupted the binding between insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) so that the free form of IGF-1 could be released from the IGF-1·IGFBP3 complex to activate IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling. Because IGF1R signaling is involved, PI3K/AKT constitutes only one of the prosurvival pathways that are activated by 2-DG treatment; we validated that MEK-ERK signaling was also induced in an IGF1R-dependent manner in some cancer cell lines. Furthermore, our phospho-specific antibody microarray analysis indicated that 2-DG up-regulated the phosphorylation of 64 sites within various signaling pathways in H460 cells. Chemical inhibition of IGF1R reduced 57 of these up-regulations. These data suggest that 2-DG-induced activation of many survival pathways can be jointly attenuated through IGF1R inhibition. Our in vitro analysis demonstrated that treatment with a combination of subtoxic doses of 2-DG and the IGF1R inhibitor II reduced cancer cell proliferation 90% and promoted significant apoptosis. PMID:19574224

  4. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose simultaneously targets cancer and endothelial cells to suppress neuroblastoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Cheng; Wang, Shuo-Yu; Lin, Li-Ling; Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, Ting-Ya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and associated with poor prognosis when there is amplification of MYCN oncogene or high expression of Myc oncoproteins. In a previous in vitro study, we found that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) could suppress the growth of neuroblastoma cells, particularly in those with MYCN amplification. In this study, we established a mouse model of neuroblastoma xenografts with SK-N-DZ and SK-N-AS cells treated with 2DG by intraperitoneal injection twice a week for 3 weeks at 100 or 500 mg/kg body weight. We found that 2DG was effective in suppressing the growth of both MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ and MYCN-non-amplified SK-N-AS neuroblastoma xenografts, which was associated with downregulation of HIF-1α, PDK1 and c-Myc, and a reduction in the number of tumor blood vessels. In vitro study showed that 2DG can suppress proliferation, cause apoptosis and reduce migration of murine endothelial cells, with inhibition of the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia and disorganization of F-actin filaments. The results suggest that 2DG might simultaneously target cancer cells and endothelial cells in the neuroblastoma xenografts in mice regardless of the status of MYCN amplification, providing a potential therapeutic opportunity to use 2DG or other glycolytic inhibitors for the treatment of patients with refractory neuroblastoma.

  5. A validated bioanalytical HPLC method for pharmacokinetic evaluation of 2-deoxyglucose in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Murugesan K; Lin, Hongxia; Stein, Mark; Goodin, Susan; Bertino, Joseph R; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; DiPaola, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG), an analog of glucose, is widely used to interfere with glycolysis in tumor cells and studied as a therapeutic approach in clinical trials. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of 2-DG, we describe the development and validation of a sensitive HPLC fluorescent method for the quantitation of 2-DG in plasma. Plasma samples were deproteinized with methanol and the supernatant was dried at 45°C. The residues were dissolved in methanolic sodium acetate-boric acid solution. 2-DG and other monosaccharides were derivatized to 2-aminobenzoic acid derivatives in a single step in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride at 80°C for 45 min. The analytes were separated on a YMC ODS C₁₈ reversed-phase column using gradient elution. The excitation and emission wavelengths were set at 360 and 425 nm. The 2-DG calibration curves were linear over the range of 0.63-300 µg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.5 µg/mL. The assay provided satisfactory intra-day and inter-day precision with RSD less than 9.8%, and the accuracy ranged from 86.8 to 110.0%. The HPLC method is reproducible and suitable for the quantitation of 2-DG in plasma. The method was successfully applied to characterize the pharmacokinetics profile of 2-DG in patients with advanced solid tumors.

  6. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose simultaneously targets cancer and endothelial cells to suppress neuroblastoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Cheng; Wang, Shuo-Yu; Lin, Li-Ling; Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, Ting-Ya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuroblastoma is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and associated with poor prognosis when there is amplification of MYCN oncogene or high expression of Myc oncoproteins. In a previous in vitro study, we found that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) could suppress the growth of neuroblastoma cells, particularly in those with MYCN amplification. In this study, we established a mouse model of neuroblastoma xenografts with SK-N-DZ and SK-N-AS cells treated with 2DG by intraperitoneal injection twice a week for 3 weeks at 100 or 500 mg/kg body weight. We found that 2DG was effective in suppressing the growth of both MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ and MYCN-non-amplified SK-N-AS neuroblastoma xenografts, which was associated with downregulation of HIF-1α, PDK1 and c-Myc, and a reduction in the number of tumor blood vessels. In vitro study showed that 2DG can suppress proliferation, cause apoptosis and reduce migration of murine endothelial cells, with inhibition of the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia and disorganization of F-actin filaments. The results suggest that 2DG might simultaneously target cancer cells and endothelial cells in the neuroblastoma xenografts in mice regardless of the status of MYCN amplification, providing a potential therapeutic opportunity to use 2DG or other glycolytic inhibitors for the treatment of patients with refractory neuroblastoma. PMID:26398947

  7. Breast cancer stem cells rely on fermentative glycolysis and are sensitive to 2-deoxyglucose treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ciavardelli, D; Rossi, C; Barcaroli, D; Volpe, S; Consalvo, A; Zucchelli, M; De Cola, A; Scavo, E; Carollo, R; D'Agostino, D; Forlì, F; D'Aguanno, S; Todaro, M; Stassi, G; Di Ilio, C; De Laurenzi, V; Urbani, A

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies suggest that cancer stem cells are essential for tumour growth, and failure to target these cells can result in tumour relapse. As this population of cells has been shown to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, it is essential to understand their biology and identify new therapeutic approaches. Targeting cancer metabolism is a potential alternative strategy to counteract tumour growth and recurrence. Here we applied a proteomic and targeted metabolomic analysis in order to point out the main metabolic differences between breast cancer cells grown as spheres and thus enriched in cancer stem cells were compared with the same cells grown in adherent differentiating conditions. This integrated approach allowed us to identify a metabolic phenotype associated with the stem-like condition and shows that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation towards fermentative glycolysis. Functional validation of proteomic and metabolic data provide evidences for increased activities of key enzymes of anaerobic glucose fate such as pyruvate kinase M2 isoform, lactate dehydrogenase and glucose 6-phopshate dehydrogenase in cancer stem cells as well as different redox status. Moreover, we show that treatment with 2-deoxyglucose, a well known inhibitor of glycolysis, inhibits BCSC proliferation when used alone and shows a synergic effect when used in combination with doxorubicin. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of glycolysis may be a potentially effective strategy to target BCSCs. PMID:25032859

  8. Breast cancer stem cells rely on fermentative glycolysis and are sensitive to 2-deoxyglucose treatment.

    PubMed

    Ciavardelli, D; Rossi, C; Barcaroli, D; Volpe, S; Consalvo, A; Zucchelli, M; De Cola, A; Scavo, E; Carollo, R; D'Agostino, D; Forlì, F; D'Aguanno, S; Todaro, M; Stassi, G; Di Ilio, C; De Laurenzi, V; Urbani, A

    2014-07-17

    A number of studies suggest that cancer stem cells are essential for tumour growth, and failure to target these cells can result in tumour relapse. As this population of cells has been shown to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, it is essential to understand their biology and identify new therapeutic approaches. Targeting cancer metabolism is a potential alternative strategy to counteract tumour growth and recurrence. Here we applied a proteomic and targeted metabolomic analysis in order to point out the main metabolic differences between breast cancer cells grown as spheres and thus enriched in cancer stem cells were compared with the same cells grown in adherent differentiating conditions. This integrated approach allowed us to identify a metabolic phenotype associated with the stem-like condition and shows that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation towards fermentative glycolysis. Functional validation of proteomic and metabolic data provide evidences for increased activities of key enzymes of anaerobic glucose fate such as pyruvate kinase M2 isoform, lactate dehydrogenase and glucose 6-phopshate dehydrogenase in cancer stem cells as well as different redox status. Moreover, we show that treatment with 2-deoxyglucose, a well known inhibitor of glycolysis, inhibits BCSC proliferation when used alone and shows a synergic effect when used in combination with doxorubicin. In conclusion, we suggest that inhibition of glycolysis may be a potentially effective strategy to target BCSCs.

  9. Cerebral correlates of depressed behavior in rats, visualized using /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Caldecott-Hazard, S.; Mazziotta, J.; Phelps, M.

    1988-06-01

    /sup 14/C-2-Deoxyglucose (2DG) was used to investigate changes in the rate of cerebral metabolism in 3 rat models of depressed behavior. The models had already been established in the literature and were induced by injections of alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, withdrawal from chronic amphetamine, or stress. We verified that exploratory behaviors were depressed in each model and that an antidepressant drug, tranylcypromine, prevented the depressed behavior in each model. 2DG studies revealed that the rate of regional glucose metabolism was elevated bilaterally in the lateral habenula of each of the 3 models. Regional metabolic rates were reduced in each model in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, anterior ventral nucleus of the thalamus, and inferior colliculus. Forebrain global metabolic rates were also reduced in each of the models. Tranylcypromine prevented the elevated rate of lateral habenula metabolism seen in each of the models alone but did not significantly affect the rates of global metabolism. Our findings of identical metabolic changes in each of the models indicate that these changes are not idiosyncratic to a particular model; rather, they correlate with a generalizable state of depressed exploratory behavior in rats.

  10. Microdialysis sampling extraction efficiency of 2-deoxyglucose: role of macrophages in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaodun; Stenken, Julie A

    2006-11-15

    Macrophages are a class of inflammatory cells believed to direct the outcome of device biocompatibility. Despite their relevance to implanted in vivo devices, particularly implanted glucose sensors, few studies have attempted to elucidate how these cells affect device performance. Microdialysis sampling probes were used to determine glucose uptake alterations in the presence of resting and activated macrophages in vitro. Significant differences for 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) relative recovery at 1.0 microL/min were observed between resting (74 +/- 7%, n = 18) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1 microg/mL)-activated (56 +/- 6%, n = 18) macrophages in culture that had 2-DG spiked into the media (p < 0.005). To establish if in vitro characterization could be correlated to in vivo studies, microdialysis probes were implanted into the dorsal subcutis of male Sprague-Dawley rats for 0, 3, 5, and 7 days. An internal standard, 2-DG, was passed through the microdialysis probe during in vivo studies. No significant differences in 2-DG extraction efficiency from the probe into the tissue site were observed in vivo among microdialysis probes implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague-Dawley rats for either 3, 5, or 7 days vs probes implanted the day of sample collection. These results suggest that macrophage activation in vivo at implant sites is much lower than highly activated macrophages in vitro. It is important to note that these results do not rule out the potential for increased glucose metabolism at sensor implant sites.

  11. Decreased glycolytic metabolism in non-compaction cardiomyopathy by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography: new insights into pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Tavares de Melo, Marcelo Dantas; Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; Assuncao, Antonildes Nascimento; Dantas, Roberto Nery; Araujo Filho, Jose de Arimateia; Parga Filho, Jose Rodrigues; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza de Souza; de Lima, Camila Rocon; Soares, José; Meneguetti, José Claudio; Mady, Charles; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahão; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Salemi, Vera Maria Cury

    2017-05-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) remain controversial. This study performed combined 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose dynamic positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and 99mTc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies to evaluate myocardial glucose metabolism and perfusion in patients with LVNC and their clinical implications. Thirty patients (41 ± 12 years, 53% male) with LVNC, diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) criteria, and eight age-matched healthy controls (42 ± 12 years, 50% male) were prospectively recruited to undergo FDG-PET with measurement of the myocardial glucose uptake rate (MGU) and SPECT to investigate perfusion-metabolism patterns. Patients with LVNC had lower global MGU compared with that in controls (36.9 ± 8.8 vs. 44.6 ± 5.4 μmol/min/100 g, respectively, P = 0.02). Of 17 LV segments, MGU levels were significantly reduced in 8, and also a reduction was observed when compacted segments from LVNC were compared with the segments from control subjects (P < 0.001). Perfusion defects were also found in 15 (50%) patients (45 LV segments: 64.4% match, and 35.6% mismatch perfusion-metabolism pattern). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that beta-blocker therapy was associated with increased MGU (beta coefficient = 10.1, P = 0.008). Moreover, a gradual increase occurred in MGU across the beta-blocker dose groups (P for trend = 0.01). The reduction of MGU documented by FDG-PET in LVNC supports the hypothesis that a cellular metabolic pathway may play a role in the pathophysiology of LVNC. The beneficial effect of beta-blocker mediating myocardial metabolism in the clinical course of LVNC requires further investigation.

  12. Regulation of the proliferation of colon cancer cells by compounds that affect glycolysis, including 3-bromopyruvate, 2-deoxyglucose and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Qureshi, Mehreen S; Buxhoeveden, Michael; Gengel, Nicolette; Kleinschmit, Jessica; Desbordes, Charles

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies performed by our group, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose blocked the acidification of the medium used for culture of colon cancer cells caused by incubation with biguanides and it had an additive inhibitory effect on growth. In the present work, we found that 3-bromopyruvate can also prevent the lowering of pH caused by biguanide treatment. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited colonic cancer cell proliferation, but the effect was not always additive to that of biguanides and an additive effect was more notable in combined treatment with 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose. The induction of alkaline phosphatase activity by butyrate was not consistently affected by combination with other agents that modified glucose metabolism. The drug combinations that were examined inhibited proliferation of wild-type and p53-null cells and affected colonic cancer lines with different growth rates.

  13. Additive Effects of Millimeter Waves and 2-Deoxyglucose Co-Exposure on the Human Keratinocyte Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Soubere Mahamoud, Yonis; Aite, Meziane; Martin, Catherine; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Millimeter Waves (MMW) will be used in the next-generation of high-speed wireless technologies, especially in future Ultra-Broadband small cells in 5G cellular networks. Therefore, their biocompatibilities must be evaluated prior to their massive deployment. Using a microarray-based approach, we analyzed modifications to the whole genome of a human keratinocyte model that was exposed at 60.4 GHz-MMW at an incident power density (IPD) of 20 mW/cm2 for 3 hours in athermic conditions. No keratinocyte transcriptome modifications were observed. We tested the effects of MMWs on cell metabolism by co-treating MMW-exposed cells with a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose (2dG, 20 mM for 3 hours), and whole genome expression was evaluated along with the ATP content. We found that the 2dG treatment decreased the cellular ATP content and induced a high modification in the transcriptome (632 coding genes). The affected genes were associated with transcriptional repression, cellular communication and endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. The MMW/2dG co-treatment did not alter the keratinocyte ATP content, but it did slightly alter the transcriptome, which reflected the capacity of MMW to interfere with the bioenergetic stress response. The RT-PCR-based validation confirmed 6 MMW-sensitive genes (SOCS3, SPRY2, TRIB1, FAM46A, CSRNP1 and PPP1R15A) during the 2dG treatment. These 6 genes encoded transcription factors or inhibitors of cytokine pathways, which raised questions regarding the potential impact of long-term or chronic MMW exposure on metabolically stressed cells. PMID:27529420

  14. Effects of unilateral and bilateral cochlea removal on 2-deoxyglucose patterns in the chick auditory system.

    PubMed

    Heil, P; Scheich, H

    1986-10-15

    The 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) method was used to map functional activity in the auditory system of chicks that had been subjected to unilateral or bilateral cochlea removal. Following survival times of 1 day to 4 weeks, chicks were exposed to continuous white noise in the 2DG experiments. In monaural subjects nucleus angularis and nucleus magnocellularis showed faint 2DG uptake on the side contralateral to the intact ear. In the binaural nucleus laminaris, the asymmetrical and almost mirror-imaged labeling pattern (Lippe, Stewart, and Rubel: Brain Res. 196:43-58, '80) was produced. The superior olive (OS) was strongly labeled on the ipsilateral side, whereas the contralateral OS showed only a slight 2DG uptake at its medial border. The lateral lemniscus and nucleus lemnisci lateralis, pars ventralis (LLv) showed stronger activation on the contralateral side. Both Nissl stains and 2DG patterns provide evidence that nucleus ventralis lemnisci lateralis (VLV) can be subdivided into an anterior (VLVa) and a posterior (VLVp) part. Whereas VLVp is labeled only contralaterally, VLVa is labeled on both sides with similar intensity. Nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis (MLD) is strongly labeled throughout contralaterally. The ipsilateral MLD shows a defined ventral portion of high 2DG uptake. Intensity of labeling here is symmetrical to the corresponding area of the contralateral MLD. These symmetrical patterns were related to the tonotopic organization of MLD, which was mapped in intact animals by using tone stimuli. Assuming that symmetrical 2DG uptake in monaural animals indicates excitatory input from both ears (EE-cells), it appears that these EE-cells occupy a sector of each isofrequency plane in MLD. Nucleus ovoidalis (Ov) generally was stronger labeled on the contralateral side. The columnar organization of field L as seen in monaural chicks has already been described (Scheich, Exp. Brain Res. 51:199-205, '83). In bilaterally deafened chicks, MLD, Ov, and

  15. Characterization and Predictive Value of Near Infrared 2-Deoxyglucose Optical Imaging in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cristiane; Patel, Krutika; Mishra, Vivek; Trivedi, Ram N.; Noel, Pawan; Singh, Abhilasha; Yaron, Jordan R.; Singh, Vijay P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studying the uptake of 2-deoxy glucose (2-DG) analogs such as 2-Deoxy-2-[18F] fluoroglucose (FDG) is a common approach to identify and monitor malignancies and more recently chronic inflammation. While pancreatitis is a common cause for false positive results in human studies on pancreatic cancer using FDG, the relevance of these findings to acute pancreatitis (AP) is unknown. FDG has a short half-life. Thus, with an aim to accurately characterize the metabolic demand of the pancreas during AP in real-time, we studied the uptake of the non-radioactive, near infrared fluorescence labelled 2-deoxyglucose analog, IRDye® 800CW 2-DG probe (NIR 2-DG; Li-Cor) during mild and severe biliary AP. Methods Wistar rats (300 g; 8–12/group) were administered NIR 2-DG (10 nM; I.V.). Mild and severe biliary AP were respectively induced by biliopancreatic duct ligation (DL) alone or along with infusing glyceryl trilinoleate (GTL; 50 μL/100 g) within 10 minutes of giving NIR 2-DG. Controls (CON) only received NIR 2-DG. Imaging was done every 5–10 minutes over 3 hrs. Average Radiant Efficiency [p/s/cm²/sr]/[μW/cm²] was measured over the pancreas using the IVIS 200 in-vivo imaging system (PerkinElmer) using the Living Image® software and verified in ex vivo pancreata. Blood amylase, lipase and pancreatic edema, necrosis were measured over the course of AP. Results NIR 2-DG uptake over the first hour was not influenced by AP induction. However, while the signal declined in controls and rats with mild AP, there was significantly higher retention of NIR 2-DG in the pancreas after 1 hour in those with GTL pancreatitis. The increase was > 3 fold over controls in the GTL group and was verified to be in the pancreas ex vivo. In vitro, pancreatic acini exposed to GTL had a similar increase in NIR 2-DG uptake which was followed by progressively worse acinar necrosis. Greater retention of NIR 2-DG in vivo was associated with worse pancreatic necrosis, reduced ATP

  16. Targeting P-glycoprotein expression and cancer cell energy metabolism: combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose reverses the multidrug resistance of K562/Dox cells to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaojun; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Meng, Qiang; Sun, Huijun; Huo, Xiaokui; Ma, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhihao; Ma, Xiaochi; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Kexin

    2016-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the major obstacles to efficiency of cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated whether combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose reverses the multidrug resistance (MDR) of K562/Dox cells and tried to elucidate the possible mechanisms. The combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose selectively enhanced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin against K562/Dox cells. Metformin was not a substrate of P-gp but suppressed the elevated level of P-gp in K562/Dox cells. The downregulation of P-gp may be partly attributed to the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. The addition of 2-deoxyglucose to metformin initiated a strong metabolic stress in both K562 and K562/Dox cells. Combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited glucose uptake and lactate production in K562 and K562/Dox cells leading to a severe depletion in ATP and a enhanced autophagy. Above all, P-gp substrate selectively aggravated this ATP depletion effect and increased cell apoptosis in K562/Dox cells. In conclusion, metformin decreases P-gp expression in K562/Dox cells via blocking phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. P-gp substrate increases K562/Dox cell apoptosis via aggravating ATP depletion induced by combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose. Our observations highlight the importance of combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose in reversing multidrug resistance.

  17. Characterization of Macrophage Polarization States Using Combined Measurement of 2-Deoxyglucose and Glutamine Accumulation: Implications for Imaging of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Sina; Downs, Kevin; Short, John D; Nguyen, Huynh Nga; Lai, Yanlai; Jerabek, Paul A; Goins, Beth; Toczek, Jakub; Sadeghi, Mehran M; Asmis, Reto

    2017-10-01

    Despite the early promising results of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for assessment of vessel wall inflammation, its accuracy in prospective identification of vulnerable plaques has remained limited. Additionally, previous studies have indicated that (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake alone may not allow for accurate identification of specific macrophage activation states. We aimed to determine whether combined measurement of glucose and glutamine accumulation-the 2 most important bioenergetic substrates for macrophages-improves the distinction of macrophage inflammatory states and can be utilized to image atherosclerosis. Murine peritoneal macrophages (MΦ) were activated ex vivo into proinflammatory states with either lipopolysaccharide (MΦLPS) or interferon-γ+tumor necrosis factor-α (MΦIFN-γ+TNF-α). An alternative polarization phenotype was induced with interleukin-4 (MΦIL-4). The pronounced increase in 2-deoxyglucose uptake distinguishes MΦLPS from MΦIFN-γ+TNF-α, MΦIL-4, and unstimulated macrophages (MΦ0). Despite having comparable levels of 2-deoxyglucose accumulation, MΦIL-4 can be distinguished from both MΦIFN-γ+TNF-α and MΦ0 based on the enhanced glutamine accumulation, which was associated with increased expression of a glutamine transporter, Slc1a5. Ex vivo autoradiography experiments demonstrated distinct and heterogenous patterns of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (14)C-glutamine accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions of low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed a high-fat diet. Combined assessment of glutamine and 2-deoxyglucose accumulation improves the ex vivo identification of macrophage activation states. Combined ex vivo metabolic imaging demonstrates heterogenous and distinct patterns of substrate accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions. Further studies are required to define the in vivo significance of glutamine uptake in atherosclerosis and its potential application in identification of vulnerable

  18. Positive selection for resistance to 2-deoxyglucose gives rise, in Streptococcus salivarius, to seven classes of pleiotropic mutants, including ptsH and ptsI missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, L; Thomas, S; Gagnon, G; Frenette, M; Trahan, L; Vadeboncoeur, C

    1994-09-01

    We have used the toxic non-metabolizable glucose/mannose analogue 2-deoxyglucose to isolate a comprehensive collection of mutants of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system from Streptococcus salivarius. To increase the range of possible mutations, we isolated spontaneous mutants on different media containing 2-deoxyglucose and various metabolizable sugars, either lactose, melibiose, galactose or fructose. We found that the frequency at which 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutants were isolated varied according to the growth substrate. The highest frequency was obtained with the combination galactose and 2-deoxyglucose and was 15-fold higher than the rate observed with the mixture melibiose and 2-deoxyglucose, the combination that gave the lowest frequency. By combining results from: (i) Western blot analysis of IIIMan, a specific component of the phosphoenolpyruvate:mannose phosphotransferase system in S. salivarius; (ii) rocket immunoelectrophoresis of HPr and EI, the two general energy-coupling proteins of the phosphotransferase system; and (iii) from gene sequencing, mutants could be assigned to seven classes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of 2-deoxyglucose-containing maltooligosaccharides for tracing the location of glucose absorption from starch digestion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hoo; Koh, Dong-Wan; Territo, Paul R; Park, Cheon-Seok; Hamaker, Bruce R; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2015-11-05

    The ileal brake mechanism which induces a potentially beneficial slower gastric emptying rate and increased satiety is triggered by macronutrients including glucose from glycemic carbohydrates. For optimization of this diet-induced health benefit, there is the need for a way to determine the location of glucose deposition in the small intestine. Labeled 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) can be used to trace the location of glucose absorption due to its accumulative property in the small intestine enterocytes. However, because pure glucose, or 2-DG, is directly absorbed in the proximal small intestine, we designed 2-DG containing maltooligosaccharides (2-DG-MOs) that can be used with a mild α-glucosidase inhibitor to attain an analytical method for determining location-specific delivery of glucose and its physiological effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The central nervous system effects of carbon disulfide in male albino rats utilizing the tritiated 2-deoxyglucose method

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, W.E. III.

    1989-01-01

    The methodology employed was the autoradiographic 2-deoxyglucose method. Due to the coupling between functional activity and energy metabolism, these autoradiographs can be likened to a stain for functional activity under varying physiological and pathological states. Exposure regimes consisted of intraperitoneal injections of: (1) 400 milligrams of carbon disulfide per kilogram body weight five days per week for eight weeks; (2) 600 milligrams of carbon disulfide per kilogram body weight for five consecutive days; (3) 800 milligrams of carbon disulfide per kilogram body weight for only a single injection. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the autoradiograms were employed. Appropriate statistical techniques were then be used to test for significant differences in the optical densities of structures between experimental and control radiographs. The results indicate a significant effect across all levels of analyses for the eight week group and the five day group for the auditory and olfactory central pathways.

  1. Multifaceted effects of antimetabolite and anticancer drug, 2-deoxyglucose on eukaryotic cancer models budding and fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Vishwanatha, Akshay; D'Souza, Cletus Joseph Michael

    2017-03-01

    Glycolytic inhibitors are of interest therapeutically as they are effective against cancers that display increased glycolytic rate and mitochondrial defects. 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG) is one such glycolytic inhibitor and was identified to be a competitive inhibitor of glucose. Studies from past few decades have shown that the mechanism of action of 2-DG is complex involving several metabolic and signaling pathways. Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are two important models for studying metabolism, cell cycle and cell signaling. These two unicellular eukaryotes are Crabtree positive yeasts exhibiting a metabolism similar to that of cancer cells. Effects of 2-DG in yeast is of interest owing to these similarities and hence yeasts have emerged as ideal model organisms to study the mode of action and resistance to 2-DG. In this review, we summarize the studies on biological effect and resistance to 2-DG in budding and fission yeasts and give an insight into its possible mechanism of action as models for understanding cancer metabolism and drugs affecting cancer progression. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(3):137-147, 2017.

  2. 2-Deoxyglucose Suppresses ERK Phosphorylation in LKB1 and Ras Wild-Type Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linlin; Liu, Xiuju; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Zhong, Diansheng

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate ATP, namely the "Warburg" effect. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) is well characterized as a glycolytic inhibitor, but its effect on cellular signaling pathways has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we sought to investigate the effect of 2-DG on ERK function in lung cancer cells. We found that 2-DG inhibits ERK phosphorylation in a time and dose-dependent manner in lung cancer cells. This inhibition requires functional LKB1. LKB1 knockdown in LKB1 wildtype cells correlated with an increase in the basal level of p-ERK. Restoration of LKB1 in LKB1-null cells significantly inhibits ERK activation. Blocking AMPK function with AMPK inhibitor, AMPK siRNA or DN-AMPK diminishes the inhibitory effect of 2-DG on ERK, suggesting that 2-DG—induced ERK inhibition is mediated by LKB1/AMPK signaling. Moreover, IGF1-induced ERK phosphorylation is significantly decreased by 2-DG. Conversely, a subset of oncogenic mutants of K-Ras, the main upstream regulator of ERK, blocks 2-DG—induced LKB1/AMPK signaling. These findings reveal the potential cross-talk between LKB1/AMPK and ERK signaling and help to better understand the mechanism of action of 2-DG. PMID:28033353

  3. Inhibition of bioenergetic metabolism by the combination of metformin and 2-deoxyglucose highly decreases viability of feline mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arbe, María Florencia; Fondello, Chiara; Agnetti, Lucrecia; Álvarez, Gabriel Martín; Tellado, Matías Nicolás; Glikin, Gerardo Claudio; Finocchiaro, Liliana María Elena; Villaverde, Marcela Solange

    2017-08-03

    Feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is a highly aggressive pathology that has been proposed as an interesting model of breast cancer disease, especially for the hormone refractory subgroup. Recently, cancer cell metabolism has been described as a hallmark of cancer cells. Here, we investigate the effects and mechanism of metabolic modulation by metformin (MET, anti-diabetic drug), 2-deoxyglucose (2DG, hexokinase inhibitor) or a combination of both drugs, MET/2DG on two established FMC cells lines: AlRB (HER2 (3+) and Ki67<5%) and AlRATN (HER2 (-) and Ki67>15%). We found that treatments significantly decreased both FMC cells viability by up to 80%. AlRB resulted more sensitive to 2DG than AlRATN (IC50: 3.15 vs 6.32mM, respectively). The combination of MET/2DG potentiated the effects of the individually added drugs on FMC cells. In addition, MET/2DG caused an increased in intracellular oxidants, autophagic vesicles and completely inhibited colony formation. Conversely, only MET significantly altered plasma membrane integrity, presented late apoptotic/necrotic cells and increased both glucose consumption and lactate concentration. Our results support further studies to investigate the potential use of this metabolic modulation approach in a clinical veterinary setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Different rates of functional development in the two visual systems of the chicken revealed by [14C]2-deoxyglucose.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Bell, G A

    1989-10-01

    Age-dependent changes in neuronal metabolic activity in the visual systems of the male chicken were assessed using [14C]2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiography. Groups of 3 and 4 chicks aged either 2 or 23 days posthatching were injected with 2 DG and exposed for 30 min to a variety of visual stimuli in either the monocular or binocular condition. Control birds had both eyes occluded. All groups were subjected to the same auditory background. In the 2-day-old chicks high levels of metabolic activity occurred in the rotundal-ectostriatal system in a manner consistent with eye use and known neuro-anatomical connections, but very low levels of activity occurred in the thalamo-hyperstriatal visual system. In the 23-day-old chicks eye use resulted in high levels of metabolic activity in both visual systems. The distribution of higher activity within the rostral regions of the anterior hyperstriatum at this age was consistent with eye use and the known distribution of ipsilateral and contralateral projections to the region. Different rates of functional development in the hyperstriatal and ectostriatal systems may reflect a requirement for different visual information processing in young versus older chickens. This study indicates that the ectostriatal system subserves the majority of early visual behavior. Age-dependent changes in the regional arrangement of activity in the Field L auditory region were also noted.

  5. Sorafenib and 2-Deoxyglucose Synergistically Inhibit Proliferation of both Sorafenib Sensitive and Resistant HCC Cells by Inhibiting ATP Production

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ryan; Wani, Nissar A.; Ghoshal, Kalpana; Jacob, Samson T.; Motiwala, Tasneem

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths globally1,2. Sorafenib is the only first-line systemic drug for advanced HCC, but it has very limited survival benefits because patients treated with sorafenib either suffer from side effects or show disease progression after initial response. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel strategies for first-line and second-line therapy. The association between sorafenib resistance and glycolysis prompted us to screen several drugs with known anti-glycolytic activity to identify those that will sensitize cells to sorafenib. We demonstrate that the combination of glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) and sorafenib drastically inhibits viability of sorafenib sensitive and resistant cells. However, the combination of other anti-glycolytic drugs like lonidamine, gossypol, 3-bromopyruvate and imatinib with sorafenib does not show synergistic effect. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the combination of 2DG and sorafenib induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1. Mechanistic investigation suggests that the cell-cycle arrest is due to depletion of cellular ATP that activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which, in turn, inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to induce cell cycle arrest. This study provides strong evidence for the therapeutic potential of the combination of sorafenib and 2-deoxyglucose for HCC. PMID:27938509

  6. sup 14 C-2-deoxyglucose uptake in the ground squirrel brain during entrance to and arousal from hibernation

    SciTech Connect

    Kilduff, T.S.; Miller, J.D.; Radeke, C.M.; Sharp, F.R.; Heller, H.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Neuronal activity underlying various phases of the mammalian hibernation cycle was investigated using the {sup 14}C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG) method. Relative 2DG uptake (R2DGU) values were computed for 96 brain regions across 7 phases of the hibernation cycle: euthermia, 3 body temperature (Tb) intervals during entrance into hibernation, stable deep hibernation, and 2 Tb intervals during arousal from hibernation. Multivariate statistical techniques were employed to identify objectively groups of brain regions whose R2DGU values showed a similar pattern across all phases of hibernation. Factor analysis revealed that most of the variability in R2DGU values for the 96 brain regions across the entire cycle could be accounted for by 3 principal factors. These factors could accurately discriminate the various phases of hibernation on the basis of the R2DGU values alone. Three hypothalamic and 3 cortical regions were identified as possibly mediating the entrance into hibernation because they underwent a change in R2DGU early in entrance into hibernation and loaded strongly on one of the principal factors. Another 4 hypothalamic regions were similarly identified as possibly causally involved in the arousal from hibernation. These results, coupled with characteristic changes in ordinal rank of the 96 brain regions in each phase of hibernation, support the concept that mammalian hibernation is an active, integrated orchestration of neurophysiological events rather than a state entered through a passive process.

  7. Identification of the determinants of 2-deoxyglucose sensitivity in cancer cells by shRNA library screening.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Nishimura, Haruna; Matsumoto, Ken; Yoshida, Minoru

    2015-11-06

    Combining glycolytic inhibition with other anti-cancer therapies is a potential approach to treating cancer. In this context, we attempted to identify genes that determine sensitivity to 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), a glycolytic inhibitor, in cancer cells using pooled shRNA libraries targeting ∼15,000 genes. The screen revealed that COPB1 and ARCN1, which are essential in retrograde transport, as determinants of sensitivity to 2DG: silencing of COPB1 or ARCN1 expression sensitized cells to 2DG toxicity. To address the mechanism of potentiation of 2DG toxicity by inhibition of COPI-mediated transport, we focused on the role of lipolysis as an alternate source of energy upon inhibition of glycolysis. In the process of lipolysis, COPI-mediated transport is required for localization to lipid droplets of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), a key enzyme that produces fatty acids from triacylglycerol as a substrate for β-oxidation. The ATGL inhibitor atglistatin potentiated 2DG toxicity, consistent with a model in which a defect in COPI-mediated transport of ATGL to lipid droplets inhibits energy supply, thereby sensitizing cells to glycolytic inhibition. Collectively, our data demonstrated that a defect in COPI-mediated transport or pharmacological inhibition of ATGL potentiates 2DG toxicity in cancer cells, possibly due to a reduction in the energy supply.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by 2-deoxyglucose but not glucose starvation activates AMPK through CaMKKβ leading to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xi, Haibin; Barredo, Julio C; Merchan, Jaime R; Lampidis, Theodore J

    2013-05-15

    Autophagy, a well-conserved cellular self-eating process, has been shown to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of cancer. Previously, we reported that under normal O₂ conditions (21% O₂), the dual glucose metabolism inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) activates a cytoprotective autophagic response in cancer cells mainly through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress rather than ATP² reduction. However, the pathway(s) by which this occurs was unknown. Here, we find that ER stress induced by 2-DG as well as tunicamycin activates AMPK via Ca²⁺-CaMKKβ leading to stimulation of autophagy. These results suggest a new role for AMPK as a sensor of ER stress. In contrast, we find that although physiologic glucose starvation (GS) leads to ER stress which contributes to autophagy activation, it does so by a different mechanism. In addition to ER stress, GS also stimulates autophagy through lowering ATP and activating the canonical LKB1-AMPK energy sensing pathway as well as through increasing reactive oxygen species resulting in the activation of ERK. Furthermore, under hypoxia we observe that both 2-DG and GS inhibit rather than activate autophagy. This inhibition correlates with dramatically depleted ATP levels, and occurs through reduction of the PI3K III-Beclin1 complex for autophagy initiation, blockage of the conjugation of ATG12 to ATG5 for autophagosome expansion, as well as inhibition of the functional lysosomal compartment for autophagic degradation. Taken together, our data support a model where under normoxia therapeutic (2-DG) and physiologic (GS) glucose restriction differentially activate autophagy, while under hypoxia they similarly inhibit it.

  9. 18-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: an additional tool in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Alessandra; Sordillo, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Laura; Maffongelli, Gaetano; Calisti, Giorgio; Di Pietro, Barbara; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Schillaci, Orazio; Pellegrino, Antonio; Chiariello, Luigi; Andreoni, Massimo; Sarmati, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the role of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET-CT) in the diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE). We retrospectively examined 27 consecutive patients who were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department of Tor Vergata University Hospital between 2009 and 2013 with a suspicion of IE. The final IE diagnosis was defined according to the modified Duke criteria, and the microbiological and diagnostic results were collected for each patient. Twenty out of 27 patients had a suspected prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) and seven had a suspected native valve endocarditis (NVE). Twenty-five out of 27 patients (92%) had a confirmed diagnosis of IE (18/25 PVE and 7/25 NVE); 16 had a positive echocardiography evaluation and 16 had positive (18)F-FDG-PET-CT findings. Echocardiography showed a higher sensitivity as a diagnostic tool for the detection of IE compared to (18)F-FDG-PET-CT (80% vs. 55%). However, a greater number of PVE had positive (18)F-FDG-PET-CT results compared to those with positive echocardiography findings (11/13 vs. 9/13), and overall 89% (16/18) of confirmed PVE resulted (18)F-FDG-PET-CT positive. Analyzing only the cases who underwent transoesophageal echocardiography, (18)F-FDG-PET-CT showed a sensitivity of 85% in PVE (vs. 69% for echocardiography and 77% for the Duke criteria). All seven patients with NVE had a positive echocardiography and negative (18)F-FDG-PET-CT findings (p<0.001). The results of this study further highlight the limitations of echocardiography in the diagnosis of PVE and the potential advantages of (18)F-FDG-PET-CT in these cases.

  10. Incidental abnormal FDG uptake in the prostate on 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Pil Moon; Seo, Won Ik; Lee, Sun Seong; Bae, Sang Kyun; Kwak, Ho Sup; Min, Kweonsik; Kim, Wansuk; Kang, Dong Il

    2014-01-01

    18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) scans are commonly used for the staging and restaging of various malignancies, such as head and neck, breast, colorectal and gynecological cancers. However, the value of FDG PET/CT for detecting prostate cancer is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of incidental prostate 18F-FDG uptake on PET/CT scans. We reviewed 18F-FDG PET/CT scan reports from September 2009 to September 2013, and selected cases that reported focal/diffuse FDG uptake in the prostate. We analyzed the correlation between 18F-FDG PET/CT scan findings and data collected during evaluations such as serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, digital rectal examination (DRE), transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), and/or biopsy to confirm prostate cancer. Of a total of 18,393 cases, 106 (0.6%) exhibited abnormal hypermetabolism in the prostate. Additional evaluations were performed in 66 patients. Serum PSA levels were not significantly correlated with maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) in all patients (rho 0.483, p=0.132). Prostate biopsies were performed in 15 patients, and prostate cancer was confirmed in 11. The median serum PSA level was 4.8 (0.55-7.06) ng/mL and 127.4 (1.06-495) ng/mL in the benign and prostate cancer groups, respectively. The median SUVmax was higher in the prostate cancer group (mean 10.1, range 3.8-24.5) than in the benign group (mean 4.3, range 3.1-8.8), but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.078). There was no significant correlation between SUVmax and serum PSA, prostatic volume, or Gleason score. 18F-FDG PET/CT scans did not reliably differentiate malignant or benign from abnormal uptake lesions in the prostate, and routine prostate biopsy was not usually recommended in patients with abnormal FDG uptake. Nevertheless, patients with incidental prostate uptake on 18F-FDG PET/ CT scans should not be ignored and should be undergo

  11. Prediction of Central Nervous System Relapse of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Using Pretherapeutic [18F]2-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoo Sung; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Sang Eun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Central nervous system (CNS) relapse of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rare complication, but has a poor prognosis with unknown pathophysiology. Recent trials of CNS prophylaxis have shown to be ineffective, despite patient's selection using several known clinical risk factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the value of pretreatment [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in predicting CNS relapse in DLBCL patients. The authors analyzed 180 pathologically confirmed DLBCL patients, retrospectively. Patients underwent [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography before first line rituximab to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone therapy. Clinical characteristics were evaluated and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) with a threshold margin of 50% was calculated. Among age, sex, Ann Arbor stage, International Prognostic Index, revised International Prognostic Index, high serum lactate dehydrogenase level, presence of B symptoms, bulky disease (≥10 cm), extranodal lesion involvement, bone marrow involvement, high metabolic tumor volume ( >450 mL), and high TLG50 (>2000), the high TLG50 was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting CNS relapse in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.04). Kaplan–Meir survival analysis between high TLG50 (>2000) and low TLG50 (≤2000) groups revealed significantly different mean progression free survival (PFS) of 1317.2 ± 134.3 days and 1968.6 ± 18.3 days, respectively (P < 0.001). High TLG50 on [18F]2-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography is the most significant predictor of CNS relapse in un-treated DLBCL patients. PMID:26554808

  12. Topographic organization of the orientation column system in large flat-mounts of the cat visual cortex: a 2-deoxyglucose study.

    PubMed

    Löwel, S; Freeman, B; Singer, W

    1987-01-15

    We developed a flat-mount technique in order to visualize, without additional reconstruction, the system of orientation columns in the cat visual cortex by using 2-deoxyglucose-autoradiography. Experimental animals were injected with 2-deoxyglucose and then stimulated for 45-60 minutes either with vertical or horizontal or oblique gratings alone or with vertical and horizontal gratings presented in alternation. In both areas 17 and 18 stimulation with either vertical or horizontal or oblique stripes produced similar and highly ordered patterns of parallel bands of increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake that were perpendicular to the boundaries of the areas. In area 17 they occasionally extended without interruption from the 17/18 border on the top of the lateral gyrus to the monocular segment in the splenial sulcus. Superposition of serial sections revealed that these bands were present in all cortical layers and in precise register along lines orthogonal to the lamination. The center-to-center spacing of the bands was 1.0-1.1 mm in area 17 and 1.2-1.4 mm in area 18. Stimulation with alternating vertical and horizontal contours led to a pattern the general organization of which resembled that induced by a single orientation but the spacing of which was reduced by a factor of 0.5. This strongly supports the concept that orientation is mapped in a system of parallel bands and argues against a recently formulated hypothesis that iso-orientation bands extend like spokes from centers that lack orientation selectivity (Braitenberg and Braitenberg, Biol. Cybern. 33:179-186, '79). Another characteristic feature, revealed by the flat-mount technique, was a periodic variation of 2-deoxyglucose uptake along the bands that gave them a beaded appearance. The mean center-to-center distance between adjacent beads on the same band was in the range of 0.9-1.2 mm and remained unchanged when horizontal and vertical gratings were presented in alternation. We propose that these beads reflect

  13. “Drop” Metastases from an Operated Case of Intracranial Anaplastic Ependymoma Identified on Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    The seeding of tumor through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from primary intracranial tumors is very rare, often goes undetected, and is usually identified only on autopsy. CSF cytology along with magnetic resonance imaging constitutes the standard approach of diagnosing this grave condition. Use of fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in indentifying spinal metastases from primary intracranial malignancies is very limited and has been reported in patients with metastatic glioblastoma multiforme and medulloblastomas. We present a rare case of metastatic anaplastic ependymoma to show the potentially clinically utility of PET/CT in diagnosing leptomeningeal or the so-called “drop” metastases. PMID:28242994

  14. Insulin response in individual tissues of control and gold thioglucose-obese mice in vivo with (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, G.J.; Astbury, L.D.; Williams, P.F.; Caterson, I.D.

    1987-02-01

    The dose-response characteristics of several glucose-utilizing tissues (brain, heart, white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and quadriceps muscle) to a single injection of insulin have been compared in control mice and mice made obese with a single injection of gold thioglucose (GTG). Tissue content of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate and blood disappearance rate of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) were measured at nine different insulin doses and used to calculate rates of 2-DG uptake and phosphorylation in tissues from control and obese mice. The insulin sensitivity of tissues reflected in the ED50 of insulin response varied widely, and brown adipose tissue was the most insulin-sensitive tissue studied. In GTG-obese mice, heart, quadriceps, and brown adipose tissue were insulin resistant (demonstrated by increased ED50), whereas in white adipose tissue, 2-DG phosphorylation was more sensitive to insulin. Brain 2-DG phosphorylation was insulin independent in control and obese animals. The largest decrease in insulin sensitivity in GTG-obese mice was observed in brown adipose tissue. The loss of diet-induced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue as a result of the hypothalamic lesion in GTG-obese mice could be a major cause of insulin resistance in brown adipose tissue. Because brown adipose tissue can make a major contribution to whole-body glucose utilization, insulin resistance in this tissue may have a significant effect on whole-animal glucose homeostasis in GTG-obese mice.

  15. Fetal frontal cortex transplant (/sup 14/C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake and histology: survival in cavities of host rat brain motor cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.

    1984-10-01

    Fetal frontal neocortex from 18-day-old rat embryonic brain was transplanted into cavities in 30-day-old host motor cortex. Sixty days after transplantation, 5 of 15 transplanted rats had surviving fetal transplants. The fetal cortex transplants were physically attached to the host brain, completely filled the original cavity, and had numerous surviving cells including pyramidal neurons. Cell lamination within the fetal transplant was abnormal. The (/sup 14/C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake of all five of the fetal neocortex transplants was less than adjacent cortex and contralateral host motor-sensory cortex, but more than adjacent corpus callosum white matter. The results indicate that fetal frontal neocortex can be transplanted into damaged rat motor cortex. The metabolic rate of the transplants suggests they could be partially functional.

  16. Targeting cancer cell metabolism: The combination of metformin and 2-Deoxyglucose regulates apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via p38 MAPK/JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Zheng, Ya; Zhang, Haiyan; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Targeting cancer cell metabolism is a new promising strategy to fight cancer. Metformin, a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, exerts anti-cancer and anti-proliferative action. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), a glucose analog, works as a competitive inhibitor of glycolysis. In this study, we show for the first time that metformin in combination with 2-DG inhibited growth, migration, invasion and induced cell cycle arrest of ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Moreover, metformin and 2-DG could efficiently induce apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells, which was achieved by activating p38 MAPK and JNK pathways. Our study reinforces the growing interest of metabolic interference in cancer therapy and highlights the potential use of the combination of metformin and 2-DG as an anti-tumor treatment in ovarian cancer. PMID:27904682

  17. Kinetics of high-Level of ß-glucosidase production by a 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutant of Humicola lanuginosa in submerged fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Bokhari, Syed Ali Imran; Latif, Farooq; Rajoka, Muhammad Ibrahim

    2008-01-01

    A 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutant (M7) of Humicola lanuginosa was obtained by exposing conidia to γ-rays and permitting expression in broth containing 0.6% 2-deoxyglucose (DG) and cellobiose (1%) before plating on DG esculin-ferric ammonium citrate agar medium from which colonies showing faster and bigger blackening zones were selected. Kinetic parameters for enhanced ß-glucosidase (BGL) synthesis by M7 were achieved when corncobs acted as the carbon source. The combination between corncobs and corn steep liquor was the best to support higher values of all product formation kinetic parameters. Effect of temperature on the kinetic and thermodynamic attributes of BGL production equilibrium in the wild organism and M7 was studied using batch process at eight different temperatures in shake-flask studies. The best performance was found at 45°C and 20 g L−1 corncobs in 64 h. Both growth and product formation (17.93 U mL−1) were remarkably high at 45°C and both were coupled under optimum working conditions. Product yield of BGL from the mutant M7 (1556.5 U g−1 dry corncobs) was significantly higher than the values reported on all fungal and bacterial systems. Mutation had thermo-stabilization influence on the organism and mutant required lower activation energy for growth and lower magnitudes of enthalpy and entropy for product formation than those demanded by the wild organism, other mesophilic and thermo-tolerant organisms. In the inactivation phase, the organisms needed lower values of activation energy, enthalpy and entropy for product formation equilibrium, confirming thermophilic nature of metabolic network possessed by the mutant organism. PMID:24031297

  18. Role of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography in detecting acute inflammatory lesions of non-bacterial osteitis in patients with a fever of unknown origin: A comparative study of 18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography, bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masaki; Saikawa, Yutaka; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-06-20

    We report three patients with non-bacterial osteitis (NBO) who had fever of unknown origin (FUO) as an initial symptom. 18-Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) can be used to detect acute inflammatory lesions. There seems to be variation among the results of (18)F-FDG-PET, a bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, it would be useful to perform a bone scan to detect all lesions, combined with MRI to confirm the diagnosis of NBO, followed by (18)F-FDG-PET.

  19. Measurement of blood-brain hexose transport with dynamic PET: comparison of (/sup 18/F)2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose and (/sup 11/C)O-methylglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Herholz, K.; Wienhard, K.; Pietrzyk, U.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1989-02-01

    Blood-to-tissue transport of (/sup 18/F)2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) and (/sup 11/C)O-methylglucose (CMG) was compared by dynamic positron emission tomography in four patients with recent ischemic infarcts and in three patients with intracerebral tumors. Local blood volume, tracer transport from tissue to blood, and FDG phosphorylation rates were also determined. A regional analysis of parametric images showed a close correlation of FDG and CMG transport rate constants in pathological tissue. Transport rates of FDG and CMG showed correspondingly less asymmetric remote effects than FDG phosphorylation rates. Transport rate constants were consistently higher for FDG than for CMG in pathological and normal tissue, in accordance with the higher affinity of carrier enzymes to FDG. There was a significant correlation between fitted regional blood volume values and correspondence of average absolute values with both tracers. It is concluded that dynamic FDG PET for measurement of cerebral glucose metabolism is also useful to measure alterations of hexose transport and local blood volume in pathological tissue.

  20. Decoding the dynamics of cellular metabolism and the action of 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose using pulsed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Pietzke, Matthias; Zasada, Christin; Mudrich, Susann; Kempa, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cellular metabolism is highly dynamic and continuously adjusts to the physiological program of the cell. The regulation of metabolism appears at all biological levels: (post-) transcriptional, (post-) translational, and allosteric. This regulatory information is expressed in the metabolome, but in a complex manner. To decode such complex information, new methods are needed in order to facilitate dynamic metabolic characterization at high resolution. Here, we describe pulsed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics (pSIRM) as a tool for the dynamic metabolic characterization of cellular metabolism. We have adapted gas chromatography-coupled mass spectrometric methods for metabolomic profiling and stable isotope-resolved metabolomics. In addition, we have improved robustness and reproducibility and implemented a strategy for the absolute quantification of metabolites. By way of examples, we have applied this methodology to characterize central carbon metabolism of a panel of cancer cell lines and to determine the mode of metabolic inhibition of glycolytic inhibitors in times ranging from minutes to hours. Using pSIRM, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose is a metabolic inhibitor, but does not directly act on the glycolytic cascade.

  1. Lignosulfonic acid promotes hypertrophy in 3T3-L1 cells without increasing lipid content and increases their 2-deoxyglucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Erina; Kadota, Yukiya; Kawaminami, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Adipose tissue plays a key role in the development of obesity and diabetes. We previously reported that lignosulfonic acid suppresses the rise in blood glucose levels through the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity and intestinal glucose absorption. The purpose of this study is to examine further biological activities of lignosulfonic acid. Methods In this study, we examined the effect of lignosulfonic acid on differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Results While lignosulfonic acid inhibited proliferation (mitotic clonal expansion) after induction of differentiation, lignosulfonic acid significantly increased the size of accumulated lipid droplets in the cells. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that lignosulfonic acid increased the expression of the adipogenic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (Glut-4) expression and 2-deoxyglucose uptake in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Additionally, feeding lignosulfonic acid to diabetic KK-Ay mice suppressed increase of blood glucose level. Conclusion Lignosulfonic acid may be useful as a functional anti-diabetic component of food. PMID:27383805

  2. Lignosulfonic acid promotes hypertrophy in 3T3-L1 cells without increasing lipid content and increases their 2-deoxyglucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Erina; Kadota, Yukiya; Kawaminami, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a key role in the development of obesity and diabetes. We previously reported that lignosulfonic acid suppresses the rise in blood glucose levels through the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity and intestinal glucose absorption. The purpose of this study is to examine further biological activities of lignosulfonic acid. In this study, we examined the effect of lignosulfonic acid on differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. While lignosulfonic acid inhibited proliferation (mitotic clonal expansion) after induction of differentiation, lignosulfonic acid significantly increased the size of accumulated lipid droplets in the cells. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that lignosulfonic acid increased the expression of the adipogenic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), leading to increased glucose transporter 4 (Glut-4) expression and 2-deoxyglucose uptake in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Additionally, feeding lignosulfonic acid to diabetic KK-Ay mice suppressed increase of blood glucose level. Lignosulfonic acid may be useful as a functional anti-diabetic component of food.

  3. Effects of reinforcement-blocking doses of pimozide on neural systems driven by rewarding stimulation of the MFB: a /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gomita, Y.; Gallistel, C.R.

    1982-10-01

    An analysis by means of /sup 14/C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography of the neural systems unilaterally activated by the reinforcing stimulation used in the two accompanying papers revealed strong and reliable effects in the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca, in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and/or the fornix throughout the diencephalon, and in the part of the anterior ventral tegmentum where the dopaminergic projection to the lateral habenula originates. The terminal fields of the dopaminergic forebrain projections were not affected, but there was bilateral suppression of lateral habenular activity. A second experiment found that the same systems are still activated by (automatically administered) reinforcing stimulation in rats treated with reinforcement blocking doses of pimozide. The only clear effect of pimozide was to reverse the bilateral suppressive effect of the stimulation on lateral habenular activity. Animals treated with pimozide show greatly elevated activity in the lateral habenula, whether or not they receive reinforcing stimulation. The results suggest that pimozide's effect on reinforcement is mediated by the circuitry interconnecting the lateral habenula with the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and/or the anterior ventral tegmentum.

  4. Evaluation on the effectiveness of 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase (DOGR1) gene as a selectable marker for oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) embryogenic calli transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Izawati, Abang Masli Dayang; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Ismanizan, Ismail; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    DOGR1, which encodes 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase, has been used as a selectable marker gene to produce transgenic plants. In this study, a transformation vector, pBIDOG, which contains the DOGR1 gene, was transformed into oil palm embryogenic calli (EC) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Transformed EC were exposed to 400 mg l-1 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) as the selection agent. 2-DOG resistant tissues were regenerated into whole plantlets on various regeneration media containing the same concentration of 2-DOG. The plantlets were later transferred into soil and grown in a biosafety screenhouse. PCR and subsequently Southern blot analyses were carried out to confirm the integration of the transgene in the plantlets. A transformation efficiency of about 1.0% was obtained using DOGR1 gene into the genome of oil palm. This result demonstrates the potential of using combination of DOGR1 gene and 2-DOG for regenerating transgenic oil palm. PMID:26442041

  5. Characterization of low-acetic-acid-producing yeast isolated from 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutants and its application to high-gravity brewing.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Akihiro; Tabei, Hideaki; Iwahuti, Masahumi

    2006-01-01

    We isolated a mutant with low acetic acid and high ethanol productivities from 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutants of brewers' yeast NCYC1245 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). To determine the mechanism for these properties in the mutant (2DGR19) during fermentation, gene expression and enzyme activity related to acetic acid and ethanol production were investigated. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional levels of many genes involved in glycolysis were higher in 2DGR19 than in NCYC1245. Among these transcriptional levels of 2DGR19 relative to NCYC1245, the expression level of ADH4 encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was highest, which corresponded to the high ADH activity in 2DGR19. Quantitative PCR analysis also revealed that the transcriptional level of ADH4 was the highest among ADH1 to ADH4. Although no significant differences in the transcriptional levels of ALD2 to ALD6 encoding acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD) between 2DGR19 and NCYC1245 were observed, ALD activity in 2DGR19 was lower. Using quantitative PCR analysis, ALD6 was found to be the most highly expressed among the ALD2 to ALD6 genes. These results indicate that ALD6 contributes to a low ALD activity, depending on post-transcriptional regulation. A high ADH activity appeared to be the major reason for the high ethanol productivity of 2DGR19. A low ALD activity was considered to be principally responsible for a low acetic acid productivity, although a high ADH activity also might have played a role. Beer brewed using 2DGR19 in pilot-scale high-gravity brewing contained about half as much acetic acid and 1.1% more ethanol compared with that brewed using NCYC1245. The use of 2DGR19 may overcome difficulties associated with high-gravity brewing.

  6. Impact of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography on treatment strategy and radiotherapy planning for stage I-II Hodgkin disease: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Pascal; Dussart, Sophie; Girinsky, Théodore; Chabaud, Sylvie; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Beckendorff, Véronique; D'Hombres, Anne; Artignan, Xavier; Bondiau, Pierre Yves; Carrie, Christian; Giammarile, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    To quantify the impact of preradiotherapy 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) on treatment strategy and radiotherapy planning for patients with Stage I/II Hodgkin disease included in a large prospective multicenter study. Conventional computed tomography and FDG-PET were performed just before the planned radiotherapy. The radiotherapy plan was first elaborated under blinded conditions for FDG-PET data. Then, the medical staff was asked to confirm or not confirm the treatment strategy and, if appropriate, to modify the radiotherapy plan based on additional information from FDG-PET. Between January 2004 and January 2006, 137 patients were included (124 were available for analysis) in 11 centers (108 adults, 16 children). All but 1 patient had received chemotherapy before inclusion. Prechemotherapy work-up included FDG-PET for 61 patients, and data were available for elaboration of the first radiotherapy plan. Based on preradiotherapy FDG-PET data, the radiotherapy was cancelled in 6 patients (4.8%), and treatment plan modifications occurred in 16 patients (12.9%): total dose (11 patients), CTV volume (5 patients), number of beam incidences (6 patients), and number of CTV (6 patients). The concordance between the treatment strategies with or without preradiotherapy FDG-PET was 82.3%. Concordance results were not significantly different when prechemotherapy PET-CT information was available. Preradiotherapy FDG-PET for treatment planning in Hodgkin lymphoma may lead to significant modification of the treatment strategy and the radiotherapy planning in patients with Stage I or II Hodgkin disease, even in those who have undergone FDG-PET as part of the prechemotherapy work-up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sensitivity of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography for advanced colorectal neoplasms: a large-scale analysis of 7505 asymptomatic screening individuals.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Masau; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Terauchi, Takashi; Matsumoto, Minori; Saito, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Yukio; Saito, Yutaka; Matsuda, Takahisa

    2016-12-01

    The sensitivity of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for advanced colorectal neoplasms among healthy subjects is not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to clarify the sensitivity by analyzing large-scale data from an asymptomatic screening population. A total of 7505 asymptomatic screenees who underwent both FDG-PET and colonoscopy at our Cancer Screening Division between February 2004 and March 2013 were analyzed. FDG-PET and colonoscopy were performed on consecutive days, and each examination was interpreted in a blinded fashion. The results of the two examinations were compared for each of the divided six colonic segments, with those from colonoscopy being set as the reference. The relationships between the sensitivity of FDG-PET and clinicopathological features of advanced neoplasms were also evaluated. Two hundred ninety-one advanced neoplasms, including 24 invasive cancers, were detected in 262 individuals. Thirteen advanced neoplasms (advanced adenomas) were excluded from the analysis because of the coexistence of lesions in the same colonic segment. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-PET for advanced neoplasms were 16.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 12.7-21.8 %], 99.3 % (95 % CI 99.2-99.4 %), 13.5 % (95 % CI 10.1-17.6 %), and 99.4 % (95 % CI 99.3-99.5 %), respectively. The sensitivity was lower for lesions with less advanced histological grade, of smaller size, and flat-type morphology, and for those located in the proximal part of the colon. FDG-PET is believed to be difficult to use as a primary screening tool in population-based colorectal cancer screening because of its low sensitivity for advanced neoplasms. Even when it is used in opportunistic cancer screening, the limit of its sensitivity should be considered.

