Science.gov

Sample records for myocardium oxygen consumption

  1. Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on carbohydrate metabolism protein synthesis in the myocardium during sustained hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    Glycolysis and the intensity of protein synthesis were studied in 140 white male rats in subcellular fractions of the myocardium during 45 day hypodynamia and hyperbaric oxygenation. Hypodynamia increased: (1) the amount of lactic acids; (2) the amount of pyruvic acid; (3) the lactate/pyruvate coefficient; and (4) the activities of aldolase and lactate dehydrogenase. Hyperbaric oxygenation was found to have a favorable metabolic effect on the animals with hypodynamia.

  2. Effects of myocardial infarction on the distribution and transport of nutrients and oxygen in porcine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Davis, Bryce H; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sample, Chris; Olbrich, Kevin; Leddy, Holly A; Guilak, Farshid; Taylor, Doris A

    2012-10-01

    One of the primary limitations of cell therapy for myocardial infarction is the low survival of transplanted cells, with a loss of up to 80% of cells within 3 days of delivery. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of nutrients and oxygen in infarcted myocardium and to quantify how macromolecular transport properties might affect cell survival. Transmural myocardial infarction was created by controlled cryoablation in pigs. At 30 days post-infarction, oxygen and metabolite levels were measured in the peripheral skeletal muscle, normal myocardium, the infarct border zone, and the infarct interior. The diffusion coefficients of fluorescein or FITC-labeled dextran (0.3-70 kD) were measured in these tissues using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The vascular density was measured via endogenous alkaline phosphatase staining. To examine the influence of these infarct conditions on cells therapeutically used in vivo, skeletal myoblast survival and differentiation were studied in vitro under the oxygen and glucose concentrations measured in the infarct tissue. Glucose and oxygen concentrations, along with vascular density were significantly reduced in infarct when compared to the uninjured myocardium and infarct border zone, although the degree of decrease differed. The diffusivity of molecules smaller than 40 kD was significantly higher in infarct center and border zone as compared to uninjured heart. Skeletal myoblast differentiation and survival were decreased stepwise from control to hypoxia, starvation, and ischemia conditions. Although oxygen, glucose, and vascular density were significantly reduced in infarcted myocardium, the rate of macromolecular diffusion was significantly increased, suggesting that diffusive transport may not be inhibited in infarct tissue, and thus the supply of nutrients to transplanted cells may be possible. in vitro studies mimicking infarct conditions suggest that increasing nutrients available to

  3. Matching coronary blood flow to myocardial oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Tune, Johnathan D; Gorman, Mark W; Feigl, Eric O

    2004-07-01

    At rest the myocardium extracts approximately 75% of the oxygen delivered by coronary blood flow. Thus there is little extraction reserve when myocardial oxygen consumption is augmented severalfold during exercise. There are local metabolic feedback and sympathetic feedforward control mechanisms that match coronary blood flow to myocardial oxygen consumption. Despite intensive research the local feedback control mechanism remains unknown. Physiological local metabolic control is not due to adenosine, ATP-dependent K(+) channels, nitric oxide, prostaglandins, or inhibition of endothelin. Adenosine and ATP-dependent K(+) channels are involved in pathophysiological ischemic or hypoxic coronary dilation and myocardial protection during ischemia. Sympathetic beta-adrenoceptor-mediated feedforward arteriolar vasodilation contributes approximately 25% of the increase in coronary blood flow during exercise. Sympathetic alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in medium and large coronary arteries during exercise helps maintain blood flow to the vulnerable subendocardium when cardiac contractility, heart rate, and myocardial oxygen consumption are high. In conclusion, several potential mediators of local metabolic control of the coronary circulation have been evaluated without success. More research is needed.

  4. Myoglobin translational diffusion in rat myocardium and its implication on intracellular oxygen transport

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Jue, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Current theory of respiratory control invokes a role of myoglobin (Mb)-facilitated O2 diffusion in regulating the intracellular O2 flux, provided Mb diffusion can compete effectively with free O2 diffusion. Pulsed-field gradient NMR methods have now followed gradient-dependent changes in the distinct 1H NMR γ CH3 Val E11 signal of MbO2 in perfused rat myocardium to obtain the endogenous Mb translational diffusion coefficient (DMb) of 4.24 × 10−7 cm2 s−1 at 22°C. The DMb matches precisely the value predicted by in vivo NMR rotational diffusion measurements of Mb and shows no orientation preference. Given values in the literature for the Krogh's free O2 diffusion coefficient (K0), myocardial Mb concentration and a partial pressure of O2 that half saturates Mb (P50), the analysis yields an equipoise diffusion PO2 of 1.77 mmHg, where Mb and free O2 contribute equally to the O2 flux. In the myocardium, Mb-facilitated O2 diffusion contributes increasingly more than free O2 diffusion when the PO2 falls below 1.77 mmHg. In skeletal muscle, the PO2 must fall below 5.72 mmHg. Altering the Mb P50 induces modest change. Mb-facilitated diffusion has a higher poise in skeletal muscle than in myocardium. Because the basal PO2 hovers around 10 mmHg, Mb does not have a predominant role in facilitating O2 transport in myocardium but contributes significantly only when cellular oxygen falls below the equipoise diffusion PO2. PMID:17038435

  5. Myoglobin translational diffusion in rat myocardium and its implication on intracellular oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Jue, Thomas

    2007-01-15

    Current theory of respiratory control invokes a role of myoglobin (Mb)-facilitated O2 diffusion in regulating the intracellular O2 flux, provided Mb diffusion can compete effectively with free O2 diffusion. Pulsed-field gradient NMR methods have now followed gradient-dependent changes in the distinct 1H NMR gamma CH3 Val E11 signal of MbO2 in perfused rat myocardium to obtain the endogenous Mb translational diffusion coefficient (D(Mb)) of 4.24 x 10(-7) cm2 s(-1) at 22 degrees C. The D(Mb) matches precisely the value predicted by in vivo NMR rotational diffusion measurements of Mb and shows no orientation preference. Given values in the literature for the Krogh's free O2 diffusion coefficient (K0), myocardial Mb concentration and a partial pressure of O2 that half saturates Mb (P50), the analysis yields an equipoise diffusion P(O2) of 1.77 mmHg, where Mb and free O2 contribute equally to the O2 flux. In the myocardium, Mb-facilitated O2 diffusion contributes increasingly more than free O2 diffusion when the P(O2) falls below 1.77 mmHg. In skeletal muscle, the P(O2) must fall below 5.72 mmHg. Altering the Mb P50 induces modest change. Mb-facilitated diffusion has a higher poise in skeletal muscle than in myocardium. Because the basal P(O2) hovers around 10 mmHg, Mb does not have a predominant role in facilitating O2 transport in myocardium but contributes significantly only when cellular oxygen falls below the equipoise diffusion P(O2).

  6. Rat splanchnic net oxygen consumption, energy implications.

    PubMed Central

    Casado, J; Fernández-López, J A; Esteve, M; Rafecas, I; Argilés, J M; Alemany, M

    1990-01-01

    1. The blood flow, PO2, pH and PCO2 have been estimated in portal and suprahepatic veins as well as in hepatic artery of fed and overnight starved rats given an oral glucose load. From these data the net intestinal, hepatic and splanchnic balances for oxygen and bicarbonate were calculated. The oxygen consumption of the intact animal has also been measured under comparable conditions. 2. The direct utilization of oxygen balances as energy equivalents when establishing the contribution of energy metabolism of liver and intestine to the overall energy expenses of the rat, has been found to be incorrect, since it incorporates the intrinsic error of interorgan proton transfer through bicarbonate. Liver and intestine produced high net bicarbonate balances in all situations tested, implying the elimination (by means of oxidative pathways, i.e. consuming additional oxygen) of high amounts of H+ generated with bicarbonate. The equivalence in energy output of the oxygen balances was then corrected for bicarbonate production to 11-54% lower values. 3. Intestine and liver consume a high proportion of available oxygen, about one-half in basal (fed or starved) conditions and about one-third after gavage, the intestine consumption being about 15% in all situations tested and the liver decreasing its oxygen consumption with gavage. PMID:2129230

  7. Oxygen consumption by conserved archaeological wood.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin N; Matthiesen, Henning

    2013-07-01

    Rates of oxygen consumption have been measured over extended time periods for 29 whole samples of conserved, archaeological wood and four samples of fresh, unconserved wood, at 50% relative humidity and room temperature. Samples from the Swedish Warship Vasa and the Danish Skuldelev Viking ships are included. Most rates were close to 1 μg O2 (g wood)(-1) day(-1) and the process persisted for several years at least. Consumption of oxygen is related to change in chemical composition, which is, in turn, related to degradation. It is thus demonstrated that despite conservation, waterlogged archaeological wood continues to degrade in a museum climate.

  8. Measuring Oxygen Consumption Rate in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Palikaras, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2017-01-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption is a vital marker indicating cellular function during lifetime under normal or metabolically challenged conditions. It is used broadly to study mitochondrial function (Artal-Sanz and Tavernarakis, 2009; Palikaras et al., 2015; Ryu et al., 2016) or investigate factors mediating the switch from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis (Chen et al., 2015; Vander Heiden et al., 2009). In this protocol, we describe a method for the determination of oxygen consumption rates in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:28239622

  9. Spatial Variations in Vitreous Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Karthik; Kang, Dongyang; Nazari, Hossein; Scianmarello, Nicholas; Cadenas, Enrique; Tai, Yu-Chong; Kashani, Amir; Humayun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the spatial variation of vitreous oxygen consumption in enucleated porcine eyes. A custom made oxygen source was fabricated that could be localized to either the mid or posterior vitreous cavity and steady state vitreous oxygen tension was measured as a function of distance from the source using a commercially available probe. The reaction rate constant of ascorbate oxidation was estimated ex vivo by measuring the change in oxygen tension over time using vitreous harvested from porcine eyes. Vitreous ascorbate from mid and posterior vitreous was measured spectrophotometrically. When the oxygen source was placed in either the mid-vitreous (N = 6) or the posterior vitreous (N = 6), we measured a statistically significant decrease in vitreous oxygen tension as a function of distance from the oxygen source when compared to control experiments without an oxygen source; (p<0.005 for mid-vitreous and p<0.018 for posterior vitreous at all distances). The mid-vitreous oxygen tension change was significantly different from the posterior vitreous oxygen tension change at 2 and 3mm distances from the respective oxygen source (p<0.001). We also found a statistically significant lower concentration of ascorbate in the mid-vitreous as compared to posterior vitreous (p = 0.02). We determined the reaction rate constant, k = 1.61 M-1s-1 ± 0.708 M-1s-1 (SE), of the oxidation of ascorbate which was modeled following a second order rate equation. Our data demonstrates that vitreous oxygen consumption is higher in the posterior vitreous compared to the mid-vitreous. We also show spatial variations in vitreous ascorbate concentration. PMID:26930281

  10. Calibrated histochemistry applied to oxygen supply and demand in hypertrophied rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Des Tombe, A L; Van Beek-Harmsen, B J; Lee-De Groot, M B E; Van Der Laarse, W J

    2002-09-01

    Oxygen supply and demand of individual cardiomyocytes during the development of myocardial hypertrophy is studied using calibrated histochemical methods. An oxygen diffusion model is used to calculate the critical extracellular oxygen tension (PO(2,crit)) required by cardiomyocytes to prevent hypoxia during hypertrophic growth, and determinants of PO(2,crit) are estimated using calibrated histochemical methods for succinate dehydrogenase activity, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, and myoglobin concentration. The model calculation demonstrates that it is essential to calibrate the histochemical methods, so that absolute values for the relevant parameters are obtained. The succinate dehydrogenase activity, which is proportional to the maximum rate of oxygen consumption, and the myoglobin concentration hardly change while the cardiomyocytes grow. The cross-sectional area of the cardiomyocytes, which increases up to threefold in the right ventricular wall due to pulmonary hypertension in monocrotaline-treated rats, is the most important determinant of PO(2,crit) in this model of myocardial hypertrophy. The relationship between oxygen supply and demand at the level of the cardiomyocyte can be investigated using paired determinations of spatially integrated succinate dehydrogenase activity and capillary density. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha can be demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in cardiomyocytes with high PO(2,crit) and increased spatially integrated succinate dehydrogenase activity, indicating that limited oxygen supply affects gene expression in these cells. We conclude that a mismatch of oxygen supply and demand may develop during hypertrophic growth, which can play a role in the transition from myocardial hypertrophy to heart failure. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Oxygen consumption in subseafloor basaltic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; Wheat, C. G.; Hulme, S.; Edwards, K. J.; Bach, W.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass, yet little is known about the form and function of life in this vast subseafloor realm that covers nearly two-thirds of the Earth's surface. A deep biosphere hosted in subseafloor basalts has been suggested from several lines of evidence; yet, empirical analysis of metabolic reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first measure of oxygen consumption in young (~ 8 Ma) and cool (<25 degrees C) basaltic crust, calculated from modeling oxygen and strontium profiles in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 336 to 'North Pond', a sediment 'pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), where vigorous fluid circulation within basaltic crust occurs. Dissolved oxygen concentrations increased towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward diffusional supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction-transport model suggests oxygen consumption rates on the order of 0.5-500 nmol per cubic centimeter fluid per day in young and cool basaltic crust, providing sufficient energy to support a subsurface crustal biosphere.

  12. Hypokinesia of myocardium of perfused rat heart at different oxygenation of myoglobin and redox state of cytochrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.; Zuendorf, J.; Tauschek, D.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Questions about development of hypo-kinetic zones in myocardium of patients suffering from severe coronary heart disease are discussed controversially among heart surgeons. We established a model for isolated and hemoglobin free perfusion of rat heart in which sufficient flow was established within all capillaries and thus existence of ischemic capillaries could be excluded. A definite diagnosis of tissue anoxia is only possible by optical measurements of the oxidation and the reduction (redox state) of the cytochrome oxidase of intact myocytes. Therefore, we used an EMPHO for this kind of measurements. Intracellular oxygenation of myoglobin oxygenation (MbO2) and redox state of cytochrome aa3, b and c were recorded in the outer wall of working, hypo-kinetic and a-kinetic myocardium. As a result of our investigations we were able to prove that by lowering at the venous end of capillaries tissue pO2 and myoglobin oxygenation stepwise below 5 mmHg and 50% of saturation respectively, a continuous decrease of myocardial contractility could be achieved.

  13. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  14. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  15. Hyperbaric Oxygen Preconditioning Attenuates Myocardium Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Through Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression: PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathway Involved.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuesong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Fan, Zhixin; Peng, Chenghai; Ren, Zhongqiao; Huang, Le; Liu, Zhuang; Zhao, Kan

    2015-07-01

    With the rise of the burden of ischemic heart disease, both clinical and economic evidence show a desperate need to protect the heart against myocardium ischemia-reperfusion injury-related complications following cardiac surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention. However, there is no effective intervention for myocardium ischemia-reperfusion injury as yet. We pretreated mice with 4 daily 2.0 absolute atmosphere (ATA) hyperbaric oxygen, then observed its effects on heart function parameters and infarct size following in situ ischemia-reperfusion. Multiple oxidative and inflammation products were measured in the myocardium. Next, we investigated the expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/serine/threonine protein kinase (Akt) pathway, and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the presence of myocardium ischemia-reperfusion injury, hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning, and their inhibitors and their effects on heart function parameters. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning ameliorated the cardiac function and histological alterations induced by myocardium ischemia-reperfusion injury, decreased oxidative products and proinflammatory cytokine. Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning increased expression of HO-1, which was suppressed by PI3K inhibitor LY294002, Nrf2 knockout, and Akt inhibitor triciribine. The expression of Nrf2 was enhanced by hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning, but decreased by LY294002 and triciribine. The Akt was also activated by hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning but suppressed by LY294002. The hemodynamic assays showed that cardiac function was suppressed by LY294002, Nrf2 knockout, and triciribine. These data present a novel signaling mechanism by which hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning protects myocardium ischemia-reperfusion injury via PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defensive system. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Consumption During Evoked Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alberto L.; Masamoto, Kazuto; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). PMID:20616881

  17. Development of a model to determine oxygen consumption when crawling.

    PubMed

    Pollard, J P; Heberger, J R; Dempsey, P G

    During a mine disaster or emergency, underground air can quickly become contaminated. In these circumstances, all underground mine workers are taught to don breathable air supply units at the first sign of an emergency. However, no contemporary oxygen consumption data is available for the purposes of designing breathing air supply equipment specifically for mine escape. Further, it would be useful to quantify the oxygen requirements of breathing air supply users for various escape scenarios. To address this need, 14 participants crawled a distance of 305 m each while their breath-by-breath oxygen consumption measurements were taken. Using these data, linear regression models were developed to determine peak and average oxygen consumption rates as well as total oxygen consumption. These models can be used by manufacturers of breathing air supply equipment to aid in the design of devices that would be capable of producing sufficient on-demand oxygen to allow miners to perform self-escape.

  18. Development of a model to determine oxygen consumption when crawling

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, J.P.; Heberger, J.R.; Dempsey, P.G.

    2016-01-01

    During a mine disaster or emergency, underground air can quickly become contaminated. In these circumstances, all underground mine workers are taught to don breathable air supply units at the first sign of an emergency. However, no contemporary oxygen consumption data is available for the purposes of designing breathing air supply equipment specifically for mine escape. Further, it would be useful to quantify the oxygen requirements of breathing air supply users for various escape scenarios. To address this need, 14 participants crawled a distance of 305 m each while their breath-by-breath oxygen consumption measurements were taken. Using these data, linear regression models were developed to determine peak and average oxygen consumption rates as well as total oxygen consumption. These models can be used by manufacturers of breathing air supply equipment to aid in the design of devices that would be capable of producing sufficient on-demand oxygen to allow miners to perform self-escape. PMID:26997858

  19. Relationship between PVA and myocardial oxygen consumption can be derived from thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Denslow, S

    1996-02-01

    The pressure-volume area (PVA) has been shown to be an excellent, linear index of myocardial oxygen consumption. The thermodynamic basis for this result, however, has not been elucidated. The present study was undertaken to determine what information could be gained from analyzing the cardiac pressure-volume (P-V) cycle as an approximation to some "ideal" thermodynamic cycle operating under the constraints imposed by cardiovascular anatomy and physiology. The myocardium was approximated as a linear, chemically driven elastance in accordance with the time-varying elastance model. Analysis provided descriptions of a Carnot cycle for myocardium and a suboptimal ideal cycle, including isovolumic phases. Further analysis of the ideal cycle indicated that the end-systolic P-V relationship (ESPVR) is an approximation to the adiabatic P-V trajectory that primarily determines total energy consumption. Analysis also indicated possible explanations of current results that seem to be at odds with the time-varying elastance model. These results suggest that thermodynamic cycle analysis may provide a useful analytic tool for investigation of the cardiac cycle.

  20. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Uncovers Heterogeneous Intracellular Oxygen Consumption.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla Santana; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Bertotti, Mauro

    2017-09-12

    We developed a highly sensitive oxygen consumption scanning microscopy system using platinized platinum disc microelectrodes. The system is capable of reliably detecting single-cell respiration, responding to classical regulators of mitochondrial oxygen consumption activity as expected. Comparisons with commercial multi-cell oxygen detection systems show that the system has comparable errors (if not smaller), with the advantage of being able to monitor inter and intra-cell heterogeneity in oxygen consumption characteristics. Our results uncover heterogeneous oxygen consumption characteristics between cells and within the same cell´s microenvironments. Single Cell Oxygen Mapping (SCOM) is thus capable of reliably studying mitochondrial oxygen consumption characteristics and heterogeneity at a single-cell level.

  1. Noninvasive estimation of regional myocardial oxygen consumption by positron emission tomography with carbon-11 acetate in patients with myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.N.; Geltman, E.M.; Brown, M.A.; Henes, C.G.; Weinheimer, C.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R. )

    1989-11-01

    We previously demonstrated in experimental studies that myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) can be estimated noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) from analysis of the myocardial turnover rate constant (k) after administration of carbon-11 (11C) acetate. To determine regional k in healthy human subjects and to estimate alterations in MVO2 accompanying myocardial ischemia, we administered (11C)acetate to five healthy human volunteers and to six patients with myocardial infarction. Extraction of (11C)acetate by the myocardium was avid and clearance from the blood-pool rapid yielding myocardial images of excellent quality. Regional k was homogeneous in myocardium of healthy volunteers (coefficient variation = 11%). In patients, k in regions remote from the area of infarction was not different from values in myocardium of healthy human volunteers (0.061 +/- 0.025 compared with 0.057 +/- 0.008 min-1). In contrast, MVO2 in the center of the infarct region was only 6% of that in remote regions (p less than 0.01). In four patients studied within 48 hr of infarction and again more than seven days after the acute event, regional k and MVO2 did not change. The approach developed should facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of interventions designed to enhance recovery of jeopardized myocardium and permit estimation of regional MVO2 and metabolic reserve underlying cardiac disease of diverse etiologies.

  2. Oxygen consumption of animals under conditions of hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loginova, Y. N.; Volozhin, A. I.; Krasnyku, I. G.; Stroganova, Y. A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of hypokinesia on the oxygen consumption of rats, dog, and squirrels was investigated. Three periods of gaseous exchange were revealed in rats under conditions of a limited motor activity. During the first 10-15 days O2 consumption displayed a sharp elevation; on the 20th-30th day, it became stabilized at a higher level (in comparison with control) and it sharply rose again on the 40th-100th day. In dogs, hypokinesia produced a reduction of O2 consumption and then a tendency to its elevation was seen. A short period of physical exercises in squirrels after hypokinesia led to increased oxygen consumption at rest.

  3. Oxygen consumption dynamics in steady-state tumour models.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David Robert; Fletcher, Alexander G; Partridge, Mike

    2014-09-01

    Oxygen levels in cancerous tissue can have a significant effect on treatment response: hypoxic tissue is both more radioresistant and more chemoresistant than well-oxygenated tissue. While recent advances in medical imaging have facilitated real-time observation of macroscopic oxygenation, the underlying physics limits the resolution to the millimetre domain, whereas oxygen tension varies over a micrometre scale. If the distribution of oxygen in the tumour micro-environment can be accurately estimated, then the effect of potential dose escalation to these hypoxic regions could be better modelled, allowing more realistic simulation of biologically adaptive treatments. Reaction-diffusion models are commonly used for modelling oxygen dynamics, with a variety of functional forms assumed for the dependence of oxygen consumption rate (OCR) on cellular status and local oxygen availability. In this work, we examine reaction-diffusion models of oxygen consumption in spherically and cylindrically symmetric geometries. We consider two different descriptions of oxygen consumption: one in which the rate of consumption is constant and one in which it varies with oxygen tension in a hyperbolic manner. In each case, we derive analytic approximations to the steady-state oxygen distribution, which are shown to closely match the numerical solutions of the equations and accurately predict the extent to which oxygen can diffuse. The derived expressions relate the limit to which oxygen can diffuse into a tissue to the OCR of that tissue. We also demonstrate that differences between these functional forms are likely to be negligible within the range of literature estimates of the hyperbolic oxygen constant, suggesting that the constant consumption rate approximation suffices for modelling oxygen dynamics for most values of OCR. These approximations also allow the rapid identification of situations where hyperbolic consumption forms can result in significant differences from constant

  4. Paranatal oxygen consumption and respiratory frequency in the Laysan Albatross.

    PubMed

    Whittow, G C

    2003-12-16

    The oxygen consumption and respiratory frequency of Laysan Albatross eggs were measured during the different phases of pipping (paranatal period) and in hatchlings. The initial phase of pipping--penetration of the aircell of the egg by the embryonic beak--coincided with the beginning of pulmonary ventilation, the embryo rebreathing aircell gas, but it did not result in a statistically significant increase in oxygen consumption. The second phase of pipping--star-fracture of the shell (external pipping)--was the shortest (25 h) of the three phases of pipping, and it did not result in a significant increase in either oxygen consumption or respiratory frequency. The longest phase of pipping (65 h)--the pip-hole phase--represented 54% of the total duration of pipping, and it was accompanied by significant increases in oxygen consumption and respiratory frequency. When the eggs hatched, the oxygen consumption increased further but respiratory frequency diminished significantly. It was calculated that the paranatal period, which represented 7.9% of the total incubation period of the egg, accounted for 37.2% of the total oxygen consumption of the egg.

  5. Oxygen consumption in weakly electric Neotropical fishes.

    PubMed

    Julian, David; Crampton, William G R; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E; Albert, James S

    2003-12-01

    Weakly electric gymnotiform fishes with wave-type electric organ discharge (EOD) are less hypoxia-tolerant and are less likely to be found in hypoxic habitats than weakly electric gymnotiforms with pulse-type EOD, suggesting that differences in metabolism resulting from EOD type affects habitat choice. Although gymnotiform fishes are common in most Neotropical freshwaters and represent the dominant vertebrates in some habitats, the metabolic rates of these unique fishes have never been determined. In this study, O(2) consumption rates during EOD generation are reported for 34 gymnotiforms representing 23 species, all five families and 17 (59%) of the 28 genera. Over the size range sampled (0.4 g to 125 g), O(2) consumption of gymnotiform fishes was dependent on body mass, as expected, fitting a power function with a scaling exponent of 0.74, but the O(2) consumption rate was generally about 50% of that expected by extrapolation of temperate teleost metabolic rates to a similar ambient temperature (26 degrees C). O(2) consumption rate was not dependent on EOD type, but maintenance of "scan swimming" (continuous forwards and backwards swimming), which is characteristic only of gymnotiforms with wave-type EODs, increased O(2) consumption 2.83+/-0.49-fold (mean+/-SD). This suggests that the increased metabolic cost of scan swimming could restrict gymnotiforms with wave-type EODs from hypoxic habitats.

  6. Intra-cardiac Light Catheter for Transmural Absorbance Spectroscopy of Perfused Myocardium: Measurement of Myoglobin Oxygenation and Mitochondria Redox State.

    PubMed

    Femnou, Armel N; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Covian, Raul; Giles, Abigail V; Kay, Matthew W; Balaban, Robert S

    2017-09-22

    Absorbance spectroscopy of intrinsic cardiac chromophores provides non-destructive assessment of cytosolic oxygenation and mitochondria redox state. Isolated perfused heart spectroscopy is usually conducted by collecting reflected light from the heart surface, which represents a combination of surface scattering events and light that traversed portions of the myocardium. Reflectance spectroscopy with complex surface scattering effects in the beating heart leads to difficulty in quantitating chromophore absorbance. In this study, surface scattering was minimized and transmural path length optimized by placing a light source within the left ventricle (LV) chamber while monitoring transmurally transmitted light at the epicardial surface. The custom designed intra-chamber light catheter was a flexible coaxial cable (2.42 French) terminated with an encapsulated side firing Light Emitting Diode (LED) of 1.8×0.8 mm, altogether similar in size to a Millar pressure catheter. The LED catheter had minimal impact on aortic flow and heart rate in Langendorff perfusion and did not impact stability of the LV working heart. Changes in transmural absorbance spectra were deconvoluted using a library of chromophore reference spectra to quantify the relative contribution of specific chromophores to the changes in measured absorbance. This broad band spectral deconvolution approach eliminated errors that may result from simple dual wavelength absorbance intensity. Myoglobin oxygenation level was only 82.2±3.0%, while cytochrome c and cytochrome a+a3 were 13.3±1.4% and 12.6±2.2% reduced, respectively, in Langendorff perfused heart. The intra-cardiac illumination strategy permits transmural optical absorbance spectroscopy in perfused hearts which provides a non-invasive real-time monitor of cytosolic oxygenation and mitochondria redox state. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

  7. Circadian rhythm of energy expenditure and oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Leuck, Marlene; Levandovski, Rosa; Harb, Ana; Quiles, Caroline; Hidalgo, Maria Paz

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of continuous and intermittent methods of enteral nutrition (EN) administration on circadian rhythm. Thirty-four individuals, aged between 52 and 80 years, were fed through a nasoenteric tube. Fifteen individuals received a continuous infusion for 24 hours/d, and 19 received an intermittent infusion in comparable quantities, every 4 hours from 8:00 to 20:00. In each patient, 4 indirect calorimetric measurements were carried out over 24 hours (A: 7:30, B: 10:30, C: 14:30, and D: 21:30) for 3 days. Energy expenditure and oxygen consumption were significantly higher in the intermittent group than in the continuous group (1782 ± 862 vs 1478 ± 817 kcal/24 hours, P = .05; 257 125 vs 212 117 ml/min, P = .048, respectively). The intermittent group had higher levels of energy expenditure and oxygen consumption at all the measured time points compared with the continuous group. energy expenditure and oxygen consumption in both groups were significantly different throughout the day for 3 days. There is circadian rhythm variation of energy expenditure and oxygen consumption with continuous and intermittent infusion for EN. This suggests that only one indirect daily calorimetric measurement is not able to show the patient's true needs. Energy expenditure is higher at night with both food administration methods. Moreover, energy expenditure and oxygen consumption are higher with the intermittent administration method at all times.

  8. A study of benthic oxygen consumption on exposed sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, A. H.

    1981-12-01

    Measurements of interstitial and macrofaunal oxygen consumption, as well as bacterial, protozoan and meiofaunal densities, were made on one moderately exposed and one very exposed beach in the vicinity of Port Elizabeth (33°58' S, 25°39' E). Measurements were made at 3-monthly intervals at three tidal levels and various depths in the substratum from July 1977 to April 1979. Biological oxygen demand (BOD) is only partly related to the distribution of meio- and microorganisms. The mean interstitial oxygen uptake is 422·4 ml O 2m -2 day -1 and 324·0 ml O 2m -2 day -1 on the moderately exposed and very exposed beach respectively. Macrofaunal oxygen consumption ranges from 14·4 to 480·0 ml O 2m -2 day -1 on these beaches respectively. Of the total oxygen consumption on the moderately exposed beach, macrofauna accounts for 3% and the remainder (meiofauna, protozoa and bacteria) for 97%. On the very exposed beach the relative proportions are 55 and 45% for macrofauna and the remainder respectively. Estimates of the oxygen consumption of the meiofauna and protozoa on each beach are made on the basis of published respiration data.

  9. Computational Model for Oxygen Transport and Consumption in Human Vitreous

    PubMed Central

    Filas, Benjamen A.; Shui, Ying-Bo; Beebe, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies that measured liquefaction and oxygen content in human vitreous suggested that exposure of the lens to excess oxygen causes nuclear cataracts. Here, we developed a computational model that reproduced available experimental oxygen distributions for intact and degraded human vitreous in physiologic and environmentally perturbed conditions. After validation, the model was used to estimate how age-related changes in vitreous physiology and structure alter oxygen levels at the lens. Methods. A finite-element model for oxygen transport and consumption in the human vitreous was created. Major inputs included ascorbate-mediated oxygen consumption in the vitreous, consumption at the posterior lens surface, and inflow from the retinal vasculature. Concentration-dependent relations were determined from experimental human data or estimated from animal studies, with the impact of all assumptions explored via parameter studies. Results. The model reproduced experimental data in humans, including oxygen partial pressure (Po2) gradients (≈15 mm Hg) across the anterior-posterior extent of the vitreous body, higher oxygen levels at the pars plana relative to the vitreous core, increases in Po2 near the lens after cataract surgery, and equilibration in the vitreous chamber following vitrectomy. Loss of the antioxidative capacity of ascorbate increases oxygen levels 3-fold at the lens surface. Homogeneous vitreous degeneration (liquefaction), but not partial posterior vitreous detachment, greatly increases oxygen exposure to the lens. Conclusions. Ascorbate content and the structure of the vitreous gel are critical determinants of lens oxygen exposure. Minimally invasive surgery and restoration of vitreous structure warrant further attention as strategies for preventing nuclear cataracts. PMID:24008409

  10. Oxygen consumption of human heart cells in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kaori; Kagawa, Yuki; Maeyama, Erina; Ota, Hiroki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-09-26

    Tissue engineering in cardiovascular regenerative therapy requires the development of an efficient oxygen supply system for cell cultures. However, there are few studies which have examined human cardiomyocytes in terms of oxygen consumption and metabolism in culture. We developed an oxygen measurement system equipped with an oxygen microelectrode sensor and estimated the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) by using the oxygen concentration profiles in culture medium. The heart is largely made up of cardiomyocytes, cardiac fibroblasts, and cardiac endothelial cells. Therefore, we measured the oxygen consumption of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), cardiac fibroblasts, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cell and aortic smooth muscle cells. Then we made correlations with their metabolisms. In hiPSC-CMs, the value of the OCR was 0.71±0.38pmol/h/cell, whereas the glucose consumption rate and lactate production rate were 0.77±0.32pmol/h/cell and 1.61±0.70pmol/h/cell, respectively. These values differed significantly from those of the other cells in human heart. The metabolism of the cells that constitute human heart showed the molar ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption (L/G ratio) that ranged between 1.97 and 2.2. Although the energy metabolism in adult heart in vivo is reported to be aerobic, our data demonstrated a dominance of anaerobic glycolysis in an in vitro environment. With our measuring system, we clearly showed the differences in the metabolism of cells between in vivo and in vitro monolayer culture. Our results regarding cell OCRs and metabolism may be useful for future tissue engineering of human heart.

  11. Quantifying consumption rates of dissolved oxygen along bed forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boano, Fulvio; De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai

    2016-04-01

    Streambed interfaces represent hotspots for nutrient transformations because they host different microbial species, and the evaluation of these reaction rates is important to assess the fate of nutrients in riverine environments. In this work we analyze a series of flume experiments on oxygen demand in dune-shaped hyporheic sediments under losing and gaining flow conditions. We employ a new modeling code to quantify oxygen consumption rates from observed vertical profiles of oxygen concentration. The code accounts for transport by molecular diffusion and water advection, and automatically determines the reaction rates that provide the best fit between observed and modeled concentration values. The results show that reaction rates are not uniformly distributed across the streambed, in agreement with the expected behavior predicted by hyporheic exchange theory. Oxygen consumption was found to be highly influenced by the presence of gaining or losing flow conditions, which controlled the delivery of labile DOC to streambed microorganisms.

  12. [Oxygen consumption by resting humans at different Elbrus altitudes].

    PubMed

    Demin, A V; D'iachenko, A I; Ivanov, A I

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to test experimentally the "hypoxic paradox" of growing or constant oxygen consumption by normal humans exposed to O2-deficient environments. The objective was to perform thorough statistical analysis of O2 consumption at two altitudes above sea level under the conditions of close to basic metabolism, and to develop an analytical expression for adequate description of O2 consumption dependence on altitude above seal level. The investigation was fulfilled in August, 2009 at the altitudes of 2224 and 4200 m on Elbrus flanks with participation of 4 volunteers. It was shown that O2 consumption by resting humans decreases with altitude, i.e. the "hypoxic paradox" is invalid. An analytical expression was proposed to describe change in O2 consumption in the interval of altitudes from 0 to 4200 m above sea level.

  13. Comparative quantification of oxygen release by wetland plants: electrode technique and oxygen consumption model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiming; Liu, Jufeng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Cong; Fan, Jinlin; Xu, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Understanding oxygen release by plants is important to the design of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment. Lab-scale systems planted with Phragmites australis were studied to evaluate the amount of oxygen release by plants using electrode techniques and oxygen consumption model. Oxygen release rate (0.14 g O2/m(2)/day) measured using electrode techniques was much lower than that (3.94-25.20 gO2/m(2)/day) calculated using the oxygen consumption model. The results revealed that oxygen release by plants was significantly influenced by the oxygen demand for the degradation of pollutants, and the oxygen release rate increased with the rising of the concentration of degradable materials in the solution. The summary of the methods in qualifying oxygen release by wetland plants demonstrated that variations existed among different measuring methods and even in the same measuring approach. The results would be helpful for understanding the contribution of plants in constructed wetlands toward actual wastewater treatment.

  14. Ocular oxygen consumption during vitreoperfusion in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, N P

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known about the total ocular oxygen consumption rate (QO2) in human diseases. Reductions in QO2 may indicate the amount of tissue loss produced by conditions such as retinal ischemia. We sought a method to estimate QO2 that eventually could be used in patients during vitrectomy surgery. METHODS: We performed vitreoperfusion (perfusion of the vitreous cavity after vitrectomy) in 22 cat eyes with no ocular blood flow. The solution contained nutrients and a high partial pressure of oxygen (PO2). In 8 eyes we placed an oxygen electrode on the sclera, choroid, or outer retina to evaluate oxygen delivery from the vitreoperfusion solution (group 1). In 8 eyes the retinas were undisturbed (group 2), and in 6 eyes we excised the retinas (group 3). In groups 2 and 3 we estimated QO2 from the temporal decline of PO2 in the vitreoperfusion solution according to a pharmacokinetic model. RESULTS: Group 1 demonstrated oxygenation of the entire retina. The means and standard deviations of QO2 were 3.2 +/- 0.8 and 0.4 +/- 0.7 microL/min in groups 2 and 3, respectively, the difference being the retinal contribution, 88%. In group 2, metabolism accounted for an average of 82% of the oxygen loss from the vitreoperfusion solution, whereas flow and diffusion accounted for 13% and 5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Ocular oxygen consumption can be estimated by means of vitreoperfusion. Further developments may allow measurements in patients during vitreous surgery to clarify the pathophysiology of their diseases and assess the amount of retinal tissue that has been lost. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:11190030

  15. Decavanadate induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization and inhibits oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-05-01

    Decavanadate induced rat liver mitochondrial depolarization at very low concentrations, half-depolarization with 39 nM decavanadate, while it was needed a 130-fold higher concentration of monomeric vanadate (5 microM) to induce the same effect. Decavanadate also inhibits mitochondrial repolarization induced by reduced glutathione in vitro, with an inhibition constant of 1 microM, whereas no effect was observed up to 100 microM of monomeric vanadate. The oxygen consumption by mitochondria is also inhibited by lower decavanadate than monomeric vanadate concentrations, i.e. 50% inhibition is attained with 99 M decavanadate and 10 microM monomeric vanadate. Thus, decavanadate is stronger as mitochondrial depolarization agent than as inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Up to 5 microM, decavanadate does not alter mitochondrial NADH levels nor inhibit neither F(O)F(1)-ATPase nor cytochrome c oxidase activity, but it induces changes in the redox steady-state of mitochondrial b-type cytochromes (complex III). NMR spectra showed that decameric vanadate is the predominant vanadate species in decavanadate solutions. It is concluded that decavanadate is much more potent mitochondrial depolarization agent and a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption than monomeric vanadate, pointing out the importance to take into account the contribution of higher oligomeric species of vanadium for the biological effects of vanadate solutions.

  16. Oxygen transport and consumption during experimental cardiopulmonary bypass using oxyfluor.

    PubMed

    Briceño, J C; Rincón, I E; Vélez, J F; Castro, I; Arcos, M I; Velásquez, C E

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate a perfluorocarbon based oxygen carrier (Oxyfluor), a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was implemented. Swine (30 kg) were subjected to 2 h of normothermic CPB using Oxyfluor (OF group, n = 8) or Ringer's lactate (RL group, n = 13) as the prime. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was kept at 50 mm Hg, flow rate at 80 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1), and PaCO2 at 35 mm Hg. Hemodynamic, hematologic, fluid balance, and blood gasimetry variables were measured. Total body oxygen delivery (DO2), consumption (VO2), and the fractional contribution to delivery (FCD) and to consumption (FCC) of the red blood cells (RBC), PFC, and plasma phases were calculated. Mixed venous PO2 (PvO2) was significantly higher at 30 min and 1 h on CPB in the OF group than in the RL group. FCCRBC was significantly lower at 30 min, 1 h, and 90 min on CPB in the OF group than in the RL group. PvjO2, Ca-vO2, Ca-vj O2, and VO2 were slightly higher in the OF group than in the RL group. Tissue fluid accumulation was not alleviated with Oxyfluor, and tissue and brain acidosis were significantly increased in the OF group. This study presented evidence that Oxyfluor improved tissue oxygenation and total body oxygen consumption during experimental CPB. In addition, Oxyfluor reduced FCCRBC, increasing oxygen transport reserve of the RBC phase, which can be useful to reduce hypoxic events during CPB. Further research should be conducted to optimize PFC-OCs for use in CPB and to reduce secondary effects.

  17. MODELING ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS: ACCOUNTING FOR FATIGUE AND EPOC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled Individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized val...

  18. MODELING ENERGY EXPENDITURE AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELS: ACCOUNTING FOR FATIGUE AND EPOC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled Individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized val...

  19. Oxygen monitor for semi-closed rebreathers: design and use for estimating metabolic oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John R.; Southerland, David

    1999-07-01

    Semi-closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus (UBA) provide a constant flow of mixed gas containing oxygen and nitrogen or helium to a diver. However, as a diver's work rate and metabolic oxygen consumption varies, the oxygen percentages within the UBA can change dramatically. Hence, even a resting diver can become hypoxic and become at risk for oxygen induced seizures. Conversely, a hard working diver can become hypoxic and lose consciousness. Unfortunately, current semi-closed UBA do not contain oxygen monitors. We describe a simple oxygen monitoring system designed and prototyped at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit. The main monitor components include a PIC microcontroller, analog-to-digital converter, bicolor LED, and oxygen sensor. The LED, affixed to the diver's mask is steady green if the oxygen partial pressure is within pre- defined acceptable limits. A more advanced monitor with a depth senor and additional computational circuitry could be used to estimate metabolic oxygen consumption. The computational algorithm uses the oxygen partial pressure and the diver's depth to compute O2 using the steady state solution of the differential equation describing oxygen concentrations within the UBA. Consequently, dive transients induce errors in the O2 estimation. To evalute these errors, we used a computer simulation of semi-closed circuit UBA dives to generate transient rich data as input to the estimation algorithm. A step change in simulated O2 elicits a monoexponential change in the estimated O2 with a time constant of 5 to 10 minutes. Methods for predicting error and providing a probable error indication to the diver are presented.

  20. Two cytochrome oxygen consumption model and mechanism for carotid body chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Nair, P K; Buerk, D G; Whalen, W J; Schubert, R W

    1986-01-01

    We have measured sinus nerve discharge, tissue PO2 and oxygen consumption (VO2) in cat carotid bodies under different experimental conditions using our recessed oxygen microelectrode. Our results indicate that the change in chemoreceptor activity with oxygen disappearance following blood flow occlusion can be related to a two cytochrome model for oxygen consumption as previously proposed by Mills and Jöbsis (1972).

  1. Oxygen consumption by mitochondria from an endotherm and an ectotherm.

    PubMed

    Berner, N J

    1999-09-01

    Comparisons of metabolic properties of mitochondria from an endothermic and an ectothermic vertebrate were performed. Oxygen (O2) consumption rates of liver mitochondria from laboratory mice and western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) were determined over a range of temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 37 degrees C) and in the presence of a variety of substrates. At 37 degrees C the O2 consumption rate of mouse mitochondria was 4-11 times higher than lizard mitochondria in the presence of five of eight substrates. This range of differences is similar to differences reported for O2 consumption of endothermic animals, tissues and cells over those of ectotherms. Thermal sensitivity of mitochondria was measured by calculation of Q10s for O2 consumption. Q10s were highest for mouse mitochondria overall. The range that showed the highest Q10s for the mouse mitochondria was 30-20 degrees C, whereas for the lizard mitochondria it was 20-10 degrees C. Thus, mitochondria from the ectotherm showed a lower degree of temperature sensitivity than did mitochondria from the endotherm. The preferred substrate for all mitochondria at all temperatures was succinate, but mouse mitochondria then showed some preference for alpha-ketoglutarate and citrate, whereas lizard mitochondria showed a preference for pyruvate and malate + pyruvate.

  2. [Comparation of maximal oxygen consumption equations in young people].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fernando Policarpo; Oliveira, Hildeamo Bonifacio; Fernandes, Paula Roqueti; Fernandes Filho, José

    2005-01-01

    To compare the results of equations for estimate of the indirect maximal oxygen consumption with obtained them in test ergoespirometric in young individuals. Fifty-two individuals of the masculine sex were submitted to the test of effort with it analyzes direct of gases in treadmill for the determination of the maximum consumption of oxygen (VO2máx). The progressive protocol was used with load increment to each one minute. The obtained results were compared ace equations of Jackson et al and the one of Mathews et al. For the statistical analysis of the results the test of multiple comparisons corrected by the test of Bonferrone was applied. The significance level was of p < 0.05. The average of age was of (21.06 +/- 2.75) years; body mass (70.85 +/- 9.15); thin mass (62.69 +/- 6.86); fat mass (8.30 +/- 4.77); percentile of fat (11.34 +/- 5.45) and maximun heartrate of (191.73 +/- 7.84). The equations of Jackson et al (VO2máx = 49.29 +/- 2.95) for a standard mistake of (EPE = 0.41) and Mathews et al (VO2máx = 37.43 +/-. 2.14) with a (EPE = 0,31) presenting tendency in underestimating the consumption of oxygen for the sample that was of (VO2máx = 55.34 +/- 8.34) for a (EPE = 1.16), being observed significant difference in relation to measure of the VO2máx obtained in test of effort (p < 0.05), for the value of Wilks'E = 0.044; F (2.500) = 539.27; p = 0.001. The equations didn't present a power of reliable estimate for the studied population.

  3. Simultaneous Sampling of Tissue Oxygenation and Oxygen Consumption in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, William H.; Song, Bjorn K.; Pittman, Roland N.; Golub, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120–130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5 s compression followed by 15 s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100cm3 min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. PMID:26683232

  4. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxygen consumption and chloride secretion in rat distal colon isolated mucosa.

    PubMed

    Saraví, Fernando D; Saldeña, Teobaldo A; Carrera, Cristian A; Ibañez, Jorge E; Cincunegui, Liliana M; Carra, Graciela E

    2003-09-01

    The aerobic metabolic cost of chloride secretion was studied in rat distal colon isolated mucosa under several conditions by simultaneous measurement of short-circuit current and oxygen consumption under conditions that preserve vectorial ion transport. A low-chloride solution and the presence of bumetanide plus diphenylamine-2-carboxylate reduced short-circuit current by 75% and oxygen consumption by 25%. Ouabain decreased short-circuit current by 93% and oxygen consumption by 32%. Serotonin increased both variables by 59% and 33%, respectively. Bumetanide and diphenylamine-2-carboxylate reduced but did not abolish the effect of serotonin on short-circuit current and oxygen consumption. Changes in short-circuit current and oxygen consumption were linearly correlated under all conditions tested. It is concluded that, in the unstimulated rat distal colon epithelium, chloride secretion accounts for about 75% of ouabain-sensitive short-circuit current and oxygen consumption. Stimulated chloride secretion may demand over 40% of total oxygen consumption.

  6. Anisotropy and temperature dependence of myoglobin translational diffusion in myocardium: implication for oxygen transport and cellular architecture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang; Kreutzer, Ulrike; Jue, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed field gradient NMR methods have determined the temperature-dependent diffusion of myoglobin (Mb) in perfused rat myocardium. Mb diffuses with an averaged translational diffusion coefficient (DMb) of 4.24-8.37x10(-7)cm2/s from 22 degrees C to 40 degrees C and shows no orientation preference over a root mean-square displacement of 2.5-3.5 microm. The DMb agrees with the value predicted by rotational diffusion measurements. Based on the DMb, the equipoise diffusion PO2, the PO2 in which Mb-facilitated and free O2 diffusion contribute equally to the O2 flux, varies from 2.72 to 0.15 in myocardium and from 7.27 to 4.24 mmHg in skeletal muscle. Given the basal PO2 of approximately 10 mmHg, the Mb contribution to O2 transport appears insignificant in myocardium. In skeletal muscle, Mb-facilitated diffusion begins to contribute significantly only when the PO2 approaches the P50. In marine mammals, the high Mb concentration confers a predominant role for Mb in intracellular O2 transport under all physiological conditions. The Q10 of the DMb ranges from 1.3 to 1.6. The Mb diffusion data indicate that the postulated gel network in the cell must have a minimum percolation cutoff size exceeding 17.5 A and does not impose tortuosity within the diffusion root mean-square displacement. Moreover, the similar Q10 for the DMb of solution versus cell Mb suggests that any temperature-dependent alteration of the postulated cell matrix does not significantly affect protein mobility.

  7. Oxygen delivery, consumption, and conversion to reactive oxygen species in experimental models of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Eshaq, Randa S.; Wright, William S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal tissue receives its supply of oxygen from two sources – the retinal and choroidal circulations. Decreases in retinal blood flow occur in the early stages of diabetes, with the eventual development of hypoxia thought to contribute to pathological neovascularization. Oxygen consumption in the retina has been found to decrease in diabetes, possibly due to either a reduction in neuronal metabolism or to cell death. Diabetes also enhances the rate of conversion of oxygen to superoxide in the retina, with experimental evidence suggesting that mitochondrial superoxide not only drives the overall production of reactive oxygen species, but also initiates several pathways leading to retinopathy, including the increased activity of the polyol and hexosamine pathways, increased production of advanced glycation end products and expression of their receptors, and activation of protein kinase C. PMID:24936440

  8. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  9. Progressively heterogeneous mismatch of regional oxygen delivery to consumption during graded coronary stenosis in pig left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Alders, David J C; Groeneveld, A B Johan; Binsl, Thomas W; van Beek, Johannes H G M

    2015-11-15

    In normal hearts, myocardial perfusion is fairly well matched to regional metabolic demand, although both are distributed heterogeneously. Nonuniform regional metabolic vulnerability during coronary stenosis would help to explain nonuniform necrosis during myocardial infarction. In the present study, we investigated whether metabolism-perfusion correlation diminishes during coronary stenosis, indicating increasing mismatch of regional oxygen supply to demand. Thirty anesthetized male pigs were studied: controls without coronary stenosis (n = 11); group I, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary stenosis leading to coronary perfusion pressure reduction to 70 mmHg (n = 6); group II, stenosis with perfusion pressure of about 35 mmHg (n = 6); and group III, stenosis with perfusion pressure of 45 mmHg combined with adenosine infusion (n = 7). [2-(13)C]- and [1,2-(13)C]acetate infusion was used to calculate regional O2 consumption from glutamate NMR spectra measured for multiple tissue samples of about 100 mg dry mass in the LAD region. Blood flow was measured with microspheres in the same regions. In control hearts without stenosis, regional oxygen extraction did not correlate with basal blood flow. Average myocardial O2 delivery and consumption decreased during coronary stenosis, but vasodilation with adenosine counteracted this. Regional oxygen extraction was on average decreased during stenosis, suggesting adaptation of metabolism to lower oxygen supply after half an hour of ischemia. Whereas regional O2 delivery correlated with O2 consumption in controls, this relation was progressively lost with graded coronary hypotension but partially reestablished by adenosine infusion. Therefore, coronary stenosis leads to heterogeneous metabolic stress indicated by decreasing regional O2 supply to demand matching in myocardium during partial coronary obstruction. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Convective oxygen transport and tissue oxygen consumption in Weddell seals during aerobic dives.