  8. Impact of 18F-Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography on Treatment Strategy and Radiotherapy Planning for Stage I-II Hodgkin Disease: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pommier, Pascal; Dussart, Sophie; Girinsky, Theodore; Chabaud, Sylvie; Lagrange, Jean Leon; Nguyen, Tan Dat; Beckendorff, Veronique; D'Hombres, Anne; Artignan, Xavier; Bondiau, Pierre Yves; Carrie, Christian; Giammarile, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of preradiotherapy 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET) on treatment strategy and radiotherapy planning for patients with Stage I/II Hodgkin disease included in a large prospective multicenter study. Patients and Methods: Conventional computed tomography and FDG-PET were performed just before the planned radiotherapy. The radiotherapy plan was first elaborated under blinded conditions for FDG-PET data. Then, the medical staff was asked to confirm or not confirm the treatment strategy and, if appropriate, to modify the radiotherapy plan based on additional information from FDG-PET. Results: Between January 2004 and January 2006, 137 patients were included (124 were available for analysis) in 11 centers (108 adults, 16 children). All but 1 patient had received chemotherapy before inclusion. Prechemotherapy work-up included FDG-PET for 61 patients, and data were available for elaboration of the first radiotherapy plan. Based on preradiotherapy FDG-PET data, the radiotherapy was cancelled in 6 patients (4.8%), and treatment plan modifications occurred in 16 patients (12.9%): total dose (11 patients), CTV volume (5 patients), number of beam incidences (6 patients), and number of CTV (6 patients). The concordance between the treatment strategies with or without preradiotherapy FDG-PET was 82.3%. Concordance results were not significantly different when prechemotherapy PET-CT information was available. Conclusion: Preradiotherapy FDG-PET for treatment planning in Hodgkin lymphoma may lead to significant modification of the treatment strategy and the radiotherapy planning in patients with Stage I or II Hodgkin disease, even in those who have undergone FDG-PET as part of the prechemotherapy work-up.

  9. Radiation Treatment Planning Using Positron Emission and Computed Tomography for Lung and Pharyngeal Cancers: A Multiple-Threshold Method for [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-Deoxyglucose Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Okumura, Masahiko R.T.; Shibata, Toru; Kanamori, Shuichi; Hanaoka, Kouhei R.T.; Hosono, Makoto

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Clinical applicability of a multiple-threshold method for [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) activity in radiation treatment planning was evaluated. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients who underwent positron emission and computed tomography (PET/CT) simulation were included; 18 patients had lung cancer, and 14 patients had pharyngeal cancer. For tumors of <=2 cm, 2 to 5 cm, and >5 cm, thresholds were defined as 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV), 35%, and 20% of the maximum FDG activity, respectively. The cervical and mediastinal lymph nodes with the shortest axial diameter of >=10 mm were considered to be metastatic on CT (LNCT). The retropharyngeal lymph nodes with the shortest axial diameter of >=5 mm on CT and MRI were also defined as metastatic. Lymph nodes showing maximum FDG activity greater than the adopted thresholds for radiation therapy planning were designated LNPET-RTP, and lymph nodes with a maximum FDG activity of >=2.5 SUV were regarded as malignant and were designated LNPET-2.5 SUV. Results: The sizes of gross tumor volumes on PET (GTVPET) with the adopted thresholds in the axial plane were visually well fitted to those of GTV on CT (GTVCT). However, the volumes of GTVPET were larger than those of GTVCT, with significant differences (p < 0.0001) for lung cancer, due to respiratory motion. For lung cancer, the numbers of LNCT, LNPET-RTP, and LNPET-2.5 SUV were 29, 28, and 34, respectively. For pharyngeal cancer, the numbers of LNCT, LNPET-RTP, and LNPET-2.5 SUV were 14, 9, and 15, respectively. Conclusions: Our multiple thresholds were applicable for delineating the primary target on PET/CT simulation. However, these thresholds were inaccurate for depicting malignant lymph nodes.

  10. Biochemical modulation of cell energy by 2-deoxyglucose and malonate in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Moselhy, Said S; Kumosani, T A; Al-Malki, A L; Naif, Almalki A

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the impact of 2-deoxglucose or malonate individually or in combination on the level of cell energy (adenosine-5'-triphosphate) and oxidative stress in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary proliferation in rats. A total of 60 adult female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (12 rats each): group I serves as the control group. Rats in groups (II-V) were administrated intragastrically a single dose of 50 mg/kg body weight (bw) of DMBA. A day after DMBA administration, rats in group III were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with 100 mg 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG)/kg bw daily. Rats in group IV were injected ip with 10 mg sodium malonate/kg bw daily. Rats in group V were injected ip with 100 mg 2-DG/kg bw and 10 mg sodium malonate/kg bw (treatment for 90 days). The results obtained showed that DMBA induced oxidative stress by decreasing the activities of glutathione reductase (GRase) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and elevating the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in mammary tissues when compared with control. The combined treatment protected against the previous deleterious changes by a significant elevation in the activities of GRase and SOD, GPx and lowering the levels of MDA and NO more potentially when compared with individual treatment. Apoptosis, as indicated by a significant release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, observed in DMBA-injected rats was positively significantly correlated with the elevation of the level of NO. These data explained the possible additive effect of 2-DG and malonate by depleting the cell energy by their protective effects against the earlier stages of carcinogenesis.

  11. Common fur and mystacial vibrissae parallel sensory pathways: /sup 14/C 2-deoxyglucose and WGA-HRP studies in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.; Morgan, C.W.; Morton, M.T.; Sharp, J.W.

    1988-04-15

    Stimulation of mystacial vibrissae in rows A,B, and C increased (14C) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake in spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis (Sp5c) mostly in ventral portions of laminae III-IV with less activation of II and V. Stimulation of common fur above the whiskers mainly activated lamina II, with less activation in deeper layers. The patterns of activation were compatible with an inverted head, onion skin Sp5c somatotopy. Wheatgerm Agglutinin-Horseradish Peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections into common fur between mystacial vibrissae rows A-B and B-C led to anterograde transganglionic labeling only of Sp5c, mainly of lamina II with less label in layer V, and very sparse label in III and IV. WGA-HRP skin injections appear to primarily label small fibers, which along with larger fibers, were metabolically activated during common fur stimulation. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation increased 2DG uptake in ventral ipsilateral spinal trigeminal nuclei pars interpolaris (Sp5i) and oralis (Sp5o) and principal trigeminal sensory nucleus (Pr5). Common fur stimulation above the whiskers slightly increased 2DG uptake in ventral Sp5i, Sp5o, and possibly Pr5. The most dorsal aspect of the ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus of thalamus was activated contralateral to whisker stimulation. Stimulation of the common fur dorsal to the whiskers activated a region of dorsal VPM caudal to the VPM region activated during whisker stimulation. This is consistent with previous data showing that ventral whiskers and portions of the face are represented rostrally in VPM, and more dorsal whiskers and dorsal portions of the face are represented progressively more caudally in VPM. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation activated the contralateral primary sensory SI barrelfield cortex and a separate region in the second somatosensory SII cortex.

  12. Changes in brain glucose use and extracellular ions associated with kainic acid-induced seizures: (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose and intracranial

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, J.E Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of kainic acid (KA) on brain glucose use with coadministration of diazepam, and the effect of KA on brain extracellular (K/sup +/), Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/) was investigated in rats by means of (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and intracranial microdialysis, respectively. Also, the impact of intracranial microdialysis on brain regional metabolic function was studied. Co-treatment with KA and diazepam attenuated KA-induced 3 hr increases and prevented 48 hr decreases in glucose use within all structures measured, particularly the piriform cortex and amygdala. Hippocampal CA/sub 3/, CA/sub 4/, and CA/sub 1/-ventral were least affected by diazepam. The results suggest that diazepam suppresses KA seizure spread from its focus, proposed to be CA/sub 3/. KA-induced ions changes were studied by intracranial microdialysis. Dialysis fibers were implanted within the hippocampus or piriform cortex and perfused 24 hr later. Samples, collected before and after KA, were analyzed for (K/sup +/), (Ca/sup 2 +/), and (Na/sup +/). KA caused an early and prolonged increase in extracellular (K/sup +/) and a negligible decrease in (Ca/sup 2 +/) within the hippocampus. In the piriform cortex, both (K/sup +/) and (Na/sup +/) increase during a period of early seizure signs. The results indicate that ion homostatic control of ion levels is better maintained during parenteral KA-induced seizures than when the brain is activated locally or during ischemia/hypoxia. The effect of intracranial microdialysis was studied by means of 2-DG in control state and KA-induced seizure state. The results indicate that intracranial microdialysis alters brain metabolic function during KA-induced seizures, but not in the control state. At 3 hr post KA, seizure metabolic activity was enhanced within the piriform cortex, and attenuated within the hippocampus.

  13. 2-Deoxyglucose induces the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) by increasing O-GlcNAcylation – Implications for targeting the Warburg effect in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Shin Yee; Hagen, Thilo

    2015-10-02

    The high proliferation rate of cancer cells and the microenvironment in the tumor tissue require the reprogramming of tumor cell metabolism. The major mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells is the Warburg effect, defined as the preferential utilization of glucose via glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. Targeting the Warburg effect is considered as a promising therapeutic strategy in cancer therapy. In this regard, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been evaluated clinically. 2DG exerts its effect by directly inhibiting glycolysis at the level of hexokinase and phosphoglucoisomerase. In addition, 2DG is also known to induce the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), a tumor suppressor protein and an important negative regulator of cellular glucose uptake. Hence, characterization of the mechanism through which 2DG regulates TXNIP expression may reveal novel approaches to target the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Therefore, in this study we sought to test various hypotheses for the mechanistic basis of the 2DG dependent TXNIP regulation. We have shown that 2DG induced TXNIP expression is independent of carbohydrate response element mediated transcription. Furthermore, the induction of TXNIP is neither dependent on the ability of 2DG to deplete cellular ATP nor to cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. We found that the 2DG induced TXNIP expression is at least in part dependent on the inhibition of the O-GlcNAcase enzyme and the accumulation of O-GlcNAc modified proteins. These results have implications for the identification of therapeutic targets to increase TXNIP expression in cancer. - Highlights: • 2DG increases TXNIP expression at the mRNA and protein level. • The effect of 2DG on TXNIP is independent of ChoRE mediated transcription. • 2DG induces TXNIP independent of ER stress induction and ATP depletion. • 2DG inhibits OGA and leads to accumulation of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. • The upregulation of

  14. Evaluation on the effectiveness of 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase (DOG(R)1) gene as a selectable marker for oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) embryogenic calli transformation mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Izawati, Abang Masli Dayang; Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Ismanizan, Ismail; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    DOG(R)1, which encodes 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase, has been used as a selectable marker gene to produce transgenic plants. In this study, a transformation vector, pBIDOG, which contains the DOG(R)1 gene, was transformed into oil palm embryogenic calli (EC) mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Transformed EC were exposed to 400 mg l(-1) 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) as the selection agent. 2-DOG resistant tissues were regenerated into whole plantlets on various regeneration media containing the same concentration of 2-DOG. The plantlets were later transferred into soil and grown in a biosafety screenhouse. PCR and subsequently Southern blot analyses were carried out to confirm the integration of the transgene in the plantlets. A transformation efficiency of about 1.0% was obtained using DOG(R)1 gene into the genome of oil palm. This result demonstrates the potential of using combination of DOG(R)1 gene and 2-DOG for regenerating transgenic oil palm.

  15. Effect of water extracts from edible Myrtaceae plants on uptake of 2-(n-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose in TNF-α-treated FL83B mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chang; Shen, Szu-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the glucose uptake activity of the water extracts from the leaves and fruit of edible Myrtaceae plants, including guava (Psidium guajava Linn.), wax apples [Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. and L.M. Perry], Pu-Tau [Syzygium jambo (L.) Alston], and Kan-Shi Pu-Tau (Syzygium cumini Linn.) in FL83B mouse hepatocytes. The fluorescent dye 2-(n-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose was used to estimate the uptake ability of the cells. Glucose uptake test showed that pink wax apple fruit extract (PWFE) exhibits the highest glucose uptake activity, at an increment of 21% in the insulin-resistant FL83B mouse hepatocytes as compared with the TNF-α-treated control group. Vescalagin was isolated using column chromatography of PWFE. This compound, at the concentration of 6.25 µg/mL, exhibits the same glucose uptake improvement in insulin-resistant cells as PWFE at a 100-µg/mL dose. We postulate that vescalagin is an active component in PWFE that may alleviate the insulin resistance in mouse hepatocytes. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Regionally selective and dose-dependent effects of the ampakines Org 26576 and Org 24448 on local cerebral glucose utilisation in the mouse as assessed by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Graeme R; McCulloch, James; Shahid, Mohammed; Hill, David R; Henry, Brian; Horsburgh, Karen

    2005-08-01

    AMPA receptor potentiating drugs (e.g. ampakines) enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission, and may have potential therapeutic consequences in CNS disorders. The neuroanatomical basis of action for these compounds is at present unclear. This study aimed to identify the effects of two novel ampakines, Org 26576 and Org 24448, on local cerebral glucose use (LCGU) in the mouse. C57BL/6J mice received Org 26576 (0.1, 1, 10 mg/kg i.p.) or Org 24448 (3, 10, 30 mg/kg i.p.) or vehicle and LCGU was assessed using 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. Both compounds produced dose-dependent increases in LCGU with specific regional activation at low doses. Org 26576 (1 mg/kg) produced significant increases in 9 of the 43 areas examined, including the anteroventral and laterodorsal thalamus, cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Org 24448 (3 mg/kg) produced significant increases in LCGU in 4 of the 43 regions examined, including the dorsal raphe nucleus, medial lateral habenula, CA1 subfield of the hippocampus and median forebrain bundle. Furthermore, the increases in LCGU observed with both Org 26576 (10 mg/kg) and Org 24448 (10 mg/kg) were blocked by pre-treatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg). These data demonstrate that both Org 26576 and Org 24448 produce dose-dependent AMPA receptor mediated increases in LCGU and provide an anatomical basis suggestive that these drugs may be of use in the treatment of conditions such as depression or schizophrenia.

  17. Comparing whole body 18F-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and technetium-99m methylene diophosphate bone scan to detect bone metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsia, T C; Shen, Y Y; Yen, R F; Kao, C H; Changlai, S P

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in morphological imaging, some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are found to have non-resectable disease at surgery or die of recurrence within a year of surgery. At present, metastatic bone involvement is usually assessed using conventional technetium-99m methylene diophosphate (Tc-99m MDP) whole body bone scan (bone scan), which has a high sensitivity but a poor specificity. We have attempted to evaluate the usefulness of whole body positron emission tomography with 18F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET) for the detection of malignant bone metastases of NSCLC, and to compare FDG-PET results with Bone Scan findings. Forty-eight patients with biopsy-proven NSCLC and suspected to have stage IV disease underwent whole body bone scan and FDG-PET to detect bone metastases. The final diagnoses of bone metastases were established by operative, histopathological findings or clinical follow-up longer than 1 year by additional radiographs or following FDG-PET/Tc-99m MDP bone scan findings showing progressively and extensively widespread bone lesions. A total of 138 bone lesions found on either FDG-PET or Tc-99m MDP bone scan were evaluated. Among the 106 metastatic and 32 benign bone lesions, FDG-PET and Tc-99m MDP bone scan could accurately diagnose 99 and 98, as well as 30 and 2 metastatic and benign bone lesions, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of FDG-PET and Tc-99m MDP bone scan were 93.4% and 92.5%, as well as 93.5% and 72.5%, respectively. In conclusion, our data suggest that FDG-PET with the same sensitivity and a better accuracy than those of Tc-99m MDP bone scan to detect metastatic bone lesions in patients with biopsy-proven NSCLC and suspected to have stage IV disease.

  18. Impact of chronic subthalamic high-frequency stimulation on metabolic basal ganglia activity: a 2-deoxyglucose uptake and cytochrome oxidase mRNA study in a macaque model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Wassilios; Guigoni, Celine; Cirilli, Laetitia; Garret, Maurice; Bioulac, Bernard H; Gross, Christian E; Bezard, Erwan; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms of action of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) remain only partially understood. Hitherto, experimental studies have suggested that STN-HFS reduces the activity of STN neurons. However, some recent reports have challenged this view, showing that STN-HFS might also increase the activity of globus pallidus internalis (GPi) neurons that are under strong excitatory drive of the STN. In addition, most results emanate from studies applying acute STN-HFS, while parkinsonian patients receive chronic stimulation. Thus, the present study was designed to assess the effect of chronic (10 days) STN-HFS in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated nonhuman primate. For this purpose, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake, a measure of global synaptic activity, was assessed in the basal ganglia and the motor thalamus after chronic unilateral STN-HFS. Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) mRNA expression, a marker of efferent metabolic activity, was additionally assessed in the globus pallidus. Chronic STN-HFS (i) reversed abnormally decreased 2-DG uptake in the STN of parkinsonian nonhuman primates, (ii) reversed abnormally increased 2-DG accumulation in the GPi while COI mRNA expression was increased, suggesting global activation of GPi neurons, and (iii) reversed abnormally increased 2-DG uptake in the ventrolateral motor thalamus nucleus. The simultaneous decrease in 2-DG uptake and increase in COI mRNA expression are difficult to reconcile with the current model of basal ganglia function and suggest that the mechanisms by which STN-HFS exerts its clinical benefits are more complex than a simple reversal of abnormal activity in the STN and its targets.

  19. Positron emission tomography detects tissue metabolic activity in myocardial segments with persistent thallium perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunken, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Grover-McKay, M.; Phelps, M.E.; Tillisch, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1987-09-01

    Positron emission tomography with /sup 13/N-ammonia and /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose was used to assess myocardial perfusion and glucose utilization in 51 myocardial segments with a stress thallium defect in 12 patients. Myocardial infarction was defined by a concordant reduction in segmental perfusion and glucose utilization, and myocardial ischemia was identified by preservation of glucose utilization in segments with rest hypoperfusion. Of the 51 segments studied, 36 had a fixed thallium defect, 11 had a partially reversible defect and 4 had a completely reversible defect. Only 15 (42%) of the 36 segments with a fixed defect and 4 (36%) of the 11 segments with a partially reversible defect exhibited myocardial infarction on study with positron tomography. In contrast, residual myocardial glucose utilization was identified in the majority of segments with a fixed (58%) or a partially reversible (64%) thallium defect. All of the segments with a completely reversible defect appeared normal on positron tomography. Apparent improvement in the thallium defect on delayed images did not distinguish segments with ischemia from infarction. Thus, positron emission tomography reveals evidence of persistent tissue metabolism in the majority of segments with a fixed or partially resolving stress thallium defect, implying that markers of perfusion alone may underestimate the extent of viable tissue in hypoperfused myocardial segments.

  20. Diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH Mutants That Can Be Isolated in the Presence of 2-Deoxyglucose and Galactose and Characterization of Two Mutants Synthesizing Reduced Levels of HPr, a Phosphocarrier of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne; Brochu, Denis; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2001-01-01

    In streptococci, HPr, a phosphocarrier of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS), undergoes multiple posttranslational chemical modifications resulting in the formation of HPr(His∼P), HPr(Ser-P), and HPr(Ser-P)(His∼P), whose cellular concentrations vary with growth conditions. Distinct physiological functions are associated with specific forms of HPr. We do not know, however, the cellular thresholds below which these forms become unable to fulfill their functions and to what extent modifications in the cellular concentrations of the different forms of HPr modify cellular physiology. In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Streptococcus salivarius ptsH mutants that can be isolated by positive selection on a solid medium containing 2-deoxyglucose and galactose and identify 13 amino acids that are essential for HPr to properly accomplish its physiological functions. We also report the characterization of two S. salivarius mutants that produced approximately two- and threefoldless HPr and enzyme I (EI) respectively. The data indicated that (i) a reduction in the synthesis of HPr due to a mutation in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of ptsH reduced ptsI expression; (ii) a threefold reduction in EI and HPr cellular levels did not affect PTS transport capacity; (iii) a twofold reduction in HPr synthesis was sufficient to reduce the rate at which cells metabolized PTS sugars, increase generation times on PTS sugars and to a lesser extent on non-PTS sugars, and impede the exclusion of non-PTS sugars by PTS sugars; (iv) a threefold reduction in HPr synthesis caused a strong derepression of the genes coding for α-galactosidase, β-galactosidase, and galactokinase when the cells were grown at the expense of a PTS sugar but did not affect the synthesis of α-galactosidase when cells were grown at the expense of lactose, a noninducing non-PTS sugar; and (v) no correlation was found between the magnitude of enzyme derepression and

  1. Myocardial Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... pectoris: Chest pain caused by myocardial ischemia. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 1, 2015. Deedwania PC. Silent myocardial ischemia: Epidemiology and pathogenesis. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 1, 2015. Mann DL, ...

  2. Myocardial viability.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Y; Kloner, R A

    1996-01-01

    Left ventricular function is a major predictor of outcome in patients with coronary artery disease. Acute ischemia, postischemic dysfunction (stunning), myocardial hibernation, or a combination of these 3 are among the reversible forms of myocardial dysfunction. In myocardial stunning, dysfunction occurs despite normal myocardial perfusion, and function recovers spontaneously over time. In acute ischemia and hibernation, there is regional hypoperfusion. Function improves only after revascularization. Evidence of myocardial viability usually relies on the demonstration of uptake of various metabolic tracers, such as thallium (thallous chloride TI 201) or fludeoxyglucose F 18, by dysfunctional myocardium or by the demonstration of contractile reserve in a dysfunctional region. This can be shown as an augmentation of function during the infusion of various sympathomimetic agents. The response of ventricular segments to increasing doses of dobutamine may indicate the underlying mechanism of dysfunction. Stunned segments that have normal perfusion show dose-dependent augmentation of function. If perfusion is reduced as in hibernating myocardium, however, a biphasic response usually occurs: function improves at low doses of dobutamine, whereas higher doses may induce ischemia and, hence, dysfunction. But in patients with severely impaired perfusion, even low doses may cause ischemia. Myocardial regions with subendocardial infarction or diffuse scarring may also have augmented contractility during catecholamine infusion due to stimulation of the subepicardial layers. In these cases, augmentation of function after revascularization is not expected. Because the underlying mechanism, prognosis, and therapy may differ among these conditions, it is crucial to differentiate among dysfunctional myocardial segments that are nonviable and have no potential to regain function, hibernating or ischemic segments in which recovery of function occurs only after revascularization, and

  3. Myocardial glucose transporters and glycolytic metabolism during ischemia in hyperglycemic diabetic swine.

    PubMed

    Stanley, W C; Hall, J L; Smith, K R; Cartee, G D; Hacker, T A; Wisneski, J A

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the effects of 4 weeks of streptozocin-induced diabetes on regional myocardial glycolytic metabolism during ischemia in anesthetized open-chest domestic swine. Diabetic animals were hyperglycemic (12.0 +/- 2.1 v 6.6 +/- .5 mmol/L), and had lower fasting insulin levels (27 +/- 8 v 79 +/- 19 pmol/L). Myocardial glycolytic metabolism was studied with coronary flow controlled by an extracorporeal perfusion circuit. Left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) flow was decreased by 50% for 45 minutes and left circumflex (CFX) flow was constant. Myocardial glucose uptake and extraction were measured with D-[6-3H]-2-deoxyglucose (DG) and myocardial blood flow was measured with microspheres. The rate of glucose conversion to lactate and lactate uptake and output were assessed with a continuous infusion of [6-14C]glucose and [U-13C]lactate into the coronary perfusion circuit. Both diabetic and nondiabetic animals had sharp decreases in subendocardial blood flow during ischemia (from 1.21 +/- .10 to 0.43 +/- .08 mL.g-1.min-1 in the nondiabetic group, and from 1.30 +/- .15 to 0.55 +/- .11 in the diabetic group). Diabetes had no significant effect on myocardial glucose uptake or glucose conversion to lactate under either well-perfused or ischemic conditions. Forty-five minutes of ischemia resulted in significant glycogen depletion in the subendocardium in both nondiabetic and diabetic animals, with no differences between the two groups. Glycolytic metabolism is not impaired in hyperglycemic diabetic swine after 1 month of the disease when compared with that in normoglycemic nondiabetic animals. The myocardial content of the insulin-regulatable glucose transporter (GLUT 4) was measured in left ventricular biopsies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  5. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  6. [Depression and myocardial infaction].

    PubMed

    Testuz, A

    2009-03-04

    Several works show an association between depression and the occurence of a first myocardial infarction. Depression after myocardial infarction seems to be a marker of poorer outcome, regardless of other risk factors or severity of the myocardial infarction. Dysautonomia and alteration of platelet activation are a few physiopathological changes shared by both affections, through which they might be related. Treatment of depression is not associated with better cardiovascular outcome, but selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown safe and efficient among patients with coronary heart disease. Cognitivo-comportemental approach and cardiovascular rehabilitation program after myocardial infarction also play a role in improving quality of life of the depressed patient with coronary heart disease.

  7. Myocardial Noncompaction Presenting With Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuechun; Li, Xinchun; Lu, Dongfeng; Xiao, Aiyi; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial noncompaction, namly isolated noncompaction of the left ventricular myocardium (NVM), is a rare congenital disease. It can be either seen in the absence of other cardiac anomalies, or associated with other congenital cardiac defects, mostly stenotic lesions of the left ventricular outflow tract. A myocardial bridge (MB) is thought being associated with coronary heart disease, such as coronary spasm, arrhythmia, and so on. The significance of MB in association with other congenital cardiac conditions is unknown. We report a novel case who was presented NVM and MB. A 34-year-old man complained of chest prickling-like pain and dizzy for 1 year. His blood pressure was 110/70 mm Hg. Echocardiograph revealed increased trabeculations below the level of papillary muscle of left ventricle (LV); deep intertrabecular recesses in the endocardial wall of LV particularly in apex free wall; and LV ejection fraction of 57%. A coronary computerized tomography scan showed that part, 38.9 cm, of left descending artery tunnel was surrounding by cardiac muscles rather than resting on top of the myocardium. The therapeutics interventions included lifestyle cares, agents of anti-ischemia and improvement myocardial cell metabolism. The patient was followed up for 2.6 years, and his general condition was stable. This case indicates that NVM can be developed with MB, and the complete diagnosis of NVM and MB should be made by different image studies. PMID:26356695

  8. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  9. Myocardial Lineage Development

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sylvia M.; Yelon, Deborah; Conlon, Frank L.; Kirby, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    The myocardium of the heart is composed of multiple highly specialized myocardial lineages, including those of the ventricular and atrial myocardium, and the specialized conduction system. Specification and maturation of each of these lineages during heart development is a highly ordered, ongoing process involving multiple signaling pathways and their intersection with transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we attempt to summarize and compare much of what we know about specification and maturation of myocardial lineages from studies in several different vertebrate model systems. To date, most research has focused on early specification, and while there is still more to learn, less is known about factors that promote subsequent maturation of myocardial lineages required to build the functioning adult heart. PMID:21148449

  10. Myocardial diseases of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this review we have attempted a comprehensive compilation of the cardiac morphologic changes that occur in spontaneous and experimental myocardial diseases of animals. Our coverage addresses diseases of mammals and birds and includes these diseases found in both domesticated and wild animals. A similar review of the myocardial diseases in this broad range of animal species has not been attempted previously. We have summarized and illustrated the gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural alterations for these myocardial diseases; and, whenever possible, we have reviewed their biochemical pathogenesis. We have arranged the myocardial diseases for presentation and discussion according to an etiologic classification with seven categories. These include a group of idiopathic or primary cardiomyopathies recognized in man (hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive types) and a large group of secondary cardiomyopathies with known causes, such as inherited tendency; nutritional deficiency; toxicity; physical injury and shock; endocrine disorders, and myocarditides of viral, bacterial, and protozoal causation. Considerable overlap exists between each of the etiologic groups in the spectrum of pathologic alterations seen in the myocardium. These include various degenerative changes, myocyte necrosis, and inflammatory lesions. However, some diseases show rather characteristic myocardial alterations such as vacuolar degeneration in anthracycline cardiotoxicity, myofibrillar lysis in furazolidone cardiotoxicity, calcification in calcinosis of mice, glycogen accumulation in the glycogenoses, lipofuscinosis in cattle, fatty degeneration in erucic acid cardiotoxicity, myofiber disarray in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and lymphocytic inflammation with inclusion bodies in canine parvoviral myocarditis. The myocardial diseases represent the largest group in the spectrum of spontaneous cardiac diseases of animals. Pericardial and endocardial diseases and congential cardiac diseases are

  11. Perioperative Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andra E.; Alfirevic, Andrej; Sessler, Daniel I.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Thomas, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of left ventricular performance improves risk assessment and guides anesthetic decisions. However, the most common echocardiographic measure of myocardial function, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has important limitations. LVEF is limited by subjective interpretation which reduces accuracy and reproducibility, and LVEF assesses global function without characterizing regional myocardial abnormalities. An alternative objective echocardiographic measure of myocardial function is thus needed. Myocardial deformation analysis, which performs quantitative assessment of global and regional myocardial function, may be useful for perioperative care of surgical patients. Myocardial deformation analysis evaluates left ventricular mechanics by quantifying strain and strain rate. Strain describes percent change in myocardial length in the longitudinal (from base to apex) and circumferential (encircling the short-axis of the ventricle) direction and change in thickness in the radial direction. Segmental strain describes regional myocardial function. Strain is a negative number when the ventricle shortens longitudinally or circumferentially and is positive with radial thickening. Reference values for normal longitudinal strain from a recent meta-analysis using transthoracic echocardiography are (mean ± SD) −19.7 ± 0.4%, while radial and circumferential strain are 47.3 ± 1.9 and −23.3 ± 0.7%, respectively. The speed of myocardial deformation is also important and is characterized by strain rate. Longitudinal systolic strain rate in healthy subjects averages −1.10 ± 0.16 sec−1. Assessment of myocardial deformation requires consideration of both strain (change in deformation), which correlates with LVEF, and strain rate (speed of deformation), which correlates with rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt). Myocardial deformation analysis also evaluates ventricular relaxation, twist, and untwist, providing new and noninvasive methods to

  12. Acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Eric; Mercado, Nestor; Poldermans, Don; Gardien, Martin; Vos, Jeroen; Simoons, Maarten L

    2003-03-08

    Acute myocardial infarction is a common disease with serious consequences in mortality, morbidity, and cost to the society. Coronary atherosclerosis plays a pivotal part as the underlying substrate in many patients. In addition, a new definition of myocardial infarction has recently been introduced that has major implications from the epidemiological, societal, and patient points of view. The advent of coronary-care units and the results of randomised clinical trials on reperfusion therapy, lytic or percutaneous coronary intervention, and chronic medical treatment with various pharmacological agents have substantially changed the therapeutic approach, decreased in-hospital mortality, and improved the long-term outlook in survivors of the acute phase. New treatments will continue to emerge, but the greatest challenge will be to effectively implement preventive actions in all high-risk individuals and to expand delivery of acute treatment in a timely fashion for all eligible patients.

  13. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  14. Myocardial Tagging With SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Herzka, Daniel A.; Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the first implementation of myocardial tagging with refocused steady-state free precession (SSFP) and magnetization preparation. The combination of myocardial tagging (a noninvasive method for quantitative measurement of regional and global cardiac function) with the high tissue signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained with SSFP is shown to yield improvements in terms of the myocardium–tag contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and tag persistence when compared to the current standard fast gradient-echo (FGRE) tagging protocol. Myocardium–tag CNR and tag persistence were studied using numerical simulations as well as phantom and human experiments. Both quantities were found to decrease with increasing imaging flip angle (α) due to an increased tag decay rate and a decrease in myocardial steady-state signal. However, higher α yielded better blood–myocardium contrast, indicating that optimal α is dependent on the application: higher α for better blood–myocardium boundary visualization, and lower α for better tag persistence. SSFP tagging provided the same myocardium–tag CNR as FGRE tagging when acquired at four times the bandwidth and better tag– and blood–myocardium CNRs than FGRE tagging when acquired at equal or twice the receiver bandwidth (RBW). The increased acquisition efficiency of SSFP allowed decreases in breath-hold duration, or increases in temporal resolution, as compared to FGRE. PMID:12541254

  15. Perioperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Pericles; Martins, Gerez Fernandes; Biscaro, Andressa; Kruczan, Dany David; Jessen, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative myocardial infarction adversely affects the prognosis of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft and its diagnosis was hampered by numerous difficulties, because the pathophysiology is different from the traditional instability atherosclerotic and the clinical difficulty to be characterized. Objective To identify the frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction and its outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Methods Retrospective cohort study performed in a tertiary hospital specialized in cardiology, from May 01, 2011 to April 30, 2012, which included all records containing coronary artery bypass graft records. To confirm the diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction criteria, the Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction was used. Results We analyzed 116 cases. Perioperative myocardial infarction was diagnosed in 28 patients (24.1%). Number of grafts and use and cardiopulmonary bypass time were associated with this diagnosis and the mean age was significantly higher in this group. The diagnostic criteria elevated troponin I, which was positive in 99.1% of cases regardless of diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction. No significant difference was found between length of hospital stay and intensive care unit in patients with and without this complication, however patients with perioperative myocardial infarction progressed with worse left ventricular function and more death cases. Conclusion The frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction found in this study was considered high and as a consequence the same observed average higher troponin I, more cases of worsening left ventricular function and death. PMID:25859867

  16. Myocardial revascularisation after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bana, A; Yadava, O P; Ghadiok, R; Selot, N

    1999-05-15

    One hundred and twenty-three patients had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) within 30 days of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from May 1992 to November 1997. Commonest infarct was anterior transmural (61.8%) and commonest indication of surgery was post-infarct persistent or recurrent angina (69.1%). Ten patients were operated within 48 h and 36 between 48 h to 2 weeks of having MI. Out of these, nine patients were having infarct extension and cardiogenic shock at the time of surgery. Pre-operatively fourteen patients were on inotropes of which six also had intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support. All patients had complete revascularisation with 3.8+/-1.2 distal anastomoses per patient. By multivariate analysis, we found that independent predictors of post-operative morbidity [inotropes >48 h, use of IABP, ventilation >24 h, ICU stay >5 days] and complications [re-exploration, arrhythmias, pulmonary complications, wound infection, cerebrovascular accident (CVA)] were left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) <30%, Q-wave MI, surgery <48 h after AMI, presence of pre-operative cardiogenic shock and age >60 years (P < or = 0.01). Mortality at 30 days was 3.3%. LVEF <30%, Q-wave MI, surgery <48 h after AMI, presence of pre-operative cardiogenic shock and age >60 years were found to be independent predictors of 30 days mortality (P < or = 0.01). Ninety patients were followed up for a mean duration of 33 months (1 to 65 months). There were three late deaths and five patients developed recurrence of angina. To conclude, CABG can be carried out with low risk following AMI in stable patients for post-infarct angina. Patients who undergo urgent or emergent surgery and who have pre-operative cardiogenic shock, IABP, poor left ventricular functions, age >60 years and Q-wave MI are at increased risk.

  17. Dipyridamole thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    Thallium-201 (/sup 201/Tl) myocardial scintigraphy is a sensitive technique for detecting coronary artery disease. Standardized exercise testing is the most common method for inducing myocardial stress for /sup 201/Tl imaging. Unfortunately, a significant number of patients are unable to undergo adequate treadmill or bicycle exercise. In these patients, pharmacologic stress with dipyridamole provides a safe, efficacious, and reliable alternative.

  18. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasin...

  19. 2-Deoxyglucose and sorafenib synergistically suppress the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells consume more glucose than normal cells, mainly due to their increased rate of glycolysis. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2DG) is an analogue of glucose, and sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and molecular agent used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study aimed to demonstrate whether combining 2DG and sorafenib suppresses tumor cell proliferation and motility more effectively than either drug alone. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 HCC cells were incubated with sorafenib with or without 1 µM 2DG, and subjected to a proliferation assay. A scratch assay was then performed to analyze cell motility following the addition of 2DG and sorafenib in combination, and each agent alone. RNA was isolated and subjected to reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) following the addition of 2DG and sorafenib in combination and each agent alone. Proliferation was markedly suppressed in cells cultured with 1 µM 2DG and 30 µM sorafenib compared with cells cultured with either agent alone (P<0.05). In addition, levels of Cyclin D1 expression decreased in cells exposed to 3 µM sorafenib and 1 µM 2DG compared with cells exposed to 2DG or sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Scratch assay demonstrated that the distance between the growing edge of the cell sheet and the scratched line was shorter in cells cultured with sorafenib and 2DG than in cells cultured with 2DG or sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Levels of MMP9 expression decreased more in cells treated with both sorafenib and 2DG than in cells treated with 2DG or sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Therefore, 2DG and sorafenib in combination suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells more effectively than 2DG or sorafenib alone, and a cancer treatment combining both drugs may be more effective than sorafenib alone. PMID:28356961

  20. Characteristics of (3H)2-Deoxyglucose Uptake by Slices of Rat Cerebral Cortex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-17

    system because carrier sys- tems are generally stereoselective ( Lehninger , 1975). For these reasons, L -glucose is a valid control for estimating the...analogues to human erythrocytes in connection with inhibition of sugar transport. J. Biol. Chem. 234:3022-26. Lehninger , A . L . 1975. Biochemistry...3H]Glucose uptake by slices was a valid approximation of the space available for glucose diffusion because L -[^H]glucose is an inactive stereoisomer

  1. Prevention of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Adams, M R

    2002-12-01

    Despite the rapid advances that have been made in the treatment of coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction remains the major cause of death in the developed world and a growing problem for developing countries. To address this growing problem, a strategy aimed at prevention of events in high-risk individuals is required. This involves assessment of cardiovascular risk followed by risk reduction. At present there is no perfect technique available for risk prediction, although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scanning, along with serum markers of inflammation, offer the greatest potential. The applicability of these techniques at present is also limited by cost and accessibility. Risk reduction is possible through lifestyle changes and drug therapy, and effective risk assessment is essential in selecting those most likely to benefit from these interventions.

  2. Death Due to Myocardial Bridging.

    PubMed

    Ural, M Numan; Eren, Filiz; Inanir, Nursel Türkmen; Eren, Bülent; Vojtisek, Tomas; Gürses, Murat Serdar

    2015-06-01

    Myocardial bridging is a congenital coronary pathology described as a segment of coronary artery which courses through the myocardial wall beneath the muscle bridge. Although the myocardial bridging prognosis is benign, have been also reported sudden death in medical literature. ¬A 30-year-old married woman was found dead at her home. After local prosecutors' investigation the death was declared as suspicious and forensic autopsy was obliged. The left anterior descending coronary artery was detected embedded deeply in the myocardium 2 cm from its coronary ostial origin. There were no other pathology to explain death. We analyzed sudden death case occurred because of myocardial bridging and the pathophysiological mechanisms in the light of medico-legal literature.

  3. Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch: Correlation with Myocardial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Pislaru, Sorin V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart wall s. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Methods Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in sixteen pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (EVP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end -diastolic stress-strain relation (ESS). Myocardial distensibility and α-and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Results Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6±1.3 m/s vs. 1.3±0.4 m/s; p=0.005) and best correlated with ESS (r 2=0.80, p<0.0001), β-coefficient (r2=0.78, p<0.0001), distensibility (r2=0.47, p=0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2=0.42, p=0.009). Elastic moduli (EVP and ESS) were strongly correlated (r2=0.83, p<0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and EVP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, ESS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2model=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions The main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  4. Wave propagation of myocardial stretch: correlation with myocardial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart walls. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in 16 pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (E VP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end-diastolic stress-strain relation (E SS). Myocardial distensibility and α- and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6 ± 1.3 vs. 1.3 ± 0.4 m/s; p = 0.005) and best correlated with E SS (r2 = 0.80, p < 0.0001), β-coefficient (r2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001), distensibility (r2 = 0.47, p = 0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2 = 0.42, p = 0.009). Elastic moduli (E VP and E SS) were strongly correlated (r2 = 0.83, p < 0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and E VP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, E SS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2 model = 0.83, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography.

  5. Optimization of myocardial function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, N R; Mulieri, L A; Hasenfuss, G; Holubarsch, C

    1993-01-01

    Under normal conditions the cardiac output is designed to meet the metabolic needs of the organism. Thus, the demands imposed on the heart muscle can range from low values at rest to an order of magnitude greater values during exercise. The heart uses a number of strategies to meet the short- and long-term changes in demand. These strategies are of general biological interest and employ similar mechanisms to those responsible for the differences in muscle performance seen between muscle from various species and diverse muscle types within a given animal. This review deals with the heart's utilization of these strategies to meet a broad range of requirements. Tortoise (TM) and rat soleus (RS) muscles are slow, have high economy and develop low power. In contrast (FM) and rat extensor digitorum longus (REDL) are fast, have low economy and have a high power output. These differences are explainable in terms of the characteristics of the myosin head cross-bridge cycle (Cross-bridge tension-time integral: FM/FT = 0.024; REDL/RS = 0.16. Myosin ATPase activity: FM/TM = 15; RDEL/RS = 2.3) and excitation contraction coupling system (time to peak tension: FM/TM = 0.2; REDL/RS = 0.4). Heart muscle employs similar strategies (cross-bridge cycle; excitation contraction coupling) to meet short (catecholamine) and long (hypertrophy secondary to pressure overload or thyrotoxicosis) term changes in demand. In the presence of catecholamine power is increased while economy is decreased. This difference between control (C) and isoproterenol treated hearts (I) is explainable in terms of the contractile and excitation contraction coupling systems (Cross-bridge tension-time integral: I/C = 0.4. Tension independent heat: I/C = 2.0. Tension independent heat rate: I/C = 2.5). A persistent increase in the demand on the heart results in myocardial hypertrophy that is associated with intracellular reorganization. Hyperthyroidism (T) and pressure overload (PO) were used to produce myocardial

  6. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  7. Myocardial complications of immunisations.

    PubMed

    Helle, E P; Koskenvuo, K; Heikkilä, J; Pikkarainen, J; Weckström, P

    1978-10-01

    Immunisation may induce myocardial complications. In this pilot study clinical, electrocardiographic, chemical and immunological findings have been studied during a six weeks' follow-up after routine immunisation (mumps, polio, tetanus, smallpox, diphtheria and type A meningococcal disease) among 234 Finnish conscripts at the beginning of their military service. Serial pattern of ECG changes suggestive of myocarditis was recorded in eight of the 234 conscripts one to two weeks after vaccination against smallpox and diphtheria. Changes were mainly minor ST segment elevations and T wave inversions and usually they disappeared in a few weeks. The ECG positives more often had a history of atopy, and their mean body temperatures and heart rates after the vaccinations were higher than among the other subjects (p less than 0.01). However, clinical myocarditis was never noted, nor were immunological or enzymological changes different among the ECG positives. Thus in 3% of the study population, evidence of postvaccinal myocarditis was noted, based on serial ECG patterns, but without any other evidence of cardiac disease.

  8. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  9. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  10. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  11. MYOCARDIAL AKT: THE OMNIPRESENT NEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Mark A.; Völkers, Mirko; Fischer, Kimberlee; Bailey, Brandi; Cottage, Christopher T.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Avitabile, Daniele; Alvarez, Roberto; Sundararaman, Balaji; Quijada, Pearl; Mason, Matt; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Malhowski, Amy; Cheng, Zhaokang; Khan, Mohsin; McGregor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest examples of integrated signal transduction is revealed by examination of effects mediated by AKT kinase in myocardial biology. Positioned at the intersection of multiple afferent and efferent signals, AKT exemplifies a molecular sensing node that coordinates dynamic responses of the cell in literally every aspect of biological responses. The balanced and nuanced nature of homeostatic signaling is particularly essential within the myocardial context, where regulation of survival, energy production, contractility, and response to pathological stress all flow through the nexus of AKT activation or repression. Equally important, the loss of regulated AKT activity is primarily the cause or consequence of pathological conditions leading to remodeling of the heart and eventual decompensation. This review presents an overview compendium of the complex world of myocardial AKT biology gleaned from more than a decade of research. Summarization of the widespread influence that AKT exerts upon myocardial responses leaves no doubt that the participation of AKT in molecular signaling will need to be reckoned with as a seemingly omnipresent regulator of myocardial molecular biological responses. PMID:21742795

  12. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E

    2008-07-15

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasingly apparent is that the heart exhibits diurnal variations in its intrinsic properties, including responsiveness to extracellular stimuli. This article summarizes our current knowledge regarding the mechanism(s) mediating diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism. Particular attention is focused towards the intramyocardial circadian clock, a cell autonomous molecular mechanism that appears to regulate myocardial metabolism both directly (e.g. triglyceride and glycogen metabolism) and indirectly (through modulation of the responsiveness of the myocardium to workload, insulin, and fatty acids). In doing so, the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte allows the heart to anticipate environmental stimuli (such as changes in workload, feeding status) prior to their onset. This synchronization between the myocardium and its environment is enhanced by regular feeding schedules. Conversely, loss of synchronization may occur through disruption of the circadian clock and/or diurnal variations in neurohumoral factors (as observed during diabetes mellitus). Here, we discuss the possibility that loss of synchronization between the heart and its environment predisposes the heart to metabolic maladaptation and subsequent myocardial contractile dysfunction.

  13. How reliable is myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Willerson, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial scintigraphic techniques available presently allow a sensitive and relatively specific diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction when they are used correctly, although every technique has definite limitations. Small myocardial infarcts (less than 3 gm.) may be missed, and there are temporal limitations in the usefulness of the scintigraphic techniques. The development of tomographic methodology that may be used with single-photon radionuclide emitters (including technetium and /sup 201/Tl will allow the detection of relatively small abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and regions of myocardial infarction and will help to provide a more objective interpretation of the myocardial scintigrams. The use of overlay techniques allowing simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion, infarct-avid imaging, and radionuclide ventriculograms will provide insight into the relevant aspects of the extent of myocardial damage, the relationship of damage to myocardial perfusion, and the functional impact of myocardial infarction on ventricular performance.

  14. Morphological aspects of myocardial bridges.

    PubMed

    Lujinović, Almira; Kulenović, Amela; Kapur, Eldan; Gojak, Refet

    2013-11-01

    Although some myocardial bridges can be asymptomatic, their presence often causes coronary disease either through direct compression of the "tunnel" segment or through stimulation and accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the segment proximally to the myocardial bridge. The studied material contained 30 human hearts received from the Department of Anatomy. The hearts were preserved 3 to 5 days in 10% formalin solution. Thereafter, the fatty tissue was removed and arterial blood vessels prepared by careful dissection with special reference to the presence of the myocardial bridges. Length and thickness of the bridges were measured by the precise electronic caliper. The angle between the myocardial bridge fibre axis and other axis of the crossed blood vessel was measured by a goniometer. The presence of the bridges was confirmed in 53.33% of the researched material, most frequently (43.33%) above the anterior interventricular branch. The mean length of the bridges was 14.64 ± 9.03 mm and the mean thickness was 1.23 ± 1.32 mm. Myocardial bridge fibres pass over the descending blood vessel at the angle of 10-90 degrees. The results obtained on a limited sample suggest that the muscular index of myocardial bridge is the highest for bridges located on RIA, but that the difference is not significant in relation to bridges located on other branches. The results obtained suggest that bridges located on other branches, not only those on RIA, could have a great contractive power and, consequently, a great compressive force, which would be exerted on the wall of a crossed blood vessel.

  15. Morphological aspects of myocardial bridges

    PubMed Central

    Lujinović, Almira; Kulenović, Amela; Kapur, Eldan; Gojak, Refet

    2013-01-01

    Although some myocardial bridges can be asymptomatic, their presence often causes coronary disease either through direct compression of the “tunnel” segment or through stimulation and accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the segment proximally to the myocardial bridge. The studied material contained 30 human hearts received from the Department of Anatomy. The hearts were preserved 3 to 5 days in 10% formalin solution. Thereafter, the fatty tissue was removed and arterial blood vessels prepared by careful dissection with special reference to the presence of the myocardial bridges. Length and thickness of the bridges were measured by the precise electronic caliper. The angle between the myocardial bridge fibre axis and other axis of the crossed blood vessel was measured by a goniometer. The presence of the bridges was confirmed in 53.33% of the researched material, most frequently (43.33%) above the anterior interventricular branch. The mean length of the bridges was 14.64±9.03 mm and the mean thickness was 1.23±1.32 mm. Myocardial bridge fibres pass over the descending blood vessel at the angle of 10-90 degrees. The results obtained on a limited sample suggest that the muscular index of myocardial bridge is the highest for bridges located on RIA, but that the difference is not significant in relation to bridges located on other branches. The results obtained suggest that bridges located on other branches, not only those on RIA, could have a great contractive power and, consequently, a great compressive force, which would be exerted on the wall of a crossed blood vessel. PMID:24289755

  16. Paraganglioma causing a myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    DeMers, Gerard; Portouw, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Paragangliomas, extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas, are rare and classically associated with sustained or paroxysmal hypertension, headache, perspiration, palpitations, and anxiety. A 49-year-old male, parachute instructor, likely developed a hypertensive emergency when deploying his parachute leading to a myocardial infarction. A para-aortic tumor was incidentally discovered during the patient's emergency department work-up and was eventually surgically resected. He had no evidence of coronary disease during his evaluation. This case shows that a myocardial infarction may be the initial manifestation of these neuroendocrine tumors. Hypertensive emergency, much less elevated blood pressure may not be present at time of presentation. PMID:22787353

  17. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  18. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  19. Myocardial revascularization in Jehovah Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Seifert, P E; Auer, J E; Hohensee, P

    1989-04-01

    The refusal of certain patients to accept blood transfusions need not be a deterrent to surgery. We report on nine Jehovah's Witnesses who over a one-year period underwent myocardial revascularization without significant blood loss or decrease in hematocrit values.

  20. Imaging techniques for myocardial inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, J.B.; Henkin, R.E.; Robinson, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders which results in morbidity and mortality in young individuals. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of these patients have histologic evidence of myocarditis which is potentially treatable with immunosuppression. The identification of myocardial inflammation may therefore lead to development of therapeutic regimens designed to treat the cause rather than the effect of the myocardial disease. Ultimately, this may result in improvement in the abysmal prognosis of DC. The currently accepted technique for identification of active myocardial inflammation is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is not perfect, however, since pathologic standards for the diagnosis of myocarditis have not been established. Furthermore, focal inflammation may give rise to sampling error. The inflammation-avid radioisotope gallium-67 citrate has been used as an adjunct to biopsy improving the yield of myocarditis from 7 percent to 36 percent. Serial imaging correlates well to biopsy results. Future studies are designed to study the applicability of lymphocyte labelling techniques to myocardial inflammatory disease.

  1. Severe Hypokalemia Masquerading Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Daniel Bogdanov; Sardovski, Svetlozar Ivanov; Milanova, Maria Hristova

    2012-01-01

    An advanced degree of body potassium deficit may produce striking changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG). These changes can result in incidental findings on the 12-lead ECG or precipitate potentially life-threatening dysrhythmias. Although usually readily recognized, at times these abnormalities may be confused with myocardial ischemia. The object was to report a case of severe hypokalemia mimicking myocardial ischemia. A 33-year-old, previously healthy man, presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a progressive weakness and chest discomfort. The electrocardiogram showed a marked ST-segment depression in leads II, III, aVF, V1-V6. The initial diagnosis was non ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Echocardiography was normal and troponin levels were within normal limits. A more detailed history revealed that the patient had an episode of acute gastroenteritis with diarrhea and vomiting. Serum chemistries were notable for a potassium concentration of 1,8 mmol per liter. With aggressive electrolyte correction, the ECG abnormalities reverted as potassium levels normalized. Hypokalemia induced ST-segment depression may simulate myocardial ischemia. The differential diagnosis might be difficult, especially in the cases when ST changes are accompanied with chest discomfort.

  2. Myocardial protection in heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Mentzer, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    One of the unmet clinical needs in heart surgery is the prevention of myocardial stunning and necrosis that occurs as a result of ischemia-reperfusion. Myocardial stunning, a frequent consequence after heart surgery, is characterized by a requirement for postoperative inotropic support despite a technically satisfactory heart operation. In high-risk patients with marginal cardiac reserve, stunning is a major cause of prolonged critical care and may be associated with as much as a 5-fold increase in mortality. In contrast, the frequency of myocardial necrosis (myocardial infarction [MI]) after cardiac surgery is less appreciated and its consequences are much more subtle. The consequences may not be apparent for months to years. While we now have a much better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial stunning and MI, we still have no effective way to prevent these complications, nor a consistently effective means to engage the well-studied endogenous mechanisms of cardioprotection. The failure to develop clinically effective interventions is multifactorial and can be attributed to reliance on findings obtained from subcellular and cellular studies, to drawing conclusions from preclinical large animal studies that have been conducted in a disease-free state, and to accepting less than robust surrogate markers of injury in phase II clinical trials. These factors also explain the disappointing failure to identify effective adjuvant therapy in the setting of percutaneous coronary revascularization for acute MI (AMI) and reperfusion injury. These issues have contributed to the disappointing outcomes of large and costly phase III trials, resulting in a lack of enthusiasm on the part of the pharmaceutical industry to engage in further drug development for this indication. The purpose of this review is to (1) define the scope of the clinical problem; (2) summarize the outcomes of selected phases II and III clinical trials; and (3) identify the gap that

  3. Myocardial disarray. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, A E; Caruso, G

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial disarray or disorganisation is at present a contentious topic, not least because its value as a clinical marker for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has changed considerably over the years. Initially observed as one of the features of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, disarray has since been promoted as its pathognomonic histological feature, regarded by some observers as the morphological manifestation of a genetically transmitted myocardial defect. Recently, however, it has become evident that myocardial disarray is not limited to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but is encountered in hearts with both congenital and acquired conditions, and is also observed in normal hearts. The specificity of disarray for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is thus seriously questioned. Latterly, it has been suggested that disarray, judged from through-and-through sections of the ventricular midseptum is a highly specific and sensitive marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when considered in quantitative rather than qualitative fashion. The present study sets out to answer the question whether disarray could be the histological expression of the normal but intricate fibre architecture of the heart, a consideration also initiated by debatable definitions of normality and abnormality of myocardial histology. Gross fibre dissections in five normal hearts showed that many sites occurred in which disarray was a natural phenomenon. In five more hearts it was found that the plane of section of a tissue block might profoundly influence the histology. In fact, tissue cubicles sampled from different faces showed a change in histology in the vast majority. Thus the diagnostic significance of myocardial disarray as a marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the clinical setting almost vanishes; a change in orientation of a tissue section may actually turn "normality" into "disarray". Images PMID:7044398

  4. [Premonitory sign of myocardial rupture].

    PubMed

    Lauten, A; Dittrich, P

    1975-10-01

    It is reported on 14 cases in which a rupture of the myocardium occurred following a myocardial infarction. The moment of the appearance as well as anamnestic and clinical peculiarities are examined. As the only usable symptom of the rupture the symptomatology of the electromechanic dissociation must be taken into consideration. Finally it is referred to the on principle possible operative consequences of the rupture of the myocardium (oversewing or infarctetomy).

  5. Myocardial structure and matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Aggeli, C; Pietri, P; Felekos, I; Rautopoulos, L; Toutouzas, K; Tsiamis, E; Stefanadis, C

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes which enhance proteolysis of extracellular matrix proteins. The pathophysiologic and prognostic role of MMPs has been demonstrated in numerous studies. The present review covers a wide a range of topics with regards to MMPs structural and functional properties, as well as their role in myocardial remodeling in several cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the clinical and therapeutic implications from their assessment are highlighted.

  6. Tachyarrhythmias in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    McLean, K H; Bett, J N; Saltups, A

    1975-02-01

    In 1505 patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) serious ventricular arrhythmias were commoner in those with transmural ECG changes, and were associated with an increase in mortality and in the incidence of left ventricular failure (LVF) as well as higher peak serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Atrial fibrillation (AF) occurred more often in older patients and in those with LVF and clinical evidence of pericarditis.

  7. Functional tests for myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, J.R.; Guiney, T.E.; Boucher, C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Functional tests for myocardial ischemia are numerous. Most depend upon a combination of either exercise or pharmacologic intervention with analysis of the electrocardiogram, of regional perfusion with radionuclide imaging, or of regional wall motion with radionuclide imaging or echocardiography. While each test has unique features, especially at the research level, they are generally quite similar in clinical practice, so the clinician is advised to concentrate on one or two in which local expertise is high.22 references.

  8. [Psychiatric disorders following myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Meincke, Ulrich; Hoff, Paul

    2006-05-15

    The number of patients who survive acute myocardial infarction has increased during recent decades. In addition, demographic development results in a rising incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Based on these facts, also the significance of psychiatric disorders is growing that may occur after myocardial infarction, such as depression, posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders. Physicians are faced with the challenge to identify these clinical entities, that show a syndromal overlap with somatic complaints after myocardial infarction. After differentiation prompt start of adequate psychiatric-psychotherapeutic interventions is of relevance, not only regarding the patient's quality of life, but also in terms of cardiovascular prognosis. Indeed, depressive and anxiety disorders are known to be associated with a poor compliance as for rehabilitation and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disorders. Moreover, some studies suggest depression to be an independent risk factor of coronary heart disease. Consequently, early recognition and treatment, most often primarily in the hands of internists and cardiologists, are of enormous importance for the course and prognosis of the psychiatric disorder but also of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Myocardial Infarction in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Amelia; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Advances in pharmacological treatment and effective early myocardial revascularization have –in recent years- led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it has been suggested that compared to younger subjects, elderly AMI patients are less likely to receive evidence-based treatment, including myocardial revascularization therapy. Several reasons have been postulated to explain this trend, including uncertainty regarding the true benefits of the interventions commonly used in this setting as well as increased risk mainly associated with comorbidities. The diagnosis, management, and post-hospitalization care of elderly patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome pose many difficulties at present. A complex interplay of variables such as comorbidities, functional and socioeconomic status, side effects associated with multiple drug administration, and individual biologic variability, all contribute to creating a complex clinical scenario. In this complex setting, clinicians are often required to extrapolate evidence-based results obtained in cardiovascular trials from which older patients are often, implicitly or explicitly, excluded. This article reviews current recommendations regarding management of AMI in the elderly. PMID:22396870

  10. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  11. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  12. Myocardial bridges: Overview of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer A; Schnittger, Ingela

    2017-09-01

    A myocardial bridge is a segment of a coronary artery that travels into the myocardium instead of the normal epicardial course. Although it is general perception that myocardial bridges are normal variants, patients with myocardial bridges can present with symptoms, such as exertional chest pain, that cannot be explained by a secondary etiology. Such patients may benefit from individualized medical/surgical therapy. This article describes the prevalence, clinical presentation, classification, evaluation, and management of children and adults with symptomatic myocardial bridges. © 2017 The Authors Congenital Heart Disease published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Vectorcardiographic diagnosis of the myocardial inactivatable zone].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1989-01-01

    Clinical importance of the vectorcardiographic exploration (distant and spatial) of the myocardial electrical phenomenon is emphasized. This technique constitutes a useful integration of electrocardiographic exploration (near and analytical). The more characteristic morphological and chronological changes due to an inactivatable area are discussed in the light of ventricular myocardial depolarization. Some typical vectorcardiographic features corresponding to the presence of a myocardial inactivatable zone are presented. The utility of the complementary elements which vectorcardiography can bring to electrocardiography is emphasized. Both of these procedures integrate a rational exploration of electrical activity of the myocardium, the solid base of prognostic and therapeutic decisions in cases of myocardial infarction.