    PubMed

    Davis, R W; Kanatous, S B

    1999-05-01

    Unlike their terrestrial counterparts, marine mammals stop breathing and reduce their convective oxygen transport while performing activities (e.g. foraging, courtship, aggressive interactions, predator avoidance and migration) that require sustained power output during submergence. Since most voluntary dives are believed to remain aerobic, the goal of this study was to examine the potential importance of the dive response in optimizing the use of blood and muscle oxygen stores during dives involving different levels of muscular exertion. To accomplish this, we designed a numerical model based on Fick's principle that integrated cardiac output (Vb), regional blood flow, convective oxygen transport (Q(O2)), muscle oxymyoglobin desaturation and regional rates of oxygen consumption (VO2). The model quantified how the optimal matching or mismatching of QO2 to VO2 affected the aerobic dive limit (ADL). We chose an adult Weddell seal Leptonycotes weddellii on which to base our model because of available data on the diving physiology and metabolism of this species. The results show that the use of blood and muscle oxygen stores must be completed at the same time to maximize the ADL for each level of VO2. This is achieved by adjusting Vb (range 19-94 % of resting levels) and muscle QO2 according to the rate of muscle oxygen consumption (VMO2). At higher values of VMO2, Vb and muscle perfusion must increase to maintain an appropriate QO2/VO2 ratio so that available blood and muscle oxygen stores are depleted at the same time. Although the dive response does not sequester blood oxygen exclusively for brain and heart metabolism during aerobic dives, as it does during forced submersion, a reduction in Vb and muscle perfusion below resting levels is necessary to maximize the ADL over the range of diving VO2 (approximately 2-9 ml O2 min-1 kg-1). Despite the reduction in Vb, convective oxygen transport is adequate to maintain aerobic metabolism and normal function in the

  11. Systemic oxygen delivery and consumption in dogs with heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Yasuda, K; Sasaki, Y

    1995-02-01

    To investigate systemic oxygen (O2) transport, we calculated the oxygen delivery index (Do2I), oxygen consumption index (Vo2I) and oxygen extraction ratio (ER) in dogs with heartworm (HW) disease. The Do2I was 770 +/- 331 ml/min/kg in dogs mildly affected with pulmonary HW disease showing respiratory signs, mild anemia and mild cardiac insufficiency (n = 34); 238 +/- 155 ml/min/kg in dogs with ascitic pulmonary HW disease (n = 7); and 577 +/- 320 ml/min/kg in dogs with caval syndrome (CS) which survived (n = 15) or died (n = 7) after surgical HW removal. The Do2I was lower (P < 0.01) in all HW-infected groups, especially in ascites and CS-non-surviving dogs, than in HW-free dogs (n = 11, 1041 +/- 264 ml/min/kg). The Vo2I was higher in some mildly affected dogs (161 +/- 88 ml/min/kg), and lower (P < 0.01) in ascitic dogs (45 +/- 53 ml/min/kg) than in HW-free dogs (123 +/- 44 ml/min/kg). The ER was higher (P < 0.01) in all HW-infected groups than in HW-free dogs. The Do2I correlated significantly with Vo2I (r = 0.84, P < 0.01), and the Vo2I correlated significantly with ER (r = 0.48, P < 0.01). The Do2I correlated significantly with arterial O2 tension (r = 0.33), serum LDH (r = -0.46) and CK (r = -0.46) activities, serum urea nitrogen (UN, r = -0.32) and lactic acid (LA, r = -0.39) concentrations and cardiac index (r = 0.64).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Oxygen consumption rates and oxygen concentration in molt-4 cells and their mtDNA depleted (rho0) mutants.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiangang; Khan, Nadeem; Lewis, Lionel D; Armand, Ray; Grinberg, Oleg; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold

    2003-02-01

    Respiratory deficient cell lines are being increasingly used to elucidate the role of mitochondria and to understand the pathophysiology of mitochondrial genetic disease. We have investigated the oxygen consumption rates and oxygen concentration in wild-type (WT) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depleted (rho(0)) Molt-4 cells. Wild-type Molt-4 cells have moderate oxygen consumption rates, which were significantly reduced in the rho(0) cells. PCMB (p-chloromercurobenzoate) inhibited the oxygen consumption rates in both WT and rho(0) cells, whereas potassium cyanide decreased the oxygen consumption rates only in WT Molt-4 cells. Menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB) increased the oxygen consumption rates in both cell lines, whereas CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone) stimulated the oxygen consumption rates only in WT Molt-4 cells. Superoxide radical adducts were observed in both WT and rho(0) cells when stimulated with MSB. The formation of this adduct was inhibited by PCMB but not by potassium cyanide. These results suggest that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by MSB were at least in part produced via a mitochondrial independent pathway. An oxygen gradient between the extra- and intracellular compartments was observed in WT Molt-4 cells, which further increased when cells were stimulated by CCCP and MSB. The results are consistent with our earlier findings suggesting that such oxygen gradients may be a general phenomenon found in most or all cell systems under appropriate conditions.

  13. A Nomogram for Calculation of Oxygen Consumption from Minute Ventilation at Varying Workloads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    981~ IZ:;: I~ ~ TATL’MLNrh j.V Approved for public releasel ’ý [ I .Ad& - ABSTRACT .L Oxygen consumption can be difficult and time consuming to measure ...employed to evaluate diff-erent aspects of cardiopulmonary function (1). One of the principal measurements used to quantify response to exercise is...the oxygen consumption. The direct measurement of oxygen consumption is time consuming and cumbersome. Unfortunately, no reliable indirect method for

  14. A new method for measuring the oxygen diffusion constant and oxygen consumption rate of arteriolar walls.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Nobuhiko; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Ushiyama, Akira; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen transport is believed to primarily occur via capillaries and depends on the oxygen tension gradient between the vessels and tissues. As blood flows along branching arterioles, the O(2) saturation drops, indicating either consumption or diffusion. The blood flow rate, the O(2) concentration gradient, and Krogh's O(2) diffusion constant (K) of the vessel wall are parameters affecting O(2)delivery. We devised a method for evaluating K of arteriolar wall in vivo using phosphorescence quenching microscopy to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in two areas almost simultaneously. The K value of arteriolar wall (inner diameter, 63.5 ± 11.9 μm; wall thickness, 18.0 ± 1.2 μm) was found to be 6.0 ± 1.2 × 10(-11) (cm(2)/s)(ml O(2)·cm(-3) tissue·mmHg(-1)). The arteriolar wall O(2) consumption rate (M) was 1.5 ± 0.1 (ml O(2)·100 cm(-3) tissue·min(-1)), as calculated using Krogh's diffusion equation. These results suggest that the arteriolar wall consumes a considerable proportion of the O(2) that diffuses through it.

  15. Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) deficiency impairs myocardium-induced dilation of coronary arterioles associated with reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamada, Shinya; Hoshino, Yasuto; Misaka, Tomofumi; Ishigami, Akihito; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2013-04-29

    Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) decreases with aging. Mice with SMP30 deficiency, a model of aging, have a short lifespan with increased oxidant stress. To elucidate SMP30's effect on coronary circulation derived from myocytes, we measured the changes in the diameter of isolated coronary arterioles in wild-type (WT) mice exposed to supernatant collected from isolated paced cardiac myocytes from SMP30 KO or WT mice. Pacing increased hydrogen peroxide in myocytes, and hydrogen peroxide was greater in SMP30 KO myocytes compared to WT myocytes. Antimycin enhanced and FCCP (oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler in mitochondria) decreased superoxide production in both groups. Addition of supernatant from stimulated myocytes, either SMP30 KO or WT, caused vasodilation. The degree of the vasodilation response to supernatant was smaller in SMP30 KO mice compared to WT mice. Administration of catalase to arterioles eliminated vasodilation in myocyte supernatant of WT mice and converted vasodilation to vasoconstriction in myocyte supernatant of SMP30 KO mice. This vasoconstriction was eliminated by olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. Thus, SMP30 deficiency combined with oxidant stress increases angiotensin and hydrogen peroxide release from cardiac myocytes. SMP30 plays an important role in the regulation of coronary vascular tone by myocardium.

  16. On-line monitoring of oxygen as a method to qualify the oxygen consumption rate of wines.

    PubMed

    Nevares, Ignacio; Martínez-Martínez, Víctor; Martínez-Gil, Ana; Martín, Roberto; Laurie, V Felipe; Del Álamo-Sanza, María

    2017-08-15

    Measuring the oxygen content during winemaking and bottle storage has become increasingly popular due to its impact on the sensory quality and longevity of wines. Nevertheless, only a few attempts to describe the kinetics of oxygen consumption based on the chemical composition of wines have been published. Therefore, this study proposes firstly a new fitting approach describing oxygen consuming kinetics and secondly the use of an Artificial Neural Network approach to describe and compare the oxygen avidity of wines according to their basic chemical composition (i.e. the content of ethanol, titratable acidity, total sulfur dioxide, total phenolics, iron and copper). The results showed no significant differences in the oxygen consumption rate between white and red wines, and allowed the sorting of the wines studied according to their oxygen consumption rate.

  17. Effect of tetracyclines and UV light on oxygen consumption by human leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Glette, J; Sandberg, S; Haneberg, B; Solberg, C O

    1984-01-01

    When polymorphonuclear leukocytes were stimulated with zymosan, a sharp rise in oxygen consumption was observed. In the presence of doxycycline, we observed a further increase in oxygen consumption when the phagocytosing cells were exposed to UV light. When the light was turned off, oxygen consumption of the cells almost ceased, indicating photodamage to polymorphonuclear leukocytes during irradiation. Irradiation of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes for 20 min in the presence of doxycycline (10 micrograms/ml) before phagocytosis completely abolished the rise in oxygen consumption initiated by zymosan. Demethylchlortetracycline and light exposure also caused a marked reduction of polymorphonuclear leukocyte oxygen consumption, whereas oxytetracycline, lymecycline, chlortetracycline, and minocycline had only a slight or no photosensitizing effect. The photodamage induced by doxycycline and demethylchlortetracycline was inhibited by azide and enhanced in deuterium oxide. This was in accordance with singlet oxygen-mediated damage. PMID:6517541

  18. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaka, M.; Takeda, M.

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m2 s- 1) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69 × 10- 11 < De < 6.30 × 10- 11. Values of the second-order rate constant (k, in L mol-1 s- 1) were in the range - 3.66 < log k < - 2.83 (from batch experiments) and in the range - 3.87 < log k < - 2.22 (from diffusion-chemical reaction experiments). Many of these values are within the range of previously published rates for reaction between O2(aq) and Fe(II) surface complexes. The average value for the total concentration of reactive sites was about 10- 4 mol m- 2 from batch experiments. In contrast, the value of reactive sites estimated from the physical surface area was about 10- 8 mol m- 2, indicating that the reaction within intact rock is limited to the sites that originally existed with accessible porosity for O2(aq). This difference arises because the batch experiments used powdered samples, meaning that new sites which formed during milling were added to the original reaction sites. On the basis of these observations and interpretations, diffusion-chemical reaction experiments make it possible to determine the values of the kinetic parameter and diffusivity for an intact rock sample simultaneously.

  19. Effect of music-movement synchrony on exercise oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Bacon, C J; Myers, T R; Karageorghis, C I

    2012-08-01

    Past research indicates that endurance is improved when exercise movements are synchronised with a musical beat, however it is unclear whether such benefits are associated with reduced metabolic cost. We compared oxygen consumption (.VO2) and related physiological effects of exercise conducted synchronously and asynchronously with music. Three music tracks, each recorded at three different tempi (123, 130, and 137 beats.min-1), accompanied cycle ergometry at 65 pedal revolutions.min-1. Thus three randomly-assigned experimental conditions were administered: slow tempo asynchronous, synchronous, and fast tempo asynchronous. Exercise response of .VO2, HR, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), to each condition was monitored in 10 untrained male participants aged 21.7±0.8 years (mean±SD) who cycled for 12 min at 70% maximal heart rate (HR). Mean .VO2 differed among conditions (P=0.008), being lower in the synchronous (1.80±0.22 L.min-1) compared to the slow tempo asynchronous condition (1.94±0.21 L.min-1; P<0.05). There was no difference in HR or RPE among conditions, although HR showed a similar trend to .VO2. The present results indicate that exercise is more efficient when performed synchronously with music than when musical tempo is slightly slower than the rate of cyclical movement.

  20. Determining oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus using an improved respirometer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Longwu; Jiang, Haifeng; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of oxygen consumption rates and asphyxiation points in fish is important to determine appropriate stocking and water quality management in aquaculture. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus were detected under laboratory conditions using an improved respirometer chamber. The results revealed that more accurate estimates can be obtained by adjusting the volume of the respirometer chamber, which may avoid system errors caused by either repeatedly adjusting fish density or selecting different equipment specifications. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of C. mongolicus increased with increasing water temperature and decreasing fish size. Changes in the C. mongolicus oxygen consumption rate were divided into three stages at water temperatures of 11-33°C: (1) a low temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 11-19°C, (2) the optimum temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 19-23°C, and (3) a high temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was > 27°C. The temperature quotients (Q10) obtained suggested that C. mongolicus preferred a temperature range of 19-23°C. At 19°C, C. mongolicus exhibited higher oxygen consumption rates during the day when the maximum values were observed at 10:00 and 14:00 than at night when the minimum occurred at 02:00.

  1. Determining oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus using an improved respirometer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Longwu; Jiang, Haifeng; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of oxygen consumption rates and asphyxiation points in fish is important to determine appropriate stocking and water quality management in aquaculture. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus were detected under laboratory conditions using an improved respirometer chamber. The results revealed that more accurate estimates can be obtained by adjusting the volume of the respirometer chamber, which may avoid system errors caused by either repeatedly adjusting fish density or selecting different equipment specifications. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of C. mongolicus increased with increasing water temperature and decreasing fish size. Changes in the C. mongolicus oxygen consumption rate were divided into three stages at water temperatures of 11-33°C: (1) a low temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 11-19°C, (2) the optimum temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 19-23°C, and (3) a high temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was > 27°C. The temperature quotients (Q10) obtained suggested that C. mongolicus preferred a temperature range of 19-23°C. At 19°C, C. mongolicus exhibited higher oxygen consumption rates during the day when the maximum values were observed at 10:00 and 14:00 than at night when the minimum occurred at 02:00.

  2. CORRECTING ENERGY EXPENDITURES FOR FATIGUE AND EXCESS POST-EXERCISE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the individual's current level of physical activity (PA), which is determined from activity diaries selected from the Conso...

  3. CORRECTING ENERGY EXPENDITURES FOR FATIGUE AND EXCESS POST-EXERCISE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the individual's current level of physical activity (PA), which is determined from activity diaries selected from the Conso...

  4. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones I: Oxygen consumption rates and critical oxygen partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trueblood, Lloyd A.; Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active, epipelagic squid known to undertake diel vertical migrations across a large temperature and oxygen gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Hypoxia is known to cause metabolic suppression in D. gigas. However, the precise oxygen level at which metabolic suppression sets in is unknown. Here we describe a novel ship-board swim tunnel respirometer that was used to measure metabolic rates and critical oxygen partial pressures (Pcrit) for adult squids (2-7kg). Metabolic rate measurements were validated by comparison to the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, citrate synthase, in mantle muscle tissue (2-17kg). We recorded a mean routine metabolic rate of 5.91μmolg-1h-1 at 10°C and 12.62μmolg-1h-1 at 20°C. A temperature coefficient, Q10, of 2.1 was calculated. D. gigas had Pcrits of 1.6 and 3.8kPa at 10 and 20°C, respectively. Oxygen consumption rate (MO2) varied with body mass (M) according to MO2=11.57M-0.12±0.03 at 10°C. Citrate synthase activity varied with body mass according to Y=9.32M-0.19±0.02.

  5. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Manaka, M; Takeda, M

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m(2)s(-1)) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69×10(-11)

  6. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and oxygen pulse associated with selected exercise-to-muscle class elements.

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, P; Batman, P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate and oxygen pulse associated with the constituent elements of an exercise-to-music class. Six women exercise-to-music leaders with a mean(s.d.) age, weight and height of 33.2(5.2) years, 51.0(2.8) kg and 157.9(5.6) cm respectively, completed five distinct exercise-to-music movement elements. The movement elements were of a locomoter (circuit, jump and low impact) and callisthenic (prone and side/supine) nature. The movement elements were distinguishable from one another in terms of their movement patterns, posture and tempo. Relative VO2 values were greatest for the circuit element (40.6 ml kg-1 min-1) and least for the side/supine element (20.0 ml kg-1 min-1). The differences in VO2 between the locomotrr and callisthenic elements were significant (circuit approximately jump approximately low impact > prone approximately side/supine). However, effect size data suggested that the differences between the low impact and jump elements and the prone and side/supine elements were of practical significance (circuit approximately jump > low impact > prone > side/supine). With a single exception similar parametric statistics and effect size trends were identified for absolute heart rate. Specifically, the heart rate associated with the low impact element was not significantly greater than the prone element. The oxygen pulse associated with the locomotor elements was significantly greater than the callisthenic elements (circuit approximately jump approximately low impact > prone > side/supine). This suggested that heart rate may be an inappropriate index for making comparisons between exercise-to-music elements. Reasons for differences in oxygen uptake values between movement elements are discussed. PMID:8044493

  7. Comparison of maximal oxygen consumption with oral and nasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Morton, A R; King, K; Papalia, S; Goodman, C; Turley, K R; Wilmore, J H

    1995-09-01

    The major cause of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is thought to be the drying and cooling of the airways during the 'conditioning' of the inspired air. Nasal breathing increases the respiratory system's ability to warm and humidity the inspired air compared to oral breathing and reduces the drying and cooling effects of the increased ventilation during exercise. This will reduce the severity of EIA provoked by a given intensity and duration of exercise. The purpose of the study was to determine the exercise intensity (%VO2 max) at which healthy subjects, free from respiratory disease, could perform while breathing through the nose-only and to compare this with mouth-only and mouth plus nose breathing. Twenty subjects (11 males and 9 females) ranging from 18-55 years acted as subjects in this study. They were all non-smokers and non-asthmatic. At the time of the study, all subjects were involved in regular physical activity and were classified, by a physician, as free from nasal polyps or other nasal obstruction. The percentage decrease in maximal ventilation with nose-only breathing compare to mouth and mouth plus nose breathing was three times the percentage decrease in maximal oxygen consumption. The pattern of nose-only breathing at maximal work showed a small reduction in tidal volume and large reduction in breathing frequency. Nasal breathing resulted in a reduction in FEO2 and an increase in FECO2. While breathing through the nose-only, all subjects could attain a work intensity great enough to produce an aerobic training effect (based on heart rate and percentage of VO2 max).

  8. Maximal Oxygen Consumption Is Reduced in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Goossens, Dominique; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Nielsen, Søren; Scherbarth, Frank; Steinlechner, Stephan; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have measured maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2,max) of mice lacking one or two of the established mouse red-cell CO2 channels AQP1, AQP9, and Rhag. We intended to study whether these proteins, by acting as channels for O2, determine O2 exchange in the lung and in the periphery. We found that V˙O2,max as determined by the Helox technique is reduced by ~16%, when AQP1 is knocked out, but not when AQP9 or Rhag are lacking. This figure holds for animals respiring normoxic as well as hypoxic gas mixtures. To see whether the reduction of V˙O2,max is due to impaired O2 uptake in the lung, we measured carotid arterial O2 saturation (SO2) by pulse oximetry. Neither under normoxic (inspiratory O2 21%) nor under hypoxic conditions (11% O2) is there a difference in SO2 between AQP1null and WT mice, suggesting that AQP1 is not critical for O2 uptake in the lung. The fact that the % reduction of V˙O2,max is identical in normoxia and hypoxia indicates moreover that the limitation of V˙O2,max is not due to an O2 diffusion problem, neither in the lung nor in the periphery. Instead, it appears likely that AQP1null animals exhibit a reduced V˙O2,max due to the reduced wall thickness and muscle mass of the left ventricles of their hearts, as reported previously. We conclude that very likely the properties of the hearts of AQP1 knockout mice cause a reduced maximal cardiac output and thus cause a reduced V˙O2,max, which constitutes a new phenotype of these mice. PMID:27559317

  9. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after aerobic exercise training.

    PubMed

    Sedlock, Darlene A; Lee, Man-Gyoon; Flynn, Michael G; Park, Kyung-Shin; Kamimori, Gary H

    2010-08-01

    Literature examining the effects of aerobic exercise training on excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) is sparse. In this study, 9 male participants (19-32 yr) trained (EX) for 12 wk, and 10 in a control group (CON) maintained normal activity. VO(2max), rectal temperature (T(re)), epinephrine, norepinephrine, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, glucose, blood lactate (BLA), and EPOC were measured before (PRE) and after (POST) the intervention. EPOC at PRE was measured for 120 min after 30 min of treadmill running at 70% VO(2max). EX completed 2 EPOC trials at POST, i.e., at the same absolute (ABS) and relative (REL) intensity; 1 EPOC test for CON served as both the ABS and REL trial because no significant change in VO(2max) was noted. During the ABS trial, total EPOC decreased significantly (p < .01) from PRE (39.4 ± 3.6 kcal) to POST (31.7 ± 2.2 kcal). T(re), epinephrine, insulin, glucose, and BLA at end-exercise or during recovery were significantly lower and FFA significantly higher after training. Training did not significantly affect EPOC during the REL trial; however, epinephrine was significantly lower, and norepinephrine and FFA, significantly higher, at endexercise after training. Results indicate that EPOC varies as a function of relative rather than absolute metabolic stress and that training improves the efficiency of metabolic regulation during recovery from exercise. Mechanisms for the decreased magnitude of EPOC in the ABS trial include decreases in BLA, T(re), and perhaps epinephrine-mediated hepatic glucose production and insulin-mediated glucose uptake.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of mammalian maximal oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Chappell, Mark A; Meek, Thomas H; Szafranska, Paulina A; Zub, Karol; Konarzewski, Marek; Jones, James H; Bicudo, J Eduardo P W; Nespolo, Roberto F; Careau, Vincent; Garland, Theodore

    2013-12-15

    We compiled published values of mammalian maximum oxygen consumption during exercise ( ) and supplemented these data with new measurements of for the largest rodent (capybara), 20 species of smaller-bodied rodents, two species of weasels and one small marsupial. Many of the new data were obtained with running-wheel respirometers instead of the treadmill systems used in most previous measurements of mammalian . We used both conventional and phylogenetically informed allometric regression models to analyze of 77 'species' (including subspecies or separate populations within species) in relation to body size, phylogeny, diet and measurement method. Both body mass and allometrically mass-corrected showed highly significant phylogenetic signals (i.e. related species tended to resemble each other). The Akaike information criterion corrected for sample size was used to compare 27 candidate models predicting (all of which included body mass). In addition to mass, the two best-fitting models (cumulative Akaike weight=0.93) included dummy variables coding for three species previously shown to have high (pronghorn, horse and a bat), and incorporated a transformation of the phylogenetic branch lengths under an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of residual variation (thus indicating phylogenetic signal in the residuals). We found no statistical difference between wheel- and treadmill-elicited values, and diet had no predictive ability for . Averaged across all models, the allometric scaling exponent was 0.839, with 95% confidence limits of 0.795 and 0.883, which does not provide support for a scaling exponent of 0.67, 0.75 or unity.

  11. Oxygen consumption and energy expenditure of level versus downhill running.

    PubMed

    Robergs, R A; Wagner, D R; Skemp, K M

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare submaximal oxygen consumption (VO2) and energy expenditure (kJ) while running at 0, -1.8, -3.6, and -5.4% grades for three individually selected running speeds (9.4 + 0.79, 10.3 + 0.74, 11.3 + 0.73 km.h-1). Subjects completed the four grade conditions in random order via a modified Latin squares design at three self-selected submaximal running speeds for each condition. Thirteen (5 females and 8 males) recreational (< 35 km.wk-1) runners (age: 27.7 +/- 4.3 yrs) volunteered for the study. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (Grade x Speed) was used to analyze steady-state VO2 and kJ expenditure. Stepwise linear multiple regression was used to develop an equation for predicting VO2 for running at recreational speeds on moderately negative grades. VO2 and kJ mean values were significantly different between all speed and % grade comparisons. Compared to level grade, the average reductions in VO2 and kJ expenditure ranged from approximately 9% at a grade of -1.8% to 22% at a grade of -5.4%. The relationship between VO2 and % grade for each running speed was linear. For a given speed, running at a modest negative grade can significantly decrease VO2 and kJ expenditure compared to level running. The following regression equation can be used to estimate VO2 (ml.kg-1.min-1) for running at recreational speeds on slight downhills: VO2 = 6.8192 + 0.1313 (speed in m.min-1) + 1.2367 (% grade).

  12. Hyperoxia Reduces Oxygen Consumption in Children with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long; Bobhate, Prashant; Kumar, Shine; Vadlamudi, Karunakar; Kaddoura, Tarek; Elgendi, Mohamed; Holinski, Paula; Coe, James Y; Rutledge, Jennifer; Adatia, Ian

    2017-03-18

    High inspired oxygen concentration (FiO2 > 0.85) is administered to test pulmonary vascular reactivity in children with pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is difficult to measure oxygen consumption (VO2) if the subject is breathing a hyperoxic gas mixture so the assumption is made that baseline VO2 does not change. We hypothesized that hyperoxia changes VO2. We sought to compare the VO2 measured by a thermodilution catheter in room air and hyperoxia. A retrospective review of the hemodynamic data obtained in children with PH who underwent cardiac catheterization was conducted between 2009 and 2014. Cardiac index (CI) was measured by a thermodilution catheter in room air and hyperoxia. VO2 was calculated using the equation CI = VO2/arterial-venous oxygen content difference. Data were available in 24 subjects (males = 10), with median age 8.3 years (0.8-17.6 years), weight 23.3 kg (7.5-95 kg), and body surface area 0.9 m(2) (0.4-2.0 m(2)). In hyperoxia compared with room air, we measured decreased VO2 (154 ± 38 to 136 ± 34 ml/min/m(2), p = 0.007), heart rate (91 [Formula: see text] 20 to 83 [Formula: see text] 21 beats/minute, p=0.005), mean pulmonary artery pressure (41 [Formula: see text] 16 to 35 [Formula: see text] 14 mmHg, p=0.024), CI (3.6 [Formula: see text] 0.8 to 3.3 [Formula: see text] 0.9 L/min/m(2), p = 0.03), pulmonary vascular resistance (9 [Formula: see text] 6 to 7 [Formula: see text] 3 WU m(2), p = 0.029), increased mean aortic (61 [Formula: see text] 11 to 67 [Formula: see text] 11 mmHg, p = 0.005), pulmonary artery wedge pressures (11 [Formula: see text] 8 to 13 [Formula: see text] 9 mmHg, p = 0.006), and systemic vascular resistance (12 [Formula: see text] 6 to 20 [Formula: see text] 7 WU m(2), p=0.001). Hyperoxia decreased VO2 and CI and caused pulmonary vasodilation and systemic vasoconstriction in children with PH. The assumption that VO

  13. Energetics of the Frank-Starling effect in rabbit myocardium: economy and efficiency depend on muscle length.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeffrey W; Hünlich, Mark; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2002-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that economy and efficiency are independent of length in intact cardiac muscle over its normal working range. We measured force, force-time integral, force-length area, and myocardial oxygen consumption in eight isometrically contracting rabbit right ventricular papillary muscles. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime was used to partition nonbasal oxygen consumption into tension-independent and tension-dependent components. Developed force, force-time integral, and force-length area increased by factors of 2.4, 2.7, and 4.8, respectively, as muscle length was increased from 90% to 100% maximal length, whereas tension-dependent oxygen consumption increased only 1.6-fold. Economy (the ratio of force-time integral to tension-dependent oxygen consumption) increased significantly with muscle length, as did contractile efficiency, the ratio of force-length area to tension-dependent oxygen consumption. The average force-length area-nonbasal oxygen consumption intercept was more than the twice tension-independent oxygen consumption. We conclude that economy and efficiency increase with length in rabbit myocardium. This conclusion is consistent with published data in isolated rabbit and dog hearts but at odds with studies in skinned myocardium.

  14. The effect of an herbal dietary supplement containing ephedrine and caffeine on oxygen consumption in humans.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Raum, W J; DeLany, J P

    2000-12-01

    To determine if an herbal dietary supplement for weight loss increases metabolism. Measurement of peak oxygen consumption in response to the supplement followed by a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover measurement of oxygen consumption in response to the supplement. The study was conducted in an academic research clinic. Ten obese females (aged 41 +/- 4 years [body mass index (BMI)] 33.3 +/- 2.6 kg/m2) participated in the peak oxygen consumption test; six of these females participated in the crossover trial. Peak oxygen consumption was measured for 45 minutes after taking two herbal dietary supplement capsules orally, each containing the equivalent of 10 mg of caffeine and 5 mg of ephedrine. The crossover trial measured oxygen consumption for 45 minutes after taking two herbal dietary supplement capsules or two placebo capsules orally. The herbal dietary supplement increased peak oxygen consumption 0.178 +/- 0.03 (SEM) kcal/min (8.01 +/- 1.35 kcal/min expressed over 45 minutes) above baseline (p < 0.0001), and 2.0 +/- 0.56 kcal/min over 45 minutes compared to placebo (p < 0.006). The herbal dietary supplement increased oxygen consumption when taken according to the package directions. The significance of this rise for weight loss requires further research.

  15. Oxygen uptake efficiency slope and peak oxygen consumption predict prognosis in children with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-Jeng; Li, Min-Hui; Tsai, Wan-Jung; Tuan, Sheng-Hui; Liao, Tin-Yun; Lin, Ko-Long

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) are exercise parameters that can predict cardiac morbidity in patients with numerous heart diseases. But the predictive value in patients with tetralogy of Fallot is still undetermined, especially in children. We evaluated the prognostic value of OUES and VO2peak in children with total repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Retrospective cohort study. Forty tetralogy of Fallot patients younger than 12 years old were recruited. They underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test during the follow-up period after total repair surgery. The results of the cardiopulmonary exercise test were used to predict the cardiac related hospitalization in the following two years after the test. OUES normalized by body surface area (OUES/BSA) and the percentage of predicted VO2peak appeared to be predictive for two-year cardiac related hospitalization. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that the best threshold value for OUES/BSA was 1.029 (area under the curve = 0.70, p = 0.03), and for VO2peak was 74% of age prediction (area under the curve = 0.72, p = 0.02). The aforementioned findings were confirmed by Kaplan-Meier plots and log-rank test. OUES/BSA and VO2peak are useful predictors of cardiac-related hospitalization in children with total repair of tetralogy of Fallot. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  16. Modeling energy expenditure and oxygen consumption in human exposure models: accounting for fatigue and EPOC.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Kristin; Glen, Graham; Mccurdy, Thomas; Smith, Luther

    2008-05-01

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized values of metabolic equivalents of work (METS) for the activity being performed and converted into activity-specific oxygen consumption estimates. However, oxygen consumption remains elevated after a moderate- or high-intensity activity is completed. This effect, which is termed excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), requires upward adjustment of the METS estimates that follow high-energy expenditure events, to model subsequent increased ventilation and intake dose rates. In addition, since an individual's capacity for work decreases during extended activity, methods are also required to adjust downward those METS estimates that exceed physiologically realistic limits over time. A unified method for simultaneously performing these adjustments is developed. The method simulates a cumulative oxygen deficit for each individual and uses it to impose appropriate time-dependent reductions in the METS time series and additions for EPOC. The relationships between the oxygen deficit and METS limits are nonlinear and are derived from published data on work capacity and oxygen consumption. These modifications result in improved modeling of ventilation patterns, and should improve intake dose estimates associated with exposure to airborne environmental contaminants.

  17. Regional myocardial oxygen consumption determined noninvasively in humans with (1- sup 11 C)acetate and dynamic positron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Armbrecht, J.J.; Buxton, D.B.; Brunken, R.C.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1989-10-01

    Experimental studies of animals have previously demonstrated the validity of (1-11C)acetate as a tracer of oxidative metabolism for use with positron emission tomography. The present study was undertaken to define in normal human volunteers the relation between myocardial clearance kinetics of (1-11C)acetate, and the rate-pressure product as an index of myocardial oxygen consumption. Twenty-two studies were performed of 12 volunteers. The rate-pressure product was increased with continuous supine bicycle exercise in six studies. Of the 16 resting studies, seven were performed in the fasted state and nine following an oral glucose load, to define possible effects of substrate availability on the tracer-tissue kinetics. Myocardial tissue time-activity curves were biexponential. Clearance of activity was homogeneous throughout the myocardium. The rate constants k1, obtained from biexponential fitting, and kmono, obtained by monoexponential fitting of the initial linear portion of the time-activity curves, correlated well with the rate-pressure product. Although the correlation coefficient was higher for k1 than for kmono (0.95 vs. 0.91), analysis on a sectorial basis showed less regional variability in kmono. This suggests that kmono, which is more practical than k1 because it requires shorter acquisition times, may be more clinically and experimentally useful for detection of myocardial segments with abnormal oxygen consumption. Overall, changes in myocardial substrate supply were without significant effect on the relation between the rate constants (k1 and kmono) and the rate-pressure product, although a small decrease in kmono/rate-pressure product was observed following oral glucose by paired analysis in four subjects.

  18. Carbon dioxide elimination and oxygen consumption in mechanically ventilated children.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Craig D; Walsh, Brian K; Bechard, Lori J; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2015-05-01

    Accurate measurement of carbon dioxide elimination (V̇CO2 ) and oxygen consumption (V̇O2 ) at the bedside may help titrate nutritional and respiratory support in mechanically ventilated patients. Continuous V̇CO2 monitoring is now available with many ventilators. However, because normative data are sparsely available in the literature, we aimed to describe the range of V̇CO2 and V̇O2 values observed in mechanically ventilated children. We also aimed to examine the characteristics of V̇CO2 values that are associated with standard steady state (5-min period when V̇CO2 and V̇O2 variability are < 10%). Mechanically ventilated patients who underwent indirect calorimetry testing were eligible for inclusion, and subjects who achieved standard steady state were included. Normalized V̇CO2 and V̇O2 values (mL/kg/min) were modeled against subject height, and correlation coefficients were computed to quantify the goodness of fit. A steady-state definition using only V̇CO2 was developed (V̇CO2 variability of < 5% for a 5-min period) and tested against standard steady state using sensitivity and specificity. Steady-state data from 87 indirect calorimetry tests (in 70 subjects) were included. For age groups < 0.5, 0.5-8, and > 8 y, the mean V̇CO2 values were 7.6, 5.8, and 3.5 mL/kg/min. Normalized V̇CO2 and V̇O2 values were inversely related to subject height and age. The relationships between normalized gas exchange values and height were demonstrated by the models: V̇CO2 = 115 × (height in cm)(-0.71) (R = 0.61, P < .001) and V̇O2 = 130 × (height in cm)(-0.72) (R = 0.61, P < .001). Steady-state V̇CO2 predicted standard steady state (sensitivity of 0.84, specificity of 1.0, P < .01). V̇CO2 and V̇O2 measurements correlated with subject height and age. Smaller and younger subjects produced larger amounts of CO2 and consumed more O2 per unit of body weight. The use of a 5-min period when V̇CO2 varied by < 5% predicted standard steady state. Our observations

  19. A New Approach for Measuring Single-Cell Oxygen Consumption Rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Dragavon, Joseph M.; Anderson, Judith B.; Young, A. Cody; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel system that has enabled the measurement of single-cell oxygen consumption rates is presented. The experimental apparatus includes a temperature controlled environmental chamber, an array of microwells etched in glass, and a lid actuator used to seal cells in the microwells. Each microwell contains an oxygen sensitive platinum phosphor sensor used to monitor the cellular metabolic rates. Custom automation software controls the digital image data collection for oxygen sensor measurements, which are analyzed using an image-processing program to yield the oxygen concentration within each microwell versus time. Two proof-of-concept experiments produced oxygen consumption rate measurements for A549 human epithelial lung cancer cells of 5.39 and 5.27 fmol/min/cell, closely matching published oxygen consumption rates for bulk A549 populations. PMID:21057593

  20. Lactate and venoarterial carbon dioxide difference/arterial-venous oxygen difference ratio, but not central venous oxygen saturation, predict increase in oxygen consumption in fluid responders.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Xavier; Julien, Florence; Ait-Hamou, Nora; Lequoy, Marie; Gosset, Clément; Jozwiak, Mathieu; Persichini, Romain; Anguel, Nadia; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2013-06-01

    During circulatory failure, the ultimate goal of treatments that increase cardiac output is to reduce tissue hypoxia. This can only occur if oxygen consumption depends on oxygen delivery. We compared the ability of central venous oxygen saturation and markers of anaerobic metabolism to predict whether a fluid-induced increase in oxygen delivery results in an increase in oxygen consumption. Prospective study. ICU. Fifty-one patients with an acute circulatory failure (78% of septic origin). Before and after a volume expansion (500 mL of saline), we measured cardiac index, o2- and Co2-derived variables and lactate. Volume expansion increased cardiac index ≥ 15% in 49% of patients ("volume-responders"). Oxygen delivery significantly increased in these 25 patients (+32% ± 16%, p < 0.0001). An increase in oxygen consumption ≥ 15% concomitantly occurred in 56% of these 25 volume-responders (+38% ± 28%). Compared with the volume-responders in whom oxygen consumption did not increase, the volume-responders in whom oxygen consumption increased ≥ 15% were characterized by a higher lactate (2.3 ± 1.1 mmol/L vs. 5.5 ± 4.0 mmol/L, respectively) and a higher ratio of the veno-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference (P(v - a)Co2) over the arteriovenous oxygen content difference (C(a - v)o2). A fluid-induced increase in oxygen consumption greater than or equal to 15% was not predicted by baseline central venous oxygen saturation but by high baseline lactate and (P(v - a)Co2/C(a - v)o2 ratio (areas under the receiving operating characteristics curves: 0.68 ± 0.11, 0.94 ± 0.05, and 0.91 ± 0.06). In volume-nonresponders, volume expansion did not significantly change cardiac index, but the oxygen delivery decreased due to a hemodilution-induced decrease in hematocrit. In volume-responders, unlike markers of anaerobic metabolism, central venous oxygen saturation did not allow the prediction of whether a fluid-induced increase in oxygen delivery would result in an

  1. Effect of Solcoseryl on cadaveric split-skin oxygen consumption during 4 degrees C storage and in frozen biopsies.

    PubMed

    Alsbjörn, B F; Jensen, M G; Sørensen, B

    1989-04-01

    Oxygen consumption rate in cadaveric split-skin biopsies was investigated. Biopsies were harvested at different times postmortem and stored at different temperatures in either Solcoseryl (a protein-free bovine hemodialysate) or placebo-containing media. During the first week of storage Solcoseryl had no influence on oxygen consumption. However, in the second and third weeks the oxygen consumption was improved by Solcoseryl.

  2. Improved myocardium transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culler, V. H.; Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.

    1979-01-01

    Method of implanting myocardium transducer uses special indented pins that are caught and securely held by epicardial fibers. Pins are small enough to cause minimum of trauma to myocardium during implantation or removal.

  3. Oxygen Consumption by Postfermentation Wine Yeast Lees: Factors Affecting Its Rate and Extent under Oenological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jonas; Schmidt, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Summary Postfermentation wine yeast lees show antioxidant properties based on their ability to consume dissolved oxygen. The oxygen consumption capacity of suspended yeast lees obtained after fermentations with six commercial active dry yeast strains was investigated in model, white and red wines using fluorescence-based oxygen sensors operating in a nondestructive way. In model solution, the oxygen consumption rate of yeast lees was shown to depend on their amount, yeast strain, sulfur dioxide and temperature. It is slightly lower in red than in white wines. It is strongly decreased by current levels of free sulfur dioxide, thus excluding the complementary use of both as antioxidants in wine. However, in 25 randomly sampled white wines produced under commercial conditions, the rate and extent of oxygen consumption during the first six months of postfermentation had no significant correlation with any of these interacting factors, making it difficult to predict the actual antioxidant effect of yeast lees. In these wines, yeast lees consumed 0 to 47% of the dissolved oxygen. Although total oxygen consumption capacity of yeast lees is not a limiting factor under commercial winemaking conditions, their oxygen consumption proceeds at a limited rate that reduces but cannot totally prevent concomitant chemical oxidation of the wine. PMID:28115896

  4. Repetition rate-dependent oxygen consumption modifies cytotoxicity in photodynamic therapy using pulsed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Morimoto, Yuji; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Arai, Tsunenori; Sato, Shunichi; Sakata, Isao; Takemura, Takeshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2003-06-01

    We studied the repetition-rate dependence of PDT cytotoxicity and relation between PDT cytotoxicity and both oxygen consumption and photobleaching during PDT in vitro. Mice renal carcinoma cells were incubated wtih second-generation photosensitizier, PAD-S31, and were irradiated with 670-nm nanoseconds pulsed light from YAG-OPO system. Four repetition rates of 30, 15, 5 and 3 Hz were investigated, provided that the incident peak intensity and the total light dose adjusted to 1.2 MW/cm2 and 40 J/cm2, respectively. We found limited cytotoxicity about 40% at 30 and 15 Hz and sufficient cytotoxicity about 80% at 5 and 3 Hz. The oxygen measurement during irradiation revealed that the 5- and 30Hz irradiation caused slow oxygen consumption, while rapid oxygen consumption followed by a rapid recovery of oxygenation at 30 and 15 Hz. Interestingly, the fluorescence measurement during irradiation also demonstrated that photobleaching discontinued in the same period of oxygen recovery at 30 and 15 Hz. These discontinued oxygen consumption and photobleaching at 30 and 15 Hz might have limited effective total fluence and resulted in suppressed cytotoxicity. These results suggest that the PDT efficacy using a pulsed laser significantly depends on the pulse repetition rate probably due to different oxygen consumption process during PDT.

  5. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate intermittent hypoxia induced protection of canine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Juan A; Williams, Arthur G; Sun, Jie; Gonzalez, Leticia; Downey, H Fred; Caffrey, James L; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent, normobaric hypoxia confers robust cardioprotection against ischemia-induced myocardial infarction and lethal ventricular arrhythmias. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cardioprotective phenomena, but their roles in intermittent hypoxia are unknown. This study examined the contributions of DOR and ROS in mediating intermittent hypoxia-induced cardioprotection. Mongrel dogs completed a 20 day program consisting of 5-8 daily, 5-10 min cycles of moderate, normobaric hypoxia (FIO2 0.095-0.10), with intervening 4 min room air exposures. Subsets of dogs received the DOR antagonist naltrindole (200 μg/kg, sc) or antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (250 mg/kg, po) before each hypoxia session. Twenty-four hours after the last session, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min and then reperfused for 5 h. Arrhythmias detected by electrocardiography were scored according to the Lambeth II conventions. Left ventricles were sectioned and stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride, and infarct sizes were expressed as percentages of the area at risk (IS/AAR). Intermittent hypoxia sharply decreased IS/AAR from 41 ± 5 % (n = 12) to 1.8 ± 0.9 % (n = 9; P < 0.001) and arrhythmia score from 4.1 ± 0.3 to 0.7 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001) vs. non-hypoxic controls. Naltrindole (n = 6) abrogated the cardioprotection with IS/AAR 35 ± 5 % and arrhythmia score 3.7 ± 0.7 (P < 0.001 vs. untreated intermittent hypoxia). N-acetylcysteine (n = 6) interfered to a similar degree, with IS/AAR 42 ± 3 % and arrhythmia score 4.7 ± 0.3 (P < 0.001 vs. untreated intermittent hypoxia). Without the intervening reoxygenations, hypoxia (n = 4) was not cardioprotective (IS/AAR 50 ± 8 %; arrhythmia score 4.5 ± 0.5; P < 0.001 vs. intermittent hypoxia). Thus DOR, ROS and cyclic reoxygenation were obligatory participants in the gradually evolving cardioprotection produced by intermittent hypoxia.

  6. Brazilian Cardiorespiratory Fitness Classification Based on Maximum Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Herdy, Artur Haddad; Caixeta, Ananda

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) is the most complete tool available to assess functional aerobic capacity (FAC). Maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max), an important biomarker, reflects the real FAC. Objective To develop a cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) classification based on VO2 max in a Brazilian sample of healthy and physically active individuals of both sexes. Methods We selected 2837 CEPT from 2837 individuals aged 15 to 74 years, distributed as follows: G1 (15 to 24); G2 (25 to 34); G3 (35 to 44); G4 (45 to 54); G5 (55 to 64) and G6 (65 to 74). Good CRF was the mean VO2 max obtained for each group, generating the following subclassification: Very Low (VL): VO2 < 50% of the mean; Low (L): 50% - 80%; Fair (F): 80% - 95%; Good (G): 95% -105%; Excellent (E) > 105%. Results Men VL < 50% L 50-80% F 80-95% G 95-105% E > 105% G1 < 25.30 25.30-40.48 40.49-48.07 48.08-53.13 > 53.13 G2 < 23.70 23.70-37.92 37.93-45.03 45.04-49.77 > 49.77 G3 < 22.70 22.70-36.32 36.33-43.13 43.14-47.67 > 47.67 G4 < 20.25 20.25-32.40 32.41-38.47 38.48-42.52 > 42.52 G5 < 17.54 17.65-28.24 28.25-33.53 33.54-37.06 > 37.06 G6 < 15 15.00-24.00 24.01-28.50 28.51-31.50 > 31.50 Women G1 < 19.45 19.45-31.12 31.13-36.95 36.96-40.84 > 40.85 G2 < 19.05 19.05-30.48 30.49-36.19 36.20-40.00 > 40.01 G3 < 17.45 17.45-27.92 27.93-33.15 33.16-34.08 > 34.09 G4 < 15.55 15.55-24.88 24.89-29.54 29.55-32.65 > 32.66 G5 < 14.30 14.30-22.88 22.89-27.17 27.18-30.03 > 30.04 G6 < 12.55 12.55-20.08 20.09-23.84 23.85-26.35 > 26.36 Conclusions This chart stratifies VO2 max measured on a treadmill in a robust Brazilian sample and can be used as an alternative for the real functional evaluation of physically and healthy individuals stratified by age and sex. PMID:27305285

  7. Oxygen consumption rates by different oenological tannins in a model wine solution.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Olga; Vignault, Adeline; Gombau, Jordi; Navarro, Maria; Gómez-Alonso, Sergio; García-Romero, Esteban; Canals, Joan Miquel; Hermosín-Gutíerrez, Isidro; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Zamora, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    The kinetics of oxygen consumption by different oenological tannins were measured in a model wine solution using the non-invasive method based on luminiscence. The results indicate that the oxygen consumption rate follows second-order kinetics depending on tannin and oxygen concentrations. They also confirm that the oxygen consumption rate is influenced by temperature in accordance with Arrhenius law. The indications are that ellagitannins are the fastest oxygen consumers of the different oenological tannins, followed in decreasing order by quebracho tannins, skin tannins, seed tannins and finally gallotannins. This methodology can therefore be proposed as an index for determining the effectiveness of different commercial tannins in protecting wines against oxidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen consumption along bed forms under losing and gaining streamflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that bed forms are the most significant geomorphological structure that drives hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes in stream networks. Other studies also demonstrated that due to the hyporheic flow patterns within bed form, biogeochemical processes do not occur uniformly along and within the bed forms. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate how losing or gaining flow conditions affect oxygen consumption by biofilm along sandy bed forms. We measured the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions on oxygen consumption by combining modeling and experiments in a novel laboratory flume system that enable the control of losing and gaining fluxes. Oxygen consumption was measured after growing a benthic biofilm fed with Sodium Benzoate (as a carbon source) and measuring the distribution of oxygen in the streambed with microelectrodes. The experimental results were analyzed using a novel code that calculates vertical profiles of reaction rates in the presence of hyporheic water fluxes. These experimental observations and modeling revealed that oxygen distribution varied along the bed forms. The zone of oxygen consumption (i.e. depth of penetration) was the largest at the upstream side of the bed form and the smallest in the lee side (at the lowest part of the bed form), regardless of the flow conditions. Also, the zone of oxygen consumption was the largest under losing conditions, the smallest under gaining conditions, and in-between under neutral conditions. The distribution of oxygen consumption rates determined with our new model will be also discussed. Our preliminary results enable us to show the importance of the coupling between flow conditions and oxygen consumption along bed forms and are expected to improve our understanding of nutrient cycling in streams.

  9. Endurance training and maximal oxygen consumption with ageing: Role of maximal cardiac output and oxygen extraction.

    PubMed

    Montero, David; Díaz-Cañestro, Candela

    2016-05-01

    The increase in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) with endurance training is associated with that of maximal cardiac output (Qmax), but not oxygen extraction, in young individuals. Whether such a relationship is altered with ageing remains unclear. Therefore, we sought systematically to review and determine the effect of endurance training on and the associations among VO2max, Qmax and arteriovenous oxygen difference at maximal exercise (Ca-vO2max) in healthy aged individuals. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science, from their inceptions until May 2015 for articles assessing the effect of endurance training lasting 3 weeks or longer on VO2max and Qmax and/or Ca-vO2max in healthy middle-aged and/or older individuals (mean age ≥40 years). Meta-analyses were performed to determine the standardised mean difference (SMD) in VO2max, Qmax and Ca-vO2max between post and pre-training measurements. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations among SMDs and potential moderating factors. Sixteen studies were included after systematic review, comprising a total of 153 primarily untrained healthy middle-aged and older subjects (mean age 42-71 years). Endurance training programmes ranged from 8 to 52 weeks of duration. After data pooling, VO2max (SMD 0.89; P < 0.0001) and Qmax (SMD 0.61; P < 0.0001) were increased after endurance training; no heterogeneity among studies was detected. Ca-vO2max was only increased with endurance training interventions lasting more than 12 weeks (SMD 0.62; P = 0.001). In meta-regression, the SMD in Qmax was positively associated with the SMD in VO2max (B = 0.79, P = 0.04). The SMD in Ca-vO2max was not associated with the SMD in VO2max (B = 0.09, P = 0.84). The improvement in VO2max following endurance training is a linear function of Qmax, but not Ca-vO2max, through healthy ageing. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  10. Fish oil reduces heart rate and oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Peoples, Gregory E; McLennan, Peter L; Howe, Peter R C; Groeller, Herbert

    2008-12-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are readily incorporated into heart and skeletal muscle membranes where, in the heart, animal studies show they reduce O2 consumption. To test the hypothesis that omega-3 PUFAs alter O2 efficiency in humans, the effects of fish oil (FO) supplementation on O2 consumption during exercise were evaluated. Sixteen well-trained men (cyclists), randomly assigned to receive 8 x 1 g capsules per day of olive oil (control) or FO for 8 weeks in a double-blind, parallel design, completed the study (control: n = 7, age 27.1 +/- 2.7 years; FO: n = 9, age 23.2 +/- 1.2 years). Subjects used an electronically braked cycle ergometer to complete peak O2 consumption tests (VO 2peak) and sustained submaximal exercise tests at 55% of peak workload (from the VO 2peak test) before and after supplementation. Whole-body O2 consumption and indirect measurements of myocardial O2 consumption [heart rate and rate pressure product (RPP)] were assessed. FO supplementation increased omega-3 PUFA content of erythrocyte cell membranes. There were no differences in VO 2peak (mL kg(-1) min(-1)) (control: pre 66.8 +/- 2.4, post 67.2 +/- 2.3; FO: pre 68.3 +/- 1.4, post 67.2 +/- 1.2) or peak workload after supplementation. The FO supplementation lowered heart rate (including peak heart rate) during incremental workloads to exhaustion (P < 0.05). In addition, the FO supplementation lowered steady-state submaximal exercise heart rate, whole-body O2 consumption, and RPP (P < 0.01). Time to voluntary fatigue was not altered by FO supplementation. This study indicates that FOs may act within the healthy heart and skeletal muscle to reduce both whole-body and myocardial O2 demand during exercise, without a decrement in performance.

  11. Metabolically Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates (Final Report, 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Metabolically Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates. This report provides a revised approach for calculating an individual's ventilation rate directly from their oxygen c...

  12. Metabolically Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates (Final Report, 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Metabolically Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates. This report provides a revised approach for calculating an individual's ventilation rate directly from their oxygen c...

  13. Oxygen Consumption during Underwater Fin Swimming Wearing Dry Suits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    ensur-d Hydration was encouraged and any exercise 2 or diving within 24 hours was prevented to avoid dehydration. Caffeine consumption was kept to a...experiment in maintaining homeostasis in a long distance underwater swimmer . U.S. Naval Medical Research Institute (Bethesda, MD) Report MR 005.13-4001.06, No

  14. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios.

    PubMed Central

    Makemson, J C

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively. PMID:3944057

  15. Luciferase-dependent oxygen consumption by bioluminescent vibrios

    SciTech Connect

    Makemson, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    Oxygen uptake due to luciferase in two luminous Vibrio species was estimated in vivo by utilizing inhibitors having specificities for luciferase (decanol) and cytochromes (cyanide). Cyanide titration of respiration revealed a component of oxygen uptake less sensitive to cyanide which was completely inhibitable by low concentrations of decanol. From this it was estimated that in vivo luciferase is responsible for less than 12% (Vibrio harveyi) or 20% (Vibrio fischeri) of the total respiration. From these data in vivo bioluminescent quantum yields are estimated to be not lower than 1.7 and 2.6%, respectively.

  16. How diverse is the oxygen consumption during the life cycle of the pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, M.; Paffenhofer, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The goal of our study was to study the intraspecies physiological diversity of different life stages of the pelagic tunicate Dolioletta gegenbauri (Tunicata, Thaliacea) that occur intermittently in high abundances on the shelf off the southeastern US. The complex life cycle of this species starts with solitary oozooids that develop to nurses with colonies of feeding trophozooids and phorozooids. As the latter mature they produce clusters of gonozooids. As oxygen consumption is a good physiological indicator for metabolic expenditures, we quantified the oxygen consumption of different zooids of D. gegenbauri (nurses, phorozooids and gonozooids) at environmental conditions. Oxygen consumption rates were determined from changes in oxygen concentration that were monitored non-invasively and continuously by an innovative sensor system in time-series-experiments. Specific oxygen consumption rates varied considerably and were related to moving activity, feeding behaviour, biomass, and growth of different life stages of doliolids. The results of our study will advance our understanding of variability in oxygen consumption of different stages of doliolid development due to their specific ecological role.

  17. Kidney hypoxia, attributable to increased oxygen consumption, induces nephropathy independently of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Thörn, Erik; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Levin, Max; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is strongly associated with both increased oxidative stress and kidney tissue hypoxia. The increased oxidative stress causes increased kidney oxygen consumption resulting in kidney tissue hypoxia. To date, it has been difficult to determine the role of kidney hypoxia, per se, for the development of nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that kidney hypoxia, without confounding factors such as hyperglycemia or elevated oxidative stress, results in nephropathy. To induce kidney hypoxia, dinitrophenol (30 mg per day per kg bodyweight by gavage), a mitochondrial uncoupler that increases oxygen consumption and causes kidney hypoxia, was administered for 30 consecutive days to rats. Thereafter, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, kidney oxygen consumption, kidney oxygen tension, kidney concentrations of glucose and glycogen, markers of oxidative stress, urinary protein excretion, and histological findings were determined and compared with vehicle-treated controls. Dinitrophenol did not affect arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, or markers of oxidative stress but increased kidney oxygen consumption, and reduced cortical and medullary concentrations of glucose and glycogen, and resulted in intrarenal tissue hypoxia. Furthermore, dinitrophenol treatment increased urinary protein excretion, kidney vimentin expression, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption results in kidney hypoxia and subsequent nephropathy. Importantly, these results demonstrate that kidney tissue hypoxia, per se, without confounding hyperglycemia or oxidative stress, may be sufficient to initiate the development of nephropathy and therefore demonstrate a new interventional target for treating kidney disease.

  18. Oxygen consumption of the chicken embryo: interaction between temperature and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Labbè, Katherine

    2005-03-01

    We measured the effects of hypoxia and changes in ambient temperature (T) on the oxygen consumption (VO2) of chicken embryos at embryonic days 11, 16 and 20 (E11, E16 and E20, respectively), and post-hatching day 1 (H1). Between 30 and 39 degrees C, at E11 and E16, VO2 changed linearly with T, as in ectothermic animals, with a Q10 of about 2.1. At E20, VO2 did not significantly change with T, indicating the onset of endothermy. At H1, a drop in T increased VO2, a clear thermogenic response. Hypoxia (11% O2 for 30 min) decreased VO2, by an amount that varied with T and age. At H1, hypoxia lowered VO2 especially at low T. At E20, hypoxic hypometabolism was similar at all T. At E11 and E16, hypoxia lowered VO2 only at the higher T. In fact, at E11, with T=39 degrees C even a modest hypoxia (15-18% O2) decreased VO2. Upon return to normoxia after 40 min of 11% O2, VO2 did not rise above the pre-hypoxic level, indicating that the hypometabolism during hypoxia did not generate an O2 debt. At E11, during modest hypoxia (16% O2) at 36 degrees C, the drop in VO2 was lifted by raising the T to 39 degrees C, suggesting that the hypoxic hypometabolism at 36 degrees C was not due to O2-supply limitation. In conclusion, the hypometabolic effects of hypoxia on the chicken embryo's VO2 depend on the development of the thermogenic ability, occurring predominantly at high T during the early (ectothermic phase) and at low T during the late (endothermic) phase. At E11, both low T and low oxygen force VO2 to drop. However, at a near-normal T, modest hypoxia promotes a hypometabolic response with the characteristics of regulated O2 conformism.

  19. Plant respirometer enables high resolution of oxygen consumption rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Plant respirometer permits high resolution of relatively small changes in the rate of oxygen consumed by plant organisms undergoing oxidative metabolism in a nonphotosynthetic state. The two stage supply and monitoring system operates by a differential pressure transducer and provides a calibrated output by digital or analog signals.

  20. Prediction of Maximum Oxygen Consumption from Walking, Jogging, or Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Gary E.; George, James D.; Alexander, Jeffrey L.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; Aldana, Steve G.; Parcell, Allen C.

    2002-01-01

    Developed a cardiorespiratory endurance test that retained the inherent advantages of submaximal testing while eliminating reliance on heart rate measurement in predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). College students completed three exercise tests. The 1.5-mile endurance test predicted VO2max from submaximal exercise without requiring heart…

  1. Prediction of Maximum Oxygen Consumption from Walking, Jogging, or Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Gary E.; George, James D.; Alexander, Jeffrey L.; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; Aldana, Steve G.; Parcell, Allen C.

    2002-01-01

    Developed a cardiorespiratory endurance test that retained the inherent advantages of submaximal testing while eliminating reliance on heart rate measurement in predicting maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). College students completed three exercise tests. The 1.5-mile endurance test predicted VO2max from submaximal exercise without requiring heart…

  2. Measurement of oxygen consumption during muscle flaccidity exercise by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, K.; Fukawa, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative measurement oxygen consumption in the muscles is important to evaluate the effect of the exercise. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method for measuring muscle oxygenation. However, measurement results are affected by blood volume change due to changes in the blood pressure. In order to evaluate changes in blood volume and to improve measurement accuracy, we proposed a calculation method of three-wavelength measurement with considering the scattering factor and the measurement with monitoring blood flow for measuring the temporal change of the oxygen concentration more precisely. We applied three-wavelength light source (680nm, 808nm and 830nm) for the continued wave measurement. Two detectors (targeted detector and the reference detector) were placed near the target muscle and apart from it. We measured the blood flow by controlling the intravascular pressure and the oxygen consumption with the handgrip exercise in the forearm. The measured results show that the scattering factor contains the artifact at the surface and the blood flow in the artery and the vein in the same phase. The artifact and the blood flow in the same phase are reduced from the oxygenated and the deoxygenated hemoglobin densities. Thus our proposed method is effective for reducing the influence of the artifact and the blood flow in the same phase from the oxygen consumption measurement. Further, it is shown that the oxygen consumption is measured more accurately by subtracting the blood flow measured by the reference detector.

  3. Oxygen consumption rates in subseafloor basaltic crust derived from a reaction transport model.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Beth N; Wheat, C Geoffrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Hulme, Samuel; Edwards, Katrina J; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic crust is the largest potential habitat for life on Earth and may contain a significant fraction of Earth's total microbial biomass; yet, empirical analysis of reaction rates in basaltic crust is lacking. Here we report the first assessment of oxygen consumption in young (~8 Ma) and cool (<25 °C) basaltic crust, which we calculate from modelling dissolved oxygen and strontium pore water gradients in basal sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 336 to 'North Pond' on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Dissolved oxygen is completely consumed within the upper to middle section of the sediment column, with an increase in concentration towards the sediment-basement interface, indicating an upward supply from oxic fluids circulating within the crust. A parametric reaction transport model of oxygen behaviour in upper basement suggests oxygen consumption rates of 1 nmol  cm(-3)ROCK d(-1) or less in young and cool basaltic crust.

  4. Oxygen Consumption Rate and Energy Expenditure in Mice: Indirect Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ran; Tong, Qingchun

    2017-01-01

    Global obesity epidemic demands more effective therapeutic treatments and better understanding of obesity pathophysiology. Since obesity results from energy imbalance, accurate quantification of energy intake and energy expenditure (EE) becomes an essential prerequisite to phenotype the cause for obesity development. Indirect calorimetry has long been used as one of the most established methods in EE quantification by detecting changes in levels of O2 consumption and CO2 production. In this article, we describe procedures and important considerations for an effective measurement using indirect calorimetry.

  5. Effects of dental methacrylates on oxygen consumption and redox status of human pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Callà, Cinzia; Martorana, Giuseppe Ettore; Cicillini, Loredana; Rengo, Sandro; Lupi, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Luisa Gozzo, Maria; Spagnuolo, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have already demonstrated that the incomplete polymerization of resin-based dental materials causes the release of monomers which might affect cell metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on (1) cellular energy metabolism, evaluating oxygen consumption rate, glucose consumption, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lactate production, and (2) cellular redox status, through the evaluation of glutathione concentration and of the activities of enzymes regulating glutathione metabolism. Human pulp cells were used and oxygen consumption was measured by means of a Clark electrode. Moreover, reactive oxygen species production was quantified. Enzymatic activity and glucose and lactate concentrations were determined through a specific kit. Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate induced a decrease in oxygen consumption rate, an enhancement of glucose consumption, and lactate production, whilst glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity were not significantly modified. Moreover, the monomers induced an increase of reactive oxygen species production with a consequent increase of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities. A depletion of both reduced and total glutathione was also observed. The obtained results indicate that dental monomers might alter energy metabolism and glutathione redox balance in human pulp cells.

  6. Interindividual variability in body composition and resting oxygen consumption rate in breeding tree swallows, Tachycineta bicolor.

    PubMed

    Burness, G P; Ydenberg, R C; Hochachka, P W

    1998-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate is one of the most widely measured physiological traits. Previous studies on lab mice and field-caught lizards suggest that individuals with relatively high basal metabolic rates or standard metabolic rates have relatively large masses of metabolically active tissues (e.g., heart, kidney, liver). As these are energetically expensive organs, there may be variability between breeding seasons dependent on, for example, availability of prey and capacity for energy intake. We present data from breeding tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) collected over two successive seasons. There was no difference between years in resting oxygen consumption rates, although there were significant interannual differences in the masses of all organs and tissues except the pectoralis. Interindividual differences in the masses of the kidney and small intestine explained 21% of the variation in oxygen consumption rates. Although individuals with relatively high resting oxygen consumption rates had relatively large, metabolically active kidneys, they had relatively small intestines and pectoral muscles. This is in contrast to all previous studies on mammals and to the single interspecific study of birds. Oxygen consumption rate also correlated positively with hematocrit. Our results suggest that assumptions of consistent positive relationships between resting oxygen consumption rate and organ masses cannot be extended intraspecifically for birds.

  7. Estimate of oxygen consumption and intracellular zinc concentration of human spermatozoa in relation to motility.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Ralf R; Defosse, Kerstin; Koyro, Hans-Wilhelm; Weissmann, Norbert; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the human sperm oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content in relation to motility. In washed spermatozoa from 67 ejaculates, the oxygen consumption was determined. Following calculation of the total oxygen consumed by the Ideal Gas Law, the energy consumption of spermatozoa was calculated. In addition, the zinc content of the sperm was determined using an atomic absorption spectrometer. The resulting data were correlated to the vitality and motility. The oxygen consumption averaged 0.24 micromol/10(6) sperm x 24h, 0.28 micromol/10(6) live sperm x 24h and 0.85 micromol/10(6) live motile sperm x 24h. Further calculations revealed that sperm motility was the most energy consuming process (164.31 mJ/10(6) motile spermatozoa x 24h), while the oxygen consumption of the total spermatozoa was 46.06 mJ/10(6) spermatozoa x 24h. The correlation of the oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content with motility showed significant negative correlations (r= -0.759; P<0.0001 and r=-0.441; P<0.0001, respectively). However, when correlating sperm energy consumption with the zinc content, a significant positive relation (r=0.323; P=0.01) was observed. Poorly motile sperm are actually wasting the available energy. Moreover, our data clearly support the "Geometric Clutch Model" of the axoneme function and demonstrate the importance of the outer dense fibers for the generation of sperm motility, especially progressive motility.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of macro- and microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation for quantification of muscle oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Englund, Erin K; Rodgers, Zachary B; Langham, Michael C; Mohler, Emile R; Floyd, Thomas F; Wehrli, Felix W

    2017-05-11

    To investigate the relationship between blood flow and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle, a technique called "Velocity and Perfusion, Intravascular Venous Oxygen saturation and T2*" (vPIVOT) is presented. vPIVOT allows the quantification of feeding artery blood flow velocity, perfusion, draining vein oxygen saturation, and muscle T2*, all at 4-s temporal resolution. Together, the measurement of blood flow and oxygen extraction can yield muscle oxygen consumption ( V˙O2) via the Fick principle. In five subjects, vPIVOT-derived results were compared with those obtained from stand-alone sequences during separate ischemia-reperfusion paradigms to investigate the presence of measurement bias. Subsequently, in 10 subjects, vPIVOT was applied to assess muscle hemodynamics and V˙O2 following a bout of dynamic plantar flexion contractions. From the ischemia-reperfusion paradigm, no significant differences were observed between data from vPIVOT and comparison sequences. After exercise, the macrovascular flow response reached a maximum 8 ± 3 s after relaxation; however, perfusion in the gastrocnemius muscle continued to rise for 101 ± 53 s. Peak V˙O2 calculated based on mass-normalized arterial blood flow or perfusion was 15.2 ± 6.7 mL O2 /min/100 g or 6.0 ± 1.9 mL O2 /min/100 g, respectively. vPIVOT is a new method to measure blood flow and oxygen saturation, and therefore to quantify muscle oxygen consumption. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Oxygen production/consumption rates in the upper layer of the northwestern subtropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubono, K.; Suga, T.; Sukigara, C.; Kobayashi, T.; Hosoda, S.

    2010-12-01

    The cycling of nutrients in the subtropical gyre is crucial in sustaining primary production and the biological pump. Recently it has been proposed that subtropical mode water (STMW) and its subduction processes play a major role in sustaining nutrient distribution in the permanent pycnocline in the subtropical gyres and also facilitating nutrient supply to the euphotic zone. It is not easy, however, to describe temporal evolution of nutrients themselves associated with those processes over a few months to a year or so. As an alternative approach, we examine temporal evolution of dissolved oxygen, which increases or decreases associated with the nutrient utilization by primary production or its production by remineralization. We analyze time-series data of dissolved oxygen obtained by profiling floats drifting over several months to a year in the upper layer of the northwestern subtropical North Pacific. The purpose of this study is to document the temporal variation of dissolved oxygen in STMW and its adjacent layers, to estimate oxygen production/consumption rates at each vertical level, and to discuss their implication in nutrient cycle. The dissolved oxygen in the subsurface layer centered at 50-70 m continuously increased over a few months after the formation of the seasonal pycnocline, resulting in a distinctive shallow oxygen maximum (SOM). Since the SOM is insulated from the atmosphere, the net increase in its oxygen concentration must be attributable to biological oxygen production. On the other hand, a continuous decrease in dissolved oxygen over several months is observed in the layer below 100 m probably due to biological consumption. The estimation of the oxygen production/consumption rates is done by applying the least square method for the time series of dissolved oxygen either at each depth or each isopycnal surface. The Net Community Production (NCP) is estimated for the depth range of 0-100m, where the remarkable oxygen increase occurs. The

  10. Acute inhibition of respiratory capacity of muscle reduces peak oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    McAllister, R M; Terjung, R L

    1990-12-01

    Electron transport capacity of skeletal muscle was inhibited in situ in an acute dose-dependent manner with myxothiazol, a tight-binding inhibitor of ubiquinone-cytochrome c reductase, complex III of the respiratory chain. Peak oxygen consumption of rat hindlimb muscle was determined via consecutive 10-min isometric contraction (100 ms at 100 Hz) periods of increasing energy demands (4, 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 tetani/min), using an isolated hindlimb preparation perfused with a high oxygen delivery (approximately 6-8 mumol.min-1.g-1). Peak oxygen consumption decreased from 4.61 +/- 0.19 mumol.min-1.g-1 (control) in a dose-dependent manner to 0.73 +/- 0.07 mumol.min-1.g-1 at 0.50 microM myxothiazol in blood. Oxygen extraction decreased from 65 to 12% of delivered oxygen. Furthermore, the reduction in peak respiratory rate became evident at lower energy demands of the contraction sequence. Myxothiazol inhibition of respiration was not dependent on the presence of muscle contractions but was evident when mitochondria were uncoupled with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. A 50% effective dosage (ED50) of 0.21 microM myxothiazol for inhibition of peak oxygen consumption closely resembled the inhibition of NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity (ED50 of 0.27 microM) determined from homogenates of the same muscles. This suggests that the peak oxygen consumption of skeletal muscle is tightly coupled to the capacity for electron transport evaluated by flux through NADH-cytochrome c reductase. If the enzyme activity measured in vitro correctly represents available enzymatic capacity within contracting muscle, approximately 75% of electron transport capacity for handling reducing equivalents generated from NADH is utilized during peak oxygen consumption of rat hindlimb muscle contracting in situ.

  11. Regional Cell Density Distribution and Oxygen Consumption Rates in Porcine TMJ Discs: An Explant Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jonathan; Shi, Changcheng; Cisewski, Sarah; Zhang, Lixia; Kern, Michael J.; Yao, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the regional cell density distribution and basal oxygen consumption rates (based on tissue volume and cell number) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs and further examine the impact of oxygen tension on these rates. Design TMJ discs from pigs aged 6–8 months were divided into five regions: anterior, intermediate, posterior, lateral and medial. The cell density was determined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The change in oxygen tension was recorded while TMJ disc explants were cultured in sealed metabolism chambers. The volume based oxygen consumption rate of explants was determined by theoretical curve fitting of the recoded oxygen tension data with the Michaelis-Menten equation. The rate on a per-cell basis was calculated based on the cell density measurements and volume based rate measured in another group of discs. Results The overall cell density (mean, 95% CI) was 51.3(21.3–81.3)×106cells/mL wet tissue. Along the anteroposterior axis, the anterior band had 25.5% higher cell density than the intermediate zone (p<0.02) and 29.1% higher than the posterior band (p<0.008). Along the mediolateral axes, the medial region had 26.2% higher cell density than the intermediate zone (p<0.04) and 25.4% higher than the lateral region (p<0.045). The overall volume and cell based maximum oxygen consumption rates were 1.44(0.44–2.44) μmol/mL wet tissue/hr and 28.7(12.2–45.2) nmol/106 cells/hr, respectively. The central regions (intermediate, lateral, and medial) had significantly higher volume based (p<0.02) and cell based (p<0.005) oxygen consumption rates than the anterior and posterior bands. At high oxygen tension, the oxygen consumption rate remained constant, but dropped as oxygen tension fell below 5%. Conclusions The TMJ disc had higher cell density and oxygen consumption rates than articular cartilage reported in the literature. These results suggest that a steeper oxygen gradient may exist in the TMJ disc and may be

  12. Oxygen Consumption of Tilapia and Preliminary Mass Flows through a Prototype Closed Aquaculture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Matthew S.; Bauer, Clarence F.

    1994-01-01

    Performance of NASA's prototype CELSS Breadboard Project Closed Aquaculture System was evaluated by estimating gas exchange quantification and preliminary carbon and nitrogen balances. The total system oxygen consumption rate was 535 mg/hr kg/fish (cv = 30%) when stocked with Tilapia aurea populations (fresh weights of 97 +/- 19 to 147 +/- 36 g/fish for various trials). Oxygen consumption by T. aurea (260 mg/hr kg/fish) contributed to approximately one-half of total system demand. Continuous carbon dioxide quantification methods were analyzed using the,relation of carbon dioxide to oxygen consumption. Overall food conversion rates averaged 18.2 +/- 3.2%. Major pathways for nitrogen and carbon in the system were described with preliminary mass closure of 60-80% and 60% for nitrogen and carbon.

  13. On the influence of topographic factors upon the oxygen consumption rate in sill basins of fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aure, Jan; Stigebrandt, Anders

    1989-01-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption has been estimated for 29 different sill basins of fjords, all located in a relatively small area of the Norwegian west coast. It is found that CONS, the volume mean rate of oxygen consumption in a sill basin (i.e. below the sill level), is inversely proportional to the mean depth, Hb, of the sill basin. In addition it is demonstrated that CONS decreases with increasing sill depth, Ht, in an approximately linear fashion. Our results are compatible with a regionally horizontally homogeneous and downward decreasing vertical flux of organic carbon. Based on data from the present set of sill basins, an empirical formula has been derived for CONS as a function of Ht and Hb. This may be looked upon as a regionally valid empirical fjord model which may be used to determine whether or not the oxygen consumption in a sill basin is 'normal'.

  14. Cardiac output assessment using oxygen consumption estimated from the left ventricular pressure-volume area.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C; Bertolotti, Alejandro M; Gómez, Carmen B; Rodríguez Correa, Carlos A; Favaloro, Roberto R

    2010-01-01

    Use of a majority of structural variables (age, sex, height) to estimate oxygen consumption in the calculation of cardiac output (CO) by the Fick principle does not account for changes in physiological conditions. To improve this limitation, oxygen consumption was estimated based on the left ventricular pressure-volume area. A pilot study with 10 patients undergoing right cardiac catheterization showed that this approach was successful to estimate CO (r=0,73, vs. thermodilution measured CO). Further essays changing end-diastolic-volume in the pressure-volume area formula by body weight or body surface area showed that this last yielded the best correlation with the thermodilution measured CO (slope=1, ordinate =0.01 and r=0.93). These preliminary results indicate that use of a formula originated from the pressure-volume-area concept is a good alternative to estimate oxygen consumption for CO calculation.

  15. Development of a new clinically applicable device for embryo evaluation which measures embryo oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hiroki; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Shiga, Naomi; Takahashi, Aiko; Ihara, Motomasa; Ishibashi, Masumi; Nishimoto, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Zen; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro; Igarashi, Hideki; Takahashi, Toshifumi; Fukui, Atsushi; Suganuma, Ryota; Tachibana, Masahito; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2016-10-01

    Does a new system-the chip-sensing embryo respiration monitoring system (CERMs)-enable evaluation of embryo viability for potential application in a clinical IVF setting? The system enabled the oxygen consumption rate of spheroids, bovine embryos and frozen-thawed human embryos to be measured, and this rate corresponded to the developmental potential of embryos. To date, no reliable and clinically suitable objective evaluation methods for embryos are available, which circumvent the differences in inter-observer subjective view. Existing systems such as the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) technique, which enables the measurement of oxygen consumption rate in embryos, need improvement in usability before they can be applied to a clinical setting. This is a prospective original research study. The feasibility of measuring the oxygen consumption rate was assessed using CERMs for 9 spheroids, 9 bovine embryos and 30 redundant frozen-thawed human embryos. The endpoints for the study were whether CERMs could detect a dissolved oxygen gradient with high sensitivity, had comparable accuracy to the SECM measuring system with improved usability, and could predict the development of an embryo to a blastocyst by measuring the oxygen consumption rate. The relationship between the oxygen consumption rate and standard morphological evaluation was also examined. We developed a new CERMs, which enables the oxygen consumption rate to be measured automatically using an electrochemical method. The device was initially used for measuring a dissolved oxygen concentration gradient in order to calculate oxygen consumption rate using nine spheroids. Next, we evaluated data correlation between the CERMs and the SECM measuring systems using nine bovine embryos. Finally, the oxygen consumption rates of 30 human embryos, which were frozen-thawed on 2nd day after fertilization, were measured by CERMs at 6, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after thawing with standard morphological evaluation

  16. Effect of blood donation on maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, L; Dahl, T; Boone, T

    2006-12-01

    This study determined the effect of donating one unit of blood on various physiological parameters associated with a VO2(max) test. Ten healthy, male subjects (23+/-4 years, 178+/-7.6 cm, 74.4+/-12.3 kg) completed a VO2(max) test 24 h before donating one unit of blood (~500 mL) and 24 h after donating blood. The Bruce protocol was used to determine the subjects' VO2(max). Physiological responses were measured at the end of the VO2(max) test. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine if there were significant (P<0.05) differences in the subjects' physiological responses between the VO2(max) before and after blood donation. Significant differences were found in VO2(max) (mean+/-SD, 3.18+/-0.74 vs 2.87+/-0.53 L.min(-1)), cardiac output (Q, 25+/-5 vs 22.5+/-3.3 L.min(-1)), stroke volume (SV, 134+/-37 vs 121+/-22 mL.beat(-1)), delivery of oxygen (DO(2), 5+/-.87 vs 3.97+/-.68 L.min(-1)), and hemoglobin concentration (Hb, 153+/-12 vs 135+/-16 gm.L(-1)). No significant changes were observed for heart rate (HR); arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO(2) diff), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). These findings indicate that donating one unit of blood decreased VO2(max) due to the decrease in Q, which resulted from the decrease in SV since HR was unchanged. The lower VO2(max) along with the decrease in DO(2) would be expected to have a negative effect on athletic performance.

  17. TEMPERATURE CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF GERMINATING SEEDS OF LUPINUS ALBUS AND ZEA MAYS

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Pei-Sung

    1931-01-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption by germinating seeds of Lupinus albus and of Zea mays was studied as a function of temperature (7–26°C.). The Warburg manometer technique was used, with slight modifications. Above and below a critical temperature at 19.5°C. the temperature characteristic for oxygen consumption by Lupinus albus was found to be µ = 11,700± and 16,600 respectively. The same critical temperature was encountered in the case of Zea mays, with temperature characteristics µ = 13,100± above and µ = 21,050 below that temperature. PMID:19872612

  18. Probing oxygen consumption in epileptic brain slices with QDs-based FRET sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunfeng; Ingram, Justin; Schiff, Steven; Xu, Jian; Xiao, Min

    2011-02-01

    We developed ratiometric optical oxygen sensors to probe the oxygen consumption during epileptic events in rat brain slices. The oxygen sensors consist of the sensing part of phosphorescence dyes (Platinum (II) octaethylporphine ketone) and reference part of nanocystal quantum dots (NQDs) embedded in polymer blends, with pre-designed excitation through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from NQDs to the oxygen sensitive dyes (OSDs). The ratiometric FRET sensors with fast temporal response and excellent bio-compatibility are suitable for real time quantitative dissolved oxygen (D.O.) probes in biological microenvironment. Coating the sensors onto the micro-pipettes, we performed simultaneous oxygen probes at pyramidal and oriens layers in rat hippocampal CA1. Different spatiotemporal patterns with maximum D.O. decreases of 9.9+/-1.1 mg/L and 4.9+/-0.7 mg/L during seizure events were observed in pyramidal and oriens layers, respectively.

  19. Effect of Rocker Shoe Radius on Oxygen Consumption Rate in Young Able-bodied Persons

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Andrew H.; Wang, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    We studied oxygen consumption rate of eleven young able-bodied persons walking at self-selected speed with five different pairs of shoes: one regular pair without rocker soles (REG) and four pairs with uniform hardness (35–40 shore A durometer) rocker soles of different radii (25% of leg length (LL) (R25), 40% LL (R40), 55% LL (R55), and infinite radius (FLAT)). Rocker soled shoes in the study were developed to provide similar vertical lift (three inches higher than the REG shoes condition). Oxygen consumption rate was significantly affected by the use of the different shoes (p<0.001) and pairwise comparisons indicated that persons consumed significantly less oxygen (per minute per kilogram of body mass) when walking on the R40 shoes compared with both the FLAT (p<0.001) and REG (p=0.021) shoe conditions. Oxygen consumption was also significantly less for the R25 shoes compared with the FLAT shoes (p=0.005) and for the R55 shoes compared with FLAT shoes (p=0.027). The three inch lift on the FLAT shoe did not cause a significant change in oxygen consumption compared to the shoe without the lift (REG). PMID:21371713

  20. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  1. Oxygen consumption, ventilatory frequency and heart rate of lampreys (Lampetra fluviatilis) during their spawning run.

    PubMed

    Claridge, P N; Potter, I C

    1975-08-01

    1. The standard rate of oxygen consumption, ventilatory frequency and heart rate of adult Lampetra fluviatilis were measured during the light phase of the photoperiod and at times corresponding to various stages in the upstream migration. 2. All three parameters increased during the spawning run but only in mature individuals were significant differences found between the sexes. 3. The regression coefficients for the logarithmic relationship between oxygen consumption and body weight of immature animals were 0.912 and 0.925 at 9.5 and 16 degrees C respectively. 4. Both the standard rate of oxygen consumption and the amount of oxygen taken up during activity increased greatly during the hours of darkness. 5. Oxygen consumption, ventilatory frequency and, to a lesser extent, heart rate increased significantly at 9.5 degrees C over the 100-20% range of saturation with air. 6. Below 20% saturation with air, lampreys no longer remained attached by their oral disc for prolonged periods and the ventilatory frequency rose even more rapidly to reach a maximum of 175 beats/min at 12.5%. Exposure to 7.5% resulted in death within 5-8 h.

  2. Effect of rocker shoe radius on oxygen consumption rate in young able-bodied persons.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Andrew H; Wang, Charles C

    2011-04-07

    We studied oxygen consumption rate of eleven young able-bodied persons walking at self-selected speed with five different pairs of shoes: one regular pair without rocker soles (REG) and four pairs with uniform hardness (35-40 shore A durometer) rocker soles of different radii (25% of leg length (LL) (R25), 40% LL (R40), 55% LL (R55), and infinite radius (FLAT)). Rocker soled shoes in the study were developed to provide similar vertical lift (three inches higher than the REG shoes condition). Oxygen consumption rate was significantly affected by the use of the different shoes (p<0.001) and pairwise comparisons indicated that persons consumed significantly less oxygen (per minute per kilogram of body mass) when walking on the R40 shoes when compared with both the FLAT (p<0.001) and REG (p=0.021) shoe conditions. Oxygen consumption was also significantly less for the R25 shoes compared with the FLAT shoes (p=0.005) and for the R55 shoes compared with FLAT shoes (p=0.027). The three-inch lift on the FLAT shoe did not cause a significant change in oxygen consumption compared to the shoe without the lift (REG).

  3. [Oxygen consumption rate and effects of hypoxia stress on enzyme activities of Sepiella maindron].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-lin; Wu, Dan-hua; Dong, Tian-ye; Jiang, Xia-min

    2008-11-01

    The oxygen consumption rate and suffocation point of Sepiella maindroni were determined through the measurement of dissolved oxygen in control and experimental respiration chambers by Winkler's method, and the changes of S. maindroni enzyme activities under different levels of hypoxia stress were studied. The results indicated that the oxygen consumption rate of S. maindroni exhibited an obvious diurnal fluctuation of 'up-down-up-down', and positively correlated with water temperature (16 degrees C-28 degrees C) and illumination (3-500 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1)) while negatively correlated with water pH (6.25-9.25). With increasing water salinity from 18.1 to 29.8, the oxygen consumption rate had a variation of 'up-down-up', being the lowest at salinity 24. 8. Female S. maindroni had a higher oxygen consumption rate than male S. maindroni. The suffocation point of S. maindroni decreased with its increasing body mass, and that of (38.70 +/- 0.52) g in mass was (0.9427 +/- 0.0318) mg x L(-1). With the increase of hypoxia stress, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) decreased after an initial increase, lipase activity decreased, protease activity had a variation of 'decrease-increase-decrease', and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity had a trend of increasing first and decreasing then. The enzyme activities were higher under hypoxia stress than under normal conditions.

  4. Impact of reduced cytochrome oxidase activity on peak oxygen consumption of muscle.

    PubMed

    McAllister, R M; Ogilvie, R W; Terjung, R L

    1990-07-01

    The impact of reduced muscle oxidative capacity on peak oxygen consumption and isometric performance was evaluated using an isolated rat hindlimb preparation perfused with a high oxygen delivery. Capacity for electron transport was reduced with chloramphenicol (CAP), an inhibitor of mitochondrial gene-coded protein synthesis. The activity of cytochrome oxidase, a mitochondrial cristae component, was reduced approximately 45% (P less than 0.005) in the mixed-fiber-type plantaris muscle. Several facets of muscle remodeling were also evident with the 10- to 14-day CAP treatment, including decreased citrate synthase activity, increased capillarity, and increased numbers of type IIc fibers. Perfusion of CAP (n = 6) and control (n = 7) rat hindlimbs of similar size with similar total flows (10-11 ml/min) and oxygen contents (20-21 vol%) resulted in similarly high oxygen deliveries to contracting muscles of the hindlimbs (CAP, 9.66 +/- 0.83 mumols.min-1.g-1; control, 8.74 +/- 0.75). Performance of the gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus group declined in a similar fashion for both groups during increasingly intense near-steady-state tetanic contraction (100 ms at 100 Hz) conditions of 4, 8, 15, 30, 45, and 60 per minute. Oxygen consumption was similar for both groups at rest and increased similarly at each contraction condition. Peak oxygen consumption was not different between CAP (5.34 +/- 0.55 mumols.min-1.g-1) and control (5.74 +/- 0.43) groups and required only 56-68% of the oxygen delivered. This implies that rat skeletal muscle can suffer a significant reduction in its electron transport capacity without impairing peak oxygen consumption and muscle performance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Measurement of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in mouse primary neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sofia M; Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Danial, Nika N

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of microplate-based assays that measure extracellular fluxes in intact, living cells has revolutionized the field of cellular bioenergetics. Here, we describe a method for real time assessment of mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates in primary mouse cortical neurons and astrocytes. This method requires the Extracellular Flux Analyzer Instrument (XF24, Seahorse Biosciences), which uses fluorescent oxygen sensors in a microplate assay format.

  6. Exercise capacity and peak oxygen consumption in asymptomatic patients with chronic aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Broch, Kaspar; Urheim, Stig; Massey, Richard; Stueflotten, Wenche; Fosså, Kristian; Hopp, Einar; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2016-11-15

    In patients with chronic, hemodynamically significant aortic regurgitation (AR), a long period of left ventricular remodeling usually occurs prior to the development of symptoms or left ventricular dysfunction. The value of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in patients with asymptomatic AR is not established. Sixty-six asymptomatic patients aged 44±14 years with hemodynamically significant, chronic AR and no indication for aortic valve replacement were evaluated by echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and exercise testing with measurement of peak oxygen consumption. The average left ventricular end diastolic volume was 244±62ml and the aortic regurgitant fraction 34±13%. At an average of 35.8±8.9ml/kg/min, peak oxygen consumption was well preserved. As in healthy individuals, a high peak oxygen consumption was associated with a relatively large LV end diastolic volume (r=0.51; p<0.001) and a low resting heart rate (r=-0.37; p=0.002). The aortic regurgitant fraction was not predictive of maximum oxygen consumption. Higher levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were independently associated with poorer exercise capacity and oxygen uptake (adjusted β -0.35; p=0.003). Our results suggest that in asymptomatic patients with moderate to severe AR and moderately dilated left ventricles, remodeling is primarily adaptive. An increased level of NT-proBNP is associated with a reduced capacity for work and reduced oxygen consumption, possibly heralding the onset of adverse remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparison between laddermill and treadmill maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, M A; Gonzalez, V; Rodriguez, B; Palenciano, L

    1997-01-01

    Maximal O2 consumption (VO2max) is an index of the capacity for work over an 8 h workshift. Running on a treadmill is the most common method of eliciting it, because it is an easy, natural exercise, and also, by engaging large muscle masses, larger values are obtained than by other exercises. It has been claimed, however, that climbing a laddermill elicits a still higher VO2max, probably because more muscle mass is apparently engaged (legs + arms) than on the treadmill (legs only). However, no data in support of this claim have been presented. To see if differences exist, we conducted progressive tests to exhaustion on 44 active coal miners, on a laddermill (slant angle 75 degrees, vertical separation of rungs 25 cm) and on a treadmill set at a 5% gradient. The subjects' mean (range) age was 37.4 (31-47) years, height 174.3 (164-187) cm, body mass 82.2 (64-103) kg. Mean (range) VO2max on the laddermill was 2.83 (2.31-3.64) l x min(-1) and 2.98 (2.03-4.22) l x min(-1) on the treadmill (P < 0.01, Student's paired t-test). Mean (range) of maximal heart rate f(cmax) (beats x min(-1)) on the laddermill and on the treadmill were 181.0 (161-194) and 181.3 (162-195), respectively (NS). Laddermill:treadmill VO2max was negatively related to both treadmill VO2max x kg body mass(-1) (r = -0.410, P < 0.01) and body mass (r = -0.409, P < 0.01). Laddermill:treadmill f(cmax) was negatively related to treadmill VO2max x kg body mass(-1) (r = -0.367, P < 0.02) but not to body mass (r = -0.166, P = 0.28). Our data would suggest that for fitter subjects (VO2max > 2.6 l x min or VO2max kg body mass(-1) > 30 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1)) and/or higher body masses (> 70 kg), exercise on the laddermill is not dynamic enough to elicit a VO2max as high as on the treadmill. For such subjects, treadmill VO2max would overestimate exercise capacity for jobs requiring a fair amount of climbing ladders or ladder-like structures.

  8. A novel approach to the assess biotic oxygen consumption in marine sediment communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Victor; Queiros, Ana; Widdicombe, Stephen; Stephens, Nick; Lessin, Gennadi; Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Bioturbation , the mixing of the sediment matrix by burrowing animals impacts sediment metabolism, including respiration through redistribution of particulate organics, changes in bacterial biota diversity and acitivity, as well as via burrowing fauna's own metabolism. Bioturbation, reflecting faunal activity, is also a proxy for the general sedimentary ecosystem health, and can be impacted by many of emerging marine environmental issues such as ocean acidification, warming and the occurrence of heat waves. Sedimentary oxygen consumption is often taken as a proxy for the activity of bioturbating fauna, but determining baselines can be difficult because of the confounding effects of other fauna and microbes present in sediments, as well as irnorganic processes that consume oxygen. Limitations therefore exist in current methodologies, and numerous confounding factors are hampering progress in this area. Here, we present novel method for the assessment of sediment respiration which is expected to be affected only by the biogenic oxygen consumption (namely aerobic respiration). As long as tracer reduction "immune" to inorganic oxygen consumption, so that measurements using this method can be used, alongside traditional methods, to decouple biological respiration from inorganic oxygen consumption reactions. The tracer is easily detectable, non-toxic and can be applied in systems with constant oxygen supply. The latter allow for incubation without the need to to work with unsealed experimental units, bringing procedural advantage over traditional methods. Consequently assessed bioturbating fauna is not exposed to hypoxia and additional stress. Here, we had applied system for the first time to investigate impacts of a common North-Atlantic bioturbator, the brittle star Amphiura filiformis, - on respiration of marine sediments. Two series of experiments were conducted with animals and sediment collected from Cawsand Bay, Plymouth, UK Preliminary results show that tracer

  9. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  10. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V˙O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V˙O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). The rBF and rV˙O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V˙O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  11. Metabolic oxygen consumption measurement with a single-cell biosensor after particle microbeam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Messerli, Mark; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Hei, Tom K.; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A noninvasive, self-referencing biosensor/probe system has been integrated into the Columbia University Radiological Research Accelerator Facility Microbeam II end station. A single-cell oxygen consumption measurement has been conducted with this type of oxygen probe in 37°C Krebs–Ringer Bicarbonate buffer immediately before and after a single-cell microbeam irradiation. It is the first such measurement made for a microbeam irradiation, and a six fold increment of oxygen flux induced during a 15-s period of time has been observed following radiation exposure. The experimental procedure and the results are discussed. PMID:25335641

  12. Coupling Oxygen Consumption with Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Liang, Alexandria D; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-09-15

    A fundamental goal in catalysis is the coupling of multiple reactions to yield a desired product. Enzymes have evolved elegant approaches to address this grand challenge. A salient example is the biological conversion of methane to methanol catalyzed by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. sMMO is a dynamic protein complex of three components: a hydroxylase, a reductase, and a regulatory protein. The active site, a carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron center, is buried inside the 251 kDa hydroxylase component. The enzyme processes four substrates: O2, protons, electrons, and methane. To couple O2 activation to methane oxidation, timely control of substrate access to the active site is critical. Recent studies of sMMO, as well as its homologues in the BMM superfamily, have begun to unravel the mechanism. The emerging and unifying picture reveals that each substrate gains access to the active site along a specific pathway through the hydroxylase. Electrons and protons are delivered via a three-amino-acid pore located adjacent to the diiron center; O2 migrates via a series of hydrophobic cavities; and hydrocarbon substrates reach the active site through a channel or linked set of cavities. The gating of these pathways mediates entry of each substrate to the diiron active site in a timed sequence and is coordinated by dynamic interactions with the other component proteins. The result is coupling of dioxygen consumption with hydrocarbon oxidation, avoiding unproductive oxidation of the reductant rather than the desired hydrocarbon. To initiate catalysis, the reductase delivers two electrons to the diiron(III) center by binding over the pore of the hydroxylase. The regulatory component then displaces the reductase, docking onto the same surface of the hydroxylase. Formation of the hydroxylase-regulatory component complex (i) induces conformational changes of pore residues that may bring protons to the

  13. [Endocellular regulation of oxygen consumption in the neurone of isolated crawfish stretch receptor].

    PubMed

    Zaguskin, S L; Zaguskina, L D; Zaguskina, S S

    2007-01-01

    Morphological correlations of functional regulation of oxygen consumption have been investigated in single of isolated crustacean stretch receptor neuron. The increase in oxygen consumption is promoted by: 1) redistribution of mitochondria and increase in cytochrome oxidase (CO) activity in mitochondria near to the plasmatic membrane; 2) coordination of mitochondria aggregation rhythms with pO2 rhythms in external environment of a cell; 3) reduction of the area with high CO and mitochondria activity, and reduction of the way of oxygen diffusion; 4) increase in CO activity gradient from periphery to the center of the neuron body; 5) carry of oxygen by water current under hydration of the neuron body, and cytoplasm dilution under transition of a part of gel in sol; 6) cyclic changes in the neuron body and hillock sizes ratio determining carry of oxygen by water current into the neuron body, oxygen absorption by mitochondria in the neuron body, and transition of the water released from oxygen from the neuron body into hillock and further into the external environment.

  14. Thermodynamics of the heart: Relation between cardiac output and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mituo; Sakane, Kumiko K.; Bertolotti, Simone A.

    2008-06-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to derive a relation between cardiac output and rate of oxygen consumption. As an example, the relation is used to calculate the cardiac output of a young woman exercising on a treadmill. The results can be understood by undergraduates without any previous knowledge of human physiology.

  15. MODELING NITROGEN-CARBON CYCLING AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model framework is presented for simulating nitrogen and carbon cycling at the sediment–water interface, and predicting oxygen consumption by oxidation reactions inside the sediments. Based on conservation of mass and invoking simplifying assumptions, a coupled system of diffus...

  16. MODELING NITROGEN-CARBON CYCLING AND OXYGEN CONSUMPTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model framework is presented for simulating nitrogen and carbon cycling at the sediment–water interface, and predicting oxygen consumption by oxidation reactions inside the sediments. Based on conservation of mass and invoking simplifying assumptions, a coupled system of diffus...

  17. Effects of cadmium chloride on oxygen consumption and gill morphology of Indian flying barb, Esomus danricus.

    PubMed

    Das, Suchismita; Gupta, Abhik

    2012-11-01

    Effects of three sub lethal concentrations of cadmium chloride (0.636, 0.063 and 0.006 mg l(-1)) on oxygen consumption and gill morphology in Indian flying barb, Esomus danricus (Hamilton-Buchanan), a teleost fish, were studied. When compared to control, 0.636 mg l(-1) of cadmium chloride after 7,14, 21 and 28 day exposure showed a significant decline in rates of oxygen consumption at 32.98, 28.40, 23.88 and 21.69 ml hr(1) 100 g(-1) of tissue, respectively; while, 0.063 mg l(-1) of cadmium chloride for the same exposure durations showed a significant decline in rates of oxygen consumption at 34.28, 29.30, 28.05 and 26.47 ml hr(1)100 g(-1) of tissue, respectively. However, significant decline in the rate of oxygen consumption at 0.006 mg l(-1) of cadmium chloride could be observed from 21st day of exposure. Gill tissue showed various histopathological changes including epithelial lifting, hyperplasia, mucous secretion, marked leucocyte infiltration in the epithelium after 28 days of cadmium chloride exposure.

  18. Methylmalonate inhibits succinate-supported oxygen consumption by interfering with mitochondrial succinate uptake.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, S R; Melo, D R; Schuck, P F; Ferreira, G C; Wajner, M; Castilho, R F

    2008-02-01

    The effect of methylmalonate (MMA) on mitochondrial succinate oxidation has received great attention since it could present an important role in energy metabolism impairment in methylmalonic acidaemia. In the present work, we show that while millimolar concentrations of MMA inhibit succinate-supported oxygen consumption by isolated rat brain or muscle mitochondria, there is no effect when either a pool of NADH-linked substrates or N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylendiamine (TMPD)/ascorbate were used as electron donors. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of MMA, but not of malonate, on succinate-supported brain mitochondrial oxygen consumption was minimized when nonselective permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes was induced by alamethicin. In addition, only a slight inhibitory effect of MMA was observed on succinate-supported oxygen consumption by inside-out submitochondrial particles. In agreement with these observations, brain mitochondrial swelling experiments indicate that MMA is an important inhibitor of succinate transport by the dicarboxylate carrier. Under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of malonate production in MMA-treated mitochondria. We conclude that MMA inhibits succinate-supported mitochondrial oxygen consumption by interfering with the uptake of this substrate. Although succinate generated outside the mitochondria is probably not a sig-nificant contributor to mitochondrial energy generation, the physiopathological implications of MMA-induced inhibition of substrate transport by the mitochondrial dicarboxylate carrier are discussed.

  19. Metabolically Derived human ventilation rates: A revised approach based upon oxygen consumption rates (Final Report) 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to provide a revised approach for calculating an individual's ventilation rate directly from their oxygen consumption rate. This revised approach will be used to update the ventilation rate information in the Exposure Factors Handbook, which serve as...

  20. Oxygen supply and consumption in the retina: implications for studies of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Cringle, Stephen J; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2010-02-01

    A disrupted oxygen environment in the retina of severely premature neonates is thought to be a key factor in the development of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). This review describes our understanding of intraretinal oxygen distribution and consumption in a range of animal models, including species with naturally avascular retinas and models of induced occlusion of the retinal vasculature. The influence of graded systemic hyperoxia on retinal oxygenation is also discussed along with modulation of retinal oxygen metabolism. The differences in retinal oxygenation between developing and mature retinas are also described. Comparisons are made with studies in the monkey retina in order to assess possible similarities in behaviour between rat and human retinas. Pathogenesis mechanism and possible intervention strategies during the diseased processes in ROP are proposed based on our current knowledge.

  1. Effect of bottom water oxygenation on oxygen consumption and benthic biogeochemical processes at the Crimean Shelf (Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, A.; Janssen, F.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Holtappels, M.; Struck, U.; Jessen, G.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxia occurs where oxygen concentrations fall below a physiological threshold of many animals, usually defined as <63 µmol L-1. Oxygen depletion can be caused by anthropogenic influences, such as global warming and eutrophication, but as well occurs naturally due to restricted water exchange in combination with high nutrient loads (e.g. upwelling). Bottom-water oxygen availability not only influences the composition of faunal communities, but is also one of the main factors controlling sediment-water exchange fluxes and organic carbon degradation in the sediment, usually shifting processes towards anaerobic mineralization pathways mediated by microorganisms. The Black Sea is one of the world's largest meromictic marine basins with an anoxic water column below 180m. The outer shelf edge, where anoxic waters meet the seafloor, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the response of benthic ecosystems to hypoxia, including benthic biogeochemical processes. During the MSM 15/1 expedition with the German research vessel MARIA S. MERIAN, the NW area of the Black Sea (Crimean Shelf) was studied. The study was set up to investigate the influence of bottom water oxygenation on, (1) the respective share of fauna-mediated oxygen uptake, microbial respiration, or re-oxidation of reduced compounds formed in the deeper sediments for the total oxygen flux and (2) on the efficiency of benthic biogeochemical cycles. During our study, oxygen consumption and pathways of organic carbon degradation were estimated from benthic chamber incubations, oxygen microprofiles measured in situ, and pore water and solid phase profiles measured on retrieved cores under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic water column conditions. Benthic oxygen fluxes measured in Crimean Shelf sediments in this study were comparable to fluxes from previous in situ and laboratory measurements at similar oxygen concentrations (total fluxes -8 to -12 mmol m-2 d-1; diffusive fluxes: -2 to -5 mmol m-2 d-1) with oxygen

  2. Variation in the link between oxygen consumption and ATP production, and its relevance for animal performance.

    PubMed

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K; Rey, Benjamin; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2015-08-07

    It is often assumed that an animal's metabolic rate can be estimated through measuring the whole-organism oxygen consumption rate. However, oxygen consumption alone is unlikely to be a sufficient marker of energy metabolism in many situations. This is due to the inherent variability in the link between oxidation and phosphorylation; that is, the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generated per molecule of oxygen consumed by mitochondria (P/O ratio). In this article, we describe how the P/O ratio can vary within and among individuals, and in response to a number of environmental parameters, including diet and temperature. As the P/O ratio affects the efficiency of cellular energy production, its variability may have significant consequences for animal performance, such as growth rate and reproductive output. We explore the adaptive significance of such variability and hypothesize that while a reduction in the P/O ratio is energetically costly, it may be associated with advantages in terms of somatic maintenance through reduced production of reactive oxygen species. Finally, we discuss how considering variation in mitochondrial efficiency, together with whole-organism oxygen consumption, can permit a better understanding of the relationship between energy metabolism and life history for studies in evolutionary ecology. © 2015 The Authors.

  3. Variation in the link between oxygen consumption and ATP production, and its relevance for animal performance

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K.; Rey, Benjamin; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2015-01-01

    It is often assumed that an animal's metabolic rate can be estimated through measuring the whole-organism oxygen consumption rate. However, oxygen consumption alone is unlikely to be a sufficient marker of energy metabolism in many situations. This is due to the inherent variability in the link between oxidation and phosphorylation; that is, the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generated per molecule of oxygen consumed by mitochondria (P/O ratio). In this article, we describe how the P/O ratio can vary within and among individuals, and in response to a number of environmental parameters, including diet and temperature. As the P/O ratio affects the efficiency of cellular energy production, its variability may have significant consequences for animal performance, such as growth rate and reproductive output. We explore the adaptive significance of such variability and hypothesize that while a reduction in the P/O ratio is energetically costly, it may be associated with advantages in terms of somatic maintenance through reduced production of reactive oxygen species. Finally, we discuss how considering variation in mitochondrial efficiency, together with whole-organism oxygen consumption, can permit a better understanding of the relationship between energy metabolism and life history for studies in evolutionary ecology. PMID:26203001

  4. Mechanisms controlling the oxygen consumption in experimentally induced hypochloremic alkalosis in calves.

    PubMed

    Cambier, Carole; Clerbaux, Thierry; Amory, Hélène; Detry, Bruno; Florquin, Sandra; Marville, Vincent; Frans, Albert; Gustin, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    The study was carried out on healthy Friesian calves (n = 10) aged between 10 and 30 days. Hypochloremia and alkalosis were induced by intravenous administration of furosemide and isotonic sodium bicarbonate. The venous and arterial blood samples were collected repeatedly. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), hemoglobin and plasmatic chloride concentrations were determined. The red blood cell chloride concentration was also calculated. pH, PCO2 and PO2 were measured in arterial and mixed venous blood. The oxygen equilibrium curve (OEC) was measured in standard conditions. The correspondence of the OEC to the arterial and mixed venous compartments was calculated, taking blood temperature, pH and PCO2 values into account. The oxygen exchange fraction (OEF%), corresponding to the degree of blood desaturation between the arterial and mixed venous compartments and the amount of oxygen released at the tissue level by 100 mL of blood (OEF Vol%) were calculated from the arterial and mixed venous OEC, combined with PO2 and hemoglobin concentration. Oxygen delivery (DO2) was calculated using the arterial oxygen content, the cardiac output measured by thermodilution, and the body weight of the animal. The oxygen consumption (VO2) was derived from the cardiac output, OEF Vol% and body weight values. Despite the plasma hypochloremia, the erythrocyte chloride concentration was not influenced by furosemide and sodium bicarbonate infusion. Due to the alkalosis-induced increase in the 2,3-DPG, the standard OEC was shifted to the right, allowing oxygen to dissociate from hemoglobin more rapidly. These changes opposed the increased affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen induced by alkalosis. Moreover, respiratory acidosis, hemoconcentration, and the slight decrease in the partial oxygen pressure in mixed venous blood (Pvo2) tended to improve the OEF Vol% and maintain the oxygen consumption in a physiological range while the cardiac output, and the oxygen delivery were significantly decreased

  5. Oxygen Consumption by Anaerobic Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Enological Conditions: Effect on Fermentation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Eric; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Blondin, Bruno; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    The anaerobic growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae normally requires the addition of molecular oxygen, which is used to synthesize sterols and unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). A single oxygen pulse can stimulate enological fermentation, but the biochemical pathways involved in this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. We showed that the addition of oxygen (0.3 to 1.5 mg/g [dry mass] of yeast) to a lipid-depleted medium mainly resulted in the synthesis of the sterols and UFAs required for cell growth. However, the addition of oxygen during the stationary phase in a medium containing excess ergosterol and oleic acid increased the specific fermentation rate, increased cell viability, and shortened the fermentation period. Neither the respiratory chain nor de novo protein synthesis was required for these medium- and long-term effects. As de novo lipid synthesis may be involved in ethanol tolerance, we studied the effect of oxygen addition on sterol and UFA auxotrophs (erg1 and ole1 mutants, respectively). Both mutants exhibited normal anaerobic fermentation kinetics. However, only the ole1 mutant strain responded to the oxygen pulse during the stationary phase, suggesting that de novo sterol synthesis is required for the oxygen-induced increase of the specific fermentation rate. In conclusion, the sterol pathway appears to contribute significantly to the oxygen consumption capacities of cells under anaerobic conditions. Nevertheless, we demonstrated the existence of alternative oxygen consumption pathways that are neither linked to the respiratory chain nor linked to heme, sterol, or UFA synthesis. These pathways dissipate the oxygen added during the stationary phase, without affecting the fermentation kinetics. PMID:12513985

  6. The influence of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol and cannabidiol on tissue oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Chiu, P; Karler, R; Craven, C; Olsen, D M; Turkanis, S A

    1975-10-01

    The mechanism of the hypothermia produced in mice by the naturally occurring cannabinoids, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabinol, and cannabidiol, was investigated by evaluating the direct effect of these drugs on the oxygen consumption of tissue homogenates and isolated mitochondria. The tissues studied were brain, liver, skeletal muscle, and heart; the mitochondrial preparations were limited to brain and skeletal muscle. The in-vitro studies included a description of the influence of various cannabinoid vehicles containing Tween 80, ethanol, Pluronic F68, and albumin on the oxygen consumption of tissue preparations. Of these vehicles, only albumin was without effect on all tissues. The other vehicles produced diverse responses, including some that were qualitatively different; the data illustrate that the influence of each vehicle on oxygen consumption must be defined for each tissue employed. In spite of the different vehicle effects, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol generally reduced oxygen consumption of all tissue preparations; however, the vehicles were capable of modifying the dose-effect relationship. The results of all three drugs prepared in Pluronic F68 on brain and skeletal muscle indicated that the cannabinoids generally cause a dose-related depression of oxygen consumption. The findings demonstrate that the cannabinoids can directly decrease oxidative metabolism of tissue and isolated mitochondria and that a marked response occurs in the concentration range of 1 X 10(-5) to 1 X 10(-4) M. Because these concentrations can exist in tissues following the in-vivo administration of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the results suggest that the depressant effect of the cannabinoids on metabolic rate may contribute to the mechanism of the hypothermia produced by the drugs.