  14. Arrhythmias in Post-Myocardial Infarction Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Myocardial Infarction; Coronary Artery Disease; Arrythmia; ECG Electrical Alternans; Atrioventricular Block; Atrial Fibrillation; Atrial Flutter; Ventricular Tachycardia; Ventricular Fibrillation; Ventricular Arrythmia

  15. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostopoulos, C.; Cerqueira, M.; Ell, P. J.; Flint, E. J.; Harbinson, M.; Kelion, A. D.; Al-Mohammad, A.; Prvulovich, E. M.; Shaw, L. J.; Tweddel, A. C.

    2003-01-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  16. Clinical value of delayed thallium-201 myocardial imaging in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    McKillop, J H; Turner, J G; Gray, H W; Bessent, R G; Greig, W R

    1978-01-01

    Fifty patients with acute chest pain had thallium-201 myocardial imaging performed three to six days after emergency admission to hospital. The image was abnormal in 20 out of 22 patients with acute transmural myocardial infarcts but in only 1 of 5 with acute subendocardial infarcts. Indistinguishable scan abnormalities caused by old infarcts were seen in 7 patients, and caused by myocardial ischaemia in 1 patient. A single thallium-201 myocardial scan some days after the onset of symptoms appears to be of little value in the clinical assessment of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. Images PMID:687488

  17. Prophylactic lidocaine for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Anand, Vidhu; Bangdiwala, Shrikant

    2015-08-21

    Coronary artery disease is a major public health problem affecting both developed and developing countries. Acute coronary syndromes include unstable angina and myocardial infarction with or without ST-segment elevation (electrocardiogram sector is higher than baseline). Ventricular arrhythmia after myocardial infarction is associated with high risk of mortality. The evidence is out of date, and considerable uncertainty remains about the effects of prophylactic use of lidocaine on all-cause mortality, in particular, in patients with suspected myocardial infarction. To determine the clinical effectiveness and safety of prophylactic lidocaine in preventing death among people with myocardial infarction. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 13 April 2015), EMBASE (1947 to 13 April 2015) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1986 to 13 April 2015). We also searched Web of Science (1970 to 13 April 2013) and handsearched the reference lists of included papers. We applied no language restriction in the search. We included randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of prophylactic lidocaine for myocardial infarction. We considered all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality and overall survival at 30 days after myocardial infarction as primary outcomes. We performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and measured statistical heterogeneity using I(2). We used a random-effects model and conducted trial sequential analysis. We identified 37 randomised controlled trials involving 11,948 participants. These trials compared lidocaine versus placebo or no intervention, disopyramide, mexiletine, tocainide, propafenone, amiodarone, dimethylammonium chloride, aprindine and pirmenol. Overall, trials were underpowered and had high risk of bias. Ninety-seven per cent of trials (36

  18. Myocardial contusion in patients with blunt chest trauma as evaluated by thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, L.; Rouby, J.J.; Viars, P.

    1988-07-01

    Fifty five patients suffering from blunt chest trauma were studied to assess the diagnosis of myocardial contusion using thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy. Thirty-eight patients had consistent scintigraphic defects and were considered to have a myocardial contusion. All patients with scintigraphic defects had paroxysmal arrhythmias and/or ECG abnormalities. Of 38 patients, 32 had localized ST-T segment abnormalities; 29, ST-T segment abnormalities suggesting involvement of the same cardiac area as scintigraphic defects; 21, echocardiographic abnormalities. Sixteen patients had segmental hypokinesia involving the same cardiac area as the scintigraphic defects. Fifteen patients had clinical signs suggestive of myocardial contusion and scintigraphic defects. Almost 70 percent of patients with blunt chest trauma had scintigraphic defects related to areas of myocardial contusion. When thallium 201 myocardial scintigraphy directly showed myocardial lesion, two-dimensional echocardiography and standard ECG detected related functional consequences of cardiac trauma.

  19. Technetium myocardial perfusion agents: an introduction

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Kozlowski, J.; Tumeh, S.S.; Holman, B.L.

    1987-09-01

    This is the third in a series of four Continuing Education articles on developing radiopharmaceuticals. After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1) understand the basic concepts of myocardial perfusion imaging; and 2) discuss the advantages of the technetium myocardial perfusion complexes over thallium-201.

  20. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines.

  1. Solar activity and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, E; Mergentaler, J; Kotlarek-Haus, S; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, M; Kucharczyk, J; Janus, W

    1983-01-01

    The correlation between the incidence of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, the solar activity and geomagnetism in the period 1969-1976 was studied, basing on Wrocław hospitals material registered according to WHO standards; sudden death was assumed when a person died within 24 hours after the onset of the disease. The highest number of infarctions and sudden deaths was detected for 1975, which coincided with the lowest solar activity, and the lowest one for the years 1969-1970 coinciding with the highest solar activity. Such an inverse, statistically significant correlation was not found to exist between the studied biological phenomena and geomagnetism.

  2. Risk stratification after myocardial infarction. Clinical overview

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, R.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Many patients with an acute myocardial infarction can be stratified into subgroups that are at high risk for morbidity and mortality on the basis of clinical characteristics that indicate recurrent myocardial ischemia, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and/or recurrent cardiac arrhythmias. In patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction the assessment of symptoms, physical findings, and ECG changes during predischarge exercise testing often identifies patients at increased risk for further cardiac events. Because of the suboptimum sensitivity and specificity of the exercise ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia, myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl and/or assessment of global and segmental ventricular function by two-dimensional echocardiography or radionuclide cineangiography during or immediately after exercise are often added to the predischarge risk stratification.

  3. Taxonomy of segmental myocardial systolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDiarmid, Adam K.; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Cleland, John G.

    2017-01-01

    The terms used to describe different states of myocardial health and disease are poorly defined. Imprecision and inconsistency in nomenclature can lead to difficulty in interpreting and applying trial outcomes to clinical practice. In particular, the terms ‘viable’ and ‘hibernating’ are commonly applied interchangeably and incorrectly to myocardium that exhibits chronic contractile dysfunction in patients with ischaemic heart disease. The range of inherent differences amongst imaging modalities used to define myocardial health and disease add further challenges to consistent definitions. The results of several large trials have led to renewed discussion about the classification of dysfunctional myocardial segments. This article aims to describe the diverse myocardial pathologies that may affect the myocardium in ischaemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy, and how they may be assessed with non-invasive imaging techniques in order to provide a taxonomy of myocardial dysfunction. PMID:27147609

  4. Left ventricular diastolic function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thune, Jens Jakob; Solomon, Scott D

    2006-12-01

    An acute myocardial infarction causes a loss of contractile fibers which reduces systolic function. Parallel to the effect on systolic function, a myocardial infarction also impacts diastolic function, but this relationship is not as well understood. The two physiologic phases of diastole, active relaxation and passive filling, are both influenced by myocardial ischemia and infarction. Active relaxation is delayed following a myocardial infarction, whereas left ventricular stiffness changes depending on the extent of infarction and remodeling. Interstitial edema and fibrosis cause an increase in wall stiffness which is counteracted by dilation. The effect on diastolic function is correlated to an increased incidence of adverse outcomes. Moreover, patients with comorbid conditions that are associated with worse diastolic function tend to have more adverse outcomes after infarction. There are currently no treatments aimed specifically at treating diastolic dysfunction following a myocardial infarction, but several new drugs, including aldosterone antagonists, may offer promise.

  5. Parametric display of myocardial function.

    PubMed

    Eusemann, C D; Ritman, E L; Bellemann, M E; Robb, R A

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of regional heart motion has significant potential to provide more specific diagnosis of cardiac disease and cardiac malfunction than currently possible. Local heart motion may be captured from various medical imaging scanners. In this study, 3-D reconstructions of pre-infarct and post-infarct hearts were obtained from the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR)[Ritman EL, Robb RA, Harris LD. Imaging physiological functions: experience with DSR. Philadelphia: Praeger, 1985; Robb RA, Lent AH, Gilbert BK, Chu A. The dynamic spatial reconstructor: a computed tomography system for high-speed simultaneous scanning of multiple cross sections of the heart. J Med Syst 1980;4(2):253-88; Jorgensen SM, Whitlock SV, Thomas PJ, Roessler RW, Ritman EL. The dynamic spatial reconstructor: a high speed, stop action, 3-D, digital radiographic imager of moving internal organs and blood. Proceedings of SPIE, Ultrahigh- and High-speed Photography, Videography, Photonics, and Velocimetry 1990;1346:180-91.] (DSR). Using functional parametric mapping of disturbances in regional contractility and relaxation, regional myocardial motion during a cardiac cycle is color mapped onto a deformable heart model to facilitate appreciation of the structure-to-function relationships in the myocardium, such as occurs in regional patterns of akinesis or dyskinesis associated with myocardial ischemia or infarction resulting from coronary artery occlusion.

  6. Mechanics of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium: effects of acute and chronic myocardial edema.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketaki V; Laine, Glen A; Stewart, Randolph H; Cox, Charles S; Quick, Christopher M; Allen, Steven J; Fischer, Uwe M

    2008-06-01

    Myocardial interstitial edema forms as a result of several disease states and clinical interventions. Acute myocardial interstitial edema is associated with compromised systolic and diastolic cardiac function and increased stiffness of the left ventricular chamber. Formation of chronic myocardial interstitial edema results in deposition of interstitial collagen, which causes interstitial fibrosis. To assess the effect of myocardial interstitial edema on the mechanical properties of the left ventricle and the myocardial interstitium, we induced acute and chronic interstitial edema in dogs. Acute myocardial edema was generated by coronary sinus pressure elevation, while chronic myocardial edema was generated by chronic pulmonary artery banding. The pressure-volume relationships of the left ventricular myocardial interstitium and left ventricular chamber for control animals were compared with acutely and chronically edematous animals. Collagen content of nonedematous and chronically edematous animals was also compared. Generating acute myocardial interstitial edema resulted in decreased left ventricular chamber compliance compared with nonedematous animals. With chronic edema, the primary form of collagen changed from type I to III. Left ventricular chamber compliance in animals made chronically edematous was significantly higher than nonedematous animals. The change in primary collagen type secondary to chronic left ventricular myocardial interstitial edema provides direct evidence for structural remodeling. The resulting functional adaptation allows the chronically edematous heart to maintain left ventricular chamber compliance when challenged with acute edema, thus preserving cardiac function over a wide range of interstitial fluid pressures.

  7. Direct Evidence that Myocardial Insulin Resistance following Myocardial Ischemia Contributes to Post-Ischemic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Feng; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chengfeng; Yang, Weidong; Gao, Chao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yan; Cui, Qin; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Wang, Jing; Quon, Michael J; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A close link between heart failure (HF) and systemic insulin resistance has been well documented, whereas myocardial insulin resistance and its association with HF are inadequately investigated. This study aims to determine the role of myocardial insulin resistance in ischemic HF and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) developed progressive left ventricular dilation with dysfunction and HF at 4 wk post-MI. Of note, myocardial insulin sensitivity was decreased as early as 1 wk after MI, which was accompanied by increased production of myocardial TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF-α in heart mimicked impaired insulin signaling and cardiac dysfunction leading to HF observed after MI. Treatment of rats with a specific TNF-α inhibitor improved myocardial insulin signaling post-MI. Insulin treatment given immediately following MI suppressed myocardial TNF-α production and improved cardiac insulin sensitivity and opposed cardiac dysfunction/remodeling. Moreover, tamoxifen-induced cardiomyocyte-specific insulin receptor knockout mice exhibited aggravated post-ischemic ventricular remodeling and dysfunction compared with controls. In conclusion, MI induces myocardial insulin resistance (without systemic insulin resistance) mediated partly by ischemia-induced myocardial TNF-α overproduction and promotes the development of HF. Our findings underscore the direct and essential role of myocardial insulin signaling in protection against post-ischemic HF. PMID:26659007

  8. Relation between the kinetics of thallium-201 in myocardial scintigraphy and myocardial metabolism in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, H; Akioka, K; Takagi, M; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J; Ochi, H

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the relations between myocardial metabolism and the kinetics of thallium-201 in myocardial scintigraphy.
Methods—46 patients within six weeks after the onset of acute myocardial infarction underwent resting myocardial dual isotope, single acquisition, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using radioiodinated 15-iodophenyl 3-methyl pentadecaenoic acid (BMIPP) and thallium-201, exercise thallium-201 SPECT, and positron emission tomography (PET) using nitrogen-13 ammonia (NH3) and [F18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) under fasting conditions. The left ventricle was divided into nine segments, and the severity of defects was assessed visually.
Results—In the resting SPECT, less BMIPP uptake than thallium-201 uptake was observed in all of 40 segments with reverse redistribution of thallium-201, and in 21 of 88 segments with a fixed defect of thallium-201 (p < 0.0001); and more FDG uptake than NH3 uptake (NH3-FDG mismatch) was observed in 35 of 40 segments with reverse redistribution and in 38 of 88 segments with fixed defect (p < 0.0001). Less BMIPP uptake in the resting SPECT was observed in 49 of 54 segments with slow stress redistribution in exercise SPECT, and in nine of 17 segments with rapid stress redistribution (p < 0.0005); NH3-FDG mismatch was observed in 42 of 54 segments with slow stress redistribution and in five of 17 segments with rapid stress redistribution (p < 0.0005).
Conclusions—Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy provides information about not only myocardial perfusion and viability but also about myocardial metabolism in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

 Keywords: thallium-201 SPECT;  BMIPP SPECT;  FDG PET;  myocardial infarction;  redistribution PMID:9764055

  9. Lymphangiogenesis in myocardial remodelling after infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Y; Akishima-Fukasawa, Y; Ito, K; Akasaka, Y; Tanaka, M; Shimokawa, R; Kimura-Matsumoto, M; Morita, H; Sato, S; Kamata, I; Ishii, T

    2007-01-01

    Ishikawa Y, Akishima-Fukasawa Y, Ito K, Akasaka Y, Tanaka M, Shimokawa R, Kimura-Matsumoto M, Morita H, Sato S, Kamata I & Ishii T (2007) Histopathology51, 345–353 Lymphangiogenesis in myocardial remodelling after infarction Aims The lymphatic system is involved in fluid homeostasis of the cardiac interstitium, but lymphangiogenesis in myocardial remodelling has not previously been examined histopathologically. The aim was to investigate by D2-40 immunohistochemistry the sequential changes in lymphatic distribution in the process of myocardial remodelling after myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results Myocardial tissues in various phases of healing after MI were obtained from 40 autopsied hearts. D2-40+ lymphatic vessel density (LD) and CD34+ blood vessel density (BD) in the lesion were determined. BD decreased with advance of myocardial necrosis, subsequently increased at the early stage of granulation and thereafter decreased with the progression of scar formation. In contrast, lymphatic vessels were not detected in lesions with coagulation necrosis, and newly formed lymphatics first appeared in the early stages of granulation. A subsequent increase in LD was demonstrated in the late stages of granulation, and lymphatics remained up to the scar phase. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C was consistently expressed in viable cardiomyocytes around the lesion in all of these stages. Conclusion In myocardial remodelling after MI, lymphangiogenesis lags behind blood vessel angiogenesis; newly formed lymphatics may be involved mainly in the maturation of fibrosis and scar formation through the drainage of excessive proteins and fluid. PMID:17727476

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for characterizing myocardial diseases.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Liu, Hui; Liang, Chang-Hong; Wilson, Mark W

    2017-03-31

    The National Institute of Health defined cardiomyopathy as diseases of the heart muscle. These myocardial diseases have different etiology, structure and treatment. This review highlights the key imaging features of different myocardial diseases. It provides information on myocardial structure/orientation, perfusion, function and viability in diseases related to cardiomyopathy. The standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences can reveal insight on left ventricular (LV) mass, volumes and regional contractile function in all types of cardiomyopathy diseases. Contrast enhanced MRI sequences allow visualization of different infarct patterns and sizes. Enhancement of myocardial inflammation and infarct (location, transmurality and pattern) on contrast enhanced MRI have been used to highlight the key differences in myocardial diseases, predict recovery of function and healing. The common feature in many forms of cardiomyopathy is the presence of diffuse-fibrosis. Currently, imaging sequences generating the most interest in cardiomyopathy include myocardial strain analysis, tissue mapping (T1, T2, T2*) and extracellular volume (ECV) estimation techniques. MRI sequences have the potential to decode the etiology by showing various patterns of infarct and diffuse fibrosis in myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy due to aortic stenosis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension. Integrated PET/MRI system may add in the future more information for the diagnosis and progression of cardiomyopathy diseases. With the promise of high spatial/temporal resolution and 3D coverage, MRI will be an indispensible tool in diagnosis and monitoring the benefits of new therapies designed to treat myocardial diseases.

  11. Use of thallium 201 myocardial imaging to exclude myocardial infarction after dissection in congenital coarctation of the aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Halon, D.A.; Weiss, A.T.; Tzivoni, D.; Atlan, H.; Gotsman, M.S.

    1981-10-01

    The use of a mobile gamma camera with thallium 201 myocardial imaging is described to exclude myocardial infarction in a patient admitted to the coronary care unit in shock and with clinical, enzyme, and ECG changes consistent with infarction. The patient suffered from acute aortic dissection associated with congenital coarctation of the aorta. The myocardial scan excluded transmural myocardial injury.

  12. [Myocardial ischemia and ventricular arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Vester, E G

    1998-01-01

    A relation between myocardial ischemia and induction of ventricular arrhythmias can be demonstrated in patients with coronary heart disease--in contrast to patients with primary non ischemic cardiac diseases--using a combined metabolic-electrophysiological investigation protocol consisting of programmed atrial and ventricular stimulation with simultaneous measurement of the arterio/coronary venous difference for lactate, pyruvate, free fatty acids and amino acids. There are significant metabolic distinctions between both ischemic and non ischemic heart disease under pacing stress conditions as well as at rest. Areas of "hibernating myocardium" resp. "mismatch" zones in the myocardium showing reduced or abolished perfusion and preserved metabolism during scintographic SPECT/PET studies, may be found more often in patients with ventricular tachycardias (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the chronic post myocardial infarction state than in patients without VT/VF. The proof of such zones may be considered a possible risk factor for arrhythmic events and sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction. Hereby the concept of an interaction between acute and chronic ischemia triggering the onset of polymorphic VT or VF gaines increasing acceptance. In contrast, monomorphic reentrant VT are usually generated in the border zone of scarred areas where islands of vital fibers are surrounded by fibrotic tissue. These arrhythmogenic origin regions are characterized by a "match" pattern presenting a comparably severe reduction of perfusion and metabolism. Under those circumstances a control resp. suppression of the VT focus can only be provided by interventional techniques like catheter ablation, antitachycardiac surgery or implantation of a cardioverter/defibrillator beyond antiarrhythmic drug therapy. An antiischemic causal treatment (bypass surgery or angioplasty) represents for maximal 40% of patients with ischemically induced ventricular arrhythmias an adequate and

  13. [Percutaneous myocardial laser revascularization (PMR)].

    PubMed

    Lauer, B; Stahl, F; Bratanow, S; Schuler, G

    2000-09-01

    In patients with severe angina pectoris due to coronary artery disease, who are not candidates for either percutaneous coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery, transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) often leads to improvement of clinical symptoms and increased exercise capacity. One drawback of TMR is the need for surgical thoracotomy in order to gain access to the epicardial surface of the heart. Therefore, a catheter-based system has been developed, which allows creation of laser channels into the myocardium from the left ventricular cavity. Between January 1997 and November 1999, this "percutaneous myocardial laser revascularization" (PMR) has been performed in 101 patients at the Herzzentrum Leipzig. In 63 patients, only 1 region of the heart (anterior, lateral, inferior or septal) was treated with PMR, in 38 patients 2 or 3 regions were treated in 1 session. There were 12.3 +/- 4.5 (range 4 to 22) channels/region created into the myocardium. After 3 months, the majority of patients reported significant improvement of clinical symptoms (CCS class at baseline: 3.3 +/- 0.4, after 6 months: 1.6 +/- 0.8) (p < 0.001) and an increased exercise capacity (baseline: 397 +/- 125 s, after 6 months: 540 +/- 190 s) (p < 0.05). After 2 years, the majority of patients had experienced sustained clinical benefit after PMR, the CCS class after 2 years was 1.3 +/- 0.7, exercise capacity was 500 +/- 193 s. However, thallium scintigraphy failed to show increased perfusion in the PMR treated regions. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of myocardial laser revascularization is not yet understood. Most of the laser channels are found occluded after various time intervals after intervention. Other possible mechanisms include myocardial denervation or angioneogenesis after laser revascularization, however, unequivocal evidence for these theories is not yet available. In conclusion, PMR seems to be a safe and feasible new therapeutic option for patients with refractory

  14. Experimental myocardial ischemia. Pt. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Serur, J.R.; Als, A.V.; Paulin, S.

    1982-01-01

    The comparative effects of meglumine sodium diatrizoate (MSD), sodium meglumine calcium metrizoate (SMCM), and metrizamide (M) were studied in an isolated canine heart preparation. The parameters observed were coronary blood flow (CBF), myocardial contractile force (MCF), positive and negative dF/dt, and perfusion pressure during normal and ischemic perfusion conditions. MSD had an initial negative inotropic effect but baseline MCF returned in 1 min during normal perfusion and 2 min under ischemic conditions. SMCM and M had only a positive inotropic effect under normal perfusion. However, during ischemia, the positive effect of SMCM was followed by a decrease in contractile force. M showed only a positive effect on force during ischemia. Our results indicate that calcium additive may increase the risk of coronary arteriography in patients with severe coronary artery disease.

  15. [Circadian rhythm in myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Enciso, R; Ramos, M A; Badui, E; Hurtado, R

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine if the beginning of the Myocardial Infarction (MI) is at random along the day or if it follows a circadian rhythm, we analyzed the clinical charts of 819 patients admitted to the Coronary Care Unite. Among them, 645 were male and 174 female. It was established that the beginning of the MI follows a circadian rhythm with maximal frequency between 8 and 9 a.m. and minimal at 0 hours (p greater than 0.01). This rhythm is sex independent. In patients younger than 45 years as well as those who received beta-block agents in less than 24 hours previous the MI no circadian rhythm was observed.

  16. [Ventricular "remodeling" after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, A; Himbert, D; Guéret, P; Gourgon, R

    1991-06-01

    Cardiac failure is the principal medium-term complication of myocardial infarction. Changes in left ventricular geometry are observed after infarction, called ventricular remodeling, which, though compensatory initially, cause ventricular failure in the long-term. Experimental and clinical studies suggest that early treatment by coronary recanalisation, trinitrin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may prevent or limit the expansion and left ventricular dilatation after infarction, so improving ventricular function, and, at least in the animal, reduce mortality. Large scale trials with converting enzyme inhibitors are currently under way to determine the effects of this new therapeutic option. It would seem possible at present, independently of any reduction in the size of the infarction, to reduce or delay left ventricular dysfunction by interfering with the natural process of dilatation and ventricular modeling after infarction.

  17. [Indications for percutaneous myocardial revascularization].

    PubMed

    Sganzerla, Paolo; Centonze, Fabrizio; Tavasci, Emanuela

    2012-10-01

    Indications and timing of myocardial revascularization procedures are discussed based on the case of a 78-year-old woman suffering from effort angina due to three-vessel coronary artery disease with normal left ventricular function. At present, atherosclerotic patients have a relatively long history of their disease, so that physicians should organize therapeutic strategies resulting from a right trade-off between guidelines of international scientific societies and the peculiar clinical requirements of the individual patient in the particular stage of his/her disease. This kind of tailored therapy may result from a multidisciplinary approach (heart team), which should involve many specialists as comorbidities and frailty of the patients are numerous and significant.

  18. Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction by Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI); Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS); ST Elevation (STEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Reperfusion Injury; Non-ST Elevation (NSTEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Angina, Unstable

  19. Nanog expression in heart tissues induced by acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huanhuan; Li, Qiong; Pramanik, Jogen; Luo, Jiankai; Guo, Zhikun

    2014-10-01

    Nanog is a potential stem cell marker and is considered a regeneration factor during tissue repair. In the present study, we investigated expression patterns of nanog in the rat heart after acute myocardial infarction by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Our results show that nanog at both mRNA and protein levels is positively expressed in myocardial cells, fibroblasts and small round cells in different myocardial zones at different stages after myocardial infarction, showing a spatio-temporal and dynamic change. After myocardial infarction, the nanog expression in fibroblasts and small round cells in the infarcted zone (IZ) is much stronger than that in the margin zone (MZ) and remote infarcted zone (RIZ). From day 7 after myocardial infarction, the fibroblasts and small cells strongly expressed nanog protein in the IZ, and a few myocardial cells in the MZ and the RIZ and the numbers of nanog-positive fibroblasts and small cells reached the highest peak at 21 days after myocardial infarction, but in this period the number of nanog-positive myocardial cells decreased gradually. At 28 days after myocardial infarction, the numbers of all nanog-positive cells decreased into a low level. Therefore, our data suggest that all myocardial cells, fibroblasts and small round cells are involved in myocardial reconstruction after cardiac infarction. The nanog-positive myocardial cells may respond to early myocardial repair, and the nanog-positive fibroblasts and small round cells are the main source for myocardial reconstruction after cardiac infarction.

  20. Treatment and outcomes of type 2 myocardial infarction and myocardial injury compared with type 1 myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Nathaniel R; Subramanyam, Pritha; Gianos, Eugenia; Reynolds, Harmony R; Shah, Binita; Sedlis, Steven P

    2017-07-25

    Type 2 myocardial infarction (MI) is defined by a rise and fall of cardiac biomarkers and evidence of ischemia without unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) because of a mismatch in myocardial oxygen supply and demand. Myocardial injury is similar but does not fulfill the clinical criteria for MI. There is uncertainty in terms of the clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of type 2 MI and myocardial injury in comparison with type 1 MI. Patients admitted to a Veterans Affairs tertiary care hospital with a rise and fall in cardiac troponin were identified. MI and injury subtypes, presentation, management, and outcomes were determined. Type 1 MI, type 2 MI, and myocardial injury occurred in 137, 146, and 175 patients, respectively. Patients with type 2 MI were older (P=0.02), had lower peak cardiac troponin (P<0.001), and were less likely to receive aspirin and statin at discharge (P<0.001) than type 1 MI survivors. All-cause mortality (median follow-up: 1.8 years) was not different between patient groups (type 1 MI mortality: 29.9%, type 2 MI: 30.8%, myocardial injury: 29.7%; log rank P=0.94). A significant proportion of deaths were attributed to cardiovascular causes in all subgroups (type 1 MI: 34.1%, type 2 MI: 17.8%, myocardial injury: 30.8%). Patients with type 2 MI and myocardial injury were less likely to receive medical therapy for CAD than those with type 1 MI. No differences in all-cause mortality among MI subtypes were observed. Additional studies to determine optimal medical therapy and risk stratification strategies for these high-risk populations are warranted.

  1. Ethanol-induced myocardial ischemia: close relation between blood acetaldehyde level and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Abe, H; Hisanou, R

    1993-05-01

    A patient with vasospastic angina who developed myocardial ischemia following ethanol ingestion but not after exercise was described. Myocardial ischemia was evidenced by electrocardiograms (ECGs) and thallium-201 scintigrams. The blood acetaldehyde level after ethanol ingestion was abnormally high. The time course and severity of myocardial ischemia coincided with those of the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde level. Coronary arteriography showed ergonovine maleate-induced coronary vasospasm at the left anterior descending coronary artery. ECG changes similar to those induced by ethanol ingestion were observed at the same time. These findings suggest that the high blood acetaldehyde level might be responsible for the development of coronary vasospasm and myocardial ischemia in this patient.

  2. Physiology and pharmacology of myocardial preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Perioperative myocardial ischemia and infarction are not only major sources of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgery but also important causes of prolonged hospital stay and resource utilization. Ischemic and pharmacological preconditioning and postconditioning have been known for more than two decades to provide protection against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion and limit myocardial infarct size in many experimental animal models, as well as in clinical studies (1-3). This paper will review the physiology and pharmacology of ischemic and drug-induced preconditioning and postconditioning of the myocardium with special emphasis on the mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics provide myocardial protection. Insights gained from animal and clinical studies will be presented and reviewed and recommendations for the use of perioperative anesthetics and medications will be given.

  3. [Stem cell perspectives in myocardial infarctions].

    PubMed

    Aceves, José Luis; Archundia, Abel; Díaz, Guillermo; Páez, Araceli; Masso, Felipe; Alvarado, Martha; López, Manuel; Aceves, Rocío; Ixcamparij, Carlos; Puente, Adriana; Vilchis, Rafael; Montaño, Luis Felipe

    2005-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of congestive heart failure and death in industrializated countries. The cellular cardiomyoplasty has emerged as an alternative treatment in the regeneration of infarted myocardial tissue. In animals' models, different cellular lines such as cardiomyocites, skeletal myoblasts, embryonic stem cells and adult mesenchymal stem cells have been used, resulting in an improvement in ventricular function and decrease in amount of infarcted tissue. The first three cells lines have disvantages as they are allogenics and are difficult to obtain. The adult mesenchymal stem cells are autologous and can be obtained throught the aspiration of bone marrow or from peripherical circulation, after stimulating with cytokines (G-CSF). The implantation in humans with recent and old myocardial infarction have shown improvements similar to those shown in animal models. These findings encourage the continued investigation in the mechanism of cellular differentiation and implantation methods in infarcted myocardial tissue.

  4. Bone marrow cells and myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Trester, Cathy

    2004-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) plasticity and its clinical application have been studied profoundly in the past few years. Recent investigations indicate that HSC and other bone marrow stem cells can develop into other tissues. Because of the high morbidity and mortality of myocardial infarction and other heart disorders, myocardial regeneration is a good example of the clinical application of HSC plasticity in regenerative medicine. Preclinical studies in animals suggest that the use of this kind of treatment can reconstruct heart blood vessels, muscle, and function. Some clinical study results have been reported in the past 2 years. In 2003, reports of myocardial regeneration treatment increased significantly. Other studies include observations on the cell surface markers of transplanted cells and treatment efficacy. Some investigations, such as HSC testing, have focused on clinical applications using HSC plasticity and bone marrow transplantation to treat different types of disorders. In this review, we focus on the clinical application of bone marrow cells for myocardial regeneration.

  5. [The new universal definition of myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Hod, Hanoch; Halon, David; Hammerman, Haim; Hasdai, David; Zahger, Doron; Lewis, Basil; Mosseri, Morris; Atar, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    Given the considerable advances in recent years in myocardial infarction diagnosis and management, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association (AHA), together with the World Heart Federation [WHF] recently published an expert consensus document to establish a universal definition for myocardial infarction. The consensus document recognizes five separate myocardial infarction categories based on the differences in pathophysiology, and whether percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is involved. The new consensus document expands the criteria for defining myocardial infarction by adding new ECG criteria and imaging modalities, and also includes patients who present with sudden death. The Israel Heart Society has adopted the new universal definition and recommends its use by clinicians, researchers and epidemiologists. .

  6. Exosomes and cardiac repair after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Susmita; Losordo, Douglas W

    2014-01-17

    Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of death among all cardiovascular diseases. The analysis of molecular mechanisms by which the ischemic myocardium initiates repair and remodeling indicates that secreted soluble factors are key players in communication to local and distant tissues, such as bone marrow. Recently, actively secreted membrane vesicles, including exosomes, are being recognized as new candidates with important roles in intercellular and tissue-level communication. In this review, we critically examine the emerging role of exosomes in local and distant microcommunication mechanisms after myocardial infarction. A comprehensive understanding of the role of exosomes in cardiac repair after myocardial infarction could bridge a major gap in knowledge of the repair mechanism after myocardial injury.

  7. Myocardial damage after inhalation of chloramines.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Castro, Alejandro; Holanda, Maria Soledad; Canas, Borja S; Morlote, Jesús G; Minambres, Eduardo; Prieto Solis, José A

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this case report was to document a rare case of myocardial damage, in the context of an accidental inhalation of chloramines, demonstrated by electrocardiogram and myocardium-specific enzymes.

  8. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  9. The ubiquitin proteasome system and myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Calise, Justine

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been the subject of intensive research over the past 20 years to define its role in normal physiology and in pathophysiology. Many of these studies have focused in on the cardiovascular system and have determined that the UPS becomes dysfunctional in several pathologies such as familial and idiopathic cardiomyopathies, atherosclerosis, and myocardial ischemia. This review presents a synopsis of the literature as it relates to the role of the UPS in myocardial ischemia. Studies have shown that the UPS is dysfunctional during myocardial ischemia, and recent studies have shed some light on possible mechanisms. Other studies have defined a role for the UPS in ischemic preconditioning which is best associated with myocardial ischemia and is thus presented here. Very recent studies have started to define roles for specific proteasome subunits and components of the ubiquitination machinery in various aspects of myocardial ischemia. Lastly, despite the evidence linking myocardial ischemia and proteasome dysfunction, there are continuing suggestions that proteasome inhibitors may be useful to mitigate ischemic injury. This review presents the rationale behind this and discusses both supportive and nonsupportive studies and presents possible future directions that may help in clarifying this controversy. PMID:23220331

  10. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size.

  11. Novel adjunctive treatments of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Pryds, Kasper; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is a major cause of death and disability worldwide and myocardial infarct size is a major determinant of prognosis. Early and successful restoration of myocardial reperfusion following an ischemic event is the most effective strategy to reduce final infarct size and improve clinical outcome, but reperfusion may induce further myocardial damage itself. Development of adjunctive therapies to limit myocardial reperfusion injury beyond opening of the coronary artery gains increasing attention. A vast number of experimental studies have shown cardioprotective effects of ischemic and pharmacological conditioning, but despite decades of research, the translation into clinical effects has been challenging. Recently published clinical studies, however, prompt optimism as novel techniques allow for improved clinical applicability. Cyclosporine A, the GLP-1 analogue exenatide and rapid cooling by endovascular infusion of cold saline all reduce infarct size and may confer clinical benefit for patients admitted with acute myocardial infarcts. Equally promising, three follow-up studies of the effect of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) show clinical prognostic benefit in patients undergoing coronary surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The discovery that RIC can be performed noninvasively using a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm to induce brief episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion has facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical arena. This review focus on novel advances in adjunctive therapies in relation to acute and elective coronary procedures. PMID:24976915

  12. Effect of eating on thallium myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.A.; Sullivan, P.J.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Morris, C.; Pohost, G.M.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-02-01

    To determine if eating between initial and delayed thallium images alters the appearance of the delayed thallium scan, a prospective study was performed; 184 subjects sent for routine thallium imaging were randomized into two groups, those who ate a meal high in carbohydrates between initial and delayed thallium myocardial images (n = 106), and those who fasted (n = 78). The /sup 201/Tl images were interpreted in blinded fashion for global myocardial and pulmonary clearance of /sup 201/Tl myocardial defects. The eating group had a significantly lower incidence of transient myocardial defects compared to the noneating group (7 percent vs 18 percent, respectively; p less than 0.05). The time between initial and delayed images and the incidence of exercise-induced ischemic ST-segment depression or pathologic Q waves on the electrocardiogram were not significantly different between the two groups. These data suggest that eating a high-carbohydrate meal between initial and delayed /sup 201/Tl images causes increased /sup 201/Tl myocardial clearance rates and may alter /sup 201/Tl myocardial redistribution over time.

  13. Lymphangiogenesis in myocardial remodelling after infarction.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Akishima-Fukasawa, Y; Ito, K; Akasaka, Y; Tanaka, M; Shimokawa, R; Kimura-Matsumoto, M; Morita, H; Sato, S; Kamata, I; Ishii, T

    2007-09-01

    The lymphatic system is involved in fluid homeostasis of the cardiac interstitium, but lymphangiogenesis in myocardial remodelling has not previously been examined histopathologically. The aim was to investigate by D2-40 immunohistochemistry the sequential changes in lymphatic distribution in the process of myocardial remodelling after myocardial infarction (MI). Myocardial tissues in various phases of healing after MI were obtained from 40 autopsied hearts. D2-40+ lymphatic vessel density (LD) and CD34+ blood vessel density (BD) in the lesion were determined. BD decreased with advance of myocardial necrosis, subsequently increased at the early stage of granulation and thereafter decreased with the progression of scar formation. In contrast, lymphatic vessels were not detected in lesions with coagulation necrosis, and newly formed lymphatics first appeared in the early stages of granulation. A subsequent increase in LD was demonstrated in the late stages of granulation, and lymphatics remained up to the scar phase. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C was consistently expressed in viable cardiomyocytes around the lesion in all of these stages. In myocardial remodelling after MI, lymphangiogenesis lags behind blood vessel angiogenesis; newly formed lymphatics may be involved mainly in the maturation of fibrosis and scar formation through the drainage of excessive proteins and fluid.

  14. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, P.; Kuhl, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step towards simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size. PMID:26583449

  15. Motion-induced alterations in 2-deoxyglucose uptake in brainstem nuclei of squirrel monkeys: autoradiographic and liquid scintillation studies.

    PubMed

    Brizzee, K R; Dunlap, W P

    1983-01-01

    Each of 8 young adult female squirrel monkeys were injected via a femoral vein cannula with 167 microCi/100 g body weight of 2-(1,2-3H)-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) (New England Nuclear, 37.3 Ci/mmol) in 0.5 ml sterile saline. 4 additional female squirrel monkeys were injected in the same manner with 100 microCi/100 g body weight of the (3H)-2-DG. 2 h after this initial injection the original 8 animals were injected with 16.7 microCi/100 g body weight of 2-(1-14C)-deoxy-D-glucose (51.3 mCi/mmol) in 0.5 ml sterile saline. The 4 additional animals were injected with 25 microCi/100 g body weight of the (14C)-2-DG. Half of the animals each dose level were restrained in the upright position with Velcro straps and a nontraumatic moulded plastic head holder on a modified animal restraint board [Withrow and Devine, 1972] with the head in the sagittal plane but tilted forward about 20 degrees. They were then subjected to horizontal rotary motion at 25 rpm together with a vertical movement of 6 inches at 0.5 Hz for 1 h in a lighted room. The other half of the animals at each dose were restrained in the same manner and maintained in a quiescent state. At the end of this period each animal was anesthetized with ketamine, and the brain was quickly dissected out and frozen in isopentane cooled to -60 degrees C with dry ice. Transverse cryostat sections (-15 degrees C) of the brainstem were cut alternately at 200 and 20 microns from the nucleus gracilis caudally through the superior vestibular nucleus rostrally. Micropunch samples of the individual vestibular nuclei, and other brainstem nuclei and areas were obtained from the 200-microns sections with a modification of the method of Eik-Nes and Brizzee with a small stainless steel punch measuring 850 microns in diameter. The frozen punch samples were prepared for liquid scintillation counting (Beckman LS7500 system). Differential (3H) and (14C) counts (cpm) were made employing external standards. The 20-microns sections were prepared for 14C autoradiography by standard methods employing Kodak SB-5 X-ray film. The (14C) autoradiographs from the motion-stimulated animals revealed a selectively high uptake of 2-DG in all of the vestibular nuclei, the lateral cuneate nucleus and the lateral reticular nucleus as compared with the corresponding structures in the control animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  16. Clinically determined type of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose uptake as an alternative prognostic marker in resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jae Uk; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Mijin; Kang, Chang Moo; Lee, Woo Jung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between clinical PET (positron emission tomography) type and oncologic outcome in resectable pancreatic cancer. Methods Between January 2008 and October 2012, patients who underwent potentially curative resection for resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma without neoadjuvant treatment were retrospectively investigated. Clinical PET type was defined as follows: pancreatic cancer with similar 18FDG uptake to renal calyx was determined as kidney-type (K-type), and relatively lower 18FDG uptake than that of renal calyx was regarded as Non-K type. Results A total of 53 patients were enrolled. After agreement-based reclassification, agreement based K-type (aK-type) was noted in 34 patients (64.2%), and agreement based Non-K type (aNon K-type) was found in 19 patients (35.8%). There was a significant difference between aK-type and aNon K-type pancreatic cancer (tumor size (P = 0.030), adjusted CA 19–9 (P = 0.007), maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax,P<0.001), metabolic tumor volume (MTV2.5, P<0.001), total lesion glycolysis (TLG, P<0.001)). K-type pancreatic cancer (n = 31) showed a significantly shorter disease-free time compared with Non-K type (n = 16) (10.8 vs. 24.1 months, P = 0.013). It was also noted that aK-type showed inferior disease-free survival to that of aNon-K type pancreatic cancer (11.9 vs. 28.6 months, P = 0.012). Conclusions Clinical PET type is a reliable clinical marker to estimate aggressive tumor biology and can be utilized in predicting tumor recurrence and necessity for postoperative chemotherapy. PMID:28235029

  17. Abnormal Myocardial Function Is Related to Myocardial Steatosis and Diffuse Myocardial Fibrosis in HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Thiara, Diana K; Liu, Chia Ying; Raman, Fabio; Mangat, Sabrina; Purdy, Julia B; Duarte, Horacio A; Schmidt, Nancyanne; Hur, Jamie; Sibley, Christopher T; Bluemke, David A; Hadigan, Colleen

    2015-11-15

    Impaired cardiac function persists in the era of effective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy, although the etiology is unclear. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure intramyocardial lipid levels and fibrosis as possible contributors to HIV-associated myocardial dysfunction. A cross-sectional study of 95 HIV-infected and 30 matched-healthy adults, without known cardiovascular disease (CVD) was completed. Intramyocardial lipid levels, myocardial fibrosis, and cardiac function (measured on the basis of strain) were quantified by MRI. Systolic function was significantly decreased in HIV-infected subjects as compared to controls (mean radial strain [±SD], 21.7 ± 8.6% vs 30.5 ± 14.2%; P = .004). Intramyocardial lipid level and fibrosis index were both increased in HIV-infected subjects as compared to controls (P ≤ .04 for both) and correlated with the degree of myocardial dysfunction measured by strain parameters. Intramyocardial lipid levels correlated positively with antiretroviral therapy duration and visceral adiposity. Further, impaired myocardial function was strongly correlated with increased monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels (r = 0.396, P = .0002) and lipopolysaccharide binding protein levels (r = 0.25, P = .02). HIV-infected adults have reduced myocardial function as compared to controls in the absence of known CVD. Decreased cardiac function was associated with abnormal myocardial tissue composition characterized by increased lipid levels and diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Metabolic alterations related to antiretroviral therapy and chronic inflammation may be important targets for optimizing long-term cardiovascular health in HIV-infected individuals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial perfusion and viability in assessment of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.S.; Kiat, H.; Maddahi, J.; Shah, P.K.

    1989-07-18

    Technical advances in radionuclide imaging have important implications for the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Single-photon emission computerized tomography with thallium 201 (TI-201) offers greater accuracy than planar imaging in detecting, localizing and sizing myocardial perfusion defects. Use of single-photon emission computerized tomography with TI-201 should allow for a more accurate assessment of prognosis after myocardial infarction. A new radiopharmaceutical, technetium 99-m methoxyisobutyl isonitrile, provides a number of advantages over TI-201, including higher quality images, lack of redistribution, and the ability to assess first-pass ventricular function. Applications of TI-201 and technetium 99-m methoxyisobutyl isonitrile include assessment of arterial patency and myocardial salvage immediately after thrombolytic therapy, detection of resting ischemia after thrombolytic therapy, targeting of subsets of patients for further intervention, and predischarge assessment to predict the future course of patients after an acute myocardial infarction.

  19. Incidence of acute myocardial infarction in patients with exercise-induced silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Assey, M.E.; Walters, G.L.; Hendrix, G.H.; Carabello, B.A.; Usher, B.W.; Spann, J.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    Fifty-five patients with angiographically proved coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent Bruce protocol exercise stress testing with thallium-201 imaging. Twenty-seven patients (group I) showed myocardial hypoperfusion without angina pectoris during stress, which normalized at rest, and 28 patients (group II) had a similar pattern of reversible myocardial hypoperfusion but also had angina during stress. Patients were followed for at least 30 months. Six patients in group I had an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), 3 of whom died, and only 1 patient in group II had an AMI (p = 0.05), and did not die. Silent myocardial ischemia uncovered during exercise stress thallium testing may predispose to subsequent AMI. The presence of silent myocardial ischemia identified in this manner is of prognostic value, independent of angiographic variables such as extent of CAD and left ventricular ejection fraction.

  20. Molecular genetics of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Nishida, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is an important clinical problem because of its large contribution to mortality. The main causal and treatable risk factors for MI include hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. In addition to these risk factors, recent studies have shown the importance of genetic factors and interactions between multiple genes and environmental factors. Disease prevention is an important strategy for reducing the overall burden of MI, with the identification of markers for disease risk being key both for risk prediction and for potential intervention to lower the chance of future events. Although genetic linkage analyses of families and sib-pairs as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have implicated several loci and candidate genes in predisposition to coronary heart disease (CHD) or MI, the genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility to these conditions remain to be identified definitively. In this review, we summarize both candidate loci for CHD or MI identified by linkage analyses and candidate genes examined by association studies. We also review in more detail studies that have revealed the association with MI or CHD of polymorphisms in MTHFR, LPL, and APOE by the candidate gene approach and those in LTA and at chromosomal region 9p21.3 by genome-wide scans. Such studies may provide insight into the function of implicated genes as well as into the role of genetic factors in the development of CHD and MI. PMID:18704761

  1. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dworrak, Birgit; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro; Buck, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 60 years, echocardiography has emerged as a dominant and indispensable technique for the detection and assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, we will describe and discuss this powerful tool of cardiology, especially in the hands of an experienced user, with a focus on myocardial ischemia. Technical development is still on-going, and various new ultrasound techniques have been established in the field of echocardiography in the last several years, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), contrast echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE), and speckle tracking echocardiography (i.e., strain/strain rate-echocardiography). High-end equipment with harmonic imaging, high frame rates and the opportunity to adjust mechanical indices has improved imaging quality. Like all new techniques, these techniques must first be subjected to comprehensive scientific assessment, and appropriate training that accounts for physical and physiological limits should be provided. These limits will constantly be redefined as echocardiographic techniques continue to change, which will present new challenges for the further development of ultrasound technology. PMID:27500160

  2. [Occupational stress and myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Silla M

    2015-01-01

    Besides the best-known role of depressed mood, occupational stress deserves to be taken as a coronary risk factor. There are two basic models to define occupational stress: Karasek's model (high job psychological demands associated with low decision latitude, or even low social support at work) and Siegrist's model (imbalance between efforts and rewards received). The combination of the two models better reflects the coronary risk than each model alone. Occupational stress appears both as a risk factor and a prognostic factor after the occurrence of myocardial infarction. The relevance of the models is best in men or in younger age subjects. In women, role conflicts (occupational/domestic), the existence of excessive "intrinsic" efforts (job over investment) and association with marital stress provide more specific information. Burnout, particularly among health professionals, and bullying at work are also linked to cardiovascular risk. Occupational stress is a collective indicator of health at work, valuable to the employer. At an individual level, it can lead to therapeutic preventive approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. 52 Genetic Loci Influencing Myocardial Mass

    PubMed Central

    van der Harst, Pim; van Setten, Jessica; Verweij, Niek; Vogler, Georg; Franke, Lude; Maurano, Matthew T.; Wang, Xinchen; Leach, Irene Mateo; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Hayward, Caroline; Sorice, Rossella; Meirelles, Osorio; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Polašek, Ozren; Tanaka, Toshiko; Arking, Dan E.; Ulivi, Sheila; Trompet, Stella; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Dörr, Marcus; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Magnani, Jared W.; Fabiola Del Greco, M.; Zhang, Weihua; Nolte, Ilja M.; Silva, Claudia T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tragante, Vinicius; Esko, Tõnu; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Andersen, Karl; Barnett, Phil; Bis, Joshua C.; Bodmer, Rolf; Buckley, Brendan M.; Campbell, Harry; Cannon, Megan V.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Lin Y.; Delitala, Alessandro; Devereux, Richard B.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Haugen, Eric; Heinig, Matthias; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hillege, Hans L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hubner, Norbert; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Iorio, Annamaria; Kähönen, Mika; Kellis, Manolis; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kors, Jan A.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lage, Kasper; Launer, Lenore J.; Levy, Daniel; Lundby, Alicia; Macfarlane, Peter W.; May, Dalit; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Nappo, Stefania; Naitza, Silvia; Neph, Shane; Nord, Alex S.; Nutile, Teresa; Okin, Peter M.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Oostra, Ben A.; Penninger, Josef M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pers, Tune H.; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pinto, Yigal M.; Pfeufer, Arne; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prins, Bram P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rice, Ken M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schafer, Sebastian; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Silljé, Herman H.W.; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Sinner, Moritz F.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Spiering, Wilko; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Trinh, Bosco; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Visscher, Peter M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Weichenberger, Christian X.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.; Yang, Jian; Bezzina, Connie R.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Snieder, Harold; Wright, Alan F.; Rudan, Igor; Boyer, Laurie A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ciullo, Marina; Sanna, Serena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Wilson, James F.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Alonso, Alvaro; Gasparini, Paolo; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kääb, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Felix, Stephan B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Hicks, Andrew A.; Chambers, John C.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Visel, Axel; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Isaacs, Aaron; Samani, Nilesh J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Myocardial mass is a key determinant of cardiac muscle function and hypertrophy. Myocardial depolarization leading to cardiac muscle contraction is reflected by the amplitude and duration of the QRS complex on the electrocardiogram (ECG). Abnormal QRS amplitude or duration reflect changes in myocardial mass and conduction, and are associated with increased risk of heart failure and death. OBJECTIVES This meta-analysis sought to gain insights into the genetic determinants of myocardial mass. METHODS We carried out a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 4 QRS traits in up to 73,518 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. RESULTS We identified 52 genomic loci, of which 32 are novel, that are reliably associated with 1 or more QRS phenotypes at p < 1 × 10−8. These loci are enriched in regions of open chromatin, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding, suggesting that they represent regions of the genome that are actively transcribed in the human heart. Pathway analyses provided evidence that these loci play a role in cardiac hypertrophy. We further highlighted 67 candidate genes at the identified loci that are preferentially expressed in cardiac tissue and associated with cardiac abnormalities in Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. We validated the regulatory function of a novel variant in the SCN5A/SCN10A locus in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, our findings provide new insights into genes and biological pathways controlling myocardial mass and may help identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27659466

  4. Biochemical assessment of acute myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cárceles, M D; Osuna, E; Vieira, D N; Martínez, A; Luna, A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the efficacy of biochemical parameters in different fluids in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction of different causes, analysed after death. METHODS--The myoglobin concentration and total creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) activities were measured in serum, pericardial fluid, and vitreous humour from seven diagnostic groups of cadavers classified according to the severity of myocardial ischaemia and cause of death. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and myosin were measured only in serum and pericardial fluid, and cathepsin D only in pericardial fluid. Routine haematoxylin and eosin and acridine orange staining were used for microscopy studies of heart tissue. RESULTS--In pericardial fluid there were substantial differences between the different groups with respect to CK, CK-MB, and LDH activities and myosin concentrations. The highest values were found in cases with morphological evidence of myocardial ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Biochemical parameters, which reach the pericardial fluid via passive diffusion and ultrafiltration due to a pressure gradient, were thus detectable in this fluid earlier than in serum in cases with myocardial ischaemia. These biochemical parameters may be of use for ruling out myocardial ischaemia in those controversial cases in which reliable morphological findings are lacking. PMID:7745110

  5. Meta-Analysis of Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-06

    Coronary Disease; Echocardiography; Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial; Hemodynamics; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Myocardial Perfusion Imaging; Perfusion; Predictive Value of Tests; Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography; Positron Emission Tomography; Multidetector Computed Tomography; Echocardiography, Stress; Coronary Angiography

  6. Myocardial factor revisited: The importance of myocardial fibrosis in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Craig S; Burchill, Luke J

    2015-06-15

    Pioneers in congenital heart surgery observed that exercise capacity did not return to normal levels despite successful surgical repair, leading some to cite a "myocardial factor" playing a role. They conjectured that residual alterations in myocardial function would be significant for patients' long-term outlook. In fulfillment of their early observations, today's adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population shows well-recognized features of heart failure, even among patients without clear residual anatomic or hemodynamic abnormalities, demonstrating the vital role of the myocardium in their morbidity and mortality. Whereas the 'myocardial factor' was an elusive concept in the early history of congenital heart care, we now have imaging techniques to detect and quantify one such factor--myocardial fibrosis. Understanding the importance of myocardial fibrosis as a final common pathway in a variety of congenital lesions provides a framework for both the study and treatment of clinical heart failure in this context. While typical heart failure pharmacology should reduce or attenuate fibrogenesis, efforts to show meaningful improvements with standard pharmacotherapy in ACHD repeatedly fall short. This paper considers the importance of myocardial fibrosis and function, the current body of evidence for myocardial fibrosis in ACHD, and its implications for research and treatment.

  7. Role of myocardial perfusion imaging in evaluating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    Myocardial thallium-201 scintigraphy is being increasingly employed as a method for assessing the efficacy of coronary reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction. New thallium uptake after intracoronary tracer administration after successful recanalization indicates that nutrient blood flow has been successfully restored. One may also presume that some myocardial salvage occurred if thallium administered in this manner is transported intracellularly by myocytes with intact sarcolemmal membranes. However, if one injects thallium by way of the intracoronary route immediately after reperfusion, the initial uptake of thallium in reperfused myocardium may predominantly represent hyperemic flow and regional thallium counts measured may not be proportional to the mass of viable myocytes. When thallium is injected intravenously during the occlusion phase the degree of redistribution after thrombolysis is proportional to the degree of flow restoration and myocardial viability. When thallium is injected for the first time intravenously immediately after reperfusion, an overestimation of myocardial salvage may occur because of excess thallium uptake in the infarct zone consequent to significant hyperemia. Another approach to myocardial thallium scintigraphy in patients undergoing thrombolytic therapy is to administer two separate intravenous injections before and 24 hours or later after treatment. Finally, patients with acute myocardial infarction who receive intravenous thrombolytic therapy are candidates for predischarge exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy for risk stratification and detection of residual ischemia.

  8. Spontaneous changes in /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion imaging after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Buda, A.J.; Dubbin, J.D.; MacDonald, I.L.; Strauss, H.D.; Orr, S.A.; Meindok, H.

    1982-12-01

    To examine regional myocardial perfusion after myocardial infarction, 26 patients underwent exercise electrocardiographic testing with /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion imaging 3 weeks and 3 months after infarction. At 3 weeks, 9 of 26 patients (35%) had myocardial ischemia by exercise electrocardiographic testing, whereas 18 of 26 (69%) had ischemia by /sup 201/Tl imaging. The /sup 201/Tl scintigrams were scored by dividing each image, in 3 views, into 5 segments, using a 5-point scoring scheme. The exercise /sup 201/Tl score was 44.3 +/- 1.2 and increased to 47.3 +/- 1.2 in the redistribution study (p less than 0.001). Three months after infarction, although there was a significantly greater rate-pressure product which would predict a larger ischemic defect and a decrease in the stress /sup 201/Tl score, the stress score was improved (48.3 +/- 1.1, p less than 0.001). The redistribution score was similar, that is, 48.9 +/- 1.0. The improvement in /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion was associated with a loss of stress-induced ischemia in 8 patients (30%). These results indicate that spontaneous improvements in /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion imaging may occur after myocardial infarction.

  9. Panic attack triggering myocardial ischemia documented by myocardial perfusion imaging study. A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chest pain, a key element in the investigation of coronary artery disease is often regarded as a benign prognosis when present in panic attacks. However, panic disorder has been suggested as an independent risk factor for long-term prognosis of cardiovascular diseases and a trigger of acute myocardial infarction. Objective Faced with the extreme importance in differentiate from ischemic to non-ischemic chest pain, we report a case of panic attack induced by inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide triggering myocardial ischemia, documented by myocardial perfusion imaging study. Discussion Panic attack is undoubtedly a strong component of mental stress. Patients with coronary artery disease may present myocardial ischemia in mental stress response by two ways: an increase in coronary vasomotor tone or a sympathetic hyperactivity leading to a rise in myocardial oxygen consumption. Coronary artery spasm was presumed to be present in cases of cardiac ischemia linked to panic disorder. Possibly the carbon dioxide challenge test could trigger myocardial ischemia by the same mechanisms. Conclusion The use of mental stress has been suggested as an alternative method for myocardial ischemia investigation. Based on translational medicine objectives the use of CO2 challenge followed by Sestamibi SPECT could be a useful method to allow improved application of research-based knowledge to the medical field, specifically at the interface of PD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22999016

  10. Morphine Does Not Affect Myocardial Salvage in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Bin; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Jang, Woo Jin; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Ahn, Joonghyun; Carriere, Keumhee Chough; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed intravenous (IV) morphine is associated with delayed action of antiplatelet agents in acute myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether morphine results in increased myocardial damage in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We investigated myocardial salvage index (MSI) to determine whether IV morphine affects myocardial injury adversely in STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI. 299 STEMI patients underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging a median of 3 days after PCI. Infarct size was measured on delayed-enhancement imaging, and area at risk was quantified on T2-weighted imaging. MSI was calculated as ‘[area at risk–infarct size] X 100 / area at risk’. IV morphine was administrated in 32.1% of patients. Patients treated with morphine had shorter symptom to balloon time and higher prevalence of Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 0 or 1. The morphine group showed a trend toward larger MSI and infarct size and significantly greater area at risk than the non-morphine group. After propensity score matching (90 pairs), MSI was similar between the morphine and non-morphine group (46.1% versus 43.5%, P = .11), and infarct size and area at risk showed no difference. In propensity score-matched analysis, IV morphine prior to primary PCI in STEMI patients did not cause adverse impacts on myocardial salvage. PMID:28081269

  11. Depression increases sympathetic activity and exacerbates myocardial remodeling after myocardial infarction: evidence from an animal experiment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shaobo; Liang, Jinjun; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Xiaoran; Ruan, Bing; Sun, Lifang; Tang, Yanhong; Yang, Bo; Hu, Dan; Huang, Congxin

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Excessive sympathetic activation and serious myocardial remodeling may contribute to this association. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of depression on sympathetic activity and myocardial remodeling after MI. Wild-type (WT) rats were divided into a sham group (Sham), a myocardial infarction group (MI), a depression group (D), and a myocardial infarction plus depression group (MI+D). Compared with controls, the MI+D animals displayed depression-like behaviors and attenuated body weight gain. The evaluation of sympathetic activity showed an increased level in plasma concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine and higher expression of myocardial tyrosine hydroxylase in the MI+D group than the control groups (p<0.05 for all). Cardiac function and morphologic analyses revealed a decreased fractional shortening accompanied by increased left ventricular dimensions, thinning myocardium wall, and reduced collagen repair in the MI+D group compared with the MI group (p<0.05 for all). Frequent premature ventricular contractions, prolonged QT duration and ventricular repolarization duration, shorted effective refractory period, and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmia were displayed in MI+D rats. These results indicate that sympathetic hyperactivation and exacerbated myocardial remodeling may be a plausible mechanism linking depression to an adverse prognosis after MI.