  7. Method for determining oxygen consumption rates of static cultures from microplate measurements of pericellular dissolved oxygen concentration.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Richard D; Dike, Laura E; Haq, Tariq A; Rowley, Jon A; Pitner, J Bruce; Timmins, Mark R

    2004-06-30

    We describe a simple protocol for determining the oxygen consumption of cells in static culture. The protocol is based on a noninvasive oxygen-sensing microplate and a simple mathematical model derived from Fick's Law. The applicability of the model is confirmed by showing the correlation of computed oxygen consumption rate (OCR) values to actual cell densities ascertained by direct cell counting and/or MTT for HL60 and U937 cells cultured in suspension. Correlation between computed OCR and these other indications of cell number was quite good, as long as the cultures were not diffusion-limited for oxygen. The impact of the geometric factors of media depth and well size were confirmed to be consistent with the model. Based on this demonstrated correlation, we also developed a simple, completely noninvasive algorithm for ascertaining the per-cell oxygen utilization rate (OUR), which is the ratio of OCR to cell number, and a fundamental cell characteristic. This is accomplished by correlating the known seed densities to extrapolated determinations of OCR at time zero. Such determinations were performed for numerous cell types, in varying well sizes. Resulting OUR values are consistent with literature values acquired by far more painstaking methods, and ranged from <0.01 fmol.min(-1).cell(-1) for bacteria to 0.1-10 fmol.min(-1).cell(-1) for immortalized mammalian and insect cell lines to >10 fmol.min(-1).cell(-1) for primary hepatocytes. This protocol for determining OCR and OUR is extremely simple and broadly applicable and can afford rapid, informative, and noninvasive insight into the state of the culture. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Oxygen consumption by the isolated smooth muscle of guinea-pig taenia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bülbring, Edith; Golenhofen, K.

    1967-01-01

    1. An apparatus is described for simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and electrical and mechanical activity of isolated smooth muscle preparations. 2. The mean oxygen uptake by the isolated taenia coli of the guinea-pig was 10-20 μl./g/min. 3. In spontaneously active preparations, adrenaline (10-8-10-7 g/ml.) caused, with the inhibition of electrical and mechanical activity, a reduction in oxygen uptake. 4. After prolonged exposure to substrate free solution spontaneous activity ceased periodically. Adrenaline, when applied during a silent period, had no detectable effect on resting oxygen consumption, while readmission of substrate, either glucose or β-hydroxybutyrate, increased oxygen uptake. 5. Adrenaline did not modify the increased oxygen uptake during the initial recovery period when it was given simultaneously with the substrate. However, adrenaline shortened the time interval which elapsed from the addition of substrate until spontaneous activity was resumed, indicating an acceleration of the recovery process. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:16992285

  9. Oxygen consumption and ventilation during simulated escape from an offshore oil platform.

    PubMed

    Ross, J A; Henderson, G D; Howie, R M

    1997-03-01

    Twenty-six male workers from the North Sea offshore oil industry took part in a simulated escape exercise at the Offshore Fire Training Centre. The course was 370 m long and had 19.4 m of vertical ascent and descent using the stairs on simulated offshore structures. Inspired ventilation and oxygen consumption were measured using the P. K. Morgan "Oxylog' and subjects breathed through the apparatus by mouthpiece and one-way valve assembly while wearing a nose clip. On comparison with anthropometric data from larger studies, this sample of the offshore work-force was thought to be representative. The mean duration of the exercise period was 371 s (SD = 24 s, range = 325-424 s). Mean oxygen consumption standing still at the start of the trial was 0.421 min-1 (SD = 0.101 min-1, max. = 0.611 min-1) and mean ventilation 12.351 min-1 (SD = 4.251 min-1, max. = 22.271 min-1). During exercise, the mean oxygen consumption rose to 2.711 min-1 (SD = 0.641 min-1, max = 4.051 min-1) and mean ventilation reached 46.341 min-1 (SD = 15.831 min-1, max = 87.361 min-1) during the fifth minute of exercise. At the end of the exercise period, oxygen consumption returned to resting values after 2 min and ventilation after 3 min. There was no indication of an oxygen debt. Oxygen consumption and ventilation were related to body weight and the maximum figures for ventilation and oxygen consumption were seen in individuals of over the 95th centile for weight who completed the exercise more quickly than other subjects. Draft standards for respiratory protective equipment for use during escape from fire do not specify the breathing volumes identified in this study, and which are considerably higher than those being currently considered. Additionally, the atmospheric conditions near a fire are likely to stimulate ventilation to considerably higher levels than those identified here. Accordingly, such equipment is likely to limit physical performance if a similar intensity of exercise is necessary

  10. Oxygen consumption in the foraging honeybee depends on the reward rate at the food source.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, L; Núñez, J A

    1997-01-01

    Oxygen consumption of the honeybee Apis mellifera ligustica was measured as a function of the flow rate supply of sucrose solution at an automatic feeder located inside a respirometric chamber. Trained bees freely entered the respirometric chamber and collected the sucrose solution supplied. The mean value of the O2 consumption rate per visit increased with the sucrose flow rate, and for a given flow rate, with increasing locomotor activity. However, when no locomotor activity was displayed, O2 consumption also increased with increasing nectar flow rate. Crop load attained at the end of the visit showed a positive relationship with the nectar flow rate; however, for a given flow rate, O2 consumption showed either no correlation or a negative one with the final crop load attained. It is concluded that the energy expenditure of the foraging bee is controlled by a motivational drive whose intensity depends on the reward rate at the food source.

  11. System for measuring oxygen consumption rates of mammalian cells in static culture under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Miyahara, Hirotaka; Ota, Yuri; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) of mammalian cells in hypoxic environments is essential for designing and developing a three-dimensional (3-D) cell culture system. However, OCR measurements under hypoxic conditions are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we developed a system for measuring OCRs at low oxygen levels. The system injects nitrogen gas into the environment and measures the oxygen concentration by an optical oxygen microsensor that consumes no oxygen. The developed system was applied to HepG2 cells in static culture. Specifically, we measured the spatial profiles of the local dissolved oxygen concentration in the medium, then estimated the OCRs of the cells. The OCRs, and also the pericellular oxygen concentrations, decreased nonlinearly as the oxygen partial pressure in the environment decreased from 19% to 1%. The OCRs also depended on the culture period and the matrix used for coating the dish surface. Using this system, we can precisely estimate the OCRs of various cell types under environments that mimic 3-D culture conditions, contributing crucial data for an efficient 3-D culture system design.

  12. [Growth and oxygen consumption in embryonic and early postembryonic development of European pond turtle Emys orbicularis (Reptilia: Emydidae)].

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, I G; Alekseeva, T A; Nechaeva, M V

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on developing eggs of European pond turtle (Emys orbicularis) demonstrated S-shaped changes in the rate of oxygen consumption and body weight during embryonic development. The rate of oxygen consumption and weight progressively increased within 70 days after hatching. During embryogenesis, the rate of oxygen consumption decreased. After hatching, it increased but then decreased to a certain level, which remained constant to the end of the studied period. We observed unidirectional changes in oxygen consumption rate during embryonic period and this pattern was maintained after hatching as well. The coefficients of the allometric relationship between oxygen consumption and body weight were a = 0.33 and k = 0.52 during the embryonic period and a = 0.17 and k = 0.89 during the postembryonic period.

  13. Alteration of oxygen consumption and energy metabolism during repetitive exposure of mice to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lu, G W; Cui, X Y; Zhao, B M

    1999-05-01

    Changes in oxygen consumption, body temperature and energy metabolism were studied while mice were repeatedly exposed to a sealed environment. The average tolerance limits of environmental oxygen level (vol%) and the average oxygen consumption rates (ml/g x min) were exponentially decreased and the average body rectal temperatures (degrees C) were linearly declined while the average tolerable times (min) to hypoxia were linearly increased as animals were repeatedly exposed to hypoxia for 5 runs. The average survival times (min) in sealed environments after administration of normal saline, iodoacetic acid, malonic acid, potassium cyanide, and potassium cyanide plus iodoacetic acid in group exposed repeatedly to hypoxia for three runs were, respectively, 3.1, 3.9, 1.4, 2.6, and 2.8 times those of the control groups that had corresponding administration of the different chemicals, but no exposure to hypoxia. The results indicate that progressive increase in hypoxia tolerance is related to progressively lower rate of oxygen consumption and heat production, and the lowered energy requirement during repetitive exposure to hypoxia is achieved mainly via pathways of the respiratory chain and glycolysis.

  14. Nitrification and its oxygen consumption along the turbid Changjiang River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Sung-Yun; Hsu, Ting-Chang; Jing-Yu Yang, Terence; Liu, Jing-Wen; Xie, Xia-Bing; Zhang, Yao; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Jing; Dai, Minhan; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2013-04-01

    Enhanced nutrients and organic material export from rivers cause severe oxygen consumption, subsequently, hypoxia at the land-ocean boundary resulting in disruption of coastal ecosystem and potentially increasing emission of greenhouse gas. Nitrification is thought to be one of the important oxygen consuming process and the dominant N2O contributor in aquatic environment. By using stable isotope tracer method we determine the nitrification rate (bulk water and >3 μm particle free) and N2O production rate along Changjiang River plume in 2011 August. Community respiration rate was measured to identify the role of nitrification in oxygen consumption. Total suspended material, nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and particulate iron /manganese(acid-leacheable) were measured to explore controlling factors for nitrification. The bulk nitrification rate ranged from undetectable to 4586 nmol L-1 day-1 and peaked at inter salinity (S=29). The nitrous oxide was produced only in river mouth, but the production rate was not high enough to support the water column nitrous oxide concentration. Results implied that the water column nitrification was not the main source of nitrous oxide. The determination of nitrification rate and β-proteobacterial AmoA gene abundance on particle or particle-free fraction showed that nitrification preferred to occur on particles in turbid region. Moreover, the amount of reactive Fe/Mn on suspended particles was found linearly correlated to nitrification rate separately in inner shelf and river mouth. In previous study in sediment Fe/Mn were proposed to be alternative oxidant when oxygen was exhausted. However, in this survey we didn't observe hypoxia. In inner shelf region, the estimated oxygen consumption by nitrification ranged from 0.4% to 317% of total community respiration.The excess oxygen demand indicates the oxygen might not be the only oxidant. Stoichiometrical calculation suggests reactive Fe was sufficient to support nitrification along all

  15. Matching of postcontraction perfusion to oxygen consumption across submaximal contraction intensities in exercising humans.

    PubMed

    Buck, Amanda K W; Elder, Christopher P; Donahue, Manus J; Damon, Bruce M

    2015-08-01

    Studying the magnitude and kinetics of blood flow, oxygen extraction, and oxygen consumption at exercise onset and during the recovery from exercise can lead to insights into both the normal control of metabolism and blood flow and the disturbances to these processes in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the on- and off-kinetics for oxygen delivery, extraction, and consumption as functions of submaximal contraction intensity. Eight healthy subjects performed four 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions, with two at 20% MVC and two at 40% MVC. During one contraction at each intensity, relative perfusion changes were measured by using arterial spin labeling, and the deoxyhemoglobin percentage (%HHb) was estimated using the spin- and gradient-echo sequence and a previously published empirical calibration. For the whole group, the mean perfusion did not increase during contraction. The %HHb increased from ∼28 to 38% during contractions of each intensity, with kinetics well described by an exponential function and mean response times (MRTs) of 22.7 and 21.6 s for 20 and 40% MVC, respectively. Following contraction, perfusion increased ∼2.5-fold. The %HHb, oxygen consumption, and perfusion returned to precontraction levels with MRTs of 27.5, 46.4, and 50.0 s, respectively (20% MVC), and 29.2, 75.3, and 86.0 s, respectively (40% MVC). These data demonstrate in human subjects the varied recovery rates of perfusion and oxygen consumption, along with the similar rates of %HHb recovery, across these exercise intensities.

  16. Low levels of lipopolysaccharide modulate mitochondrial oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Frisard, Madlyn I.; Wu, Yaru; McMillan, Ryan P.; Voelker, Kevin A.; Wahlberg, Kristin A.; Anderson, Angela S.; Boutagy, Nabil; Resendes, Kyle; Ravussin, Eric; Hulver, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We have previously demonstrated that activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in skeletal muscle results in an increased reliance on glucose as an energy source and a concomitant decrease in fatty acid oxidation under basal conditions. Herein, we examined the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the primary ligand for TLR4, on mitochondrial oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle cell culture and isolated mitochondria. Materials/ methods Skeletal muscle cell cultures were exposed to LPS and oxygen consumption was assessed using a Seahorse Bioscience extracellular flux analyzer. Mice were also exposed to LPS and oxygen consumption was assessed in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle. Results Acute LPS exposure resulted in significant reductions in cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP)-stimulated maximal respiration (state 3u) and increased oligomycin induced state 4 (state 4O) respiration in C2C12 and human primary myotubes. These findings were observed in conjunction with increased mRNA of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The LPS-mediated changes in substrate oxidation and maximal mitochondrial respiration were prevented in the presence of the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and catalase, suggesting a potential role of reactive oxygen species in mediating these effects. Mitochondria isolated from red gastrocnemius and quadriceps femoris muscle from mice injected with LPS also demonstrated reduced respiratory control ratio (RCR), and ADP- and FCCP-stimulated respiration. Conclusion LPS exposure in skeletal muscle alters mitochondrial oxygen consumption and substrate preference, which is absent when antioxidants are present. PMID:25528444

  17. Matching of postcontraction perfusion to oxygen consumption across submaximal contraction intensities in exercising humans

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Christopher P.; Donahue, Manus J.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Studying the magnitude and kinetics of blood flow, oxygen extraction, and oxygen consumption at exercise onset and during the recovery from exercise can lead to insights into both the normal control of metabolism and blood flow and the disturbances to these processes in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the on- and off-kinetics for oxygen delivery, extraction, and consumption as functions of submaximal contraction intensity. Eight healthy subjects performed four 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions, with two at 20% MVC and two at 40% MVC. During one contraction at each intensity, relative perfusion changes were measured by using arterial spin labeling, and the deoxyhemoglobin percentage (%HHb) was estimated using the spin- and gradient-echo sequence and a previously published empirical calibration. For the whole group, the mean perfusion did not increase during contraction. The %HHb increased from ∼28 to 38% during contractions of each intensity, with kinetics well described by an exponential function and mean response times (MRTs) of 22.7 and 21.6 s for 20 and 40% MVC, respectively. Following contraction, perfusion increased ∼2.5-fold. The %HHb, oxygen consumption, and perfusion returned to precontraction levels with MRTs of 27.5, 46.4, and 50.0 s, respectively (20% MVC), and 29.2, 75.3, and 86.0 s, respectively (40% MVC). These data demonstrate in human subjects the varied recovery rates of perfusion and oxygen consumption, along with the similar rates of %HHb recovery, across these exercise intensities. PMID:26066829

  18. Fractional Consumption of Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen During the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 25 million kilograms of liquid hydrogen and over 250 million kilograms of liquid oxygen during the 3D-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the cryogenic nature of the propellants, approximately 55% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 30% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liqUid hydrogen and liqUid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  19. Dynamics of oxygen supply and consumption during mainstream large-scale composting in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianfei; Shen, Xiuli; Han, Lujia; Huang, Guangqun

    2016-11-01

    This study characterized some physicochemical and biological parameters to systematically evaluate the dynamics of oxygen supply and consumption during large-scale trough composting in China. The results showed that long active phases, low maximum temperatures, low organic matter losses and high pore methane concentrations were observed in different composting layers. Pore oxygen concentrations in the top, middle and bottom layers maintained <5vol.% for 40, 42 and 45days, respectively, which accounted for more than 89% of the whole period. After each mechanical turning, oxygen was consumed at a stable respiration rate to a concentration of 5vol.% in no more than 99min and remained anaerobic in the subsequent static condition. The daily percentage of time under aerobic condition was no more than 14% of a single day. Therefore, improving FAS, adjusting aeration interval or combining turning with forced aeration was suggested to provide sufficient oxygen during composting.

  20. Effects of rapamycin on cerebral oxygen supply and consumption during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, O Z; Barsoum, S; Vega-Cotto, N M; Jacinto, E; Liu, X; Mellender, S J; Weiss, H R

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to cell growth and survival. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR would increase infarct size and decrease microregional O2 supply/consumption balance after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. This was tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats with middle cerebral artery blockade for 1h and reperfusion for 2h with and without rapamycin (20mg/kg once daily for two days prior to ischemia). Regional cerebral blood flow was determined using a C(14)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Regional small-vessel arterial and venous oxygen saturations were determined microspectrophotometrically. The control ischemic-reperfused cortex had a similar blood flow and O2 consumption to the contralateral cortex. However, microregional O2 supply/consumption balance was significantly reduced in the ischemic-reperfused cortex. Rapamycin significantly increased cerebral O2 consumption and further reduced O2 supply/consumption balance in the reperfused area. This was associated with an increased cortical infarct size (13.5±0.8% control vs. 21.5±0.9% rapamycin). We also found that ischemia-reperfusion increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation, while rapamycin decreased this phosphorylation in both the control and ischemic-reperfused cortex. This suggests that mTOR is important for not only cell survival, but also for the control of oxygen balance after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

  1. Effect of Feeding-Fasting Cycles on Oxygen Consumption and Bioenergetics of Yellow Perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, Steven R.; Travis W. Schaeffer,; Daniel E. Spengler,; Casey W. Schoenebeck,; Michael L. Brown,

    2012-01-01

    We measured growth and oxygen consumption of age-1 yellow perch Perca flavescenssubjected to ad libitum (control) or variable feeding cycles of 2 (i.e., 2 d of feed, 2 d of deprivation), 6, or 12 d for a 72-d period. Individual, female yellow perch (initial weight = 51.9 ± 0.9 g [mean ± SE]) were stocked in 110-L aquaria to provide six replicates per treatment and fed measured rations of live fathead minnow Pimephales promelas. Consumption, absolute growth rate, growth efficiency, and oxygen consumption were similar among feeding regimens. However, growth trajectories for fish on the 2-d cycle were significantly lower than other feed–fast cycles. Hyperphagia occurred in all treatments. Bioenergetics model simulations indicated that consumption was significantly underestimated (t = 5.4, df = 4, P = 0.006), while growth was overestimated (t = −5.5, df = 4, P = 0.005) for fish on the 12-d cycle. However, model errors detected between observed and predicted values were low, ranging from −10.1% to +7.8%. We found that juvenile yellow perch exhibited compensatory growth (CG), but none of the feed–fast treatments resulted in growth overcompensation. Likewise, we found no evidence that respiration rates varied with CG, implying that yellow perch bioenergetics models could be used to predict the effects of feeding history and CG response on food consumption and fish growth.

  2. EFFECTS OF RAPAMYCIN ON CEREBRAL OXYGEN SUPPLY AND CONSUMPTION DURING REPERFUSION AFTER CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    CHI, O. Z.; BARSOUM, S.; VEGA-COTTO, N. M.; JACINTO, E.; LIU, X.; MELLENDER, S. J.; WEISS, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract—Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to cell growth and survival. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR would increase infarct size and decrease microregional O2 supply/consumption balance after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion. This was tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats with middle cerebral artery blockade for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h with and without rapamycin (20 mg/kg once daily for two days prior to ischemia). Regional cerebral blood flow was determined using a C14-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Regional small-vessel arterial and venous oxygen saturations were determined microspectrophotometrically. The control ischemic-reperfused cortex had a similar blood flow and O2 consumption to the contralateral cortex. However, microregional O2 supply/consumption balance was significantly reduced in the ischemic-reperfused cortex. Rapamycin significantly increased cerebral O2 consumption and further reduced O2 supply/consumption balance in the reperfused area. This was associated with an increased cortical infarct size (13.5 ± 0.8% control vs. 21.5 ± 0.9% rapamycin). We also found that ischemia–reperfusion increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation, while rapamycin decreased this phosphorylation in both the control and ischemic-reperfused cortex. This suggests that mTOR is important for not only cell survival, but also for the control of oxygen balance after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion. PMID:26742793

  3. Nitric oxide inhibits succinate dehydrogenase-driven oxygen consumption in potato tuber mitochondria in an oxygen tension-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Vagner; Galina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide) is described as an inhibitor of plant and mammalian respiratory chains owing to its high affinity for COX (cytochrome c oxidase), which hinders the reduction of oxygen to water. In the present study we show that in plant mitochondria NO may interfere with other respiratory complexes as well. We analysed oxygen consumption supported by complex I and/or complex II and/or external NADH dehydrogenase in Percoll-isolated potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria. When mitochondrial respiration was stimulated by succinate, adding the NO donors SNAP (S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine) or DETA-NONOate caused a 70% reduction in oxygen consumption rate in state 3 (stimulated with 1 mM of ADP). This inhibition was followed by a significant increase in the Km value of SDH (succinate dehydrogenase) for succinate (Km of 0.77±0.19 to 34.3±5.9 mM, in the presence of NO). When mitochondrial respiration was stimulated by external NADH dehydrogenase or complex I, NO had no effect on respiration. NO itself and DETA-NONOate had similar effects to SNAP. No significant inhibition of respiration was observed in the absence of ADP. More importantly, SNAP inhibited PTM (potato tuber mitochondria) respiration independently of oxygen tensions, indicating a different kinetic mechanism from that observed in mammalian mitochondria. We also observed, in an FAD reduction assay, that SNAP blocked the intrinsic SDH electron flow in much the same way as TTFA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone), a non-competitive SDH inhibitor. We suggest that NO inhibits SDH in its ubiquinone site or its Fe-S centres. These data indicate that SDH has an alternative site of NO action in plant mitochondria.

  4. Estimating streambed travel times and respiration rates based on temperature and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen consumption is a common proxy for aerobic respiration and novel in situ measurement techniques with high spatial resolution enable an accurate determination of the oxygen distribution in the streambed. The oxygen concentration at a certain location in the streambed depends on the input concentration, the respiration rate, temperature, and the travel time of the infiltrating flowpath. While oxygen concentrations and temperature can directly be measured, respiration rate and travel time must be estimated from the data. We investigated the interplay of these factors using a 6 month long, 5-min resolution dataset collected in a 3rdorder gravel-bed stream. Our objective was twofold, to determine transient rates of hyporheic respiration and to estimate travel times in the streambed based solely on oxygen and temperature measurements. Our results show that temperature and travel time explains ~70% of the variation in oxygen concentration in the streambed. Independent travel times were obtained using natural variations in the electrical conductivity (EC) of the stream water as tracer (µ=4.1 h; σ=2.3 h). By combining these travel times with the oxygen consumption, we calculated a first order respiration rate (µ=9.7 d-1; σ=6.1 d-1). Variations in the calculated respiration rate are largely explained by variations in streambed temperature. An empirical relationship between our respiration rate and temperature agrees with the theoretical Boltzmann-Arrhenius equation. With this relationship, a temperature-based respiration rate can be estimated and used to re-estimate subsurface travel times. The resulting travel times distinctively resemble the EC-derived travel times (R20.47; Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient 0.32). Both calculations of travel time are correlated to stream water levels and increase during discharge events, enhancing the oxygen consumption for these periods. No other physical factors besides temperature were significantly correlated with the respiration

  5. Oxygen consumption of cycle ergometry is nonlinearly related to work rate and pedal rate.

    PubMed

    Londeree, B R; Moffitt-Gerstenberger, J; Padfield, J A; Lottmann, D

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop an equation to predict the oxygen cost of cycle ergometry. Forty subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test on three occasions at 50, 70, or 90 rpm in a counterbalanced order. Work rate was incremented every 5 or 6 min when steady rate values were achieved. To ensure accurate work rates, ergometer resistance was calibrated and flywheel revolutions were electronically measured. Oxygen consumption was measured with a computer interfaced system which provided results every minute. Oxygen consumption (mL.min-1) was the dependent variable, and independent variables were work rate (WR in kgm.min-1), pedal rate (rpm), weight (Kg), and gender (males, 0; females, 1). The following nonlinear equation was selected; VO2 = 0.42.WR1.2 + 0.00061.rpm3 + 6.35.Wt + 0.1136.RPM50.WR-0.10144.RPM90-WR-52-Gender, R2 = 0.9961, Sy.x = 106 mL.min-1, where RPM50: 50 rpm = 1, and RPM90: 90 rpm = 1, else = 0. It was concluded that the oxygen cost of cycle ergometry is nonlinearly related to work rate and pedal rate, linearly related to weight, and that females use less oxygen for a particular work rate.

  6. Analysis and interpretation of microplate-based oxygen consumption and pH data.

    PubMed

    Divakaruni, Ajit S; Paradyse, Alexander; Ferrick, David A; Murphy, Anne N; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Breakthrough technologies to measure cellular oxygen consumption and proton efflux are reigniting the study of cellular energetics by increasing the scope and pace with which discoveries are made. As we learn the variation in metabolism between cell types is large, it is helpful to continually provide additional perspectives and update our roadmap for data interpretation. In that spirit, this chapter provides the following for those conducting microplate-based oxygen consumption experiments: (i) a description of the standard parameters for measuring respiration in intact cells, (ii) a framework for data analysis and normalization, and (iii) examples of measuring respiration in permeabilized cells to follow up results observed with intact cells. Additionally, rate-based measurements of extracellular pH are increasingly used as a qualitative indicator of glycolytic flux. As a resource to help interpret these measurements, this chapter also provides a detailed accounting of proton production during glucose oxidation in the context of plate-based assays.

  7. Rate of oxygen consumption in seasonal and non-seasonal depression.

    PubMed

    Pinchasov, Boris B; Grischin, Oleg V; Putilov, Arcady A

    2002-04-01

    Most depressives suffer from weight loss, anorexia and insomnia, while for winter depressives the typical symptoms are weight gain, carbohydrate craving, overeating, oversleeping and extreme lack of energy. It is important to know whether winter depressives differ from most other depressives on measures of energy regulation. In wintertime, we evaluated the rate of oxygen consumption in relationship to neuro-vegetative depressive symptoms in 92 Siberian women. The seated subjects underwent oxyspirography in the mid-morning (1.5 hours after a standard breakfast). It was found that the oxygen consumption rate was similar in non-depressed women (n = 25) and depressed women with non-seasonal depression (n = 27). The comparatively lower values were obtained in women with winter depression (n = 40). This finding supports the suggestion that the behaviour disturbances typical for winter depression may represent a physiological feedback loop to energy conservation.

  8. Detection of the oxygen consumption rate of migrating zebrafish by electrochemical equalization systems.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Koide, Masahiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Abe, Ryoko; Shiku, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Fumio; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-01-07

    A novel measurement system to determine oxygen consumption rates via respiration in migrating Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been developed. A signal equalization system was adapted to detect oxygen in a chamber with one fish, because typical electrochemical techniques cannot measure respiration activities for migrating organisms. A closed chamber was fabricated using a pipet tip attached to a Pt electrode, and a columnar Vycor glass tip was used as the salt bridge. Pt electrode, which was attached to the chamber with one zebrafish, and Ag electrode were immersed in 10 mM potassium iodide (KI), and both the electrodes were connected externally to form a galvanic cell. Pt and Ag electrodes act as the cathode and anode to reduce oxygen and oxidize silver, respectively, allowing the deposition of insoluble silver iodide (AgI). The AgI acts as the signal source accumulated on the Ag electrode by conversion of oxygen. The amount of AgI deposited on the Ag electrode was determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry. The presence of zebrafish or its embryo led to a decrease in the stripping currents generated by a 10 min conversion of oxygen to AgI. The conversion of oxygen to AgI is disturbed by the migration of the zebrafish and allows the detection of different equalized signals corresponding to respiration activity. The oxygen consumption rates of the zebrafish and its embryo were estimated and determined to be ∼4.1 and 2.4 pmol·s(-1), respectively. The deposited AgI almost completely disappeared with a single stripping process. The signal equalization system provides a method to determine the respiration activities for migrating zebrafish and could be used to estimate environmental risk and for effective drug screening.

  9. Quantification of Oxygen Consumption in Retina Ex Vivo Demonstrates Limited Reserve Capacity of Photoreceptor Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kooragayala, Keshav; Gotoh, Norimoto; Cogliati, Tiziana; Nellissery, Jacob; Kaden, Talia R.; French, Stephanie; Balaban, Robert; Li, Wei; Covian, Raul; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cell death in neurodegeneration occurs at the convergence of diverse metabolic pathways. In the retina, a common underlying mechanism involves mitochondrial dysfunction since photoreceptor homeostasis and survival are highly susceptible to altered aerobic energy metabolism. We sought to develop an assay to directly measure oxygen consumption in intact retina with the goal of identifying alterations in respiration during photoreceptor dysfunction and degeneration. Methods Circular punches of freshly isolated mouse retina, adjacent to the optic nerve head, were used in the microplate-based Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer to measure oxygen consumption. Tissue integrity was evaluated by propidium iodide staining and live imaging. Different substrates were tested for mitochondrial respiration. Basal and maximal respiration were expressed as oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and respectively measured in Ames' medium before and after the addition of mitochondrial uncoupler, BAM15. Results We show that glucose is an essential substrate for retinal mitochondria. At baseline, mitochondria respiration in the intact wild-type retina was close to maximal, with limited reserve capacity. Similar OCR and limited mitochondrial reserve capacity was also observed in cone-only Nrl−/− retina. However, the retina of Pde6brd1/rd1, Cep290rd16/rd16 and Rpgrip1−/− mice, all with dysfunctional or no photoreceptors, had reduced OCR and higher mitochondrial reserve capacity. Conclusions We have optimized a method to directly measure oxygen consumption in acutely isolated, ex vivo mouse retina and demonstrate that photoreceptors have low mitochondrial reserve capacity. Our data provide a plausible explanation for the high vulnerability of photoreceptors to altered energy homeostasis caused by mutations or metabolic challenges. PMID:26747773

  10. Effect of Remifentanil on Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption of Cultured Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Djafarzadeh, Siamak; Vuda, Madhusudanarao; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M.

    2012-01-01

    During sepsis, liver dysfunction is common, and failure of mitochondria to effectively couple oxygen consumption with energy production has been described. In addition to sepsis, pharmacological agents used to treat septic patients may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. This study addressed the hypothesis that remifentanil interacts with hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and their isolated mitochondria were exposed to remifentanil, with or without further exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured by high-resolution respirometry, Caspase-3 protein levels by Western blotting, and cytokine levels by ELISA. Inhibitory κBα (IκBα) phosphorylation, measurement of the cellular ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells were analysed using commercial ELISA kits. Maximal cellular respiration increased after one hour of incubation with remifentanil, and phosphorylation of IκBα occurred, denoting stimulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The effect on cellular respiration was not present at 2, 4, 8 or 16 hours of incubation. Remifentanil increased the isolated mitochondrial respiratory control ratio of complex-I-dependent respiration without interfering with maximal respiration. Preincubation with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone prevented a remifentanil-induced increase in cellular respiration. Remifentanil at 10× higher concentrations than therapeutic reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content without uncoupling oxygen consumption and basal respiration levels. TNF-α exposure reduced respiration of complex-I, -II and -IV, an effect which was prevented by prior remifentanil incubation. Furthermore, prior remifentanil incubation prevented TNF-α-induced IL-6 release of HepG2 cells, and attenuated fragmentation of pro-caspase-3 into cleaved active caspase 3 (an early marker of apoptosis). Our data suggest that remifentanil

  11. The effects of two levels of caffeine ingestion on excess postexercise oxygen consumption in untrained women.

    PubMed

    Donelly, K; McNaughton, L

    1992-01-01

    The effects of two levels of caffeine ingestion (5 mg.kg-1, CAF1, and 10 mg.kg-1, CAF2) on postexercise oxygen consumption was investigated in six untrained women aged 20.5 (SEM 0.5) years. After a test to determine maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) each subject underwent three test sessions at 55% VO2max either in a control condition (CON) or with the CAF1 or CAF2 dose of caffeine. During exercise, oxygen consumption was found to be significantly higher in the CAF1 and CAF2 trials, compared to CON (P < 0.05). During the hour postexercise, oxygen consumption in CAF1 and CAF2 remained significantly higher than in CON (P < 0.05). At all times throughout the exercise, free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations were significantly higher in the caffeine trials than in CON. The FFA concentrations 1 h postexercise (+60 min) were further elevated above resting values for all three trials. Caffeine ingestion caused the greatest elevation above resting levels being 1.89 (SEM 0.19) mmol.l-1 and 1.96 (SEM 0.22) mmol.l-1 for the CAF1 and CAF2 trials, respectively. This was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) than the CON level which was 0.97 (SEM 0.19) mmol.l-1. Respiratory exchange ratio (R) values became significantly lower (P < 0.05) in CAF1 and CAF2 compared to CON at the onset of exercise and continued to decrease during the activity. Throughout the recovery period, R values were significantly lower for both caffeine trials compared to CON. The results of this study would suggest that caffeine is useful in significantly increasing metabolic rate above normal levels in untrained women during, as well as after, exercising at 55% VO2max.

  12. Oxygen consumption and temperature control of premature infants in a double-wall incubator.

    PubMed

    Marks, K H; Lee, C A; Bolan, C D; Maisels, M J

    1981-07-01

    The effects of a double wall in a forced convection-heated incubator were studied on ten naked, nondistressed, premature infants by measuring their mean skin temperature, esophageal temperature, and oxygen consumption when they were in thermal steady state, with, and without, the double wall in place. The incubator air temperature was maintained within the recommended thermoneutral zone during the consecutive paired experiments. Ambient room temperature and relative humidity were constant and the infant's activity (quiet sleep) and postprandial state were the same in both conditions. Together with a significant rise in operative temperature (P less than .05) induced by the double wall (accounted for by a 0.9 C mean increased in incubator wall temperature nearest the baby), their mean skin temperature and esophageal temperatures increased (P less than .025), while a decrease in oxygen consumption occurred in nine of the ten infants (P less than .05). These findings suggest that the double wall reduced radiant and total heat loss from the baby by diminishing the temperature gradient between the skin and incubator surfaces and that metabolic heat production (oxygen consumption) was reduced when the double wall was in place.

  13. [Inhibition of oxygen consumption by annonaceous acetogenins in liver cell respiration and their structure-activity relationship].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Fang; Wei, Xiao-yi; Xie, Hai-hui; Yang, Ren-zhou

    2002-10-01

    To study the inhibition of oxygen consumption by annonaceous acetogenins (ACG) and their structure-activity relationship (SAR). The inhibition of oxygen consumption in chicken liver cell respiration by different structural ACG was studied by using oxygen electrode technique. Six ACG showed potent inhibitory effects like rotenone which was a classical inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, and was more potent than complex IV inhibitor KCN. The IC50 values of six ACG for inhibiting oxygen consumption suggested that bistetrahydrofuran (THF) ACG was 7-11 times more active than non-THF ACG, and A1-type ACG was more potent than A2-type ACG. The terminal gamma-lactone was crucial for the inhibition of oxygen consumption. The distance between THF and gamma-lactone, the hydroxyl groups in the alkyl chain, were the important factors of SAR, but the 4-OH group possibly played some negative role in the exhibit of potent activity.

  14. Effects of fluctuating hypoxia on benthic oxygen consumption in the Black Sea (Crimean shelf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, A.; Donis, D.; Janssen, F.; Jessen, G. L.; Holtappels, M.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Mazlumyan, S.; Sergeeva, N.; Waldmann, C.; Boetius, A.

    2015-08-01

    The outer western Crimean shelf of the Black Sea is a natural laboratory to investigate effects of stable oxic versus varying hypoxic conditions on seafloor biogeochemical processes and benthic community structure. Bottom-water oxygen concentrations ranged from normoxic (175 μmol O2 L-1) and hypoxic (< 63 μmol O2 L-1) or even anoxic/sulfidic conditions within a few kilometers' distance. Variations in oxygen concentrations between 160 and 10 μmol L-1 even occurred within hours close to the chemocline at 134 m water depth. Total oxygen uptake, including diffusive as well as fauna-mediated oxygen consumption, decreased from 15 mmol m-2 d-1 on average in the oxic zone, to 7 mmol m-2 d-1 on average in the hypoxic zone, correlating with changes in macrobenthos composition. Benthic diffusive oxygen uptake rates, comprising respiration of microorganisms and small meiofauna, were similar in oxic and hypoxic zones (on average 4.5 mmol m-2 d-1), but declined to 1.3 mmol m-2 d-1 in bottom waters with oxygen concentrations below 20 μmol L-1. Measurements and modeling of porewater profiles indicated that reoxidation of reduced compounds played only a minor role in diffusive oxygen uptake under the different oxygen conditions, leaving the major fraction to aerobic degradation of organic carbon. Remineralization efficiency decreased from nearly 100 % in the oxic zone, to 50 % in the oxic-hypoxic zone, to 10 % in the hypoxic-anoxic zone. Overall, the faunal remineralization rate was more important, but also more influenced by fluctuating oxygen concentrations, than microbial and geochemical oxidation processes.

  15. Protein expression and oxygen consumption rate of early postmortem mitochondria relate to meat tenderness.

    PubMed

    Grabež, V; Kathri, M; Phung, V; Moe, K M; Slinde, E; Skaugen, M; Saarem, K; Egelandsdal, B

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of muscle fibers from bovine semimembranosus muscle of 41 animals was investigated 3 to 4 h and 3 wk postmortem. Significant relations (P < 0.05) were found between OCR measurements and Warner-Bratzler shear force measurement. Muscles with high mitochondrial OCR after 3 to 4 h and low nonmitochondrial oxygen consumption gave more tender meat. Tender (22.92 ± 2.2 N/cm2) and tough (72.98 ± 7.2 N/cm2) meat samples (4 samples each), separated based on their OCR measurements, were selected for proteomic studies using mitochondria isolated approximately 2.5 h postmortem. Twenty-six differently expressed proteins (P < 0.05) were identified in tender meat and 19 in tough meat. In tender meat, the more prevalent antioxidant and chaperon enzymes may reduce reactive oxygen species and prolong oxygen removal by the electron transport system (ETS). Glycolytic, Krebs cycle, and ETS enzymes were also more abundant in tender meat

  16. Effect of Carbamate, Organophosphate, and Avermectin Nematicides on Oxygen Consumption by Three Meloidogyne spp.

    PubMed

    Nordmeyer, D; Dickson, D W

    1989-10-01

    Second-stage juveniles (I2) of Meloidogyne arenaria consumed more oxygen (P oxygen consumption depended on the nematicide used. Except for aldicarb, there was no differential sensitivity among the three nematode species. Meloidogyne javanica had a greater percentage decrease (P oxygen uptake when treated with aldicarb, relative to the untreated control, than either M. arenaria or M. incognita. Meloidogyne javanica J2 had a greater degree of recovery from fenamiphos or aldicarb intoxication, after subsequent transfer to water, than did M. incognita. This finding may relate to differential sensitivity among Meloidogyne spp. in the field. Degree of respiratory inhibition and loss of nematode motility for M. javanica after exposure to the nematicides were positively correlated (P

  17. ON THE RATE OF OXYGEN CONSUMPTION BY FERTILIZED AND UNFERTILIZED EGGS

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, D. M.

    1931-01-01

    1. The unfertilized eggs of Fucus vesiculosus, in the dark, consume about 5.2 mm.3 O2 per hour per 10 mm.3 eggs. 2. With an illumination of 100,000 foot candles in photosynthesis they liberate more than twice as much oxygen as they consume. 3. The actively swimming antherozoids or sperm of Fucus consume oxygen at a very high rate: 25.5 mm.3 O2 per hour per 10 mm.3 antherozoids. 4. Immediately following fertilization, in the dark, the Fucus eggs increase the rate of oxygen consumption to about 190 per cent of the prefertilization rate. 5. This rate for fertilized eggs, about 190 per cent, is maintained uniformly for 13 or 14 hours, after which there is a barely perceptible rise until 24 hours (when measurements ceased). At 18°C. 50 per cent of the spores in a population have completed the first cell division about 15 hours after fertilization. PMID:19872637

  18. Tide-related biological rhythm in the oxygen consumption rate of ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea uncinata).

    PubMed

    Leiva, Félix P; Niklitschek, Edwin J; Paschke, Kurt; Gebauer, Paulina; Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-07-01

    The effects of tidal height (high and low), acclimation to laboratory conditions (days in captivity) and oxygen level (hypoxia and normoxia) were evaluated in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea uncinata We evaluated the hypothesis that N. uncinata reduces its OCR during low tide and increases it during high tide, regardless of oxygen level or acclimation. Additionally, the existence of an endogenous rhythm in OCR was explored, and we examined whether it synchronized with tidal, diurnal or semidiurnal cycles. Unexpectedly, high OCRs were observed at low tide, during normoxia, in non-acclimated animals. Results from a second, longer experiment under normoxic conditions suggested the presence of a tide-related metabolic rhythm, a response pattern not yet demonstrated for a burrowing decapod. Although rhythms persisted for only 2 days after capture, their period of 12.8 h closely matched the semidiurnal tidal cycle that ghost shrimp confront inside their burrows.

  19. Both superficial and deep zone articular chondrocyte subpopulations exhibit the Crabtree effect but have different basal oxygen consumption rates.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Hannah K; Knight, Martin M; Lee, David A

    2010-06-01

    In the absence of in vivo measurements, the oxygen concentration within articular cartilage is calculated from the balance between cellular oxygen consumption and mass transfer. Current estimates of the oxygen tension within articular cartilage are based on oxygen consumption data from full-depth tissue samples. However, superficial and deep cell subpopulations of articular cartilage express intrinsic metabolic differences. We test the hypothesis that the subpopulations differ with respect to their intrinsic oxygen consumption rate. Chondrocytes from the full cartilage thickness demonstrate enhanced oxygen consumption when deprived of glucose, consistent with the Crabtree phenomena. Chondrocyte subpopulations differ in the prevailing availability of oxygen and glucose, which decrease with distance from the cartilage-synovial fluid interface. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the oxygen consumption of each subpopulation is modulated by nutrient availability, by examining the expression of the Crabtree effect. The deep cells had a greater oxygen consumption than the superficial cells (V(max) of 6.6 compared to 3.2 fmol/cell/h), consistent with our observations of mitochondrial volume (mean values 52.0 vs. 36.4 microm(3)/cell). Both populations expressed the Crabtree phenomena, with oxygen consumption increasing approximately 2.5-fold in response to glycolytic inhibition by glucose deprivation or 2-deoxyglucose. Over 90% of this increase was oligomycin-sensitive and thus accounted for by oxidative phosphorylation. The data contributes towards our understanding of chondrocyte energy metabolism and provides information valuable for the accurate calculation of the oxygen concentration that the cells experience in vivo. The work has further application to the optimisation of bioreactor design and engineered tissues.

  20. Diffusion and Monod kinetics model to determine in vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate during soft contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Luis F; da Silva, Ana R Ferreira; Hernández, Saul I; Aguilella, M; Andrio, Andreu; Mollá, Sergio; Compañ, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the corneal oxygen consumption Qc from non-linear models, using data of oxygen partial pressure or tension (P(O2) ) obtained from in vivo estimation previously reported by other authors. (1) METHODS: Assuming that the cornea is a single homogeneous layer, the oxygen permeability through the cornea will be the same regardless of the type of lens that is available on it. The obtention of the real value of the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max is very important because this parameter is directly related with the gradient pressure profile into the cornea and moreover, the real corneal oxygen consumption is influenced by both anterior and posterior oxygen fluxes. Our calculations give different values for the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max, when different oxygen pressure values (high and low P(O2)) are considered at the interface cornea-tears film. Present results are relevant for the calculation on the partial pressure of oxygen, available at different depths into the corneal tissue behind contact lenses of different oxygen transmissibility. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  1. Diffusion and Monod kinetics model to determine in vivo human corneal oxygen-consumption rate during soft contact lens wear

    PubMed Central

    Del Castillo, Luis F.; da Silva, Ana R. Ferreira; Hernández, Saul I.; Aguilella, M.; Andrio, Andreu; Mollá, Sergio; Compañ, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We present an analysis of the corneal oxygen consumption Qc from non-linear models, using data of oxygen partial pressure or tension (pO2) obtained from in vivo estimation previously reported by other authors.1 Methods Assuming that the cornea is a single homogeneous layer, the oxygen permeability through the cornea will be the same regardless of the type of lens that is available on it. The obtention of the real value of the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max is very important because this parameter is directly related with the gradient pressure profile into the cornea and moreover, the real corneal oxygen consumption is influenced by both anterior and posterior oxygen fluxes. Results Our calculations give different values for the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max, when different oxygen pressure values (high and low pO2) are considered at the interface cornea-tears film. Conclusion Present results are relevant for the calculation on the partial pressure of oxygen, available at different depths into the corneal tissue behind contact lenses of different oxygen transmissibility. PMID:25649636

  2. Acute EPOC response in women to circuit training and treadmill exercise of matched oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Braun, W A; Hawthorne, W E; Markofski, M M

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of circuit training (CT) and treadmill exercise performed at matched rates of oxygen consumption and exercise duration on elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in untrained women, while controlling for the menstrual cycle. Eight, untrained females (31.3 +/- 9.1 years; 2.04 +/- 0.26 l min(-1) estimated VO2max; BMI=24.6+/-3.9 kg/m2) volunteered to participate in the study. Testing was performed during the early follicular phase for each subject to minimize hormonal variability between tests. Subjects performed two exercise sessions approximately 28 days apart. Resting, supine energy expenditure was measured for 30 min preceding exercise and for 1 h after completion of exercise. Respiratory gas exchange data were collected continuously during rest and exercise periods via indirect calorimetry. CT consisted of three sets of eight common resistance exercises. Pre-exercise and exercise oxygen consumption was not different between testing days (P>0.05). Thus, exercise conditions were appropriately matched. Analysis of EPOC data revealed that CT resulted in a significantly higher (p<0.05) oxygen uptake during the first 30 min of recovery (0.27 +/- 0.01 l min(-1) vs 0.23+/-0.01 l min(-1)); though, at 60 min, treatment differences were not present. Mean VO2 remained significantly higher (0.231 +/- 0.01 l min(-1)) than pre-exercise measures (0.193 +/- 0.01 l min(-1)) throughout the 60-min EPOC period (p<0.05). Heart rate, RPE, V(E) and RER were all significantly greater during CT (p<0.05). When exercise VO2 and exercise duration were matched, CT was associated with a greater metabolic disturbance and cost during the early phases of EPOC.

  3. Oxygen consumption and distribution in the Long-Evans rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jennifer C.M.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxygen distribution and consumption in the pigmented Long-Evans rat retina in vivo during dark and light adaptation, and to compare these results to previous work on cat and albino rat. Double-barreled microelectrodes recorded both intraretinal PO2 depth profiles and the electroretinogram (ERG), which was used to identify the boundaries of the retina. Light adaptation decreased photoreceptor oxygen consumption per unit volume (Qav) from 3.0±0.4 ml•100 g−1•min−1 (mean ± SEM) in darkness to 1.8±0.2 ml•100 g−1•min−1 and increased minimum outer retinal PO2 at the inner segments (Pmin) from 17.4±3.0 to 29.9±5.3 mmHg. The effects of light on outer retinal PO2 and Qav were similar to those previously observed in cat, monkey, and albino rats; however, dark-adapted Pmin was higher in rat than cat. The parameters derived from fitting the oxygen diffusion model to the rat data were compared to those from cat. Oxygen consumption of the inner segments (Q2) and choroidal PO2 (PC) in rat and cat were similar. Pmin was higher in rat than in cat for two reasons: first, rat photoreceptors have a shorter oxygen consuming region; and second, the retinal circulation supplied a greater fraction of consumed oxygen to rat photoreceptors. The average PO2 across the inner retina (PIR) was not different in dark adaptation (25.4±4.8 mm Hg) and light adaptation (28.8±5.4 mmHg) when measured from PO2 profiles. However, with the microelectrode stationary at 9–18% retinal depth, a small consistent decrease in PO2 occurred during illumination. Flickering light at 6 Hz decreased inner retinal PO2 significantly more than an equivalent steady illumination, suggesting that changes in blood flow did not completely compensate for increased metabolism. This study comprehensively characterized rat retinal oxygenation in both light and dark, and determined the similarities and differences between rat and cat retinas. PMID:22828049

  4. Cardiac output, oxygen consumption and arteriovenous oxygen difference following a sudden rise in exercise level in humans.

    PubMed Central

    De Cort, S C; Innes, J A; Barstow, T J; Guz, A

    1991-01-01

    1. To investigate the relative contributions of increases in cardiac output and arteriovenous oxygen difference to the increase in oxygen consumption during exercise, the ventilatory and cardiovascular responses to a sudden transition from unloaded cycling to 70 or 80 W were measured in six normal healthy subjects. 2. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured breath-by-breath and corrected for changes in lung gas stores. Cardiac output (Q) was measured beat-by-beat using pulsed Doppler ultrasound, and blood pressure was measured beat-by-beat using a non-invasive finger cuff (Finapres). All data were calculated off-line, second-by-second. 3. Arteriovenous oxygen difference (A-VO2) was calculated from Q and VO2 using the Fick Principle. Left ventricular afterload was calculated by dividing Q by mean blood pressure. 4. The data for Q and VO2 were closely fitted by single exponential curves (mean r2 0.84 and 0.90 respectively; r is the correlation coefficient). These curves yielded mean time constants for the increases in Q and VO2 of 28 and 55 s respectively following the increase in exercise level. In each individual subject, the time course of adjustment of Q was faster than that of VO2. There was a mean lag of 15 s from the start of the new exercise level before the derived A-V O2 began to increase; the mean time constant for A-V O2 was 57 s. 5. If A-V O2 had remained constant, the observed rise in Q alone would have resulted in an average of 87% of the increase in VO2 which was observed after 5 s. If Q had remained constant, the observed increase in A-V O2 would have led to only 8% of the actual increase in VO2 after 5 s. 6. Mean and systolic blood pressure rose and afterload fell immediately after the onset of the increased workload. The time constants of the systolic blood pressure and afterload responses to exercise varied widely and ranged from 37 to 81 and 10 to 26 s respectively (n = 4). 7. We conclude that Q is responsible for most of the early increase in VO2

  5. Enhanced inotropic state of the failing left ventricle by cardiac contractility modulation electrical signals is not associated with increased myocardial oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Butter, Christian; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Schlegl, Michael; Winbeck, Georgia; Fleck, Eckart; Sabbah, Hani N

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies in patients and in dogs with experimentally induced heart failure (HF) showed that electrical signals applied to the failing myocardium during the absolute refractory period improved left ventricular (LV) function. We examined the effects these same cardiac contractility modulating (CCM) electrical signals on myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO(2)) in both patients and dogs with chronic HF. Six dogs with microembolizations-induced HF and 9 HF patients underwent CCM leads and generator (OPTIMIZER II) implantation. After baseline measurements, CCM signals were delivered continuously for 2 hours in dogs and for 30 minutes in patients. MVO(2) was measured before and after CCM therapy. In dogs, CCM therapy increased LV ejection fraction at 2 hours (26 +/- 1 versus 31 +/- 2 %, P = .001) without increasing MVO(2) (257 +/- 41 versus 180 +/- 34 micromol/min). In patients, CCM therapy increased LV peak +dP/dt by 10.1 +/- 1.5 %. As with dogs, the increase in LV function after 30 minutes of CCM therapy was not associated with increased MVO(2) (13.6 +/- 9.7 versus 12.5 +/- 7.2 mL O(2)/min). The study results suggest that unlike cAMP-dependent positive inotropic drugs, the increase in LV function during CCM therapy is elicited without increasing MVO(2).