  12. Myocardial Factor Revisited: The Importance of Myocardial Fibrosis in Adults with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, Craig S.; Burchill, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    Pioneers in congenital heart surgery observed that exercise capacity did not return to normal levels despite successful surgical repair, leading some to cite a “myocardial factor” playing a role. They conjectured that residual alterations in myocardial function would be significant for patients’ long-term outlook. In fulfillment of their early observations, today’s adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population shows well-recognized features of heart failure, even among patients without clear residual anatomic or hemodynamic abnormalities, demonstrating the vital role of the myocardium in their morbidity and mortality. Whereas the ‘myocardial factor’ was an elusive concept in the early history of congenital heart care, we now have imaging techniques to detect and quantify one such factor – myocardial fibrosis. Understanding the importance of myocardial fibrosis as a final common pathway in a variety of congenital lesions provides a framework for both the study and treatment of clinical heart failure in this context. While typical heart failure pharmacology should reduce or attenuate fibrogenesis, efforts to show meaningful improvements with standard pharmacotherapy in ACHD repeatedly fall short. This paper considers the importance of myocardial fibrosis and function, the current body of evidence for myocardial fibrosis in ACHD, and its implications for research and treatment. PMID:25897907

  13. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described.

  14. Coincidence of cerebrovascular accident and silent myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Badui, E; Estañol, B; Garcia-Rubi, D

    1982-11-01

    Although it is well known that a myocardial and a cerebral infarction may be coincident, the nature of this association is not clear. The problem is further complicated because the myocardial infarction may be silent. This is a report of 3 patients with cerebral infarct in whom a silent recent myocardial infarction was found. All patients with cerebrovascular disease should be screened for a possible myocardial lesion.

  15. Iloprost reduces myocardial edema in a rat model of myocardial ischemia reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, A; Yavuz, C; Karahan, O; Yazici, S; Guclu, O; Demirtas, S; Mavitas, B

    2014-05-01

    Myocardial ischemia severely reduces myocyte longevity and function. Extensive interstitial edema and cell damage occur as a result of myocardial reperfusion injury. Current therapies are directed at prevention of ischemia-induced damage to cardiac tissue. Iloprost is a novel pharmaceutical agent for the treatment of ischemia. Twenty rats were segregated into four experimental groups. The procedure control group consisted of four rats undergoing a sham operation. The remaining 16 rats were divided into two equal groups. The first group (control group) received a continuous intravenous infusion of physiological serum immediately prior to the procedure. Iloprost was administered by a continuous intravenous infusion into the right jugular vein at an infusion rate of 100 ng/kg/min for 30 minutes prior to reperfusion in the experimental group (study group). Following the infusion treatments, ligation of the left coronary artery was conducted for 30 minutes to induce myocardial ischemia. The rats were euthanized 24 hours after reperfusion and cardiac tissue was harvested from all specimens for analysis. Histological examination revealed three myocardial tissue specimens with grade II damage and five myocardial tissue specimens with grade III reperfusion injury in the control group. However, the study group consisted of two grade III myocardial tissue specimens, five grade II myocardial tissue specimens and one grade I myocardial tissue specimen. Moreover, a statistically significant reduction in myocardial edema was observed in the study group (p=0.022). Our results support the hypothesis that iloprost enhances protection against cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury. This protective effect may be associated with vasodilation, antioxidant or anti-edema mechanisms.

  16. Action of acetylstrophanthidin on experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, G. T.; Pope, S. E.; Harrison, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental animal model with acute myocardial infarction of a size insufficient to produce profound heart failure or shock was used to study the effects of acute infarction on digitalis tolerance and the hemodynamic changes produced by moderate and large doses of acetylstrophanthidin. With acute myocardial infarction, digitalis toxic arrhythmias could be precipitated with significantly lower doses of digitalis than in animals without myocardial infarction. There was no precise correlation between the size of infarction and the toxic dose of glycoside. Coronary artery ligation produced a stable but relatively depressed circulatory state, as evidenced by lowered cardiac output and stroke volume and elevated systemic vascular resistance and left atrial mean pressure. When digitalis was infused, the following significant changes were observed at nontoxic doses: (1) elevation of aortic and left ventricular pressures; (2) further decline in cardiac output; and (3) decreased left atrial mean pressure.

  17. Myocardial infarction in Antigua. 1990 to 1995.

    PubMed

    Martin, T C; Van Longhuyzen, H W; Amaraswamy, R; Tangutoori, R; Bennett, B

    1997-09-01

    Between January 1990 and May 1995, 117 patients were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at Holberton Hospital, Antigua, for chest pain due to suspected acute myocardial infarction. 39 (45%) of 86 patients whose records were available for retrospective review had confirmed (27 patients) or probable (12 patients) acute myocardial infarction. Risk factors identified among the patients included hypertension, diabetes, tobacco smoking, hypercholesterolaemia and obesity. On admission, 82% were Killip class I and 18% were Killip class II. Medications in the Intensive Care Unit included nitrates, aspirin, calcium channel blockers, beta-adrenergic blockers, heparin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (21%). No thrombolytic agents were available. The average hospital stay was 10 days and the in-hospital mortality rate was 13%. These data indicate that early mortality from acute myocardial infarction can be reduced in developing countries by early admission to an Intensive Care Unit and use of drugs known to be effective in its treatment.

  18. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-01-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. PMID:28591322

  19. Winter weather conditions and myocardial infarctions.

    PubMed

    Ohlson, C G; Bodin, L; Bryngelsson, I L; Helsing, M; Malmberg, L

    1991-03-01

    The daily number of cases of myocardial infarctions admitted to a hospital in middle Sweden over three winter seasons 1984-87 was correlated to the weather conditions on a day-to-day basis. The study encompassed 634 days and all cases younger than 70 years, living within the catchment area, in all 382 subjects. Information on temperature, wind force, precipitation and atmospheric pressure was obtained from the Swedish Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology. A low number of myocardial infarctions was seen on Saturdays and Sundays with a mild wind chill factor and on days with moderate snowfall and high atmospheric pressure. A high number was observed for workdays, especially Mondays, as day of diagnosis. Heterogeneity of the study population and a misclassification of the time relationships between dates of diagnosis and weather changes may have caused an underestimation of the impact of weather conditions. However, weather conditions do not seem to be a major triggering factor of myocardial infarctions in Sweden.

  20. Action of acetylstrophanthidin on experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, G. T.; Pope, S. E.; Harrison, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental animal model with acute myocardial infarction of a size insufficient to produce profound heart failure or shock was used to study the effects of acute infarction on digitalis tolerance and the hemodynamic changes produced by moderate and large doses of acetylstrophanthidin. With acute myocardial infarction, digitalis toxic arrhythmias could be precipitated with significantly lower doses of digitalis than in animals without myocardial infarction. There was no precise correlation between the size of infarction and the toxic dose of glycoside. Coronary artery ligation produced a stable but relatively depressed circulatory state, as evidenced by lowered cardiac output and stroke volume and elevated systemic vascular resistance and left atrial mean pressure. When digitalis was infused, the following significant changes were observed at nontoxic doses: (1) elevation of aortic and left ventricular pressures; (2) further decline in cardiac output; and (3) decreased left atrial mean pressure.

  1. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by Subepicardial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Philippe; Nef, Holger; Böning, Andreas; Niemann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Background Bleeding from bypass anastomosis leakage occurs early after coronary artery bypass grafting. Later, once the anastomosis is covered by intima, spontaneous bleeding is unlikely. Case Description A 63-year-old male patient developed a pseudoaneurysm-like, subepicardial late-term bleeding resulting in a hematoma that compromised coronary artery flow by increasing extracoronary pressure. This resulted in severe angina pectoris (Canadian Cardiovascular Society IV) and myocardial ischemia within the affected area. After surgical removal of the hematoma and repair of the anastomosis, the patient's symptoms disappeared and no signs of myocardial ischemia were present. Conclusion Surgical removal is an efficient therapy for subepicardial hematoma inducing myocardial ischemia. PMID:28352501

  2. Neuroendocrine activation after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, H M; Morton, J J; Leckie, B; Rumley, A; Gillen, G; Dargie, H J

    1988-01-01

    The extent of neuroendocrine activation, its time course, and relation to left ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias were investigated in 78 consecutive patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. High concentrations of arginine vasopressin were found within six hours of symptoms, even in the absence of myocardial infarction (n = 18). Plasma catecholamine concentrations also were highest on admission, whereas renin and angiotensin II concentrations rose progressively over the first three days, not only in those with heart failure but also in patients with no clinical complications. Heart failure, ventricular tachycardia, and deaths were associated with extensive myocardial infarction, low left ventricular ejection fraction, and persistently high concentrations of catecholamines, renin, and angiotensin II up to 10 days after admission, whereas in uncomplicated cases concentrations had already returned to normal. PMID:3415870

  3. [Mosaic portrait method in the prognosis of myocardial infarct complications].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, G M; Ardashev, V N; Kats, M D; Galkina, T A

    1981-06-01

    A mosaic portrait of variants of the course of myocardial infarction differing in the clinical picture of the first days of the disease was created by means of methods of Boolean algebra and electronic computers. A total of 354 patients with transmural myocardial infarction were examined., The created models allow the development of some complications of myocardial infarction to be prognosticated exact within 90%.

  4. Disappearance of myocardial bridging of the left anterior descending coronary artery after inferior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Bekir Serhat; Esin, Fatma; Alihanoğlu, Yusuf Izzettin; Kılıç, Ismail Doğu; Evrengül, Harun

    2014-06-01

    Myocardial bridging (MB) is defined as the intramural course of a major epicardial coronary artery, and is mostly confined to the left ventricle and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). MB is a common congenital abnormality of a coronary artery, and is usually thought to be a benign anatomical variant. Although rare, previous studies have reported that patients with MB may suffer from myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction (MI), arrhythmias, and even sudden death. Therefore, the diagnosis and treatment of MB are both important. Since MB is congenital, its disappearance is unlikely. We here report a very rare case of disappearance of MB after inferior MI.

  5. [Recurrent myocardial infarctions: specific changes in biomarkers and in myocardial remodeling (case-control study)].

    PubMed

    Volkova, E G; Malykhina, O P; Levashov, S Iu

    2007-01-01

    Basing on a case-control study (n=81) with the use of standard methods of myocardial infarction verification, examination of hemogram, troponin T, C-reactive protein, echocardiography data it was established that markers of myocardial infarction (troponin T level) and inflammation (C reactive protein level, lymphopenia) during recurrent infarctions are less pronounced than during first infarctions. Remodeling in recurrent infarctions had the following specific characteristics: increase of left ventricular end diastolic dimension, myocardial mass index, diastolic dysfunction and stroke volume with unchanged ejection fraction.

  6. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  7. Depressed Myocardial Contractility: Can It Be Rescued?

    PubMed

    Weber, Karl T

    2016-10-01

    Current dogma suggests patients with advanced systolic heart failure have an irreversible depression in myocardial contractility. Recent experience with improved ventricular function during continuous flow ventricular assist devices used as destination therapy would suggest otherwise. Herein, cellular and molecular signaling involved in reversing depressed myocardial contractility would be addressed. This includes cardiomyocyte thyroid hormone signaling responsible for the reexpression of fetal gene program that preserves cell efficiency (work and energy consumed) and the rescue of an endogenous population of atrophic myocytes bordering on microdomains of fibrosis to improve contractile mass. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Methylphenidate induced ST elevation acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ruwald, Martin Huth; Ruwald, Anne-Christine Huth; Tønder, Niels

    2012-03-05

    Adult attention deficit and hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD) is increasingly diagnosed and treated with methylphenidate. We present the case of an 20 year-old man, who was diagnosed with ADHD and suffered a ST elevation acute myocardial infarction due to coronary vasospasm related to an overdose, and subsequent episodes of myocardial injury due to the use and misuse of methylphenidate over a period of two years. We recommend an increased attention to the subscription of methylphenidate to patients, who are at risk of misuse and patients, who have a cardiovascular history.

  9. Myocardial Wall Tagging With Undersampled Projection Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dana C.; Epstein, Frederick H.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Azimuthally undersampled projection reconstruction (PR) acquisition is investigated for use in myocardial wall tagging with MR using grid tags to provide increased temporal and spatial resolution. PR can provide the high-resolution images required for tagging with very few projections, at the expense of artifact. Insight is provided into the PR undersampling artifact, in the context of measuring myocardial motion with tags. For Fourier transform imaging, at least 112 phase-encodings must be collected to image tagging grids spaced 7 pixels apart. PR requires about 80 projections, a 1.4-fold reduction in scan time. PMID:11283982

  10. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by a Coronary Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mustafa; Ozeren, Ali; Peksoy, Irfan; Cabuk, Mehmet; Bilge, Mehmet; Dursun, Aydin; Elbey, Mehmet Ali

    2004-01-01

    We present the case of a patient in whom a previously undetected anomalous origin of the circumflex coronary artery caused myocardial ischemia and led to positive myocardial scintigraphic results. Subsequent coronary angiography showed that the left circumflex coronary artery arose from the right coronary ostium—an anomaly that has been associated with chest discomfort—without atherosclerotic lesions. The peripheral distribution of the left circumflex artery was normal. We describe the clinical and angiographic findings in our patient and discuss the relationship between coronary artery anomalies and ischemia. PMID:15562848

  11. Aspergillus coronary embolization causing acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M; Trigg, M; de Alarcon, P; Giller, R

    1988-05-01

    An increased frequency of disseminated aspergillosis has been observed in the last decade, mostly occurring in immunocompromised patients including the bone marrow transplant population. Cardiac involvement by Aspergillus remains rare. We report the clinical and postmortem findings of an unusual case of Aspergillus pancarditis in a 7-year-old bone marrow transplant patient with Aspergillus embolization to the coronary arteries leading to a massive acute myocardial infarction. This case suggests that myocardial injury secondary to disseminated aspergillosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of chest pain in the immunocompromised pediatric patient.

  12. [Frovatriptan possibly causing acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Møller-Helgestad, Ole Kristian; Kaltoft, Anne Kjer; Kasch, Helge

    2015-03-23

    Globally migraine affects more than 10% of the adult population and it is treated with simple analgesics, combined with a triptan for a stronger treatment effect. Triptans cause arterial vasoconstriction, and this is a case report of vasospasm-induced acute myocardial infarction in a 61-year-old woman with frequent episodic migraine attacks treated with triptans. She was possibly also suffering from medication overuse headache. We suggest that regular frovatriptan use may have contributed to the myocardial infarction and that long-term triptan use may have caused the medication overuse headache.

  13. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging in myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Kadota, K.; Kambara, H.; Torizuka, K.

    1985-08-01

    TI-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was performed in six patients with clinically documented myocarditis. Each case manifested electrocardiographic abnormalities with elevation of serum cardiac enzymes and no significant stenosis of the coronary arteries observed on angiogram. Resting TI-201 images were visually assessed by three observers. Focal perfusion defects were observed in three cases (50%), among which two showed multiple perfusion defects. Emission computed tomography using TI-201 clearly delineated multifocal lesions in the first case. On the other hand, no significant perfusion defects were noted in the remaining three cases. Thus, myocarditis should be considered as one of the disease entities that may produce perfusion defects on TI-201 myocardial imaging.

  14. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  15. Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury: a neglected therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hausenloy, Derek J.; Yellon, Derek M.

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. In patients with MI, the treatment of choice for reducing acute myocardial ischemic injury and limiting MI size is timely and effective myocardial reperfusion using either thombolytic therapy or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). However, the process of reperfusion can itself induce cardiomyocyte death, known as myocardial reperfusion injury, for which there is still no effective therapy. A number of new therapeutic strategies currently under investigation for preventing myocardial reperfusion injury have the potential to improve clinical outcomes in patients with acute MI treated with PPCI. PMID:23281415

  16. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Michiel A; El-Naggar, Heba M; Boogers, Mark J; Veltman, Caroline E; Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Dijkstra, Jouke; Kroft, Lucia J; Al Younis, Imad; Reiber, Johan H; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria; Scholte, Arthur J

    2013-08-01

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 ± 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS ≥2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5%) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95% CI 2.41-24.7, p < 0.001, and OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.45, p = 0.032, respectively) after correcting for clinical variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. The addition of quantitatively assessed significant stenosis (χ(2) = 20.7) and lesion length (χ(2) = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment (χ(2) = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have incremental value

  17. Myocardial infarction and water hardness in the WHO myocardial infarction registry network

    PubMed Central

    Masironi, R.; Piša, Z.; Clayton, D.

    1979-01-01

    The negative association between water hardness and cardiovascular disease found by several authors in different countries has also been found in the present investigation. All cases of myocardial infarction were registered in a standardized way at 15 WHO Collaborating Centres in Europe; information on the hardness of drinking water used by the population studied was also collected. Higher rates of myocardial infarction were usually found in towns served by softer water. PMID:312161

  18. Myocardial infarction and water hardness in the WHO myocardial infarction registry network.

    PubMed

    Masironi, R; Pisa, Z; Clayton, D

    1979-01-01

    The negative association between water hardness and cardiovascular disease found by several authors in different countries has also been found in the present investigation. All cases of myocardial infarction were registered in a standardized way at 15 WHO Collaborating Centres in Europe; information on the hardness of drinking water used by the population studied was also collected. Higher rates of myocardial infarction were usually found in towns served by softer water.

  19. Decreased selenium levels in acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, F.J.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; de Bruijn, A.M.; Kruyssen, D.H.C.M.; de Bruin, M.; Valkenburg, H.A. )

    1989-02-24

    To study the association between selenium status and the risk of myocardial infarction, the authors compared plasma, erythrocyte, and toenail selenium levels and the activity of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase among 84 patients with acute myocardial infarction and 84 population controls. Mean concentrations of all selenium measurements were lower in cases than controls. The differences were statistically significant, except for the plasma selenium level. A positive trend in the risk of acute myocardial infarction from high to low toenail selenium levels was observed, which persisted after adjustment for other risk factors for myocardial infarction. In contrast, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher in cases than controls. Because toenail selenium level reflects blood levels up to one year before sampling, these findings suggest that a low selenium status was present before the infarction and, thus, may be of etiologic relevance. The higher glutathione peroxidase activity in the cases may be interpreted as a defense against increased oxidant stress either preceding or following the acute event.

  20. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, James A.; Emery, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    Examines three behavioral strategies in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for formal treatment for physical and psychosocial sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI): exercise therapy, Type A modification, and nonspecific psychological therapies. Concludes CR improves the quality of life among post-MI patients, but does not prolong life or significantly…

  1. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation.

  2. [Myocardial infarction after conduction electrical weapon shock].

    PubMed

    Ben Ahmed, H; Bouzouita, K; Selmi, K; Chelli, M; Mokaddem, A; Ben Ameur, Y; Boujnah, M R

    2013-04-01

    Controversy persists over the safety of conducted electrical weapons, which are increasingly used by law enforcement agencies around the world. We report a case of 33-year-old man who had an acute inferior myocardial infarction after he was shot in the chest with an electrical weapon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Hawes, Armani M.; Smith, Jacqui

    2015-01-01

    Background The main strategy for alleviating heart disease has been to target individuals and encourage them to change their health behaviors. Though important, emphasis on individuals has diverted focus and responsibility away from neighborhood characteristics, which also strongly influence people’s behaviors. Although a growing body of research has repeatedly demonstrated strong associations between neighborhood characteristics and cardiovascular health, it has typically focused on negative neighborhood characteristics. Only a few studies have examined the potential health enhancing effects of positive neighborhood characteristics, such as perceived neighborhood social cohesion. Methods Using multiple logistic regression models, we tested whether higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with lower incidence of myocardial infarction. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study—a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50—were used to analyze 5,276 participants with no history of heart disease. Respondents were tracked for four years and analyses adjusted for relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychosocial factors. Results In a model that adjusted for age, gender, race, marital status, education, and total wealth, each standard deviation increase in perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a 22% reduced odds of myocardial infarction (OR = 0.78, 95% CI, 0.63–0.94. The association between perceived neighborhood social cohesion and myocardial infarction remained even after adjusting for behavioral, biological, and psychosocial covariates. Conclusions Higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion may have a protective effect against myocardial infarction. PMID:25135074

  4. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  5. Protective approaches against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Sun, Rongrong; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is the leading cause for the events of cardiovascular disease, and is considered as a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary occlusion. The myocardial damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury constitutes the primary pathological manifestation of coronary artery disease. It results from the interaction between the substances that accumulate during ischemia and those that are delivered on reperfusion. The level of this damage can range from a small insult resulting in limited myocardial damage to a large injury culminating in myocyte death. Importantly, major ischemia-reperfusion injury to the heart can result in permanent disability or death. Given the worldwide prevalence of coronary artery disease, developing a strategy to provide cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage is of great importance. Currently, the treatment of reperfusion injury following ischemia is primarily supportive, since no specific target-oriented therapy has been validated thus far. Nevertheless, therapeutic approaches to protect against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury remain an active area of investigation given the detrimental effects of this phenomenon. PMID:28101167

  6. [Myocardial depression in the burn patient].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Martín de Jesús

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial depression and heart failure are frequent complications in critically ill burn patients. The physiopathology is complex and involves the activation of inflammatory pathways, ischemia-reperfusion, oxidative stress and endothelial lesion. Diagnosis should be made early by means of hemodynamic monitoring. Treatment is accomplished by inotropics that act on different pathways of the contractile function and immune response associated with antioxidants and allopurinol.

  7. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  8. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, James A.; Emery, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    Examines three behavioral strategies in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for formal treatment for physical and psychosocial sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI): exercise therapy, Type A modification, and nonspecific psychological therapies. Concludes CR improves the quality of life among post-MI patients, but does not prolong life or significantly…

  9. Myocardial infarction. Considerations for geriatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D.

    1994-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is common among the elderly. Presentation is often atypical, and symptoms include confusion, weakness, chest pain, dyspnea, and vomiting. Serial electrocardiograms and cardiac enzyme determination lead to diagnosis. Postmyocardial treatments include acetylsalicylic acid, beta-blockers, nitrates, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Thrombolytic agents are safe and useful. Angioplasty and cardiac surgery should be considered for certain patients. PMID:7912578

  10. Pathogenesis and Prevention of Radiation-induced Myocardial Fibrosis

    PubMed

    Liu, Li Kun; Ouyang, Weiwei; Zhao, Xing; Su, Sheng Fa; Yang, Yan; Ding, Wen Jin; Luo, Da Xian; He, Zhi Xu; Lu, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most important methods for the treatment of malignant tumors. However, in radiotherapy for thoracic tumors such as breast cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer, and mediastinal lymphoma, the heart, located in the mediastinum, is inevitably affected by the irradiation, leading to pericardial disease, myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, valvular lesions, and cardiac conduction system injury, which are considered radiation-induced heart diseases. Delayed cardiac injury especially myocardial fibrosis is more prominent, and its incidence is as high as 20–80%. Myocardial fibrosis is the final stage of radiation-induced heart diseases, and it increases the stiffness of the myocardium and decreases myocardial systolic and diastolic function, resulting in myocardial electrical physiological disorder, arrhythmia, incomplete heart function, or even sudden death. This article reviews the pathogenesis and prevention of radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis for providing references for the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis. Creative Commons Attribution License

  11. Systemic Atherosclerotic Inflammation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Myocardial Infarction Begets Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil V; Toor, Iqbal; Shah, Anoop S V; Carruthers, Kathryn; Vesey, Alex T; Alam, Shirjel R; Sills, Andrew; Hoo, Teng Y; Melville, Adam J; Langlands, Sarah P; Jenkins, William S A; Uren, Neal G; Mills, Nicholas L; Fletcher, Alison M; van Beek, Edwin J R; Rudd, James H F; Fox, Keith A A; Dweck, Marc R; Newby, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that an acute inflammatory response following myocardial infarction (MI) accelerates systemic atherosclerosis. Using combined positron emission and computed tomography, we investigated whether this phenomenon occurs in humans. Methods and Results Overall, 40 patients with MI and 40 with stable angina underwent thoracic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined positron emission and computed tomography scan. Radiotracer uptake was measured in aortic atheroma and nonvascular tissue (paraspinal muscle). In 1003 patients enrolled in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, we assessed whether infarct size predicted early (≤30 days) and late (>30 days) recurrent coronary events. Compared with patients with stable angina, patients with MI had higher aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (tissue-to-background ratio 2.15±0.30 versus 1.84±0.18, P<0.0001) and plasma C-reactive protein concentrations (6.50 [2.00 to 12.75] versus 2.00 [0.50 to 4.00] mg/dL, P=0.0005) despite having similar aortic (P=0.12) and less coronary (P=0.006) atherosclerotic burden and similar paraspinal muscular 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (P=0.52). Patients with ST-segment elevation MI had larger infarcts (peak plasma troponin 32 300 [10 200 to >50 000] versus 3800 [1000 to 9200] ng/L, P<0.0001) and greater aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (2.24±0.32 versus 2.02±0.21, P=0.03) than those with non–ST-segment elevation MI. Peak plasma troponin concentrations correlated with aortic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (r=0.43, P=0.01) and, on multivariate analysis, independently predicted early (tertile 3 versus tertile 1: relative risk 4.40 [95% CI 1.90 to 10.19], P=0.001), but not late, recurrent MI. Conclusions The presence and extent of MI is associated with increased aortic atherosclerotic inflammation and early recurrent MI. This finding supports the hypothesis that acute MI exacerbates systemic atherosclerotic inflammation and remote plaque destabilization

  12. Myocardial Tissue Doppler Velocity in Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Ha; Kim, Nam Kyun; Jung, Jo Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background In adults, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recommended component of routine echocardiography. However, TDI velocities are less accepted in pediatrics, due to their strong variability and age dependence in children. This study examines the distribution of myocardial tissue Doppler velocities in healthy children to assess the effect of age with cardiac growth on the various echocardiographic measurements. Methods Total 144 healthy children were enrolled in this study. They were recruited from the pediatric outpatient clinic for routine well-child visits. The statistical relationships between age and TDI values were analyzed. Also, the statistical relationships between body surface area (BSA) and TDI values, left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) and TDI values were analyzed. Also, we conducted multivariate analysis of cardiac growth parameters such as, age, BSA, LVEDD and TDI velocity data. Results All of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with deceleration time (DT), pressure half-time (PHT), peak early diastolic myocardial velocity, peak systolic myocardial velocity, and had negative correlations with peak late diastolic velocity (A) and the ratio of trans-mitral inflow velocity to early diastolic velocity of mitral annulus (E/E'). In the multivariate analysis, all of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with DT, PHT, and negative correlations with A and E/E'. Conclusion The cardiac growth parameters related alterations of E/E' may suggest that diastolic myocardial velocities are cardiac growth dependent, and diastolic function has positive correlation with cardiac growth in pediatric group. This cardiac growth related myocardial functional variation would be important for assessment of cardiac involvement either in healthy and sick child. PMID:27081443

  13. Relation between quantitative coronary CTA and myocardial ischemia by adenosine stress myocardial CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    van Rosendael, Alexander R; Kroft, Lucia J; Broersen, Alexander; Dijkstra, Jouke; van den Hoogen, Inge J; van Zwet, Erik W; Bax, Jeroen J; de Graaf, Michiel A; Scholte, Arthur J

    2016-02-09

    Coronary-computed tomography angiography (CTA) has limited accuracy to predict myocardial ischemia. Besides luminal area stenosis, other coronary plaque morphology and composition parameters may help to assess ischemia. With the integration of coronary CTA and adenosine stress CT myocardial perfusion (CTP), reliable information regarding coronary anatomy and function can be derived in one procedure. This analysis aimed to investigate the association between coronary stenosis severity, plaque composition and morphology and the presence of ischemia measured with adenosine stress myocardial CTP. 84 patients (age, 62 ± 10 years; 48% men) who underwent sequential coronary CTA and adenosine stress myocardial CT perfusion were analyzed. Automated quantification was performed in all coronary lesions (quantitative CTA). Downstream myocardial ischemia was assessed by visual analysis of the rest and stress CTP images and defined as a summed difference score of ≥1. One or more coronary plaques were present in 146 coronary arteries of which 31 (21%) were ischemia-related. Of the lesions with a stenosis percentage <50%, 50%-70%, and >70%, respectively, 9% (6/67), 18% (9/51), and 57% (16/28) demonstrated downstream ischemia. Furthermore, mean plaque burden, plaque volume, lesion length, maximal plaque thickness, and dense calcium volume were significantly higher in ischemia-related lesions, but only stenosis severity (%) (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.02-1.10; P = .006) and lesion length (mm) (OR 1.26; 95% CI 1.02-1.55; P = .029) were independent correlates. Increasing stenosis percentage by quantitative CTA is positively correlated to myocardial ischemia measured with adenosine stress myocardial CTP. However, stenosis percentage remains a moderate determinant. Lumen area stenosis and lesion length were independently associated with ischemia, adjusted for coronary plaque volume, mean plaque burden, maximal lesion thickness, and dense calcium volume.

  14. Type 2 myocardial infarction: the chimaera of cardiology?

    PubMed

    Collinson, Paul; Lindahl, Bertil

    2015-11-01

    The term type 2 myocardial infarction first appeared as part of the universal definition of myocardial infarction. It was introduced to cover a group of patients who had elevation of cardiac troponin but did not meet the traditional criteria for acute myocardial infarction although they were considered to have an underlying ischaemic aetiology for the myocardial damage observed. Since first inception, the term type 2 myocardial infarction has always been vague. Although attempts have been made to produce a systematic definition of what constitutes a type 2 myocardial infarction, it has been more often characterised by what it is not rather than what it is. Clinical studies that have used type 2 myocardial infarction as a diagnostic criterion have produced disparate incidence figures. The range of associated clinical conditions differs from study to study. Additionally, there are no agreed or evidence-based treatment strategies for type 2 myocardial infarction. The authors believe that the term type 2 myocardial infarction is confusing and not evidence-based. They consider that there is good reason to stop using this term and consider instead the concept of secondary myocardial injury that relates to the underlying pathophysiology of the primary clinical condition.

  15. Bivalirudin versus Heparin Monotherapy in Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Erlinge, David; Omerovic, Elmir; Fröbert, Ole; Linder, Rikard; Danielewicz, Mikael; Hamid, Mehmet; Swahn, Eva; Henareh, Loghman; Wagner, Henrik; Hårdhammar, Peter; Sjögren, Iwar; Stewart, Jason; Grimfjärd, Per; Jensen, Jens; Aasa, Mikael; Robertsson, Lotta; Lindroos, Pontus; Haupt, Jan; Wikström, Helena; Ulvenstam, Anders; Bhiladvala, Pallonji; Lindvall, Bo; Lundin, Anders; Tödt, Tim; Ioanes, Dan; Råmunddal, Truls; Kellerth, Thomas; Zagozdzon, Leszek; Götberg, Matthias; Andersson, Jonas; Angerås, Oskar; Östlund, Ollie; Lagerqvist, Bo; Held, Claes; Wallentin, Lars; Scherstén, Fredrik; Eriksson, Peter; Koul, Sasha; James, Stefan

    2017-09-21

    The comparative efficacy of various anticoagulation strategies has not been clearly established in patients with acute myocardial infarction who are undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) according to current practice, which includes the use of radial-artery access for PCI and administration of potent P2Y12 inhibitors without the planned use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. In this multicenter, randomized, registry-based, open-label clinical trial, we enrolled patients with either ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-STEMI (NSTEMI) who were undergoing PCI and receiving treatment with a potent P2Y12 inhibitor (ticagrelor, prasugrel, or cangrelor) without the planned use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. The patients were randomly assigned to receive bivalirudin or heparin during PCI, which was performed predominantly with the use of radial-artery access. The primary end point was a composite of death from any cause, myocardial infarction, or major bleeding during 180 days of follow-up. A total of 6006 patients (3005 with STEMI and 3001 with NSTEMI) were enrolled in the trial. At 180 days, a primary end-point event had occurred in 12.3% of the patients (369 of 3004) in the bivalirudin group and in 12.8% (383 of 3002) in the heparin group (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 1.10; P=0.54). The results were consistent between patients with STEMI and those with NSTEMI and across other major subgroups. Myocardial infarction occurred in 2.0% of the patients in the bivalirudin group and in 2.4% in the heparin group (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.19; P=0.33), major bleeding in 8.6% and 8.6%, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.19; P=0.98), definite stent thrombosis in 0.4% and 0.7%, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.27 to 1.10; P=0.09), and death in 2.9% and 2.8%, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.41; P=0.76). Among patients undergoing PCI for myocardial

  16. Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Sun, Kay; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Ge, Liang; Saloner, David; Wallace, Arthur W; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (T(max_B)), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (T(max_R)), and in the infarct (T(max_I)) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized T(max_B) was found to be significantly depressed relative to T(max_R), while T(max_I) was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure.

  17. Effect of Wenxin Granule on Ventricular Remodeling and Myocardial Apoptosis in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aiming; Zhai, Jianying; Zhang, Dongmei; Lou, Lixia; Zhu, Haiyan; Gao, Yonghong; Chai, Limin; Xing, Yanwei; Lv, Xiying; Zhu, Lingqun; Zhao, Mingjing; Wang, Shuoren

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the effect of a Chinese herbal compound named Wenxin Granule on ventricular remodeling and myocardial apoptosis in rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, the model group, the metoprolol group, and the Wenxin Granule group (WXKL group) with sample size (n) of 7 rats in each group. An MI model was established in all rats by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (the control group was without occlusion). Wenxin Granule (1.35 g/kg/day), metoprolol (12 mg/kg/day), and distilled water (5 mL/kg/day for the control and model groups) were administered orally for 4 weeks. Ultrasonic echocardiography was used to examine cardiac structural and functional parameters. Myocardial histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) dyeing. Myocardial apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Serum angiotensin II (Ang II) concentration was measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. It was found that Wenxin Granule could partially reverse ventricular remodeling, improve heart function, alleviate the histopathological damage, inhibit myocardial apoptosis, and reduce Ang II concentration in rats with MI. Conclusions. The results of the current study suggest that Wenxin Granule may be a potential alternative and complementary medicine for the treatment of MI. PMID:23997803

  18. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Archana; Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary.

  19. Myocardial Edema Imaging in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Michael C.; Verhaert, David; Raman, Subha V.

    2011-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) continue to be the most common morbid condition of industrialized nations. The advent of and technical improvements in revascularization and medical therapy have led to a steady decline in mortality rates. However, many patients who suffer unstable angina or myocardial infarction require further testing and risk stratification to guide therapeutic selection and prognosis assignment. Myocardial edema imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) affords the ability to define the amount of myocardium at risk, refine estimates of prognosis and provide guidance for therapies with excellent sensitivity compared to standard clinical markers. This review will discuss the rationale for edema imaging, how it is performed using CMR and its potential clinical applications. PMID:22102557

  20. Myocardial Tissue Characterization by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Piechnik, Stefan K.; Robson, Matthew D.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a well-established noninvasive imaging modality in clinical cardiology. Its unsurpassed accuracy in defining cardiac morphology and function and its ability to provide tissue characterization make it well suited for the study of patients with cardiac diseases. Late gadolinium enhancement was a major advancement in the development of tissue characterization techniques, allowing the unique ability of CMR to differentiate ischemic heart disease from nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Using T2-weighted techniques, areas of edema and inflammation can be identified in the myocardium. A new generation of myocardial mapping techniques are emerging, enabling direct quantitative assessment of myocardial tissue properties in absolute terms. This review will summarize recent developments involving T1-mapping and T2-mapping techniques and focus on the clinical applications and future potential of these evolving CMR methodologies. PMID:24576837

  1. Myocardial fibrosis in an veteran endurance athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mathew; O'Hanlon, Rory; Prasad, Sanjay; Basavarajaiah, Sandeep; Stephens, Nigel; Senior, Roxy; Shaw, Anthony; Sharma, Sanjay; Whyte, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the cardiac structure and function of a lifelong male endurance athlete, who has run over 148 000 miles, who presented with symptoms of chest discomfort, dyspnoea and loss of competitive running performance. Importantly, the athlete documented several periods of regular intensive endurance activity while suffering with flu-like symptoms. Cardiovascular MRI demonstrated a pattern of late gadolinium enhancement, which indicated myocardial scarring as a result of previous myocarditis. Myocarditis is a non-ischaemic inflammatory disease of the myocardium associated with cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmogenic substrate. The clinical course of viral myocarditis is mostly insidious with limited cardiac inflammation and dysfunction. However, as in the present case, overwhelming inflammation may occur in a subset of patients leading to myocardial fibrosis due to recurrent inflammation. PMID:21847425

  2. Myocardial tissue engineering using electrospun nanofiber composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Emerging trends for cardiac tissue engineering are focused on increasing the biocompatibility and tissue regeneration ability of artificial heart tissue by incorporating various cell sources and bioactive molecules. Although primary cardiomyocytes can be successfully implanted, clinical applications are restricted due to their low survival rates and poor proliferation. To develop successful cardiovascular tissue regeneration systems, new technologies must be introduced to improve myocardial regeneration. Electrospinning is a simple, versatile technique for fabricating nanofibers. Here, we discuss various biodegradable polymers (natural, synthetic, and combinatorial polymers) that can be used for fiber fabrication. We also describe a series of fiber modification methods that can increase cell survival, proliferation, and migration and provide supporting mechanical properties by mimicking micro-environment structures, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, the applications and types of nanofiber-based scaffolds for myocardial regeneration are described. Finally, fusion research methods combined with stem cells and scaffolds to improve biocompatibility are discussed.

  3. Painless acute myocardial infarction on Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Nasiruddin; Rajhy, Mubina; Bapumia, Mustaafa

    2016-03-17

    An individual experiencing dyspnoea or syncope at high altitude is commonly diagnosed to have high-altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis. There have been very rare cases of AMI reported only from Mount Everest. We report a case of painless ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) that occurred while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro. A 51-year-old man suffered dyspnoea and loss of consciousness near the mountain peak, at about 5600 m. At a nearby hospital, he was treated as a case of high-altitude pulmonary edema. ECG was not obtained. Two days after the incident, he presented to our institution with continued symptoms of dyspnoea, light-headedness and weakness, but no pain. He was found to have inferior wall and right ventricular STEMI complicated by complete heart block. He was successfully managed with coronary angioplasty, with good recovery. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary. PMID:26998366

  5. Spatial fluctuation of regional myocardial blood flows.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Ebata, J; Tsujioka, K; Ogasawara, Y; Kajiya, F

    1997-12-01

    Digital radiography (100 pixels/mm2) combined with the technique of 3H-labeled desmethylimipramine deposition was employed to visualize regional blood flow distributions in rabbit left ventricular myocardium. A fluctuated pattern of myocardial flow and its dependence on arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) was evaluated with the coefficient of variation (CV) computed at each step of coarse-graining; flow images were revisualized by increasing pixel area (PA) step by step from 0.01 to 1 mm2. The CV values decreased with hypoxia at all resolution levels, suggesting that there is a vascular regulatory mechanism for making myocardial perfusion uniform in response to decreased PaO2. In both perfusion states, CV decreased with increasing PA. The relationship between CV and PA fitted the noninteger power law function, implying an apparent fractality of CV.

  6. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The clinical applications of thallium-201 scintigraphy are less well defined in children than in adults. However, the published data indicate several potential applications including assessment of: 1) deficit in left ventricular myocardial perfusion, 2) early right ventricular volume or pressure overload, or both, and 3) the right ventricle in both cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease. In this report, the applications of thallium imaging to pediatric diseases are described and the advantages and disadvantages of the procedure are enumerated.

  7. Steroid-induced recurrent myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ufuk; Gulel, Okan; Soylu, Korhan; Yuksel, Serkan; Sahin, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient under oral prednisolone therapy due to a diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension with papilledema. Unfortunately, short-term treatment with prednisolone caused an unusual complication in the patient, i.e., recurrent myocardial ischemia. Possible mechanisms leading to this complication were evaluated in the light of current knowledge. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Silent myocardial infarction during hypoglycemic coma.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Varun Vijay; Dogra, Vikas; Pargal, Iesha; Singh, Navtej

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common complication of treatment of diabetes mellitus. The potential neurological complications of hypoglycemia as seizures and coma are well-recognized entities. A hypoglycemic episode is a risk factor for a patient with diabetes to have cardiovascular complications. Myocardial ischemia and infarction are known to occur in the setting of hypoglycemia. In view of the potential association of the two, the diabetic patients should undergo a routine ECG in such circumstances.

  9. Myocardial Substrate Utilization in Experimental Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-19

    conditions experimentally: (a) administration of an LD9 0 Escherichia coli endotoxin; (b) acute severe hemorrhage, (c) anaphylactic shock caused by horse...difference ± SE. ɘ. 01.epɘ . 0 5 . TABLE 6. Changes in myocardial lactate metabolism during anaphylactic shock (n=4) Chan-ge after challenge Controla 5-15...0.05 ±0.03 ’Mean ± SEM. Anaphylactic Shock This condition was evoked by a challenging dose of horse serum given intravenously to dogs that had been

  10. PICSO: from myocardial salvage to tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mohl, Werner; Gangl, Clemens; Jusić, Alem; Aschacher, Thomas; De Jonge, Martin; Rattay, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in primary percutaneous interventions (PPCI), management of microvascular obstructions in reperfused myocardial tissue remains challenging and is a high-risk procedure. This has led to renewed interest in the coronary venous system as an alternative route of access to the myocardium. This article reviews historical data describing therapeutic options via cardiac veins as well as discussing the clinical potential and limitations of a catheter intervention: pressure controlled intermittent coronary sinus occlusion (PICSO). Collected experimental and clinical information suggest that PICSO also offers the potential for tissue regeneration beyond myocardial salvage. A meta-analysis of observer controlled pICSO application in animal studies showed a dose dependent reduction in infarct size of 29.3% (p < 0.001). Additionally, a 4-fold increase of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression (p < 0.001) in the center of infarction and a 2.5 fold increase of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (p < 0.002) in border zones suggest that molecular pathways are initiating structural maintenance. Early clinical evidence confirmed significant salvage and event free survival in patients with acute myocardial infarction and risk reduction for event free survival 5 years after the acute event (p < 0.0001). This experimental and clinical evidence was recently corroborated using modern PICSO technology in PPCI showing a significant reduction of infarct size, when compared to matched controls (p < 0.04). PICSO enhances redistribution of flow towards deprived zones, clearing microvascular obstruction and leading to myocardial protection. Beyond salvage, augmentation of molecular regenerative networks suggests a second mechanism of PICSO involving the activation of vascular cells in cardiac veins, thus enhancing structural integrity and recovery.

  11. Concomitant aortic valve replacement and myocardial revascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Craver, J M; Jones, E L; Hatcher, C R; Farmer, J H

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive patients underwent combined aortic valve replacement and myocardial revascularization at the Emory University Affiliated Hospitals between May, 1973 and March, 1976. Acute myocardial infarction resulted in two operative deaths (8%). There have been four late deaths, all Class IV preoperative. The age range was 37 to 79 years with an average age of 60. Preoperatively all patients were Class IV or late Class III. Twenty-three patients had symptoms of angina pectoris; congestive heart failure was evident in 56%. Postoperatively, 70% are now Class 1 or II. Single coronary bypass was performed in 16 patients, double in 6, and triple in three. Double bypass plus mitral valve replacement was required in two with aneurysmectomy in one. The rate of intraoperative infarction was 27% for the series but only 7% in the last year. The methods of intraoperative myocardial preservation and the technical approach for the operative procedures were variable. Results with each method are correlated, and currently preferred techniques are presented and discussed. Best results were obtained in patients who presented early in their symptomatic course with isolated proximal coronary lesions and good renoff vessels. Excellent results could be achieved despite advanced age of patients, requirement for multiple bypass grafts, and correction of other associated cardiac lesions. Poorest results were obtained when long-standing ventricular failure was combined with poor vessels distal to coronary stenoses. PMID:860881

  12. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  13. Coffee consumption and myocardial infarction in women.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J R; Rosenberg, L; Rao, R S; Shapiro, S

    1995-04-15

    Whether coffee consumption increases the risk of coronary heart disease has not yet been established. In a case-control study of nonfatal myocardial infarction among Massachusetts women aged 45-69 years in 1986-1990, 858 cases with first infarctions were compared with 858 community controls matched on age and town precinct. Detailed information on coffee drinking, cigarette smoking, and other factors was obtained by telephone interview. Relative risks (as estimated by odds ratios) and their 95% confidence intervals were computed from multiple logistic regression analyses that controlled for smoking and other risk factors. The risk of myocardial infarction increased with increasing number of cups per day among both drinkers of any type of coffee and drinkers of caffeine-containing coffee only: tests for trend, p = 0.002 and p = 0.0004, respectively. For consumption of caffeine-containing coffee alone, the relative risk estimates for 5-6 cups, 7-9 cups, and 10 or more cups per day relative to less than 1 cup per day were 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-2.5), 2.1 (95% CI 0.9-4.9), and 2.5 (95% CI 1.0-6.5), respectively. No increase was observed for fewer than 5 cups per day. The positive association with heavy coffee drinking was present among nonsmokers as well as smokers. These findings and other recent studies suggest that heavy coffee consumption increases the risk of myocardial infarction.

  14. Myocardial tissue engineering: toward a bioartificial pump.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2012-03-01

    Regenerative therapies, including cell injection and bioengineered tissue transplantation, have the potential to treat severe heart failure. Direct implantation of isolated skeletal myoblasts and bone-marrow-derived cells has already been clinically performed and research on fabricating three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac grafts using tissue engineering technologies has also now been initiated. In contrast to conventional scaffold-based methods, we have proposed cell sheet-based tissue engineering, which involves stacking confluently cultured cell sheets to construct 3-D cell-dense tissues. Upon layering, individual cardiac cell sheets integrate to form a single, continuous, cell-dense tissue that resembles native cardiac tissue. The transplantation of layered cardiac cell sheets is able to repair damaged hearts. As the next step, we have attempted to promote neovascularization within bioengineered myocardial tissues to overcome the longstanding limitations of engineered tissue thickness. Finally, as a possible advanced therapy, we are now trying to fabricate functional myocardial tubes that may have a potential for circulatory support. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering technologies therefore show an enormous promise as a novel approach in the field of myocardial tissue engineering.

  15. Mechanisms of cell survival in myocardial hibernation.

    PubMed

    Depre, Christophe; Vatner, Stephen F

    2005-04-01

    Myocardial hibernation represents a condition of regional ventricular dysfunction in patients with chronic coronary artery disease, which reverses gradually after revascularization. The precise mechanism mediating the regional dysfunction is still debated. One hypothesis suggests that chronic hypoperfusion results in a self-protecting downregulation in myocardial function and metabolism to match the decreased oxygen supply. An alternative hypothesis suggests that the myocardium is subject to repetitive episodes of ischemic dysfunction resulting from an imbalance between myocardial metabolic demand and supply that eventually creates a sustained depression of contractility. It is generally agreed that hibernating myocardium is submitted repeatedly to ischemic stress, and therefore one question persists: how do myocytes survive in the setting of chronic ischemia? The hallmark of hibernating myocardium is a maintained viability of the dysfunctional myocardium which relies on an increased uptake of glucose. We propose that, in addition to this metabolic adjustment, there must be molecular switches that confer resistance to ischemia in hibernating myocardium. Such mechanisms include the activation of a genomic program of cell survival as well as autophagy. These protective mechanisms are induced by ischemia and remain activated chronically as long as either sustained or intermittent ischemia persists.

  16. Porcine (Sus scrofa) Chronic Myocardial Infarction Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-03

    Myocardial Infarction Model Development.” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI) / TRAINING COORDINATOR (TC): Lt Col. Daren Danielson DEPARTMENT: 60MSGS/SGCH...invasively, a myocardial infarction that was isolated to the mid-anterior, left ventricular wall. In doing so, we were able to create an infarct that...be used to investigate new methodologies for treatment of chronic myocardial infarction in individuals afflicted with chronic ischemic

  17. Galectin-3 and post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Wouter C; van der Velde, A Rogier; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2015-09-15

    This review summarizes the current literature regarding the involvement and the putative role(s) of galectin-3 in post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling. Post-myocardial infarction remodeling is characterized by acute loss of myocardium, which leads to structural and biomechanical changes in order to preserve cardiac function. A hallmark herein is fibrosis formation, both in the early and late phase following acute myocardial infarction. Galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which is a shared factor in fibrosis formation in multiple organs, has an established role in cardiac fibrosis in the setting of pressure overload, neuro-endocrine activation and hypertension, but its role in post- myocardial infarction remodeling has received less attention. However, accumulative experimental studies have shown that myocardial galectin-3 expression is upregulated after myocardial infarction, both on mRNA and protein level. This already occurs shortly after myocardial infarction in the infarcted and border zone area, and also at a later stage in the spared myocardium, contributing to tissue repair and fibrosis. This is associated with typical aspects of fibrosis formation, such as apposition of matricellular proteins and increased factors of collagen turnover. Interestingly, myocardial fibrosis in experimental post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling could be attenuated by galectin-3 inhibition. In clinical studies, circulating galectin-3 levels have been shown to identify patients at risk for new-onset heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Circulating galectin-3 levels also predict progressive left ventricular dilatation after myocardial infarction. From literature we conclude that galectin-3 is an active player in cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Future studies should focus on the dynamics of galectin-3 activation after myocardial infarction, and study the possibilities to target galectin-3.

  18. Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism precludes thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Kruyer, W.B.; Borchert, R.D.

    1987-02-01

    The authors attempted to perform Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in a 42-year-old man 23 and 35 days after he received 9.8 mCi of oral I-131 for documented Graves' disease. Interference from primary and scattered photons from residual thyroid I-131 made Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy technically impossible. A series of phantom and patient studies using I-131 and Tl-201 were performed, yielding guidelines for planning Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy following radioiodine therapy.

  19. Ipratropium bromide-mediated myocardial injury in in vitro models of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kate L; Hussain, Afthab; Maddock, Helen L

    2014-04-01

    Ipratropium bromide, a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, is widely prescribed for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Analyses of COPD patients, with underlying ischaemic heart disease, receiving anticholinergics, have indicated increased risk of severity and occurrence of cardiovascular events (including myocardial infarction). The present study explored whether ipratropium bromide induces myocardial injury in nonclinical models of simulated myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Adult Sprague Dawley rat hearts/primary ventricular myocytes were exposed to simulated ischaemia/hypoxia prior to administration of ipratropium at the onset of reperfusion/reoxygenation. Infarct to risk ratio and cell viability was measured via triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining and thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The involvement of apoptosis and necrosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial-associated responses were detected by tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester fluorescence and myocyte contracture. Ipratropium (1 × 10⁻¹¹ M - 1 × 10⁻⁴ M) significantly increased infarct/risk ratio and decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Increased levels of necrosis and apoptosis were observed via flow cytometry, accompanied by increased levels of cleaved caspase-3 following ipratropium treatment. Levels of endogenous myocardial acetylcholine were verified via use of an acetylcholine assay. In these experimental models, exogenous acetylcholine (1 × 10⁻⁷ M) showed protective properties, when administered alone, as well as abrogating the exacerbation of myocardial injury during ischaemia/reperfusion following ipratropium coadministration. In parallel experiments, under conditions of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion, a similar injury was observed following atropine (1 × 10⁻⁷ M) administration. These data demonstrate for the first time in a nonclinical setting that ipratropium exacerbates ischaemia

  20. Regional myocardial lidocaine concentration following continuous intravenous infusion early and later after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Zito, R.A.; Caride, V.J.; Holford, T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The regional concentration of lidocaine using a double constant infusion technique (250 micrograms/kg/min x 15 minutes followed by 35 micrograms/kg/mg/min x 120 minutes) was studied immediately (2 hours) in seven dogs and 24 hours (six dogs) after myocardial infarction. Tissue levels were determined by gas chromatography and related to regional myocardial blood flow as determined by the radioactive microsphere technique in multiple samples. At 2 hours after infarction a significantly higher lidocaine concentration (4.1 +/- 0.42 micrograms/g) was found in zones with greatly reduced blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that (2.6 +/- 0.19 micrograms/g) in zones with normal blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow greater than 0.8 ml/min per g) (p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the 24 hour model the opposite situation was observed. Although the concentration of lidocaine in the infarct zone was substantial, a significant decline in lidocaine tissue concentration was found in the zones of lowest blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that in normal zones (1.76 +/- 0.21 versus 3.38 +/- 0.21 micrograms/g, p less than 0.001). In addition, no significant differences in lidocaine concentrations were found between endocardium and epicardium in any of the groups other than those related to regional myocardial blood flow. Thus, with the double constant infusion technique, lidocaine reached normal and ischemic myocardium in concentrations equivalent to therapeutic plasma concentrations, even in lower infarct blood flow zones, with no significant differences between endocardium and epicardium. Of perhaps greater significance, the age of the ischemic insult is an important determinant of lidocaine tissue distribution in infarcted myocardium.

  1. Internal countershock produces myocardial damage and lactate production without myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gaba, D.M.; Maxwell, M.S.; Merlone, S.; Smith, C.

    1987-04-01

    The global myocardial extraction of lactate was measured in 13 halothane anesthetized dogs to assess the effect of electric countershock applied directly to the heart. Seven animals received two countershocks of 30 delivered joules each, while six animals were not shocked but were atrially paced to a rate of 190-200, both with and without occlusion of the vena cava to produce a mean arterial pressure of 40-50 mmHg. All animals had substantially positive lactate extraction in the baseline state (36 +/- 10% for countershock group vs. 41 +/- 3% for pacing group). Myocardial lactate extraction reached a markedly negative nadir 2.5 min after countershock (-19 +/- 15%), but returned toward normal by 6 min (10 +/- 6%). Lactate extraction was not significantly changed from baseline in the pacing group. The relationship between changes in regional myocardial blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) and post-countershock myocardial damage (technetium pyrophosphate uptake) was assessed in six dogs shocked as above. Mean myocardial blood flow was increased minimally immediately after countershock (0.78 +/- 0.08 ml X min-1 X g-1 vs. 1.16 +/- 0.3), but there was no difference in blood flow between damaged and undamaged tissue at either time point. The epicardial-to-endocardial ratio of blood flow was unchanged after countershock (0.97 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.99 +/- 0.08). There was no relationship between myocardial damage and either the absolute amount of blood flow after countershock (r = -0.03) or the change in blood flow compared with the pre-shock period (r = 0.01).

  2. Depressive symptoms are associated with mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38-60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress.

  3. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. Methods We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38–60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. Results There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Conclusion Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress. PMID:25061993

  4. Inferior ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Associated with Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Oliver; Zeymer, Uwe; Schiele, Rudolf; Zahn, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is usually characterized by transient left ventricular apical ballooning. Due to the clinical symptoms which include chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, and elevated myocardial markers, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is frequently mimicking ST-elevation myocardial infarction in the absence of a significant coronary artery disease. Otherwise an acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery can produce a typical Takotsubo contraction pattern. ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is frequently associated with emotional stress, but to date no cases of STEMI triggering TCM have been reported. We describe a case of a female patient with inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by TCM. PMID:20811565

  5. Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury: from basic science to clinical bedside.

    PubMed

    Frank, Anja; Bonney, Megan; Bonney, Stephanie; Weitzel, Lindsay; Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury contributes to adverse cardiovascular outcomes after myocardial ischemia, cardiac surgery or circulatory arrest. Primarily, no blood flow to the heart causes an imbalance between oxygen demand and supply, named ischemia (from the Greek isch, restriction; and haema, blood), resulting in damage or dysfunction of the cardiac tissue. Instinctively, early and fast restoration of blood flow has been established to be the treatment of choice to prevent further tissue injury. Indeed, the use of thrombolytic therapy or primary percutaneous coronary intervention is the most effective strategy for reducing the size of a myocardial infarct and improving the clinical outcome. Unfortunately, restoring blood flow to the ischemic myocardium, named reperfusion, can also induce injury. This phenomenon was therefore termed myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Subsequent studies in animal models of acute myocardial infarction suggest that myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury accounts for up to 50% of the final size of a myocardial infarct. Consequently, many researchers aim to understand the underlying molecular mechanism of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury to find therapeutic strategies ultimately reducing the final infarct size. Despite the identification of numerous therapeutic strategies at the bench, many of them are just in the process of being translated to bedside. The current review discusses the most striking basic science findings made during the past decades that are currently under clinical evaluation, with the ultimate goal to treat patients who are suffering from myocardial ischemia reperfusion-associated tissue injury.

  6. Myocardial uptake of digoxin in chronically digitalized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Steiness, E; Valentin, N

    1976-01-01

    1 The time course of myocardial uptake of digoxin, increase in contractility and changes in myocardial potassium concentration was studied for 90 min following an intravenous digoxin dose to long-term digitalized dogs. 2 Nineteen dogs were investigated by the use of a biopsy technique which allowed sampling before and after administration of digoxin. 3 Ten minutes after administration of digoxin the myocardial concentration increased from 60 to 306 nmol/kg tissue, the myocardial concentration of digoxin was significantly lower (250 nmol/kg tissue) after 30 min and then increased again. 4 The transmural myocardial distribution of digoxin was uniform before and 90 min after administration of digoxin in long-term digitalized dogs but at 10 min after administration, both the subepicardial and the subendocardial concentration of digoxin were significantly lower than that of the mesocardial layer. 5 During the first 10 min the dp/dtmax increased to 135% of the control level. The increase remained unchanged during the rest of the study. 6 Myocardial potassium decreased throughout the study. 7 The M-configuration of the myocardial uptake curve and the non-uniformity of myocardial distribution of digoxin observed at 10 min after administrating digoxin to long-term digitalized dogs indicate that the distribution of myocardial blood flow may be changed during chronic digitalization. PMID:1000132

  7. T2* magnetic resonance and myocardial iron in thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Dudley J

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance T2* values of the myocardium are directly related to tissue iron levels. Minor effects from myocardial oxygenation and fibrosis are overwhelmed by the highly dominant iron effect in clinically relevant levels of myocardial iron overload. Myocardial T2* values less than 20 ms indicate iron overload, and this is considered severe when T2* is less than 10 ms. Decreasing myocardial T2* levels are associated with systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction. Most recorded cases of heart failure in thalassemia to date have occurred in patients with very low T2* values (in the severe range). Exceptions to this have occurred in patients with other causes of heart failure such as concomitant congenital heart disease. In patients presenting with heart failure who undergo aggressive chelation with continuous intravenous deferoxamine, longitudinal studies show that myocardial T2* increases, and this is accompanied by increases in ejection fraction and relief of heart failure. In cross-sectional studies, the myocardial T2* and ejection fraction of patients on deferiprone was superior to that of patients on deferoxamine. Randomized controlled prospective trials comparing these two drugs for their action in clearing myocardial iron, as measured by myocardial T2*, are under way and should report in 2005/2006. These trials will clarify the role of different chelators in the management of myocardial iron overload and may be valuable in reducing the toll of death in thalassemia from heart failure.

  8. Combretastatin A4 disodium phosphate-induced myocardial injury

    PubMed Central

    Tochinai, Ryota; Nagata, Yuriko; Ando, Minoru; Hata, Chie; Suzuki, Tomo; Asakawa, Naoyuki; Yoshizawa, Kazuhiko; Uchida, Kazumi; Kado, Shoichi; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Histopathological and electrocardiographic features of myocardial lesions induced by combretastatin A4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP) were evaluated, and the relation between myocardial lesions and vascular changes and the direct toxic effect of CA4DP on cardiomyocytes were discussed. We induced myocardial lesions by administration of CA4DP to rats and evaluated myocardial damage by histopathologic examination and electrocardiography. We evaluated blood pressure (BP) of CA4DP-treated rats and effects of CA4DP on cellular impedance-based contractility of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs). The results revealed multifocal myocardial necrosis with a predilection for the interventricular septum and subendocardial regions of the apex of the left ventricular wall, injury of capillaries, morphological change of the ST junction, and QT interval prolongation. The histopathological profile of myocardial lesions suggested that CA4DP induced a lack of myocardial blood flow. CA4DP increased the diastolic BP and showed direct effects on hiPS-CMs. These results suggest that CA4DP induces dysfunction of small arteries and capillaries and has direct toxicity in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, it is thought that CA4DP induced capillary and myocardial injury due to collapse of the microcirculation in the myocardium. Moreover, the direct toxic effect of CA4DP on cardiomyocytes induced myocardial lesions in a coordinated manner. PMID:27559241

  9. Usefulness of myocardial strain imaging in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A

    2010-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin. Heart involvement is a classical complication in this disease and leads progressively to heart failure. Detecting latent myocardial involvement is essential in this disease because early use of drugs like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may delay the progression of heart disease. Myocardial strain imaging is an application of the tissue Doppler imaging. By assessing regional myocardial function, this tool might help clinicians to detect latent myocardial involvement in DMD patients.