  6. The oxygen consumption of mammalian non-myelinated nerve fibres at rest and during activity

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, J. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the oxygen consumption of non-myelinated nerve fibres of rabbit desheathed cervical vagus nerves at rest and during activity. 2. The average resting oxygen consumption (Qr) was 0·0924 μmole/g. min at 21° C. Stimulation for 1-3 min at 3/sec caused an extra oxygen consumption (Qs) of 816 p-mole/g.shock. 3. When the frequency of stimulation was increased, to 10/sec and 30/sec, Qs fell. When the frequency was decreased, to 1/sec and 0·3/sec, Qs increased slightly. 4. When the temperature was decreased, Qr fell; when the temperature was increased, Qs also increased. Temperature similarly affected Qs with high frequencies of stimulation, but had relatively little effect on Qs at low frequencies of stimulation. 5. An isolated single shock seemed to produce an increase in oxygen consumption of about 1200 p-mole/g, and this value was largely independent of temperature. 6. When part of the sodium in the Locke solution was replaced by barium, Qr decreased (by 12%) whereas Qs increased (by 87%). 7. Veratrine (1 μg/ml.) increased both Qr (by 142%) and Qs (by 361%). 8. Acetylcholine (1·7 mM) increased Qr (by 32%). 9. When nerves were transferred to potassium-free solutions there was little change in Qr, and Qs fell slightly (by 8%). 10. When the potassium concentration in the Locke solution was increased 4-fold, Qr increased (by 27%). 11. Salicylate (1-10 mM) increased Qr (by 24%) and abolished Qs. 12. When the sodium of Locke solution was replaced by lithium, Qr decreased (by 19%) and Qs was abolished. 13. In sodium-Locke solution ouabain (100 μM) decreased Qr (by 26%) and abolished Qs. In lithium-Locke solution ouabain also decreased Qr (by 28%). 14. All or nearly all of the oxygen consumed at rest or during activity seemed to be used to pump potassium ions into, and sodium ions out of, the axoplasm. 15. The K/O2 ratio during pumping was about 5·0. PMID:6032203

  7. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  8. Rodent Working Heart Model for the Study of Myocardial Performance and Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated working heart models have been used to understand the effects of loading conditions, heart rate and medications on myocardial performance in ways that cannot be accomplished in vivo. For example, inotropic medications commonly also affect preload and afterload, precluding load-independent assessments of their myocardial effects in vivo. Additionally, this model allows for sampling of coronary sinus effluent without contamination from systemic venous return, permitting assessment of myocardial oxygen consumption. Further, the advent of miniaturized pressure-volume catheters has allowed for the precise quantification of markers of both systolic and diastolic performance. We describe a model in which the left ventricle can be studied while performing both volume and pressure work under controlled conditions. In this technique, the heart and lungs of a Sprague-Dawley rat (weight 300-500 g) are removed en bloc under general anesthesia. The aorta is dissected free and cannulated for retrograde perfusion with oxygenated Krebs buffer. The pulmonary arteries and veins are ligated and the lungs removed from the preparation. The left atrium is then incised and cannulated using a separate venous cannula, attached to a preload block. Once this is determined to be leak-free, the left heart is loaded and retrograde perfusion stopped, creating the working heart model. The pulmonary artery is incised and cannulated for collection of coronary effluent and determination of myocardial oxygen consumption. A pressure-volume catheter is placed into the left ventricle either retrograde or through apical puncture. If desired, atrial pacing wires can be placed for more precise control of heart rate. This model allows for precise control of preload (using a left atrial pressure block), afterload (using an afterload block), heart rate (using pacing wires) and oxygen tension (using oxygen mixtures within the perfusate). PMID:27584550

  9. High-CHO diet increases post-exercise oxygen consumption after a supramaximal exercise bout.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, G A; Bertuzzi, R; De-Oliveira, F R; Pires, F O; Lima-Silva, A E

    2016-10-24

    We investigated if carbohydrate (CHO) availability could affect the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after a single supramaximal exercise bout. Five physically active men cycled at 115% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak) until exhaustion with low or high pre-exercise CHO availability. The endogenous CHO stores were manipulated by performing a glycogen-depletion exercise protocol 48 h before the trial, followed by 48 h consuming either a low- (10% CHO) or a high-CHO (80% CHO) diet regime. Compared to the low-CHO diet, the high-CHO diet increased time to exhaustion (3.0±0.6 min vs 4.4±0.6, respectively, P=0.01) and the total O2 consumption during the exercise (6.9±0.9 L and 11.3±2.1, respectively, P=0.01). This was accompanied by a higher EPOC magnitude (4.6±1.8 L vs 6.2±2.8, respectively, P=0.03) and a greater total O2 consumption throughout the session (exercise+recovery: 11.5±2.5 L vs 17.5±4.2, respectively, P=0.01). These results suggest that a single bout of supramaximal exercise performed with high CHO availability increases both exercise and post-exercise energy expenditure.

  10. High-CHO diet increases post-exercise oxygen consumption after a supramaximal exercise bout

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, G.A.; Bertuzzi, R.; De-Oliveira, F.R.; Pires, F.O.; Lima-Silva, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated if carbohydrate (CHO) availability could affect the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after a single supramaximal exercise bout. Five physically active men cycled at 115% of peak oxygen uptake (V̇O2 peak) until exhaustion with low or high pre-exercise CHO availability. The endogenous CHO stores were manipulated by performing a glycogen-depletion exercise protocol 48 h before the trial, followed by 48 h consuming either a low- (10% CHO) or a high-CHO (80% CHO) diet regime. Compared to the low-CHO diet, the high-CHO diet increased time to exhaustion (3.0±0.6 min vs 4.4±0.6, respectively, P=0.01) and the total O2 consumption during the exercise (6.9±0.9 L and 11.3±2.1, respectively, P=0.01). This was accompanied by a higher EPOC magnitude (4.6±1.8 L vs 6.2±2.8, respectively, P=0.03) and a greater total O2 consumption throughout the session (exercise+recovery: 11.5±2.5 L vs 17.5±4.2, respectively, P=0.01). These results suggest that a single bout of supramaximal exercise performed with high CHO availability increases both exercise and post-exercise energy expenditure. PMID:27783812

  11. Spatial mapping of blood flow and oxygen consumption in the human calf muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Sergio; Hoimes, Matthew L.; Casavola, Claudia; Franceschini, Maria-Angela

    2001-05-01

    We have designed a new optical probe to perform spatially resolved measurements of blood flow and oxygen consumption over an area of about 4 x 4 cm2 of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle (calf muscle) of human subjects. The blood flow and the oxygen consumption were measured non- invasively with frequency-domain, near-infrared spectroscopy from the maximum rate of increase of the oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin concentrations in the muscle during venous occlusion. In a preliminary test on one subject, involving measurements at rest and after exercise, we have found that the spatial variability of the measured blood flow and oxygen consumption is significantly greater than the variability of repeated measurements at a given tissue location. We have also observed a strong spatial dependence of the exercise-induced increase in blood flow and oxygen consumption.

  12. A microwell array device capable of measuring single-cell oxygen consumption rates

    PubMed Central

    Molter, Timothy W.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Suchorolski, Martin T.; Strovas, Tim J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2009-01-01

    Due to interest in cell population heterogeneity, the development of new technology and methodologies for studying single cells has dramatically increased in recent years. The ideal single cell measurement system would be high throughput for statistical relevance, would measure the most important cellular parameters, and minimize disruption of normal cell function. We have developed a microwell array device capable of measuring single cell oxygen consumption rates (OCR). This OCR device is able to diffusionally isolate single cells and enables the quantitative measurement of oxygen consumed by a single cell with fmol/min resolution in a non-invasive and relatively high throughput manner. A glass microwell array format containing fixed luminescent sensors allows for future incorporation of additional cellular parameter sensing capabilities. To demonstrate the utility of the OCR device, we determined the oxygen consumption rates of a small group of single cells (12 to 18) for three different cells lines: murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7, human epithelial lung cancer cell line A549, and human Barrett’s esophagus cell line CP-D. PMID:20084089

  13. Vertical diffusion and oxygen consumption during stagnation periods in the deep North Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervakis, Vassilis; Krasakopoulou, Evangelia; Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Souvermezoglou, Ekaterini

    2003-01-01

    Ventilation of the deep basins of the North Aegean Sea takes place during relatively scarce events of massive dense water formation in that region. In the time intervals between such events, the bottom waters of each sub-basin are excluded from interaction with other water masses through advection or isopycnal mixing and the only process that changes their properties is diapycnal mixing with overlying waters. In this work we utilize a simple one-dimensional model in order to estimate the vertical eddy diffusion coefficient Kρ based on the observed rate of change of density and stratification. Vertical diffusivity is estimated for each of three sub-basins of the North Aegean, one of convex shape of the seabed and the other two of concave topography. It is noteworthy that the convex sub-basin exhibited much higher vertical diffusivity than the two concave sub-basins, a fact consistent with theoretical predictions that internal-wave-induced mixing is higher over the former shape of seabed. Furthermore, the estimates of Kρ are exploited in computing the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen through diffusion and the rate of oxygen consumption by decaying organic matter. The different levels of the estimated diffusion and oxygen consumption rates testify to the dynamical and biogeochemical characteristics of each basin.

  14. Relationship between oxygen consumption kinetics and BODE Index in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Beltrame, Thomas; Reis, Michel Silva; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Costa, Dirceu

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present with reduced exercise capacity due to impaired oxygen consumption (VO2), caused primarily by pulmonary dysfunction and deleterious peripheral adaptations. Assuming that COPD patients present with slower VO2 and heart rate (HR) on-kinetics, we hypothesized that this finding is related to disease severity as measured by the BODE Index. In this context, the present study intends to evaluate the relationship between VO2 uptake on-kinetics during high-intensity exercise and the BODE Index in patients with COPD. Methods Twenty males with moderate-to-severe stable COPD and 13 healthy control subjects matched by age and sex were evaluated. COPD patients were screened by the BODE Index and then underwent an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test and a constant speed treadmill session at 70% of maximal intensity for 6 minutes. The onset of the exercise (first 360 seconds) response for O2 uptake and HR was modeled according to a monoexponential fit. Results Oxygen consumption and HR on-kinetics were slower in the COPD group compared with controls. Additionally, VO2 on-kinetic parameters revealed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.77, P < 0.05) with BODE scores and a moderate negative correlation with walking distance (r = −0.45, P < 0.05). Conclusion Our data show that moderate-to-severe COPD is related to impaired oxygen delivery and utilization during the onset of intense exercise. PMID:23118534

  15. FEM-based oxygen consumption and cell viability models for avascular pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background The function and viability of cultured, transplanted, or encapsulated pancreatic islets is often limited by hypoxia because these islets have lost their vasculature during the isolation process and have to rely on gradient-driven passive diffusion, which cannot provide adequate oxygen transport. Pancreatic islets (islets of Langerhans) are particularly susceptible due to their relatively large size, large metabolic demand, and increased sensitivity to hypoxia. Here, finite element method (FEM) based multiphysics models are explored to describe oxygen transport and cell viability in avascular islets both in static and in moving culture media. Methods Two- and three-dimensional models were built in COMSOL Multiphysics using the convection and diffusion as well as the incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics application modes. Oxygen consumption was assumed to follow Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics and to cease when local concentrations fell below a critical threshold; in a dynamic model, it was also allowed to increase with increasing glucose concentration. Results Partial differential equation (PDE) based exploratory cellular-level oxygen consumption and cell viability models incorporating physiologically realistic assumptions have been implemented for fully scaled cell culture geometries with 100, 150, and 200 μm diameter islets as representative. Calculated oxygen concentrations and intra-islet regions likely to suffer from hypoxia-related necrosis obtained for traditional flask-type cultures, oxygen-permeable silicone-rubber membrane bottom cultures, and perifusion chambers with flowing media and varying incoming glucose levels are presented in detail illustrated with corresponding colour-coded figures and animations. Conclusion Results of the computational models are, as a first estimate, in good quantitative agreement with existing experimental evidence, and they confirm that during culture, hypoxia is often a problem for non-vascularised islet

  16. Swimming for your life: locomotor effort and oxygen consumption during the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling frenzy.

    PubMed

    Booth, David T

    2009-01-01

    Swimming effort and oxygen consumption of newly emerged green turtle Chelonia mydas hatchlings was measured simultaneously and continuously for the first 18 h of swimming after hatchlings entered the water. Oxygen consumption was tightly correlated to swimming effort during the first 12 h of swimming indicating that swimming is powered predominantly by aerobic metabolism. The patterns of swimming effort and oxygen consumption could be divided into three distinct phases: (1) the rapid fatigue phase from 0 to 2 h when the mean swim thrust decreased from 45 to 30 mN and oxygen consumption decreased from 33 to 18 ml h(-1); (2) the slow fatigue phase from 2 to 12 h when the mean swim thrust decreased from 30 to 22 mN and oxygen consumption decreased from 18 to 10 ml h(-1); and (3) the sustained effort phase from 12 to 18 h when mean swim thrust averaged 22 mN and oxygen consumption averaged 10 ml h(-1). The decrease in mean swim thrust was caused by a combination of a decrease in front flipper stroke rate during a power stroking bout, a decrease in mean maximum thrust during a power stroking bout and a decrease in the proportion of time spent power stroking. Hence hatchlings maximise their swimming thrust as soon as they enter the water, a time when a fast swimming speed will maximise the chance of surviving the gauntlet of predators inhabiting the shallow fringing reef before reaching the relative safety of deeper water.

  17. Effects of TFM and Bayer 73 on in vivo oxygen consumption of the aquatic midge Chironomus tentans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kawatski, J.A.; Dawson, V.K.; Reuvers, J.L.

    1974-01-01

    Exposure of fourth instar larvae of Chironomus tentans to 2.0-8.0 mg/liter of TFM (3-trifluormethyl-4-nitrophenol) for 6 hr at 22 A? 0.5 C in soft water resulted in a significantly increased rate of larval oxygen consumption compared to that of control larvae, as measured with the Warburg respirometer. Maximum stimulation of oxygen consumption occurred with 8.0 mg/liter of TFM, and 1.0 mg/liter of TFM had no measurable effect on basal respiration. When hardness of exposure water was progressively increased, the effect of TFM on oxygen consumption was diminished. Bayer 73 (5,2'-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide) stimulated oxygen consumption at 0.75 and 1.0 mg/liter, had no significant effect at concentrations less that 0.75 mg/liter, and inhibited oxygen consumption at concentrations of 1.20 mg/liter or greater. Mixtures of TFM and Bayer 73, in the ratio of 98:2, had no greater effect on oxygen consumption than TFM alone.

  18. Validation of manometric microrespirometers for measuring oxygen consumption in small arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Richard G.; Ballard, J. William O.; Williams, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Scientists have used numerous techniques to measure organismal metabolic rate, including assays of oxygen (O2) consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) production. Relatively few studies have directly compared estimates of metabolic rate on the same groups of animals as determined by different assay methods. This study directly compared measures of the metabolic rate of three lines of Drosophila simulans as determined either from direct measures of CO2 production using infrared gas analysis (IRGA), or from estimates of O2 consumption based on manometeric techniques. Determinations of metabolic rate of the same cohorts of flies using these two methods produced results that often differed widely. Typically metabolic rate as determined by the manometric method was significantly greater than that determined by CO2 output. These differences are difficult to explain by simple biotic or abiotic factor/s. Because of the idiosyncratic nature of these differences it is not possible to use a simple factor to convert from metabolic rate measurements done using manometric techniques to those expected from direct measures of CO2 output or O2 consumption. Although manometric devices are simple to construct and use, measurements of metabolic rate made with this method can vary significantly from measurements made by directly assaying CO2 production or O2 consumption. PMID:18606168

  19. Influence of solid corrosion by-products on the consumption of dissolved oxygen in copper pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Ignacio T.; Alsina, Marco A.; Pastén, Pablo A.; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.

    2009-06-12

    Research on corrosion of copper pipes has given little consideration to the influence of solid corrosion by-products on the processes occurring at the metal-liquid interface. Consequently, the effect of such solid phases on the rate of dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption remains poorly understood. In-situ experiments were performed in copper pipes under different carbonate concentrations and ageing times. Our results show that the amount of solid corrosion by-products and concentration of hydrogen ions affect the rate of DO consumption during stagnation. Furthermore, our findings support the existing hypothesis that the available concentration of hydrogen ions, rather than DO, is the limiting factor for copper release into drinking water.

  20. Hand Grip Strength and Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Index among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sokran, Siti Nur Baait Biniti Mohd; Mohan, Vikram; Kamaruddin, Kamaria; Sulaiman, Mohd Daud; Awang, Yahya; Othman, Ida Rosmini Binti; Victor, Smiley Jesu Priya

    2015-01-01

    Background Hand grip strength (HGS) is a reliable indicator of peripheral muscle strength. Although, numerous studies have investigated the strength of hand grip; little attention has been given to coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, exploring the relationship between HGS and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) index. The current study aimed to evaluate the interaction between HGS and MVO2 index findings before and after cardiac surgery. Methods Twenty-seven patients with CAD had HGS were assessed using handheld dynamometer. HGS for each hand were documented. MVO2 index was assessed using rate pressure product (RPP), which is the product of the heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Repeated measures MANOVA were carried out to estimate the interaction between both hands HGS and MVO2 index before and after surgery. Results There was significant interactions (P<0.001) for both HGS dominant and non-dominant with large effect sizes (HGS dominant×MVO2 index: hp2=0.44; HGS dominant×RPP: hp2=0.49). This signifies that peripheral muscle strength of the upper limb (HGS dominant and non-dominant) had different effects on MVO2 index before and after surgery. The interaction graph shows that the increase in MVO2 index after surgery was significantly greater for peripheral muscle strength of the dominant hand when compared to non-dominant.  Conclusion Patients with CAD had interactions between HGS and oxygen consumption before and after surgery. Hence, HGS might be used as a predictor to assess oxygen consumption among cardiac patients. PMID:26170520

  1. Hand Grip Strength and Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Index among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients.

    PubMed

    Sokran, Siti Nur Baait Biniti Mohd; Mohan, Vikram; Kamaruddin, Kamaria; Sulaiman, Mohd Daud; Awang, Yahya; Othman, Ida Rosmini Binti; Victor, Smiley Jesu Priya

    2015-07-01

    Hand grip strength (HGS) is a reliable indicator of peripheral muscle strength. Although, numerous studies have investigated the strength of hand grip; little attention has been given to coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, exploring the relationship between HGS and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) index. The current study aimed to evaluate the interaction between HGS and MVO2 index findings before and after cardiac surgery. Twenty-seven patients with CAD had HGS were assessed using handheld dynamometer. HGS for each hand were documented. MVO2 index was assessed using rate pressure product (RPP), which is the product of the heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Repeated measures MANOVA were carried out to estimate the interaction between both hands HGS and MVO2 index before and after surgery. There was significant interactions (P<0.001) for both HGS dominant and non-dominant with large effect sizes (HGS dominant×MVO2 index: hp (2)=0.44; HGS dominant×RPP: hp (2)=0.49). This signifies that peripheral muscle strength of the upper limb (HGS dominant and non-dominant) had different effects on MVO2 index before and after surgery. The interaction graph shows that the increase in MVO2 index after surgery was significantly greater for peripheral muscle strength of the dominant hand when compared to non-dominant. Patients with CAD had interactions between HGS and oxygen consumption before and after surgery. Hence, HGS might be used as a predictor to assess oxygen consumption among cardiac patients.

  2. [The construction and application of a novel apparatus for detecting oxygen consumption of mice under normobaric hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Duan, Rui-Feng; Zeng, Xiang-Zhi; Ji, Jia-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Long, Chao-Liang; Liu, Wei; Cui, Wen-Yu; Wang, Hai

    2014-07-01

    To establish a method for real-time recording the oxygen consumption of mice under normobaric hypoxia. The experimental apparatus was made up of animal container, filling water control system, electronic balance, hose, a computer with weight recording software, etc. The working principle was that the oxygen consumed by animal was replaced by water filling which was controlled by the pneumatic and hydraulic actuator. The water was weighted by an electronic balance and the weight signal was recorded into excel file at the same time. The accuracy and precision of the apparatus were detected by a 10 ml syringe. The oxygen consumption characteristics of 6 acute repetitive hypoxia mice and 6 normal mice were observed. The P value for the paired t test was 1 and the CV value was 4%. The survival time and total oxygen consumption of acute repetitive hypoxia mice were both significantly increased compared to normal mice (P < 0.05), which were (58.8 +/- 6.8) min and (46.0 +/- 8.7) min respectively for the survival time and (85.1 +/- 8.5) ml and (73.6 +/- 5.4) ml respectively for total oxygen consumption. The hypoxia tolerance of the acute repetitive hypoxia mice can significantly improved by taking more oxygen in the animal cabin. The accuracy and precision of the apparatus are high and it can be used for the determination of oxygen consumption in hypoxia research.

  3. Autonomic control of cardiac function and myocardial oxygen consumption during hypoxic hypoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Stone, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation in 19 conscious dogs of the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in the coronary and cardiac response to altitude (hypoxic) hypoxia. Beta-adrenergic blockade was used to minimize the cardiac effect associated with sympathetic receptors. It is shown that the autonomic nervous system, and particularly the sympathetic nervous system, is responsible for the increase in ventricular function and myocardial oxygen consumption that occurs during hypoxia. Minimizing this response through appropriate conditioning and training may improve the operating efficiency of the heart and reduce the hazard of hypoxia and other environmental stresses, such as acceleration, which are encountered in advanced aircraft systems.

  4. [Effects of temperature and salinity on oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of Sagitta crassa].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Liu, Fang; Ding, Zi-Yuan

    2011-11-01

    A laboratory test was conducted to study the effects of different temperature and salinity on the oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of chaetognath Sagitta crassa. Both temperature and salinity had significant effects on the oxygen consumption rate (IO) and specific oxygen consumption rate (SO) of S. crassa. When the temperature raised from 5 degrees C to 25 degrees C, the IO and SO of S. crassa increased first, and then presented an obvious decreasing trend, with the regression function being y = 0.0058x3-0.2956x2 +4.415x-8.7816 (R2 = 0.99, P < 0.05) for IO and y = 0.0011x3-0.0546x2+0.8161x-1.6232 (R2 = 0.99, P < 0.05) for SO. The IO and SO at different temperature were in the ranges of 6.30-11.71 microg x ind(-1) x h(-1) and 1.22-2.16 microg x mg(-1) x h(-1), respectively, and the asphyxiation point was 4.18-6.87 mg x L(-1). When the salinity increased from 10 to 40, the IO and SO of S. crassa decreased gradually, with the regression function being y = -0.0068x2-0.1412x+21.702 (R2 = 0.89, P < 0.05) for IO and y = -0.0013x2 -0.0261x+ 4.0114 (R2 = 0.89, P < 0.05) for SO. The IO and SO at different salinity were in the ranges of 4.98-17.73 microg x ind(-1) x h(-1) and 0.92-3.56 microg x mg(-1) x h(-1), respectively, and the asphyxiation point was 4.02-6.24 mg x L(-1). Based on the differences in the oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point between S. crassa and other aquatic animals, it was concluded that S. crassa was a stenooxybiotic zooplankton species.

  5. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Aníbal J; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Herrera, Emilio; Cabello, Gertrudis; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T

    2002-01-01

    Unlike fetal animals of lowland species, the llama fetus does not increase its cerebral blood flow during an episode of acute hypoxaemia. This study tested the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral O2 extraction rather than decreasing cerebral oxygen utilisation during acute hypoxaemia. Six llama fetuses were surgically instrumented under general anaesthesia at 217 days of gestation (term ca 350 days) with vascular and amniotic catheters in order to carry out cardiorespiratory studies. Following a control period of 1 h, the llama fetuses underwent 3 × 20 min episodes of progressive hypoxaemia, induced by maternal inhalational hypoxia. During basal conditions and during each of the 20 min of hypoxaemia, fetal cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, cerebral oxygen extraction was calculated, and fetal cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption was determined by the modified Fick principle. During hypoxaemia, fetal arterial O2 tension and fetal pH decreased progressively from 24 ± 1 to 20 ± 1 Torr and from 7.36 ± 0.01 to 7.33 ± 0.01, respectively, during the first 20 min episode, to 16 ± 1 Torr and 7.25 ± 0.05 during the second 20 min episode and to 14 ± 1 Torr and 7.21 ± 0.04 during the final 20 min episode. Fetal arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2, 42 ± 2 Torr) remained unaltered from baseline throughout the experiment. Fetal cerebral hemispheric blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen extraction were unaltered from baseline during progressive hypoxaemia. In contrast, a progressive fall in fetal cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption occurred during the hypoxaemic challenge. In conclusion, these data do not support the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral hemispheric O2 extraction. Rather, the data show that in the llama fetus, a reduction in cerebral hemispheric metabolism occurs during acute

  6. Effect of some organophosphorus pesticides on oxygen consumption of shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Galindo Reyes, José Guillermo; Dalla-Venezia, Luisella; Lazcano Alvarez, Maria Guadalupe

    2002-06-01

    Oxygen consumption was measured in adult specimens of Litopenaeus vannamei shrimps from a coastal lagoon of Sinaloa, Mexico, during exposure to sublethal concentrations of the organophosphorus pesticides, Diazinon, Folidol, and Gusathion. Each individual was used as a control of itself, to avoid differences between treatments being masked by individual variability. In all three treatments with pesticides, respiration rate, measured by a polarographic electrode, was significantly lower than in controls. This may, at least partly, explain the decrease in shrimp production observed in recent years in the coastal lagoons of Sinaloa. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  7. Daily cycle in oxygen consumption by the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis Stephenson

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Amy E.; Jones, Ian T.; Reitzel, Adam M.; Tarrant, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bilaterian animals, the circadian clock is intimately involved in regulating energetic metabolism. Although cnidarians exhibit diel behavioral rhythms including cycles in locomotor activity, tentacle extension and spawning, daily cycles in cnidarian metabolism have not been described. To explore a possible circadian metabolic cycle, we maintained the anemone Nematostella vectensis in a 12 h light/dark cycle, a reversed light cycle, or in constant darkness. Oxygen consumption rates were measured at intervals using an optical oxygen meter. Respiration rates responded to entrainment with higher rates during light periods. During a second experiment with higher temporal resolution, respiration rates peaked late in the light period. The diel pattern could be detected after six days in constant darkness. Together, our results suggest that respiration rates in Nematostella exhibit a daily cycle that may be under circadian control and that the cycle in respiration rate is not driven by the previously described nocturnal increase in locomotor activity in this species. PMID:26772201

  8. Effects of temperature and dissolved oxygen content on oxygen consumption rate of Chinese prawn, giant tiger prawn and giant freshwater prawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xi-Lin; Zang, Wei-Ling; Wang, Wei-Dong; Shi, Yong-Hai; Liu, Wen-Cui; Xu, Gui-Rong; Li, Shi-Hua

    1999-06-01

    Temperature and the dissolved oxygen content affect the oxygen consumption of juveniles of Chinese prawn ( Penaeus chinensis), giant tiger prawn ( P. monodon) and giant freshwater prawn ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii). There is good correlation between the oxygen consumption rate ( V, mg/g·h) of the above three prawn species and the water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. In the range of test temperature, V increased with water temperature and dissolved oxygen content. The V of the above three prawn species increased 0.085 mg/g·h, 0.093 mg/g·h and 0.08 mg/g·h respectively with each °C of rising temperature. The comatose point and stifling point of the juveniles rose obviously at unsuitable temperature.

  9. The use of an optical method to evaluate prokaryotic oxygen consumption under high pressure condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, M.; Martini, S.; Lefèvre, D.; Tamburini, C.

    2016-02-01

    The heterotrophic prokaryotes are the main contributor to organic matter degradation in the ocean and particularly in the deep ocean. Nowadays, a classical way to evaluate the prokaryotic carbon demand (PCD) needs the estimation of both prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) and prokaryotic respiration (PR). PHP measurements in deep-sea waters are relatively well documented and the importance of maintaining the in situ conditions (pressure and temperature) to avoid bias of the real deep-sea activities has been highlighted. However, no accurate methodology is available to measure directly, under in situ conditions (pressure and temperature) PR in the dark ocean. This study is presenting PR measurements under in situ conditions. High-pressure bottles have been adapted with a non-invasive sensor to measure prokaryotic oxygen consumption. The methodology is based on fluorescence quenching where molecular oxygen quenches the luminescence of planar-optode-oxygen sensor widely used in oceanography. Firstly, accuracy, detection limit, precision and response time of oxygen concentration measurements have been investigated in relation to an increase of hydrostatic pressure. Secondly, we will present experiments performed on natural prokaryotic consortium mixed with freshly collected particles to assess the O2 consumption in relation with increasing hydrostatic pressure (150 m depth per day). Finally, first results of coupled PHP and PR measurements at in situ conditions (temperature and pressure) from mesopelagic and bathypelagic samples of the Atlantic Ocean (PAP site), will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss first results of coupled PHP and PR measurements at in situ conditions (temperature and pressure) from Atlantic Ocean mesopelagic and bathypelagic samples (PAP site).

  10. Linear coupling between cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in activated human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hoge, Richard D.; Atkinson, Jeff; Gill, Brad; Crelier, Gérard R.; Marrett, Sean; Pike, G. Bruce

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that, within a specific cortical unit, fractional changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) are coupled through an invariant relationship during physiological stimulation. This aim was achieved by simultaneously measuring relative changes in these quantities in human primary visual cortex (V1) during graded stimulation with patterns designed to selectively activate different populations of V1 neurons. Primary visual cortex was delineated individually in each subject by using phase-encoded retinotopic mapping. Flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery MRI, in conjunction with blood oxygenation-sensitive MRI and hypercapnic calibration, was used to monitor CBF and CMRO2. The stimuli used included (i) diffuse isoluminant chromatic displays; (ii) high spatial-frequency achromatic luminance gratings; and (iii) radial checkerboard patterns containing both color and luminance contrast modulated at different temporal rates. Perfusion responses to each pattern were graded by varying luminance and/or color modulation amplitudes. For all stimulus types, fractional changes in blood flow and oxygen uptake were found to be linearly coupled in a consistent ratio of approximately 2:1. The most potent stimulus produced CBF and CMRO2 increases of 48 ± 5% and 25 ± 4%, respectively, with no evidence of a plateau for oxygen consumption. Estimation of aerobic ATP yields from the observed CMRO2 increases and comparison with the maximum possible anaerobic ATP contribution indicate that elevated energy demands during brain activation are met largely through oxidative metabolism. PMID:10430955

  11. Stable Isotope Composition of Molecular Oxygen in Soil Gas and Groundwater: A Potentially Robust Tracer for Diffusion and Oxygen Consumption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Dillon, M. A.

    1998-02-01

    We have measured the concentration and isotopic composition of molecular oxygen in soil gas and groundwater. At a site near Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, soil gas oxygen concentrations ranged from 13.8 to 17.6% at depths of 3-4 m and the δ 18O values ranged mostly from 24.0 to 27.2‰ (SMOW). The concentration of dissolved oxygen in a perched aquifer in the Texas Panhandle (depth to water ˜76 m) was about 5 mg/L and the δ 18O values were 21.2-22.9‰. The δ 18O of soil gas oxygen in our study are higher and those of dissolved oxygen are lower than the δ 18O of atmospheric oxygen (23.5‰). A model for the oxygen concentration and isotopic composition in soil gas was developed using the molecular diffusion theory. The higher δ 18O values in soil gas at the Nebraska site can be explained by the effects of diffusion and soil respiration (plant root and bacterial) on the isotopic composition of molecular oxygen. The lower δ 18O of dissolved oxygen at the Texas site indicates that oxygen consumption below the root zone in the relatively thick unsaturated zone here may have occurred with a different fractionation factor (either due to inorganic consumption or due to low respiration rates) than that observed for the dominant pathways of plant root and bacterial respiration. It is concluded that the use of the concentration and isotopic composition of soil gas and dissolved oxygen should provide a robust tool for studying the subsurface gaseous diffusion and oxygen consumption processes.

  12. A comparison of direct and indirect measurements of oxygen delivery and consumption: the effects of prostacyclin in two human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bihari, D J; Smithies, M; Pozniak, A; Gimson, A

    1987-01-01

    To examine the relation of oxygen delivery to uptake in normals, we have measured cardiac index, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption directly and indirectly in two human volunteers before and during a prostacyclin (PGI2) infusion (5 ng/kg/min). We have also investigated the relation of direct and indirect measurements of delivery to consumption in two critically ill patients over a more prolonged study period of 24 hours. Overall, there were close correlations between both cardiac index measured by thermodilution with that calculated from the Fick equation (r = 0.97 p less than 0.001) and oxygen consumption measured directly by analysis of inspired gases (V O2) with that calculated by the reverse Fick method (OUI) (r = 0.95 p less than 0.001). Nevertheless, the limits of agreement between the two methods were wide (1.6 L/min.m2 for the cardiac index and 70.5 ml 02/min.m2 for oxygen consumption, 95% confidence limits). In the two human volunteers, PGI2 produced substantial increases in oxygen delivery but there was no change in oxygen consumption measured directly or indirectly; V O2 and OUI were unrelated and independent of oxygen delivery. However, in the two patients studied over 24 hours, there were close correlations between delivery and both V O2 (r = 0.93 p less than 0.001) and OUI (r = 0.94 p less than 0.001). These results suggest that the derivation of oxygen consumption by the reverse Fick method (OUI) is a reasonable substitute for direct measurements of V O2 but occasionally the absolute values so obtained may be somewhat different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. UV radiation impacts body weight, oxygen consumption, and shelter selection in the intertidal vertebrate Girella laevifrons.

    PubMed

    Pulgar, José; Waldisperg, Melany; Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal; Maturana, Diego; Pulgar, Victor M; Aldana, Marcela

    2017-02-01

    The amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface has increased due to ozone layer depletion, and this fact represents an opportunity to evaluate the physiological and behavioral responses of animals to this global-scale stressor. The transitory fish Girella laevifrons inhabits pools in the upper intertidal zone, which is characterized by exposure to a wide range of stressors, including UV radiation. We documented the field magnitude and the impact of UV radiation on oxygen consumption, body mass variations, and shelter (rocky and algae) selection by G. laevifrons. UV-exposed animals showed increased oxygen consumption, slower body weight increase, and active rocky shelter selection. Control fish showed increased body weight and no evident shelter selection. The results indicated that UV exposure affects fish energetic balance and habitat selection to favor greater protection against radiation. Increased UV exposure in transitory intertidal animals at levels observed in upper intertidal pools may alter the residency time of fish before leaving for the subtidal zone. Therefore, UV-induced energetic changes may determine animal performance and ontogenetic physiological itineraries, whereas shelter quality might determine habitat use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxygen consumption during cold exposure at 2.1 G in rats adapted to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J.; Patterson, S.; Monson, C.

    1985-01-01

    The thermoregulation ability of rats exposed to various gravitational fields is examined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 22 C and 1 G, and 9 C and 2.1 G in experiment one, 1 G, 2.4 G, 5.8 G and 22 + or - 1.5 C in experiment two, and 1 G, 19-22 C, and 5 C in experiment three. It is observed that the core temperature in the control rats was 36.8 + or 0.4 C at 22C and 30.8 + or - 0.6 C at 9 C, and oxygen consumption dropped from 37 + or - 0.3 C core temperature at 22 C, 36.4 + or - 0.3 C at 9 C, 0.4 oxygen consumption was 8.18 + or - 0.9 ml/min at 22 C, and 14.2 + or - 0.4 ml/min at 9 C. The data from experiment two reveal that tail temperature in the control rats peaked at 2.4 G and at 5.8 G for the acclimated rats, and in experiment three a greater decrease in core temperature is detected in the 2.1-G rats. It is noted that prior acclimation to 2.1 G enhances the thermoregulation ability when exposed to the cold.

  15. PET imaging of cerebral perfusion and oxygen consumption in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Marchal, G.; Serrati, C.; Rioux, P.; Petit-Taboue, M.C.; Viader, F.; Sayette, V. de la; Doze, F. le; Lonchon, P; Derlon, J.M.; Orgogozo, J.M.; Baron, J.C.

    1993-04-10

    The authors used positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the relation between combined imaging of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption 5-18 h after first middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke and neurological outcome at 2 months. All 18 patients could be classified into three visually defined PET patterns of perfusion and oxygen consumption changes. Pattern 1 suggested extensive irreversible damage and was consistently associated with poor outcome. Pattern 2 suggested continuing ischemia and was associated with variable outcome. Pattern 3 with hyperperfusion and little or no metabolic alteration, was associated with excellent recovery, which suggests that early reperfusion is beneficial. This relation between PET and outcome was highly significant. The results suggest that within 5-18 h of stroke onset, PET is a good predictor of outcome in patterns 1 and 3, for which therapy seems limited. The absence of predictive value for pattern 2 suggests that it is due to a reversible ischemic state that is possibly amenable to therapy. These findings may have important implications for acute MCA stroke management and for patients' selection for therapeutic trials.

  16. The Effect of Postoperative Skin-Surface Warming on Oxygen Consumption and the Shivering Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, P.; Nourredine, K.; Adam, F.; Chauvin, M.; Sessler, D. I.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous warming is reportedly an effective treatment for shivering during epidural and after general anaesthesia. We quantified the efficacy of cutaneous warming as a treatment for shivering. Unwarmed surgical patients (final intraoperative core temperatures ≈35°C) were randomly assigned to be covered with a blanket (n=9) or full-body forced-air cover (n=9). Shivering was evaluated clinically and by oxygen consumption. Forced-air heating increased mean-skin temperature (35.7±0.4 °C vs. 33.2±0.8°C, P< 0.0001) and lowered core temperature at the shivering threshold (35.7±0.2 °C vs. 36.4±0.2°C, P< 0.0001). Active warming improved thermal comfort and significantly reduced oxygen consumption from 9.7±4.4 to 5.6±1.9 mL·min−1·kg−1(P=0.038). However, duration of shivering was similar in the two groups (37±11 min [warming] and 36±10 min [control]). Core temperature thus contributed about four times as much as skin temperature to control of shivering. Cutaneous warming improved thermal comfort and reduced metabolic stress in postoperative patients, but did not quickly obliterate shivering. PMID:14705689

  17. Effect of captopril on serum lipid levels and cardiac mitochondrial oxygen consumption in experimentally-induced hypercholesterolemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kojic, Z; Gopcevic, K; Marinkovic, D; Tasic, G

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are widely used in therapy of cardiovascular diseases. However, the consensus on effects of these inhibitors in control of myocardial oxygen consumption during the process of experimental hypercholesterolemia and under the condition of endothelial dysfunction has not been reached. Here we examined effects of captopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, on serum lipid levels and oxygen consumption rate in mitochondria isolated from heart of rabbits treated by hypercholesterolemic diet. During the twelve-week period, the Chinchilla male rabbits were daily treated by saline (controls); 1 % cholesterol diet; 5 mg/kg/day captopril or 1 % cholesterol + 5 mg/kg/day captopril. Total- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride in serum were measured spectrophotometrically. The left ventricle mitochondrial fraction was isolated and myocardial oxygen consumption was measured by Biological Oxygen Monitor. Mitochondria isolated from hearts of rabbits exposed to hypercholesterolemic diet showed significantly reduced respiration rates (state 3 and state 4) with altering adenosine diphosphate/oxygen ratio, whereas the respiratory control ratio was not affected when compared to controls. Mitochondria from cholesterol/captopril-treated animals showed significantly reduced respiration rates without altering adenosine diphosphate/oxygen ratio index or respiratory control ratio. Although captopril did not exert the favorable effect on serum lipid levels in cholesterol-treated animals, it restored the mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Further studies should be performed to define the underlying physiological and/or pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications.

  18. Following the N2O consumption at the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the eastern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Farías, L.

    2012-03-01

    Oxygen deficient zones (OMZs), such as those found in the eastern South Pacific (ESP), are the most important N2O sources in the world ocean relative to their volume. N2O production is related to low O2 concentrations and high primary productivity. However, when O2 is sufficiently low, canonical denitrification takes place and N2O consumption can be expected. N2O distribution in the ESP was analyzed over a wide latitudinal range (from 5° to 30° S and 71°-76° to ~84° W) based on ~890 N2O measurements. The intense consumption of N2O appears to be related to secondary NO2- accumulation, the best indicator of very low O2 levels. Using relationships that depend on threshold levels of O2 (<8 μM) and nitrite (>0.75 μM), we reproduced the apparent N2O production (ΔN2O) with high reliability (r2=0.73 p=0.01). Our results contribute to quantify the ratio of N2O production/consumption that is being cycling in O2 deficient water of N2O and may improve the prediction of N2O behavior under future scenarios of the OMZ expansion.

  19. Effect of exercise intensity on post-exercise oxygen consumption and heart rate recovery.

    PubMed

    Mann, Theresa N; Webster, Christopher; Lamberts, Robert P; Lambert, Michael I

    2014-09-01

    There is some evidence that measures of acute post-exercise recovery are sensitive to the homeostatic stress of the preceding exercise and these measurements warrant further investigation as possible markers of training load. The current study investigated which of four different measures of metabolic and autonomic recovery was most sensitive to changes in exercise intensity. Thirty-eight moderately trained runners completed 20-min bouts of treadmill exercise at 60, 70 and 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and four different recovery measurements were determined: the magnitude of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOCMAG), the time constant of the oxygen consumption recovery curve (EPOCτ), heart rate recovery within 1 min (HRR60s) and the time constant of the heart rate recovery curve (HRRτ) . Despite significant differences in exercise parameters at each exercise intensity, only EPOCMAG showed significantly slower recovery with each increase in exercise intensity at the group level and in the majority of individuals. EPOCτ was significantly slower at 70 and 80% of VO₂max vs. 60% VO₂max and HRRτ was only significantly slower when comparing the 80 vs. 60% VO₂max exercise bouts. In contrast, HRR60s reflected faster recovery at 70 and 80% of VO₂max than at 60% VO₂max. Of the four recovery measurements investigated, EPOCMAG was the most sensitive to changes in exercise intensity and shows potential to reflect changes in the homeostatic stress of exercise at the group and individual level. Determining EPOCMAG may help to interpret the homeostatic stress of laboratory-based research trials or training sessions.

  20. Comparison of Oxygen Consumption Rates of Nondegenerate and Degenerate Human IVD Cells.

    PubMed

    Cisewski, Sarah E; Wu, Yongren; Damon, Brooke J; Sachs, Barton L; Kern, Michael J; Yao, Hai

    2017-05-24

    In vitro measurements of the oxygen consumption rates (OCR) of human intervertebral disc (IVD) cells. To determine the differences in the OCR of nondegenerate and degenerate human annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilage endplate (CEP) cells at different glucose concentrations. The avascular nature of the IVD creates a delicate balance between rate of nutrient transport through the matrix and rate of disc cell consumption necessary to maintain tissue health. Previous studies have shown a dependence of OCR for animal (e.g. bovine and porcine) IVD cells on oxygen level and glucose concentration. However, the OCR of nondegenerate human IVD cells compared to degenerate human IVD cells at different glucose concentrations has not been investigated. IVD cells were isolated from the AF, NP, and CEP regions of human cadaver spines and surgical samples. The changes in oxygen concentration were recorded when cells were sealed in a metabolic chamber. The OCR of cells was determined by curve fitting using the Michaelis-Menton equation. Under identical cell culture conditions, the OCR of degenerate human IVD cells was 3-5 times greater than that of nondegenerate human IVD cells. The degenerate IVD cells cultured in low glucose medium (1 mM) exhibited the highest OCR compared to degenerate cells cultured at higher glucose levels (i.e., 5 mM, 25 mM), while no significant differences in OCR was found among the nondegenerate IVD cells for all glucose levels. Considering the significantly higher OCR and unique response to glucose of degenerate human IVD cells, the degeneration of the IVD is associated with a cell phenotypic change related to OCR. The OCR of IVD cells reported in this study will be valuable for understanding human IVD cellular behavior and tissue nutrition in response to disc degeneration. N/A.

  1. Somatosensory evoked changes in cerebral oxygen consumption measured non-invasively in premature neonates

    PubMed Central

    Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Fenoglio, Angela; Radakrishnan, Harsha; Kocienski-Filip, Marcia; Carp, Stefan A.; Dubb, Jay; Boas, David A.; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2013-01-01

    The hemodynamic functional response is used as a reliable marker of neuronal activity in countless studies of brain function and cognition. In newborns and infants, however, conflicting results have appeared in the literature concerning the typical response, and there is little information on brain metabolism and functional activation. Measurement of all hemodynamic components and oxygen metabolism is critical for understanding neurovascular coupling in the developing brain. To this end, we combined multiple near infrared spectroscopy techniques to measure oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, cerebral blood volume (CBV), and relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the somatosensory cortex of 6 preterm neonates during passive tactile stimulation of the hand. By combining these measures we estimated relative changes in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (rCMRO2). CBF starts increasing immediately after stimulus onset, and returns to baseline before blood volume. This is consistent with the model of pre-capillary arteriole active dilation driving the CBF response, with a subsequent CBV increase influenced by capillaries and veins dilating passively to accommodate the extra blood. rCMRO2 estimated using the steady-state formulation shows a biphasic pattern: an increase immediately after stimulus onset, followed by a post-stimulus undershoot due to blood flow returning faster to baseline than oxygenation. However, assuming a longer mean transit time from the arterial to the venous compartment, due to the immature vascular system of premature infants, reduces the post-stimulus undershoot and increases the flow/consumption ratio to values closer to adult values reported in the literature. We are the first to report changes in local rCBF and rCMRO2 during functional activation in preterm infants. The ability to measure these variables in addition to hemoglobin concentration changes is critical for understanding neurovascular coupling in the developing

  2. Lung mechanics and oxygen consumption during spontaneous ventilation and severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Stock, M C; Davis, D W; Manning, J W; Ryan, M L

    1992-07-01

    The effects of acute heart failure on lung mechanics and oxygen consumption (VO2) during normocarbic spontaneous ventilation were studied in 21 anesthetized pigs. Heart failure severe enough to double oxygen extraction (O2ex) was induced with intravenous esmolol boluses and infusion. Compared to normal, the inspiratory elastic work of breathing (Wel) increased from 335 +/- 371 (mean +/- SD) to 559 +/- 48 mm Hg.ml (p less than 0.003) during heart failure, lung compliance (CL) fell from 121 +/- 144 to 22 +/- 15 ml/mm Hg (p less than 0.05), and respiratory power climbed from 140 +/- 200 to 245 +/- 214 mm Hg.ml.min-1 (p less than 0.002). These mechanical changes were accompanied by a decrease in both VO2 (221 +/- 61 to 191 +/- 50 mlO2/min, p less than 0.05) and oxygen delivery (DO2) (680 +/- 240 to 260 +/- 90 mlO2/min, p less than 0.004). The VO2/DO2 ratio doubled (p less than 0.0002), confirming increased O2ex. In conclusion, severe acute heart failure decreased CL, and increased Wel and respiratory power significantly. The depressed cardiac output limits both DO2, and to some extent, VO2. However, a greater proportion of the delivered O2 is consumed, supplying indirect evidence which suggests that the respiratory muscles' VO2 increases as a consequence of increased power expenditure.

  3. On the adhesion-cohesion balance and oxygen consumption characteristics of liver organoids

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Giorgio; Magliaro, Chiara; Giusti, Serena; Ramachandran, Sarada Devi; Heinz, Stefan; Braspenning, Joris; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2017-01-01

    Liver organoids (LOs) are of interest in tissue replacement, hepatotoxicity and pathophysiological studies. However, it is still unclear what triggers LO self-assembly and what the optimal environment is for their culture. Hypothesizing that LO formation occurs as a result of a fine balance between cell-substrate adhesion and cell-cell cohesion, we used 3 cell types (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) to investigate LO self-assembly on different substrates keeping the culture parameters (e.g. culture media, cell types/number) and substrate stiffness constant. As cellular spheroids may suffer from oxygen depletion in the core, we also sought to identify the optimal culture conditions for LOs in order to guarantee an adequate supply of oxygen during proliferation and differentiation. The oxygen consumption characteristics of LOs were measured using an O2 sensor and used to model the O2 concentration gradient in the organoids. We show that no LO formation occurs on highly adhesive hepatic extra-cellular matrix-based substrates, suggesting that cellular aggregation requires an optimal trade-off between the adhesiveness of a substrate and the cohesive forces between cells and that this balance is modulated by substrate mechanics. Thus, in addition to substrate stiffness, physicochemical properties, which are also critical for cell adhesion, play a role in LO self-assembly. PMID:28267799

  4. Effects of chronic metabolic acidosis on splanchnic protein turnover and oxygen consumption in human beings.

    PubMed

    Tessari, Paolo; Sofia, Antonella; Saffioti, Stefano; Vettore, Monica; Verzola, Daniela; Millioni, Renato; Puricelli, Lucia; Garibotto, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    Although metabolic acidosis stimulates protein catabolism, its effects on splanchnic protein turnover and energy expenditure have not been measured in human beings. We investigated the effects of chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) on splanchnic protein dynamics and oxygen consumption in human beings by using a leucine tracer and mass-balance techniques. Five subjects were studied after 6 days of HCl-, CaCl(2)-, and NH(4)Cl-induced acidosis; 8 subjects served as controls. Blood samples were collected from the radial artery and the hepatic veins. Measurements were performed on plasma and whole-blood samples. Based on plasma measurements, subjects who had undergone CMA had lower rates of splanchnic proteolysis (-35%) and protein synthesis (-50%; P < .05) than controls, as well as a negative leucine kinetic balance (-6.81 +/- 2.48 micromol/kg/min/1.73 m(2) body surface [BS](-1)), compared with the neutral balance in control plasma samples (0.76 +/- 2.11 micromol/kg/min/1.73; P < .05 between groups). Based on measurements from whole blood, splanchnic proteolysis and protein synthesis did not differ significantly between CMA and control samples, and the net leucine kinetic balance was neutral in both groups (CMA, -0.69 +/- 1.57; controls, -0.74 +/- 3.45 micromol/kg/min/1.73). In CMA whole-blood measurements, splanchnic oxygen consumption (44.8 +/- 4.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) BS) was slightly lower than in controls (57.5 +/- 8.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2) BS; P = NS). Splanchnic protein synthesis correlated with oxygen consumption (r = 0.82; P < .001). CMA reduces splanchnic protein turnover and results in a negative leucine balance--an effect that apparently is offset by the contribution of blood cells to organ leucine (and protein) dynamics. Protein synthesis is a major contributor (about 67%) to energy expenditure in splanchnic organs. 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impairment of energy metabolism in intact residual myocardium of rat hearts with chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, S; Horn, M; Naumann, A; Tian, R; Hu, K; Laser, M; Friedrich, J; Gaudron, P; Schnackerz, K; Ingwall, J S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that energy metabolism is impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rat heart, contributing to contractile dysfunction. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in rats by coronary artery ligation. Hearts were isolated 8 wk later and buffer-perfused isovolumically. MI hearts showed reduced left ventricular developed pressure, but oxygen consumption was unchanged. High-energy phosphate contents were measured chemically and by 31P-NMR spectroscopy. In residual intact left ventricular tissue, ATP was unchanged after MI, while creatine phosphate was reduced by 31%. Total creatine kinase (CK) activity was reduced by 17%, the fetal CK isoenzymes BB and MB increased, while the "adult" mitochondrial CK isoenzyme activity decreased by 44%. Total creatine content decreased by 35%. Phosphoryl exchange between ATP and creatine phosphate, measured by 31P-NMR magnetization transfer, fell by 50% in MI hearts. Thus, energy reserve is substantially impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rats. Because phosphoryl exchange was still five times higher than ATP synthesis rates calculated from oxygen consumption, phosphoryl transfer via CK may not limit baseline contractile performance 2 mo after MI. In contrast, when MI hearts were subjected to acute stress (hypoxia), mechanical recovery during reoxygenation was impaired, suggesting that reduced energy reserve contributes to increased susceptibility of MI hearts to acute metabolic stress. PMID:7883957

  6. Oxygen consumption of zooplankton as affected by laboratory and field Cadmium exposures. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Kettle, W.D.; deNoyelles, F. Jr.; Lei, C.H.