  10. Visualization of myocardial perfusion after percutaneous myocardial septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using superharmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Folkert J; Bouakaz, Ayache; Krenning, Boudewijn; Vletter, Wim; de Jong, Nico

    2003-04-01

    Harmonic imaging is used for detection of ultrasound contrast agents in myocardial perfusion studies. However, harmonic imaging has limitations because of the presence of tissue harmonics, which results in less specificity and sensitivity, thus, lower contrast-to-tissue ratio. We describe a clinical example using superharmonic imaging. This technique detects the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics. These harmonics are not created in tissue, resulting, hence, in a high contrast-to-tissue ratio. After myocardial alcohol ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy areas of nontreated and treated myocardium, normal and low flow could be visualized with superharmonic imaging.

  11. [Clinical significance of myocardial 123I-BMIPP imaging in patients with myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Narita, M; Kurihara, T; Shindoh, T; Honda, M

    1997-03-01

    In order to clarify the characteristics of fatty acid metabolism in patients with myocardial infarction (MI), we performed myocardial imaging with 123I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) and we compared these findings with exercise stress (Ex) and resting myocardial perfusion imaging with 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) and left ventricular wall motion index (WMI) which were obtained by left ventriculography. We studied 55 patients with MI, 14 patients with recent MI (RMI) and 41 patients with old MI (OMI), and myocardial images were divided into 17 segments and myocardial uptake of the radionuclide was graded from 0 (normal) to 3 (maximal abnormality). In 28 patients we compared segmental defect score (SDS) with WMI which were obtained by centerline method at the corresponded segments. As a whole, the mean total defect scores (TDSs) of BMIPP and Ex were similar and they were greater than the mean TDS of resting perfusion. In 30 patient (55%) TDS of BMIPP was greater than that of TDS of resting perfusion. In 24 patients perfusion abnormality developed by Ex and the location of BMIPP abnormality coincided with the abnormality of Ex. But in the other 6 patients Ex did not induce any abnormality and they were all RMI and infarcted coronary artery was patent. However in the group with TDS of BMIPP identical to TDS of resting perfusion (25 patients), 92% did not show myocardial perfusion abnormality after Ex. In the comparison of SDS and WMI, myocardial segments were divided into 3 groups; both SDSs of BMIPP and resting perfusion were normal or borderline abnormality (Group 1, 82 segments), SDS of resting perfusion was normal or borderline and SDS of BMIPP was definitely abnormal (Group 2, 10 segments) and both SDSs of BMIPP and resting perfusion were definitely abnormal (Group 3, 48 segments). In Group 1, WMS (-0.41 +/- 0.77) was significantly (p < 0.001) greater than those of Group 2 (-2.14 +/- 0.50) and Group 3 (-2.32 +/- 0.67). But there was

  12. Radionuclide imaging in myocardial sarcoidosis. Demonstration of myocardial uptake of /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate and gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, M.B.; Sandler, M.P.; Sacks, G.A.; Kronenberg, M.W.; Powers, T.A.

    1983-03-01

    A patient had severe congestive cardiomyopathy secondary to myocardial sarcoidosis. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by radionuclide ventriculography, /sup 201/Tl, /sup 67/Ga, and /sup 99m/Tc pyrophosphate (TcPYP) scintigraphy. Myocardial TcPYP uptake has not been reported previously in sarcoidosis. In this patient, TcPYP was as useful as gallium scanning and thallium imaging in documenting the myocardial process.

  13. Combined assessment of reflow and collateral blood flow by myocardial contrast echocardiography after acute reperfused myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, F; Messner-Pellenc, P; Descours, Q; Daures, J; Pasquie, J; Hager, F; Davy, J; Grolleau-Raoux, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the combined assessment of reflow and collateral blood flow by myocardial contrast echocardiography after myocardial infarction.
DESIGN—Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed in patients with acute myocardial infarction shortly after successful coronary reperfusion (TIMI 3 patency) by direct angioplasty. Collateral flow was assessed before coronary angioplasty, and contrast reflow was evaluated 15 minutes after reperfusion. The presence of contractile reserve was assessed by low dose dobutamine echocardiography (5 to 15 µg/kg/min) at (mean (SD)) 3 (2) days after myocardial infarction. Recovery of segmental function (myocardial viability) was evaluated by resting echocardiography at a two month follow up. The study was prospective.
PATIENTS—35 consecutive patients referred for acute transmural myocardial infarction.
RESULTS—Contrast reflow was observed in 20 patients (57%) and collateral flow in 14 (40%). Contrast reflow and collateral contrast flow were both correlated with reversible dysfunction on initial dobutamine echocardiography and at follow up (p < 0.05). The presence of reflow or collateral flow on myocardial contrast echocardiography was a highly sensitive (100%) but weakly specific (60%) indicator of segmental dysfunction recovery. Simultaneous presence of contrast reflow and collateral flow was more specific of reversible dysfunction than reflow alone (90% v 60%).
CONCLUSIONS—Combined assessment of reflow and collateral blood flow enhanced the sensitivity of myocardial contrast echocardiography in predicting myocardial viability after acute, reperfused myocardial infarction. The simultaneous presence of reflow and collateral blood flow was highly specific of recovery of segmental dysfunction.


Keywords: contrast echocardiography; coronary reflow; collateral blood flow; dobutamine echocardiography; myocardial dysfunction PMID:10377311

  14. Do depressive symptoms predict the incidence of myocardial infarction independent of hopelessness?

    PubMed

    Pössel, Patrick; Mitchell, Amanda M; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kaplan, George A; Kauhanen, Jussi; Valtonen, Maarit

    2015-01-01

    Depression and hopelessness predict myocardial infarction, but it is unclear whether depression and hopelessness are independent predictors of myocardial infarction incidents. Hopelessness, depression, and myocardial infarction incidence rate 18 years later were measured in 2005 men. Cox regressions were conducted with hopelessness and depression serving as individual predictors of myocardial infarction. Another Cox model examined whether the two predictors predict myocardial infarction when adjusting for each other. Depression and hopelessness predicted myocardial infarction in independent regressions, but when adjusting for each other, hopelessness, but not depression, predicted myocardial infarction incidents. Thus, these results suggest that depression and hopelessness are not independent predictors of myocardial infarction. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Ultrasound imaging of propagation of myocardial contraction for non-invasive identification of myocardial ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Yuya; Taki, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hirano, Michinori; Morosawa, Susumu; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    Non-invasive identification of ischemic regions is important for diagnosis and treatment of myocardial infarction. In the present study, ultrasound measurement was applied to the interventricular septum of three open-chest swine hearts. The properties of the myocardial contraction response of the septum were compared between normal and acute ischemic conditions, where the acute ischemic condition of the septum originated from direct avascularization of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. The result showed that the contraction response propagated from the basal side to the apical side along the septum. The estimated propagation velocities in the normal and acute ischemic conditions were 3.6 and 1.9 m/s, respectively. This finding indicates that acute ischemia which occurred 5 s after the avascularization of the LAD promptly suppressed the propagation velocity through the ventricular septum to about half the normal velocity. It was suggested that the myocardial ischemic region could be identified using the difference in the propagation velocity of the myocardial response to contraction.

  16. Acute Anterior Myocardial Infarction Accompanied by Acute Inferior Myocardial Infarction: A Very Rare Coronary Artery Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Alsancak, Y; Sezenöz, B; Duran, M; Unlu, S; Turkoglu, S; Yalcın, R

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are rare and mostly silent in clinical practice. First manifestation of this congenital abnormality can be devastating as syncope, acute coronary syndrome, and sudden cardiac death. Herein we report a case with coronary artery anomaly complicated with ST segment myocardial infarction in both inferior and anterior walls simultaneously diagnosed during primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

  17. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function indices assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Dadpour, Bita; Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid R; Afshari, Reza; Dorri-Giv, Masoumeh; Mohajeri, Seyed A R; Ghahremani, Somayeh

    2016-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is associated with alterations of cardiac structure and function, although it is less known. In this study, we assessed possible abnormality in myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Fifteen patients with MA abuse, on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) MA dependency determined by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, underwent 2-day dipyridamole stress/rest Tc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. An average daily dose of MA use was 0.91±1.1 (0.2-4) g. The duration of MA use was 3.4±2.1 (1-7) years. In visual and semiquantitative analyses, all patients had normal gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, with no perfusion defects. In all gated SPECT images, there was no abnormality in left ventricular wall motion and thickening. All summed stress scores and summed rest scores were below 3. Calculated left ventricular functional indices including the end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were normal. Many cardiac findings because of MA mentioned in previous reports are less likely because of significant epicardial coronary artery stenosis.

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Myocardial Hypertrophy in Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Yu, Wen; Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on high-salt-induced oxidative stress and myocardial hypertrophy in salt-sensitive (Dahl) rats. Thirty male Dahl rats and 40 SD rats were included in the study. They were randomly divided into Dahl control (Dahl + NS), Dahl high salt (Dahl + HS), Dahl + HS + NaHS, SD + NS, SD + HS, SD + HS + NaHS, and SD + HS + hydroxylamine (HA). Rats in Dahl + NS and SD + NS groups were given chow with 0.5% NaCl and 0.9% normal saline intraperitoneally daily. Myocardial structure, α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expressions were determined. Endogenous myocardial H2S pathway and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues were tested. Myocardial H2S pathway was downregulated with myocardial hypertrophy featured by increased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, decreased α-MHC and increased β-MHC expressions in Dahl rats with high-salt diet (all P < 0.01), and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues was significantly activated, demonstrated by the increased contents of hydroxyl radical, malondialdehyde and oxidized glutathione and decreased total antioxidant capacity, carbon monoxide, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). However, H2S reduced myocardial hypertrophy with decreased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, increased α-MHC, decreased β-MHC expressions and inhibited oxidative stress in myocardial tissues of Dahl rats with high-salt diet. However, no significant difference was found in H2S pathway, myocardial structure, α-MHC and β-MHC protein and oxidative status in myocardial tissues among SD + NS, SD + HS, and SD + HS + NaHS groups. HA, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase, inhibited myocardial H2S pathway (P < 0.01), and stimulated myocardial hypertrophy and oxidative stress in SD rats

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Myocardial Oxidative Stress and Myocardial Hypertrophy in Dahl Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Yu, Wen; Huang, Yaqian; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on high-salt-induced oxidative stress and myocardial hypertrophy in salt-sensitive (Dahl) rats. Thirty male Dahl rats and 40 SD rats were included in the study. They were randomly divided into Dahl control (Dahl + NS), Dahl high salt (Dahl + HS), Dahl + HS + NaHS, SD + NS, SD + HS, SD + HS + NaHS, and SD + HS + hydroxylamine (HA). Rats in Dahl + NS and SD + NS groups were given chow with 0.5% NaCl and 0.9% normal saline intraperitoneally daily. Myocardial structure, α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) expressions were determined. Endogenous myocardial H2S pathway and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues were tested. Myocardial H2S pathway was downregulated with myocardial hypertrophy featured by increased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, decreased α-MHC and increased β-MHC expressions in Dahl rats with high-salt diet (all P < 0.01), and oxidative stress in myocardial tissues was significantly activated, demonstrated by the increased contents of hydroxyl radical, malondialdehyde and oxidized glutathione and decreased total antioxidant capacity, carbon monoxide, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and decreased SOD1 and SOD2 protein expressions (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). However, H2S reduced myocardial hypertrophy with decreased heart weight/body weight and cardiomyocytes cross-sectional area, increased α-MHC, decreased β-MHC expressions and inhibited oxidative stress in myocardial tissues of Dahl rats with high-salt diet. However, no significant difference was found in H2S pathway, myocardial structure, α-MHC and β-MHC protein and oxidative status in myocardial tissues among SD + NS, SD + HS, and SD + HS + NaHS groups. HA, an inhibitor of cystathionine β-synthase, inhibited myocardial H2S pathway (P < 0.01), and stimulated myocardial hypertrophy and oxidative stress in SD rats

  20. Improved Quantitative Myocardial T2 Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A.; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Roujol, Sébastien; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop an improved T2 prepared (T2prep) balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) sequence and signal relaxation curve fitting method for myocardial T2 mapping. Methods Myocardial T2 mapping is commonly performed by acquisition of multiple T2prep bSSFP images and estimating the voxel-wise T2 values using a 2-parameter fit for relaxation. However, a 2-parameter fit model does not take into account the effect of imaging pulses in a bSSFP sequence or other imperfections in T2prep RF pulses, which may decrease the robustness of T2 mapping. Therefore, we propose a novel T2 mapping sequence that incorporates an additional image acquired with saturation preparation, simulating a very long T2prep echo time. This enables the robust estimation of T2 maps using a 3-parameter fit model, which captures the effect of imaging pulses and other imperfections. Phantom imaging is performed to compare the T2 maps generated using the proposed 3-parameter model to the conventional 2-parameter model, as well as a spin echo reference. In-vivo imaging is performed on eight healthy subjects to compare the different fitting models. Results Phantom and in-vivo data show that the T2 values generated by the proposed 3-parameter model fitting do not change with different choices of the T2prep echo times, and are not statistically different than the reference values for the phantom (P = 0.10 with three T2prep echoes). The 2-parameter model exhibits dependence on the choice of T2prep echo times and are significantly different than the reference values (P = 0.01 with three T2prep echoes). Conclusion The proposed imaging sequence in combination with a 3-parameter model allows accurate measurement of myocardial T2 values, which is independent of number and duration of T2prep echo times. PMID:25103908

  1. [Valvular surgical treatment concurrent with myocardial revascularization].

    PubMed

    Lavítola, P de L; Dallan, L A; Tarasoutchi, F; Grinberg, M; da Luz, P L; Pileggi, F; Jatene, A D

    1992-12-01

    To study the morbidity and mortality due to valvar surgical treatment performed concomitantly to myocardial revascularization. From 1650 patients submitted to mitral or aortic valve surgical treatment, 103 (6.24%) had it associated to myocardial revascularization. Coronary insufficiency was associated to aortic valvar lesion in 66 (64.0%) patients, group I, with mean age of 62.3 +/- 8 years; and in 37 (35.9%) patients with mitral valve lesion, group II, with mean age of 57.8 +/- 5.8 years. Diagnosis was based upon the anamnesis, physical examination and confirmed by cine-coronarographic findings. I-Complications at the immediate postoperative; a) mortality 11 (10.6%) patients, 6 (9.09%) from group I: by low cardiac output 3, uncontrolled arrhythmia 1, mediastinitis 1; acute infarction with cardiogenic shock 1, and 5 (134.5%) of group II: uncontrolled hemorrhage 2, sudden death 1, saphenous vein graft occlusion, respiratory insufficiency and sepsis 2; b) controlled intercurrences that increased the time of hospitalization: mental disorder 5 patients; CVA 7, diabetes decompensation 2, worsening of chronic renal insufficiency 1, upper level digestive hemorrhage 1 and respiratory insufficiency 3 patients. II-late postoperative complications of 77 (83.6%) patients which could be followed up during a period of 60 months: 1) mortality: 3 (3.89%) patients; 2 due to cardiomyopathy and 1 by acute myocardial infarction; 2) late evolution-functional capacity III (NYHA) by cardiomyopathy 6; I/II 68 patients; mild angina 6 patients, 2 underwent revascularization at the end of final 36-42 months. The clinical improvement and mortality indexes statistically similar to the isolate surgical acts stimulate us to keep up with such associate procedures.

  2. Myocardial T1 Mapping: Techniques and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jeremy R.; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Halushka, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a common endpoint in a variety of cardiac diseases and a major independent predictor of adverse cardiac outcomes. Short of histopathologic analysis, which is limited by sampling bias, most diagnostic modalities are limited in their depiction of myocardial fibrosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has the advantage of providing detailed soft-tissue characterization, and a variety of novel quantification methods have further improved its usefulness. Contrast material–enhanced cardiac MR imaging depends on differences in signal intensity between regions of scarring and adjacent normal myocardium. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis lacks these differences in signal intensity. Measurement of myocardial T1 times (T1 mapping) with gadolinium-enhanced inversion recovery–prepared sequences may depict diffuse myocardial fibrosis and has good correlation with ex vivo fibrosis content. T1 mapping calculates myocardial T1 relaxation times with image-based signal intensities and may be performed with standard cardiac MR imagers and radiologic workstations. Myocardium with diffuse fibrosis has greater retention of contrast material, resulting in T1 times that are shorter than those in normal myocardium. Early studies have suggested that diffuse myocardial fibrosis may be distinguished from normal myocardium with T1 mapping. Large multicenter studies are needed to define the role of T1 mapping in developing prognoses and therapeutic assessments. However, given its strengths as a noninvasive method for direct quantification of myocardial fibrosis, T1 mapping may eventually play an important role in the management of cardiac disease. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24617686

  3. Prognostic value of radionuclide exercise testing after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Schocken, D.D.

    1984-08-01

    Abnormal systolic ventricular function and persistent ischemia are sensitive indicators of poor prognosis following myocardial infarction. The use of exercise improves the utility of both radionuclide ventriculography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the identification of postinfarction patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac events. 51 references.

  4. Predictors of Appraisal and Coping Dimensions in Myocardial Infarction Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyong Sil; Martin, Peter

    This study attempted to identify predictors of perception and coping after the occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Sixty males and 17 females who had suffered from a myocardial infarction within 3 months prior to the research were recruited from a hospital rehabilitation program. Subjects completed the Peri-Life Events Scale, the 16-PF…

  5. Increase in mean platelet volume in patients with myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Emine; Tanboga, Ibrahim Halil; Kurt, Mustafa; Kocak, Umran; Ayhan, Huseyin; Keles, Telat; Bozkurt, Engin

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial bridge is associated with atherosclerosis altered in shear stress and endothelial dysfunction. Mean platelet volume (MPV), a determinant of platelet activation, is shown to be related with atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we aimed to evaluate platelet function assessed by MPV in patients with myocardial bridge. Forty-two patients with myocardial bridge in the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and 43 age- and gender-matched healthy participants were included in the study. Myocardial bridging was defined as an intramyocardial systolic compression or milking of a segment of an epicardial coronary artery on angiography. For the entire study population, MPV was measured using an automatic blood counter. The study population consisted of 42 patients with myocardial bridge (52.7 ± 10.2, 76.2% male) and 43 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants (52.1 ± 10.4, 74.4% male). Compared to the control group, MPV value was significantly higher in patients with myocardial bridge (8.9 ± 1.24 vs 8.3 ± 0.78; P = .01). Further, there were no significant differences between groups regarding hemoglobin level, platelet count, fasting blood glucose, and creatinine levels. Our study findings indicated that myocardial bridge is associated with elevated MPV values. Our results might partly explain the increased cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial bridge.

  6. Low High-Density Lipoprotein and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, A; Hu, P P

    2015-01-01

    Low HDL is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction. This paper reviews our current understanding of HDL, HDL structure and function, HDL subclasses, the relationship of low HDL with myocardial infarction, HDL targeted therapy, and clinical trials and studies. Furthermore potential new agents, such as alirocumab (praluent) and evolocumab (repatha) are discussed.

  7. Tissue engineering for post-myocardial infarction ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kolettis, T M; Vilaeti, A; Dimos, K; Tsitou, N; Agathopoulos, S

    2011-03-01

    Myocardial tissue engineering involves the design of biomaterial scaffolds, aiming at regenerating necrotic myocardium after myocardial infarction. Biomaterials provide mechanical support to the infarct area and they can be used as vehicles for sustained and controlled local administration of cells and growth factors. Although promising results have been reported in experimental studies, many issues need to be addressed before human use.

  8. An alternative method for neonatal cerebro-myocardial perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; De Rita, Fabrizio; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Several techniques have already been described for selective cerebral perfusion during repair of aortic arch pathology in children. One method combining cerebral with myocardial perfusion has also been proposed. A novel technique is reported here for selective and independent cerebro-myocardial perfusion for neonatal and infant arch surgery. Technical aspects and potential advantages are discussed. PMID:22307393

  9. Coronary Slow Flow Phenomenon Leads to ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Sen, Taner

    2013-03-01

    The exact etiology of the coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) is not certain. CSFP is not a normal variant as it is an absolutely pathological entity. Furthermore, CSFP not only leads to myocardial ischemia but it can also cause classical acute ST elevation myocardial infarction, which necessitates coronary angiography for a definite diagnosis.

  10. Myocardial microvascular permeability, interstitial oedema, and compromised cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Stewart, Randolph H.; Geissler, Hans J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2010-01-01

    The heart, perhaps more than any other organ, is exquisitely sensitive to increases in microvascular permeability and the accumulation of myocardial interstitial oedema fluid. Whereas some organs can cope with profound increases in the interstitial fluid volume or oedema formation without a compromise in function, heart function is significantly compromised with only a few percent increase in the interstitial fluid volume. This would be of little consequence if myocardial oedema were an uncommon pathology. On the contrary, myocardial oedema forms in response to many disease states as well as clinical interventions such as cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest common to many cardiothoracic surgical procedures. The heart's inability to function effectively in the presence of myocardial oedema is further confounded by the perplexing fact that the resolution of myocardial oedema does not restore normal cardiac function. We will attempt to provide some insight as to how microvascular permeability and myocardial oedema formation compromise cardiac function and discuss the acute changes that might take place in the myocardium to perpetuate compromised cardiac function following oedema resolution. We will also discuss compensatory changes in the interstitial matrix of the heart in response to chronic myocardial oedema and the role they play to optimize myocardial function during chronic oedemagenic disease. PMID:20472566

  11. Predictors of Appraisal and Coping Dimensions in Myocardial Infarction Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyong Sil; Martin, Peter

    This study attempted to identify predictors of perception and coping after the occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Sixty males and 17 females who had suffered from a myocardial infarction within 3 months prior to the research were recruited from a hospital rehabilitation program. Subjects completed the Peri-Life Events Scale, the 16-PF…

  12. Acute posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction secondary to football chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, R; Badui, E; Castaño, R; Madrid, R

    1985-12-01

    Myocardial infarction secondary to nonpenetrating chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a sportsman who developed an acute transmural posteroinferior wall myocardial infarction due to chest trauma by a football. The angiographic study revealed total obstruction of the proximal right coronary artery.

  13. [TIMI group study of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    The article presents the history of development of various methods of reperfusion therapy in myocardial infarction. The method of intracoronary thrombolysis was developed and used in Russia in 1976. In 1984 the TIMI Study Group initiated large-scale long-term trial of thrombolytic therapy in myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris. Some basic results of the study are outlined.

  14. Acute myocardial infarction in a young woman on isotretinoin treatment.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Natalia; Antuña, Paula; Dominguez, Lourdes; Rivero, Fernando; Bastante, Teresa; Alfonso, Fernando

    2015-02-15

    The use of isotretinoin has been associated with mild changes in the metabolic profile of adolescents. In very rare cases, a possible association with myocardial infarction, stroke and thromboembolic events has been reported. In this report we describe the potential association of isotretinoin with the occurrence of an acute myocardial infarction in a very young girl. OCT provided unique visualization of the culprit lesion.

  15. Complement Component 3 is Necessary to Preserve Myocardium and Myocardial Function in Chronic Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Solanki, Mitesh; Borkowska, Sylwia; van Hoose, Patrick; Brittian, Kenneth R.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Rokosh, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement cascade (CC) with myocardial infarction (MI) acutely initiates immune cell infiltration, membrane attack complex formation on injured myocytes, and exacerbates myocardial injury. Recent studies implicate the CC in mobilization of stem/progenitor cells and tissue regeneration. Its role in chronic MI is unknown. Here, we consider complement component C3, in the chronic response to MI. C3 knockout (KO) mice were studied after permanent coronary artery ligation. C3 deficiency exacerbated myocardial dysfunction 28 days after MI compared to WT with further impaired systolic function and LV dilation despite similar infarct size 24 hours post-MI. Morphometric analysis 28 days post-MI showed C3 KO mice had more scar tissue with less viable myocardium within the infarct zone which correlated with decreased c-kitpos cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CPSC), decreased proliferating Ki67pos CSPCs and decreased formation of new BrdUpos/α-sarcomeric actinpos myocytes and increased apoptosis compared to WT. Decreased CSPCs and increased apoptosis were evident 7 days post-MI in C3 KO hearts. The inflammatory response with MI was attenuated in the C3 KO and was accompanied by attenuated hematopoietic, pluripotent, and cardiac stem/progenitor cell mobilization into the peripheral blood 72 hours post-MI. These results are the first to demonstrate the CC, through C3, contributes to myocardial preservation and regeneration in response to chronic MI. Responses in the C3 KO infer that C3 activation in response to MI expands the resident CSPC population, increases new myocyte formation, increases and preserves myocardium, inflammatory response, and bone marrow stem/progenitor cell mobilization to preserve myocardial function. PMID:24806427

  16. Complement component 3 is necessary to preserve myocardium and myocardial function in chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wysoczynski, Marcin; Solanki, Mitesh; Borkowska, Sylwia; van Hoose, Patrick; Brittian, Kenneth R; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Rokosh, Gregg

    2014-09-01

    Activation of the complement cascade (CC) with myocardial infarction (MI) acutely initiates immune cell infiltration, membrane attack complex formation on injured myocytes, and exacerbates myocardial injury. Recent studies implicate the CC in mobilization of stem/progenitor cells and tissue regeneration. Its role in chronic MI is unknown. Here, we consider complement component C3, in the chronic response to MI. C3 knockout (KO) mice were studied after permanent coronary artery ligation. C3 deficiency exacerbated myocardial dysfunction 28 days after MI compared to WT with further impaired systolic function and LV dilation despite similar infarct size 24 hours post-MI. Morphometric analysis 28 days post-MI showed C3 KO mice had more scar tissue with less viable myocardium within the infarct zone which correlated with decreased c-kit(pos) cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CPSC), decreased proliferating Ki67(pos) CSPCs and decreased formation of new BrdU(pos) /α-sarcomeric actin(pos) myocytes, and increased apoptosis compared to WT. Decreased CSPCs and increased apoptosis were evident 7 days post-MI in C3 KO hearts. The inflammatory response with MI was attenuated in the C3 KO and was accompanied by attenuated hematopoietic, pluripotent, and cardiac stem/progenitor cell mobilization into the peripheral blood 72 hours post-MI. These results are the first to demonstrate that CC, through C3, contributes to myocardial preservation and regeneration in response to chronic MI. Responses in the C3 KO infer that C3 activation in response to MI expands the resident CSPC population, increases new myocyte formation, increases and preserves myocardium, inflammatory response, and bone marrow stem/progenitor cell mobilization to preserve myocardial function. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Abnormal 201Tl myocardial single photon emission computed tomography in energetic male patients with myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Huang, W S; Chang, H D; Yang, S P; Tsao, T P; Cheng, C Y; Cherng, S C

    2002-11-01

    Myocardial bridge is a relatively benign condition where a major coronary artery is bridged by a band of muscle and narrows during systole, particularly during rapid heart rates. Its clinical presentation and electrocardiogram (ECG) changes overlap with that of coronary artery disease. 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging is thus frequently prescribed for further evaluation. This retrospective study was carried out to determine the 201Tl image patterns in patients with myocardial bridge. A total of 17 male patients (aged from 30 to 63 years) who had a positive exercise ECG and angiographic evidence of myocardial bridge in the mid-third of the left anterior descending coronary artery were recruited. Most of them were robust and received routine physical check-ups. They had no known heart disease or medication that affected cardiac function. The patients' clinical presentations, echocardiograph and exercise ECG findings were analysed. 201Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed by intravenous injection of 201Tl (111 MBq) immediately following stress (treadmill or dipyridamole induced) and 4 h after stress, using a fixed, right angle camera equipped with a low energy, general purpose collimator. The images were interpreted independently by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Nine of the 17 patients had anterior chest pain during exercise. All patients had an abnormal ECG during exercise, including ST-T wave depression in leads II, III and aVF, and v4-6. Except for eight patients revealing reversible perfusion defect (R), 16 of the 17 patients also exhibited a partial reversible perfusion defect (PR) or a significant reverse redistribution (RR) scan pattern in the anterior or inferior walls of the left ventricle. Myocardial bridge should be taken into consideration in energetic male patients who had abnormal exercise ECGs and the corresponding patterns of Tl SPECT abnormalities including R, PR and RR.

  18. Effect of hydroxy safflower yellow A on myocardial apoptosis after acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M X; Fu, J H; Zhang, Q; Wang, J Q

    2015-04-10

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydroxy safflower yellow A (HSYA) on myocardial apoptosis after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in rats. We randomly divided 170 male Wistar rats into 6 groups (N = 23): normal control, sham, control, SY (90 mg/kg), HSYA high-dose (HSYA-H, 40 mg/kg), and HSYA low-dose groups (HSYA-L, 20 mg/kg). Myocardial ischemic injury was induced by ligating the anterior descending coronary artery, and the degree of myocardial ischemia was evaluated using electrocardiography and nitroblue tetrazolium staining. Bax and Bcl-2 expressions in the ischemic myocardium were determined using immunohistochemical analysis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) expression in the myocardium of rats with AMI was determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Compared to rats in the control group, those in the HYSA-H, HSYA-L, and SY groups showed a decrease in the elevated ST segments and an increase in the infarct size. The rats in the drug-treated groups showed a significantly lower percentage of Bax-positive cells and a significantly higher percentage of Bcl-2-positive cells than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Moreover, mRNA expression of PPAR-γ in the ischemic myocardium of rats in the SY, HSYA-L, and HSYA-H groups was significantly lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05). Thus, HSYA and SY can attenuate myocardial ischemia in rats, possibly by increasing the level of Bcl-2/Bax, and PPAR-γ may be not a necessary link in this process.

  19. Oxygen Therapy in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Robin; James, Stefan K; Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil; Erlinge, David; Witt, Nils; Arefalk, Gabriel; Frick, Mats; Alfredsson, Joakim; Nilsson, Lennart; Ravn-Fischer, Annica; Omerovic, Elmir; Kellerth, Thomas; Sparv, David; Ekelund, Ulf; Linder, Rickard; Ekström, Mattias; Lauermann, Jörg; Haaga, Urban; Pernow, John; Östlund, Ollie; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif

    2017-08-28

    Background The clinical effect of routine oxygen therapy in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction who do not have hypoxemia at baseline is uncertain. Methods In this registry-based randomized clinical trial, we used nationwide Swedish registries for patient enrollment and data collection. Patients with suspected myocardial infarction and an oxygen saturation of 90% or higher were randomly assigned to receive either supplemental oxygen (6 liters per minute for 6 to 12 hours, delivered through an open face mask) or ambient air. Results A total of 6629 patients were enrolled. The median duration of oxygen therapy was 11.6 hours, and the median oxygen saturation at the end of the treatment period was 99% among patients assigned to oxygen and 97% among patients assigned to ambient air. Hypoxemia developed in 62 patients (1.9%) in the oxygen group, as compared with 254 patients (7.7%) in the ambient-air group. The median of the highest troponin level during hospitalization was 946.5 ng per liter in the oxygen group and 983.0 ng per liter in the ambient-air group. The primary end point of death from any cause within 1 year after randomization occurred in 5.0% of patients (166 of 3311) assigned to oxygen and in 5.1% of patients (168 of 3318) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 1.21; P=0.80). Rehospitalization with myocardial infarction within 1 year occurred in 126 patients (3.8%) assigned to oxygen and in 111 patients (3.3%) assigned to ambient air (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.46; P=0.33). The results were consistent across all predefined subgroups. Conclusions Routine use of supplemental oxygen in patients with suspected myocardial infarction who did not have hypoxemia was not found to reduce 1-year all-cause mortality. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and others; DETO2X-AMI ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01787110 .).

  20. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  1. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy simulating an infiltrative myocardial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, A; Loperfido, F; Pennestrì, F

    1985-01-01

    Congestive heart failure developed in a patient with low electrocardiographic QRS voltages, diffuse thickening of the septum and free cardiac wall, and a reduction in left ventricular internal diameter, which suggested an infiltrative heart muscle disease. Histological examination at necropsy showed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with symmetrical left ventricular hypertrophy. Myocardial disarray of type 1A disorganisation was extensive and equally distributed in the ventricular septum and the left anterior and left posterior ventricular free walls. Severe fibrosis (40%) was also present and may have been a possible cause of the electrocardiographic abnormalities as well as of the lack of ventricular dilatation. Images PMID:4041302

  2. Postmortem detection of inapparent myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    McVie, J. G.

    1970-01-01

    Two methods of detecting early inapparent myocardial infarcts have been studied and their value in diagnostic practice compared. The better method proved to be the determination of the potassium to sodium ratio (ionic ratio) which falls in infarcted tissue within minutes of the onset of anoxia. The second method was nitro blue tetrazolium staining of gross sections of myocardium which revealed any infarct older than three and a half hours. As staining is dependent upon enzyme activity, the latter method is disturbed by autolysis. It was shown, on the other hand, that the ionic ratio (K+/Na+) was not affected by autolysis and was therefore well suited to forensic practice. Sixteen non-infarcted control hearts, plus the nine from cases of sudden death due to causes other than myocardial infarction, all yielded high ionic ratios (K+/Na+), average 1·4, and stained normally with tetrazolium (the normal controls). Positive control was provided by 20 histologically proven infarcts of which the ionic ratios (K+/Na+) were all low (average 0·7). Histochemical staining with tetrazolium delineated infarcted areas in each case. In a series of 29 sudden deaths, a cause of death other than myocardial infarction was found at necropsy in nine, mentioned above as normal controls. The remaining 20 hearts were not infarcted histologically, but were shown to be infarcted by examination of the ionic ratios (K+/Na+). These ratios were low (average 0·8) including three borderline ratios. Confirmatory evidence of infarction included nitro blue tetrazolium staining which revealed infarcts in 10 of the 20 cases, and clinical and necropsy observations. The ionic ratio (K+/Na+) decreases as the age of the infarct increases for at least 24 hours. Thereafter as healing proceeds, the ratio gradually reverts to normal. Thus, previous infarction and replacement fibrosis do not significantly alter the ionic ratio (K+/Na+). Nor is it changed by left ventricular hypertrophy, the presence of

  3. Defibrillator implantation early after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Gerhard; Andresen, Dietrich; Seidl, Karlheinz; Brachmann, Johannes; Hoffmann, Ellen; Wojciechowski, Dariusz; Kornacewicz-Jach, Zdzisława; Sredniawa, Beata; Lupkovics, Géza; Hofgärtner, Franz; Lubinski, Andrzej; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Habets, Alphonsus; Wegscheider, Karl; Senges, Jochen

    2009-10-08

    The rate of death, including sudden cardiac death, is highest early after a myocardial infarction. Yet current guidelines do not recommend the use of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) within 40 days after a myocardial infarction for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. We tested the hypothesis that patients at increased risk who are treated early with an ICD will live longer than those who receive optimal medical therapy alone. This randomized, prospective, open-label, investigator-initiated, multicenter trial registered 62,944 unselected patients with myocardial infarction. Of this total, 898 patients were enrolled 5 to 31 days after the event if they met certain clinical criteria: a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 40%) and a heart rate of 90 or more beats per minute on the first available electrocardiogram (ECG) (criterion 1: 602 patients), nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (> or = 150 beats per minute) during Holter monitoring (criterion 2: 208 patients), or both criteria (88 patients). Of the 898 patients, 445 were randomly assigned to treatment with an ICD and 453 to medical therapy alone. During a mean follow-up of 37 months, 233 patients died: 116 patients in the ICD group and 117 patients in the control group. Overall mortality was not reduced in the ICD group (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 1.35; P=0.78). There were fewer sudden cardiac deaths in the ICD group than in the control group (27 vs. 60; hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.31 to 1.00; P=0.049), but the number of nonsudden cardiac deaths was higher (68 vs. 39; hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.29 to 2.84; P=0.001). Hazard ratios were similar among the three groups of patients categorized according to the enrollment criteria they met (criterion 1, criterion 2, or both). Prophylactic ICD therapy did not reduce overall mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction and clinical features that placed them at increased risk. (Clinical

  4. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase: Clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2003-01-01

    The specific binding of digitalis glycosides to Na,K-ATPase is used as a tool for Na,K-ATPase quantification with high accuracy and precision. In myocardial biopsies from patients with heart failure, total Na,K-ATPase concentration is decreased by around 40%; a correlation exists between a decrease in heart function and a decrease in Na,K-ATPase concentration. During digitalization, around 30% of remaining pumps are occupied by digoxin. Myocardial Na,K-ATPase is also influenced by other drugs used for the treatment of heart failure. Thus, potassium loss during diuretic therapy has been found to reduce myocardial Na,K-ATPase, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may stimulate Na,K pump activity. Furthermore, hyperaldosteronism induced by heart failure has been found to decrease Na,K-ATPase activity. Accordingly, treatment with the aldosterone antagonist, spironolactone, may also influence Na,K-ATPase activity. The importance of Na,K pump modulation with heart disease, inhibition in digitalization and other effects of medication should be considered in the context of sodium, potassium and calcium regulation. It is recommended that digoxin be administered to heart failure patients who, after institution of mortality-reducing therapy, still have heart failure symptoms, and that the therapy be continued if symptoms are revealed or reduced. Digitalis glycosides are the only safe inotropic drugs for oral use that improve hemodynamics in heart failure. An important aspect of myocardial Na,K pump affection in heart disease is its influence on extracellular potassium (Ke) homeostasis. Two important aspects should be considered: potassium handling among myocytes, and effects of potassium entering the extracellular space of the heart via the bloodstream. It should be noted that both of these aspects of Ke homeostasis are affected by regulatory aspects, eg, regulation of the Na,K pump by physiological and pathophysiological conditions, as well as by medical

  5. Atypical myocardial infarction on a cruise ship.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A previously asymptomatic 44-year-old male crewmember on a cruise ship experienced several brief episodes of acute chest pain within a short time frame. He was ultimately diagnosed with myocardial infarction; 5 h earlier he had been discharged from the ship's medical centre after almost 8 h of monitoring to rule-out infarction. Subsequent angiography ashore revealed a 99% occlusion of the right coronary artery. This case highlights the dangers of over-reliance on shipboard cardiac enzyme testing to clear a patient with chest pain.

  6. Stress-first Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Nasir; Parker, Matthew W; Henzlova, Milena J; Duvall, William Lane

    2016-02-01

    Stress-first approaches to myocardial perfusion imaging provide diagnostically and prognostically accurate perfusion data equivalent to a full rest-stress study, save time in the imaging laboratory, and reduce the radiation exposure to patients and laboratory staff. Converting a nuclear cardiology laboratory from a conventional rest-stress strategy to a stress-first approach involves challenges such as the need for attenuation correction, triage of patients to an appropriate protocol, real-time review of stress images, and consideration of differential reimbursement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  8. Type 2 myocardial infarction due to supply-demand mismatch.

    PubMed

    Mihatov, Nino; Januzzi, James L; Gaggin, Hanna K

    2017-08-01

    The best-accepted definition of myocardial infarction (MI) is provided by statements from the Universal Definition of MI Global Task force. This article, now in its third iteration, defines MI as myocardial cell death due to prolonged myocardial ischemia. It further delineates an increasingly incident subclassification of MI known as type 2 MI (T2MI). T2MI identifies instances of myocardial necrosis in which an imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and/or demand occurs for reasons other than atherosclerotic plaque disruption. While associated with considerable risk (comparable to that of type 1 MI, which has well-defined management strategies), the spectrum of potential etiologies for T2MI makes development of precise diagnostic criteria and therapeutic implications of the diagnosis challenging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reducing myocardial infarct size: challenges and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    Despite prompt reperfusion by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), the mortality and morbidity of patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain significant with 9% death and 10% heart failure at 1 year. In these patients, one important neglected therapeutic target is ‘myocardial reperfusion injury’, a term given to the cardiomyocyte death and microvascular dysfunction which occurs on reperfusing ischaemic myocardium. A number of cardioprotective therapies (both mechanical and pharmacological), which are known to target myocardial reperfusion injury, have been shown to reduce myocardial infarct (MI) size in small proof-of-concept clinical studies—however, being able to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes has been elusive. In this article, we review the challenges facing clinical cardioprotection research, and highlight future therapies for reducing MI size and preventing heart failure in patients presenting with STEMI at risk of myocardial reperfusion injury. PMID:26674987

  10. Reducing myocardial infarct size: challenges and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2016-03-01

    Despite prompt reperfusion by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), the mortality and morbidity of patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain significant with 9% death and 10% heart failure at 1 year. In these patients, one important neglected therapeutic target is 'myocardial reperfusion injury', a term given to the cardiomyocyte death and microvascular dysfunction which occurs on reperfusing ischaemic myocardium. A number of cardioprotective therapies (both mechanical and pharmacological), which are known to target myocardial reperfusion injury, have been shown to reduce myocardial infarct (MI) size in small proof-of-concept clinical studies-however, being able to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes has been elusive. In this article, we review the challenges facing clinical cardioprotection research, and highlight future therapies for reducing MI size and preventing heart failure in patients presenting with STEMI at risk of myocardial reperfusion injury.

  11. Treatment strategies in myocardial bridging: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Ihsan; Bahcivan, Muzaffer; Durna, Kenan; Ibrahimov, Firdovsi; Erk, Noker Han; Yasar, Erdogan; Sahin, Mahmut

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is one of the nonatherosclerotic causes of coronary artery disease and is characterized by muscles overlying the intramyocardial course of a major epicardial coronary artery segment, leading to systolic compression. Myocardial bridging is considered a benign condition in most cases, but has been associated with serious cardiac events such as myocardial infarction and sudden death. We discuss the case of a 63-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with effort-induced angina, bradycardia, and left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiogram. On coronary angiography, we found significant myocardial bridging with total occlusion in the left anterior descending artery during systole. In patients with myocardial bridging, symptoms often manifest during exercise and with tachycardia. But it is interesting to note that our patient was bradycardic and became symptomatic with minimal effort. Thus, we thought that these emphasized its significance and affected treatment strategy.

  12. [Prognosis of the outcome of recurrent myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Ustinskova, N M; Syrkin, A L; Markova, A I; Zhuravel', A A

    1979-05-01

    The authors developed a method for prognosticating the outcome of recurrent myocardial infarction with the use of the Bayes formula. The diagnosis of recurrent myocardial infarction was made when necroses recurred in the myocardium during in-patient treatment for acute myocardial infarction. The prognosis was determined 72 hours after the recurrence of the necrosis. The prognostic signs characterized predominantly the degree of congestive circulatory failure and the frequency of disorders of cardiac rhythm in the acute period of myocardial infarction and recurrent myocardial infarction as well as in the interval betwen them (10 signs with informativeness of 0.117 to 0.05 were used.) The prognosis was erroneous in 8 of 70 patients who recovered from the disease and in 1 of 17 who died.

  13. [Research progress of myocardial tissue engineering scaffold materials].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yibing; Liao, Bin

    2011-03-01

    To review the current status and problems in the developing scaffolds for the myocardial tissue engineering application. The literature concerning the myocardial tissue engineering scaffold in recent years was reviewed extensively and summarized. As one of three elements for tissue engineering, a proper scaffold is very important for the proliferation and differentiation of the seeding cells. The naturally derived and synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) materials aim to closely resemble the in vivo microenvironment by acting as an active component of the developing tissue construct in myocardial tissue engineering. With the advent and continuous refinement of cell removal techniques, a new class of native ECM has emerged with some striking advantages. Through using the principle of composite scaffold, computers and other high-technology nano-polymer technology, surface modification of traditional biological materials in myocardial tissue engineering are expected to provide ideal myocardial scaffolds.

  14. Association of urinary cadmium and myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Charles J. Frithsen, Ivar L.

    2008-02-15

    We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals 45-79 years old in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) (NHANES III). Myocardial infarction was determined by electrocardiogram (ECG). Our sample included 4912 participants, which when weighted represented 52,234,055 Americans. We performed adjusted logistic regressions with the Framingham risk score, pack-years of smoking, race-ethnicity, and family history of heart attack, and diabetes as covariates. Urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.86 (95% CI 1.26-2.75) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine. This result supports the hypothesis that cadmium is associated with coronary heart disease. When logistic regressions were done by gender, women, but not men, showed a significant association of urinary cadmium with myocardial infarction. Women with urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.80 (95% CI 1.06-3.04) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine. When the analysis was restricted to never smokers (N=2187) urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.85 (95% CI 1.10-3.14) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine.

  15. Myocardial tissue engineering using electrospun nanofiber composites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Emerging trends for cardiac tissue engineering are focused on increasing the biocompatibility and tissue regeneration ability of artificial heart tissue by incorporating various cell sources and bioactive molecules. Although primary cardiomyocytes can be successfully implanted, clinical applications are restricted due to their low survival rates and poor proliferation. To develop successful cardiovascular tissue regeneration systems, new technologies must be introduced to improve myocardial regeneration. Electrospinning is a simple, versatile technique for fabricating nanofibers. Here, we discuss various biodegradable polymers (natural, synthetic, and combinatorial polymers) that can be used for fiber fabrication. We also describe a series of fiber modification methods that can increase cell survival, proliferation, and migration and provide supporting mechanical properties by mimicking micro-environment structures, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, the applications and types of nanofiber-based scaffolds for myocardial regeneration are described. Finally, fusion research methods combined with stem cells and scaffolds to improve biocompatibility are discussed. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(1): 26-36] PMID:26497579

  16. Incidence of myocardial infarction and weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staiger, Henning

    1982-08-01

    Extreme values of temperature and/or humidity in the temperate climate of Hamburg are not able to explain the influence of weather on day-to-day fluctuations of morbidity. Short term changes in weather are described by two objective classifications as deviation from the meteorological past: 1. the temperature-humidity-environment, derived from values of temperature and water vapour pressure at 07.00 h, 2. changes in the cyclonality, derived from the difference of 500 and 850 mbar vorticity values. Their suitability for human biometeorology is illustrated with a material of 1262 subjects who suffered from acute myocardial infarction. For these investigated cases it was known whether angina pectoris was already manifest before the infarction or not. The daily weather conditions have a significant effect on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction according to angina pectoris. Compared to subjects with angina pectoris those without angina pectoris show an increased susceptibility to infarction during changes in weather conditions to warmer/more humid and also during all strong changes in the cyclonality whereby the temperature-humidity-environment seems to leave only the role of an indicator too. Persons with a preceeding angina pectoris are more sensitive agains rapid changes in weather conditions.

  17. Infant acute myocarditis mimicking acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tilouche, Samia; Masmoudi, Tasnim; Sahnoun, Maha; Chkirbène, Youssef; Mestiri, Sarra; Boughamoura, Lamia; Ben Dhiab, Mohamed; Souguir, Mohamed Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the myocardium with heterogeneous clinical manifestations and progression. In clinical practice, although there are many methods of diagnosis of acute myocarditis, the diagnosis remains an embarrassing dilemma for clinicians. The authors report the case of 9-month-old infant who was brought to the Pediatric Emergency Department with sudden onset dyspnea. Examination disclosed heart failure and resuscitation was undertaken. The electrocardiogram showed an ST segment elevation in the anterolateral leads with a mirror image. Cardiac enzyme tests revealed a significant elevation of troponin and creatine phosphokinase levels. A diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction was made, and heparin therapy was prescribed. The infant died on the third day after admission with cardiogenic shock. The autopsy showed dilatation of the ventricles and massive edema of the lungs. Histological examinations of myocardium samples revealed the presence of a marked lymphocytic infiltrate dissociating myocardiocytes. Death was attributed to acute myocarditis. The authors call attention to the difficulties of differential diagnosis between acute myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction especially in children, and to the important therapeutic implications of a correct diagnosis. PMID:28210569

  18. Strategies and Challenges to Myocardial Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feric, Nicole T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cardiovascular diseases account for the majority of deaths globally and are a significant drain on economic resources. Although heart transplants and left-ventricle assist devices are the solution for some, the best chance for many patients who suffer because of a myocardial infarction, heart failure, or a congenital heart disease may be cell-based regenerative therapies. Such therapies can be divided into two categories: the application of a cell suspension and the implantation of an in vitro engineered tissue construct to the damaged area of the heart. Both strategies have their advantages and challenges, and in this review, we discuss the current state of the art in myocardial regeneration, the challenges to success, and the future direction of the field. Significance This article outlines the advantages and limitations of the cell injection and patch approaches to cardiac regenerative therapy. If the field is to move forward, some fundamental questions require answers, including the limitations to the use of animal models for human cell-transplantation studies; the best way to measure success in terms of functional improvements, histological integration, electrical coupling, and arrhythmias; and where the cells should be applied for maximal benefit—the epicardium or the myocardium. PMID:26933042

  19. The Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP)

    PubMed Central

    Smeeth, Liam; Walker, Lynne; Weston, Clive

    2010-01-01

    Aims of MINAP To audit the quality of care of patients with acute coronary syndrome and provide a resource for academic research. Quality of care interventions Feedback to hospitals, ambulance services and cardiac networks regarding benchmarking of performance against national standards and targets. Setting All 230 acute hospitals in England and Wales. Years: 2000-present. Population Consecutive patients, unconsented. Current number of records: 735 000. Startpoints Any acute coronary syndrome, including non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction, ST-elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina. Baseline data 123 fields covering demographic factors, co-morbid conditions and treatment in hospital. No blood resource. Data capture Manual entry by clerks, nurses or doctors onto Lotus Notes; non-financial incentives at hospital level. Data quality Hospitals perform an annual data validation study, where data are re-entered from the case notes in 20 randomly selected records that are held on the server. In 2008 data were >90% complete for 20 key fields, with >80% completeness for all but four of the remaining fields. Endpoints and linkages to other data All-cause mortality is obtained through linkage with Office for National Statistics. No other linkages exist at present. Access to data Available for research and audit by application to the MINAP Academic Group. http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/CLINICAL-STANDARDS/ORGANISATION/PARTNERSHIP/Pages/MINAP-.aspx. PMID:20659944

  20. Cardiovascular gene therapy for myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Scimia, Maria C; Gumpert, Anna M; Koch, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular gene therapy is the third most popular application for gene therapy, representing 8.4% of all gene therapy trials as reported in 2012 estimates. Gene therapy in cardiovascular disease is aiming to treat heart failure from ischemic and non-ischemic causes, peripheral artery disease, venous ulcer, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis and monogenic diseases, such as Fabry disease. Areas covered In this review, we will focus on elucidating current molecular targets for the treatment of ventricular dysfunction following myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, we will focus on the treatment of i) the clinical consequences of it, such as heart failure and residual myocardial ischemia and ii) etiological causes of MI (coronary vessels atherosclerosis, bypass venous graft disease, in-stent restenosis). Expert opinion We summarise the scheme of the review and the molecular targets either already at the gene therapy clinical trial phase or in the pipeline. These targets will be discussed below. Following this, we will focus on what we believe are the 4 prerequisites of success of any gene target therapy: safety, expression, specificity and efficacy (SESE). PMID:24328708

  1. [Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and melatonin].

    PubMed

    Sahna, Engin; Deniz, Esra; Aksulu, Hakki Engin

    2006-06-01

    It is believed that myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury is related to increased free radical generated and intracellular calcium overload especially during the period of reperfusion. The pineal secretory product, melatonin, is known to be a potent free radical scavenger, antioxidant and can inhibit the intracellular calcium overload. In this review, we have summarized the fundamental of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury and the effects of melatonin on myocardial damage that related to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. The total antioxidant capacity of human serum is related to melatonin levels. Incidence of sudden cardiac death is high in the morning hours. It has been shown that melatonin levels are significantly low at these times and patients with coronary heart disease have lower than normal individuals. These findings thought that melatonin would be valuable to test in clinical trials for prevention of possible ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury, especially life threatening arrhythmias and infarct size, effecting life quality, associated with thrombolysis, angioplasty, coronary artery spasm or coronary bypass surgery.

  2. Biomaterial strategies for alleviation of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Dan, Kai; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-01-01

    World Health Organization estimated that heart failure initiated by coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI) leads to 29 per cent of deaths worldwide. Heart failure is one of the leading causes of death in industrialized countries and is expected to become a global epidemic within the twenty-first century. MI, the main cause of heart failure, leads to a loss of cardiac tissue impairment of left ventricular function. The damaged left ventricle undergoes progressive ‘remodelling’ and chamber dilation, with myocyte slippage and fibroblast proliferation. Repair of diseased myocardium with in vitro-engineered cardiac muscle patch/injectable biopolymers with cells may become a viable option for heart failure patients. These events reflect an apparent lack of effective intrinsic mechanism for myocardial repair and regeneration. Motivated by the desire to develop minimally invasive procedures, the last 10 years observed growing efforts to develop injectable biomaterials with and without cells to treat cardiac failure. Biomaterials evaluated include alginate, fibrin, collagen, chitosan, self-assembling peptides, biopolymers and a range of synthetic hydrogels. The ultimate goal in therapeutic cardiac tissue engineering is to generate biocompatible, non-immunogenic heart muscle with morphological and functional properties similar to natural myocardium to repair MI. This review summarizes the properties of biomaterial substrates having sufficient mechanical stability, which stimulates the native collagen fibril structure for differentiating pluripotent stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocytes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21900319

  3. New perspectives on the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate myocardial salvage and myocardial hemorrhage after acute reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mangion, Kenneth; Corcoran, David; Carrick, David; Berry, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging enables the assessment of left ventricular function and pathology. In addition to established contrast-enhanced methods for the assessment of infarct size and microvascular obstruction, other infarct pathologies, such as myocardial edema and myocardial hemorrhage, can be identified using innovative CMR techniques. The initial extent of myocardial edema revealed by T2-weighted CMR has to be stable for edema to be taken as a retrospective marker of the area-at-risk, which is used to calculate myocardial salvage. The timing of edema assessment is important and should be focused within 2 - 7 days post-reperfusion. Some recent investigations have called into question the diagnostic validity of edema imaging after acute STEMI. Considering the results of these studies, as well as results from our own laboratory, we conclude that the time-course of edema post-STEMI is unimodal, not bimodal. Myocardial hemorrhage is the final consequence of severe vascular injury and a progressive and prognostically important complication early post-MI. Myocardial hemorrhage is a therapeutic target to limit reperfusion injury and infarct size post-STEMI.

  4. Acute oedema in the evaluation of microvascular reperfusion and myocardial salvage in reperfused myocardial infarction with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Abdel-Aty, Hassan; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Friedrich, Matthias G; Taylor, Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    The accurate measurement of myocardial salvage is critical to the ongoing refinement of reperfusion strategies in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) can define the area at risk in AMI by the presence of myocardial oedema, identified by high signal intensity on T(2)-weighted imaging with a short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence. In addition, myocardial necrosis can be identified with CMR delayed contrast enhanced imaging. In this prospective study we examined the relationship of acute oedema and necrosis with impaired microvascular reperfusion. We also evaluated acute oedema as a marker of the area at risk in AMI, for the purposes of documenting myocardial salvage. CMR was performed on 15 patients with (AMI), within 24h of successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was defined by a systolic thickening <40% (severe <20%). Microvascular reperfusion was evaluated during the acute phase of contrast wash-in. CMR was repeated 3 months post-PCI to evaluate recovery of LV function and final infarct size. Myocardial salvage was defined as the percentage of the area at risk that was not infarcted on follow up CMR. There was a significant correlation between impaired microvascular reperfusion and the extent of segmental oedema (R=0.363, P<0.01), but not myocardial necrosis (R=0.110, P>0.5). The extent of myocardial salvage correlated with recovery of systolic function (R=0.241, P<0.05), which was strongest in LV segments with severely reduced systolic function (R=0.422, P<0.01). In acutely reperfused AMI, oedema can be used to identify the area at risk for the purpose of calculating myocardial salvage. The correlation between myocardial oedema and reperfusion status suggests a pathological role of acute oedema in the impairment of microvascular reperfusion. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Creation of Chronic Myocardial Infarction in a Pig (Sus Scrofa) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Objectives: The goal of this protocol was to create myocardial infarctions in mini pigs using polystyrenemicrospheres to infarct a portion of the...underwent myocardial infarctions without misadventure. Infusion of polystyrene beads into a diagonal branch of the LAD resulted In a repeatable and...controlled myocardial Infarction.Conclusion: The method reported here provided consistent and repeatable myocardial infarcts with minimal morbidity.

  6. Heterogeneity of myocardial fatty acid tracer uptake in the porcine heart wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritman, Erik L.; Beighley, Patricia E.

    1997-05-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of myocardial perfusion has been recognized for many years. We have previously shown that whole-body CT is a method for providing the simultaneous measurements of heterogeneity of myocardial perfusion and myocardial blood volume. In the present study we found that the spatial distribution of myocardial metabolism, as indicated by the local accumulation of iodinated phenyl pentadecanoic acid, is slightly more heterogeneous than, but not statistically different from, the heterogeneity of perfusion and blood volume. These findings are consistent with the notion that a common factor is likely to play a major role in determining the spatial heterogeneity of myocardial intravascular blood volume, of myocardial perfusion and of myocardial metabolism.

  7. Cardioprotective Properties of Aerobic and Resistance Training Against Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Barboza, C A; Souza, G I H; Oliveira, J C M F; Silva, L M; Mostarda, C T; Dourado, P M M; Oyama, L M; Lira, F S; Irigoyen, M C; Rodrigues, B

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on ventricular morphometry and function, physical capacity, autonomic function, as well as on ventricular inflammatory status in trained rats prior to myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sedentary+Sham, sedentary+myocardial infarction, aerobic trained+myocardial infarction, and resistance trained+myocardial infarction. Sham and myocardial infarction were performed after training periods. In the days following the surgeries, evaluations were performed. Aerobic training prevents aerobic (to a greater extent) and resistance capacity impairments, ventricular dysfunction, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic disorders (vagal tonus decrease and sympathetic tonus increase) triggered by myocardial infarction. Resistance training was able to prevent negative changes to aerobic and resistance capacity (to a greater extent) but not to ventricular dysfunction, and it prevented cardiovascular sympathetic increments. Additionally, both types of training reduced left ventricle inflammatory cytokine concentration. Our results suggest that aerobic and, for the first time, dynamic resistance training were able to reduce sympathetic tonus to the heart and vessels, as well as preventing the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the left ventricle of trained groups. These data emphasizes the positive effects of aerobic and dynamic resistance training on the prevention of the negative changes triggered by myocardial infarction. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. [Environmental pollution with lead and myocardial infarction morbidity].

    PubMed

    Dulskiene, Virginija

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of exposure to ambient lead and other environmental factors on first myocardial infarction incidence. Epidemiological case-control study comprised 579 male cases (25-64 year old) of myocardial infarction, treated in Kaunas hospitals and 1777 controls of the same age group without ischemic heart disease. Myocardial infarction incidence in the area of low exposure to lead was 2.34 per 1000, while in the high exposure area it was 2.61 per 1000. We determined the distribution of potential myocardial infarction risk factors among cases and controls and calculated corresponding crude odds ratios. Variables considered for inclusion in multivariate logistic regression model were those with higher prevalence among cases and values of odds ratios greater than 1.5. The analysis revealed that smoking, arterial hypertension and stress significantly increased the risk of first myocardial infarction among 25-64 year old men. Occupational exposure to chemical substances increased myocardial infarction risk by 26%, while residential exposure to ambient lead concentrations, exceeding 0.225 microg/m (3), tended to increase myocardial infarction risk by 12% (95% PI 0.94-1.34).

  9. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-05-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. Resumo O estudo de viabilidade miocárdica é de grande importância para a orientação e manejo de pacientes que necessitam de cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica ou angioplastia. A técnica de realce tardio (RT) é precisa e transformou o estudo de viabilidade em um teste fácil, não só para a detecção de fibrose, mas também como um modelo binário para a detecção do que é ou não é viável. Uma fibrose identificada pelo RT é considerada como não viável quando igual ou maior do que 50% da área segmentar e como viável quando menor que 50%. A ressonância magnética cardíaca (RMC) também pode lançar mão de outras técnicas para estudo funcional e de perfusão para uma avaliação global da doença isquêmica do coração no mesmo exame. Este estudo tem como objetivo destacar os conceitos atuais e enfatizar amplamente o uso da RMC como um método que nos últimos 20 anos se tornou referência na detecção de infarto e avaliação de viabilidade miocárdica.

  10. Myocardial potency of Bio-tea against Isoproterenol induced myocardial damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Reema Orison; Shenoy, Chandrakala K

    2015-07-01

    Kombucha (Bio-tea) is a beverage produced by the fermentation of sugared black tea using a symbiotic association of bacteria and yeasts. Traditional claims about Kombucha report beneficial effects such as antibiotic properties, gastric regulation, relief from joint rheumatism and positive influence on the cholesterol level, arteriosclerosis, diabetes, and aging problems. The present investigation was carried out to understand the preventive effect of Kombucha on heart weight, blood glucose, total protein, lipid profile and cardiac markers in rats with myocardial damage induced using Isoproterenol. As Bio-tea is produced by fermenting tea, the parameters were compared in rats pre-treated with normal black tea and Bio-tea for 30 days followed by subcutaneous injection of Isoproterenol (85 mg/kg body weight). Normal rats as well as Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats were also used, which served as controls. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted control rats showed a significant increase in heart weight, blood glucose and cardiac markers and a decrease in plasma protein. Increased levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipids (LDL) and very low density lipids (VLDL) were also observed, while the high density lipid (HDL) content decreased. Bio-tea showed a higher preventive effect against myocardial infarction when compared to tea, as was observed by the significant reduction in heart weight, and blood glucose and increase in plasma albumin levels. Bio-tea significantly decreased cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL and VLDL while simultaneously increasing the levels of HDL. Similarly a decrease in leakage of cardiac markers from the myocardium was also observed.

  11. Effect of eating on thallium-201 myocardial redistribution after myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Angello, D.A.; Wilson, R.A.; Palac, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    To determine whether eating a high-carbohydrate meal between initial and delayed postexercise thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging affects detection of Tl-201 redistribution during exercise stress testing, 16 patients with stable angina performed 2 Tl-201 treadmill exercise stress tests within a 14-day interval. Immediately after initial postexercise imaging, patients either drank a commercially available instant breakfast preparation for the intervention test or drank an equivalent volume of water for the control test. Comparable exercise workloads were achieved by exercising patients to the same heart rate for both tests. The order of the 2 (intervention and control) tests were randomized. All patients had at least 1 region of Tl-201 myocardial redistribution on either their eating or control test scans, although only 7 of the 16 had positive treadmill exercise test responses. Forty-six regions showing Tl-201 myocardial redistribution were identified in all 144 regions examined. Significantly more of these regions were identified on control test scans than on eating test scans: 11 of 46 on both test scans, 6 of 46 only on eating test scans and 29 of 46 only on control scans (p less than 0.001). Consistent with results of the quantitative regional analysis, the percentage of Tl-201 clearance over 4 hours in the 46 Tl-201 myocardial redistribution regions was 39 +/- 8% for the eating tests and 29 +/- 8% for control tests (mean +/- standard deviation, p less than 0.003). In 4 patients diagnosis of transient ischemia would have been missed because their 14 Tl-201 myocardial redistribution regions were detected only on the control test scans.

  12. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  13. Image-driven constitutive modeling of myocardial fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Vicky Y.; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Wilson, Alexander J.; Sands, Gregory B.; Young, Alistair A.; LeGrice, Ian J.; Nash, Martyn P.

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a pathological process that occurs during heart failure (HF). It involves microstructural remodeling of normal myocardial tissue, and consequent changes in both cardiac geometry and function. The role of myocardial structural remodeling in the progression of HF remains poorly understood. We propose a constitutive modeling framework, informed by high-resolution images of cardiac tissue structure, to model the mechanical response of normal and fibrotic myocardium. This image-driven constitutive modeling approach allows us to better reproduce and understand the relationship between structural and functional remodeling of ventricular myocardium during HF.

  14. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  15. Disseminated mucormycosis with myocardial involvement in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Nam, Y; Jung, J; Park, S S; Kim, S J; Shin, S J; Choi, J H; Kim, M; Yoon, H E

    2015-12-01

    We report the case of a renal transplant recipient with pulmonary and splenic mucormycosis whose demise was accelerated by a myocardial abscess. Once pulmonary and splenic mucormycosis was diagnosed, liposomal amphotericin B was started and immunosuppressant treatments were discontinued. The pulmonary cavities regressed during treatment, but new myocardial and peri-allograft abscesses developed. The myocardial abscess diffusely infiltrated the left ventricular wall and was associated with akinesia, which led to sudden cardiac arrest. This case demonstrates a rare manifestation of mucormycosis and highlights the fatality and invasiveness of this infection.

  16. Compensatory mechanisms for cardiac dysfunction in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Gaudron, P; Eilles, C; Schorb, W; Kochsiek, K

    1991-01-01

    Loss of contractile myocardial tissue by myocardial infarction would result in depressed cardiac output if compensatory mechanisms would not be operative. Frank-Straub-Starling-mechanism and increased heart rate and contractility due to sympathetic stimulation are unlikely to chronically compensate for cardiac dysfunction. Structural left ventricular dilatation may be compensatory, but results in increased wall stress and, ultimately, in progressive dilatation and heart failure. In patients with myocardial infarction, we have shown left-ventricular dilatation in dependence of infarct size and time after infarction. Dilatation is compensatory first and normalizes stroke volume. However, left ventricular dilatation progresses without further hemodynamic profit and, thus, may participate in development of heart failure.

  17. Air Versus Oxygen in ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Stub, Dion; Smith, Karen; Bernard, Stephen; Nehme, Ziad; Stephenson, Michael; Bray, Janet E; Cameron, Peter; Barger, Bill; Ellims, Andris H; Taylor, Andrew J; Meredith, Ian T; Kaye, David M

    2015-06-16

    Oxygen is commonly administered to patients with ST-elevation-myocardial infarction despite previous studies suggesting a possible increase in myocardial injury as a result of coronary vasoconstriction and heightened oxidative stress. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial comparing oxygen (8 L/min) with no supplemental oxygen in patients with ST-elevation-myocardial infarction diagnosed on paramedic 12-lead ECG. Of 638 patients randomized, 441 patients had confirmed ST-elevation-myocardial infarction and underwent primary end-point analysis. The primary end point was myocardial infarct size as assessed by cardiac enzymes, troponin I, and creatine kinase. Secondary end points included recurrent myocardial infarction, cardiac arrhythmia, and myocardial infarct size assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months. Mean peak troponin was similar in the oxygen and no oxygen groups (57.4 versus 48.0 μg/L; ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.56; P=0.18). There was a significant increase in mean peak creatine kinase in the oxygen group compared with the no oxygen group (1948 versus 1543 U/L; means ratio, 1.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.52; P=0.01). There was an increase in the rate of recurrent myocardial infarction in the oxygen group compared with the no oxygen group (5.5% versus 0.9%; P=0.006) and an increase in frequency of cardiac arrhythmia (40.4% versus 31.4%; P=0.05). At 6 months, the oxygen group had an increase in myocardial infarct size on cardiac magnetic resonance (n=139; 20.3 versus 13.1 g; P=0.04). Supplemental oxygen therapy in patients with ST-elevation-myocardial infarction but without hypoxia may increase early myocardial injury and was associated with larger myocardial infarct size assessed at 6 months. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01272713. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Acute myocardial infarction and renal failure following naphtha ingestion.

    PubMed

    Roberge, R J; Crippen, D R; Jayadevappa, D; Kosek, T L

    2001-10-01

    We present a case of a non-Q wave myocardial infarction and acute renal failure following an ingestion of naphtha, a petroleum distillate composed primarily of hydrocarbons. The patient's renal, metabolic, and cardiac status improved over several days with aggressive volume replacement and bicarbonate therapy. Acute cardiotoxic effects of hydrocarbon exposure generally manifest as dysrhythmias, secondary to myocardial sensitization to circulating catecholamines, or, possibly, coronary vasospasm. Ischemia from associated hypotension or direct myocardial toxicity are other potential causes of naphtha-related cardiac injury.

  19. 3D perfusion mapping in the intact mouse heart after myocardial infarction using myocardial contrast echocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinbo; Yang, Zequan; French, Brent A.; Hossack, John A.

    2005-04-01

    An intact mouse model of surgically-induced myocardial infarction (MI) caused by permanent occlusion of the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery was studied. Normal mice with no occlusion were also studied as controls. For each mouse, contrast enhanced ultrasound images of the heart were acquired in parallel cross-sections perpendicular to the sternum at millimeter increments. For accurate 3D reconstruction, ECG gating and a tri-axial adjustable micromanipulator were used for temporal and spatial registration. Ultrasound images at steady-state of blood refilling were color-coded in each slice to show relative perfusion. Myocardial perfusion defects and necrosis were also examined postmortem by staining with Phthalo blue and TTC red dyes. Good correlation (R>0.93) in perfused area size was observed between in vivo measurements and histological staining. A 3D multi-slice model and a 3D rendering of perfusion distribution were created and showed a promising match with postmortem results, lending further credence to its use as a more comprehensive and more reliable tool for in vivo assessment of myocardial perfusion than 2D tomographic analysis.

  20. Lidocaine Enhances Contractile Function of Ischemic Myocardial Regions in Mouse Model of Sustained Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Gabriela; Osto, Elena; Jakob, Philipp; Krasniqi, Nazmi; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Perioperative myocardial ischemia is common in high-risk patients. The use of interventional revascularisation or even thrombolysis is limited in this patient subset due to exceedingly high bleeding risks. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) with lidocaine had been suggested to reduce infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death in ischemia/reperfusion models. However, the impact of lidocaine on cardiac function during sustained ischemia still remains unclear. Methods Sustained myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery in 12–16 weeks old male BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous lidocaine (30 mg/kg) was used to block VGSC. Cardiac function was quantified at baseline and at 72h by conventional and speckle-tracking based echocardiography to allow high-sensitivity in vivo phenotyping. Infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were assessed post mortem histologically and indirectly using troponin measurements. Results Ischemia strongly impaired both, global systolic and diastolic function, which were partially rescued in lidocaine treated in mice. No differences regarding infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were observed. Mechanistically, and as shown with speckle-tracking analysis, lidocaine specifically improves residual contractility in the ischemic but not in the remote, non-ischemic myocardium. Conclusion VGSC blockade with lidocaine rescues function of ischemic myocardium as a potential bridging to revascularisation in the setting of perioperative myocardial ischemia. PMID:27140425

  1. The Impact of Early Regular Cardiac Rehabilitation Program on Myocardial Function after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul; Kim, Duk You

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine if an early regular cardiac rehabilitation program would have an adverse effect on myocardial function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Method Patients who received percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after AMI were divided into the exercise group and control group in accordance with their willingness to participate. Patients in the exercise group (n=18) received ECG monitored exercise for six weeks and were instructed to maintain self exercise in their communities for four months. The control group (n=16) patients were just instructed of risk factor control. All the subjects underwent echocardiography at the time of the AMI as well as six months later. The echocardiography parameters, including the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), stroke volume (SV), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) and end-systolic diameter (LVESD), were measured. Results In the exercise group, the LVEF increased to 59.58±9.24% and 61.58±9.63% after six weeks and six months, respectively (p<0.05), but SV, LVEDD and LVESD did not change (p>0.05). Conclusion Active participation in the cardiac rehabilitation program approximately two weeks after AMI did not have an adverse effect on the size of the left ventricle and myocardial function. PMID:22506170

  2. [Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy improved myocardial micro-vascular circulation after acute myocardial infarction at early stage in pigs].

    PubMed

    Tao, Si-ming; Guo, Tao; Wang, Yue; Cai, Hong-yan; Yang, Chao

    2011-03-01

    To explore the effect of low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy to improve myocardial micro-vascular circulation after acute myocardial infarction at the early stage in pig model. A total of 25 domestic pigs were used in this study. Model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was created successfully by the implantation of angioplasty balloon in mid-distal segment of left anterior descending coronary artery (n=20). These AMI animals were divided two groups. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy to the ischemic myocardial region was performed for the group of shock wave therapy (n=15) at 3 days after acute myocardial infarction; The remaining AMI animals were treated in the same manner, but without the shock wave therapy (n=5), The other health animals (n=5) were used as blank control group. The number of endothelium cell, capillary density, VEGF mRNA level and collateral vessel Rentrop score in each group were evaluated and compared. Shock wave treatment up-regulated the mRNA expression of VEGF in the model of acute myocardial infarction (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the number of capillaries was significantly higher in the shock wave group than that of positive and blank control group (P < 0.05). The Rentrop score of collateral vessel indicated the reconstruction of collateral circulation in shock wave group. Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy could effectively induce angiogenesis, up-regulate the expression of angiogenic factor, resulting in an improvement in micro-vascular circulation reconstruction of ischemic myocardial region.

  3. Computing myocardial motion in 4-dimensional echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ryan; Sprouse, Chad; Pinheiro, Aurélio; Abraham, Theodore; Burlina, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    We describe a novel method for computing dense 3D myocardial motion with high accuracy in four-dimensional (4D) echocardiography (3 dimensions spatial plus time). The method is based on a classic variational optical flow technique but exploits modern developments in optical flow research to utilize the full capabilities of 4D echocardiography. Using a variety of metrics, we present an in-depth performance evaluation of the method on synthetic, phantom, and intraoperative 4D transesophageal echocardiographic data. When compared with state-of-the-art optical flow and speckle tracking techniques currently found in 4D echocardiography, the method we present shows notable improvements in error rates. We believe the performance improvements shown can have a positive impact when the method is used as input for various applications, such as strain computation, biomechanical modeling, and automated diagnostics.

  4. [Sexuality in acute myocardial infarction patients].

    PubMed

    Casado Dones, Ma J; de Andrés Gimeno, B; Moreno González, C; Fernández Balcones, C; Cruz Martín, R Ma; Colmenar García, C

    2002-01-01

    We as nurses in the Coronary Unit we do not see the sexuality of the patients sufficiently addressed neither by us nor by the patients themselves. In this article we are trying to analize the reasons and to emphasize the need to include this subject in our Nursing Problem List. In it we explaine the fears and the wrong ideas that we have identified in our patients. The sexual function is not affected by a myocardial infarction but psychological factors, age, drugs and other associated diseases might be a reason. A quiet enviroment, a fit training plan and looking for personalise proper alternatives may help the patient to start a satisfactory sexual life again.

  5. PPARs: Protectors or Opponents of Myocardial Function?

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Christine J.; Lieu, Melissa; Drosatos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Over 5 million people in the United States suffer from the complications of heart failure (HF), which is a rapidly expanding health complication. Disorders that contribute to HF include ischemic cardiac disease, cardiomyopathies, and hypertension. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear receptor family. There are three PPAR isoforms: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARδ. They can be activated by endogenous ligands, such as fatty acids, as well as by pharmacologic agents. Activators of PPARs are used for treating several metabolic complications, such as diabetes and hyperlipidemia that are directly or indirectly associated with HF. However, some of these drugs have adverse effects that compromise cardiac function. This review article aims to summarize the current basic and clinical research findings of the beneficial or detrimental effects of PPAR biology on myocardial function. PMID:26713088

  6. Regenerating functional heart tissue for myocardial repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcon, Andre; Bozkulak, Esra Cagavi; Qyang, Yibing

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the number of patients with the disease is likely to grow with the continual decline in health for most of the developed world. Heart transplantation is one of the only treatment options for heart failure due to an acute myocardial infarction, but limited donor supply and organ rejection limit its widespread use. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, or cellular implantation, combined with various tissue-engineering methods aims to regenerate functional heart tissue. This review highlights the numerous cell sources that have been used to regenerate the heart as well as cover the wide range of tissue-engineering strategies that have been devised to optimize the delivery of these cells. It will probably be a long time before an effective regenerative therapy can make a serious impact at the bedside. PMID:22388688

  7. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. However, new imaging methods can be used to assess biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. We review molecular imaging techniques for evaluating the biology of infarct healing and repair. Specifically, we cover recent advances in imaging the various phases of MI and infarct healing such as apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition, and scar formation. Significant progress has been made in preclinical molecular imaging, and future challenges include translation of these methods to clinical practice. PMID:21869911

  8. Adenosine thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation as an adjunct to myocardial perfusion imaging has become increasingly important in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease, in view of the large number of patients who cannot perform an adequate exercise test or in whom contraindications render exercise inappropriate. Adenosine is a very potent coronary vasodilator and when combined with thallium 201 scintigraphy produces images of high quality, with the added advantages of a very short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and the ability to adjust the dose during the infusion, which may enhance safety and curtail the duration of side effects. The reported sensitivity and specificity of adenosine thallium 201 scintigraphy for the detection of coronary artery disease are high and at least comparable with imaging after exercise or dipyridamole administration. 23 refs.

  9. Closed-chest myocardial ischaemia in dog.

    PubMed

    Birkui, P J; Georgiopoulos, G; Riche, M C; Perrault, M; Puisieux, F; Merland, J J; Saumont, R

    1981-01-01

    Myocardial ischaemia in dog was induced with releasable material in the distal segment of the anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery. Three releasable materials were tested: gel foam, wax microspheres (120-200 micron) and latex balloons, using different methods of introduction. The left carotid route was selected for introduction of a preformed catheter. The gel foam and wax microspheres caused transitory ischaemia, which was proximal for the foam and distal for the microspheres. The balloons made it possible to standardize the ischaemia as its localization and duration could be selected. This material therefore provided a model for stable chronic ischaemia. Nine dogs were observed by means of precordial mapping (36 electrodes) during the phase following ischaemia or for a period of 4 weeks. The results of these experiments are analysed and correlated with histological results for the post-mortem phase.

  10. [Compromized myocardial perfusion in arrhythmias (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Simon, H; Neumann, G; Felix, R; Hedde, H; Schaede, A; Thurn, P; Winkler, C

    1977-09-15

    In 7 patients with arrhythmias of various origin the myocardial scintigram displayed either a diffuse or circumscript defect of the perfusion. The coronary arteriogram was normal in all patients. The localized defect of the perfusion in 2 patients was in the region of the upper part of the interventricular septum. Both had a left bundle brunch block. A correlation between the perfusion defect and the electrophysiological abnormality seems probable. The perfusion defect in one of the patients is most probably caused by a previous myocarditis followed by fibrous changes. In the other 6 patients the cause for the perfusion defect is not obvious. A history of myocarditis is missing. The presence of "small vessel disease" in those patients has however to be considered. Our results point to the relation between an abnormality of the microcirculation and arrhythmias in younger patients.

  11. Recovery of midlife women from myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Sherri; Thomas, Sandra P

    2012-01-01

    We conducted this qualitative study to elicit the experiences of midlife women who survived myocardial infarctions (MIs) and returned home to recover. We selected a phenomenological research method based on the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty. The researcher interviewed eight women ranging in age from 45 to 65. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the approach of Thomas and Pollio. For the women in this study, figural themes of the experience of the MI and recovery must be understood within the existential grounds of the body and others. Themes included the following: (a) interference, (b) freedom/unfreedom, (c) knowing/not knowing, and (d) living in fear. Based on the findings of this study, we suggest that women need to be better educated before leaving the hospital. Returning home post MI was a difficult time, and the women in this study felt a support group for female MI survivors was needed.

  12. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes.

  13. Pizza and risk of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gallus, S; Tavani, A; La Vecchia, C

    2004-11-01

    Pizza eating has been favourably related to the risk of cardiovascular disease, but the data are limited. To evaluate the potential role of pizza consumption on the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), we considered data from an Italian study. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study on 507 cases of nonfatal AMI and 478 controls in Milan, Italy, between 1995 and 1999. The multivariate odds ratios were 0.78 for occasional, 0.62 for regular and 0.44 for frequent eaters. The estimates were similar across strata of age, sex, smoking and other major covariates. Some of the ingredients of pizza have been shown to have a favourable influence on the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, there is no single explanation for the present findings. Pizza may in fact represent a general indicator of Italian diet, that has been shown to have potential cardiovascular benefits.

  14. Caffeine reduces dipyridamole-induced myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Corstens, F.H.; Thien, T. )

    1989-10-01

    The mechanism of action of coronary vasodilation after dipyridamole may be based on inhibition of cellular uptake of circulating endogenous adenosine. Since caffeine has been reported to be a competitive antagonist of adenosine we studied the effect of caffeine on the outcome of dipiridamole-{sup 201}Tl cardiac imaging in one patient. During caffeine abstinence dipyridamole induced myocardial ischemia with down-slope ST depressions on the ECG, and reversible perfusion defects on the scintigrams. When the test was repeated 1 wk later on similar conditions, but now shortly after infusion of caffeine (4 mg/kg), the ECG showed nodepressions, and the scintigrams only slight signs of ischemia. We conclude that when caffeine abstinence is not sufficient, the widespread use of coffee and related products may be responsible for false-negative findings in dipyridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging.

  15. Gender and circadian effects of myocardial infarctions.

    PubMed

    Matura, Lea Ann

    2010-02-01

    This study determines if there are differences in circadian effects of myocardial infarctions (MIs) and MI type, non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI) and ST elevation MI (STEMI), between females and males. A two-group, nonexperimental chart review was conducted. A total of 273 randomly selected patients with an acute MI were included. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, t test and chi square to determine differences between the groups. Of the 109 females, 26% had MI symptoms begin at night, 30% in the morning, 29% in the afternoon, and 15% in the evening (p = .067). In comparison, of the 164 males, 27% had MIs at night, 30% morning, 32% afternoon, and 11% evening (p < .001). There was no circadian difference between females and males and the time of day MI-related symptoms began (p = .887) or a MItype circadian effect (p = 0.466). The majority of patients had MIs during the daytime hours.

  16. Secondary prevention of myocardial infarction with drugs.

    PubMed

    Klimt, C R; Forman, S A

    1983-05-01

    Clinical trials in the field of secondary prevention of myocardial infarctions are reviewed, with emphasis on those studies that were randomized and included at least 100 patients. Standardized total mortality data, when available, are provided. Five groups of drugs are reviewed: 1) antiarrhythmic drugs, including studies of phenytoin, tocainide, mexiletine and aprindine. Important, commonly used drugs in this group, which apparently have not been submitted to clinical trials, include procainamide and lidocaine; 2) lipid-lowering drugs, including estradiol, conjugated equine estrogen, dextrothyroxine, clofibrate and nicotinic acid; 3) anticoagulant drugs, the oldest and most controversial preventive drug measure. In this group, only the oral drug derivatives of indandione or coumarin have been tested, and no appropriate studies of parenteral heparin were found; 4) platelet-active drugs--six studies dealing with aspirin alone, one combining aspirin and dipyridamole, and one study of sulfinpyrazone are reviewed; and 5) beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, including practolol and timolol.

  17. [Myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Espinosa, R; Badui, E; Narvaez, M G; Hurtado, R

    1986-01-01

    We retrospectively studied 36 cases of myocardial Infarction (MI) with normal coronary arteries, which had been obtained from a total of 538 patients with MI admitted to our Hospital in the last 3 years. All patients had coronary angiogram and left ventriculogram. The following data was reviewed: age, sex, coronary risk factors, clinical picture, short and long term follow up. The angiography findings were correlated. The average age of the patients was 42 years, 75% were male and 25% female. The 36 cases represent 7% of the total MI. Cigarette smoking was the only important risk factor. MI was the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease in 94% of the cases. The ejection fraction was normal in 94%; 27.6% presented some complication during the acute event. In the long term follow; up to 88% of the patients are asymptomatic. The physiopathologic mechanisms are analyzed.

  18. Myocardial infarction following convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures.

    PubMed

    Montepietra, Sara; Cattaneo, Luigi; Granella, Franco; Maurizio, Annarita; Sasso, Enrico; Pavesi, Giovanni; Bortone, Ermelinda

    2009-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) has been rarely reported in association with seizures, and only of convulsive type. We describe a series of five patients observed over a 4-year period, who presented MI immediately following seizures, either convulsive or nonconvulsive. Patient 1 had pre-existent coronary disease (CD) and presented multiple focal nonconvulsive seizures. Patient 2 had no CD, normal coronary angiography and presented secondary generalized convulsive seizures. Patient 3 had no history of CD, normal angiography and had a first single convulsive seizure. Patient 4 had severe CD and suffered from a single convulsive event. Patient 5 had a partial and a generalized seizure and had no known CD. MI following seizures is not an exceptional event and can occur in a spectrum of conditions including single or repeated, convulsive or nonconvulsive seizures, in patients with or without pre-existing coronary disease. We suggest that the occurrence of MI should be considered in epileptic patients during and shortly after seizures.

  19. Noncontraceptive estrogens and nonfatal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jick, H; Dinan, B; Rothman, K J

    1978-04-03

    We obtained information on 107 women younger than 46 years discharged from a hospital with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. In the series there were 17 women aged 39 to 45 years who were otherwise apparently healthy and had had a natural menopause, hysterectomy, or tubal ligation or whose spouse had had a vasectomy. Among them, nine (53%) were taking noncontraceptive estrogens just prior to admission. Among 34 control women, four (12%) were taking estrogens. The relative risk estimate, comparing estrogen users with nonusers, is 7.5, with 90% confidence limits of 2.4 and 24. All but one of the 17 ml subjects were cigarette smokers. While this illness is rare in most healthy young women, the risk in women older than about 38 years who both smoke and take estrogens appears to be substantial.

  20. Acute prolongation of myocardial refractoriness by sotalol.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D H

    1982-01-01

    Sotalol, a beta adrenoceptor antagonist, was given intravenously to 15 patients with accessory atrioventricular pathways during intracardiac electrophysiological studies. Eleven patients had the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and four patients had concealed left sided accessory pathways. Four patients were restudied while receiving oral sotalol. In contrast to the actions typical of beta blocking agents, intravenous sotalol prolonged the effective refractory periods of the ventricles and accessory pathways and reduced the ventricular response to atrial fibrillation in the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Similar results were obtained with oral administration. These findings support the observation that sotalol, unlike other beta blocking agents. causes acute prolongation of the myocardial action potential and suggest that this action might be of therapeutic use. PMID:7082500

  1. A murine model of myocardial microvascular thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Patricia D.; Edelberg, Jay M.; Picard, Michael H.; Foulkes, Andrea S.; Mamuya, Wilfred; Weiler-Guettler, Hartmut; Rubin, Robert H.; Gilbert, Peter; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    Disorders of hemostasis lead to vascular pathology. Endothelium-derived gene products play a critical role in the formation and degradation of fibrin. We sought to characterize the importance of these locally produced factors in the formation of fibrin in the cardiac macrovasculature and microvasculature. This study used mice with modifications of the thrombomodulin (TM) gene, the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) gene, and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene. The results revealed that tPA played the most important role in local regulation of fibrin deposition in the heart, with lesser contributions by TM and uPA (least significant). Moreover, a synergistic relationship in fibrin formation existed in mice with concomitant modifications of tPA and TM, resulting in myocardial necrosis and depressed cardiac function. The data were fit to a statistical model that may offer a foundation for examination of hemostasis-regulating gene interactions. PMID:10487767

  2. Oxygen therapy for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Juan B; Burls, Amanda; Emparanza, José I; Bayliss, Susan E; Quinn, Tom

    2016-12-19

    Oxygen (O2) is widely used in people with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Previous systematic reviews concluded that there was insufficient evidence to know whether oxygen reduced, increased or had no effect on heart ischaemia or infarct size. Our first Cochrane review in 2010 also concluded there was insufficient evidence to know whether oxygen should be used. Since 2010, the lack of evidence to support this widely used intervention has attracted considerable attention, prompting further trials of oxygen therapy in myocardial infarction patients. It is thus important to update this Cochrane review. To assess the effects of routine use of inhaled oxygen for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We searched the following bibliographic databases on 6 June 2015: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO) and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters). LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) was last searched in September 2016. We also contacted experts to identify eligible studies. We applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials in people with suspected or proven AMI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-STEMI) within 24 hours after onset, in which the intervention was inhaled oxygen (at normal pressure) compared to air, regardless of co-therapies provided to participants in both arms of the trial. Two authors independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of identified studies to see if they met the inclusion criteria and independently undertook the data extraction. We assessed the quality of studies and the risk of bias according to guidance in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The primary outcome was death. The measure of effect used was the risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). We used the GRADE approach to evaluate the quality of the evidence and the GRADE profiler (GRADEpro) to

  3. Metformin and Myocardial Injury in Patients With Diabetes and ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Suresh; Kozikowski, Andrzej; Makaryus, Amgad N; Pekmezaris, Renee; Zeltser, Roman; Akerman, Meredith; Lesser, Martin; Wolf-Klein, Gisele

    2015-10-22

    Although animal studies have documented metformin's cardioprotective effects, the impact in humans remains elusive. The study objective was to explore the association between metformin and myocardial infarct size in patients with diabetes presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Data extraction used the National Cardiovascular Data CathPCI Registry in all patients with diabetes aged >18 years presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction at 2 academic medical centers from January 2010 to December 2013. The exposure of interest was ongoing metformin use before the event. Propensity score matching was used for the metformin and nonmetformin groups on key prognostic variables. All matched pairs had acceptable D scores of <10%, confirming an efficient matching procedure. The primary outcome was myocardial infarct size, reflected by peak serum creatine kinase-myocardial band, troponin T, and hospital discharge left ventricular ejection fraction. Of all 1726 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction cases reviewed, 493 patients had diabetes (28.5%), with 208 metformin users (42.1%) and 285 nonusers. Matched pairs analysis yielded 137 cases per group. The difference between metformin and nonmetformin groups was -18.1 ng/mL (95% CI -55.0 to 18.8; P=0.56) for total peak serum creatine kinase-myocardial band and -1.1 ng/mL (95% CI -2.8 to 0.5; P=0.41) for troponin T. Median discharge left ventricular ejection fraction in both groups was 45, and the difference between metformin and nonmetformin users was 0.7% (95% CI -2.2 to 3.6; P=0.99). No statistically significant association of cardioprotection was found between metformin and myocardial infarct size in patients with diabetes and acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Vitexin exerts cardioprotective effect on chronic myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats via inhibiting myocardial apoptosis and lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Che, Xia; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Junyan; Peng, Chengfeng; Zhen, Yilan; Shao, Xu; Zhang, Gongliang; Dong, Liuyi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the cardioprotective effect of vitexin on chronic myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats and potential mechanisms. Methods: A chronic myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury model was established by ligating left anterior descending coronary for 60 minutes, and followed by reperfusion for 14 days. After 2 weeks ischemia/reperfusion, cardiac function was measured to assess myocardial injury. The level of ST segment was recorded in different periods by electrocardiograph. The change of left ventricular function and myocardial reaction degree of fibrosis of heart was investigated by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and Sirius red staining. Endothelium-dependent relaxations due to acetylcholine were observed in isolated rat thoracic aortic ring preparation. The blood samples were collected to measure the levels of MDA, the activities of SOD and NADPH in serum. Epac1, Rap1, Bax and Bcl-2 were examined by using Western Blotting. Results: Vitexin exerted significant protective effect on chronic myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, improved obviously left ventricular diastolic function and reduced myocardial reactive fibrosis degree in rats of myocardial ischemia. Medium and high-dose vitexin groups presented a significant decrease in Bax, Epac1 and Rap1 production and increase in Bcl-2 compared to the I/R group. It may be related to preventing myocardial cells from apoptosis, improving myocardial diastolic function and inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Conclusions: Vitexin is a cardioprotective herb, which may be a promising useful complementary and alternative medicine for patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:27648122

  5. Puerarin prevents isoprenaline-induced myocardial fibrosis in mice by reduction of myocardial TGF-β1 expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Xue, Jie; Xie, Meilin

    2012-09-01

    It has been reported that soy isoflavones could significantly increase peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ gene expressions, while the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ may attenuate myocardial fibrosis. Puerarin is the main isoflavone isolated from the root of the wild leguminous creeper Pueraria lobata (Willd) Ohwi, so we thought that puerarin could inhibit myocardial fibrotic formation. A mouse myocardial fibrotic model was induced by hypodermic injection of isoprenaline when these mice were simultaneously treated with puerarin 600 and 1200 mg/kg by gavage for 40 days, respectively. The results showed that puerarin could significantly improve myocardial fibrosis and decrease the collagen accumulation, collagen volume fraction, hydroxyproline content in myocardial tissue and cardiac weight index. The results from reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction indicated that the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in myocardial tissue was decreased, while the mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ were increased, in the puerarin groups as compared with the model group. Importantly, puerarin could significantly decrease the protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β1 and nuclear factor-κB in myocardial tissue. These results suggested that puerarin could prevent isoprenaline-induced myocardial fibrosis in mice, and its mechanisms might be related to reduction of transforming growth factor-β1 expression via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ and subsequent inhibition of nuclear factor-κB in myocardial tissue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-20

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Myocardial Rotation and Torsion in Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Sin; Park, Sora

    2016-01-01

    Background The speckle tracking echocardiography can benefit to assess the regional myocardial deformations. Although, previous reports suggested no significant change in left ventricular (LV) torsion with aging, there are certain differences in LV rotation at the base and apex. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change and relationship of LV rotation for torsion with aging in children. Methods Forty healthy children were recruited and divided into two groups of twenty based on whether the children were preschool-age (2–6 years of age) or school-age (7–12 years of age). After obtaining conventional echocardiographic data, apical and basal short axis rotation were assessed with speckle tracking echocardiography. LV rotation in the basal and apical short axis planes was determined using six myocardial segments along the central axis. Results Apical and basal LV rotation did not show the statistical difference with increased age between preschool- and school-age children. Apical radial strain showed significant higher values in preschool-age children, especially at the anterior (52.8 ± 17.4% vs. 34.7 ± 23.2%, p < 0.02), lateral (55.8 ± 20.4% vs. 36.1 ± 22.7%, p < 0.02), and posterior segments (57.1 ± 17.6% vs. 38.5 ± 21.7%, p < 0.01). The torsion values did not demonstrate the statistical difference between two groups. Conclusion This study revealed the tendency of higher rotation values in preschool-age children than in school-age children. The lesser values of rotation and torsion with increased age during childhood warrant further investigation. PMID:27721953

  8. Mineralocorticoid excess, dietary sodium, and myocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Brilla, C G; Weber, K T

    1992-12-01

    Unlike the non-renin-dependent hypertension associated with infrarenal aorta banding, an abnormal accumulation of fibrillar collagen occurs within the adventitia of intramural coronary arteries and neighboring interstitial space of the left and right ventricles in arterial hypertension associated with primary or secondary hyperaldosteronism. Based on these findings it was suggested that this interstitial and perivascular fibrosis was mediated by mineralocorticoid excess (i.e., elevated plasma aldosterone relative to dietary sodium) and not ventricular loading. To further address the importance of mineralocorticoid excess, we examined the fibrous tissue response after 8 weeks in the following uninephrectomized rat groups receiving a high-sodium diet: D-aldosterone (ALDO) infusion (0.75 micrograms/hr sc, n = 16); deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) administration (100 mg/kg/wk sc, n = 8); and administration of a mineralocorticoid-like substance, glycyrrhizic acid (GA; 1 gm kg/wk sc, n = 8). Compared with ALDO infusion and sodium deprivation (n = 9), untreated controls (n = 14), and uninephrectomized rats with high dietary sodium and no mineralocorticoid administration (n = 15), we found (1) hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy with all forms of mineralocorticoid excess; (2) a rise in collagen volume fraction with ALDO, and an increase in perivascular collagen with DOCA; and (3) no observance of myocardial fibrosis with GA or experimental controls, including ALDO infusion and sodium deprivation. Thus, in the presence of enhanced sodium intake, chronic administration of ALDO or DOCA are associated with collagen accumulation in the myocardium, whereas with the mineralocorticoid-like compound GA, myocardial fibrosis was not seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Acetaminophen and myocardial infarction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Gary F; Rork, Tyler H; Spiler, Norell M; Golfetti, Roseli

    2004-11-01

    The hypothesis that acetaminophen can reduce necrosis during myocardial infarction was tested in male dogs. Two groups were studied: vehicle- (n=10) and acetaminophen-treated (n=10) dogs. All dogs were obtained from the same vendor, and there were no significant differences in their ages (18 +/- 2 mo), weights (24 +/- 1 kg), or housing conditions. Selected physiological data, e.g., coronary blood flow, nonspecific collateral flow, epicardial temperature, heart rate, systemic mean arterial pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, the maximal first derivative of left ventricular developed pressure, blood gases, and pH, were collected at baseline and during regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. There were no significant differences in coronary blood flow, nonspecific collateral flow, epicardial temperature, heart rate, systemic mean arterial pressure, or blood gases and pH between the two groups at any of the three time intervals, even though there was a trend toward improved function in the presence of acetaminophen. Infarct size, the main objective of the investigation, was markedly and significantly reduced by acetaminophen. For example, when expressed as a percentage of ventricular wet weight, infarct size was 8 +/- 1 versus 3 +/- 1%(P <0.05) in vehicle- and acetaminophen-treated hearts, respectively. When infarct size was expressed as percentage of the area at risk, it was 35 +/- 3 versus 13 +/- 2% (P <0.05) in vehicle- and acetaminophen-treated groups, respectively. When area at risk was expressed as percentage of total ventricular mass, there were no differences in the two groups. Results reveal that the recently reported cardioprotective properties of acetaminophen in vitro can now be extended to the in vivo arena. They suggest that it is necessary to add acetaminophen to the growing list of pharmaceuticals that possess cardioprotective efficacy in mammals.

  10. Myocardial Autophagy after Severe Burn in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Shi, Xiao-hua; Huang, Yue-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Autophagy plays a major role in myocardial ischemia and hypoxia injury. The present study investigated the effects of autophagy on cardiac dysfunction in rats after severe burn. Methods Protein expression of the autophagy markers LC3 and Beclin 1 were determined at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h post-burn in Sprague Dawley rats subjected to 30% total body surface area 3rd degree burns. Autophagic, apoptotic, and oncotic cell death were evaluated in the myocardium at each time point by immunofluorescence. Changes of cardiac function were measured in a Langendorff model of isolated heart at 6 h post-burn, and the autophagic response was measured following activation by Rapamycin and inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalaprilat, the angiotensin receptor I blocker losartan, and the reactive oxygen species inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) were also applied to the ex vivo heart model to examine the roles of these factors in post-burn cardiac function. Results Autophagic cell death was first observed in the myocardium at 3 h post-burn, occurring in 0.008 ± 0.001% of total cardiomyocytes, and continued to increase to a level of 0.022 ± 0.005% by 12 h post-burn. No autophagic cell death was observed in control hearts. Compared with apoptosis, autophagic cell death occurred earlier and in larger quantities. Rapamycin enhanced autophagy and decreased cardiac function in isolated hearts 6 h post-burn, while 3-MA exerted the opposite response. Enalaprilat, losartan, and DPI all inhibited autophagy and enhanced heart function. Conclusion Myocardial autophagy is enhanced in severe burns and autophagic cell death occurred early at 3 h post-burn, which may contribute to post-burn cardiac dysfunction. Angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species may play important roles in this process by regulating cell signaling transduction. PMID:22768082

  11. (1) Coronary Events Caused by Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Yoko, Kawawa; Ehiichi, Kohda; Toshiharu, Ishii

    2009-01-01

    Myocardial bridge (MB), which covers a part of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), is a normal anatomical variant structure (45% in frequency by autopsy) in LAD. MB contraction plays the role of a “double-edged sword” on the coronary events, suppressing coronary atherosclerosis under the MB, yet generating abnormal blood flow associated with coronary heart diseases (CHDs). High shear stress driven by MB compression causes the suppression of vascular permeability and vasoactive protein expression such as e-NOS and endothelin-1, which leads to the suppression of atherosclerosis in the LAD segment under the MB. However, despite the prevalent view of MB as benignancy by conventional coronary angiography (5-6% in frequency), with advance of imaging technique such as multislice spiral computed tomography [(MSCT); 16% in frequency], cardiologists are now frequently aware of symptomatic MB occurring not only in hospitalized patients, but also in young athletes free from atherosclerosis. Moreover, the large mass volume of MB muscle induces atherosclerosis evolution at the settled site in LAD proximal to MB and contributes to the occurrence of myocardial infarction. These events upon the coronary events result from the different pathophysiological mechanisms induced by contractile force of MB, which is solely determined just by the integration of anatomical properties of MB, such as the location, length and thickness of MB in an individual LAD. A recent MSCT provides the objective quantification of the anatomical variables that correlate with the histopathological results in relation to the occurrence of CHD. In this review, we therefore discuss the necessity to explore MB as a inherent chance anatomical risk factor for CHD. PMID:23555365

  12. Adaptation to cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gaudron, P; Eilles, C; Ertl, G; Kochsiek, K

    1993-05-01

    Survival after myocardial infarction decreases with left ventricular dilatation, although dilatation at 4 weeks was found to be compensatory. To study this apparent discrepancy, prospective simultaneous volume and hemodynamic measurements at rest were extended in 39 patients with small and 37 with large myocardial infarctions from 4 days (range, 2-6 days) and 4 weeks (range, 3-5 weeks) to 6 months (range, 5-8 months) after infarction and were repeated during supine bicycle exercise at 50 W. In patients with small infarction, end-diastolic volume (mL/m2) decreased from 4 days to 6 months; ejection fraction (%), stroke volume (mL/m2), and end-systolic volume (mL/m2) remained unchanged. Stroke index rose during exercise at 4 weeks and 6 months. In patients after large infarction (n = 37), left ventricular end-systolic volume index (4 days, 38 +/- 3; 4 weeks, 47 +/- 3*; 6 months, 52 +/- 3*; *p < 0.05 versus 4 days) and end-diastolic volume indexes (4 days, 72 +/- 3; 4 weeks, 86 +/- 5*; 6 months, 92 +/- 5*; *p < 0.05 versus 4 days, +p < 0.05 versus 4 weeks) increased at constant wedge pressure. Stroke index remained restored beyond 4 weeks after infarction (4 days, 35 +/- 2; 4 weeks, 42 +/- 2*; 6 months, 42 +/- 2*; p < 0.05 versus 4 days) and rose during exercise at 4 weeks (rest, 45 +/- 2; exercise, 55 +/- 3; p < 0.05) but not at 6 months (rest, 42 +/- 3; exercise, 45 +/- 3; p = NS).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Myocardial bioenergetic abnormalities in experimental uremia

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Alistair MS; Harwood, Steven M; Raftery, Martin J; Yaqoob, Muhammad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac bioenergetics are known to be abnormal in experimental uremia as exemplified by a reduced phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. However, the progression of these bioenergetic changes during the development of uremia still requires further study and was therefore investigated at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy (PNx). Methods A two-stage PNx uremia model in male Wistar rats was used to explore in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscles’ bioenergetic changes over time. High-energy phosphate nucleotides were determined by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) and capillary zone electrophoresis. Results 31P-NMR spectroscopy revealed lower PCr/ATP ratios in PNx hearts compared to sham (SH)-operated animals 4 weeks after PNx (median values given ± SD, 0.64±0.16 PNx, 1.13±0.31 SH, P<0.02). However, 8 weeks after PNx, the same ratio was more comparable between the two groups (0.84±0.15 PNx, 1.04±0.44 SH, P= not significant), suggestive of an adaptive mechanism. When 8-week hearts were prestressed with dobutamine, the PCr/ATP ratio was again lower in the PNx group (1.08±0.36 PNx, 1.55±0.38 SH, P<0.02), indicating a reduced energy reserve during the progression of uremic heart disease. 31P-NMR data were confirmed by capillary zone electrophoresis, and the changes in myocardial bioenergetics were replicated in the skeletal muscle. Conclusion This study provides evidence of the changes that occur in myocardial energetics in experimental uremia and highlights how skeletal muscle bioenergetics mirror those found in the cardiac tissue and so might potentially serve as a practical surrogate tissue during clinical cardiac NMR investigations. PMID:27307758

  14. Current strategies for myocardial gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Swain, JaBaris D.; Tomasulo, Catherine E.; Sumaroka, Marina; Fargnoli, Anthony; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Existing methods of cardiac gene delivery can be classified by the site of injection, interventional approach and type of cardiac circulation at the time of transfer. General criteria to assess the efficacy of a given delivery method include: global versus regional myocardial transduction, technical complexity and the pathophysiological effects associated with its use, delivery-related collateral expression and the delivery-associated inflammatory and immune response. Direct gene delivery (intramyocardial, endocardial, epicardial) may be useful for therapeutic angiogenesis and for focal arrhythmia therapy but with gene expression which is primarily limited to regions in close proximity to the injection site. An often unappreciated limitation of these techniques is that they are frequently associated with substantial systemic vector delivery. Percutaneous infusion of vector into the coronary arteries is minimally invasive and allows for transgene delivery to the whole myocardium. Unfortunately, efficiency of intracoronary delivery is highly variable and the short residence time of vector within the coronary circulation and significant collateral organ expression limit its clinical potential. Surgical techniques, including the incorporation of cardiopulmonary bypass with isolated cardiac recirculation, represent novel delivery strategies that may potentially overcome these limitations; yet, these techniques are complex with inherent morbidity that must be thoroughly evaluated before safe translation into clinical practice. Characteristics of the optimal technique for gene delivery include low morbidity, increased myocardial transcapillary gradient, extended vector residence time in the coronary circulation and exclusion of residual vector from the systemic circulation after delivery to minimize extracardiac expression and to mitigate a cellular immune response. This article is part of a Special Section entitled “Special Section: Cardiovascular Gene Therapy”. PMID

  15. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Myocardial Salvaging Effects of Berberine in Experimental Diabetes Co-Existing with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Manjusha K.; Mohanty, Ipseeta Ray; Maheshwari, Ujwala; Deshmukh, Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the Berberis aristata, has been shown to display a wide array of pharmacological activities (hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic). Aim The present study was designed to investigate whether these pharmacological properties translate into the cardioprotective effects of Berberine in the setting of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Necessary approval from the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee was taken for the study. Experimental diabetes was produced with single dose of Streptozotocin (STZ): 45mg/kg ip and myocardial infarction was induced by administering Isoproterenol (ISP): 85mg/kg, sc to rats on 35th & 36th day. After the confirmation of diabetes on 7th day (>200mg/dl), Berberine (100 mg/kg) was administered orally to experimental rats from day 8 and continued for 30 days thereafter. Various anti-diabetic (Glucose, HbA1c), cardioprotective (CPK-MB), metabolic (lipid profile), safety {liver function (SGPT, kidney function (Creatinine)} and histopathological indices of injury were evaluated in Healthy Control, Diabetic Control and Berberine treated groups. Results Administration of STZ-ISP resulted in a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001), diabetic changes (increase in blood glucose, HbA1c), cardiac injury (leakage of myocardial CPK-MB), altered lipid profile, SGPT, creatinine levels (p<0.001) in the diabetic control group rats as compared to healthy control. Berberine treatment demonstrated significant antidiabetic as well as myocardial salvaging effects as indicated by restoration of blood glucose, HbA1c and CPK-MB levels (p<0.001) compared to diabetic control group. In addition, Berberine favourably modulated the lipid parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL). Subsequent to ISP challenge, histopathological assessment of heart, pancreas and biochemical indices of injury confirmed the cardioprotective effects of Berberine in setting of diabetes. In addition, Berberine

  17. Contractile analysis with kriging based on MR myocardial velocity imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Lin; Huntbatch, Andrew; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease requires a full understanding of the intrinsic contractile mechanics of the heart. MR myocardial velocity imaging is a promising technique for revealing intramural cardiac motion but its ability to depict 3D strain tensor distribution is constrained by anisotropic voxel coverage of velocity imaging due to limited imaging slices and the achievable SNR in patient studies. This paper introduces a novel Kriging estimator for simultaneously improving the tracking and dense inter-slice estimation of the myocardial velocity data. A harmonic embedding technique is employed to determine point correspondence between left ventricle models between subjects, allowing for a statistical shape model to be reconstructed. The use of different semivariograms is investigated for optimal deformation reconstruction. Results from in vivo data demonstrate a marked improvement in tracking myocardial deformation, thus enhancing the potential clinical value of MR myocardial velocity imaging.

  18. Asymptomatic myocardial infarction in Kawasaki disease: Long-term prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, I.; Onouchi, Z.; Hayano, T.; Hamaoka, K.; Kiyosawa, N. )

    1991-04-01

    Eight patients with Kawasaki disease who had sustained asymptomatic myocardial infarction 8-15 years ago (mean, 13.1 years) were reexamined by various noninvasive cardiac function tests to assess long-term prognosis. At present, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are normal in six patients. However, all eight patients had a prolonged preejection period (PEP) to left ventricular ejection time (LVET) ratio 30 s after amylnitrate (AN) inhalation. Six patients had perfusion defects by exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, and two patients developed ST segment depression in treadmill exercise testing. These patients are symptom-free even though their physical activity has not been restricted. Yet they proved to have serious abnormalities suggesting sequelae of myocardial infarction or existing myocardial ischemia. Judging from the results of noninvasive cardiac function tests and recently performed coronary angiography, five of the eight patients require coronary bypass surgery.

  19. An Unusual Complication Following Transarterial Chemoembolization: Acute Myocardial Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Yiliang; Chang Weichou; Kuo Wuhsien; Huang Tienyu; Chu Hengcheng; Hsieh Tsaiyuan; Chang Weikuo

    2010-02-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization has been widely used to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Various complications have been reported, but they have not included acute myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction results mainly from coronary artery occlusion by plaques that are vulnerable to rupture or from coronary spasm, embolization, or dissection of the coronary artery. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case report that describes a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent transarterial chemoembolization and died subsequently of acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this complication induced by transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to be aware of acute myocardial infarction when transarterial chemoembolization is planned for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in patients with underlying coronary artery disease.

  20. Identification of local myocardial repolarization time by bipolar electrode potential.

    PubMed

    Namba, Tsunetoyo; Todo, Takahiro; Yao, Takenori; Ashihara, Takashi; Haraguchi, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ikeda, Takanori; Ohe, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether bipolar electrode potentials (BEPs) reflect local myocardial repolarization dynamics, using computer simulation. Simulated action potential and BEP mapping of myocardial tissue during fibrillation was performed. The BEP was modified to make all the fluctuations have the same polarity. Then, the modified BEP (mBEP) was transformed to "dynamic relative amplitude" (DRA) designed to make all the fluctuations have the similar amplitude. The repolarization end point corresponded to the end of the repolarization-related small fluctuation that clearly appeared in the DRA of mBEP. Using the DRA of mBEP, we could reproduce the repolarization dynamics in the myocardial tissue during fibrillation. The BEP may facilitate identifying the repolarization time. Furthermore, BEP mapping has the possibility that it would be available for evaluating repolarization behavior in myocardial tissue even during fibrillation. The accuracy of activation-recovery interval was also reconfirmed.

  1. Reduced myocardial blood flow in acute and chronic digitalization.

    PubMed

    Steiness, E; Bille-Brahe, N E; Hansen, J F; Lomholt, N; Ring-Larsen, H

    1978-07-01

    The myocardial blood flow was measured by the 133Xenon disappearance curve from the left ventricular wall following an injection of 133Xenon in the left coronary artery in 8 dogs without digoxin pretreatment and in 8 chronically digitalized dogs. The myocardial blood flow was significantly less (30%) in the digitalized dogs than in the dogs without pretreatment. In the digitalized dogs as well as in those without pretreatment an intravenous injection of digoxin resulted in a further significant decrease of the myocardial blood flow of about 20% and a significant increase of the coronary vascular resistance. The reduced myocardial blood flow both during acute and chronic digitalization is beleived to be of clinical importance.

  2. Use of intravenous dipyridamole in thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, F.P.; Blend, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging is a standard method of evaluating regional myocardial blood flow. Myocardial perfusion is best evaluated at rest and during exercise, however, alternative methods have been sought to increase coronary blood flow in patients incapable of performing adequate exercise. A promising new method is the use of intravenous dipyridamole for pharmacologic stress imaging. It has distinct advantages over traditional treadmill exercise testing. The primary advantage of combining intravenous dipyridamole and thallium 201 is for testing patients in whom exercise is impractical or contraindicated. Examples include patients taking beta blockers and those who have had myocardial infarction or have severe peripheral vascular disease. To date, this agent has been available only to clinical investigators in approved protocols. With continued success, it should be approved for general use in the near future. 33 references.

  3. Acute myocardial infarction and sudden death in Sioux Indians.

    PubMed

    Hrabovsky, S L; Welty, T K; Coulehan, J L

    1989-04-01

    While some Indian tribes have low rates of acute myocardial infarction, Northern Plains Indians, including the Sioux, have rates of morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction higher than those reported for the United States population in general. In a review of diagnosed cases of acute myocardial infarction over a 3-year period in 2 hospitals serving predominantly Sioux Indians, 8% of cases were found misclassified, and 22% failed to meet rigorous diagnostic criteria, although the patients did indeed have ischemic heart disease. Patients had high frequencies of complications and risk factors and a fatality rate of 16% within a month of admission. Sudden deaths likely due to ischemic heart disease but in persons not diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction by chart review occurred 3 times more frequently than deaths occurring within a month of clinical diagnosis.

  4. Increased Sensitivity to Heparin Following Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dufault, C.

    1965-01-01

    In vivo increased sensitivity to heparin has been demonstrated in patients following an acute myocardial infarction. An intravenous injection of 10,000 units of heparin was given to each of 18 patients with recent myocardial infarction in order to compare them with 17 patients who were not suffering from any acute illness. The changes in whole blood clotting time, recalcified plasma clotting time and prothrombin time were greater and more prolonged in the patients with recent myocardial infarction. Of the three tests, the one-stage prothrombin time provided the simplest and the most precise measurement of heparin sensitivity. The reason for this was not clear: it is possible that it is related to shock and congestive heart failure which were complications of the clinical course following myocardial infarction. PMID:14216140

  5. [Estimation of I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial washout].

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Watanabe, N; Saitoh, T; Asakura, T; Kanke, M; Owada, K; Hoshi, K; Kimura, K; Maruyama, Y

    1990-11-01

    A crosstalk from I-123 to Tl-201 (Tl) window was 35 +/- 30% (mean +/- SD) and 30 +/- 10% in a myocardial phantom and the images of 6 patients respectively. However, the crosstalk from Tl to I-123 was approximately 1% in each. I-123 MIBG (MIBG) and Tl myocardial SPECT images were recorded in 3 normal volunteers (N), 10 patients with myocardial infarction (MI), and 4 with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The MIBG and Tl imagings were performed on the other day to avoid the crosstalk. Myocardial washout rates (WR) of Tl and MIBG were derived from 15 min and 4 hour images. WR of Tl was approximately 36% in each group. On the other hand, WR of MIBG in DCM (52 +/- 7%) and MI (41 +/- 14%) groups were statistically higher than in N (24 +/- 7%) group. Thus WR of MIBG would be useful to detect abnormalities in adrenergic nervous system.

  6. Imaging considerations for a technetium-99m myocardial perfusion agent

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Lister-James, J.; Campbell, S.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with /sup 201/Tl chloride suffers from a number of physical, geometric, and dosimetric constraints that could be diminished if an agent labeled with /sup 99m/Tc were available. The cationic complex /sup 99m/Tc hexakis-(t-butylisonitrile)technetium(I) ((/sup 99m/Tc)TBI) has been shown to concentrate in the myocardial tissue of both animals and humans, with preliminary clinical studies demonstrating a number of technical attributes not possible with /sup 201/Tl. Technetium-99m-TBI is a promising myocardial imaging agent that may permit high quality planar, gated, and tomographic imaging of both myocardial ischemia and infarction with reduced imaging times and improved resolution.

  7. Tomographic myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in children with Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, R.P.; Nienaber, C.A.; Hausdorf, G.; Montz, R.

    1987-12-01

    Myocardial infarction and stenotic coronary lesions are serious late complications in children with Kawasaki disease. For the noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion, dipyridamole-redistribution /sup 201/Tl emission computed tomography (ECT) was performed in seven children (age 2 8/12-8 7/12 yr) 3-20 mo after the acute stage of the disease. In all patients, coronary aneurysms had been demonstrated by cross-sectional echocardiography. The scintigrams of six children showed no significant regional reduction of myocardial thallium uptake. These children had remained asymptomatic since the acute stage of Kawasaki disease. Persistent and transient thallium defects were present in one child with documented myocardial infarction. For this patient, obstruction of corresponding coronary vessels was confirmed by contrast angiography. It is suggested, that /sup 201/Tl ECT after dipyridamole-induced vasodilation may be used as a safe alternative to invasive coronary angiography for follow-up investigations in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  8. Roles of microRNAs and myocardial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohide; Nishi, Hitoo; Horie, Takahiro; Ono, Koh; Hasegawa, Koji

    2012-01-01

    As drug therapy is of limited efficacy in the treatment of heart diseases related to loss of cardiomyocytes, which have very poor division potential, regenerative medicine is expected to be a new strategy to address regenerative treatment in cardiac diseases. To achieve myocardial regeneration, elucidation of the mechanism of myocardial differentiation from stem cells is essential. Myocardial differentiation from embryonic pluripotent stem cells has been investigated worldwide, and remarkable developments such as establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells and transformation of somatic cells to cardiomyocytes have recently been made, markedly changing the strategy of regenerative medicine. At the same time, the close involvement of microRNA in the maintenance, proliferation, differentiation, and reprogramming of these stem cells has been revealed. In this report, microRNA is outlined, focusing on its role in myocardial differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  10. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial infarction using Tc-99m TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Campbell, S.; Kirshenbaum, J.M.; Lister-James, J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Antman, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cationic complex Tc-99m t-butylisonitrile (TBI) concentrates in the myocardial tissue of several animal species. Its myocardial distribution is proportional to blood flow both in zones of ischemia and in normal myocardium at rest. Planar, tomographic, and gated myocardial images have been obtained using Tc-99m TBI in the human. The authors investigated the potential application of Tc-99m TBI imaging to detect and localize myocardial infarction. Four subjects without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease and five patients with ECG evidence of previous myocardial infarction were studied. Tc-99m TBI (10mCi) was injected intravenously with the patient in a resting state with planar imaging in the anterior, 30 and 70 degree LAO projections beginning one hr after injection. The distribution of the tracer was homogeneous throughout the left ventricular wall in the normal subjects. Regional perfusion defects were present in 4/5 of the patients with myocardial infarction. Location of the defects corresponded to the location of the infarct using ECG criteria (2 inferoposterior and 2 anterior). The patient in whom the Tc-99m TBI image appeared normal had sustained a subendocardial myocardial infarct which could not be localized by ECG; the other 4 pts had transmural infarcts. Anterior and 30 degree LAO images were of excellent quality in all cases; there was overlap of the liver on the inferior wall of the left ventricle on the 70 degree LAO views. The authors conclude that accurate perfusion imaging may be possible using Tc-99m TBI in patients with transmural myocardial infarction.