    1980-10-01

    Virtually none of the many studies of the responses of aquatic organisms to heavy metals has involved organism response to heavy metals under natural, whole system exposure. The ability of laboratory studies to simulate and predict actual field conditions and responses remains questionable. The effects of cadmium exposure on zooplankton has been measured in laboratory studies and in enclosures placed in the field. However, studies involving zooplankton subjected to field exposure of cadmium are lacking. The objectives of this experiment were to measure oxygen consumption, survivorship, and reproduction of Daphnia pulex and Simocephalus serrulatus in response to low level cadmium exposure, in both laboratory and field situations. This design makes possible the comparisons of 1) laboratory and field exposures, and 2) responses of 2 common freshwater zooplankton species.

  7. Acclimation to constant and variable temperatures in plethodontid salamanders--I. Rates of oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Feder, M E

    1985-01-01

    In preliminary experiments, salamanders of three species (Desmognathus ochrophaeus, Plethodon cinereus and Plethodon jordani) required 5-11 days to complete metabolic acclimation to a constant warm temperature; the rate of oxygen consumption (VO2) decreased 16-28% during acclimation. Unfed animals of each species underwent cyclic exposure to 5 and 21 degrees C at three different cycle periods (12 hr, 4-5 days, 51 days), or constant exposure to 14 degrees C for 102 days. The experimental treatments significantly affected the VO2 measured at 5, 14, 17.5 and 21 degrees C. The direction and magnitude of the acclimatory effects upon VO2 were inconsistent among species and among experimental temperatures, and resulted in little energy saving. The VO2 during exposure to cyclic temperatures averaged only 83% of that during preliminary experiments, perhaps as a response to starvation.

  8. Effect of split exercise sessions on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Kaminsky, L A; Padjen, S; LaHam-Saeger, J

    1990-01-01

    In this study the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), and related metabolic measures, following a 50 minute run compared to two 25 minute runs all at 70 per cent of peak VO2 in six women were investigated. Open-circuit spirometry procedures were used and appropriate control conditions were maintained for all trials. Following exercise, VO2 returned to baseline within 30 minutes for all three exercise trials. Magnitude of EPOC was also similar after all runs. However, the combined magnitude (expressed in kcals) of the two 25 minute runs was significantly greater than the continuous 50 minute run (13.88 vs 6.39). Heart rate remained elevated above baseline, and respiratory exchange ratio was lower than baseline 30 minutes after exercise. It is concluded that split exercise sessions can significantly increase post-exercise caloric expenditure. However, the overall magnitude of the increase is small. PMID:2265322

  9. Effect of 29 days of simulated microgravity on maximal oxygen consumption and fat-free mass of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, Christopher R.; Stump, Craig S.; Stump, Jane A.; Rahman, Zia; Tipton, Charles M.

    1991-01-01

    Effects of a 29-days exposure to simulated microgravity on the values of maximal oxygen consumption and fat-free mass (FFM) and on the mechanical efficiency of running were investigated in rats randomly assigned to one of three regimens: head-down suspension (HDS) at 45 deg, horizontal suspension (HS), or cage control (CC). Before suspension and on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, five exercise performance tests were carried out, with measurements related to maximal oxygen consumption, treadmill run time, and mechanical efficiency. It was found that maximal oxygen consumption of both HDS and HS groups decreased significantly at day 7, after which the HDS rats remained decreased while the HS rats returned to presuspension values. Apparent mechanical efficiency in the HDS and HS groups decreased by 22-35 percent during the experimental period, and FFM decreased significantly.

  10. Real-time measurements of cellular oxygen consumption, pH, and energy metabolism using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pilatus, U; Aboagye, E; Artemov, D; Mori, N; Ackerstaff, E; Bhujwalla, Z M

    2001-05-01

    Changes in molecular expression or apoptotic behavior, induced by malignant transformation or anticancer treatment, are frequently reflected in cellular metabolism and oxygen consumption. A technique to monitor oxygen consumption, cell physiology, and metabolism noninvasively would provide a better understanding of interactions between molecular changes and metabolism in malignant transformation and following cancer treatment. Such a system was developed in this study by adapting multinuclear MRI and spectroscopic techniques to an isolated cell perfusion system. The system was evaluated by studying the effects of two agents, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) which is an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, and antimycin, an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, on the oxygen consumption and metabolism of MCF-7 and MatLyLu cancer cell lines.

  11. Comparison of Oxygen Consumption in Rats During Uphill (Concentric) and Downhill (Eccentric) Treadmill Exercise Tests

    PubMed Central

    Chavanelle, Vivien; Sirvent, Pascal; Ennequin, Gaël; Caillaud, Kévin; Montaurier, Christophe; Morio, Béatrice; Boisseau, Nathalie; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The study of the physiological adaptations of skeletal muscle in response to eccentric (ECC) contraction is based on protocols in which exercise intensities are determined relative to the concentric (CON) reference exercise (as percentage of the CON maximal oxygen consumption, or VO2max). In order to use similar exercise protocols in rats, we compared the VO2 values during uphill (CON) and downhill (ECC) running tests. VO2 was measured in 15 Wistar rats during incremental treadmill running exercises with different slopes: level (0%), positive (+15% incline: CON+15%) and negative (i15% incline: ECC-15%; and 130% incline: ECC-30%). Similar VO2 values were obtained in the ECC-30% and CON+15% running conditions at the three target speeds (15, 25 and 35 cm/sec). Conversely, VO2 values were lower (p < 0.05) in the ECC-15% than in the CON+15% condition (CON+15% VO2/ECC-15% VO2 ratios ranging from 1.86 to 2.05 at the three target speeds). Thus, doubling the downhill slope gradient in ECC condition leads to an oxygen consumption level that is not significantly different as in CON condition. These findings can be useful for designing animal research protocols to study the effects of ECC and CON exercise in ageing population or subjects suffering from cardiovascular diseases. Key Points VO2 in rats during treadmill race in eccentric and concentric conditions were measured. A novel breath-by-breath device allowing direct access to the animal was used. Three different slopes: +15%, -15% and -30% were used. VO2 values obtained in the -30% eccentric and the +15% concentric conditions were not significantly different. PMID:25177200

  12. Validating the relationship between 3-dimensional body acceleration and oxygen consumption in trained Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Volpov, Beth L; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-08-01

    We tested the ability of overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) to predict the rate of oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) in freely diving Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) while resting at the surface and diving. The trained sea lions executed three dive types-single dives, bouts of multiple long dives with 4-6 dives per bout, or bouts of multiple short dives with 10-12 dives per bout-to depths of 40 m, resulting in a range of activity and oxygen consumption levels. Average metabolic rate (AMR) over the dive cycle or dive bout calculated was calculated from [Formula: see text]. We found that ODBA could statistically predict AMR when data from all dive types were combined, but that dive type was a significant model factor. However, there were no significant linear relationships between AMR and ODBA when data for each dive type were analyzed separately. The potential relationships between AMR and ODBA were not improved by including dive duration, food consumed, proportion of dive cycle spent submerged, or number of dives per bout. It is not clear whether the lack of predictive power within dive type was due to low statistical power, or whether it reflected a true absence of a relationship between ODBA and AMR. The average percent error for predicting AMR from ODBA was 7-11 %, and standard error of the estimated AMR was 5-32 %. Overall, the extensive range of dive behaviors and physiological conditions we tested indicated that ODBA was not suitable for estimating AMR in the field due to considerable error and the inconclusive effects of dive type.

  13. Accuracy of Oxygen Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Elimination Measurements in 2 Breath-by-Breath Devices.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Craig D; Kheir, John N; Walsh, Brian K; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2017-04-01

    Although accurate quantification of oxygen consumption (V̇O2 ) and carbon dioxide elimination (V̇CO2 ) provides important insights into a patient's nutritional and hemodynamic status, few devices exist to accurately measure these parameters in children. Therefore, we assessed the accuracy and agreement of 2 devices currently on the market using a pediatric in vitro model of gas exchange. We utilized a Huszczuk simulation model, which simulates oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production using gas dilution, to examine the accuracy of two FDA-cleared respiratory modules (E-COVX and E-sCAiOVX-00). V̇O2 and V̇CO2 were set at 20, 40, 60, and 100 mL/min, ranges typical for infant and pediatric patients. Bland-Altman analysis was used to calculate the bias and limits of agreement of each device relative to simulated values for V̇O2 and V̇CO2 . The E-COVX mean percentage bias (limits of agreement) was -26.3% (-36.1 to -16.6%) and -39.3% (-47.5 to -31.1%) for V̇O2 and V̇CO2 , respectively. The mean bias (limits of agreement) for the E-aCAiOVX-00 was -0.5% (-13.3 to 12.3%) and -6.0% (-13.8 to 1.7%) for V̇O2 and V̇CO2 , respectively. The E-COVX demonstrated bias and limits of agreement that were not clinically acceptable; therefore, application of this module to pediatric patients would not be recommended. The new module, E-sCAiOVX, demonstrated acceptable bias and limits of agreement for the V̇O2 and V̇CO2 in the range 40-100 mL/min (which corresponds to patients in the range of ∼5-16 kg). Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Differences in oxygen consumption and external power between male and female speed skaters during supramaximal cycling.

    PubMed

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; de Groot, G

    1983-01-01

    Differences in performance levels between elite male and female endurance athletes are often explained by differences found in VO2 max even when expressed in VO2 max per kilogram lean body mass (VO2/LBM). Such an explanation is only a matter of course when less or no difference exists in mechanical efficiency, anaerobic power and technical variables like friction constants between males and females. Particularly during supramaximal exercises. In this study five elite male speed skaters were compared with five elite female speed skaters with respect to oxygen consumption and external power during a 3 min supramaximal bicycle ergometer test. The training background and training history of both groups were comparable. Although the elite males showed a 20% higher VO2/BW and 8% higher VO2/LBM (71.0 versus 65.01 x min-1 . kg-1) than the females, the female group showed the same mean external power Pc per kilogram body weight, and a surprising 12% higher Pc/LBM than the males (6.47 versus 5.79 W x kg-1). Hence the female group delivered 22% more external power per liter of oxygen consumption. With the help of additional data from 14 male and 11 female sub-elite skaters it is shown that the differences between the elite groups are mainly due to sex differences. In the light of differences between men and women reported in other studies, it seems likely that the differences found in this study are due to a difference in mechanical efficiency which particularly occurs in supramaximal tasks.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Case Studies in Physiology: Maximal oxygen consumption and performance in a centenarian cyclist.

    PubMed

    Billat, Véronique; Dhonneur, Gilles; Mille-Hamard, Laurence; Le Moyec, Laurence; Momken, Iman; Launay, Thierry; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Besse, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological characteristics of an elite centenarian cyclist who, at 101 yr old, established the 1-h cycling record for individuals ≥100 yr old (24.25 km) and to determine the physiological factors associated with his performance improvement 2 yr later at 103 yr old (26.92 km; +11%). Before each record, he performed an incremental test on a cycling ergometer. For 2 yr, he trained 5,000 km/yr with a polarized training that involved cycling 80% of mileage at "light" rate of perceived exertion (RPE) ≤12 and 20% at "hard" RPE ≥15 at a cadence between 50 and 70 rpm. His body weight and lean body mass did not change, while his maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o2max) increased (31-35 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); +13%). Peak power output increased from 90 to 125 W (+39%), mainly because of increasing the maximal pedaling frequency (69-90 rpm; +30%). Maximal heart rate did not change (134-137 beats/min) in contrast to the maximal ventilation (57-70 l/min, +23%), increasing with both the respiratory frequency (38-41 cycles/min; +8%) and the tidal volume (1.5-1.7 liters; +13%). Respiratory exchange ratio increased (1.03-1.14) to the same extent as tolerance to V̇co2 In conclusion, it is possible to increase performance and V̇o2max with polarized training focusing on a high pedaling cadence even after turning 100 yr old.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study shows, for the first time, that maximal oxygen consumption (+13%) and performance (+11%) can still be increased between 101 and 103 yr old with 2 yr of training and that a centenarian is able, at 103 yr old, to cover 26.9 km/h in 1 h. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Brain natriuretic peptide predicts forced vital capacity of the lungs, oxygen pulse and peak oxygen consumption in physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Popovic, Bojana; Petrovic, Milan; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Kocijancic, Aleksandar; Banovic, Marko; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Markovic, Vidan; Damjanovic, Svetozar S

    2013-05-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) is used as marker of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. However, the predictive value of circulating NT-pro-BNP for cardiac and pulmonary performance is unclear in physiological conditions. Standard echocardiography, tissue Doppler and forced spirometry at rest were used to assess cardiac parameters and forced vital capacity (FVC) in two groups of athletes (16 elite male wrestlers (W), 21 water polo player (WP)), as different stress adaptation models, and 20 sedentary subjects (C) matched for age. Cardiopulmonary test on treadmill (CPET), as acute stress model, was used to measure peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2), maximal heart rate (HRmax) and peak oxygen pulse (peak VO2/HR). NT-pro-BNP was measured by immunoassey sandwich technique 10min before the test - at rest, at the beginning of the test, at maximal effort, at third minute of recovery. FVC was higher in athletes and the highest in W (WP 5.60±0.29 l; W 6.57±1.00 l; C 5.41±0.29 l; p<0.01). Peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR were higher in athletes and the highest in WP. HRmax was not different among groups. In all groups, NT-pro-BNP decreased from rest to the beginning phase, increased in maximal effort and stayed unchanged in recovery. NT-pro-BNP was higher in C than W in all phases; WP had similar values as W and C. On multiple regression analysis, in all three groups together, ΔNT-pro-BNP from rest to the beginning phase independently predicted both peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR (r=0.38, 0.35; B=37.40, 0.19; p=0.007, 0.000, respectively). NT-pro-BNP at rest predicted HRmax (r=-0.32, B=-0.22, p=0.02). Maximal NT-pro-BNP predicted FVC (r=-0.22, B=-0.07, p=0.02). These results show noticeable predictive value of NT-pro-BNP for both cardiac and pulmonary performance in physiological conditions suggesting that NT-pro-BNP could be a common regulatory factor coordinating adaptation of heart and lungs to stress condition.

  17. Oxygen consumption and osmoregulatory capacity in Neomysis integer reduce competition for resources among mysid shrimp in a temperate estuary.

    PubMed

    Vilas, Cesar; Drake, Pilar; Pascual, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Results of field surveys and laboratory measurements of oxygen consumption and body fluid osmolality at different salinities in the mysids Neomysis integer, Mesopodopsis slabberi, and Rhopalophthalmus mediterraneus from the Guadalquivir estuary (southwest Spain) were used to test the hypothesis that osmotic stress (oxygen consumption vs. isosmotic points) was lowest at salinities that field distributions suggest are optimal. The three species showed overlapping spatial distributions within the estuary but clear segregation along the salinity gradient: N. integer, M. slabberi, and R. mediterraneus displayed maximal densities at lower, intermediate, and higher salinities, respectively. Adults of N. integer were extremely efficient hyperregulators (isosmotic point 30 per thousand) over the full salinity range tested (3 per thousand-32 per thousand), and their oxygen consumption rates were independent of salinity; adults of M. slabberi were strong hyper- and hyporegulators at salinities between 7 per thousand and 29 per thousand (isosmotic point, 21 per thousand) and showed higher oxygen consumptions at the lowest salinity (6 per thousand); adults of R. mediterraneus hyperregulated at salinities between 19 per thousand and seawater (isosmotic point, 36 per thousand), with the lowest oxygen consumption at salinity around their isosmotic point (35 per thousand). Thus, the osmoregulation capabilities of M. slabberi and R. mediterraneus seem to determine the salinity ranges in which most of their adults live, but this is not so for adults of N. integer. Moreover, maximal field densities of M. slabberi (males and females) and R. mediterraneus (males) occur at the same salinities as the lowest oxygen consumption. In contrast, field distribution of N. integer was clearly biased toward the lower end of the salinity ranges within which it osmoregulated. We hypothesize that the greater euryhalinity of N. integer makes it possible for this species to avoid competition with R

  18. Insulin regulates glucose consumption and lactate production through reactive oxygen species and pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Wang, Jing; Shen, Hua; Li, Chong-Yong; Wang, Min; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate glucose metabolism and closely associate with liver cancer, the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to understand the mechanism of insulin in promotion of liver cancer metabolism. We found that insulin increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression through reactive oxygen species (ROS) for regulating glucose consumption and lactate production, key process of glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Interestingly, insulin-induced ROS was found responsible for the suppression of miR-145 and miR-128, and forced expression of either miR-145 or miR-128 was sufficient to abolish insulin-induced PKM2 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of PKM2 expression also inhibited cancer cell growth and insulin-induced glucose consumption and lactate production, suggesting that PKM2 is a functional downstream effecter of insulin. Taken together, this study would provide a new insight into the mechanism of insulin-induced glycolysis.

  19. Regulation of photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in a hypersaline cyanobacterial mat (Camargue, France) by irradiance, temperature and salinity.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Andrea; Kühl, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Short-term effects of irradiance (0-1560 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), temperature (10-25 degrees C), and salinity (40-160) on oxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in a hypersaline mat (Salin-de-Giraud, France) were investigated with microsensors under controlled laboratory conditions. Dark O(2) consumption rates were mainly regulated by the mass transfer limitations imposed by the diffusive boundary layer. Areal rates of net photosynthesis increased with irradiance and saturated at irradiances >400 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1). At low irradiances, oxygen consumption increased more strongly with temperature than photosynthesis, whereas the opposite was observed at saturating irradiances. Net photosynthesis vs. irradiance curves were almost unaffected by decreasing salinity (100 to 40), whereas increasing salinities (100 to 160) led to a decrease of net photosynthesis at each irradiance. Dark O(2) consumption rates, maximal gross and net photosynthesis at light saturation were relatively constant over a broad salinity range (60-100) and decreased at salinities above the in situ salinity of 100. Within the range of natural variation, temperature was more important than salinity in regulating photosynthesis and oxygen consumption. At higher salinities the inhibitory impact of salinity on these processes and therefore the importance of salinity as a regulating environmental parameter increased, indicating that in more hypersaline systems, salinity has a stronger limiting effect on microbial activity.

  20. Oxygen consumption estimation with combined color doppler ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Harrison, Tyler; Forbrich, Alex; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (MRO2) quantifies tissue metabolism, which is important for diagnosis of many diseases. For a single vessel model, the MRO2 can be estimated in terms of the mean flow velocity, vessel crosssectional area, total concentration of hemoglobin (CHB), and the difference between the oxygen saturation (sO2) of blood flowing into and out of the tissue region. In this work, we would like to show the feasibility to estimate MRO2 with our combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow velocity can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate sO2 and CHB, all of these parameters necessary for MRO2 estimation can be provided by our system. Experiments have been performed on flow phantoms to generate co-registered color Doppler and photoacoustic images. To verify the sO2 estimation, two ink samples (red and blue) were mixed in various concentration ratios to mimic different levels of sO2, and the result shows a good match between the calculated concentration ratios and actual values.

  1. Increased oxygen radical-dependent inactivation of metabolic enzymes by liver microsomes after chronic ethanol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Dicker, E.; Cederbaum, A.I. )

    1988-10-01

    Enzymatic and nonenzymatic mixed-function oxidase systems have been shown to generate an oxidant that catalyzes the inactivation of glutamine synthetase and other metabolic enzymes. Recent studies have shown that microsomes isolated from rats chronically fed ethanol generate reactive oxygen intermediates at elevated rates compared with controls. Microsomes from rats fed ethanol were found to be more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes added to the incubation system. The enzymes studied were alcohol dehydrogenase, lactic dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase. The inactivation process by both types of microsomal preparations was sensitive to catalase and glutathione plus glutathione peroxidase, but was not affected by superoxide dismutase or hydroxyl radical scavengers. Iron was required for the inactivation of added enzymes; microsomes from the rats fed ethanol remained more effective than control microsomes in catalyzing the inactivation of enzymes in the absence or presence of several ferric complexes. The inactivation of enzymes was enhanced by the addition of menadione or paraquat to the microsomes, and rates of inactivation were higher with the microsomes from the ethanol-fed rats. The enhanced generation of reactive oxygen intermediates and increased inactivation of enzymes by microsomes may contribute toward the hepatotoxic effects associated with ethanol consumption.

  2. Daily cycle in oxygen consumption by the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis Stephenson.

    PubMed

    Maas, Amy E; Jones, Ian T; Reitzel, Adam M; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-01-15

    In bilaterian animals, the circadian clock is intimately involved in regulating energetic metabolism. Although cnidarians exhibit diel behavioral rhythms including cycles in locomotor activity, tentacle extension and spawning, daily cycles in cnidarian metabolism have not been described. To explore a possible circadian metabolic cycle, we maintained the anemone Nematostella vectensis in a 12 h light/dark cycle, a reversed light cycle, or in constant darkness. Oxygen consumption rates were measured at intervals using an optical oxygen meter. Respiration rates responded to entrainment with higher rates during light periods. During a second experiment with higher temporal resolution, respiration rates peaked late in the light period. The diel pattern could be detected after six days in constant darkness. Together, our results suggest that respiration rates in Nematostella exhibit a daily cycle that may be under circadian control and that the cycle in respiration rate is not driven by the previously described nocturnal increase in locomotor activity in this species. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Argon, xenon, hydrogen, and the oxygen consumption and glycolysis of mouse tissue slices.

    PubMed

    SOUTH, F E; COOK, S F

    1954-01-20

    The effects of xenon, argon, and hydrogen on the aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of mouse liver, brain, and sarcoma slices have been investigated. Xenon was found to alter the rates of metabolism of these tissues in a manner almost identical with helium. The gas increased the rate of oxygen consumption in all three tissues and significantly depressed that of anaerobic glycolysis in brain and liver. The depression of glycolysis in sarcoma was less pronounced and not highly significant. Although both the magnitude and statistical significance of the effects observed with argon were much smaller, there was a seeming adherence to the general pattern established by xenon and helium. Hydrogen while remaining essentially ineffective insofar as oxygen uptake was concerned, depressed glycolysis in both liver and brain slices but did not significantly affect sarcoma slices. The following points are stressed in the Discussion: (1) the magnitude and direction of effects exerted by helium, argon, xenon, hydrogen, and nitrogen do not conform with the relative values of molecular weight, density, and solubility of these gases; (2) the effect of these gases on tissue metabolism does not necessarily parallel that exerted upon the whole organism.

  4. Effects of temperature on oxygen consumption and ammonia—N excretion of Chlamys farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Ping; He, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Fu-Sui

    1998-06-01

    Effects of temperature on oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and ammonia—N excretion rate of scallop Chlamys farreri (1.7 6.2 cm in shell height) were studied in laboratory from Dec. 30,1996 to Jan. 28,1997. Under the controlled conditions of ambient water temperature 10 31°C and salinity 32, the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and ammonia—N were determined by the Winkle method and the hypobromite method, respectively. Results showed that the OCR ranged from 1.20 mg/g (DW) · h to 5.76 mg/g (DW) · h. The OCR increased with temperature from 10°C to 23°C, but at 28°C the OCR of mature individuals decreased, and that of different size scallops reduced at 31°C. The ammonia—N excretion rate ranged from 113.03 μg NH4-N/g (DW) · h to 486.63 μg NH4-N/g (DW) · h, and increased with temperature from 10°C to 31°C.

  5. Effects of reduced salinity on oxygen consumption and ammonia-N excretion of Chlamys farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jian; He, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Fu-Sui

    1999-09-01

    Effects of reduced salinity on the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the ammonia-N excretion rate (AER) of scallop Chlamys farreri (3.2 5.9 cm in shell height, 0.147 1.635 g in soft tissue dry weight) were studied in laboratory from March 21, 1997 to April 16, 1997. Under the controlled conditions of reduced salinity from 31.5 to 15.0 and ambient temperature 17°C and 23°C, the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and ammonia-N were determined by the Winkle method and the hypobromite method, respectively. Results showed that with controlled reduced salinity, the mean values of the OCR were 2.17 mg/(g.h) at 17°C, and 2.86 mg/(g.h) at 23°C and that the mean values of the AER were 178.0 μg/(g.h) at 17°C and 147.0 μg/(g.h) at 23°C. The OCR and the AER decreased with reducing salinity from 31.5 to 15.0 both at 17°C and 23°C. The effects of reduced salinity on the OCR and the AER of scallop C. farreri could be represented by the allometric equation and the exponential equation, respectively.

  6. Oxygen consumption rate and Na+/K+-ATPase activity in early developmental stages of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus Lam.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomšić, Sanja; Stanković, Suzana; Lucu, Čedomil

    2011-09-01

    Changes in oxygen consumption rate and Na+/K+-ATPase activity during early development were studied in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus Lam. The oxygen consumption rate increased from 0.12 μmol O2 mg protein-1 h-1 in unfertilized eggs to 0.38 μmol O2 mg protein-1 h-1 25 min after fertilization. Specific activity of the Na+/K+-ATPase was significantly stimulated after fertilization, ranging up to 1.07 μmol Pi h-1 mg protein-1 in the late blastula stage and slightly lower values in the early and late pluteus stages.

  7. Oxygen consumption of elite distance runners on an anti-gravity treadmill®.

    PubMed

    McNeill, David K P; Kline, John R; de Heer, Hendrick D; Coast, J Richard

    2015-06-01

    amounts of body weight-support (BWS), the slope of the relationship between velocity and oxygen consumption (ΔVO2/Δv) decreases significantly. This means the change in oxygen consumption (VO2) is significantly smaller over a given change in velocity at higher amounts of BWS.There is a non-linear decrease in VO2 with increasing BWS. As such, with each increment in the amount of BWS provided, the reduction in VO2 becomes increasingly smaller.This paper provides first of its kind data on the effects of BWS on the cost of running among highly trained, elite runners. The outcomes of this study are in line with previous findings among non-elite runners.

  8. Acute toxicity of lead on tolerance, oxygen consumption, ammonia-N excretion, and metal accumulation in Penaeus indicus postlarvae.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Satyavathi; Khan, Ritindra N; Yallapragada, Prabhakara Rao

    2002-02-01

    The estuaries and backwaters that are the potential breeding grounds of penaeid shrimps are subject to heavy metal pollution through industrial effluents and domestic sewage. In the present investigation, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the acute toxicity of lead on tolerance, oxygen consumption, ammonia-N excretion, and metal accumulation in Penaeus indicus postlarvae. Static bioassay tests were employed to determine tolerance limits. Oxygen consumption, ammonia-N excretion, and metal accumulation were determined in postlarvae by exposing them to different concentrations of lead for a period of 48 h. Oxygen consumption measurements were made by using a respiratory chamber equipped with an oxygen electrode and ammonia-N was determined with trione (dichloro-S-triamine 2,4,6(1H,3H,5H-trione)). Accumulation of metal was estimated by wet-ash method. The LC50 value for 96 h was 7.223 ppm and the regression equation Y=4.1638+0.9738X with correlation coefficient of 0.9613 was obtained by probit method. A decrease in oxygen consumption and ammonia-N excretion was observed in postlarvae with increasing concentration of lead. A concentration-dependent accumulation of metal was noticed in these postlarvae. Modifications in O:N ratios of postlarvae suggest that lead accumulation might have altered utilization patterns.

  9. [The value of systematic monitoring of oxygen consumption in the diagnosis and therapy of septic shock].

    PubMed

    Pilas, V; Cubrilo, M; Bakula, V; Vranjkovic, S; Bakula, B; Bilic, A

    1990-01-01

    In 31 patients with sepsis and multiple organic dysfunction, changes in the systemic oxygen consumption (VO2) during reanimation were observed in order to discover more objective indicators of the course and prognosis of the disease. In a prospective randomized study, 21 live (Group 1) and 11 dead patients (Group 2) were included. The investigation was based upon the application of the invasive tracing of oxygen hemodynamics and transport. The findings of the initially hypovolemic status were compared with those of the stabile normovolemic status obtained by the application of infusions and the blood volume substitute. In the early phase of the disease there were no significant differences in the clinical finding of the circulatory shock and the volume deficit of the circulated blood between these two groups of patients. Group 1 patients had lower values of the cardiac index (CI) and the systemic oxygen transport (DO2). In them there was a greater frequency of acute organic insufficiency, especially pulmonal, renal and hepatal. In the initial status VO2 decreased. In the normovolemic status of Group 1, a significant VO2 was found, while in Group 2 in spite of a DO2 increase and hemodynamics improvement, a more significant VO2 increase was not obtained. As VO2 is an objective indicator of oxidative metabolic reactions of the organism and the circulatory system, the authors maintain that by the VO2 tracing, a better insight into the seriousness and course of the disease is obtained, and that an inadequate VO2 finding during the therapeutic treatment requires a revision of the treatment.

  10. Tissue blood flow and oxygen consumption measured with near-infrared frequency-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunescu, Lelia Adelina

    2001-12-01

    For decades, researchers have contributed with new ways of applying physics' principles to medicine. Moreover, researchers were involved in developing new, non-invasive instrumentation for medical applications. Recently, application of optical techniques in biology and medicine became an important field. Researchers found a non- invasive approach of using visible and near-infrared light as a probe for tissue investigation. Optical methods can contribute to medicine by offering the possibility of rapid, low-resolution, functional images and real-time devices. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a useful technique for the investigation of biological tissues because of the relatively low absorption of water and high absorption of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in the near- infrared region of 750-900 nm. Due to these properties, the near-infrared light can penetrate biological tissues in the range of 0.5-2 cm, offering investigation possibility of deep tissues and differentiate among healthy and diseased tissues. This work represents the initial steps towards understanding and improving of the promising near- infrared frequency-domain technique. This instrument has a very important advantage: it can be used non-invasively to investigate many parts of the human body, including the brain. My research consists primarily of in vivo measurements of optical parameters such as absorption and reduced scattering coefficients and consequently, blood parameters such as oxy, deoxy, and total hemoglobin concentrations, tissue oxygen saturation, blood flow and oxygen consumption of skeletal muscle of healthy and diseased subjects. This research gives a solid background towards a ready- to-use instrument that can continuously, in real-time, measure blood parameters and especially blood oxygenation. This is a very important information in emergency medicine, for persons under intensive care, or undergoing surgery, organ transplant or other interventions.

  11. Effect of micro- and macroencapsulation on oxygen consumption by pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Cornolti, Roberta; Figliuzzi, Marina; Remuzzi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Immunoisolation of pancreatic islets is extensively investigated for glycemic control in diabetic experimental animals. We previously reported that subcutaneous xenotransplantation of bovine islets protected by a selective polysulfone membrane successfully controlled glycemia in diabetic rats for up to 20 days. We then wondered whether immunoisolated islets have adequate oxygen supply in this device, where only diffusive transport allows cell function and survival. Here we set up an experimental technique to measure oxygen consumption rate (OCR) using a Clark's electrode inserted in a glass thermostated chamber connected to a data recorder and acquisition system. Bovine islets were isolated from 6-month-old calves, encapsulated in sodium alginate microcapsules or inserted in polysulfone hollow fibers. After 1 and 2 days in culture a series of measurements was performed using free islets (at normal or high-glucose concentration), islets encapsulated in microcapsules, or in hollow fibers. In free islets OCR averaged from 2.0 +/- 0.8 pmol/IEQ/min at low-glucose concentration and from 2.5 +/- 1.0 pmol/IEQ/min at high-glucose concentration (p < 0.01). OCR in islets encapsulated in microcapsules and in hollow fibers was comparable, and not significantly different from that measured in free islets. Two days after isolation OCR averaged 2.3 +/- 0.6 in free islets, 2.3 +/- 0.9 in alginate microcapsules, and 2.2 +/- 0.7 pmol/IEQ/min in hollow fibers. These results show that OCR by bovine islets is comparable to that previously reported for other species. OCR increases in islets stimulated with high glucose and may be considered as a functional index. Moreover, islet encapsulation in alginate microcapsule, as well as in hollow fiber membranes, did not significantly affect in vitro OCR, suggesting adequate islet oxygenation in these conditions.

  12. The response to monochromatic light flashes of the oxygen consumption of honeybee drone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Local measurements of the fall in oxygen pressure on stimulation of slices of the retina of the honeybee drone by flashes of light were made with oxygen microelectrodes and used to calculate the kinetics of the extra oxygen consumption (delta QO2) induced by each flash. The action spectrum for delta QO2 was obtained from response-intensity curves in response to brief (40 ms) monochromatic light flashes. The action spectrum of receptor potentials was obtained with the same experimental conditions. The two action spectra match closely: they deviate slightly from the photosensitivity spectrum of the drone rhodopsin (R). The deviation is thought to be due to wavelength- dependent light scattering and absorption in the preparation. In these experiments, the visual pigment was first illuminated with orange light, which is known to convert the bistable drone photopigment predominantly to the R state from the metarhodopsin (M) state. When long (300-900 ms) light flashes were used to elicit delta QO2, the responses to different wavelengths could not be matched in time course (as for the short flashes). Flashes producing large R-to-M conversions produced a prolonged delta QO2. The prolongation did not occur after double flashes, which produced both large R-to-M and M-to-R conversions. Similar changes in the length of afterpotentials in the photoreceptor cells and in a long-lasting decrease in photoreceptor intracellular K+ activity were found after long single or double flashes. The results are interpreted to show that the initial event for stimulation by light of metabolism in the drone retina is the same as that for stimulation of electrical responses (i.e., absorption of photons by R). Absorption of photons by M can produce an inhibitory effect on this stimulation. PMID:3598560

  13. Anaphylactic shock: a form of distributive shock without inhibition of oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Dewachter, Pascale; Jouan-Hureaux, Valérie; Franck, Patricia; Menu, Patrick; de Talancé, Nicole; Zannad, Faiez; Laxenaire, Marie-Claire; Longrois, Dan; Mertes, Paul Michel

    2005-07-01

    The pathophysiology of anaphylactic shock during anesthesia is incompletely characterized. It is described as distributive by analogy with septic shock (anaerobic metabolism, high tissue oxygen pressure [Ptio2] values). The Ptio2 profile and its metabolic consequences during anaphylaxis are not known. Ovalbumin-sensitized anaphylactic shock rats (n = 11) were compared to nicardipine-induced hypotension rats (n = 12) for systemic hemodynamics, Ptio2, sympathetic nervous system activation, skeletal muscle blood flow, and interstitial lactate and pyruvate concentrations using combined microdialysis and polarographic Clark-type oxygen probes. In both groups, the time course and the magnitude of arterial hypotension were similar. The ovalbumin group but not the nicardipine group displayed decreased skeletal muscle blood flow (from 45 +/- 6.2 ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) to 24.3 +/- 5 ml x 100 g(-1) x min(-1); P < 0.0001) and Ptio2 values (from 42 +/- 5 to 5 +/- 2; P < 0.0001). The ovalbumin group had more intense sympathetic nervous system activation with higher plasma epinephrine and interstitial norepinephrine concentrations. For the ovalbumin group, there was skeletal muscle anaerobic metabolism (lactate concentration increased from 0.446 +/- 0.105 to 1.741 +/- 0.459 mm; P < 0.05) and substrate depletion (pyruvate concentration decreased from 0.034 +/- 0.01 mm to 0.006 +/- 0.002 mm; P < 0.05) leading to increased interstitial lactate/pyruvate ratios (from 17 +/- 6 to 311 +/- 115; P < 0.05). This profile suggests decreased skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery. Persistent energy consumption results in decreased Ptio2 and substrate depletion through anaerobic glycolysis leading to complete failure of cellular energy production. This could explain rapid organ dysfunction and resuscitation difficulties.

  14. Comparative effects of isoproterenol and dopamine on myocardial oxygen consumption, blood flow distribution and total body oxygen consumption in conscious lambs with and without an aortopulmonary left to right shunt.

    PubMed

    Bartelds, B; Gratama, J W; Meuzelaar, K J; Dalinghaus, M; Koers, J H; Heikens, W F; Zijlstra, W G; Kuipers, J R

    1998-02-01

    We sought to study the effects of catecholamines on myocardial oxygen consumption (VO2), regional blood flows and total body VO2 in lambs with circulatory congestion. Catecholamines are often used to support cardiovascular function in children with circulatory congestion because they increase contractility as well as heart rate. However, these changes increase myocardial oxygen demand and thus can lead to a mismatch between myocardial oxygen supply and demand. Catecholamines can also change regional blood flows and VO2 unfavorably. We infused isoproterenol (0.1 microg/kg body weight per min) and dopamine (10 microg/kg per min) and measured myocardial and total body VO2 and regional blood flows in chronically instrumented 7-week old lambs with and without a left to right shunt. Isoproterenol increased myocardial VO2, parallel to the increase in heart rate. However, myocardial blood flow and, consequently, oxygen supply also increased. This increase outweighed the increase in myocardial VO2, so that myocardial oxygen extraction decreased. Isoproterenol did not change blood flow distribution. Isoproterenol increased total body VO2; however, systemic oxygen supply increased even more, so that oxygen extraction decreased and mixed venous oxygen saturation increased. In contrast, dopamine had no or little effect on myocardial VO2 or blood flow distribution. We conclude that the catecholamines isoproterenol and dopamine do not lead to a mismatch between myocardial oxygen supply and demand, nor do they change blood flow distribution unfavorably in 7-week old lambs with a left to right shunt. We demonstrated that isoproterenol is superior to dopamine, because it shifts the balance between oxygen supply and consumption toward supply so that systemic oxygen extraction reserve increases.

  15. [Neurogenic stunned myocardium].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Bailén, M; Rucabado Aguilar, L; López Martínez, A

    2006-01-01

    The existence of stunned myocardium and reversible myocardial dysfunction is widely described and accepted in patients suffering ischemic heart disease. However, it cannot be exclusive to coronary disease. Classically, the appearance of electrocardiographic changes in the critical neurological disease has been described. However, at present, it seems to be observed that some of these patients with critical neurological disease could have variable grades of myocardial dysfunction, which is generally reversible in the surviving patients. This myocardial dysfunction, which could affect critically ill neurological patients, has traits similar to stunned myocardium generated in coronary patients since: a) it is generally associated to electrocardiographic changes, b) it can be accompanied by segmental contractility disorders and even c) it may be accompanied by a certain increase of cardiac biomarkers. Although its etiopathogeny is unknown, it could be related with the severity of the primary neurological disease. Its prophylaxis and prognosis are also unknown. It could be related with neurogenic edema, with hemodynamic instability, and could also play a very important role in brain death and in organ donation.

  16. Loading and Concurrent Synchronous Whole-Body Vibration Interaction Increases Oxygen Consumption During Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Serravite, Daniel H.; Edwards, David; Edwards, Elizabeth S.; Gallo, Sara E.; Signorile, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise is commonly used as an intervention to increase caloric output and positively affect body composition. A major challenge is the low compliance often seen when the prescribed exercise is associated with high levels of exertion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may allow increased caloric output with reduced effort; however, there is limited information concerning the effect of WBV on oxygen consumption (VO2). Therefore, this study assessed the synergistic effects of resistance training and WBV on VO2. We examined VO2 at different loads (0%, 20%, and 40% body weight (BW)) and vibration intensities (No vibration (NV), 35HZ, 2-3mm (35L), 50Hz, 57mm (50H)) in ten men (26.5 ± 5.1 years). Data were collected during different stages (rest, six 30s sets of squatting, and recovery). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a stage x load x vibration interaction. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences during rest; however, a significant vibration x load interaction occurred during exercise. Both 35L and 50H produced greater VO2 than NV at a moderate load of 20%BW. Although 40%BW produced greater VO2 than 20%BW or 0%BW using NV, no significant difference in VO2 was seen among vibratory conditions at 40%BW. Moreover, no significant differences were seen between 50H and 35L at 20%BW and NV at 40%BW. During recovery there was a main effect for load. Post hoc analyses revealed that VO2 at 40%BW was significantly higher than 20%BW or 0%BW, and 20%BW produced higher VO2 than no load. Minute-by-minute analysis revealed a significant impact on VO2 due to load but not to vibratory condition. We conclude that the synergistic effect of WBV and active squatting with a moderate load is as effective at increasing VO2 as doubling the external load during squatting without WBV. Key Points Synchronous whole body vibration in conjunction with moderate external loading (app 20% BW) can increase oxygen consumption to the same extent as heavier loading (40% BW) during performance of the parallel

  17. Loading and concurrent synchronous whole-body vibration interaction increases oxygen consumption during resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Serravite, Daniel H; Edwards, David; Edwards, Elizabeth S; Gallo, Sara E; Signorile, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    Exercise is commonly used as an intervention to increase caloric output and positively affect body composition. A major challenge is the low compliance often seen when the prescribed exercise is associated with high levels of exertion. Whole-body vibration (WBV) may allow increased caloric output with reduced effort; however, there is limited information concerning the effect of WBV on oxygen consumption (VO2). Therefore, this study assessed the synergistic effects of resistance training and WBV on VO2. We examined VO2 at different loads (0%, 20%, and 40% body weight (BW)) and vibration intensities (No vibration (NV), 35HZ, 2-3mm (35L), 50Hz, 57mm (50H)) in ten men (26.5 ± 5.1 years). Data were collected during different stages (rest, six 30s sets of squatting, and recovery). Repeated measures ANOVA showed a stage x load x vibration interaction. Post hoc analysis revealed no differences during rest; however, a significant vibration x load interaction occurred during exercise. Both 35L and 50H produced greater VO2 than NV at a moderate load of 20%BW. Although 40%BW produced greater VO2 than 20%BW or 0%BW using NV, no significant difference in VO2 was seen among vibratory conditions at 40%BW. Moreover, no significant differences were seen between 50H and 35L at 20%BW and NV at 40%BW. During recovery there was a main effect for load. Post hoc analyses revealed that VO2 at 40%BW was significantly higher than 20%BW or 0%BW, and 20%BW produced higher VO2 than no load. Minute-by-minute analysis revealed a significant impact on VO2 due to load but not to vibratory condition. We conclude that the synergistic effect of WBV and active squatting with a moderate load is as effective at increasing VO2 as doubling the external load during squatting without WBV. Key PointsSynchronous whole body vibration in conjunction with moderate external loading (app 20% BW) can increase oxygen consumption to the same extent as heavier loading (40% BW) during performance of the parallel squat

  18. A novel isotopic fractionation during dissolved oxygen consumption in mesopelagic waters inferred from observation and model simulation of dissolved oxygen δ18O in open oceanic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, N.; Oka, A.; Gamo, T.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic ratio (δ18O) of dissolved oxygen is a useful for bioactive tracer of the subsurface aphotic (mesopelagic) ocean since it varies nonlinearly related to oxygen consumption via stoichiometry of organic matter decomposition. Therefore, along with global circulation model (GCM), observed δ18O and their vertical/geographical distribution can be effectively used to quantitatively determine how marine biological and ocean physical processes contribute to varying dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the ocean, in particular mesopelagic zone where pronounced biological activity alters DO concentration significantly. In the central north Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean, including Arabian Sea, one of the few regions in the open ocean which has oxygen minimum zone (OMZ, a layer with severely depleted DO), vertical profiles of DO and δ18O were observed. These observed data are compared with a GCM simulation in which a constant isotopic fractionation factor of DO by marine biological respiration and a fixed Redfield molar ratio between P and O are assumed. Even in the Arabian Sea OMZ, relationship between DO and δ18O was found to be similar to those observed in other open oceans, indicating that no specific oxygen consumption process occurred in the OMZ. Using the GCM model, we attempted to reproduce the observed overall relationship between DO and δ18O, but it failed when we adopted the previously reported isotopic fractionation factor: Discrepancy became larger when oxygen saturation level decreased, in particular in thermocline water (at 20% oxygen saturation level, modeled δ18O was heavier than observed values by +7‰). Sensitivity simulations with the GCM model revealed that (1) simply changing the intensity of oxygen consumption by respiration/organic matter decomposition nor physical processes (diffusion and/or advection) could explain the observed relationship between DO and δ18O, (2) applying a smaller isotopic fractionation for deep waters

  19. Oxygen consumption and development of volatile sulfur compounds during bottle aging of two Shiraz wines. Influence of pre- and postbottling controlled oxygen exposure.

    PubMed

    Ugliano, Maurizio; Dieval, Jean-Baptiste; Siebert, Tracey E; Kwiatkowski, Mariola; Aagaard, Olav; Vidal, Stéphane; Waters, Elizabeth J

    2012-09-05

    The evolution of different volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) during bottle maturation of two Shiraz wines submitted to controlled oxygen exposure prior to bottling (through micro-oxygenation, MOX) and postbottling (through the closure) was investigated. H(2)S, methyl mercaptan (MeSH), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were found to increase during aging. Lower postbottling oxygen exposure, as obtained by different degrees of oxygen ingress through the closure, resulted in increased H(2)S and methyl mercaptan. In one wine MOX increased the concentration of H(2)S and methyl mercaptan during maturation. Dimethyl disulfide and DMS were not affected by any form of oxygen exposure. Overall, postbottling oxygen had a stronger influence than MOX on the evolution of VSCs. Data suggest that dimethyl disulfide was not a precursor to methyl mercaptan during bottle maturation. For the two wines studied, a consumption of oxygen of 5 mg/L over 12 months was the most effective oxygen exposure regimen to decrease accumulation of MeSH and H(2)S during bottle aging.

  20. The distribution of blood flow, oxygen consumption, and work output among the respiratory muscles during unobstructed hyperventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, C H; Pagel, M A; Johnson, R L

    1977-01-01

    An animal model was developed to describe respiratory muscle work output, blood flow, and oxygen consumption during mechanical ventilation, resting spontaneous ventilation, and the increased unobstructed ventilatory efforts induced by CO2 rebreathing. Almost all of the work of breathing was inspiratory work at all ventilatory levels; thus, only blood flows to the diaphragm and external intercostals increased in the transition from mechanical to spontaneous ventilation, and they further increased linearly as ventilatory work was incrementally augmented ninefold by CO2 rebreathing. No other muscles of inspiration manifest increased blood flows. A small amount of expiratory work was measured at high ventilatory volumes during which two expiratory muscles (transverse abdominal and intercostals) had moderate increases in blood flow. Blood pressure did not change, but cardiac output doubled. Arterial-venous oxygen content difference across the diaphragm increased progressively, so oxygen delivery was augmented by both increased blood flow and increased oxygen extraction at all work loads. Oxygen consumption increased linearly as work of breathing increased, so efficiency did not change significantly. The mean efficiency of the respiratory muscles was 15.5%. These results differ significantly from the patterns previously observed by us during increased work of breathing induced by inspiratory resistance, suggesting a different distribution of work load among the various muscles of respiration, a different fractionation of oxygen delivery between blood flow and oxygen extraction, and a higher efficiency when shortening, not tension development, of the muscle is increased. PMID:830664

  1. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride on methane production, total body oxygen consumption, and blood metabolites in finishing beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An indirect calorimetry experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) for 20 d on total body oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, methane production, and blood metabolites in finishing beef steers. Sixteen Angus steers (initial BW = 555 ± 12.7 kg) w...

  2. Seasonal and ontogenetic changes modulate oxygen consumption and antioxidant defenses in the cutlassfish Trichiurus lepturus (Pisces, Trichiuridae).

    PubMed

    Filho, Danilo Wilhelm; Fraga, César G; Boveris, Alberto

    2017-03-24

    Several oxidative stress markers and liver oxygen consumption were measured in different tissues of the marine fish Trichiurus lepturus in late summer and late winter, as well as in juveniles and adult females. Oxygen consumption in liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity in liver, red cells, lens and roe, vitamin E, ubiquinol10, β-carotene in liver, red cells, and roe, as well as contents of reduced glutathione (GSH) and lipoperoxidation (TBARS) in red cells were evaluated. Regarding ontogeny, compared to adult fish, juveniles showed significant higher SOD activity in liver and lens, as well as higher liver contents of vitamin E. In contrast, adult females showed higher contents of vitamin E in roe, ubiquinol10 in liver and roe, and higher GSH levels in red cells, while the other markers remained unchanged. Regarding seasonal changes, no differences were detected in adult females for liver CAT and ubiquinol10, CAT in roe, vitamin E in roe and in red cells, liver and red cell ubiquinol10, and in GSH in red cells. However, and coinciding with the spawning period of late summer, liver oxygen consumption, SOD and CAT activity and ubiquinol10 contents in roe and SOD activity in red cells, and red cell TBARS contents were higher compared to late winter. These temporal antioxidant adjustments of Trichiurus lepturus seem to be parallel to the higher oxygen consumption typical of juvenile forms and also to the intense spawning and foraging activities of adult females in late summer.

  3. EFFECT OF HYPOXIA ON THE RATE OF OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF NEWBORN, YOUNG, AND ADULT MICE AT VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Critical Po2 that is, Po2 below the point at which oxygen consumption is reduced - was measured in newborn, 5-day-old, and adult mice. At...thermoneutral environmental temperatures, the critical Po2 of newborn was 85 mm. Hg; that of 5-day-old mice was 100 mm. Hg; and that of adults was 70 mm. Hg

  4. Metabolically-Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released a draft report entitled, Metabolically-Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates, for independent external peer review and public comment. NCEA published the Exposure Factors Handbook in 1997. This comprehens...

  5. Effect of long-term caloric restriction on oxygen consumption and body temperature in two different strains of mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Melissa; Sohal, Barbara H.; Forster, Michael J.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis, that a decrease in metabolic rate mediates the life span prolonging effect of caloric restriction (CR), was tested using two strains of mice, one of which, C57BL/6, exhibits life span extension as a result of CR, while the other, DBA/2, shows little or no effect. Comparisons of the rate of resting oxygen consumption and body temperature were made between the strains after they were fed ad libitum (AL) or maintained under 40% CR, from 4 to 16 months of age. Ad libitum-fed mice of the two strains weighed the same when young and consumed similar amounts of food throughout the experiment; however, the C57BL/6 mice weighed 25% more than DBA/2 mice at 15 months of age. The rate of oxygen consumption was normalized as per gram body weight, lean body mass or organ weight as well as per animal. The body temperature and the rate of oxygen consumption, expressed according to all of the four criteria, were decreased in the DBA/2 mice following CR. The C57BL/6 mice also showed a CR-related decrease in body temperature and in the rate of oxygen consumption per animal and when normalized according to lean body mass or organ weight. The results of this study indicate that CR indeed lowers the rate of metabolism; however, this effect by CR does not necessarily entail the prolongation of the life span of mice. PMID:17822741

  6. Effect of long-term caloric restriction on oxygen consumption and body temperature in two different strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melissa; Sohal, Barbara H; Forster, Michael J; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2007-10-01

    The hypothesis, that a decrease in metabolic rate mediates the life span prolonging effect of caloric restriction (CR), was tested using two strains of mice, one of which, C57BL/6, exhibits life span extension as a result of CR, while the other, DBA/2, shows little or no effect. Comparisons of the rate of resting oxygen consumption and body temperature were made between the strains after they were fed ad libitum (AL) or maintained under 40% CR, from 4 to 16 months of age. Ad libitum-fed mice of the two strains weighed the same when young and consumed similar amounts of food throughout the experiment; however, the C57BL/6 mice weighed 25% more than DBA/2 mice at 15 months of age. The rate of oxygen consumption was normalized as per gram body weight, lean body mass or organ weight as well as per animal. The body temperature and the rate of oxygen consumption, expressed according to all of the four criteria, were decreased in the DBA/2 mice following CR. The C57BL/6 mice also showed a CR-related decrease in body temperature and in the rate of oxygen consumption per animal and when normalized according to lean body mass or organ weight. The results of this study indicate that CR indeed lowers the rate of metabolism; however, this effect by CR does not necessarily entail the prolongation of the life span of mice.

  7. Effects of thiamine and clenbuterol on body composition, plasma metabolites and hepatic oxygen consumption in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Y; Okada, S; Tanaka, T

    1999-03-01

    1. We examined the effects of thiamine-hydrochloride (10 mg/kg body weight) and a beta-agonist, clenbuterol (50 microg/kg body weight), on plasma metabolites and hepatic oxygen consumption in female broiler chicks. 2. Clenbuterol, thiamine or both, dissolved in saline, were injected into thigh muscle on 2, 4 and 6 d of age. At 7 d of age blood samples in each treatment group were obtained and breast muscle and liver were weighed; liver slices were used for measurement of oxygen consumption. 3. Body weight gain was reduced by clenbuterol. Thiamine increased breast muscle weight as a proportion of body weight regardless of clenbuterol dose. Clenbuterol increased relative liver weight markedly, especially when chicks received thiamine also. 4. Clenbuterol increased plasma free fatty acid concentration in chicks treated with thiamine. Thiamine decreased plasma triglyceride regardless of clenbuterol dose. Plasma glucose concentration was decreased by both thiamine and clenbuterol. 5. The absolute rate of oxygen consumption in liver slices was greater in the thiamine-treated chicks; clenbuterol did not affect hepatic oxygen consumption. 6. These findings suggest that thiamine-induced energy expenditure results not only from thermogenesis in the liver, but also from increasing energy utilisation for muscle hypertrophy and this vitamin supplementation facilitates the lipolytic effects of the beta-agonist.