  11. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  12. Ventricular Septal Dissection Complicating Inferior Wall Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kalvin, Lindsey; Yousefzai, Rayan; Khandheria, Bijoy K.; Paterick, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Postmyocardial infarction ventricular septal defect is an increasingly rare mechanical complication of acute myocardial infarction. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction from right coronary artery occlusion that developed hypotension and systolic murmur 12 hours after successful percutaneous coronary intervention. Although preoperative imaging suggested a large ventricular septal defect and a pseudoaneurysm, intraoperative findings concluded a serpiginous dissection of the ventricular septum. The imaging technicalities are discussed.

  13. Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo-Dorantes, L.; Valle, L.; Uruchurtu, E.; Medel, A.; García-Mayen, F.; Serrano-Luna, G.

    2003-09-01

    Healing of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with inflammatory response, which promotes healing and scar formation. Activation of a local inflammatory response in patients with sequel of AMI could have an important role to enhance angiogenesis and regeneration of hibernating myocardial tissue. Chronic arterial leg ulcers have a similar etiology, and healing has been promoted by exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF). We report the evolution of three AMI patients with sequel of AMI that were exposed to ELF.

  14. Myocardial uptake of a bone tracer associated with hypercalcemia

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.; Oster, Z.H.

    1984-11-01

    A patient with end-stage renal disease and hypercalcemia was referred for a radionuclide bone imaging study. Deposition of Tc-99m hydroxymethylenediphosphonate was apparent in the lungs and myocardium as well as in the skeleton. Renal uptake was also noted, despite anuria. Computed tomography demonstrated nephrocalcinosis but no myocardial calcification. The cause of myocardial uptake of tracer is unknown. Amyloidosis is suggested as a possibility but is not validated in this case.

  15. Myocardial bridges, neither rare nor isolated-Autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Teofilovski-Parapid, G; Jankovic, R; Kanjuh, V; Virmani, R; Danchin, N; Prates, N; Simic, D V; Parapid, B

    2017-03-01

    Myocardial bridge is a congenital anomaly with a markedly variable reported incidence on autopsy (4.7%-86%), likely related to geographical regions. Our previous retrospective study showed a prevalence of 0.8%, which we doubted to be the true one in the examined sample of the Serbian population. To assess the importance of the phenomenon we conducted a 2-year prospective study at the same institution. Ninety-six cadaver hearts from adult individuals of both genders (51 men, 45 women) who died from natural causes underwent special dissection. Tunneled coronary arteries and myocardium were examined using light microscopy. A total of 14 myocardial bridges were found in 13 (13.54%) hearts. This anomaly was insignificantly more common in men (13.72% vs. 13.33%, p>0.05). In one heart we noted two myocardial bridges (the left anterior interventricular artery and left marginal artery were overbridged). None of the myocardial bridges had been diagnosed during life. The most common causes of death were cardiac related. Myocardial bridges were located in the following areas: left anterior interventricular (50%), left circumflex artery (28.6%), left marginal artery (14.3%), and right coronary artery (7.1%). In 92.3% of cases, the right coronary artery was dominant. The only heart with a balanced-type had two bridges. Most of the myocardial bridges were long and deep. All tunneled coronary arteries, and although surrounded by "coronary cushion," were not protected from atherosclerosis. In 30.8% of hearts with myocardial bridges, we found additional coronary artery anomalies. Myocardial bridges were not rare in the examined sample of the Serbian population and were often associated with other coronary artery anomalies, rendering the carriers at higher risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Myocardial imaging artifacts caused by mitral valve annulus calcification

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, L.E.; Movahed, A.; Reeves, W.C. )

    1991-02-01

    Knowledge of imaging artifact of myocardial perfusion studies with thallium-201 is critical for improving the diagnostic accuracy of coronary artery disease. Three patients are described who underwent exercise or pharmacologic stress thallium-201 imaging studies and had a moderate, fixed myocardial perfusion defect (scar) involving the posterolateral and inferoposterior walls of the left ventricle. This was an imaging artifact caused by a heavily calcified mitral valve annulus.

  17. Modeling myocardial growth and hypertrophy in engineered heart muscle.

    PubMed

    Tiburcy, Malte; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of biomimetic culture paradigms has advanced myocardial tissue engineering fundamentally, enabling today the provision of engineered rodent and human heart muscle with features characteristically found in postnatal myocardium. This is in marked contrasts to "flat" cardiomyocyte cultures with their typically low degree of organotypic maturation. Here, we discuss the collagen hydrogel-based engineered heart muscle (EHM) technology and provide background information on its use in simulations of myocardial growth and disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  19. Inhalation of decomposed chlorodifluoromethane (freon-22) and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Bengt; Gunnare, Sara; Sandler, Håkan

    2002-06-01

    After exposure to decomposed chlorodifluoromethane (freon-22), a 65-year-old man developed respiratory symptoms such as cough, blood-stained sputum, and increasing dyspnea. Three weeks later, his family doctor diagnosed infectious bronchitis. Another week later he died due to myocardial infarction. The discussion focuses on an inflammatory process caused by the inhalation of decomposed freon and its possible association with myocardial infarction.

  20. PSYCHO SOCIAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE RECOVERY AFTER MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Karri Rama; Channabasavanna, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY A group of 41 consecutive patients with proven diagnosis of Myocardial Infarction were studied. The severity of the Myocardial Infarction, the personality, social back ground, stressful life events preceding the onset of illness and the psychological reaction occuring in the hospital were correlated with the Psychological, Social and Physical recoveries 4 months after the onset of illness. Social and Psychological recoveries did not depend entirely on physical recovery. All the three were independently influenced by different bio-psychosocial factors. PMID:21927231

  1. The role of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate in myocardial imaging to recognize, localize and identify extension of acute myocardial infarction in patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willerson, J. T.; Parkey, R. W.; Bonte, F. J.; Stokely, E. M.; Buja, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate myocardial scintigrams to aid diagnostically in recognizing, localizing, and identifying extension of acute myocardial infarction in patients was evaluated. The present study is an extension of previous animal and patient evaluations that were recently performed utilizing this myocardial imaging agent.

  2. The role of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate in myocardial imaging to recognize, localize and identify extension of acute myocardial infarction in patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willerson, J. T.; Parkey, R. W.; Bonte, F. J.; Stokely, E. M.; Buja, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate myocardial scintigrams to aid diagnostically in recognizing, localizing, and identifying extension of acute myocardial infarction in patients was evaluated. The present study is an extension of previous animal and patient evaluations that were recently performed utilizing this myocardial imaging agent.

  3. Early-phase myocardial infarction: Evaluation by MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tscholakoff, D.; Higgins, C.B.; McNamara, M.T.; Derugin, N.

    1986-06-01

    In vivo gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 12 dogs immediately after occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and serially up to 5 hours and again between 4 and 14 days. This was done to evaluate the appearance of acute myocardial infarcts and to determine how soon after coronary artery occlusion MR imaging can demonstrate the site of acute myocardial ischemia. In nine dogs with postmortem evidence of myocardial infarction, regional increase of signal intensity of the myocardium was present by 3 hours after coronary occlusion and conformed to the site of myocardial infarct found at autopsy. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images of the infarcted on T2-weighted images of the infarcted myocardium was significantly greater than that of normal myocardium at 3, 4, and 5 hours after occlusion. The T2 (spin-spin) relaxation time was significantly prolonged in the region of myocardial infarct at 3, 4, and 5 hours post-occlusion compared with normal myocardium. Myocardial wall thinning and increased intracavitary flow signal were found in six dogs with comparable pre- and postocclusion images in late systole.

  4. Heroin-associated myocardial damages--conventional and immunohistochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Dettmeyer, R; Friedrich, K; Schmidt, P; Madea, B

    2009-05-30

    Well-known complications related to drug abuse are myocardial insufficiency, myocardial infarction, endocarditis, myocarditis, aortic dissection, neurologic damages, ischemic colitis, thrombotic phenomenons, renal infarction and acute liver failure. Furthermore, microfocal fibrosis of the myocardium is found in stimulant abuse. The origin of myocardial fibrosis associated with opiate abuse (endocarditis, myocarditis, embolism) is still unclear. This question shall be investigated using immunohistochemical staining for early diagnosis of myocarditis. A quantification of myocardial interstitial leucocytic infiltrates was accomplished in 21 chronic drug abusers who died of heroin/morphine intoxication and compared to 15 normal subjects who died suddenly due to non-cardiac causes of death without intoxication (e.g. traffic accidents, head trauma). Toxicological investigations were performed and in addition, blood samples were checked to clarify the status of HIV, hepatitis A, B and C in both groups. To verify signs of inflammation, myocardial specimen from different locations were investigated with conventional histological stainings and immunohistochemical techniques for characterization and quantification of interstitial myocardial leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages. The number of cells were found up to fivefold increased in heroin addicts compared to the control group without reaching the cut-off values for immunohistochemically based diagnosis of myocarditis.

  5. Myocardial ischemia and ventricular fibrillation: pathophysiology and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Luqman, Nazar; Sung, Ruey J; Wang, Chun-Li; Kuo, Chi-Tai

    2007-07-31

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) and myocardial ischemia are inseparable. The first clinical manifestation of myocardial ischemia or infarction may be sudden cardiac death in 20-25% of patients. The occurrence of potentially lethal arrhythmia is the end result of a cascade of pathophysiological abnormalities that result from complex interactions between coronary vascular events, myocardial injury, and changes in autonomic tone, metabolic conditions and ionic state of the myocardium. It is also related to the time from the onset of ischemia. Within the first few minutes there is abundant ventricular arrhythmogenesis usually lasting for 30 min. Triggers for ischemic VF occur at the border zone or regionally ischemic heart. The border zone of ischemia is the predominant site of fragmentation. Acute ischemia opens K(ATP) channels and causes acidosis and hypoxia of myocardial cells leading to a large dispersion in repolarization across the border zone. Abnormalities of intracellular Ca2+ handling also occur in the first few minutes of acute myocardial ischemia and may be an important cause of arrhythmias in human coronary artery disease. Substrate on the other hand transforms triggers into VF and serves to maintain it through fragmentation of waves in the ischemic zone. Thrombin levels, stretch, catecholamine, genetic predisposition, etc. are some of these factors. Reentry models described are spiral wave reentry, 3 dimensional rotors, reentry around 'M' cells and figure-of-eight reentry. Continuing efforts to better understand these arrhythmias will help identify patients of myocardial ischemia prone to arrhythmias.

  6. Stochastic modeling for magnetic resonance quantification of myocardial blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Muehling, Olaf; Panse, Prasad M.; Wilke, Norbert M.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael

    2000-10-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow is useful for determining the functional severity of coronary artery lesions. With advances in MR imaging it has become possible to assess myocardial perfusion and blood flow in a non-invasive manner by rapid serial imaging following injection of contrast agent. To date most approaches reported in the literature relied mostly on deriving relative indices of myocardial perfusion directly from the measured signal intensity curves. The central volume principle on the other hand states that it is possible to derive absolute myocardial blood flow from the tissue impulse response. Because of the sensitivity involved in deconvolution due to noise in measured data, conventional methods are sub-optimal, hence, we propose to use stochastic time series modeling techniques like ARMA to obtain a robust impulse response estimate. It is shown that these methods when applied for the optical estimation of the transfer function give accurate estimates of myocardial blood flow. The most significant advantage of this approach, compared with compartmental tracer kinetic models, is the use of a minimum set of prior assumptions on data. The bottleneck in assessing myocardial blood flow, does not lie in the MRI acquisition, but rather in the effort or time for post processing. It is anticipated that the very limited requirements for user input and interaction will be of significant advantage for the clinical application of these methods. The proposed methods are validated by comparison with mean blood flow measurements obtained from radio-isotope labeled microspheres.

  7. Stem cell therapy for the treatment of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, D F; Janssens, S P

    2011-10-01

    Despite timely reperfusion and subsequent optimal postinfarct pharmacotherapy and device-based treatment, the outcome in patients with severe myocardial infarction remains unfavourable. Myocardial salvage is incomplete, resulting in adverse left ventricular remodeling with concomitant morbidity and mortality. The combined risk of recurrent myocardial infarction, death or readmission for heart failure amounts to 25 % within the first year, highlighting the need for additional treatment strategies. Recent and rapidly evolving insights in cardiac biology, recognizing endogenous repair capabilities of the adult human heart, paved the path towards progenitor or stem cell based cardiac protection and repair strategies following ischemic injury. We critically report on the major randomized controlled clinical trials published so far concerning intracoronary transfer of autologous bone marrow cells in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Moreover, underlying mechanisms, practical aspects, remaining questions and future challenges are highlighted. Taken together, these trials confirm the safety and feasibility of intracoronary progenitor cell transfer in the setting of myocardial infarction. Efficacy data suggests its potential to improve left ventricular function recovery beyond current state of the art therapy, but results are mixed, modest at best and do not support true cardiomyogenesis. Hence, due to its complexity, costs and remaining uncertainties, it is still too early to implement progenitor cell therapy in its current form in standard treatment strategies for ischemic heart disease. Future studies on strategies for cardiomyocyte regeneration in combination with myocardial protection are needed.

  8. Detection of Myocardial Sarcoidosis by Thallium 201 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, L. Julian; Sharma, Om P.; Siegel, Michael E.; Siegel, Robert J.; Gottlieb, Stephen L.; Caldwell, John; Siemsen, Jan K.

    1982-01-01

    Thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scanning revealed focal left ventricular defects at rest in four of 30 patients (13 percent) with systemic sarcoidosis. All the defects decreased in size during thallium stress imaging, a finding opposite of that usually seen in myocardial ischemia. Nine patients had abnormal right ventricular visualization at rest. Thus, 11 of 30 (37 percent) had abnormal resting myocardial scand. Two of the four patients with left ventricular defects were studied serially for up to 1.5 years to evaluate response to corticosteroid therapy. The myocardial defect diminished in one patient, whereas the second patient, maintained for 2 years on low doses of steroids, had no resolution. In patients suspected of focal myocardial involvement by sarcoidosis on thallium scanning dynamic changes in scan defects can occur during exercise which are the reverse of those usually seen in coronary artery disease. These defects probably represent myocardial sarcoid. Right ventricular uptake generally appears to correlate with the severity of pulmonary involvement by sarcoidosis, yet does not appear to be a specific finding. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:7143469

  9. Hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in the thrombolytic era

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, N; O'Rorke, C; Codd, M; McCann, H; McGarry, K; Sugrue, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the management and outcome of an unselected consecutive series of patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction to a tertiary referral centre.
DESIGN—A historical cohort study over a three year period (1992-94) of consecutive unselected admissions with acute myocardial infarction identified using the HIPE (hospital inpatient enquiry) database and validated according to MONICA criteria for definite or probable acute myocardial infarction.
SETTING—University teaching hospital and cardiac tertiary referral centre.
RESULTS—1059 patients were included. Mean age was 67 years; 60% were male and 40% female. Rates of coronary care unit (CCU) admission, thrombolysis, and predischarge angiography were 70%, 28%, and 32%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 18%. Independent predictors of hospital mortality by multivariate analysis were age, left ventricular failure, ventricular arrhythmias, cardiogenic shock, management outside CCU, and reinfarction. Hospital mortality in a small cohort from a non-tertiary referral centre was 14%, a difference largely explained by the lower mean age of these patients (64 years). Five year survival in the cohort was 50%. Only age and left ventricular failure were independent predictors of mortality at follow up.
CONCLUSIONS—In unselected consecutive patients the hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction remains high (18%). Age and the occurrence of left ventricular failure are major determinants of short and long term mortality after acute myocardial infarction.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; mortality; thrombolysis PMID:10212164

  10. Rethinking the epidemiology of acute myocardial infarction: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Robert W; Go, Alan S

    2010-05-10

    During the previous decade, many strategies for preventing acute myocardial infarction found to be efficacious in randomized controlled trials have been adopted by physicians in the community. Although evaluations of quality improvement typically focus on process measures at the hospital, practice, or clinician level, assessment of improvements in health outcomes remains the true test for the successful translation of evidence into practice. We performed a review of the current literature examining trends in the incidence of myocardial infarction in communities. We focused specifically on the group of population-based studies that have examined trends in myocardial infarction incidence. Few population-based studies have examined recent temporal trends in the incidence of myocardial infarction, overall and by type. Existing studies have been largely limited by modest sample sizes, limited diversity within the study populations, the use of composite end points that combine disparate outcomes, and the inability to characterize the effect of long-term outpatient medication use on observed trends in incidence and severity of myocardial infarction. More contemporary assessments of community-wide changes in the epidemiology of myocardial infarction are needed to help assess the effectiveness of primary prevention and to identify areas for potential improvement.

  11. Thallium-201 versus technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial imaging in detection and evaluation of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, B.; Thrall, J.H.

    1980-12-18

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging is of value in the early detection and evaluation of patients with suspected acute infarction. Thallium imaging may have a special value in characterizing patients with cardiogenic shock and in detecting patients at risk for subsequent infarction or death or death or both, before hospital discharge. Approximately 95 percent of pateints with transmural or nontransmural myocardial infarction can be detected with technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial imaging if the imaging is performed 24 to 72 hours after the onset of symptoms. Pyrophosphate imaging may have an important role in the evaluation of patients during the early follow-up period after hospital discharge from an episode of acute infarction. The finding of a persistently positive pyrophosphate image suggests a poor prognosis and is associated with a relatively large incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction and death.

  12. Assessment of myocardial function in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus using tissue Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Ravikumar; Negrine, Robert J S; Chikermane, Ashish; Rasiah, Shree Vishna; Ewer, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    To assess myocardial function in preterm infants with different degrees of ductal patency in the first week of life using tissue Doppler imaging. Infants <30 weeks of gestation underwent echocardiography on day 3. A total of 72 infants were recruited into the study and categorised into three groups (i) haemodyamically significant ductus arteriosus, (ii) patent ductus arteriosus and (iii) no patent ductus arteriosus. Those with haemodynamically significant ductus arteriosus were treated with indometacin and echocardiography was repeated after 48-72 hours following treatment. Peak systolic and diastolic myocardial velocities were obtained using tissue Doppler imaging, and myocardial performance index was calculated. Initial myocardial velocities were significantly lower and myocardial performance index significantly higher in the haemodynamically significant ductus arteriosus group compared with other groups. For the haemodynamically significant ductus arteriosus group, post-treatment myocardial velocities were higher and myocardial performance index lower than pre-treatment. Preterm infants with haemodynamically significant ductus arteriosus had lower myocardial velocities and higher myocardial performance index, suggesting relative systolic and diastolic myocardial dysfunction. Babies whose patent ductus arteriosus remained open despite indometacin had lower pre-treatment myocardial velocities and higher myocardial performance index than those babies whose patent ductus arteriosus closed, suggesting worse myocardial function in this group. Measurement of myocardial function using tissue Doppler imaging in preterm infants is feasible and may prove to be helpful in the management of babies with patent ductus arteriosus.

  13. Detecting Acute Myocardial Infarction by Diffusion-Weighted versus T2-Weighted Imaging and Myocardial Necrosis Markers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Li, Yongjun; Wang, YaLing; Zhang, Shijun; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-01-01

    We used a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction to study the signal evolution of ischemic myocardium on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI). Eight Chinese miniature pigs underwent percutaneous left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery occlusion for 90 minutes followed by reperfusion, which induced acute myocardial infarction. We used DWI preprocedurally and hourly for 4 hours postprocedurally. We acquired turbo inversion recovery magnitude T2-weighted images (TIRM T2WI) and late gadolinium enhancement images from the DWI slices. We measured the serum myocardial necrosis markers myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, and cardiac troponin I at the same time points as the magnetic resonance scanning. We used histochemical staining to confirm injury. All images were analyzed qualitatively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (the contrast between infarcted and healthy myocardium) and relative signal index were used in quantitative image analysis. We found that DWI identified myocardial signal abnormity early (<4 hr) after acute myocardial infarction and identified the infarct-related high signal more often than did TIRM T2WI: 7 of 8 pigs (87.5%) versus 3 of 8 (37.5%) (P=0.046). Quantitative image analysis yielded a significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio and relative signal index between infarcted and normal myocardium on DWI. However, within 4 hours after infarction, the serologic myocardial injury markers were not significantly positive. We conclude that DWI can be used to detect myocardial signal abnormalities early after acute myocardial infarction—identifying the infarction earlier than TIRM T2WI and widely used clinical serologic biomarkers. PMID:27777517

  14. Detecting Acute Myocardial Infarction by Diffusion-Weighted versus T2-Weighted Imaging and Myocardial Necrosis Markers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiyang; Chen, Min; Li, Yongjun; Wang, YaLing; Zhang, Shijun; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-10-01

    We used a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction to study the signal evolution of ischemic myocardium on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI). Eight Chinese miniature pigs underwent percutaneous left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery occlusion for 90 minutes followed by reperfusion, which induced acute myocardial infarction. We used DWI preprocedurally and hourly for 4 hours postprocedurally. We acquired turbo inversion recovery magnitude T2-weighted images (TIRM T2WI) and late gadolinium enhancement images from the DWI slices. We measured the serum myocardial necrosis markers myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, and cardiac troponin I at the same time points as the magnetic resonance scanning. We used histochemical staining to confirm injury. All images were analyzed qualitatively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (the contrast between infarcted and healthy myocardium) and relative signal index were used in quantitative image analysis. We found that DWI identified myocardial signal abnormity early (<4 hr) after acute myocardial infarction and identified the infarct-related high signal more often than did TIRM T2WI: 7 of 8 pigs (87.5%) versus 3 of 8 (37.5%) (P=0.046). Quantitative image analysis yielded a significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio and relative signal index between infarcted and normal myocardium on DWI. However, within 4 hours after infarction, the serologic myocardial injury markers were not significantly positive. We conclude that DWI can be used to detect myocardial signal abnormalities early after acute myocardial infarction-identifying the infarction earlier than TIRM T2WI and widely used clinical serologic biomarkers.

  15. Blood PGC-1α Concentration Predicts Myocardial Salvage and Ventricular Remodeling After ST-segment Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Andrés, Óscar; Ridocci-Soriano, Francisco; Estornell-Erill, Jordi; Corbí-Pascual, Miguel; Valle-Muñoz, Alfonso; Berenguer-Jofresa, Alberto; Barrabés, José A; Mata, Manuel; Monsalve, María

    2015-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a metabolic regulator induced during ischemia that prevents cardiac remodeling in animal models. The activity of PGC-1α can be estimated in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of blood PGC-1α levels in predicting the extent of necrosis and ventricular remodeling after infarction. In this prospective study of 31 patients with a first myocardial infarction in an anterior location and successful reperfusion, PGC-1α expression in peripheral blood on admission and at 72 hours was correlated with myocardial injury, ventricular volume, and systolic function at 6 months. Edema and myocardial necrosis were estimated using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging during the first week. At 6 months, infarct size and ventricular remodeling, defined as an increase > 10% of the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, was evaluated by follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Myocardial salvage was defined as the difference between the edema and necrosis areas. Greater myocardial salvage was seen in patients with detectable PGC-1α levels at admission (mean [standard deviation (SD)], 18.3% [5.3%] vs 4.5% [3.9%]; P = .04). Induction of PGC-1α at 72 hours correlated with greater ventricular remodeling (change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume at 6 months, 29.7% [11.2%] vs 1.2% [5.8%]; P = .04). Baseline PGC-1α expression and an attenuated systemic response after acute myocardial infarction are associated with greater myocardial salvage and predict less ventricular remodeling. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Myocardial protection of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gang-jie; Sun, Li-na; Li, Xing-hai; Wang, Ning-fu; Wu, Hong-hai; Yuan, Chen-xing; Li, Qiao-qiao; Xu, Peng; Ren, Ya-qi; Mao, Bao-gen

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore myocardial protection of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in pigs. 24 male pigs (34.6 ± 1.3 kg) were randomly divided into three groups-control group, drug therapy group, and ECMO group. Myocardial infarction model was created in drug therapy group and ECMO group by ligating coronary artery. When cardiogenic shock occurred, drugs were given in drug therapy group and ECMO began to work in ECMO group. The pigs were killed 24 h after cardiogenic shock. Compared with in drug therapy group, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in ECMO group decreased significantly 6 h after ligation (P < 0.05). At the end of the experiments, LV - dp/dt among three groups was significantly different, drug therapy group < ECMO group < control group. There was no difference in LV + dp/dt between drug therapy group and ECMO group. Compared with drug group, myocardial infarct size of ECMO group did not reduce significantly, but myocardial enzyme and troponin-I decreased significantly. Compared with drug therapy, ECMO improves left ventricular diastolic function, and may improve systolic function. ECMO cannot reduce myocardial infarct size without revascularization, but may have positive effects on ischemic areas by avoiding further injuring.

  17. Correlation between myocardial dysfunction and perfusion impairment in diabetic rats with velocity vector imaging and myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhangrui; Zhang, Haibin; Su, Haili; Zhu, Ting; Zhu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether myocardial systolic dysfunction and perfusion impairment occur in diabetic rats, and to assess their relationship using velocity vector imaging (VVI) and myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Forty-six rats were randomly divided into either control or the diabetes mellitus (DM) groups. DM was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Twelve weeks later, 39 survival rats underwent VVI and MCE in short-axis view at the middle level of the left ventricle, both at rest and after dipyridamole stress. VVI-derived contractile parameters included peak systolic velocity (Vs ), circumferential strain (εc ), strain rate (SRc ), and their reserves. MCE-derived perfusion parameters consisted of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). At rest, SRc in the DM group was significantly lower than in the control group, Vs , εc , and MBF did not differ significantly between groups. After dipyridamole stress, all VVI parameters and their reserves in the DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group, MBF and MFR were substantially lower than those in the control group, too. Meanwhile, significant correlations between VVI parameter reserves and MFR were observed in the DM group. Both myocardial systolic function and perfusion were impaired in DM rats. Decreased MFR could be an important contributor to the reduction in myocardial contractile reserve.

  18. Cardiac restricted overexpression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase causes adverse myocardial remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Spinale, Francis G; Mukherjee, Rupak; Zavadzkas, Juozas A; Koval, Christine N; Bouges, Shenikqua; Stroud, Robert E; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Sinusas, Albert J

    2010-09-24

    The membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a unique member of the MMP family, but induction patterns and consequences of MT1-MMP overexpression (MT1-MMPexp), in a left ventricular (LV) remodeling process such as myocardial infarction (MI), have not been explored. MT1-MMP promoter activity (murine luciferase reporter) increased 20-fold at 3 days and 50-fold at 14 days post-MI. MI was then induced in mice with cardiac restricted MT1-MMPexp (n = 58) and wild type (WT, n = 60). Post-MI survival was reduced (67% versus 46%, p < 0.05), and LV ejection fraction was lower in the post-MI MT1-MMPexp mice compared with WT (41 ± 2 versus 32 ± 2%,p < 0.05). In the post-MI MT1-MMPexp mice, LV myocardial MMP activity, as assessed by radiotracer uptake, and MT1-MMP-specific proteolytic activity using a specific fluorogenic assay were both increased by 2-fold. LV collagen content was increased by nearly 2-fold in the post-MI MT1-MMPexp compared with WT. Using a validated fluorogenic construct, it was discovered that MT1-MMP proteolytically processed the pro-fibrotic molecule, latency-associated transforming growth factor-1 binding protein (LTBP-1), and MT1-MMP-specific LTBP-1 proteolytic activity was increased by 4-fold in the post-MI MT1-MMPexp group. Early and persistent MT1-MMP promoter activity occurred post-MI, and increased myocardial MT1-MMP levels resulted in poor survival, worsening of LV function, and significant fibrosis. A molecular mechanism for the adverse LV matrix remodeling with MT1-MMP induction is increased processing of pro-fibrotic signaling molecules. Thus, a proteolytically diverse portfolio exists for MT1-MMP within the myocardium and likely plays a mechanistic role in adverse LV remodeling.

  19. Changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion assessed by quantitative intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, S; Muro, T; Hozumi, T; Watanabe, H; Shimada, K; Yoshiyama, M; Takeuchi, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clarify whether changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion under significant coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by quantitative intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in humans. Methods: 31 patients underwent dipyridamole stress MCE and quantitative coronary angiography. Intravenous MCE was performed by continuous infusion of Levovist. Images were obtained from the apical four chamber view with alternating pulsing intervals both at rest and after dipyridamole infusion. Images were analysed offline by placing regions of interest over both endocardial and epicardial sides of the mid-septum. The background subtracted intensity versus pulsing interval plots were fitted to an exponential function, y = A (1 − e−βt), where A is plateau level and β is rate of rise. Results: Of the 31 patients, 16 had significant stenosis (> 70%) in the left anterior descending artery (group A) and 15 did not (group B). At rest, there were no differences in the A endocardial to epicardial ratio (A-EER) and β-EER between the two groups (mean (SD) 1.2 (0.6) v 1.2 (0.8) and 1.2 (0.7) v 1.1 (0.6), respectively, NS). During hyperaemia, β-EER in group A was significantly lower than that in group B (1.0 (0.5) v 1.4 (0.5), p < 0.05) and A-EER did not differ between the two groups (1.0 (0.5) v 1.2 (0.4), NS). Conclusions: Changes in transmural distribution of myocardial perfusion under significant coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by quantitative intravenous MCE in humans. PMID:12231594

  20. Provoking conditions, management and outcomes of type 2 myocardial infarction and myocardial necrosis.

    PubMed

    Smilowitz, Nathaniel R; Weiss, Matthew C; Mauricio, Rina; Mahajan, Asha M; Dugan, Kaitlyn E; Devanabanda, Arvind; Pulgarin, Claudia; Gianos, Eugenia; Shah, Binita; Sedlis, Steven P; Radford, Martha; Reynolds, Harmony R

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 myocardial infarction (MI) is defined as myocardial necrosis (myonecrosis) due to an imbalance in supply and demand with clinical evidence of ischemia. Some clinical scenarios of supply-demand mismatch predispose to myonecrosis but limit the identification of symptoms and ECG changes referable to ischemia; therefore, the MI definition may not be met. Factors that predispose to type 2 MI and myonecrosis without definite MI, approaches to treatment, and outcomes remain poorly characterized. Patients admitted to an academic medical center with an ICD-9 diagnosis of secondary myocardial ischemia or non-primary diagnosis of non-ST-elevation MI were retrospectively reviewed. Cases were classified as either MI (n=255) or myonecrosis without definite MI (n=220) based on reported symptoms, ischemic ECG changes, and new wall motion abnormalities. Conditions associated with type 2 MI or myonecrosis included non-cardiac surgery (38%), anemia or bleeding requiring transfusion (32%), sepsis (31%), tachyarrhythmia (23%), hypotension (22%), respiratory failure (23%), and severe hypertension (8%). Inpatient mortality was 5%, with no difference between patients with MI and those with myonecrosis (6% vs. 5%, p=0.41). At discharge, only 43% of patients received aspirin and statin therapy. Type 2 MI and myonecrosis occur frequently in the setting of supply-demand mismatch due to non-cardiac surgery, sepsis, or anemia. Myonecrosis without definite MI is associated with similar in-hospital mortality as type 2 MI; both groups warrant further workup for cardiovascular disease. Antiplatelet and statin prescriptions were infrequent at discharge, reflecting physician uncertainty about the role of secondary prevention in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The allometric model in chronic myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An allometric relationship between different electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters and infarcted ventricular mass was assessed in a myocardial infarction (MI) model in New Zealand rabbits. Methods A total of fifteen animals were used, out of which ten underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation to induce infarction (7–35% area). Myocardial infarction (MI) evolved and stabilized during a three month-period, after which, rabbits were sacrificed and the injured area was histologically confirmed. Right before sacrifice, ECGs were obtained to correlate several of its parameters to the infarcted mass. The latter was normalized after combining data from planimetry measurements and heart weight. The following ECG parameters were studied: RR and PR intervals, P-wave duration (PD), QRS duration (QRSD) and amplitude (QRSA), Q-wave (QA), R-wave (RA) and S-wave (SA) amplitudes, T-wave peak amplitude (TA), the interval from the peak to the end of the T-wave (TPE), ST-segment deviation (STA), QT interval (QT), corrected QT and JT intervals. Corrected QT was analyzed with different correction formulae, i.e., Bazett (QTB), Framingham (QTFRA), Fridericia (QTFRI), Hodge (QTHO) and Matsunaga (QTMA) and compared thereafter. The former variables and infarcted ventricular mass were then fitted to the allometric equation in terms of deviation from normality, in turn derived after ECGs in 5 healthy rabbits. Results Six variables (JT, QTB, QA, SA, TA and STA) presented statistical differences among leads. QT showed the best allometric fit (r = 0.78), followed by TA (r = 0.77), STA (r = 0.75), QTFRA (r = 0.72), TPE (r = 0.69), QTFRI (r = 0.68) and QTMA (r = 0.68). Corrected QT’s (QTFRA, QTFRI and QTMA) performed worse than the uncorrected counterpart (QT), the former scaling allometrically with similar goodness of fits. Conclusions QT, TA, STA and TPE could possibly be used to assess infarction extent in an old MI event through the

  2. [Influences of percutaneous coronary intervention on myocardial activity in myocardial infarction patients with different viable myocardium].

    PubMed

    Li, Li-qi; Liu, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Jin; Lai, Chun-lin; He, Ye-xin

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on left ventricular function in patients with different types of myocardial infarction and to explore the correlation factors for the left ventricular function. A total of 43 patients diagnosed as acute myocardial infarction were enrolled in this study. The perfusion and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) was applied to observe the following parameters before the PCI and at month 6 after the procedure: infarct mass, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and abnormal wall motion score. The subjects were divided into the following three groups by the transmural extent of myocardial infarction manifested in the DE-MRI: the transmural enhancement group, the nontransmural group and the mixed group. Laboratory test was done to detect the level of endothelin (ET), matrix metal enzyme 9 (MMP-9) and high sensitive C reactive protein (hsCRP) before PCI and at month 6 after the procedure. The t test was used to compare the differences among the groups and the multiple regression analysis was taken to explore the correlation factors for the left ventricular function. Compared with the parameters before PCI, the infarct mass after PCI significantly decreased in the nontransmural group and the mixed group [(4.0 ± 2.9) g/cm(3) vs (9.8 ± 5.6) g/cm(3) and (6.0 ± 3.5) g/cm(3) vs (11.8 ± 6.2)g/cm(3), all P < 0.05], while LVEF was significantly improved after PCI in both groups [(52.6 ± 15.4)% vs (41.9 ± 16.3)%,(45.6 ± 15.4)% vs (38.9 ± 16.3)%, all P < 0.05]. The infarct mass was an independent correlation factor for LVEF before PCI (RR = 0.318, P < 0.05) and LVEF after PCI (RR = 0.293, P < 0.05) . LVEF before PCI was independently correlated with the level of hsCRP (RR = 0.318, P < 0.05). The effect of PCI on the improvement of left ventricular function differs in patients with different extent of myocardial infarction, which is correlated with the amount of survival myocardium and the

  3. Persistent T-wave inversion predicts myocardial damage after ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Reindl, Martin; Reinstadler, Sebastian Johannes; Feistritzer, Hans-Josef; Niess, Lea; Koch, Constantin; Mayr, Agnes; Klug, Gert; Metzler, Bernhard

    2017-08-15

    Persistent T-wave inversion (PTI) after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is associated with worse clinical outcome; however, the underlying mechanism between PTI and poor prognosis is incompletely understood. We sought to investigate the relationship between PTI and myocardial damage assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) following STEMI. In this prospective observational study, we included 142 consecutive revascularized STEMI patients. Electrocardiography to determine the presence and amplitude of PTI and pathological Q-waves was conducted 4months after infarction. CMR was performed within 1week after infarction and at 4months follow-up to evaluate infarct characteristics and myocardial function. Patients with PTI (n=103, 73%) showed a larger acute (21[11-29] vs. 6[1-13]%; p<0.001) and chronic infarct size (IS) (14[8-19] vs. 3[1-8]%; p<0.001) and more frequently microvascular obstruction (59 vs. 33%; p=0.02). The association between PTI and chronic IS remained significant (odds ratio: 9.02, 95%CI 3.49-23.35; p<0.001) after adjustment for pathological Q-wave and other IS estimators (high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and C-reactive protein, N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide, culprit vessel, pre-interventional TIMI flow). The value of PTI amplitude for the prediction of large chronic IS>11% (AUC: 0.84, 95%CI 0.77-0.90) was significantly higher compared to Q-wave amplitude (AUC: 0.72, 95%CI 0.63-0.80; p=0.009); the combination of PTI with pathological Q-wave (Q-wave/T-wave score) led to a net reclassification improvement of 0.43 (95% CI 0.29-0.57; p<0.001) as compared to PTI alone. PTI following STEMI is independently and incrementally associated with more extensive myocardial damage as visualized by CMR. An electrocardiographic score combining PTI with pathological Q-wave allows for a highly accurate IS estimation post-STEMI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of initial temperature changes on myocardial enzyme levels and cardiac function in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuanyu; Liu, Jie; Ma, Jinling; Meng, Qingyi; Peng, Chaoying

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of initial body temperature changes on myocardial enzyme levels and cardiac function in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients was investigated. A total of 315 AMI patients were enrolled and the mean temperature was calculated based on their body temperature within 24 h of admission to hospital. The patients were divided into four groups according to their normal body temperature: Group A, <36.5°C; group B, ≥36.5°C and <37.0°C; group C, ≥37.0°C and <37.5°C and group D, ≥37.5°C. The levels of percutaneous coronary intervention, myocardial enzymes and troponin T (TNT), as well as cardiac ultrasound images, were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in the quantity of creatine kinase at 12 and 24 h following admission were identified between group A and groups C and D (P<0.01). A significant difference in TNT at 12 h following admission was observed between groups A and D (P<0.05), however, this difference was not observed with groups B and C. The difference in TNT between the groups at 24 h following admission was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Significant differences in lactate dehydrogenase at 12 and 24 h following admission were observed between groups A and D (P<0.05), however, differences were not observed with groups B and C (P>0.05). Significant differences in glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase at 12 and 24 h following admission were observed between groups A and D (P<0.05), however, differences were not observed in groups B and C (P>0.05). However, no significant differences were identified in cardiac function index between all the groups. Therefore, the results of the present study indicated that AMI patients with low initial body temperatures exhibited decreased levels of myocardial enzymes and TNT. Thus, the observation of an initially low body temperature may be used as a protective factor for AMI and may improve the existing clinical program.

  5. Intracoronary delivery of recombinant TIMP-3 after myocardial infarction: effects on myocardial remodeling and function.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Shayne C; Doviak, Heather; Jacobs, Julia; Freeburg, Lisa A; Perreault, Paige E; Zellars, Kia N; Moreau, Karen; Villacreses, Camila F; Smith, Stephen; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Lee, TaeWeon; Spinale, Francis G

    2017-10-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and myocardial infarction (MI) cause adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling and heart failure and are facilitated by an imbalance in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation and the endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMPs). We have identified that myocardial injections of recombinant TIMP-3 (rTIMP-3; human full length) can interrupt post-MI remodeling. However, whether and to what degree intracoronary delivery of rTIMP-3 post-IR is feasible and effective remained to be established. Pigs (25 kg) underwent coronary catheterization and balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) for 90 min whereby at the final 4 min, rTIMP-3 (30 mg, n = 9) or saline was infused in the distal LAD. LV echocardiography was performed at 3-28 days post-IR, and LV ejection fraction (EF) and LV end-diastolic volume were measured. LV EF fell and LV end-diastolic volume increased from baseline (pre-IR) values (66 ± 1% and 40 ± 1 ml, respectively, means ± standard deviation) in both groups; however, the extent of LV dilation was reduced in the rTIMP-3 group by 40% at 28 days post-IR (P < 0.05) and the fall in LV EF was attenuated. Despite equivalent plasma troponin levels (14 ± 3 ng/ml), computed MI size at 28 days was reduced by over 45% in the rTIMP-3 group (P < 0.05), indicating that rTIMP-3 treatment abrogated MI expansion post-IR. Plasma NH2-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels, an index of heart failure progression, were reduced by 25% in the rTIMP-3 group compared with MI saline values (P < 0.05). Although the imbalance between MMPs and TIMPs has been recognized as a contributory factor for post-MI remodeling, therapeutic strategies targeting this imbalance have not been forthcoming. This study is the first to demonstrate that a relevant delivery approach (intracoronary) using rTIMP can alter the course of post-MI remodeling.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury

  6. Electric field penetration depth of myocardial surface catheters and the measurement of myocardial resistivity.

    PubMed

    Kottam, Anil; Pearce, John A

    2004-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of cardiac conductance in mice offers a method to generate an instantaneous left ventricular volume signal. In order to translate the measured conductance to volume, it is necessary to determine the resistivity of the myocardial tissue. This is done using tetrapolar surface conductance catheters, placed on the surface of the left ventricle. It is important to determine the depth of penetration of the electric field of this surface catheter to ensure that the electric field is confined within the myocardium and does not extend into the left ventricle blood volume. The depth of penetration is experimentally determined by a technique described by Foster et al. [2].

  7. Guidelines for management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amal Kumar; Kumar, Soumitra

    2011-12-01

    These Guidelines summarize and evaluate all currently available evidence on Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) with the aim of assisting physicians in selecting the best management strategies for a typical patient, suffering from AMI, taking into account the impact on outcome, as well as the risk/benefit ratio of particular diagnostic or therapeutic means. Rapid diagnosis and early risk stratification of patients presenting with AMI are important to identify patients in whom early interventions can improve outcome. AMI can be defined from a number of different perspectives related to clinical, electrocardiographic (ECG), biochemical, and pathological characteristics. Quantitative assessment of risk is useful for clinical decision making. For patients with the clinical presentation of AMI within 12 h after symptom onset, early mechanical (PCI) or pharmacological reperfusion should be performed. Platelet activation and subsequent aggregation play a dominant role in the propagation of arterial thrombosis and consequently are the key therapeutic targets in the management of AMI. Adjunctive therapy with antiplatelets and antithrombotics is essential. A recommendation for routine urgent PCI (within 24 h) following successful fibrinolysis seems to be most practical option. In India, pharmacoinvasive therapy is the best option.

  8. Effects of carbon monoxide on myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, E.N.; Pagano, M. ); Bleecker, E.R.; Walden, S.M. ); Chaitman, B.R.; Dahms, T.E. ); Hackney, J.D.; Selvester, R.H. ); Warren, J. ); Gottlieb, S.O.

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether low doses of carbon monoxide (CO) exacerbate myocardial ischemia during a progressive exercise test. The effect of CO exposure was evaluated using the objective measure of time to development of electrocardiographic changes indicative of ischemia and the subjective measure of time to onset of angina. Sixty-three male subjects (41-75 years) with well-documented coronary artery disease, who had exertional angina pectoris and ischemic ST-segment changes in their electrocardiograms, were studied. Results from three randomized, double-blind test visits (room air, low and high CO) were compared. The effect of CO exposure was determined from the percent difference in the end points obtained on exercise tests performed before and after a 1-hr exposure to room air or CO. A significant dose-response relationship was found for the individual differences in the time to ST end point and angina for the pre-versus postexposure exercise test at the three carboxyhemoglobin levels. These findings demonstrate that low doses of CO produce significant effects on cardiac function during exercise in subjects with coronary artery disease.

  9. Vitamin D and acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Valentina; De Metrio, Monica; Cosentino, Nicola; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Tremoli, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a prevalent condition, cutting across all ethnicities and among all age groups, and occurring in about 30%-50% of the population. Besides vitamin D established role in calcium homeostasis, its deficiency is emerging as a new risk factor for coronary artery disease. Notably, clinical investigations have suggested that there is an association between hypovitaminosis D and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Not only has it been linked to incident AMI, but also to increased morbidity and mortality in this clinical setting. Moreover, vitamin D deficiency seems to predispose to recurrent adverse cardiovascular events, as it is associated with post-infarction complications and cardiac remodeling in patients with AMI. Several mechanisms underlying the association between vitamin D and AMI risk can be involved. Despite these observational and mechanistic data, interventional trials with supplementation of vitamin D are controversial. In this review, we will discuss the evidence on the association between vitamin D deficiency and AMI, in terms of prevalence and prognostic impact, and the possible mechanisms mediating it. Further research in this direction is warranted and it is likely to open up new avenues for reducing the risk of AMI. PMID:28163832

  10. Mitochondria, myocardial remodeling, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Gutierrez, Tomás; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Pedrozo, Zully; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Lorena; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The process of muscle remodeling lies at the core of most cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac adaptation to pressure or volume overload is associated with a complex molecular change in cardiomyocytes which leads to anatomic remodeling of the heart muscle. Although adaptive at its beginnings, the sustained cardiac hypertrophic remodeling almost unavoidably ends in progressive muscle dysfunction, heart failure and ultimately death. One of the features of cardiac remodeling is a progressive impairment in mitochondrial function. The heart has the highest oxygen uptake in the human body and accordingly it has a large number of mitochondria, which form a complex network under constant remodeling in order to sustain the high metabolic rate of cardiac cells and serve as Ca(2+) buffers acting together with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, this high dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has its costs: when oxygen supply is threatened, high leak of electrons from the electron transport chain leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. These three aspects of mitochondrial function (Reactive oxygen species signaling, Ca(2+) handling and mitochondrial dynamics) are critical for normal muscle homeostasis. In this article, we will review the latest evidence linking mitochondrial morphology and function with the process of myocardial remodeling and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Myocardial Bridge and Acute Plaque Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Leor; Daniels, David; Schwartz, Jonathan; Tanaka, Shige; Yeung, Alan; Tremmel, Jennifer A.; Schnittger, Ingela

    2016-01-01

    A myocardial bridge (MB) is a common anatomic variant, most frequently located in the left anterior descending coronary artery, where a portion of the coronary artery is covered by myocardium. Importantly, MBs are known to result in a proximal atherosclerotic lesion. It has recently been postulated that these lesions predispose patients to acute coronary events, even in cases of otherwise low-risk patients. One such mechanism may involve acute plaque rupture. In this article, we report 2 cases of patients with MBs who presented with acute coronary syndromes despite having low cardiovascular risk. Their presentation was life-risking and both were treated urgently and studied with coronary angiographies and intravascular ultrasound. This latter modality confirmed a rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque proximal to the MB as a likely cause of the acute events. These cases, of unexplained acute coronary syndrome in low-risk patients, raise the question of alternative processes leading to the event and the role MB play as an underlying cause of ruptured plaques. In some cases, an active investigation for this entity may be warranted, due to the prognostic implications of the different therapeutic modalities, should an MB be discovered. PMID:28251167

  12. [Thrombolytic therapy of acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Murín, J; Kasper, J; Bulas, J; Uhliar, R

    1993-08-01

    In the period of two years the authors treated at the coronary care unit 146 patients inflicted by the acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In 15 of them (13 men, 2 women, 13 times Q and twice non-Q, 5 times anterior, 10 times inferior) they performed intravenous thrombolytic treatment by use of streptokinase. The success rate of the thrombolytic therapy was evaluated by noninvasive markers: 1.) rapid withdrawal of chest pain, 2.) rapid (in 6 hours) and essential improvement of ST segment elevation and 3.) presence of reperfusion arrhythmias (in 6 hours). The authors detected insufficient medicinal conciousness among their health district population as regard to their response after the AMI origin (absolute majority of patients delayed their arrival). Minor complications due to therapy (allergy and minor local hemorrhage) occurred in 4 patients. Nobody died. Only those cases were considered as being successful, in which all three success rate markers were present. This condition was fulfilled in 8 patients (i.e. in 53% of cases) and with minor insufficiencies in further two patients (which would increase the percentage of the success rate to 67%). This success rate of the thrombolytic therapy ranges within the limits given by literature. In five patients the authors evaluated the behaviour of the left ventricular asynergy (its range and index) prior to and following the thrombolytic therapy and this examination they consider to be appropriate for observance of the thrombolytic therapy success rate in patients with AMI. (Tab. 3, Ref. 20.).

  13. Monocyte subsets in myocardial infarction: A review.

    PubMed

    Arfvidsson, John; Ahlin, Fredrik; Vargas, Kris G; Thaler, Barbara; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-03-15

    Monocytes form an important part of the human innate immune system by taking part in inflammatory reactions. With time, monocytes have gained interest in the role they may play during the event of myocardial infarction (MI). The current paradigm suggests that monocytes consist of three subdivisions which differ in phenotypic and dynamic patterns after an MI. In the inflammation that ensues, the different subsets have been shown to have an impact on reparative processes and patient recovery. We searched Medline and Embase until April 5, 2016, for observational studies or clinical trials regarding monocyte functions and dynamics in MI. Apart from studies in humans, extensive work has been done in mice in an effort to understand the complex nature of monocyte dynamics. Animal models might add useful information on mapping these processes. The question still remains whether animal data can, to a certain degree, be extrapolated to monocyte functions during human MI. This review aims to summarize current available evidence on both mice and men with particular focus on the understanding of monocyte subsets dynamics and effects in human MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Daylight savings time and myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Amneet; Seth, Milan; Gurm, Hitinder S

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior research has shown a transient increase in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) after daylight savings time (DST) in the spring as well as a decrease in AMI after returning to standard time in the fall. These findings have not been verified in a broader population and if extant, may have significant public health and policy implications. Methods We assessed changes in admissions for AMI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium (BMC2) database for the weeks following the four spring and three fall DST changes between March 2010 and September 2013. A negative binomial regression model was used to adjust for trend and seasonal variation. Results There was no difference in the total weekly number of PCIs performed for AMI for either the fall or spring time changes in the time period analysed. After adjustment for trend and seasonal effects, the Monday following spring time changes was associated with a 24% increase in daily AMI counts (p=0.011), and the Tuesday following fall changes was conversely associated with a 21% reduction (p=0.044). No other weekdays in the weeks following DST changes demonstrated significant associations. Conclusions In the week following the seasonal time change, DST impacts the timing of presentations for AMI but does not influence the overall incidence of this disease. PMID:25332784

  15. New Trends in Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Guang-Uei; Wang, Yuh-Feng; Su, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Ko, Chi-Lun; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used clinically as one of the major functional imaging modalities for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) for decades. Ample evidence has supported the use of MPI as a useful and important tool in the diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment planning for CAD. Although popular in the United States, MPI has become the most frequently used imaging modality among all nuclear medicine tests in Taiwan. However, it should be acknowledged that MPI SPECT does have its limitations. These include false-positive results due to certain artifacts, false-negative due to balanced ischemia, complexity and adverse reaction arising from current pharmacological stressors, time consuming nature of the imaging procedure, no blood flow quantitation and relatively high radiation exposure. The purpose of this article was to review the recent trends in nuclear cardiology, including the utilization of positron emission tomography (PET) for MPI, new stressor, new SPECT camera with higher resolution and higher sensitivity, dynamic SPECT protocol for blood flow quantitation, new software of phase analysis for evaluation of LV dyssynchrony, and measures utilized for reducing radiation exposure of MPI. PMID:27122946

  16. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  17. Myocardial Tissue Engineering for Regenerative Applications.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Buntaro; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2017-09-01

    This review provides an overview of the current state of tissue-engineered heart repair with a special focus on the anticipated modes of action of tissue-engineered therapy candidates and particular implications as to transplant immunology. Myocardial tissue engineering technologies have made tremendous advances in recent years. Numerous different strategies are under investigation and have reached different stages on their way to clinical translation. Studies in animal models demonstrated that heart repair requires either remuscularization by delivery of bona fide cardiomyocytes or paracrine support for the activation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Tissue engineering approaches result in enhanced cardiomyocyte retention and sustained remuscularization, but may also be explored for targeted paracrine or mechanical support. Some of the more advanced tissue engineering approaches are already tested clinically; others are at late stages of pre-clinical development. Process optimization towards cGMP compatibility and clinical scalability of contractile engineered human myocardium is an essential step towards clinical translation. Long-term allograft retention can be achieved under immune suppression. HLA matching may be an option to enhance graft retention and reduce the need for comprehensive immune suppression. Tissue-engineered heart repair is entering the clinical stage of the translational pipeline. Like in any effective therapy, side effects must be anticipated and carefully controlled. Allograft implantation under immune suppression is the most likely clinical scenario. Strategies to overcome transplant rejection are evolving and may further boost the clinical acceptance of tissue-engineered heart repair.

  18. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, WJ; Clarke, SA; Quinn, TA; Holmes, JW

    2016-01-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following an MI, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  19. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xiaowen; Alt, Eckhard

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. {yields} For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. {yields} This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the

  20. Significance of U wave polarities in previous anterior myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanemoto, N.; Imaoka, C.; Suzuki, Y. )

    1991-04-01

    The significance of the polarity of U waves in left precordial leads was evaluated in relation to myocardial perfusion (T1 201 myocardial scintigraphy) and left ventricular function (99m Tc radionuclide ventriculography) in 63 patients with clinical and electrocardiographic evidence of a previous anterior myocardial infarction. Patients were divided into three groups according to the polarity of the U waves: positive U waves, flat U waves, and negative U waves. Twelve matched patients served as normal controls. The following parameters were analyzed: (1) total number of abnormal Q waves; (2) total myocardial perfusion index and regional myocardial perfusion index; (3) global ejection fraction; (4) regional ejection fraction; and (5) number of diseased coronary arteries. The total myocardial perfusion index values were 43.9 {plus minus} 1.0 in controls, 40.8 {plus minus} 3.4 in the positive U wave group, 33.4 {plus minus} 3.5 in the flat U wave group, and 30.3 {plus minus} 4.4 in the patients with negative U waves. Global ejection fractions in these groups were, respectively, 63.9 {plus minus} 8.6%, 65.0 {plus minus} 11.8%, 53.6 {plus minus} 8.1%, and 36.5 {plus minus} 13.6%. The sensitivity of negative U waves suggesting a global ejection fraction of less than 45% was 91.6%, and the specificity was 82.1%. Therefore the size of myocardial infarction increased and left ventricular function decreased, in order, from patients with positive U waves, to those with flat U waves, to those with negative U waves, with statistically significant differences.

  1. T1 Mapping in Characterizing Myocardial Disease: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Puntmann, Valentina O; Peker, Elif; Chandrashekhar, Y; Nagel, Eike

    2016-07-08

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides insights into myocardial structure and function noninvasively, with high diagnostic accuracy and without ionizing radiation. Myocardial tissue characterization in particular gives cardiovascular magnetic resonance a prime role among all the noninvasive cardiovascular investigations. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging is an established method for visualizing replacement scar, providing diagnostic and prognostic information in a variety of cardiac conditions. Late gadolinium enhancement, however, relies on the regional segregation of tissue characteristics to generate the imaging contrast. Thus, myocardial pathology that is diffuse in nature and affecting the myocardium in a rather uniform and global distribution is not well visualized with late gadolinium enhancement. Examples include diffuse myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, hypertrophy, and infiltration. T1 mapping is a novel technique allowing to diagnose these diffuse conditions by measurement of T1 values, which directly correspond to variation in intrinsic myocardial tissue properties. In addition to providing clinically meaningful indices, T1-mapping measurements also allow for an estimation of extracellular space by calculation of extracellular volume fraction. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a central role for T1 mapping in detection of diffuse myocardial disease in early disease stages and complements late gadolinium enhancement in visualization of the regional changes in common advanced myocardial disease. As a quantifiable measure, it may allow grading of disease activity, monitoring progress, and guiding treatment, potentially as a fast contrast-free clinical application. We present an overview of clinically relevant technical aspects of acquisition and processing, and the current state of art and evidence, supporting its clinical use. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Left ventricular remodeling after experimental myocardial cryoinjury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, Michele M; Paliotti, Roberta; Ferrero, Stefano; Braidotti, Paola; Esposito, Arturo; Gianelli, Umberto; Busca, Giuseppe; Cioffi, Ugo; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Magrini, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    The standard coronary ligation, the most studied model of experimental myocardial infarction in rats, is limited by high mortality and produces unpredictable areas of necrosis. To standardize the location and size of the infarct and to elucidate the mechanisms of myocardial remodeling and its progression to heart failure, we studied the functional, structural, and ultrastructural changes of myocardial infarction produced by experimental myocardial cryoinjury. The cryoinjury was successful in 24 (80%) of 30 male adult CD rats. A subepicardial infarct was documented on echocardiograms, with an average size of about 21%. Macroscopic examination reflected closely the stamp of the instrument used, without transition zones to viable myocardium. Histological examination, during the acute setting, revealed an extensive area of coagulation necrosis and hemorrhage in the subepicardium. An inflammatory infiltrate was evident since the 7th hour, whereas the reparative phase started within the first week, with proliferation of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and myocytes. From the 7th day, deposition of collagen fibers was reported with a reparative scar completed at the 30th day. Ultrastructural study revealed vascular capillary damage and irreversible alterations of the myocytes in the acute setting and confirmed the histological findings of the later phases. The damage was associated with a progressive left ventricular (LV) remodeling, including thinning of the infarcted area, hypertrophy of the noninfarcted myocardium, and significant LV dilation. This process started from the 60th day and progressed over the subsequent 120 days period; at 180 days, a significant increase in LV filling pressure, indicative of heart failure, was found. In conclusion, myocardial cryodamage, although different in respect to ischemic damage, causes a standardized injury reproducing the cellular patterns of coagulation necrosis, early microvascular reperfusion, hemorrhage, inflammation

  3. Development of a myocardial phantom and analysis system toward the standardization of myocardial SPECT image across institutions.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takayuki; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Kinuya, Seigo

    2016-12-01

    We developed a novel myocardial phantom and analysis program to standardize using a quantitative index to objectively evaluate the image quality. We aimed to reveal whether our proposed phantom and analysis program are suitable for image standardization. An evaluation system of myocardial image based on technical grounds (EMIT) phantom was developed to standardize the image quality of myocardial SPECT and was constructed with the lung and myocardium in the thorax phantom; the myocardial phantom included five normal areas and eight defective areas with four defects in size (5, 10, 15, and 20 mm) and four defects in thickness (10, 7.5, 5, and 2.5 mm). Therefore, this phantom was appropriate to simultaneously simulate eight different defects and normal myocardium. The %rate value, calculated using the region of interest method, and the %count value, calculated from the profile method, were automatically analyzed to evaluate myocardial defects. The phantom was validated using difference in count levels and filter parameters compared with those in previously reported models. The average %count of eight defects by 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 cycles/cm were 56.8, 47.4, 44.3, and 43.4 %, respectively, whereas the %count for 0.3 cycles/cm was significantly higher than that for 0.5 and 0.6 cycles/cm. The uniformity between full- and half-time images was 16.5 ± 4.2 and 18.7 ± 5.5 % for integral uniformity and 3.4 ± 1.2 and 3.4 ± 1.3 % for differential uniformity, respectively, revealing a significant difference in integral uniformity between the two acquisition times. Visual differences in defects were evident in full-time images between 0.30 and 0.50 cycles/cm, and defect detectability of the myocardial image at 0.30 cycles/cm was poor. Normal myocardial thickness widened in comparison with images at 0.50 cycles/cm. Compared with full-time myocardial image at the same cut-off frequency, the half-time myocardial image demonstrated inhomogeneous distribution and

  4. Measurement of myocardial perfusion and infarction size using computer-aided diagnosis system for myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Du, Guo-Qing; Xue, Jing-Yi; Guo, Yanhui; Chen, Shuang; Du, Pei; Wu, Yan; Wang, Yu-Hang; Zong, Li-Qiu; Tian, Jia-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Proper evaluation of myocardial microvascular perfusion and assessment of infarct size is critical for clinicians. We have developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) approach for myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) to measure myocardial perfusion and infarct size. Rabbits underwent 15 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group I, n = 15) or 60 min of coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion (group II, n = 15). Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed before and 7 d after ischemia/reperfusion, and images were analyzed with the CAD system on the basis of eliminating particle swarm optimization clustering analysis. The myocardium was quickly and accurately detected using contrast-enhanced images, myocardial perfusion was quantitatively calibrated and a color-coded map calibrated by contrast intensity and automatically produced by the CAD system was used to outline the infarction region. Calibrated contrast intensity was significantly lower in infarct regions than in non-infarct regions, allowing differentiation of abnormal and normal myocardial perfusion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis documented that -54-pixel contrast intensity was an optimal cutoff point for the identification of infarcted myocardium with a sensitivity of 95.45% and specificity of 87.50%. Infarct sizes obtained using myocardial perfusion defect analysis of original contrast images and the contrast intensity-based color-coded map in computerized images were compared with infarct sizes measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Use of the proposed CAD approach provided observers with more information. The infarct sizes obtained with myocardial perfusion defect analysis, the contrast intensity-based color-coded map and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining were 23.72 ± 8.41%, 21.77 ± 7.8% and 18.21 ± 4.40% (% left ventricle) respectively (p > 0.05), indicating that computerized myocardial contrast echocardiography can

  5. Assessment and classification of patients with myocardial injury and infarction in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Andrew R; Adamson, Philip D

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial injury is common in patients without acute coronary syndrome, and international guidelines recommend patients with myocardial infarction are classified by aetiology. The universal definition differentiates patients with myocardial infarction due to plaque rupture (type 1) from those due to myocardial oxygen supply-demand imbalance (type 2) secondary to other acute illnesses. Patients with myocardial necrosis, but no symptoms or signs of myocardial ischaemia, are classified as acute or chronic myocardial injury. This classification has not been widely adopted in practice, because the diagnostic criteria for type 2 myocardial infarction encompass a wide range of presentations, and the implications of the diagnosis are uncertain. However, both myocardial injury and type 2 myocardial infarction are common, occurring in more than one-third of all hospitalised patients. These patients have poor short-term and long-term outcomes with two-thirds dead in 5 years. The classification of patients with myocardial infarction continues to evolve, and future guidelines are likely to recognise the importance of identifying coronary artery disease in type 2 myocardial infarction. Clinicians should consider whether coronary artery disease has contributed to myocardial injury, as selected patients are likely to benefit from further investigation and in these patients targeted secondary prevention has the potential to improve outcomes. PMID:27806987

  6. F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography imaging in primary staging of patients with malignant melanoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to systematically assess the potential patient-relevant benefit (primary aim) and diagnostic and prognostic accuracy (secondary aim) of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (CT) in primary staging of malignant melanoma. This systematic review updates the previous evidence for PET(/CT) in malignant melanoma. Materials and methods For the first aim, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating patient-relevant outcomes and comparing PET and PET(/CT) with each other or with conventional imaging were considered. For the secondary aim, a review of reviews was conducted, which was amended by an update search for primary studies. MEDLINE, EMBASE and four databases of the Cochrane Library were searched. The risk of bias was assessed using a modified QUADAS tool. Results No RCTs investigating the patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) and no prognostic accuracy studies were found. Seventeen diagnostic accuracy studies of varying quality were identified. For patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I and II, sensitivity mostly ranged from 0 to 67%. Specificity ranged from 77 to 100%. For AJCC stages III and IV, sensitivity ranged from 68 to 87% and specificity from 92 to 98%. Conclusion There is currently no evidence of a patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) in the primary staging of malignant melanoma. RCTs investigating patient-relevant outcomes are therefore required. The diagnostic accuracy of PET(/CT) appears to increase with higher AJCC stages. PMID:23237499

  7. 18F-flouro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of solitary prostatic and pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kadihasanoglu, Mustafa; Yildiz, Tekin; Atahan, Safak; Ausmus, Andrew; Atahan, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis (TB) is a common type of extrathoracic TB and can be found in isolation or associated with pulmonary TB. It contributes to 10-14% of extrapulmonary TB. Prostate TB is rare and usually found incidentally following transurethral resection of the prostate for treatment of benign prostatic obstruction as an isolated lesion in immunocompetant patient. The authors report a case of prostatic and pulmonary TB in animmunocompetant patient investigating for the positive positron emission tomography in lung and prostate. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature presenting with simultaneous hypermetabolic lesions in the prostate and lung.