  8. Metabolically-Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has released a draft report entitled, Metabolically-Derived Human Ventilation Rates: A Revised Approach Based Upon Oxygen Consumption Rates, for independent external peer review and public comment. NCEA published the Exposure Factors Handbook in 1997. This comprehens...

  9. Following the N2O consumption in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern South Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, M.; Farías, L.

    2012-08-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), such as those found in the eastern South Pacific (ESP), are the most important N2O sources in the global ocean relative to their volume. N2O production is related to low O2 concentrations and high primary productivity. However, when O2 is sufficiently low, canonical denitrification takes place and N2O consumption can be expected. N2O distribution in the ESP was analyzed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range (from 5° to 30° S and from 71-76° to ~ 84° W) based on ~ 890 N2O measurements. Intense N2O consumption, driving undersaturations as low as 40%, was always associated with secondary NO2- accumulation (SNM), a good indicator of suboxic/anoxic O2 levels. First, we explore relationships between ΔN2O and O2 based on existing data of denitrifying bacteria cultures and field observations. Given the uncertainties in the O2 measurements, a second relationship between ΔN2O and NO2- (> 0.75 μM) was established for suboxic waters (O2 < 8 μM). We reproduced the apparent N2O production (ΔN2O) along the OMZ in ESP with high reliability (r2 = 0.73 p = 0.01). Our results will contribute to the quantification of the N2O that is recycled in O2 deficient waters, and improve the prediction of N2O behavior under future scenarios of OMZ expansion and intensification.

  10. Direct measurement of oxygen consumption rates from attached and unattached cells in a reversibly sealed, diffusionally isolated sample chamber

    PubMed Central

    Strovas, Timothy J.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Anderson, Judy B.; Nandakumar, Vivek; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen consumption is a fundamental component of metabolic networks, mitochondrial function, and global carbon cycling. To date there is no method available that allows for replicate measurements on attached and unattached biological samples without compensation for extraneous oxygen leaking into the system. Here we present the Respiratory Detection System, which is compatible with virtually any biological sample. The RDS can be used to measure oxygen uptake in microliter-scale volumes with a reversibly sealed sample chamber, which contains a porphyrin-based oxygen sensor. With the RDS, one can maintain a diffusional seal for up to three hours, allowing for the direct measurement of respiratory function of samples with fast or slow metabolic rates. The ability to easily measure oxygen uptake in small volumes with small populations or dilute samples has implications in cell biology, environmental biology, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:21546993

  11. Oxygen consumption and heart rate responses to isolated ballet exercise sets.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Dos Santos Cunha, Giovani; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Follmer, Bruno; Krause, Mauricio; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Ballet stage performances are associated with higher cardiorespiratory demand than rehearsals and classes. Hence, new interest is emerging to create periodized training that enhances dancers' fitness while minimizing delayed exercise-induced fatigue and possible injuries. Finding out in what zones of intensity dancers work during different ballet movements may support the use of supplemental training adjusted to the needs of the individual dancer. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to describe dancers' oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) responses during the performance of nine isolated ballet exercise sets, as correlated with their first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Twelve female ballet dancers volunteered for the study. Their maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), VT1, and VT2 were determined by use of an incremental treadmill test. Nine sets of ballet movements were assessed: pliés, tendus, jetés, rond de jambes, fondus, grand adage (adage), grand battements, temps levés, and sautés. The sets were randomly executed and separated by 5 minute rest periods. ANOVA for repeated measurements followed by the Bonferroni Post-hoc test were applied (p < 0.05). VO2 responses were as follows: pliés (17.6 ± 1.6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)); tendus and adage were not significantly greater than VT1; rond de jambes (21.8 ± 3.1 ml·kg(-1) ·min(-1)); fondus and jetés were higher than VT1 and the previous exercises; grand battements (25.8 ± 2.9 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was greater than all the other exercises and VT1; and VT2 was significantly higher than all ballet sets. This stratification followed closely, but not exactly, the variation in HR. For example, rond de jambes (156.8 ± 19 b·min(-1)) did not show any significant difference from all the other ballet sets, nor VT1 or VT2. It is concluded that the workloads of isolated ballet sets, based on VO2 responses, vary between low and moderate aerobic intensity in relation to dancers' VT1 and

  12. Reduction in Post-Marathon Peak Oxygen Consumption: Sign of Cardiac Fatigue in Amateur Runners?

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana Paula Rennó; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Francisco, Ricardo Contesini; Barretto, Rodrigo Bellios de Mattos; Sierra, Carlos Anibal; Meneghelo, Romeu Sergio; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Stein, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged aerobic exercise, such as running a marathon, produces supraphysiological stress that can affect the athlete's homeostasis. Some degree of transient myocardial dysfunction ("cardiac fatigue") can be observed for several days after the race. Objective To verify if there are changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity, and cardiac inotropy and lusitropy in amateur marathoners after running a marathon. Methods The sample comprised 6 male amateur runners. All of them underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) one week before the São Paulo Marathon, and 3 to 4 days after that race. They underwent echocardiography 24 hours prior to and immediately after the marathon. All subjects were instructed not to exercise, to maintain their regular diet, ingest the same usual amount of liquids, and rest at least 8 hours a day in the period preceding the CPET. Results The athletes completed the marathon in 221.5 (207; 250) minutes. In the post-marathon CPET, there was a significant reduction in peak oxygen consumption and peak oxygen pulse compared to the results obtained before the race (50.75 and 46.35 mL.kg-1 .min-1; 19.4 and 18.1 mL.btm, respectively). The echocardiography showed a significant reduction in the s' wave (inotropic marker), but no significant change in the E/e' ratio (lusitropic marker). Conclusions In amateur runners, the marathon seems to promote changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity identified within 4 days after the race, with a reduction in the cardiac contractility. Such changes suggest that some degree of "cardiac fatigue" can occur. PMID:26760783

  13. Reduction in Post-Marathon Peak Oxygen Consumption: Sign of Cardiac Fatigue in Amateur Runners?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Ana Paula Rennó; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Francisco, Ricardo Contesini; Barretto, Rodrigo Bellios de Mattos; Sierra, Carlos Anibal; Meneghelo, Romeu Sergio; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Stein, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    Prolonged aerobic exercise, such as running a marathon, produces supraphysiological stress that can affect the athlete's homeostasis. Some degree of transient myocardial dysfunction ("cardiac fatigue") can be observed for several days after the race. To verify if there are changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity, and cardiac inotropy and lusitropy in amateur marathoners after running a marathon. The sample comprised 6 male amateur runners. All of them underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) one week before the São Paulo Marathon, and 3 to 4 days after that race. They underwent echocardiography 24 hours prior to and immediately after the marathon. All subjects were instructed not to exercise, to maintain their regular diet, ingest the same usual amount of liquids, and rest at least 8 hours a day in the period preceding the CPET. The athletes completed the marathon in 221.5 (207; 250) minutes. In the post-marathon CPET, there was a significant reduction in peak oxygen consumption and peak oxygen pulse compared to the results obtained before the race (50.75 and 46.35 mL.kg-1 .min-1; 19.4 and 18.1 mL.btm, respectively). The echocardiography showed a significant reduction in the s' wave (inotropic marker), but no significant change in the E/e' ratio (lusitropic marker). In amateur runners, the marathon seems to promote changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity identified within 4 days after the race, with a reduction in the cardiac contractility. Such changes suggest that some degree of "cardiac fatigue" can occur.

  14. Effect of moderate exercise on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption and catecholamines in young women.

    PubMed

    Imamura, H; Shibuya, S; Uchida, K; Teshima, K; Masuda, R; Miyamoto, N

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of moderate exercise on the magnitude and duration of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) and catecholamine concentrations in 7 young women. The subjects performed 30 or 60 minutes of exercise (30-ME and 60-ME, respectively) on separate days at an intensity of 60% of maximal oxygen uptake on a cycle ergometer. The glucose, epinephrine and norepinephrine in the plasma, and free fatty acids and glycerol in the serum were measured at the end of the 60 min of the rest period before each exercise, immediately after the performance of each exercise and 30 min, 1, 2 and 24 h time points after each exercise. EPOC lasted for 46.1+/-25.4 and 116.1+/-79.8 min after the 30- and 60-ME, respectively. Corresponding total EPOC were 2636+/-1125 and 5208+/-1880 ml, respectively. The mean differences were statistically significant (p<0.05 each). The serum free fatty acids significantly increased immediately after the 60-ME. The serum glycerol was significantly increased immediately after the 30-ME and was also significantly increased immediately after and 30 min time point after the 60-ME. The plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine significantly increased immediately after the 30- and 60-ME, respectively. The plasma epinephrine at the 30 min time point after the 60-ME significantly correlated with the magnitude (r=0.955) and duration (r=0.897) of EPOC. Norepinephrine at the 30 min time point after the 60-ME also significantly correlated with the magnitude (r=0.774) of EPOC. The results indicate that longer duration exercise results in a greater and longer EPOC, and the plasma catecholamines may possibly contribute to EPOC in young women. Although, the overall magnitude of EPOC is small, if exercise frequency and compliance are strong, some long term benefits may accrue.

  15. Myocardial oxygen consumption change predicts left ventricular relaxation improvement in obese humans after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Lin, C Huie; Kurup, Suraj; Herrero, Pilar; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Eagon, J Christopher; Klein, Samuel; Dávila-Román, Víctor G; Stein, Richard I; Dorn, Gerald W; Gropler, Robert J; Waggoner, Alan D; Peterson, Linda R

    2011-09-01

    Obesity adversely affects myocardial metabolism, efficiency, and diastolic function. Our objective was to determine whether weight loss can ameliorate obesity-related myocardial metabolism and efficiency derangements and that these improvements directly relate to improved diastolic function in humans. We studied 30 obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) subjects with positron emission tomography (PET) (myocardial metabolism, blood flow) and echocardiography (structure, function) before and after marked weight loss from gastric bypass surgery (N = 10) or moderate weight loss from diet (N = 20). Baseline BMI, insulin resistance, hemodynamics, left ventricular (LV) mass, systolic function, myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), and fatty acid (FA) metabolism were similar between the groups. MVO2/g decreased after diet-induced weight loss (P = 0.009). Total MVO2 decreased after dietary (P = 0.02) and surgical weight loss (P = 0.0006) and was related to decreased BMI (P = 0.006). Total myocardial FA utilization decreased (P = 0.03), and FA oxidation trended lower (P = 0.06) only after surgery. FA esterification and LV efficiency were unchanged. After surgical weight loss, LV mass decreased by 23% (Doppler-derived) E/E' by 33%, and relaxation increased (improved) by 28%. Improved LV relaxation related significantly to decreased BMI, insulin resistance, total MVO2, and LV mass but not FA utilization. Decreased total MVO(2) predicted LV relaxation improvement independent of BMI change (P = 0.02). Weight loss can ameliorate the obesity-related derangements in myocardial metabolism and LV structure and diastolic function. Decreased total MVO2 independently predicted improved LV relaxation, suggesting that myocardial oxygen metabolism may be mechanistically important in determining cardiac relaxation.

  16. Oxygen consumption and heart rate during repeated squatting exercises with or without whole-body vibration in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Núbia Cp; Simão, Adriano P; Tossige-Gomes, Rosalina; Neves, Camila Dc; Mezencio, Bruno; Szmuchrowski, Leszek; Coimbra, Cândido C; Lacerda, Ana Cr

    2011-12-01

    Avelar, NCP, Simão, AP, Tossige-Gomes, R, Neves, CDC, Mezencio, B, Szmuchrowski, L, Coimbra, CC, and Lacerda, ACR. Oxygen consumption and heart rate during repeated squatting exercises with or without whole-body vibration in the elderly. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3495-3500, 2011-The aim of this study was to investigate whether vibration plus squatting would increase cardiovascular demand to the optimal exercise limits needed for the prescription of cardiovascular training. Oxygen consumption, measured breath by breath by a portable gas analysis system, and heart rate (HR), measured using an HR monitor, were evaluated in 18 elderly individuals, 15 women and 3 men with a mean age of 72 ± 6 years. These variables were measured simultaneously and at the same time points in each subject during rest and randomly during the performance of squatting exercises (8 series of 40 seconds, with 40 seconds of rest between series of performing squats in 3-second cycles with 10-60° of flexion, a total of 5 repetitions for 40 seconds) with or without vibration at a frequency of 40 Hz and amplitude of 4 mm, separated by at least 1 day. Associating whole-body vibration with squatting exercise resulted in an additional increase of around 20% in oxygen consumption and 7.5% in the HR recorded during exercise. However, during squatting exercise with vibration, the increase achieved in oxygen consumption was limited to around 2 metabolic equivalents, and mean HR represented around 56% of the predicted maximum HR for age. The results of this study show that, despite the fact that vibration increased oxygen consumption and HR during the performance of squatting exercise, the minimum standards of intensity for the prescription of physical exercise with the specific objective of improving cardiorespiratory fitness were not achieved. Therefore, a protocol such as that used in the study does not meet the threshold for cardiovascular training prescription.

  17. Myocardial blood flow in patients with hibernating myocardium.

    PubMed

    Camici, Paolo G; Rimoldi, Ornella E

    2003-02-01

    The debate on whether resting myocardial blood flow (MBF) to hibernating myocardium is reduced or not has attracted a lot of interest and has contributed to stimulate new research on heart failure in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Positron emission tomography with oxygen-15 labeled water (H(2)(15)O) or nitrogen-13 labeled ammonia (13NH(3)) has been used for the absolute quantification of regional MBF in human hibernating myocardium. When hibernating myocardium is properly identified, i.e. a dysfunctional segment subtended by a stenotic coronary artery that improves function upon reperfusion, the following conclusions can be reached based on the available literature: (a) in the majority of these studies resting MBF in hibernating myocardium is not different from either flow in remote tissue in the same patient or MBF in normal healthy volunteers; (b) a reduction in MBF of approximately 20% compared to MBF in remote myocardium or age matched normal subjects has been demonstrated in a minority of truly hibernating segments; (c) hibernating myocardium is characterized by a severely impaired coronary flow reserve which improves after revascularization in parallel with contractile function. Thus, the pathophysiology of hibernation in humans is more complex than initially postulated. The recent evidence that repetitive ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease can be cumulative and lead to more severe and prolonged stunning, lends further support to the hypothesis that, at least initially, stunning and hibernation are two facets of the same coin.

  18. Oxygen Consumption by Red Wines. Part I: Consumption Rates, Relationship with Chemical Composition, and Role of SO₂.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vicente; Carrascon, Vanesa; Bueno, Mónica; Ugliano, Maurizio; Fernandez-Zurbano, Purificación

    2015-12-30

    Fifteen Spanish red wines extensively characterized in terms of SO2, color, antioxidant indexes, metals, and polyphenols were subjected to five consecutive sensor-controlled cycles of air saturation at 25 °C. Within each cycle, O2 consumption rates cannot be interpreted by simple kinetic models. Plots of cumulated consumed O2 made it possible to define a fast and highly wine-dependent initial O2 consumption rate and a second and less variable average O2 consumption rate which remains constant in saturations 2 to 5. Both rates have been satisfactorily modeled, and in both cases they were independent of Fe and SO2 and highly dependent on Cu levels. Average rates were also related to Mn, pH, Folin, protein precipitable proanthocyanidins (PPAs), and polyphenolic profile. Initial rates were strong and negatively correlated to SO2 consumption, indicating that such an initial rate is either controlled by an unknown antioxidant present in some wines or affected by a poor real availability of SO2. Remaining unreacted SO2 is proportional to initial combined SO2 and to final free acetaldehyde.

  19. Oxygen distribution and consumption within the retina in vascularised and avascular retinas and in animal models of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, D Y; Cringle, S J

    2001-03-01

    Maintenance of an adequate oxygen supply to the retina is critical for retinal function. In species with vascularised retinas, such as man, oxygen is delivered to the retina via a combination of the choroidal vascular bed, which lies immediately behind the retina, and the retinal vasculature, which lies within the inner retina. The high-oxygen demands of the retina, and the relatively sparse nature of the retinal vasculature, are thought to contribute to the particular vulnerability of the retina to vascular disease. A large proportion of retinal blindness is associated with diseases having a vascular component, and disrupted oxygen supply to the retina is likely to be a critical factor. Much attention has therefore been directed at determining the intraretinal oxygen environment in healthy and diseased eyes. Measurements of oxygen levels within the retina have largely been restricted to animal studies in which oxygen sensitive microelectrodes can be used to obtain high-resolution measurements of oxygen tension as a function of retinal depth. Such measurements can immediately identify which retinal layers are supplied with oxygen from the different vascular elements. Additionally, in the outer retinal layers, which do not have any intrinsic oxygen sources, the oxygen distribution can be analysed mathematically to quantify the oxygen consumption rate of specific retinal layers. This has revealed a remarkable heterogeneity of oxygen requirements of different components of the outer retina, with the inner segments of the photoreceptors being the dominant oxygen consumers. Since the presence of the retinal vasculature precludes such a simple quantitative analysis of local oxygen consumption within the inner retina, our understanding of the oxygen needs of the inner retinal components is much less complete. Although several lines of evidence suggest that in the more commonly studied species such as cat, pig, and rat, the oxygen demands of the inner retina as a whole is

  20. Sulfur Isotope Trends in Archean Microbialite Facies Record Early Oxygen Production and Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerkle, A.; Meyer, N.; Izon, G.; Poulton, S.; Farquhar, J.; Claire, M.

    2014-12-01

    The major and minor sulfur isotope composition (δ34S and Δ33S) of pyrites preserved in ~2.65-2.5 billion-year-old (Ga) microbialites record localized oxygen production and consumption near the mat surface. These trends are preserved in two separate drill cores (GKF01 and BH1-Sacha) transecting the Campbellrand-Malmani carbonate platform (Ghaap Group, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa; Zerkle et al., 2012; Izon et al., in review). Microbialite pyrites possess positive Δ33S values, plotting parallel to typical Archean trends (with a Δ33S/δ34S slope of ~0.9) but enriched in 34S by ~3 to 7‰. We propose that these 34S-enriched pyrites were formed from a residual pool of sulfide that was partially oxidized via molecular oxygen produced by surface mat-dwelling cyanobacteria. Sulfide, carrying the range of Archean Δ33S values, could have been produced deeper within the microbial mat by the reduction of sulfate and elemental sulfur, then fractionated upon reaction with O2 produced by oxygenic photosynthesis. Preservation of this positive 34S offset requires that: 1) sulfide was only partially (50­­-80%) consumed by oxidation, meaning H2S was locally more abundant (or more rapidly produced) than O2, and 2) the majority of the sulfate produced via oxidation was not immediately reduced to sulfide, implying either that the sulfate pool was much larger than the sulfide pool, or that the sulfate formed near the mat surface was transported and reduced in another part of the system. Contrastingly, older microbialite facies (> 2.7 Ga; Thomazo et al., 2013) appear to lack these observed 34S enrichments. Consequently, the onset of 34S enrichments could mark a shift in mat ecology, from communities dominated by anoxygenic photosynthesizers to cyanobacteria. Here, we test these hypotheses with new spatially resolved mm-scale trends in sulfur isotope measurements from pyritized stromatolites of the Vryburg Formation, sampled in the lower part of the BH1-Sacha core. Millimeter

  1. Effect of exercise intensity, duration and mode on post-exercise oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Børsheim, Elisabet; Bahr, Roald

    2003-01-01

    In the recovery period after exercise there is an increase in oxygen uptake termed the 'excess post-exercise oxygen consumption' (EPOC), consisting of a rapid and a prolonged component. While some studies have shown that EPOC may last for several hours after exercise, others have concluded that EPOC is transient and minimal. The conflicting results may be resolved if differences in exercise intensity and duration are considered, since this may affect the metabolic processes underlying EPOC. Accordingly, the absence of a sustained EPOC after exercise seems to be a consistent finding in studies with low exercise intensity and/or duration. The magnitude of EPOC after aerobic exercise clearly depends on both the duration and intensity of exercise. A curvilinear relationship between the magnitude of EPOC and the intensity of the exercise bout has been found, whereas the relationship between exercise duration and EPOC magnitude appears to be more linear, especially at higher intensities. Differences in exercise mode may potentially contribute to the discrepant findings of EPOC magnitude and duration. Studies with sufficient exercise challenges are needed to determine whether various aerobic exercise modes affect EPOC differently. The relationships between the intensity and duration of resistance exercise and the magnitude and duration of EPOC have not been determined, but a more prolonged and substantial EPOC has been found after hard- versus moderate-resistance exercise. Thus, the intensity of resistance exercise seems to be of importance for EPOC. Lastly, training status and sex may also potentially influence EPOC magnitude, but this may be problematic to determine. Still, it appears that trained individuals have a more rapid return of post-exercise metabolism to resting levels after exercising at either the same relative or absolute work rate; however, studies after more strenuous exercise bouts are needed. It is not determined if there is a sex effect on EPOC

  2. Effects of Dissolved Oxygen Concentration on Oxygen Consumption and Development of Channel Catfish Eggs and Fry: Implications for Hatchery Management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Channel catfish spawns were incubated under controlled conditions to determine the effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on development and survival. Routine metabolic rate and limiting oxygen concentration were determined on eggs, sac fry and swim-up fry. Eight channel catfish spawns were s...

  3. Effect of limb cooling on peripheral and global oxygen consumption in neonates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, I A-A; Wickramasinghe, Y A; Spencer, S A

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate peripheral oxygen consumption (VO(2)) measurements using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with arterial occlusion in healthy term neonates by studying the effect of limb cooling on peripheral and global VO(2). Twenty two healthy term neonates were studied. Peripheral VO(2) was measured by NIRS using arterial occlusion and measurement of the oxyhaemoglobin (HbO(2)) decrement slope. Global VO(2) was measured by open circuit calorimetry. Global and peripheral VO(2) was measured in each neonate before and after limb cooling. In 10 neonates, a fall in forearm temperature of 2.2 degrees C (mild cooling) decreased forearm VO(2) by 19.6% (p < 0.01). Global VO(2) did not change. In 12 neonates, a fall in forearm temperature of 4 degrees C (moderate cooling) decreased forearm VO(2) by 34.7% (p < 0.01). Global VO(2) increased by 17.6% (p < 0.05). The NIRS arterial occlusion method is able to measure changes in peripheral VO(2) induced by limb cooling. The changes are more pronounced with moderate limb cooling when a concomitant rise in global VO(2) is observed. Change in peripheral temperature must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of peripheral VO(2) measurements in neonates.

  4. Selection for high and low oxygen consumption-induced differences in maintenance energy requirements of mice.

    PubMed

    Darhan, Hongyu; Kikusato, Motoi; Toyomizu, Masaaki; Roh, Sang-Gun; Katoh, Kazuo; Sato, Masahiro; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2017-07-01

    Maintenance energy requirements (MER) of mice selected for high (H) or low (L) oxygen consumption (OC) were compared. Forty-four mice from H and L OC lines were weaned at 3 weeks and divided into four experimental groups: group A were sacrificed at 4 weeks; group B were fed ad libitum, and groups C and D were fed 2.8 and 2.4 g/day, respectively, from 4 to 8 weeks of age. Groups B-D were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Chemical components were estimated for all groups. MER was estimated using a model that partitioned metabolizable energy intake into that used for maintenance, and protein and fat deposition. The feed conversion ratio for the B group was significantly higher in the H than in the L line. Feed intake for metabolic energy content per metabolic body size was significantly also higher in the H line, whereas accumulated energy content per metabolic body size was significantly higher in the L line. MER of the H line was greater than that of the L line (P < 0.10). These results suggest that selection for H or L OC produced differences in chemical components, feed efficiency, and MER between the H and L lines. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Measurement of ADP-ATP exchange in relation to mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Kiss, Gergely; Kawamata, Hibiki; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described a fluorometric method to measure ADP-ATP exchange rates in mitochondria of permeabilized cells, in which several enzymes that consume substantial amounts of ATP and other competing reactions interconverting adenine nucleotides are present. This method relies on recording changes in free extramitochondrial Mg(2+) with the Mg(2+)-sensitive fluorescent indicator Magnesium Green (MgGr)™, exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP for Mg(2+). In particular, cells are permeabilized with digitonin in the presence of BeF3(-) and Na3VO4, inhibiting all ATP- and ADP-utilizing reactions but mitochondrial exchange of ATP with ADP catalyzed by the adenine nucleotide translocase. The rate of ATP appearing in the medium upon the addition of ADP to energized mitochondria is then calculated from the rate of change in free extramitochondrial Mg(2+) using standard binding equations. Here, we describe a variant of this method involving an improved calibration step. This step minimizes errors that may be introduced during the conversion of the MgGr™ signal into free extramitochondrial [Mg(2+)] and ATP. Furthermore, we describe an approach for combining this methodology with the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential and oxygen consumption in the same sample. The method described herein is useful for the study of malignant cells, which are known to thrive in hypoxic environments and to harbor mitochondria with profound functional alterations.

  6. Measurement of ADP–ATP Exchange in Relation to Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential and Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Kiss, Gergely; Kawamata, Hibiki; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described a fluorometric method to measure ADP–ATP exchange rates in mitochondria of permeabilized cells, in which several enzymes that consume substantial amounts of ATP and other competing reactions interconverting adenine nucleotides are present. This method relies on recording changes in free extramitochondrial Mg2+ with the Mg2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator Magnesium Green (MgGr)™, exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP for Mg2+. In particular, cells are permeabilized with digitonin in the presence of BeF3− and Na3VO4, inhibiting all ATP- and ADP-utilizing reactions but mitochondrial exchange of ATP with ADP catalyzed by the adenine nucleotide translocase. The rate of ATP appearing in the medium upon the addition of ADP to energized mitochondria is then calculated from the rate of change in free extramitochondrial Mg2+ using standard binding equations. Here, we describe a variant of this method involving an improved calibration step. This step minimizes errors that may be introduced during the conversion of the MgGr™ signal into free extramitochondrial [Mg2+] and ATP. Furthermore, we describe an approach for combining this methodology with the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential and oxygen consumption in the same sample. The method described herein is useful for the study of malignant cells, which are known to thrive in hypoxic environments and to harbor mitochondria with profound functional alterations. PMID:24862274

  7. Long-term fasting decreases mitochondrial avian UCP-mediated oxygen consumption in hypometabolic king penguins

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G.; Dolmazon, Virginie; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien; Handrich, Yves; Butler, Patrick J.; Duchamp, Claude

    2008-01-01

    In endotherms, regulation of the degree of mitochondrial coupling affects cell metabolic efficiency. Thus it may be a key contributor to minimizing metabolic rate during long periods of fasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variation in mitochondrial avian uncoupling proteins (avUCP), as putative regulators of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, may contribute to the ability of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to withstand fasting for several weeks. After 20 days of fasting, king penguins showed a reduced rate of whole animal oxygen consumption (V̇o2; −33%) at rest, together with a reduced abundance of avUCP and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC1-α) mRNA in pectoralis muscle (−54%, −36%, respectively). These parameters were restored after the birds had been refed for 3 days. Furthermore, in recently fed, but not in fasted penguins, isolated muscle mitochondria showed a guanosine diphosphate-inhibited, fatty acid plus superoxide-activated respiration, indicating the presence of a functional UCP. It was calculated that variation in mitochondrial UCP-dependent respiration in vitro may contribute to nearly 20% of the difference in resting V̇o2 between fed or refed penguins and fasted penguins measured in vivo. These results suggest that the lowering of avUCP activity during periods of long-term energetic restriction may contribute to the reduction in metabolic rate and hence the ability of king penguins to face prolonged periods of fasting. PMID:18495832

  8. Exendin-4 increases oxygen consumption and thermogenic gene expression in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Choung, Jin-Seung; Lee, Young-Sun; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2017-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) has many anti-diabetic actions and also increases energy expenditure in vivo As skeletal muscle is a major organ controlling energy metabolism, we investigated whether GLP1 can affect energy metabolism in muscle. We found that treatment of differentiated C2C12 cells with exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP1 receptor agonist, reduced oleate:palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and triglyceride content compared with cells without Ex-4 treatment. When we examined the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), not only the basal OCR but also the OCR induced by oleate:palmitate addition was significantly increased in Ex-4-treated differentiated C2C12 cells, and this was inhibited by exendin-9, a GLP1 receptor antagonist. The expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), β3-adrenergic receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor a (PPARa) and farnesoid X receptor mRNA was significantly upregulated in Ex-4-treated differentiated C2C12 cells, and the upregulation of these mRNA was abolished by treatment with adenylate cyclase inhibitor (2'5'-dideoxyadenosine) or PKA inhibitor (H-89). As well, intramuscular injection of Ex-4 into diet-induced obese mice significantly increased the expression of UCP1, PPARa and p-AMPK in muscle. We suggest that exposure to GLP1 increases energy expenditure in muscle through the upregulation of fat oxidation and thermogenic gene expression, which may contribute to reducing obesity and insulin resistance.

  9. Endurance running program reverses the age related declines in peak oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Cartee, G.D.; Farrar, R.P.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to determine whether aging per se produces a decline in peak oxygen consumption (peak VO/sub 2/) or whether that decline may be due to the documented reduction in spontaneous activity. Male F344 rats, at the initial ages of 4 and 18 mos. of age, were divided into trained and untrained groups (YUT, YT, OUT, and OT). The trained groups ran up to 60 min/day 5 days/wk at a speed of 20m/min for 6 mos. The OUT rats demonstrated a 12% decline in peak VO/sub 2/ when compared to YUT rats. The OT rats had the same peak VO/sub 2/ as the YUT, but a 13% lower peak VO/sub 2/ than the YT. Representative enzymes of the TCA cycle, B oxidation, and electron transport system from gastrocnemius homogenates all declined in the OUT compared to YUT (14 to 24%). /sup 14/C-palmitate oxidation declined 45% in the OUT gastrocnemius compared to YUT. The carnitine values of the OUT were not significantly lower than the YUT and could not account for the large depression in palmitate oxidation. In contrast to the peak VO/sub 2/ which increased in OT only up to YUT values, the oxidative capacity of the skeletal muscle of OT was increased above the YUT group values equal to those of YT.

  10. LXRα fuels fatty acid-stimulated oxygen consumption in white adipocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Lea; Bugge, Anne; Collins, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are transcription factors known for their role in hepatic cholesterol and lipid metabolism. Though highly expressed in fat, the role of LXR in this tissue is not well characterized. We generated adipose tissue LXRα knockout (ATaKO) mice and showed that these mice gain more weight and fat mass on a high-fat diet compared with wild-type controls. White adipose tissue (WAT) accretion in ATaKO mice results from both a decrease in WAT lipolytic and oxidative capacities. This was demonstrated by decreased expression of the β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors, reduced level of phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase, and lower oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) in WAT of ATaKO mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in vivo and in vitro led to decreased adipocyte size in WAT and increased glycerol release from primary adipocytes, respectively, with a concomitant increase in OCR in both models. Our findings show that absence of LXRα in adipose tissue results in elevated adiposity through a decrease in WAT oxidation, secondary to attenuated FA availability. PMID:24259533

  11. Human islet oxygen consumption rate and DNA measurements predict diabetes reversal in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Papas, K K; Colton, C K; Nelson, R A; Rozak, P R; Avgoustiniatos, E S; Scott, W E; Wildey, G M; Pisania, A; Weir, G C; Hering, B J

    2007-03-01

    There is a need for simple, quantitative and prospective assays for islet quality assessment that are predictive of islet transplantation outcome. The current state-of-the-art athymic nude mouse bioassay is costly, technically challenging and retrospective. In this study, we report on the ability of 2 parameters characterizing human islet quality: (1) oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a measure of viable volume; and (2) OCR/DNA, a measure of fractional viability, to predict diabetes reversal in nude mice. Results demonstrate that the probability for diabetes reversal increases as the graft's OCR/DNA and total OCR increase. For a given transplanted OCR dose, diabetes reversal is strongly dependent on OCR/DNA. The OCR and OCR/DNA (the 'OCR test') data exhibit 89% sensitivity and 77% specificity in predicting diabetes reversal in nude mice (n = 86). We conclude that the prospective OCR test can effectively replace the retrospective athymic nude mouse bioassay in assessing human islet quality prior to islet transplantation.

  12. Oxygen consumption and thermoregulatory responses in three species of South American marsupials.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcel Cintra Pereira; Bicudo, José Eduardo Pereira Wilken

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO(2)), body temperature (T(b)) and wet thermal conductance (C(wet)), under resting conditions, exposure to low ambient temperature (T(a)) and during sustained exercise (treadmill running) were measured in three phylogenetic related (same family; Didelphidae) South American marsupials possessing similar body masses: Caluromys philander (arboreal/fruit and insect eating), Philander opossum (terrestrial and arboreal/omnivore), and Metachirus nudicaudatus (terrestrial/omnivore). Our measurements of VO(2) and C(wet) under resting conditions agree with those previously reported for other marsupials. We expected that C. philander would show a lower maximal sustained VO(2), compared to the other two species, based on its more reduced skeletal muscle mass. However, the values obtained for C. philander were not statistically different (ANOVA) from those obtained for the other two species. When exposed to low ambient temperature (12 degrees C), differences among the three species were detected, i.e., M. nudicaudatus did not survive, while the other two species were able to reduce their T(b) under such conditions. C. philander gradually decreases its T(b) when cold exposed, and P. opossum shows a more pronounced T(b) drop only when exposure to low ambient temperatures occurs for a more prolonged period of time.

  13. Long-term fasting decreases mitochondrial avian UCP-mediated oxygen consumption in hypometabolic king penguins.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G; Dolmazon, Virginie; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien; Handrich, Yves; Butler, Patrick J; Duchamp, Claude

    2008-07-01

    In endotherms, regulation of the degree of mitochondrial coupling affects cell metabolic efficiency. Thus it may be a key contributor to minimizing metabolic rate during long periods of fasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variation in mitochondrial avian uncoupling proteins (avUCP), as putative regulators of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, may contribute to the ability of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to withstand fasting for several weeks. After 20 days of fasting, king penguins showed a reduced rate of whole animal oxygen consumption (Vo2; -33%) at rest, together with a reduced abundance of avUCP and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC1-alpha) mRNA in pectoralis muscle (-54%, -36%, respectively). These parameters were restored after the birds had been refed for 3 days. Furthermore, in recently fed, but not in fasted penguins, isolated muscle mitochondria showed a guanosine diphosphate-inhibited, fatty acid plus superoxide-activated respiration, indicating the presence of a functional UCP. It was calculated that variation in mitochondrial UCP-dependent respiration in vitro may contribute to nearly 20% of the difference in resting Vo2 between fed or refed penguins and fasted penguins measured in vivo. These results suggest that the lowering of avUCP activity during periods of long-term energetic restriction may contribute to the reduction in metabolic rate and hence the ability of king penguins to face prolonged periods of fasting.

  14. Effects of Walking with Blood Flow Restriction on Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, G V; Vaz, J R; Pezarat-Correia, P; Fernhall, B

    2015-02-09

    This study determined the influence of walking with blood flow restriction (BFR) on the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) of healthy young men. 17 healthy young men (22.1±2.9 years) performed graded treadmill exercise to assess VO2peak. In a randomized fashion, each participant performed 5 sets of 3-min treadmill exercise at their optimal walking speed with 1-min interval either with or without BFR. Participants were then seated in a chair and remained there for 30 min of recovery. Expired gases were continuously monitored during exercise and recovery. BFR increased the O2 cost of walking as well as its relative intensity and cumulative O2 deficit (p<0.05). The EPOC magnitude after walking with BFR was greater than in the non-BFR condition (p<0.05). No differences between conditions were seen for the duration of EPOC. The EPOC magnitude was no longer different between conditions after controlling for the differences in relative intensity and in the cumulative O2 deficit (p>0.05). These data indicate that walking with BFR increases the magnitude of EPOC. Moreover, they also demonstrate that such increment in EPOC is likely explained by the effects of BFR on walking relative intensity and cumulative O2 deficit.

  15. Mapping cerebral glutamate 13C turnover and oxygen consumption by in vivo NMR.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Brown, Peter; Nixon, Terennce W; Behar, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Regional rates of 13C incorporation from glucose to glutamate were detected in anesthetized rat brain in vivo at 7T with high temporal and spatial resolution using NMR method ICED PEPSI (in vivo carbon edited detection with proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging). Time courses of regional glutamate 13C turnover were fitted by a metabolic model to obtain regional tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in each voxel (8 microL) of rat cortex. CMRO2 maps obtained for rats under either alpha-chloralose or morphine anesthesia revealed average cortical values of 1.5 +/- 0.2 (n = 3) and 3.2 +/- 0.3 (n = 4) mumol/g/min, respectively. These values of CMRO2 are in good agreement with previous cortical measurements with coarser spatial resolution. The heterogeneity within each map, which depicted predominantly gray and white matter differences, was significantly greater under morphine (higher cortical activity) than under-alpha-chloralose (lower cortical activity) anesthesia. The regional variations in the basal awake state, which are expected to be even greater, should be considered to avoid partial-volume artifacts in functional activation studies of awake subjects.

  16. Incremental exercise test for the evaluation of peak oxygen consumption in paralympic swimmers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Helton; DA Silva Alves, Eduardo; Ortega, Luciana; Silva, Andressa; Esteves, Andrea M; Schwingel, Paulo A; Vital, Roberto; DA Rocha, Edilson A; Rodrigues, Bruno; Lira, Fabio S; Tufik, Sergio; DE Mello, Marco T

    2016-04-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) is a fundamental parameter used to evaluate physical capacity. The objective of this study was to explore two types of incremental exercise tests used to determine VO2peak in four Paralympic swimmers: arm ergometer testing in the laboratory and testing in the swimming pool. On two different days, the VO2peak values of the four athletes were measured in a swimming pool and by a cycle ergometer. The protocols identified the VO2peak by progressive loading until the volitional exhaustion maximum was reached. The results were analyzed using the paired Student's t-test, Cohen's d effect sizes and a linear regression. The results showed that the VO2peak values obtained using the swimming pool protocol were higher (P=0.02) than those obtained by the arm ergometer (45.8±19.2 vs. 30.4±15.5; P=0.02), with a large effect size (d=3.20). When analyzing swimmers 1, 2, 3 and 4 individually, differences of 22.4%, 33.8%, 60.1% and 27.1% were observed, respectively. Field tests similar to the competitive setting are a more accurate way to determine the aerobic capacity of Paralympic swimmers. This approach provides more sensitive data that enable better direction of training, consequently facilitating improved performance.

  17. Functional Capacity, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Oxygen Consumption Predict Mortality in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Telles da Rosa, Luis Henrique; Garcia, Eduardo; Marroni, Cláudio Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Liver diseases influence musculoskeletal functions and may negatively affect the exercise capacity of patients with cirrhosis. Aim. To test the relationship between the six-minute walk test (6MWT), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and exercise capacity (VO2peak) measures and the survival rate of patients with cirrhosis. Methods. This prospective cohort study consisted of 86 patients diagnosed with cirrhosis with the following aetiology: hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and/or alcoholic cirrhosis (AC). All patients were followed up for three years and submitted to the 6MWT, pressure measurements with a compound gauge, and an exercise test (VO2peak). Results. The survival analysis showed that the individuals who covered a distance shorter than 410 m during the 6MWT had a survival rate of 55% compared with a rate of 97% for the individuals who walked more than 410 m (p = 0.0001). Individuals with MIPs below −70 cmH2O had a survival rate of 62% compared with a rate of 93% for those with MIPs above −70 cmH2O (p = 0.0001). The patients with values below 17 mL/kg had a survival rate of 55% compared with a rate of 94% for those with values above 17 mL/kg (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. The 6MWT distance, MIP, and oxygen consumption are predictors of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:27559536

  18. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption inhibition importance for TMT-dependent cell death in undifferentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Francesco; Orsini, Federica; Clementi, M Elisabetta; Lattanzi, Wanda; Giardina, Bruno; Michetti, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    The evolving role of mitochondria as a target for different death-inducing noxae prompted us to investigate trimethyltin (TMT)-dependent effects on mitochondrial functionality. For this purpose, we used a homogeneous cell culture model represented by undifferentiated PC12 cells. Mitochondria isolated from PC12 cells treated with TMT for 6, 12 and 24h, showed a time-dependent inhibition of ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption using succinate or glutamate/malate as substrate. Using a fluorescent assay, the effect of TMT on mitochondrial membrane potential (delta Psi) in PC12 cells was also determined. After 24h in culture, a strong loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (delta Psi) was observed in TMT-treated cells. Collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential correlated with an increased expression of bax/bcl-2 ratio, as evaluated by polymerase chain reaction. Western blotting and spectrophotometric analysis showed that cytochrome c release and activation of caspase 3 were concurrently induced. Our findings suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial respiration represents the early toxic event for cell death in PC12 due to trimethyltin.

  19. Modeling oxygen consumption in the proximal tubule: effects of NHE and SGLT2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how physiological, pharmacological, and pathological conditions that alter sodium reabsorption (TNa) in the proximal tubule affect oxygen consumption (QO2) and Na+ transport efficiency (TNa/QO2). To do so, we expanded a mathematical model of solute transport in the proximal tubule of the rat kidney. The model represents compliant S1, S2, and S3 segments and accounts for their specific apical and basolateral transporters. Sodium is reabsorbed transcellularly, via apical Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE) and Na+-glucose (SGLT) cotransporters, and paracellularly. Our results suggest that TNa/QO2 is 80% higher in S3 than in S1–S2 segments, due to the greater contribution of the passive paracellular pathway to TNa in the former segment. Inhibition of NHE or Na-K-ATPase reduced TNa and QO2, as well as Na+ transport efficiency. SGLT2 inhibition also reduced proximal tubular TNa but increased QO2; these effects were relatively more pronounced in the S3 vs. the S1–S2 segments. Diabetes increased TNa and QO2 and reduced TNa/QO2, owing mostly to hyperfiltration. Since SGLT2 inhibition lowers diabetic hyperfiltration, the net effect on TNa, QO2, and Na+ transport efficiency in the proximal tubule will largely depend on the individual extent to which glomerular filtration rate is lowered. PMID:25855513

  20. Oxygen consumption and insensible water loss in premature infants under radiant heaters.

    PubMed

    Marks, K H; Gunther, R C; Rossi, J A; Maisels, M J

    1980-08-01

    Oxygen consumption ((Vo2), carbon dioxide production (Vco2), and insensible water loss (IWL) were measured simultaneously in nine nondistressed, appropriately grown, premature infants less than 2 weeks old, nursed in a conventional, blow-warmed incubator, and were compared with measurements made on the same infants under a radiant heater. The infants had a pronounced increase (148% on average) in IWL when under the radiant heater (P < .001) whereas Vo2 increased by only 4.6% (P = .073). Abdominal skin temperature (servocontrolled to maintain 36.5 C) and esophageal temperature were the same under both conditions, but ambient air temperature was 0.7 C higher in the incubator (P < 05). Although a positive correlation was found between the increase in IWL and the change in Vo2 (r = .75, P < .01), the large increase in IWL (and, therefore, evaporative heat loss) under the radiant heater is out of proportion to, and cannot be accounted for, by the change in metabolic heat production. The heat transfer processes involved in maintaining body temperature constant under these conditions require further study.

  1. Left ventricular assist devices improve functional class without normalizing peak oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Benton, Casey R; Sayer, Gabriel; Nair, Ajith P; Ashley, Kimberly; Domanski, Michael J; Henzlova, Milena J; Anyanwu, Anelechi C; Pinney, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure patients supported with left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) enjoy improvements in functional capacity and quality of life. We reasoned that such improvements in exercise capacity should be reflected in an objective increase in peak oxygen consumption as measured by cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). We performed a retrospective review of all recipients of a HeartMate II LVAD at our center from June 2009 to June 2012 who completed CPET. Thirty-seven patients completed CPET an average of 6 months after implantation. Of these, 10 patients had CPET performed before LVAD implantation. Overall, 91.4% of patients improved by at least two New York Heart Association classes, with 34.3% improving by three classes. Postimplant VO2 max was significantly less than predicted (14.7 ± 3.1 vs. 29.8 ± 6.6 ml/kg/min, p < 0.001; percent-predicted 51% ± 12%). For 10 patients with pre- and post-implant studies, VO2 max increased significantly from 11.6 ± 5.0 to 15.4 ± 3.9 ml/kg/min (p = 0.009). VO2 max improves significantly with LVAD support but fails to normalize to predicted values, in spite of improvements in functional class. The severity of preimplantation heart failure does not associate with the degree of VO2 max improvement.

  2. Elevated Myocardial Oxygen Consumption During Cutaneous Cold Stress in Young Adult Overweight and Obese Africans

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Toyib; Olatunji, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated cardiovascular responses to stressful stimuli (such as cold exposure) has been linked to the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, which in turn has been demonstrated to predict the development of future hypertension. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that enhanced change in myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) to cutaneous cold stress may be one potential mechanism that predisposes overweight/obese individuals in Africa to developing hypertension. The Rate-Pressure-Product (a non-invasive determinant of MVO2) was measured in normotensive young individuals aged between 18 and 25 years at baseline and during sympathetic activation elicited by cutaneous cold stimulation (CCS). Following CCS, there was a significant enhanced rate pressure product (RPP) change in overweight individuals (P = 0.019). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis showed that body mass index, but not body weight had a significant influence on RPP variation following CCS. Thus, it can be concluded that normotensive overweight or obese individuals have an exaggerated RPP response to the CCS. However, exposure to cold may augment sympathetic reactivity in overweight/obese individuals, which may contribute to increased risk of developing myocardial dysfunction, even in young normotensive individuals. PMID:28299141

  3. Mitigating an increase of specific power consumption in a cryogenic air separation unit at reduced oxygen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Rohit; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2017-02-01

    Specific power consumed in a Linde double column air separation unit (ASU) increases as the quantity of oxygen produced at a given purity is decreased due to the changes of system requirement or market demand. As the plant operates in part load condition, the specific power consumption (SPC) increases as the total power consumption remains the same. In order to mitigate the increase of SPC at lower oxygen production, the operating pressure of high pressure column (HPC) can be lowered by extending the low pressure column (LPC) by a few trays and adding a second reboiler. As the duty of second reboiler in LPC is increased, the recovery of oxygen decreases with a lowering of the HPC pressure. This results in mitigation of the increase of SPC of the plant. A Medium pressure ASU with dual reboiler that produces pressurised gaseous and liquid products of oxygen and nitrogen is simulated in Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a commercial process simulator to determine SPC at varying oxygen production. The effects of reduced pressure of air feed into the cold box on the size of heat exchangers (HX) are analysed. Operation strategy to obtain various oxygen production rates at varying demand is also proposed.

  4. Effect of time of measurement on the relationship between metmyoglobin reducing activity and oxygen consumption to instrumental measures of beef longissimus color stability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The contribution of initial and retained levels of oxygen consumption and reducing capacity to animal variation in color stability were evaluated. Instrumental color values were determined on longissimus thoracis steaks (n=257) during 6 d of display. Oxygen consumption (OC), nitric oxide metmyoglo...

  5. Temperature induced variation in oxygen consumption of juvenile and adult stage of the dog conch Laevistrombus canarium (Linnaeus 1758)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Wan Nurul Husna Wan; Amin, S. M. Nurul; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2015-09-01

    Laevistrombus canarium Linnaeus, 1758 is one of the important edible sea snail within the western Johor Straits, Malaysia. In this study, the impact of temperature on oxygen consumption (MO2) of L. canarium based on their ontogenetic changes (juvenile and adult) was measured in the laboratory condition at 22.0, 26.0, 30.0 and 34.0°C. Measurement of MO2 were taken every 1 s for 60 min on 4.20 - 34.00 g dog conch using respirometry chamber. All experiments were carried out in static conditions in five replicates with one snail per chambers. The results of oxygen consumption showed that juvenile dog conch respired at the rate of 0.163 ml h-1 and adult respired at the rate of 0.119 ml h-1. Consequently, the oxygen consumption in juvenile and adult dog conch was expressed as a total energy spends. The results indicates that total energy spend for oxygen consumed (ml h-1) of L. canarium at different temperature regimes (22.0 to 34.0°C) slightly increased over time period (0.63 ± 0.12 to 3.24 ± 0.05 J h-1) respectively. This finding of the present study suggested L. canarium is well adapted for life in high temperature environment.

  6. Oxygen consumption rate v. rate of energy utilization of fishes: a comparison and brief history of the two measurements.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A

    2016-01-01

    Accounting for energy use by fishes has been taking place for over 200 years. The original, and continuing gold standard for measuring energy use in terrestrial animals, is to account for the waste heat produced by all reactions of metabolism, a process referred to as direct calorimetry. Direct calorimetry is not easy or convenient in terrestrial animals and is extremely difficult in aquatic animals. Thus, the original and most subsequent measurements of metabolic activity in fishes have been measured via indirect calorimetry. Indirect calorimetry takes advantage of the fact that oxygen is consumed and carbon dioxide is produced during the catabolic conversion of foodstuffs or energy reserves to useful ATP energy. As measuring [CO2 ] in water is more challenging than measuring [O2 ], most indirect calorimetric studies on fishes have used the rate of O2 consumption. To relate measurements of O2 consumption back to actual energy usage requires knowledge of the substrate being oxidized. Many contemporary studies of O2 consumption by fishes do not attempt to relate this measurement back to actual energy usage. Thus, the rate of oxygen consumption (M˙O2 ) has become a measurement in its own right that is not necessarily synonymous with metabolic rate. Because all extant fishes are obligate aerobes (many fishes engage in substantial net anaerobiosis, but all require oxygen to complete their life cycle), this discrepancy does not appear to be of great concern to the fish biology community, and reports of fish oxygen consumption, without being related to energy, have proliferated. Unfortunately, under some circumstances, these measures can be quite different from one another. A review of the methodological history of the two measurements and a look towards the future are included.

  7. Changes in oxygen consumption induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide in perfused rat liver. Effect of free-radical scavengers.

    PubMed Central

    Videla, L A; Villena, M I; Donoso, G; Giulivi, C; Boveris, A

    1984-01-01

    The addition of t-butyl hydroperoxide to perfused rat liver elicited a biphasic effect on hepatic respiration. A rapid fall in liver oxygen consumption was initially observed, followed by a recovery phase leading to respiratory rates higher than the initial steady-state values of oxygen uptake. This overshoot in hepatic oxygen uptake was abolished by free-radical scavengers such as (+)-cyanidanol-3 or butylated hydroxyanisole at concentrations that did not alter mitochondrial respiration. (+)-Cyanidanol-3 was also able to facilitate the recovery of respiration, the diminution in the calculated rate of hydroperoxide utilization and the decrease in liver GSH content produced by two consecutive pulses of t-butyl hydroperoxide. It is suggested that the t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced overshoot in liver respiration is related to increased utilization of oxygen for lipid peroxidation as a consequence of free radicals produced in the scission of the hydroperoxide by cellular haemoproteins. PMID:6508746

  8. Oxygenation, local muscle oxygen consumption and joint specific power in cycling: the effect of cadence at a constant external work rate.

    PubMed

    Skovereng, Knut; Ettema, Gertjan; van Beekvelt, Mireille C P

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the effect of cadence on joint specific power and oxygenation and local muscle oxygen consumption in the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis in addition to the relationship between joint specific power and local muscle oxygen consumption (mVO2). Seventeen recreationally active cyclists performed 6 stages of constant load cycling using cadences of 60, 70, 80, 90, 100 and 110 rpm. Joint specific power was calculated using inverse dynamics and mVO2 and oxygenation were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Increasing cadence led to increased knee joint power and decreased hip joint power while the ankle joint was unaffected. Increasing cadence also led to an increased deoxygenation in both the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis. Vastus lateralis mVO2 increased when cadence was increased. No effect of cadence was found for vastus medialis mVO2. This study demonstrates a different effect of cadence on the mVO2 of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis. The combined mVO2 of the vastus lateralis and medialis showed a linear increase with increasing knee joint specific power, demonstrating that the muscles combined related to power generated over the joint.