  8. Dual effects of 2-deoxyglucose on synthesis of the glycoprotein hormone common alpha-subunit in butyrate-treated HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G S; McClure, D S; Cosgrove, D E

    1987-01-01

    Sodium butyrate (Btr) (3 mM) causes a 10-fold increase in production of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit in HeLa cells. The following report demonstrates that this response could be inhibited about 95% by 5 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose (dGlc), whereas alpha-subunit production in uninduced cells was affected little or not at all. Addition of D-mannose restored the Btr induction of Hela-alpha in cultures that had been treated with dGlc. When the alpha-subunits secreted by cells cultured in Btr plus dGlc or in Btr alone were compared by gel filtration (Sephadex G-75) and lectin affinity (concanavalin A and ricin) chromatography, differences were noted that probably reflect changes in their carbohydrate moieties. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled HeLa-alpha and incubation with endoglycosidase H indicated that the subunit secreted from cells in the presence of dGlc contained oligosaccharide side chains that were not processed to the complex type. Cells that were simultaneously treated with Btr plus dGlc showed no increase in alpha-subunit production over cells receiving Btr only; in contrast, cells that were preincubated with Btr for either 16 or 36 h before dGlc was added exhibited high levels of subunit synthesis. Measurement of alpha-mRNA levels at various times after Btr and dGlc were added to cultures indicated that Btr brought about a dramatic increase in alpha-specific mRNA about 24 h after being added to cultures. This increase could be prevented by dGlc when added simultaneously with Btr but not when added after a 24-h preincubation. Although dGlc prevented the induction of alpha-subunit and alpha-mRNA in response to Btr, it had no effect on histone hyperacetylation, suggesting that if this chromatin modification is necessary for the induction process, it is not in itself sufficient. Together, the data demonstrate that dGlc inhibits the accumulation of alpha-subunit mRNA normally produced in response to Btr and that the subunit produced contains altered oligosaccharide constituents. Images PMID:3600639

  9. Global myocardial revascularization without cardiopulmonary bypass using innovative techniques for myocardial stabilization and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bedi, H S; Suri, A; Kalkat, M S; Sengar, B S; Mahajan, V; Chawla, R; Sharma, V P

    2000-01-01

    In off-pump coronary bypass grafting (CABG), invasiveness is reduced but technically perfect anastomosis is jeopardized by cardiac motion and the need to hurry to reduce the time of ischemia. Also, a major cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality is ungrafted circumflex coronary artery disease. We have devised a means of overcoming these shortcomings and performing multivessel CABG. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of our technique. One hundred patients with severe triple-vessel disease underwent multivessel off-pump CABG. For cardiac stabilization, a combination of local pericardial stabilization sutures and lifting and rotating the heart by means of posterior pericardial sutures were used. For myocardial perfusion, a technique of retrograde coronary sinus perfusion by arterial blood from the ascending aorta was used. Each patient received an average of 3.8 grafts (range 3 to 5). Complications included conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in 1 patient and a perioperative myocardial infarction in the same patient. In all other patients we were able to perform a satisfactory grafting in all territories with no operative mortality. Rapid recovery allowed 95% of our patients to resume normal activity within 1 month. A predischarge graft angiogram in 35 patients showed 97.8% patency. These results suggest that off-pump CABG with our techniques is effective and safe. Early clinical outcome and excellent patency rates suggest its more widespread use in selected cases.

  10. Regulation of myocardial amino acid balance in the conscious dog.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, R G; Barrett, E J; Francis, C K; Jacob, R; Zaret, B L

    1985-01-01

    The effects in vivo of physiologic increases in insulin and amino acids on myocardial amino acid balance were evaluated in conscious dogs. Arterial and coronary sinus concentrations of amino acids and coronary blood flow were measured during a 30-min basal and a 100-min experimental period employing three protocols: euglycemic insulin clamp (plasma insulin equaled 70 +/- 11 microU/ml, n = 6); euglycemic insulin clamp during amino acid infusion (plasma insulin equaled 89 +/- 12 microU/ml, n = 6); and suppression of insulin with somatostatin during amino acid infusion (plasma insulin equaled 15 +/- 4 microU/ml, n = 6). Basally, only leucine and isoleucine were removed significantly by myocardium (net branched chain amino acid [BCAA] uptake equaled 0.5 +/- 0.2 mumol/min), while glycine, alanine, and glutamine were released. Glutamine demonstrated the highest net myocardial production (1.6 +/- 0.2 mumol/min). No net exchange was seen for valine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, cysteine, methionine, glutamate, asparagine, serine, threonine, taurine, and aspartate. In group I, hyperinsulinemia caused a decline of all plasma amino acids except alanine; alanine balance switched from release to an uptake of 0.6 +/- 0.4 mumol/min (P less than 0.05), while the myocardial balance of other amino acids was unchanged. In group II, amino acid concentrations rose, and were accompanied by a marked rise in myocardial BCAA uptake (0.4 +/- 0.1-2.6 +/- 0.3 mumol/min, P less than 0.001). Uptake of alanine was again stimulated (0.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/min, P less than 0.01), while glutamine production was unchanged (1.3 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.6 +/- 0.3 mumol/min). In group III, there was a 4-5-fold increase in the plasma concentration of the infused amino acids, accompanied by marked stimulation in uptake of only BCAA (6.8 +/- 0.7 mumol/min). Myocardial glutamine production was unchanged (1.9 +/- 0.4-1.3 +/- 0.7 mumol/min). Within the three experimental groups there were highly significant linear correlations

  11. Different contribution of extent of myocardial injury to left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in early reperfused acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to investigate the influence of the extent of myocardial injury on left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function in patients after reperfused acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods Thirty-eight reperfused AMI patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging after percutaneous coronary revascularization. The extent of myocardial edema and scarring were assessed by T2 weighted imaging and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, respectively. Within a day of CMR, echocardiography was done. Using 2D speckle tracking analysis, LV longitudinal, circumferential strain, and twist were measured. Results Extent of LGE were significantly correlated with LV systolic functional indices such as ejection fraction (r = -0.57, p < 0.001), regional wall motion score index (r = 0.52, p = 0.001), and global longitudinal strain (r = 0.56, p < 0.001). The diastolic functional indices significantly correlated with age (r = -0.64, p < 0.001), LV twist (r = -0.39, p = 0.02), average non-infarcted myocardial circumferential strain (r = -0.52, p = 0.001), and LV end-diastolic wall stress index (r = -0.47, p = 0.003 with e’) but not or weakly with extent of LGE. In multivariate analysis, age and non-infarcted myocardial circumferential strain independently correlated with diastolic functional indices rather than extent of injury. Conclusions In patients with timely reperfused AMI, not only extent of myocardial injury but also age and non-infarcted myocardial function were more significantly related to LV chamber diastolic function. PMID:24512272

  12. Effects of Propranolol on Regional Myocardial Function, Electrograms, and Blood Flow in Conscious Dogs with Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Vatner, Stephen F.; Baig, Hank; Manders, W. Thomas; Ochs, Hermann; Pagani, Massimo

    1977-01-01

    The effects of coronary occlusion and of subsequent propranolol administration were examined in 18 conscious dogs. Overall left ventricular (LV) function was assessed by measurements of LV pressure and dP/dt, and regional myocardial function was assessed by measurements of segment length (SL), velocity of SL shortening and regional myocardial “work”, i.e., pressure-length loops in normal, moderately, and severely ischemic zones. Regional intra-myocardial electrograms were measured from the same sites along with regional myocardial blood flow as determined by the radioactive microsphere technique. Coronary occlusion resulted in graded loss of function from the normal to severely ischemic zones with graded flow reduction and graded elevation of the ST segment. Propranolol depressed overall LV function, function in the normal zone (work fell by 17±4%), and in the majority of moderately ischemic segments (work fell by 7±3%). In severely ischemic segments the extent of paradoxical motion and post-systolic shortening was reduced by propranolol. After propranolol regional myocardial blood flow fell in the normal zone (11±2%) and rose in the moderately (15±4%) and severely (63±10%) ischemic zones. Thus, in the conscious dog with regional myocardial ischemia, propranolol induces a redistribution of myocardial blood flow, with flow falling in normal zones and rising in moderately and severely ischemic zones. The improvement in perfusion of ischemic tissue was associated with slight but significant depression of shortening, velocity, and work in the moderately ischemic zones and of paradoxical bulging and post-systolic shortening in the severely ischemic zone. PMID:874096

  13. Regional Longitudinal Myocardial Deformation Provides Incremental Prognostic Information in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan Skov; Pedersen, Sune H.; Galatius, Søren; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Bech, Jan; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Background Global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) has recently been demonstrated to be a superior prognosticator to conventional echocardiographic measures in patients after myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of regional longitudinal myocardial deformation in comparison to GLS, conventional echocardiography and clinical information. Method In total 391 patients were admitted with ST-Segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention and subsequently examined by echocardiography. All patients were examined by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and two-dimensional strain echocardiography (2DSE). Results During a median-follow-up of 5.3 (IQR 2.5–6.1) years the primary endpoint (death, heart failure or a new MI) was reached by 145 (38.9%) patients. After adjustment for significant confounders (including conventional echocardiographic parameters) and culprit lesion, reduced longitudinal performance in the anterior septal and inferior myocardial regions (but not GLS) remained independent predictors of the combined outcome. Furthermore, inferior myocardial longitudinal deformation provided incremental prognostic information to clinical and conventional echocardiographic information (Harrell's c-statistics: 0.63 vs. 0.67, p = 0.032). In addition, impaired longitudinal deformation outside the culprit lesion perfusion region was significantly associated with an adverse outcome (p<0.05 for all deformation parameters). Conclusion Regional longitudinal myocardial deformation measures, regardless if determined by TDI or 2DSE, are superior prognosticators to GLS. In addition, impaired longitudinal deformation in the inferior myocardial segment provides prognostic information over and above clinical and conventional echocardiographic risk factors. Furthermore, impaired longitudinal deformation outside the culprit lesion perfusion region seems to be a paramount marker of adverse

  14. Simultaneous technetium-99m MIBI angiography and myocardial perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baillet, G.Y.; Mena, I.G.; Kuperus, J.H.; Robertson, J.M.; French, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Resting first-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) was performed with the myocardial perfusion agent technetium-99m MIBI. In 27 patients, it was compared with technetium-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid FPRNA. A significant correlation was present in left (r = 0.93, p less than 0.001) as well as right (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) ventricular ejection fraction measured with both radiopharmaceuticals. In 13 patients, MIBI derived segmental wall motion was compared with contrast ventriculography. A high correlation was present (p less than 0.001), and qualitative agreement was found in 38/52 segments. In 19 patients with myocardial infarction a significant correlation was present between MIBI segmental wall motion and perfusion scores (p less than 0.001). In ten patients with a history of myocardial infarction, 18 myocardial segments demonstrated diseased coronary vessels and impaired wall motion at contrast angiography. These segments were all identified by the MIBI wall motion and perfusion study. We conclude that MIBI is a promising agent for simultaneous evaluation of cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at rest.

  15. Myocardial aging as a T-cell–mediated phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Gustavo Campos; van den Berg, Anne; Nunes-Silva, Vânia; Weirather, Johannes; Peters, Laura; Burkard, Matthias; Friedrich, Mike; Pinnecker, Jürgen; Abeßer, Marco; Heinze, Katrin G.; Schuh, Kai; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Kerkau, Thomas; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Frantz, Stefan; Hofmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the myocardium has been rediscovered under the lenses of immunology, and lymphocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies with different etiologies. Aging is an important risk factor for heart diseases, and it also has impact on the immune system. Thus, we sought to determine whether immunological activity would influence myocardial structure and function in elderly mice. Morphological, functional, and molecular analyses revealed that the age-related myocardial impairment occurs in parallel with shifts in the composition of tissue-resident leukocytes and with an accumulation of activated CD4+ Foxp3− (forkhead box P3) IFN-γ+ T cells in the heart-draining lymph nodes. A comprehensive characterization of different aged immune-deficient mouse strains revealed that T cells significantly contribute to age-related myocardial inflammation and functional decline. Upon adoptive cell transfer, the T cells isolated from the mediastinal lymph node (med-LN) of aged animals exhibited increased cardiotropism, compared with cells purified from young donors or from other irrelevant sites. Nevertheless, these cells caused rather mild effects on cardiac functionality, indicating that myocardial aging might stem from a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic (immunological) factors. Taken together, the data herein presented indicate that heart-directed immune responses may spontaneously arise in the elderly, even in the absence of a clear tissue damage or concomitant infection. These observations might shed new light on the emerging role of T cells in myocardial diseases, which primarily affect the elderly population. PMID:28255084

  16. Sepsis-induced myocardial depression and takotsubo syndrome.

    PubMed

    Y-Hassan, Shams; Settergren, Magnus; Henareh, Loghman

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Myocardial depression in the setting of sepsis and septic shock is common and has been recognized for a long time. The aim of this study is to find out an association and causal link between sepsis and takotsubo syndrome (TS). Fifteen cases of TS were studied. Critical review of the literature dealing with sepsis and myocardial depression was done Results: Fifteen cases of sepsis-induced TS are described. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were men. The ages ranged from 39 to 76 years (mean age 60 years). Two-thirds of the patients had ST-elevation myocardial infarction ECG changes. Complications occurred in 80% of the patients. No specific types of sepsis or micro-organisms were associated with the development of TS. Critical review of the sepsis-induced myocardial depression shows that the left ventricular dysfunction, which is reversible within one-to-two weeks, is characterized by segmental ventricular dysfunction, and involvement of the right ventricle in one fourth of cases. These features are also consistent with TS. Sepsis triggers TS, which may be the cause of the majority of cases of sepsis-induced myocardial depression. Acute cardiac sympathetic disruption with noradrenaline spill-over may be the cause of sepsis-induced TS.

  17. Myocardial apoptosis in heart disease: does the emperor have clothes?

    PubMed

    Jose Corbalan, J; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    Since the discovery of a novel mechanism of cell death that differs from traditional necrosis, i.e., apoptosis, there have been numerous studies concluding that increased apoptosis augments myocardial infarction and heart failure and that limiting apoptosis protects the heart. Importantly, the vast majority of cells in the heart are non-myocytes with only roughly 30 % myocytes, yet almost the entire field studying apoptosis in the heart has disregarded non-myocyte apoptosis, e.g., only 4.7 % of 423 studies on myocardial apoptosis in the past 3 years quantified non-myocyte apoptosis. Accordingly, we reviewed the history of apoptosis in the heart focusing first on myocyte apoptosis, followed by the history of non-myocyte apoptosis in myocardial infarction and heart failure. Apoptosis of several of the major non-myocyte cell types in the heart (cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and leukocytes) may actually be responsible for affecting the severity of myocardial infarction and heart failure. In summary, even though it is now known that the majority of apoptosis in the heart occurs in non-myocytes, very little work has been done to elucidate the mechanisms by which non-myocyte apoptosis might be responsible for the adverse effects of apoptosis in myocardial infarction and heart failure. The goal of this review is to provide an impetus for future work in this field on non-myocyte apoptosis that will be required for a better understanding of the role of apoptosis in the heart.

  18. Human Umbilical Cord Blood for Transplantation Therapy in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A; Franzese, Nick; Staples, Meaghan; Weinbren, Nathan L.; Babilonia, Monica; Patel, Jason; Merchant, Neil; Simancas, Alejandra Jacotte; Slakter, Adam; Caputo, Mathew; Patel, Milan; Franyuti, Giorgio; Franzblau, Max H.; Suarez, Lyanne; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kaneko, Yuji; Miller, Leslie W.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising therapy for myocardial infarction. Endogenous repair of the heart muscle after myocardial infarction is a challenge because adult cardiomyocytes have a limited capacity to proliferate and replace damaged cells. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence has shown that cell based therapy may promote revascularization and replacement of damaged myocytes after myocardial infarction. Adult stem cells can be harvested from different sources including bone marrow, skeletal myoblast, and human umbilical cord blood cells. The use of these cells for the repair of myocardial infarction presents various advantages over other sources of stem cells. Among these are easy harvesting, unlimited differentiation capability, and robust angiogenic potential. In this review, we discuss the milestone findings and the most recent evidence demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with gene therapy, highlighting the importance of optimizing the timing, dose and delivery methods, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of action that will guide the clinical entry of this innovative treatment for ischemic disorders, specifically myocardial infarction. PMID:24307973

  19. Human Umbilical Cord Blood for Transplantation Therapy in Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Sandra A; Franzese, Nick; Staples, Meaghan; Weinbren, Nathan L; Babilonia, Monica; Patel, Jason; Merchant, Neil; Simancas, Alejandra Jacotte; Slakter, Adam; Caputo, Mathew; Patel, Milan; Franyuti, Giorgio; Franzblau, Max H; Suarez, Lyanne; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R; Kaneko, Yuji; Miller, Leslie W; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-07-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising therapy for myocardial infarction. Endogenous repair of the heart muscle after myocardial infarction is a challenge because adult cardiomyocytes have a limited capacity to proliferate and replace damaged cells. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence has shown that cell based therapy may promote revascularization and replacement of damaged myocytes after myocardial infarction. Adult stem cells can be harvested from different sources including bone marrow, skeletal myoblast, and human umbilical cord blood cells. The use of these cells for the repair of myocardial infarction presents various advantages over other sources of stem cells. Among these are easy harvesting, unlimited differentiation capability, and robust angiogenic potential. In this review, we discuss the milestone findings and the most recent evidence demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with gene therapy, highlighting the importance of optimizing the timing, dose and delivery methods, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of action that will guide the clinical entry of this innovative treatment for ischemic disorders, specifically myocardial infarction.

  20. Nuclear cardiac imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability

    PubMed Central

    Slart, R.H.J.A.; Bax, J.J.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Jager, P.L.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy is the assessment of myocardial viability. Patients with left ventricular dysfunction who have viable myocardium are the patients at highest risk because of the potential for ischaemia but at the same time benefit most from revascularisation. It is important to identify viable myocardium in these patients, and radionuclide myocardial scintigraphy is an excellent tool for this. Single-photon emission computed tomography perfusion scintigraphy (SPECT), whether using 201thallium, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc- tetrofosmin, in stress and/or rest protocols, has consistently been shown to be an effective modality for identifying myocardial viability and guiding appropriate management. Metabolic and perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography radiotracers frequently adds additional information and is a powerful tool for predicting which patients will have an improved outcome from revascularisation. New techniques in the nuclear cardiology field, such as attenuation corrected SPECT, dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT and gated FDG PET are promising and will further improve the detection of myocardial viability. Also the combination of multislice computed tomography scanners with PET opens possibilities of adding coronary calcium scoring and noninvasive coronary angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging and quantification. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:25696432

  1. Risk profile in women with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Târlea, Mihaela; Deleanu, D; Bucşa, A; Zarma, L; Croitoru, M; Platon, P; Ginghină, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The studies in the literature of the past years have noticed the particular characteristics of the ischemic heart disease in women, who seem to be lacking early diagnosis and invasive treatment of coronary heart disease. They especially emphasize that the evolution, complications and mortality in myocardial infarction in women are more severe. The evaluation of clinical, investigational and therapeutic aspects in a lot of women with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus a lot of men with the same pathology, hospitalised in the same period. 78 women hospitalised in the Emergency Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases between 1st January 1999 and 30th October 2001 with acute myocardial infarction. 109 men hospitalised in the Emergency Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases with acute myocardial infarction in the same period. acute myocardial infarction, coronary angiography +/=left ventriculography. The lot of study and the witness lot were divided into 3 subgroups based on the severity of coronary lesions: Group I: left main stenoses, Group II: stenoses >60% on the other epicardial coronary vessels, Group III: stenoses <60% on the other epicardial coronary vessels. The risk factors, clinical data, cardiac performance indices and medical and invasive treatment were compared between the two groups. The women hospitalised with AMI were older than men, had more diabetes and hypertension as main risk factors than men, with the exception of smoking, had more frequent heart failure and diastolic dysfunction of left ventricle. The favorite invasive treatment in women was the angioplasty with application of stent and in men--coronary bypass.

  2. Exercise-induced Myocardial Ischemia Detected by Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross; Wasserman, Karlman; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan; Chronos, Nicolas; Boden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a well-accepted physiologic evaluation technique in patients diagnosed with heart failure and in individuals presenting with unexplained dyspnea on exertion. Several variables obtained during CPET, including oxygen consumption relative to heart rate (VO2/HR or O2-pulse) and work rate (VO2/Watt) provide consistent, quantitative patterns of abnormal physiologic responses to graded exercise when left ventricular dysfunction is caused by myocardial ischemia. This concept paper describes both the methodology and clinical application of CPET associated with myocardial ischemia. Initial evidence indicates left ventricular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia may be accurately detected by an abnormal CPET response. CPET testing may complement current non-invasive testing modalities that elicit inducible ischemia. It provides a physiologic quantification of the work rate, heart rate and O2 uptake at which myocardial ischemia develops. In conclusion, the potential value of adding CPET with gas exchange measurements is likely to be of great value in diagnosing and quantifying both overt and occult myocardial ischemia and its reversibility with treatment. PMID:19231322

  3. Serial Myocardial Imaging after a Single Dose of Thallium-201.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Takahiko; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Kamitani, Tadaaki; Sugihara, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Although thallium-201 exercise scintigraphy has been established for the detection of myocardial ischemia and viability, little is known regarding the myocardial thallium-201 kinetics during angioplasty. Herein, we report a 77-year-old man with angina pectoris, in whom serial myocardial imaging after a single dose of thallium-201 was helpful in identifying not only the culprit lesion and myocardial viability, but also the dynamic changes in myocardial perfusion during angioplasty. Thallium-201 images after exercise showed a perfusion defect in the inferior wall, with a trivial redistribution 3 hours after the exercise and a marked improvement 24 hours later. Coronary angiography, performed 27 hours after exercise scintigraphy, showed severe stenosis in the right coronary artery. Guidewire crossing of the lesion interrupted the antegrade flow, which was restored after balloon dilation and stent implantation. Thallium-201 images, 2 hours after angioplasty (i.e., 30 hours after exercise), showed a decreased tracer uptake in the inferior wall, which improved the next day (i.e., 48 hours after exercise). Cardiac biomarkers were negative in the clinical course.

  4. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in subjects with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Rathbone, B.; Martin, D.; Stephens, J.; Thompson, J. R.; Samani, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk of myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: University teaching hospital. METHODS: Serological evidence of H pylori infection was determined in 342 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted into the coronary care unit and in 236 population-based controls recruited from visitors to patients on medical and surgical wards. RESULTS: 206/342 (60.2%) of cases were H pylori positive compared with 132/236 (55.9%) of controls (P = 0.30). Age and sex stratified odds ratio for myocardial infarction associated with H pylori seropositivity was 1.05 (95% CI 0.7 to 1.53, P = 0.87) and this remained non-significant (P = 0.46) when other risk factors for ischaemic heart disease were taken into account using logistic regression analysis. H pylori seropositivity was not associated with several coronary risk factors in either cases or controls. CONCLUSION: No increase was found in H pylori seropositivity in subjects with acute myocardial infarction. This suggests that previous H pylori infection is not a major risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. Images PMID:8983674

  5. Histopathological study on myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, M

    1990-06-01

    The mode and causes of myocardial hypertrophy occurring in association with ischemic heart disease were studied. The investigation involved autopsied hearts (15 cases of subendocardial infarction, 27 of transmural infarction, 20 of non-infarcted three vessel disease and 17 controls) and biopsied materials obtained during coronary-aorta bypass graft surgery (23 patients with angina pectoris and 46 with myocardial infarction). The subendocardial infarction group showed most marked myocardial hypertrophy that reflected extensive infarction and fibrosis, dilatation of the left ventricular cavity and the loss of myocytes. Despite a marked decrease in the number of myocyte layers, the residual myocardium of the left ventricle was uniformly hypertrophic, accompanied by an increase in the heart weight. The larger the area of fibrosis, the more marked was myocardial hypertrophy irrespective of the luminal diameter of the responsible coronary artery. These findings indicate that myocardial hypertrophy associated with ischemic heart disease is enhanced by the compensatory mechanisms for a decrease in the contractile myocardium due to fibrosis.

  6. Three-directional acceleration phase mapping of myocardial function.

    PubMed

    Staehle, Felix; Jung, Bernd A; Bauer, Simon; Leupold, Jochen; Bock, Jelena; Lorenz, Ramona; Föll, Daniela; Markl, Michael

    2011-05-01

    An optimized acceleration encoded phase contrast method termed "acceleration phase mapping" for the assessment of regional myocardial function is presented. Based on an efficient gradient waveform design using two-sided encoding for in vivo three-directional acceleration mapping, echo and repetition times TE = 12-14 ms and TR = 15-17 ms for low accelerations sensitivity aenc = 5-8 m/s(2) were achieved. In addition to phantom validation, the technique was applied in a study with 10 healthy volunteers at 1.5T and 3T to evaluate its feasibility to assess regional myocardial acceleration at 1.5T and 3T. Results of the acceleration measurements were compared with the temporal derivative of myocardial velocities from three-directional velocity encoded standard phase contrast MRI in the same volunteers. The feasibility to assess myocardial acceleration along the radial, circumferential, and longitudinal direction of the left ventricle was demonstrated. Despite improved signal-to-noise-ratio at 3T (34% increase compared with 1.5T), image quality with respect to susceptibility artifacts was better 1.5T compared with 3T. Analysis of global and regional left ventricular acceleration showed characteristic patterns of systolic and diastolic acceleration and deceleration. Comparisons of directly measured and derived myocardial acceleration dynamics over the cardiac cycle revealed good correlation (r = 0.45-0.68, P < 0.01) between both methods. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Adult Congenital Patients with Bodily Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Buelow, Matthew; Nijhawan, Karan; Gupta, Navdeep; Alla, Venkata; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-12-01

    Children born with congenital malformations of the heart are increasingly surviving into adulthood. This population of patients possesses lesion-specific complication risks while still being at risk for common illnesses. Bodily isomerism or heterotaxy, is a unique clinical entity associated with congenital malformations of the heart which further increases the risk for future cardiovascular complications. We aimed to investigate the frequency of myocardial infarction in adults with bodily isomerism. We utilized the 2012 iteration of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to identify adult inpatient admissions associated with acute myocardial infarction in patients with isomerism. Data regarding demographics, comorbidities and various procedures were collected and compared between those with and without isomerism. A total of 6,907,109 admissions were analyzed with a total of 172,394 admissions being associated with an initial encounter for acute myocardial infarction. The frequency of myocardial infarction did not differ between those with and without isomerism and was roughly 2% in both groups. Similarly, the number of procedures and in-hospital mortality did not differ between the two groups. The frequency and short-term prognosis of acute myocardial infarction is similar in patients with and without isomerism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Decreased myocardial glucose uptake during ischemia in diabetic swine.

    PubMed

    Stanley, W C; Hall, J L; Hacker, T A; Hernandez, L A; Whitesell, L F

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess myocardial glucose uptake in nondiabetic (n = 5) and streptozotocin-diabetic (n = 6) Yucatan miniature swine under matched hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic conditions. Fasting conscious diabetic swine had significantly higher plasma glucose levels (20.9 +/- 2.6 v 5.2 +/- 0.3 mmol/L) and lower insulin levels (6 +/- 1 v 14 +/- 4 microU/mL) than nondiabetic animals. Myocardial glucose uptake was measured in open-chest anesthetized animals under aerobic and ischemic conditions 12 weeks after streptozotocin treatment. Coronary blood flow was controlled by an extracorporeal perfusion circuit. Ischemia was induced by reducing left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery blood flow by 60% for 40 minutes. Animals were treated with somatostatin to suppress insulin secretion, and nondiabetic swine received intravenous (IV) glucose to match the hyperglycemia in the diabetic animals. The rate of glucose uptake by the myocardium was not statistically different under aerobic conditions, but was significantly lower in diabetic swine during ischemia (0.20 +/- 0.08 v 0.63 +/- 0.14 micromol x g(-1) x min(-1), P < .01). Myocardial glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein concentration was decreased by 31% in diabetic swine. In conclusion, 12 weeks of streptozotocin diabetes in swine caused a significant decrease in myocardial GLUT4 protein and a decrease in myocardial glucose uptake during ischemia.

  9. Myocardial perfusion imaging study of CO(2)-induced panic attack.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Santulli, Gaetano; Mesquita, Claudio T; Cosci, Fiammetta; Silva, Adriana C; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-15

    Chest pain is often seen alongside with panic attacks. Moreover, panic disorder has been suggested as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and even a trigger for acute coronary syndrome. Patients with coronary artery disease may have myocardial ischemia in response to mental stress, in which panic attack is a strong component, by an increase in coronary vasomotor tone or sympathetic hyperactivity setting off an increase in myocardial oxygen consumption. Indeed, coronary artery spasm was presumed to be present in cases of cardiac ischemia linked to panic disorder. These findings correlating panic disorder with coronary artery disease lead us to raise questions about the favorable prognosis of chest pain in panic attack. To investigate whether myocardial ischemia is the genesis of chest pain in panic attacks, we developed a myocardial perfusion study through research by myocardial scintigraphy in patients with panic attacks induced in the laboratory by inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide. In conclusion, from the data obtained, some hypotheses are discussed from the viewpoint of endothelial dysfunction and microvascular disease present in mental stress response.

  10. In-vivo measurement of swine myocardial resistivity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jang-Zern; Will, James A; Hubbard-Van Stelle, Scott; Cao, Hong; Tungjitkusolmun, Supan; Choy, Young Bin; Haemmerich, Dieter; Vorperian, Vicken R; Webster, John G

    2002-05-01

    We used a four-terminal plunge probe to measure myocardial resistivity in two directions at three sites from the epicardial surface of eight open-chest pigs in-vivo at eight frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 1 MHz. We calibrated the plunge probe to minimize the error due to stray capacitance between the measured subject and ground. We calibrated the probe in saline solutions contained in a metal cup situated near the heart that had an electrical connection to the pig's heart. The mean of the measured myocardial resistivity was 319 ohm x cm at 1 Hz down to 166 ohm x cm at 1 MHz. Statistical analysis showed the measured myocardial resistivity of two out of eight pigs was significantly different from that of other pigs. The myocardial resistivity measured with the resistivity probe oriented along and across the epicardial fiber direction was significantly different at only one out of the eight frequencies. There was no significant difference in the myocardial resistivity measured at different sites.

  11. Nitroglycerin Use in Myocardial Infarction Patients: Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and its sequelae are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nitroglycerin remains a first-line treatment for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction. Nitroglycerin achieves its benefit by giving rise to nitric oxide, which causes vasodilation and increases blood flow to the myocardium. However, continuous delivery of nitroglycerin results in tolerance, limiting the use of this drug. Nitroglycerin tolerance is due, at least in part, to inactivation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), an enzyme that converts nitroglycerin to the vasodilator, nitric oxide. We have recently found that, in addition to nitroglycerin’s effect on the vasculature, sustained treatment with nitroglycerin negatively affects cardiomyocyte viability following ischemia, thus resulting in increased infarct size in a myocardial infarction model in animals. Co-administration of Alda-1, an activator of ALDH2, with nitroglycerin improves metabolism of reactive aldehyde adducts and prevents the nitroglycerin-induced increase in cardiac dysfunction following myocardial infarction. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms associated with the benefits and risks of nitroglycerin administration in myocardial infarction. (167 of 200). PMID:22040938

  12. Predictors of Myocardial Dysfunction in Children with Indian Red Scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus) Sting Envenomation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P M Ananda; Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Mahadevan, Subramanian; Harichandrakumar, K T

    2015-04-01

    To identify predictive risk factors for myocardial dysfunction in children with scorpion sting envenomation and to evaluate the effects of Scorpion antivenom and prazosin combination therapy on occurrence of myocardial dysfunction. Observational. Tertiary care hospital in Southern India. 85 children aged <13 years with scorpion sting envenomation. Frequency of myocardial dysfunction; predictors of myocardial dysfunction. 24 children (28.2%) developed myocardial dysfunction. Hypotension at admission (P=0.003) and increased time (>4h) between sting and administration of appropriate therapy (P=0.001) were independent predictors of myocardial dysfunction on logistic regression. Scorpion antivenom plus prazosin combination therapy led to an increase in cumulative proportion of children without myocardial dysfunction. Early (<4 hours) administration of Scorpion antivenom along with prazosin increases the cumulative percentage of children not developing myocardial dysfunction.

  13. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  14. Myocardial Performance Index in Neurocardiogenic Syncope Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz Coskun, Fatma; Sucu, Murat; Uku, Okkes; Yuce, Murat; Ozer, Orhan; Ercan, Suleyman; Davutoglu, Vedat

    2014-01-01

    Background Many syncopes resulting from neural reflexes in various conditions are called neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS). We aimed to investigate the presence of left ventricular (LV) myocardial performance index (MPI) in patients with NCS, which was diagnosed with head-up tilt table test (HUTT), and the accurateness of the test in order to use it as a method in patients with NCS. Assuming the MPI as a potential cause of syncope, we assessed the Tei index with non-invasive tissue Doppler echocardiography method. Methods Consecutive outpatients with a history of recurrent unexplained syncope underwent HUTT. Twenty-nine HUTT (+) patients (24 female and five male, mean age: 30 ± 15 years) as the study group and HUTT (-) 23 healthy patients (six female and 17 male, mean age: 34 ± 16 years) as the control group were included into the study. Conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography was performed to both groups. The MPI was determined by using PW Doppler. Measurements of Doppler time intervals, according to Tei index ((isovolumic contraction time + isovolumic relaxation time)/ejection time) is calculated as (a - b/b), where “a” is the interval between cessation and onset of the mitral inflow, and “b” is the ejection time (ET) at the LV outflow. Results When comparing the groups in terms of MPI and ET, there was significant difference between groups. Patients with NCS had significantly longer ET and lower MPI value than control group (284 ± 24 ms vs. 260 ± 24 ms, P < 0.001, respectively and 0.44 ± 0.7 vs. 0.52 ± 0.8, P < 0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in ejection fraction between groups. Conclusion In the present study, LV MPI value decreases in patients with NCS.

  15. Targeting inflammatory pathways in myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2013-01-01

    Acute cardiomyocyte necrosis in the infarcted heart generates Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs), activating complement and Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)/Interleukin (IL)-1 signaling, and triggering an intense inflammatory reaction. Infiltrating leukocytes clear the infarct from dead cells, while activating reparative pathways that lead to formation of a scar. As the infarct heals the ventricle remodels; the geometric, functional and molecular alterations associated with post-infarction remodeling are driven by the inflammatory cascade and are involved in the development of heart failure. Because unrestrained inflammation in the infarcted heart induces matrix degradation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, timely suppression of the post-infarction inflammatory reaction may be crucial to protect the myocardium from dilative remodeling and progressive dysfunction. Inhibition and resolution of post-infarction inflammation involves mobilization of inhibitory mononuclear cell subsets and requires activation of endogenous STOP signals. Our manuscript discusses the basic cellular and molecular events involved in initiation, activation and resolution of the post-infarction inflammatory response, focusing on identification of therapeutic targets. The failure of anti-integrin approaches in patients with myocardial infarction and a growing body of experimental evidence suggest that inflammation may not increase ischemic cardiomyocyte death, but accentuates matrix degradation causing dilative remodeling. Given the pathophysiologic complexity of post-infarction remodeling, personalized biomarker-based approaches are needed to target patient subpopulations with dysregulated inflammatory and reparative responses. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory signals (such as IL-1 and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1) may be effective in patients with defective resolution of post-infarction inflammation who exhibit progressive dilative remodeling. In contrast, patients with predominant

  16. [Myocardial revascularization surgery via a left minithoracotomy].

    PubMed

    da Silveira, W L; Leite, A F; Artiaga, E P; Queiroz, F C; Ferreira, K A; de Carvalho, M C; da Silva, M A; Abdulmassih del Papa, M; Costa, L H; da Cunha, O M; Nazzeta, H; de Oliveira, V G

    1998-12-01

    There is, today, a global tendency towards a surgical approach privileging very small incisions, the so-called minimally invasive intervention, which results in a less aggressive action. The introduction of this new technique makes it possible to dissect the left internal thoracic artery (LITA) and to perform in the anastomosis with the anterior interventricular artery (AIA) through a left minithoracotomy. From May of 1996 to october of 1997, 11 patients with ischemic heart disease and a single proximal lesion of the AIA were submitted to a myocardial revascularization (MR). The surgical approach consisted of a left anterolateral thoracotomy through the 4th left intercostal space, of approximately 10 cm, and in the last 6 cases, resection of part of the cartilage of the 4th and 5th ribs, dissection of the LITA, as well as opening and repair of the pericardium adjacent to the AIA was done. All patients received a single bypass to the AIA with a graft of the LITA, without extracorporeal circulation. The patients' age varied between 46 and 76 years (mean = 58.55). Ten patients (90.90%) were males and 1 (9.09%) was a female. Hospital stay ranged from 4 to 8 days, with the average of 5.2 days. None of the patients presented any electrocardiographic change in the immediate post-operatory period. During the control period one patient developed a clot in the distal LITA, with important compromise of the flow. In another patient the stenosis was at the level of the anastomosis. Both were successfully submitted to angioplasty. There were no deaths in the groups studied. The absence of deaths suggests to us that MR surgery carried out with this minimally invasive technique, in selected groups and is an excellent alternative to the revascularization of the AIA.

  17. Virtual electrode effects in myocardial fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Knisley, S B; Hill, B C; Ideker, R E

    1994-01-01

    The changes in transmembrane potential during a stimulation pulse in the heart are not known. We have used transmembrane potential sensitive dye fluorescence to measure changes in transmembrane potential along fibers in an anisotropic arterially perfused rabbit epicardial layer. Cathodal or anodal extracellular point stimulation produced changes in transmembrane potential within 60 microns of the electrode that were positive or negative, respectively. The changes in transmembrane potential did not simply decrease to zero with increasing distance, as would occur with a theoretical fiber space constant, but instead became reversed beyond approximately 1 mm from the electrode consistent with a virtual electrode effect. Even stimulation from a line of terminals perpendicular to the fibers produced negative changes in transmembrane potential for cathodal stimulation with the largest negative changes during a 50-ms pulse at 3-4 mm from the electrode terminals. Negative changes as large as the amplitude of the action potential rising phase occurred during a 50-ms pulse for 20-volt cathodal stimulation. Switching to anodal stimulation reversed the directions of changes in transmembrane potential at most recording spots, however for stimulation during the refractory period negative changes in transmembrane potential were significantly larger than positive changes in transmembrane potential. Anodal stimulation during diastole with 3-ms pulses produced excitation in the region of depolarization that accelerated when the stimulation strength was increased to > 3 times the anodal threshold strength. Thus, virtual electrode effects of unipolar stimulation occur in myocardial fibers, and for sufficiently strong stimuli the virtual electrode effects may influence electrical behavior of the myocardium. PMID:8011903

  18. Myocardial regeneration of the failing heart.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2013-11-01

    Human heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently, heart transplantation and implantation of mechanical devices represent the only available treatments for advanced HF. Two alternative strategies have emerged to treat patients with HF. One approach relies on transplantation of exogenous stem cells (SCs) of non-cardiac or cardiac origin to induce cardiac regeneration and improve ventricular function. Another complementary strategy relies on stimulation of the endogenous regenerative capacity of uninjured cardiac progenitor cells to rebuild cardiac muscle and restore ventricular function. Various SC types and delivery strategies have been examined in the experimental and clinical settings; however, neither the ideal cell type nor the cell delivery method for cardiac cell therapy has yet emerged. Although the use of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells, most frequently exploited in clinical trials, appears to be safe, the results are controversial. Two recent randomized trials have failed to document any beneficial effects of intracardiac delivery of autologous BM mononuclear cells on cardiac function of patients with HF. The remarkable discovery that various populations of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are present in the adult human heart and that it possesses limited regeneration capacity has opened a new era in cardiac repair. Importantly, unlike BM-derived SCs, autologous CPCs from myocardial biopsies cultured and subsequently delivered by coronary injection to patients have given positive results. Although these data are promising, a better understanding of how to control proliferation and differentiation of CPCs, to enhance their recruitment and survival, is required before CPCs become clinically applicable therapeutics.

  19. Myocardial Perfusion SPECT 2015 in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Burchert, Wolfgang; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aim The working group Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine of the German Society of Nuclear Medicine presents the results of the 7th survey of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) of the reporting year 2015. Method 268 questionnaires (173 practices [PR], 67 hospitals [HO], 28 university hospitals [UH]) were evaluated. Results of the last survey from 2012 are set in squared brackets. Results MPS of 121 939 [105 941] patients were reported. 98 % [95 %] of all MPS were performed with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and 2 % [5 %] with Tl-201. 78 % [79 %] of all patients were studied in PR, 14 % [15 %] in HO, and 8 % [6 %] in UH. A pharmacological stress test was performed in 43 % [39 %] (22 % [24 %] adenosine, 20 % [9 %] regadenoson, 1% [6 %] dipyridamole or dobutamine). Attenuation correction was applied in 25 % [2009: 10 %] of MPS. Gated SPECT was performed in 78 % [70 %] of all rest MPS, in 80 % [73 %] of all stress and in 76 % [67 %] of all stress and rest MPS. 53 % [33 %] of all nuclear medicine departments performed MPS scoring by default, whereas 24 % [41 %] did not apply any quantification. 31 % [26 %] of all departments noticed an increase in their counted MPS and 29 % [29 %] no changes. Data from 89 departments which participated in all surveys showed an increase in MPS count of 11.1 % (PR: 12.2 %, HO: 4.8 %, UH: 18.4 %). 70 % [60 %] of the MPS were requested by ambulatory care cardiologists. Conclusion The 2015 MPS survey reveals a high-grade adherence of routine MPS practice to current guidelines. The positive trend in MPS performance and number of MPS already observed in 2012 continues. Educational training remains necessary in the field of SPECT scoring. PMID:27909712

  20. Animal models of primary myocardial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S. K.; Tilley, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Feline and canine cardiomyopathies (primary myocardial diseases) were reviewed and divided into three groups based on the clinical, hemodynamic, angiocardiographic, and pathologic findings: (1) feline and canine hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, (2) feline and canine congestive (dilated) cardiomyopathy, and (3) feline restrictive cardiomyopathy. All three groups consisted predominantly of mature adult male cats and dogs. Cardiomyopathy in the hamster and turkey was also reviewed. The most common presenting signs were dyspnea and/or thromboembolism in the cat, systolic murmurs with gallop rhythms on auscultation, cardiomegaly with (groups 1 and 3) or without (group 2) pulmonary edema, abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressures, and angiocardiographic evidence of mitral regurgitation with left ventricular concentric hypertrophy (group 1), left ventricular dilatation (group 2), or midventricular stenosis (group 3). Some cats in groups 1 and 3 also had evidence of left ventricular outflow obstruction. The principal pathologic findings in all of the cats and dogs were left atrial dilation, hypertrophy, increased septal:left ventricular free wall thickness ratio with disorganization of cardiac muscle cells (group 1); dilatation of the four chambers with degeneration of cardiac muscle cells (group 2); and extensive endocardial fibrosis and adhesion of the left ventricle (group 3). Aortic thromboembolism was commonly observed in the cats of all three groups. These clinical and pathologic findings indicate that cardiomyopathy in the cat or dog is similar to the three forms of cardiomyopathy in humans (hypertrophic, congestive, and restrictive). Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 FIG. 11 FIG. 12 FIG. 13 FIG. 15 FIG. 16 FIG. 17 FIG. 20 FIG. 21 FIG. 22 FIG. 24 FIG. 25 PMID:6447412

  1. Myocardial Ischemic Memory Imaging With Molecular Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Flordeliza S.; Lu, Erxiong; Bowry, Shivani; Kilic, Sevgi; Tom, Eric; Wang, Jianjun; Gretton, Joan; Pacella, John J.; Wagner, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosing acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest discomfort is a challenge. Because acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion is associated with endothelial upregulation of leukocyte adhesion molecules, which persist even after ischemia has resolved, we hypothesized that microbubbles designed to adhere to endothelial selectins would permit echocardiographic identification of recently ischemic myocardium. Methods and Results Lipid microbubbles (diameter, 3.3±1.7 μm) were synthesized. The selectin ligand sialyl Lewisx was conjugated to the microbubble surface (MBsLex). Control bubbles (MBCTL) bore surface Lewisx or sialyl Lewisc. Intravital microscopy of mouse cremaster muscle was performed after intravenous injection of MBsLex (n=11) or MBCTL (n=9) with or without prior intrascrotal tumor necrosis factor–α. There was greater adhesion of MBsLex to inflamed versus noninflamed endothelium (P=0.0081). Rats (n=12) underwent 15 minutes of anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. After 30 minutes and 1 hour of reperfusion, high-mechanical-index nonlinear echocardiographic imaging was performed in which single frames were acquired at 3.5 and 4 minutes after intravenous injection of MBsLex or MBCTL. Video intensity at 4 minutes was subtracted from that at 3.5 minutes to derive target-specific acoustic signal. MBsLex caused greater opacification in postischemic versus nonischemic myocardium at both time points (P≤0.002). Immunostaining confirmed endothelial P-selectin expression in the ischemic bed. Conclusions Echocardiographic identification of recently ischemic myocardium is possible using ultrasound contrast agents targeted to selectins. This may offer a new approach to the more timely and precise diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest pain of uncertain cardiac origin. PMID:17210843

  2. Ventricular septal rupture following acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Koh, Angela S; Loh, Yee Jim; Lim, Yeong Phang; Le Tan, Ju

    2011-04-01

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) that is associated with significant mortality. We aim to review the clinical outcome in the current era. Patients admitted to a single tertiary centre from 1997 to 2008 with VSR post-AMI were identified from the local cardiac registry. We performed a retrospective review on 25 patients. Mean age (15 women) was 71 years. Most patients had cardiovascular risk factors (84%); the commonest was hypertension (72%). Anterior AMI (80%) and apical VSR (84%) formed the majority of the cases. Eleven patients (44%) received prior coronary reperfusion therapy either via thrombolysis or PCI. Median time to rupture was 1 day from diagnosis of infarction. More than half (60%) of the patients were in Killip class 3 or 4 at diagnosis of rupture. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 33 +/- 10%. Most patients (80%) required IABP for haemodynamic support. All patients who underwent surgery had ventricular septal repair; amongst them 47% had concomitant CABG. Those managed conservatively were older (P = 0.01). Overall mortality rate was 44%. Most died within the first four days (82%). Surgical and non-surgical survival rates were 68% and 17%, respectively (P= 0.039). Patient demographics, prior coronary reperfusion techniques, Killip class status and LVEF were not significant predictors of mortality. However, non-anterior wall AMI and non-apical VSR were significantly associated with poorer survival (P = 0.009, P = 0.026 respectively). While the occurrence ofVSR post-AMI appears to be low compared to earlier studies, it continues to be associated with significant mortality. Non-anterior wall AMI and non-apical VSR were associated with poorer survival and surgical repair conferred survival advantage over conservative management.

  3. Complete myocardial revascularization using arterial grafts.

    PubMed

    Dallan, L A; de Oliveira, S A; Lisboa, L A; Platania, F; Jatene, F B; Iglezias, J C; Filho, C A; Cabral, R; Jatene, A D

    2001-01-01

    Complete arterial revascularization is important in younger patients to reduce the likelihood of future reoperation. We assessed the short-term outcome of a strategy to provide complete arterial revascularization in a cohort of young patients. Three hundred and eighty-five patients underwent myocardial revascularization using artery grafts alone and were followed up for 30 months. One hundred fourteen patients (29.6%) had single-vessel disease, 118 (30.6%) had two-vessel disease, and 153 (39.7%) had three or more obstructed coronary arteries. Eight of the patients had undergone previous surgical revascularization. The left internal thoracic artery (LITA) was routinely used for the left anterior descending branch (LAD). In 103 patients (28.1%), the in situ right internal thoracic artery (RITA) was used for revascularization of the right coronary artery (RCA) and its branches. The RITA was sometimes used as a free graft from the aorta or as an artificial "Y" from the LITA to the diagonal and marginal branches. Other arterial conduits included the radial artery (RA) in 215 patients (55.8%), the right gastroepiploic artery (RGEA) in 24 patients (6.3%), and the inferior epigastric artery (IEA) in four patients (1.1%). In patients having lesions in three or more arteries, the mean number of distal anastomoses was 3.2 per patient. There were no intraoperative deaths. Hospital mortality was 1.8% (n = 7). Of the fatal cases, two were redos and two underwent combined procedures (one for left ventricular aneurysm and one for double valve replacement), while only three of the fatal cases underwent revascularization as a primary and isolated procedure. Complete arterial reconstruction carries an acceptably low operative mortality and excellent short-term follow-up. This strategy is particularly important for young patients to reduce the probability of future reoperation.

  4. Myocardial Tissue Remodeling in Adolescent Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Neilan, Tomas G.; Hulten, Edward; Coelho‐Filho, Otavio; Hoppin, Alison; Levitsky, Lynne; de Ferranti, Sarah; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Traum, Avram; Goodman, Elizabeth; Feng, Henry; Heydari, Bobak; Harris, William S.; Hoefner, Daniel M.; McConnell, Joseph P.; Seethamraju, Ravi; Rickers, Carsten; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Jerosch‐Herold, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Although ventricular remodeling has been reported in obese youth, early tissue‐level markers within the myocardium that precede organ‐level alterations have not been described. Methods and Results We studied 21 obese adolescents (mean age, 17.7±2.6 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 41.9±9.5 kg/m2, including 11 patients with type 2 diabetes [T2D]) and 12 healthy volunteers (age, 15.1±4.5 years; BMI, 20.1±3.5 kg/m2) using biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) to phenotype cardiac structure, function, and interstitial matrix remodeling by standard techniques. Although left ventricular ejection fraction and left atrial volumes were similar in healthy volunteers and obese patients (and within normal body size‐adjusted limits), interstitial matrix expansion by CMR extracellular volume fraction (ECV) was significantly different between healthy volunteers (median, 0.264; interquartile range [IQR], 0.253 to 0.271), obese adolescents without T2D (median, 0.328; IQR, 0.278 to 0.345), and obese adolescents with T2D (median, 0.376; IQR, 0.336 to 0.407; P=0.0001). ECV was associated with BMI for the entire population (r=0.58, P<0.001) and with high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein (r=0.47, P<0.05), serum triglycerides (r=0.51, P<0.05), and hemoglobin A1c (r=0.76, P<0.0001) in the obese stratum. Conclusions Obese adolescents (particularly those with T2D) have subclinical alterations in myocardial tissue architecture associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. These alterations precede significant left ventricular hypertrophy or decreased cardiac function. PMID:23963758

  5. Sorafenib Cardiotoxicity Increases Mortality after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Trappanese, Danielle; Gross, Polina; Husain, Sharmeen; Dunn, Jonathan; Lal, Hind; Sharp, Thomas E.; Starosta, Timothy; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; Berretta, Remus M.; Barbe, Mary; Yu, Daohai; Gao, Erhe; Kubo, Hajime; Force, Thomas; Houser, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Sorafenib is an effective treatment for renal cell carcinoma, but recent clinical reports have documented its cardiotoxicity through an unknown mechanism. Objective Determining the mechanism of sorafenib-mediated cardiotoxicity. Methods and Results Mice treated with sorafenib or vehicle for 3 weeks underwent induced myocardial infarction (MI) after 1 week of treatment. Sorafenib markedly decreased 2-week survival relative to vehicle-treated controls but echocardiography at 1 and 2 weeks post-MI detected no differences in cardiac function. Sorafenib-treated hearts had significantly smaller diastolic and systolic volumes and reduced heart weights. High doses of sorafenib induced necrotic death of isolated myocytes in vitro, but lower doses did not induce myocyte death or affect inotropy. Histological analysis documented increased myocyte cross-sectional area despite smaller heart sizes following sorafenib treatment, further suggesting myocyte loss. Sorafenib caused apoptotic cell death of cardiac- and bone-derived c-kit+ stem cells in vitro and decreased the number of BrdU+ myocytes detected at the infarct border zone in fixed tissues. Sorafenib had no effect on infarct size, fibrosis or post-MI neovascularization. When sorafenib-treated animals received metoprolol treatment post-MI, the sorafenib-induced increase in post MI mortality was eliminated, cardiac function was improved, and myocyte loss was ameliorated. Conclusions Sorafenib cardiotoxicity results from myocyte necrosis rather than from any direct effect on myocyte function. Surviving myocytes undergo pathological hypertrophy. Inhibition of c-kit+ stem cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis exacerbates damage by decreasing endogenous cardiac repair. In the setting of MI, which also causes large-scale cell loss, sorafenib cardiotoxicity dramatically increases mortality. PMID:24718482

  6. [Early statin therapy in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, M; Romero-Bermejo, F J; Expósito-Ruiz, M; Zamora-Zamora, F; Martínez-Ramírez, M J; Castillo-Rivera, A M; Ramos-Cuadra, J A; Ramírez-Sánchez, M; Vázquez-García, R

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the early administration of statins during acute myocardial infarction (MI). A retrospective cohort study was carried out. National (Spain). Patients included in the ARIAM registry from January 1999 to December 2008 with a diagnosis of MI. None. We used logistic regression analysis and propensity scoring to determine whether the administration of statins during the first 24h of MI acts as a protective factor against: 1) mortality, 2) the incidence of lethal arrhythmias, or 3) cardiogenic shock. A total of 36 842 patients were included in the study. Statins were administered early in 50.2% of the patients. Statin administration was associated with younger patients with known previous dyslipidemia, obesity, a history of ischemic heart disease, heart failure, presence of sinus tachycardia, use of beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary intervention. Mortality was 8.2% (13.2% without statin versus 3% with statin, P<.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that statin administration acted as a protective factor against mortality (adjusted OR 0.518, 95%CI 0.447 to 0.601). Continued use of statins was associated with a reduction in mortality (adjusted OR 0.597, 95%CI 0.449 to 0.798), and the start of treatment was a protective factor against mortality (adjusted OR 0.642, 95%CI 0.544 -0.757). Statin therapy also exerted a protective effect against the incidence of lethal arrhythmias and cardiogenic shock. These results suggest that early treatment with statins in patients with MI is associated with reduced mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo characterization of acute myocardial ischemia using photoacoustic imaging with a focused transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifang; Chen, Haiyu; Xie, Wengming; Li, Hui

    2011-03-01

    We explore the feasibility of using photoacoustic imaging based on a focused transducer to characterizing acute myocardial ischemia at different stage. In this study, we blocked rat left anterior coronary descending artery (LAD) to induce the acute myocardial ischemia. The results show that the intensity and areas of photoacoustic images of myocardial decrease with the LAD ti