  9. Reactive transport modeling of dissolved oxygen migration and consumption in a sedimentary basins affected by a deglaciation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bea, S. A.; Mayer, K. U.; MacQuarrie, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    In intracratonic sedimentary basins, geochemical conditions are currently reducing at depth. Deep groundwater flow systems are driven primarily by salinity differences, topographic gradients and recharge derived from precipitation; these systems are also influenced by the hydrostratigraphy of the basin. However, during periods of glacial melt water production (i.e., deglaciation events), the melting of ice sheets may alter the patterns of freshwater infiltration, potentially resulting in enhanced recharge of glacial melt water containing relatively high concentrations of dissolved oxygen. Reactive transport modeling can be used to understand the evolution of geochemical conditions and redox-buffering capacity of these formations. Dissolved oxygen will interact with reduced mineral phases that are present in the sedimentary units (e.g., chlorite) or with solid organic matter causing oxygen consumption. Processes included in the model are density-driven flow and transport, vertical mechanical deformation, as well as chemical reactions (aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution and precipitation including evaporites, sulfates and carbonates, cation-exchange, redox processes involving the decomposition of organic matter, dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals, biotite and chlorite, and the oxidation of ferrous iron and sulfide). Transient boundary conditions are imposed in the upper part of the model to mimic ice sheet advance and retreat. Simulation results indicate that the presence of dense brines at depth results in low groundwater velocities during glacial meltwater infiltration, restricting the ingress of oxygenated waters in the basin. In addition, due to the abundance of reduced mineral phases and solid organic matter in these formations, geochemical processes causing oxygen consumption are restricted to shallow aquifers, further limiting the ingress of oxygenated waters to the first 100 m in the main aquifers (i.e., sandstones) and 50 m in the carbonates aquifers

  10. Oxygen Consumption and Substrate Utilization During and After Resistance Exercises Performed with Different Muscle Mass.

    PubMed

    Farinatti, Paulo; Castinheiras Neto, Antonio G; Amorim, Paulo R S

    This study investigated the energy expenditure (EE) and substrate utilization reflected by the respiratory-exchange ratio (RER) during and after resistance exercises performed with different muscle mass. Ten male volunteers (mean±SD; 26±4yr, 179±6cm, 77±8kg) performed multiple sets of the horizontal leg press (LP) and chest fly (CF) (5 sets of 10 repetitions with 15 repetition-maximum, 1-minute between-set intervals) in a counterbalanced design. Oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production were measured during 40 minutes of resting; resistance exercise protocols (sets and intervals); 90 minutes of post-exercise recovery. Total fat and carbohydrate oxidation rates were calculated according to the non-protein respiratory quotient. Both exercise conditions elicited net excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) of similar duration (approximately 40min). The EPOC magnitude at 40 minutes was greater after LP than after CF (7.36±1.10L vs. 4.73±0.99L; P<0.001). The RER was higher in LP (1.30±0.04) than CF (1.16±0.05, P=0.0003) during exercise. During recovery the RER was similar in LP and CF (P>0.05) and lower than pre-exercise (Pre-exercise=0.78±0.04 vs. CF40min=0.74±0.04; CF90min=0.68±0.02 and LP50min=0.73±0.06; LP90min=0.65±0.04, P<0.05). However, fat oxidation after LP was greater than CF between 30-90 minutes of recovery (mean total fat oxidation: LP=10.9 g vs. CF=8.4 g; P<0.01). The increases of EE and fat oxidation during post-exercise recovery were greater after multiple sets of resistance exercises performed with larger muscle mass than smaller muscle mass. This finding has practical implications for resistance training designed as part of weight management programs.

  11. Dietary nitrate reduces maximal oxygen consumption while maintaining work performance in maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Filip J; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Ekblom, Björn

    2010-01-15

    The anion nitrate-abundant in our diet-has recently emerged as a major pool of nitric oxide (NO) synthase-independent NO production. Nitrate is reduced stepwise in vivo to nitrite and then NO and possibly other bioactive nitrogen oxides. This reductive pathway is enhanced during low oxygen tension and acidosis. A recent study shows a reduction in oxygen consumption during submaximal exercise attributable to dietary nitrate. We went on to study the effects of dietary nitrate on various physiological and biochemical parameters during maximal exercise. Nine healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age 30+/-2.3 years, VO(2max) 3.72+/-0.33 L/min) participated in this study, which had a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Subjects received dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (0.1 mmol/kg/day) or placebo (NaCl) for 2 days before the test. This dose corresponds to the amount found in 100-300 g of a nitrate-rich vegetable such as spinach or beetroot. The maximal exercise tests consisted of an incremental exercise to exhaustion with combined arm and leg cranking on two separate ergometers. Dietary nitrate reduced VO(2max) from 3.72+/-0.33 to 3.62+/-0.31 L/min, P<0.05. Despite the reduction in VO(2max) the time to exhaustion trended to an increase after nitrate supplementation (524+/-31 vs 563+/-30 s, P=0.13). There was a correlation between the change in time to exhaustion and the change in VO(2max) (R(2)=0.47, P=0.04). A moderate dietary dose of nitrate significantly reduces VO(2max) during maximal exercise using a large active muscle mass. This reduction occurred with a trend toward increased time to exhaustion implying that two separate mechanisms are involved: one that reduces VO(2max) and another that improves the energetic function of the working muscles. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of exercise intensity and duration on the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    LaForgia, J; Withers, R T; Gore, C J

    2006-12-01

    Recovery from a bout of exercise is associated with an elevation in metabolism referred to as the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). A number of investigators in the first half of the last century reported prolonged EPOC durations and that the EPOC was a major component of the thermic effect of activity. It was therefore thought that the EPOC was a major contributor to total daily energy expenditure and hence the maintenance of body mass. Investigations conducted over the last two or three decades have improved the experimental protocols used in the pioneering studies and therefore have more accurately characterized the EPOC. Evidence has accumulated to suggest an exponential relationship between exercise intensity and the magnitude of the EPOC for specific exercise durations. Furthermore, work at exercise intensities >or=50-60% VO2max stimulate a linear increase in EPOC as exercise duration increases. The existence of these relationships with resistance exercise at this stage remains unclear because of the limited number of studies and problems with quantification of work intensity for this type of exercise. Although the more recent studies do not support the extended EPOC durations reported by some of the pioneering investigators, it is now apparent that a prolonged EPOC (3-24 h) may result from an appropriate exercise stimulus (submaximal: >or=50 min at >or=70% VO2max; supramaximal: >or=6 min at >or=105% VO2max). However, even those studies incorporating exercise stimuli resulting in prolonged EPOC durations have identified that the EPOC comprises only 6-15% of the net total oxygen cost of the exercise. But this figure may need to be increased when studies utilizing intermittent work bouts are designed to allow the determination of rest interval EPOCs, which should logically contribute to the EPOC determined following the cessation of the last work bout. Notwithstanding the aforementioned, the earlier research optimism regarding an important role

  13. Taurine Supplementation Improves Functional Capacity, Myocardial Oxygen Consumption, and Electrical Activity in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Mehdi; Dabidi Roshan, Valiollah; Ashourpore, Eadeh

    2017-07-04

    Taurine is an amino acid found abundantly in the heart in very high concentrations. It is assumed that taurine contributes to several physiological functions of mammalian cells, such as osmoregulation, anti-inflammation, membrane stabilization, ion transport modulation, and regulation of oxidative stress and mitochondrial protein synthesis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of taurine supplementation on functional capacity, myocardial oxygen consumption, and electrical activity in patients with heart failure. In a double-blind and randomly designed study, 16 patients with heart failure were assigned to two groups: taurine (TG, n = 8) and placebo (PG, n = 8). TG received 500-mg taurine supplementation three times per day for two weeks. Significant decrease in the values of Q-T segments (p < 0.01) and significant increase in the values of P-R segments (p < 0.01) were detected following exercise post-supplementation in TG rather than in PG. Significantly higher values of taurine concentration, T wave, Q-T segment, physical capacities, and lower values of cardiovascular capacities were detected post-supplementation in TG as compared with PG (all p values <0.01). Taurine significantly enhanced the physical function and significantly reduced the cardiovascular function parameters following exercise. Our results also suggest that the short-term taurine supplementation is an effective strategy for improving some selected hemodynamic parameters in heart failure patients. Together, these findings support the view that taurine improves cardiac function and functional capacity in patients with heart failure. This idea warrants further study.

  14. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Christensen, E A F; Svendsen, M B S; Steffensen, J F

    2017-03-01

    The present study determined the blood plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of the perch Perca fluviatilis at different salinities (0, 10 and 15) and temperatures (5, 10 and 20° C). Blood plasma osmolality increased with salinity at all temperatures. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) increased with salinity at 10 and 20° C. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope was lowest at salinity of 15 at 5° C, yet at 20° C, they were lowest at a salinity of 0. A cost of osmoregulation (SMR at a salinity of 0 and 15 compared with SMR at a salinity of 10) could only be detected at a salinity of 15 at 20° C, where it was 28%. The results show that P. fluviatilis have capacity to osmoregulate in hyper-osmotic environments. This contradicts previous studies and indicates intraspecific variability in osmoregulatory capabilities among P. fluviatilis populations or habitat origins. An apparent cost of osmoregulation (28%) at a salinity of 15 at 20° C indicates that the cost of osmoregulation in P. fluviatilis increases with temperature under hyperosmotic conditions and a power analysis showed that the cost of osmoregulation could be lower than 12·5% under other environmental conditions. The effect of salinity on MMR is possibly due to a reduction in gill permeability, initiated to reduce osmotic stress. An interaction between salinity and temperature on aerobic scope shows that high salinity habitats are energetically beneficial during warm periods (summer), whereas low salinity habitats are energetically beneficial during cold periods (winter). It is suggested, therefore, that the seasonal migrations of P. fluviatilis between brackish and fresh water is to select an environment that is optimal for metabolism and aerobic scope.

  15. Comparison of a kayaking ergometer protocol with an arm crank protocol for evaluating peak oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; Chilibeck, Philip D

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a kayak ergometer protocol with an arm crank protocol for determining peak oxygen consumption (V(.-)O2). On separate days in random order, 10 men and 5 women (16-24 years old) with kayaking experience completed the kayak ergometer protocol and a standardized arm crank protocol. The kayak protocol began at 70 strokes per minute and increased by 10 strokes per minute every 2 minutes until volitional fatigue. The arm crank protocol consisted of a crank rate of 70 revolutions per minute, initial loading of 35 W and subsequent increases of 35 W every 2 minutes until volitional fatigue. The results showed a significant difference (p < 0.01) between the kayak ergometer and the arm crank protocols for relative peak V(.-)O2 (47.5 +/- 3.9 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) vs. 44.2 +/- 6.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and absolute peak V(.-)O2 (3.38 L x min(-1) +/- 0.53 vs. 3.14 +/- 0.64 L x min(-1)). The correlation between kayak and arm crank protocol was 0.79 and 0.90, for relative and absolute V(.-)O2 peak, respectively (both p < 0.01). The higher peak V(.-)O2 on the kayak ergometer may be due to the greater muscle mass involved compared to the arm crank ergometer. The kayak ergometer protocol may therefore be more specific to the sport of kayaking than an arm crank protocol.

  16. Rethinking Dithiothreitol-Based Particulate Matter Oxidative Potential: Measuring Dithiothreitol Consumption versus Reactive Oxygen Species Generation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qianshan; Yu, Haoran; Wang, Runran; Wei, Jinlai; Verma, Vishal

    2017-06-06

    We measured the rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) [hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)] catalyzed by ambient particulate matter (PM) in the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. To understand the mechanism of ROS generation, we tested several redox-active substances, such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ), 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (5H-1,4NQ), 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ), 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ), copper(II), manganese(II), and iron (II and III). Both pure compounds and their mixtures show different patterns in DTT oxidation versus ROS generation. The quinones, known to oxidize DTT in the efficiency order of PQ > 5H-1,4NQ > 1,2-NQ > 1,4-NQ, show a different efficiency order (5H-1,4NQ > 1,2-NQ ≈ PQ > 1,4-NQ) in the ROS generation. Cu(II), a dominant metal in DTT oxidation, contributes almost negligibly to the ROS generation. Fe is mostly inactive in DTT oxidation, but shows synergistic effect in (•)OH formation in the presence of other quinones (mixture/sum > 1.5). Ten ambient PM samples collected from an urban site were analyzed, and although DTT oxidation was significantly correlated with H2O2 generation (Pearson's r = 0.91), no correlation was observed between DTT oxidation and (•)OH formation. Our results show that measuring both DTT consumption and ROS generation in the DTT assay is important to incorporate the synergistic contribution from different aerosol components and to provide a more inclusive picture of the ROS activity of ambient PM.

  17. RSI: oxygen consumption, blood flow, and reoxygenation in patients suffering RSI measured by noninvasive optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thijssen, Dick H. J.; van Uden, Caro J. T.; Krijgsman, Hans; Colier, Willy N. J. M.

    2003-07-01

    Background: Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a major problem in nowadays health care and creates high financial costs and personal distress. Average prevalence rates in the Netherlands vary from 20-40% of the working population. Insight into the patho-physiological mechanism of RSI is important in order to establish adequate treatment and prevention programs. Objective: The aim of this study was to gain insight in muscle oxygen consumption (mVO2), blood flow (BF), and reoxygenation (ReOx) in the forearm of computer workers with stage III Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI). Method: We have used continuous wave infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure these variables. Measurements were conducted on the extensor and flexor muscle in both arms as well in RSI-patients (n=10) as in control subjects (n=21). A protocol of increased isometric repetitive contraction in a handgrip ergonometer was used with increasing levels of strength. Results: mVO2 in the extensor muscle in RSI-subjects (dominant side) was increased compared to control subjects and compared to the non-dominant side (p<0.05). ReOx was not increased in RSI (dominant side-extensor muscle). However, there was a tendency towards statistical significance (p=0.065). BF in rest was equal in both groups, however after exercise it tended to be increased. Half-time recovery (T ») was measured during only one part of the protocol and it was significantly increased (p<0.05). Conclusion: mVO2 in RSI is impaired. BF and ReOx did not show difference between both groups. Future research should aim at a microvascular dysfunction in RSI.

  18. Kinetic control of oxygen consumption during contractions in self-perfused skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Rob C I; Grassi, Bruno; Hogan, Michael C; Howlett, Richard A; Gladden, L Bruce; Rossiter, Harry B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Fast kinetics of muscle oxygen consumption () is characteristic of effective physiological systems integration. The mechanism of kinetic control in vivo is equivocal as measurements are complicated by the twin difficulties of making high-frequency direct measurements of and intramuscular metabolites, and in attaining high [ADP]; complexities that can be overcome utilising highly aerobic canine muscle for the investigation of the transition from rest to contractions at maximal . Isometric tetanic contractions of the gastrocnemius complex of six anaesthetised, ventilated dogs were elicited via sciatic nerve stimulation (50 Hz; 200 ms duration; 1 contraction s−1). Muscle and lactate efflux were determined from direct Fick measurements. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and every ∼10 s during the transient and analysed for [phosphates], [lactate] and pH. The temporal vs.[PCr] and [ADP] relationships were not well fitted by linear or classical hyperbolic models (respectively), due to the high sensitivity of to metabolic perturbations early in the transient. The time course of this apparent sensitisation was closely aligned to that of ATP turnover, which was lower in the first ∼25 s of contractions compared to the steady state. These findings provide the first direct measurements of skeletal muscle and [PCr] in the non-steady state, and suggest that simple phosphate feedback models (which are adequate for steady-state observations in vitro) are not sufficient to explain the dynamic control of in situ. Rather an allosteric or ‘parallel activation’ mechanism of energy consuming and producing processes is required to explain the kinetic control of in mammalian skeletal muscle. PMID:21690197

  19. Relationship between Maximal Oxygen Consumption (VO2max) and Home Range Area in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Ralph L; Sanchez, Gabriela; Garland, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Home range is defined as the area traversed during normal daily activities, such as foraging, avoiding predators, and social or antagonistic behaviors. All else being equal, larger home ranges should be associated with longer daily movement distances and/or higher average movement speeds. The maximal rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max) generally sets an upper limit to the intensity of work (e.g., speed of locomotion) that an animal can sustain without fatigue. Therefore, home range area and VO2max are predicted to evolve in concert (coadapt). We gathered literature data on home range and VO2max for 55 species of mammals. We computed residuals from log-log (allometric) regressions on body mass with two different regression models: ordinary least squares (OLS) and phylogenetic generalized least squares (PGLS). Residuals were weakly positively related for both the OLS (r = 0.278, one-tailed P < 0.05) and PGLS (r = 0.210, P > 0.05) regressions. For VO2max, the PGLS regression model had a slightly higher likelihood than the OLS model, but the situation was reversed for home range area. In addition, for both home range area and VO2max, models that fit better than either OLS or PGLS were obtained by modeling residual variation with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process to mimic stabilizing selection (RegOU), indicating that phylogenetic signal is present in both size-adjusted traits, consistent with findings of previous studies. (However, residuals from the RegOU models cannot be tested for correlation due to mathematical complexities.) We conclude that the best estimate of the residual correlation is probably somewhere between these two values reported above. Possible reasons for the low correlation between residual home range area and VO2max are discussed.

  20. Rate and mechanism of maximal oxygen consumption decline with aging: implications for exercise training.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Steven; Wiswell, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Because of the influence of cardiorespiratory fitness on functional independence, quality of life, and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, tremendous interest has been directed towards describing the age-related change in maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)). Current evidence supports a 10% per decade decline in VO(2max) in men and women regardless of activity level. High-intensity exercise may reduce this loss by up to 50% in young and middle-aged men, but not older men, if maintained long term. Middle-aged and older women do not appear to be able to reduce loss rates in VO(2max) to less than 10% per decade, which may be related to estrogen status. However, maintaining high-intensity training seems limited to approximately one decade at best and to a select few individuals. While the factors limiting the ability to maintain high-intensity training are not completely known, aging most likely plays a role as studies have demonstrated that training maintenance becomes more difficult with advancing age. Age-related loss of VO(2max) seems to occur in a non-linear fashion in association with declines in physical activity. In sedentary individuals, this non-linear decline generally occurs during the twenties and thirties whereas athletic individuals demonstrate a non-linear decline upon decreasing or ceasing training. Non-linear loss rates are also demonstrated in individuals over the age of 70 years. The decline in VO(2max) seems to be due to both central and peripheral adaptations, primarily reductions in maximal heart rate (HR(max)) and lean body mass (LBM). Exercise training does not influence declines in HR(max), while LBM can be maintained to some degree by exercise. Recommendations for exercise training should include aerobic activities utilising guidelines established by the American College of Sports Medicine for improving CV fitness and health, as well as strength training activities for enhancing LBM.

  1. Determinants of oxygen consumption during exercise on cycle ergometer: the effects of gravity acceleration.

    PubMed

    Bonjour, Julien; Capelli, Carlo; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Calza, Stefano; Tam, Enrico; Linnarsson, Dag; Ferretti, Guido

    2010-04-30

    The hypothesis that changes in gravity acceleration (a(g)) affect the linear relationships between oxygen consumption VO2 and mechanical power (w ) so that at any w, VO2 increases linearly with a(g) was tested under conditions where the weight of constant-mass legs was let to vary by inducing changes in a(g) in a human centrifuge. The effects of a(g) on the VO2/w relationship were studied on 14 subjects at two pedalling frequencies (f(p), 1.0 and 1.5 Hz), during four work loads on a cycle ergometer (25, 50, 75 and 100 W) and at four a(g) levels (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 times normal gravity). VO2 increased linearly with w. The slope did not differ significantly at various a(g) and f(p), suggesting invariant mechanical efficiency during cycling, independent of f(p) and a(g). Conversely, the y-intercept of the VO2/w relationship, defined as constant b, increased linearly with a(g). Constant b is the sum of resting VO2 plus internal metabolic power (E (i)). Since the former was the same at all investigated a(g), the increase in constant b was entirely due to an increase in E (i). Since the VO2 versus w lines had similar slopes, the changes in E (i) entirely explained the higher VO2 at each w, as a(g) was increased. In conclusion, the effects of a(g) on VO2 are mediated through changes in E (i), and not in w or in resting VO2. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The effect of substrate utilization, manipulated by nicotinic acid, on excess postexercise oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Trost, S; Wilcox, A; Gillis, D

    1997-02-01

    Increased fat oxidation during the recovery period from exercise is thought to be a contributing factor for excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). In an attempt to study the effect of serum free fatty acid (FFA) availability during exercise and recovery on the EPOC, nicotinic acid, a potent inhibitor of FFA mobilization from adipose tissue, was administered to five trained male cyclists prior to, during, and after a bout of cycling at 65% VO2max. In the nicotinic acid trial, a 500 mg dose of nicotinic acid was ingested prior to exercise, and 100 mg doses were ingested at 15, 30, and 45 min exercise, and 30 min recovery. The cyclists also completed a trial under control conditions. Serum FFA, serum glycerol, RER and VO2 were monitored during rest, exercise, and recovery, each of which was 1-h in duration. Nicotinic acid ingestion prevented the increase in serum FFA that occurred during exercise in the control trial. FFA levels during the nicotinic acid trial were significantly lower than control values during both exercise and recovery. Serum glycerol levels were also significantly lower during exercise in the nicotinic acid trial, indicative of a reduction in lipolysis. RER was not significantly different at rest or during exercise; however, RER values were significantly lower during recovery in the control trial, indicative of greater fat oxidation. For both treatments, postexercise VO2 remained elevated above resting levels at the completion of the 1-h recovery period. However, the magnitude of EPOC was significantly reduced after FFA blockade with nicotinic acid (3.4 +/- 0.61 vs 5.5 +/- 0.71). These results support the hypothesis that increased FFA metabolism during exercise and recovery is an important contributing factor to the magnitude of EPOC.

  3. Peak oxygen consumption and skeletal muscle bioenergetics in African-American and Caucasian men.

    PubMed

    Suminski, R R; Robertson, R J; Goss, F L; Arslanian, S

    2000-12-01

    To compare peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism between nine African-American and nine Caucasian men. Subjects performed arm ergometry to exhaustion. On a separate occasion 31phosphorous-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-NMRS) was used to determine the concentrations of phosphorous (Pi), phosphocreatine (PCr), and the intracellular pH of the flexor carpi radialis before and during 4 min of steady-state, wrist flexion exercise performed at 28% (15 W) of each subject's peak voluntary contraction. The Pi/PCr ratio was used as an indirect measure of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. VO2peak was lower in the African-Americans compared with the Caucasians (means +/- SD, 19.4 +/- 3.4 vs 23.3 +/- 4.0 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) (P < 0.05). No significant between group difference was noted in the Pi/PCr ratio at rest (0.10 +/- 0.02 both groups). However, resting pH was lower in the African-Americans (6.99 +/- 0.04 vs 7.03 +/- 0.05) (P < 0.05). Exercise caused an increase in the Pi/PCr ratio in the African-Americans (1.06 +/- 0.11), which was higher than the increase observed in the Caucasians (0.50 +/- 0.14) (P < 0.05). pH levels decreased to a lower level during exercise in the African-Americans (6.89 +/- 0.04) than in the Caucasians (6.98 +/- 0.05) (P < 0.05). This select group of African-American men achieved a lower VO2peak than the Caucasian men. Variations in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolic components may explain this difference.

  4. Ventilation and oxygen consumption during acute hypoxia in newborn mammals: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Mortola, J P; Rezzonico, R; Lanthier, C

    1989-10-01

    We asked whether the lack of sustained hyperventilation during acute hypoxia, often reported to occur in the infant, is a common characteristic among newborn mammalian species, and to which extent inter-species differences may be accounted for by differences in metabolic responses. Ventilation (VE) and breathing pattern have been measured by flow-plethysmography or by the barometric method in normoxia and after 10 min of 10% O2 breathing in newborn mammals of 17 species over a 3 g to 20 kg range in body size. In 14 of these species oxygen consumption (VO2) has also been measured by a manometric technique or by calculation from the changes in chamber O2 pressure. VE and VO2 changed in proportion, among species, both in normoxia and hypoxia. In hypoxia, VE was higher, similar, or even lower than in normoxia, with some relation to the degree of maturity of the species at birth. In general, the small or absent VE responses to hypoxia resulted from small or no increase in tidal volume, while breathing frequency stayed elevated. The few departures from this pattern could be explained by interspecies differences in hypoxic sensitivity, since additional experiments in kittens and puppies indicated that, with more severe hypoxia, the pattern changed from rapid and shallow to deep and slow. In all cases, irrespective of the magnitude of the VE response, the VE/VO2 (and the mean inspiratory flow/VO2) increased during hypoxia, because the drop in VE, when present, was accompanied by an even larger drop in VO2. In fact, VO2 in hypoxia decreased in most species, although to variable degrees. Body temperature either did not change or decreased slightly, possibly indicating a trend toward a decrease of the set point of thermoregulation during hypoxia. In conclusion, the analysis gave further support to the concept that, during acute hypoxia, changes in metabolic rate play a paramount role in the ventilatory response of the newborn mammal.

  5. Seasonal differences in resting oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient, and free thyroxine in woodchucks.

    PubMed

    Rawson, R E; Concannon, P W; Roberts, P J; Tennant, B C

    1998-04-01

    The relationships among seasonal differences in body weight, food intake, metabolism, and thyroid hormone in woodchucks were investigated in 12 woodchucks. Six woodchucks had been maintained on a photoperiod simulating that found at 42 degrees N (boreal woodchucks). The other group of six animals had been maintained similarly in all respects except that the light simulated that found at 42 degrees S (austral woodchucks). An openflow respirometer, calibrated using the N2-dilution method, was used to determine metabolism twice in a 2-wk period near the September equinox, while at the same time food intake, body weight, and free thyroxine concentrations (fT4) were measured. Body weight was the same for both groups of woodchucks. However, compared with boreal animals near their autumnal equinox, austral woodchucks near their vernal equinox had significantly higher (P < 0.01) daily food intake (5 +/- 2 vs. 35 +/- 2 g.kg-1.day-1), oxygen consumption (4.4 +/- 0.3 vs. 7.3 +/- 0.3 ml.min-1.kg-1), carbon dioxide production (2.8 +/- 0.2 vs. 6.0 +/- 0.2 ml.min-1.kg-1), respiratory quotient (0.65 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.82 +/- 0.02), and fT4 (0.21 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.05 ng/dl). It was concluded that photoperiod has a strong effect on resting metabolism in the woodchuck and that there is an association between fT4 and changes in food intake and metabolic rate.

  6. [Obtaining a formula that improves maximum oxygen consumption estimation in cycle ergometer exercise tests].

    PubMed

    Romero-Farina, G; Candell-Riera, J; Bofill, J M; Aguadé-Bruix, S; Pizzi, M N; García-Dorado, D

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate if the estimation of the maximal oxygen consumption (MO2C) in METs (metabolic equivalents) by means of the table proposed in the guidelines of the Spanish Society of Cardiology is a sufficiently reliable method when applied to the bicycle exercise test. The MO2C in METs was obtained by gas-exchange analysis on bicycle ergometer tests in 97 healthy subjects (group i). It was compared with the estimate of METs using the table in which only watts and patient's weight were included. A better-adjusted formula was validated in 289 subjects with normal exercise myocardial perfusion gated-SPECT (group ii) using the introduction of clinical and ergometric variables. In group i individuals a good correlation between METs estimated with the table and those obtained through gas-exchange analysis (CCI: 0.93) was observed. However, the best adjusted formula to estimate METs in group ii subjects included watts, body mass index (BMI), age and gender (METS=11.820-0.054×age-0.189×BMI+1.031×gender+0.020×watts) (women: 0, men: 1). This formula allowed the reclassification of 46.9% of group ii subjects into the category <5METs versus the estimation by table. Estimating the METs with the conventional table is reliable. However, the best adjustment in subjects with normal bicycle exercise SPECT was obtained when, in addition to watts and BMI, age and gender were also considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of maximal oxygen consumption between obese black and white adolescents.

    PubMed

    Andreacci, Joseph L; Robertson, Robert J; Dubé, John J; Aaron, Deborah J; Dixon, Curt B; Arslanian, Silva A

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) differed between clinically obese black and white children and if a difference existed to determine whether it was related to hematological profiles and/or physical activity/inactivity levels. Twenty-three black and 21 white adolescents were matched for age, BMI, and Tanner stage (II-V). Body composition was determined by DEXA and CT scan. Daily physical activity/inactivity was assessed by questionnaire. VO2max was assessed using the Bruce treadmill protocol. Black participants had significantly lower VO2max and VO2maxFFM values when compared with white adolescents (26.1 +/- 4.2 versus 29.9 +/- 3.1 mL . kg(-1) . min(-1); 48.3 +/- 8.8 versus 55.6 +/- 5.2 mL . kgFFM(-1) . min(-1), respectively). Black adolescents also had significantly lower Hb concentrations ([Hb]) than white children (12.7 +/- 1.3 versus 13.4 +/- 0.7 g/dL). Black adolescents were more physically inactive than their white peers. VO2max correlated with [Hb] for the combined groups. Obese black adolescents had lower VO2max compared with white children and this difference was explained, in part, by the lower [Hb] observed in the black participants. Further investigations should study Hb flow rate (a function of [Hb] . maximal cardiac output) and physical activity/inactivity patterns in obese black and white children as it relates to VO2max.

  8. A computational model for simulating solute transport and oxygen consumption along the nephrons.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T; Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate water and solute transport, with a focus on sodium transport (TNa) and metabolism along individual nephron segments under differing physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To accomplish this goal, we developed a computational model of solute transport and oxygen consumption (QO2 ) along different nephron populations of a rat kidney. The model represents detailed epithelial and paracellular transport processes along both the superficial and juxtamedullary nephrons, with the loop of Henle of each model nephron extending to differing depths of the inner medulla. We used the model to assess how changes in TNa may alter QO2 in different nephron segments and how shifting the TNa sites alters overall kidney QO2 Under baseline conditions, the model predicted a whole kidney TNa/QO2 , which denotes the number of moles of Na(+) reabsorbed per moles of O2 consumed, of ∼15, with TNa efficiency predicted to be significantly greater in cortical nephron segments than in medullary segments. The TNa/QO2 ratio was generally similar among the superficial and juxtamedullary nephron segments, except for the proximal tubule, where TNa/QO2 was ∼20% higher in superficial nephrons, due to the larger luminal flow along the juxtamedullary proximal tubules and the resulting higher, flow-induced transcellular transport. Moreover, the model predicted that an increase in single-nephron glomerular filtration rate does not significantly affect TNa/QO2 in the proximal tubules but generally increases TNa/QO2 along downstream segments. The latter result can be attributed to the generally higher luminal [Na(+)], which raises paracellular TNa Consequently, vulnerable medullary segments, such as the S3 segment and medullary thick ascending limb, may be relatively protected from flow-induced increases in QO2 under pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Effect of Exercise Training on Peak Oxygen Consumption in Patients with Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Pituskin, Edith N.; Battaglini, Claudio L.; Scott, Jessica M.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Haykowsky, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the effects of supervised exercise training on peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in adults with cancer. Methods. A literature review using Ovid MEDLINE (1950–2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1991–2010), AMED (1985–2010), Embase (1988–2010), PubMed (1966–2010), Scopus (1950–2010), and Web of Science (1950–2010) was performed to identify randomized controlled trials examining the effects of supervised exercise training on measurement of VO2peak (via gas exchange analysis) in adults with cancer. Studies were selected using predetermined criteria, and two independent reviewers extracted data. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) were calculated using random effect models. Results. Six studies evaluated VO2peak involving a total of 571 adult cancer patients (exercise, n = 344; usual care control, n = 227). Pooled data indicated that exercise training was associated with a statistically significant increase in VO2peak (WMD, 2.90 ml·kg−1·min−1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–4.64); however, significant heterogeneity was evident in this estimate (I2, 87%). Usual care (control) was associated with a significant decline in VO2peak from baseline to postintervention (WMD, −1.02 ml·kg−1·min−1; 95% CI, −1.46 to −0.58; I2, 22%). Sensitivity analyses indicated superior improvements in VO2peak for studies conducted for a shorter duration (<4 months) and following the completion of adjuvant therapy (p-values < .001). Exercise training was not associated with a higher incidence of adverse events, although safety was not rigorously monitored or reported. Conclusions. Supervised exercise training is associated with significant improvements in VO2peak following a diagnosis of early-stage cancer, with minimal adverse events. PMID:21212429

  10. Local muscle oxygen consumption related to external and joint specific power.

    PubMed

    Skovereng, Knut; Ettema, Gertjan; van Beekvelt, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of external work rate on joint specific power and the relationship between knee extension power and vastus lateralis muscle oxygen consumption (mVO2). We measured kinematics and pedal forces and used inverse dynamics to calculate joint power for the hip, knee and ankle joints during an incremental cycling protocol performed by 21 recreational cyclists. Vastus lateralis mVO2 was estimated using near-infrared spectroscopy with an arterial occlusion. The main finding was a non-linear relationship between vastus lateralis mVO2 and external work rate that was characterised by an increase followed by a tendency for a levelling off (R(2)=0.99 and 0.94 for the quadratic and linear models respectively, p<0.05). When comparing 100W and 225W, there was a ∼43W increase in knee extension but still a ∼9% decrease in relative contribution of knee extension to external work rate resulting from a ∼47W increase in hip extension. When vastus lateralis mVO2 was related to knee extension power, the relationship was still non-linear (R(2)=0.99 and 0.97 for the quadratic and linear models respectively, p<0.05). These results demonstrate a non-linear response in mVO2 relative to a change in external work rate. Relating vastus lateralis mVO2 to knee extension power showed a better fit to a linear equation compared to external work rate, but it is not a straight line.

  11. A program of moderate physical training for Wistar rats based on maximal oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Carol Góis; Levada, Adriana Cristina; Hirabara, Sandro Massao; Manhães-de-Castro, Raul; De-Castro, Célia Barbosa; Curi, Rui; Pithon-Curi, Tânia Cristina

    2007-08-01

    Moderate physical training is often associated with improved cardiorespiratory fitness in athletes and the general population. In animals, studies are designed to investigate basic physiology that could be invasive and uncomfortable for humans. The standardization of an exercise training protocol for rats based on maximal consumption of oxygen (VO(2)max) is needed. This study validated a program of moderate physical training for Wistar rats based on VO(2)max determined once a week. A 10-stage treadmill running test was developed to measure VO(2)max through an indirect, open circuit calorimeter. Thirty male Wistar rats (210-226 g) were randomly assigned to either a nontrained group or a trained group. The animals were evaluated weekly to follow their VO(2)max during 8 weeks of moderate training and to adjust the intensity of the protocol of training. The soleus muscle was removed for determination of citrate synthase activity. Trained animals maintained their values of VO(2)max during a moderate running training and showed a significant less body weight gain. An increase of 42% in citrate synthase activity of the soleus muscle from trained rats was found after the training program. Our study presents a protocol of moderate physical training for Wistar rats based on VO(2)max. Peripheral adaptations such as the values of citrate synthase activity also responded to the moderate training program imposed as observed for VO(2)max. Other studies can use our protocol of moderate training to study the physiologic adaptations underlying this specific intensity of training. It will provide support for study with humans.

  12. Oxygen consumption by oak chips in a model wine solution; Influence of the botanical origin, toast level and ellagitannin content.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Giordanengo, Thomas; Gómez-Alonso, Sergio; García-Romero, Esteban; Fort, Francesca; Canals, Joan Miquel; Hermosín-Gutíerrez, Isidro; Zamora, Fernando

    2016-05-15

    The botanical origin, toast level and ellagitannin content of oak chips in a model wine solution have been studied in terms of their influence on oxygen consumption. French oak chips released significantly higher amounts of ellagitannins than American oak chips at any toast level. The release of ellagitannins by oak chips decreased as the toast level increased in the French oak but this trend was not so clear in American oak. Oxygen consumption rate was clearly related to the level of released ellagitannins. Therefore, oak chips should be chosen for their potential to release ellagitannins release should be considered, not only because they can have a direct impact on the flavor and body of the wine, but also because they can protect against oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction method for the volume of the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) following supramaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, D

    2000-01-01

    Short (up to 60 s) supramaximal (about 400 W on the average) exercise is accompanied by specific biochemical processes in the working muscles and by a general increase in energy metabolism. Outwardly, this is manifested by an excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). Since its actual measurement is time consuming and associated sometimes with difficulties, we propose a fixed 3-min test for EPOC prediction. The measured volumes of oxygen consumption are related to the corresponding periods in a coordinate system as reciprocal values. The linear equation, whose parameters were calculated by the method of least squares or were determined graphically, provided for prediction of the EPOC volume with satisfactory accuracy and precision. The obtained increase of the predicted values over the actually measured values was below 5%, and the correlation coefficient r = 0.98. Other parameters of the recovery process were also calculated, such as tau (half-time) of EPOC and the rate constant k.

  14. Oxygen consumption rates of grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) embryos exposed to the petroleum hydrocarbon, benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Hose, J E; Puffer, H W

    1984-12-01

    Bioconcentration of [14C]benzo[a]pyrene and effects of unlabeled benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) accumulation on the routine oxygen consumption of embryonic grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) were studied. At Day 15, bioconcentration factors over dissolved BaP levels ranged from 249 to 466. Weight-specific respiration rates at Days 14-15 were significantly increased (P less than or equal to 0.05) at a mean BaP body burden of 0.51 ppm wet wt. Oxygen consumption rates of embryos containing 0.70 to 12.80 ppm BaP were not significantly different from control rates. Because in a previous study embryos containing 0.51 ppm BaP exhibited hatching and developmental rates similar to those of controls, their metabolic response to low-level hydrocarbon exposure may be an example of hormesis, an overcompensating metabolic regulation to inhibitory challenges.

  15. Intermittent exposure to reduced oxygen levels affects prey size selection and consumption in swimming crab Thalamita danae Stimpson.

    PubMed

    Shin, P K S; Cheung, P H; Yang, F Y; Cheung, S G

    2005-01-01

    Portunid crabs Thalamita danae (carapace width: 46-56 mm) were exposed to low oxygen level (4.0 mg O2 l(-1)) and hypoxia (1.5 mg O2 l(-1)) for 6 h each day with three size classes (large: 15.0-19.9 mm, medium: 10.0-14.9 mm, small: 5.0-9.9 mm) of mussels Brachidontes variabilis offered as food. Consumption rate, prey size preference, and prey handling including breaking time, handling time, eating time and prey value, were studied during the time the crabs were exposed to reduced oxygen levels and results were compared with the crabs maintained at high oxygen level (8.0 mg O2 l(-1)) throughout the experiment. Consumption of mussels from all size classes was significantly higher at high oxygen level than at reduced oxygen levels. No mussel size preference was observed for crabs exposed to 4.0 or 8.0 mg O2 l(-1) but those crabs exposed to 1.5 mg O2 l(-1) preferred medium mussels. Both breaking time and handling time increased with mussel size but did not vary with oxygen level. Prey value of each mussel consumed (mg dry wt eaten crab(-1) s(-1)) was calculated by dividing the estimated dry weight of the mussel by the observed handling time. Mean prey value varied significantly with mussel size, with values obtained for large mussels being higher than small mussels at 4.0 and 8.0 mg O2 l(-1); the effect of oxygen level, however, was insignificant. In view of portunid crabs as major predators of mussels, results may help explain dominance of mussels in eutrophic harbours in Hong Kong.

  16. Excess Postexercise Oxygen Consumption After High-Intensity and Sprint Interval Exercise, and Continuous Steady-State Exercise.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Wesley J; Angadi, Siddhartha S; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2016-11-01

    Tucker, WJ, Angadi, SS, and Gaesser, GA. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after high-intensity and sprint interval exercise, and continuous steady-state exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3090-3097, 2016-Higher excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after high-intensity interval exercise (HIE) and sprint interval exercise (SIE) may contribute to greater fat loss sometimes reported after interval training compared with continuous steady-state exercise (SSE) training. We compared EPOC after HIE, SIE, and SSE. Ten recreationally active men (age 24 ± 4 years) participated in this randomized crossover study. On separate days, subjects completed a resting control trial and 3 exercise conditions on a cycle ergometer: HIE (four 4-minute intervals at 95% peak heart rate (HRpeak), separated by 3 minutes of active recovery), SIE (six 30-second Wingate sprints, separated by 4 minutes of active recovery), and SSE (30 minutes at 80% of HRpeak). Oxygen consumption (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) was measured continuously during and for 3 hours after exercise. For all conditions, V[Combining Dot Above]O2 was higher than resting control only during the first hour postexercise. Although 3-hour EPOC and total net exercise energy expenditure (EE) after exercise were higher (p = 0.01) for SIE (22.0 ± 9.3 L; 110 ± 47 kcal) compared with SSE (12.8 ± 8.5 L; 64 ± 43 kcal), total (exercise + postexercise) net O2 consumed and net EE were greater (p = 0.03) for SSE (69.5 ± 18.4 L; 348 ± 92 kcal) than those for SIE (54.2 ± 12.0 L; 271 ± 60 kcal). Corresponding values for HIE were not significantly different from SSE or SIE. Excess postexercise oxygen consumption after SIE and HIE is unlikely to account for the greater fat loss per unit EE associated with SIE and HIE training reported in the literature.

  17. The Effects of a Lower Body Exoskeleton Load Carriage Assistive Device on Oxygen Consumption and Kinematics During Walking with Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    analyze the associated gait biomechanics . Ten Army enlisted men participated in the study. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and gait biomechanics were...measured while Soldiers walked at 4.83 km/h and 0% grade under three realistic load weight configurations that were comprised of Army clothing and...increases users’ metabolic cost while carrying various loads and alters their gait biomechanics compared to conventional load carriage using a backpack

  18. 2-Aminobutyric acid modulates glutathione homeostasis in the myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Irino, Yasuhiro; Toh, Ryuji; Nagao, Manabu; Mori, Takeshige; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Shinohara, Masakazu; Tsuda, Shigeyasu; Nakajima, Hideto; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Shinke, Toshiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ishida, Tatsuro; Miyata, Okiko; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A previous report showed that the consumption of glutathione through oxidative stress activates the glutathione synthetic pathway, which is accompanied by production of ophthalmic acid from 2-aminobutyric acid (2-AB). We conducted a comprehensive quantification of serum metabolites using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in patients with atrial septal defect to find clues for understanding myocardial metabolic regulation, and demonstrated that circulating 2-AB levels reflect hemodynamic changes. However, the metabolism and pathophysiological role of 2-AB remains unclear. We revealed that 2-AB is generated by an amino group transfer reaction to 2-oxobutyric acid, a byproduct of cysteine biosynthesis from cystathionine. Because cysteine is a rate-limiting substrate for glutathione synthesis, we hypothesized that 2-AB reflects glutathione compensation against oxidative stress. A murine cardiomyopathy model induced by doxorubicin supported our hypothesis, i.e., increased reactive oxygen species are accompanied by 2-AB accumulation and compensatory maintenance of myocardial glutathione levels. Intriguingly, we also found that 2-AB increases intracellular glutathione levels by activating AMPK and exerts protective effects against oxidative stress. Finally, we demonstrated that oral administration of 2-AB efficiently raises both circulating and myocardial glutathione levels and protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in mice. This is the first study to demonstrate that 2-AB modulates glutathione homeostasis in the myocardium. PMID:27827456

  19. PTP1B regulates non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption via RNF213 to promote tumour survival during hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Robert S.; Cojocari, Dan; Rahman, Anas Abdel; Pawling, Judy; Zhang, Wei; Sinha, Ankit; Rose, Christopher M.; Isasa, Marta; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Ronald; Virtanen, Carl; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Koizumi, Akio; Wilkins, Sarah E.; Kislinger, Thomas; Gygi, Steven P.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Dennis, James W.; Wouters, Bradly G.; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2016-01-01

    Tumours exist in a hypoxic microenvironment and must limit excessive oxygen consumption. Hypoxia-inducible factor controls mitochondrial oxygen consumption, but how/if tumours regulate non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption (NMOC) is unknown. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is required for Her2/Neu-driven breast cancer (BC) in mice, though the underlying mechanism and human relevance remain unclear. We found that PTP1B-deficient HER2+ xenografts have increased hypoxia, necrosis and impaired growth. In vitro, PTP1B deficiency sensitizes HER2+ BC lines to hypoxia by increasing NMOC by α-KG-dependent dioxygenases (α-KGDDs). The Moyamoya disease gene product RNF213 , an E3 ligase, is negatively regulated by PTP1B in HER2+ BC cells. RNF213 knockdown reverses the effects of PTP1B-deficiency on α-KGDDs, NMOC and hypoxia-induced death of HER2+ BC cells, and partially restores tumourigenicity. We conclude that PTP1B acts via RNF213 to suppress α-KGDD activity and NMOC. This PTP1B/RNF213/α-KGDD pathway is critical for survival of HER2+ BC, and possibly other malignancies, in the hypoxic tumour microenvironment. PMID:27323329

  20. Cortisol-induced changes in oxygen consumption and ionic regulation in coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) parr.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J D; Iwama, G K

    1996-11-01

    The influence of cortisol on oxygen consumption and osmoregulatory variables was examined in coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) parr kept in fresh water (FW) and transferred to seawater (SW). Intraperitoneal implants containing cortisol (50 μg g(-1)) in vegetable oil resulted in elevated plasma cortisol titres similar to those observed in fish following a 24h SW exposure. Cortisol treatment significantly increased the oxygen consumption and plasma glucose levels of trout in FW, consistent with the glucocorticoid role of cortisol. Cortisol treatment did not cause any changes in plasma ion concentrations or gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in FW after 10 days. Cortisol-implanted fish exposed to SW for 24h showed slightly improved ion regulatory ability compare to non-implanted controls. The results of this study suggest that during SW transfer in juvenile salmonids, increases in cortisol may act as both a mineralocorticoid and a glucocorticoid, depending on the developmental state of the fish (e.g., smolt versus parr). Furthermore, the relative energetic costs of osmoregulation and that of the stress associated SW transfer cannot be discerned using whole-animal oxygen consumption rates.

  1. Temporary forced oral breathing affects neonates oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination, diaphragm muscles structure and physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Padzys, Guy Stéphane; Omouendze, Linda Priscillia

    2014-11-01

    We studied adaptation of diaphragm, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination to forced oral breathing (lasting for only 4 days) following reversible bilateral nasal obstruction performed on day 8 post-natal male rats. Diaphragm myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination and hormones level were analysed during nasal obstruction period. Diaphragm muscle showed significant increases in adult isoforms (MHC 1, 2a) in oral breathing group versus control. Reversible nasal obstruction was associated with a decrease of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination. Nasal obstruction period was associated with reduced growth of the olfactory bulbs and an initial decrease in lung growth. One day after implementing nasal obstruction, basal corticosterone levels had increased (by over 1000). Oral breathing was also associated with a lower level of thyroid hormone. We conclude that a 4 day nasal obstruction period in young rats leads to hormonal changes and to Diaphragm myosin heavy chain structural adaptation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Relationship of efficiency indices with performance, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood parameters, and estimated heat production in Nellore steers.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A S; Nascimento, M L; Tullio, R R; Rosa, A N; Alencar, M M; Lanna, D P

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of efficiency indices with performance, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood parameters, and estimated heat production (EHP) in Nellore steers. Eighteen steers were individually lot-fed diets of 2.7 Mcal ME/kg DM for 84 d. Estimated heat production was determined using oxygen pulse (OP) methodology, in which heart rate (HR) was monitored for 4 consecutive days. Oxygen pulse was obtained by simultaneously measuring HR and oxygen consumption during a 10- to 15-min period. Efficiency traits studied were feed efficiency (G:F) and residual feed intake (RFI) obtained by regression of DMI in relation to ADG and midtest metabolic BW (RFI). Alternatively, RFI was also obtained based on equations reported by the NRC's to estimate individual requirement and DMI (RFI calculated by the NRC [1996] equation [RFI]). The slope of the regression equation and its significance was used to evaluate the effect of efficiency indices (RFI, RFI, or G:F) on the traits studied. A mixed model was used considering RFI, RFI, or G:F and pen type as fixed effects and initial age as a covariate. For HR and EHP variables, day was included as a random effect. There was no relationship between efficiency indices and back fat depth measured by ultrasound or daily HR and EHP ( > 0.05). Because G:F is obtained in relation to BW, the slope of G:F was positive and significant ( < 0.05). Regardless of the method used, efficient steers had lower DMI ( < 0.05). The initial LM area was indirectly related to RFI and RFI ( < 0.05); however, the final muscle area was related to only RFI. Oxygen consumption per beat was not related to G:F; however, it was lower for RFI- and RFI-efficient steers, and consequently, oxygen volume (mL·min·kg) and OP (μL O·beat·kg) were also lower ( < 0.05). Blood parameters were not related to RFI and RFI ( > 0.05); however, G:F-efficient steers showed lower hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations ( < 0

  3. [Effect of temperature on the rate of oxygen consumption during the second half of embryonic and early postembryonic development of European pond turtle Emys orbicularis (Reptilia: Emydidae)].

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, I G; Alekseeva, T A; Nechaeva, M V

    2005-01-01

    Oxygen consumption by eggs of European pond turtle was determined at two constant incubation temperatures of 25 and 28 degrees C during the second half of embryogenesis. During development at both temperatures, the rate of oxygen consumption initially increased to remain constant during the last quarter of embryogenesis. The difference between the rates of oxygen consumption at these temperatures decreased during the studied period. The coefficient Q10 for the rate of oxygen consumption decreased from 9 to 1.7. At an incubation temperature of 28 degrees C, the changes in the rate of oxygen consumption in response to a short-term temperature decrease to 25 degrees C or increase to 30 degrees C depended on the developmental stage and were most pronounced at the beginning of the studied period. During late embryonic and first 2.5 months of postembryonic development, the rate of oxygen consumption did not significantly differ after such temperature changes. The regulatory mechanisms formed during embryonic development are proposed to maintain the level of oxygen consumption during temperature changes.

  4. The relationship between oxygen consumption rate and viability of in vivo-derived pig embryos vitrified by the micro volume air cooling method.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, N; Nishida, K; Misumi, K; Hirayama, Y; Yamashita, S; Hoshi, H; Misawa, H; Akiyama, K; Suzuki, C; Yoshioka, K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the viability of vitrified-warmed in vivo-derived pig embryos after measuring the oxygen consumption rate. Six days after artificial insemination, blastocysts were collected from gilts and vitrified by the micro volume air cooling method. The oxygen consumption rate was measured in 60 vitrified-warmed embryos, which were then cultured for 48h to assess the viability. The survival (re-expansion) rate of embryos after warming was 85.0%. The average oxygen consumption rate of embryos immediately after warming was greater in embryos which could re-expand during subsequent culture (F=0.75±0.04) than that in those which failed to re-expand (F=0.33±0.05). Moreover, the oxygen consumption rate of vitrified-warmed embryos was greater in the hatched (F=0.88±0.06) than that in the not-hatched group (F=0.53±0.04). When the oxygen consumption rate of the vitrified-warmed embryos and the numbers of viable and dead cells in embryos were determined, there was a positive correlation between the oxygen consumption rate and the number of live cells (P<0.01, r=0.538). A total of 29 vitrified embryos after warming and measuring the oxygen consumption rate were surgically transferred into uterine horns of two recipients. Both of the recipients become pregnant and farrowed 12 healthy piglets. These results demonstrate that the oxygen consumption rate of vitrified-warmed pig embryos can be related to the number of live cells and that the measurement of oxygen consumption of embryos after cryopreservation may be useful for estimating embryo survivability.

  5. Transfer and consumption of oxygen during the cultivation of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Rhizopogon nigrescens in an airlift bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Márcio José; Nascimento, Francisco Xavier; Giachini, Admir José; Oliveira, Vetúria Lopes; Furigo, Agenor

    2017-02-01

    The study had the objective of examining the aspects involved in the cultivation of ectomycorrhizal fungi for the production of commercially sustainable inoculant to attend the demands of the seedling nursery industry. It focused on certain parameters, such as the oxygen consumption levels, during the cultivation of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Rhizopogon nigrescens CBMAI 1472, which was performed in a 5-L airlift bioreactor. The dynamic method was employed to determine the volumetric coefficient for the oxygen transfer (k L a) and the specific oxygen uptake rate (Q O2 ). The results indicate that specific growth rates (μ X ) and oxygen consumption decline rapidly with time, affected mainly by increases in biomass concentration (X). Increases in X are obtained primarily by increases in the size of pellets that are formed, altering, consequently, the cultivation dynamics. This is the result of natural increases in transferring resistance that are observed in these environments. Therefore, to avoid critical conditions that affect viability and the productivity of the process, particular settings are discussed.

  6. Role of macrofauna on benthic oxygen consumption in sandy sediments of a high-energy tidal beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, Céline; Lavesque, Nicolas; Anschutz, Pierre; Bachelet, Guy; Lecroart, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Sandy beaches exposed to tide and waves are characterized by low abundance and diversity of benthic macrofauna, because of high-energy conditions. This is the reason why there are few studies on benthic communities living in such highly dynamic environments. It has been shown recently that tidal sandy beaches may act as biogeochemical reactors. Marine organic matter that is supplied in the sand during each flood tide is efficiently mineralized through aerobic respiration. In order to quantify the role of macrofauna in the whole beach benthic respiration, we studied the macrofauna and the pore water oxygen content of an exposed sandy beach (Truc Vert, SW of France) during four seasons in 2011. The results showed that macrofauna was characterised by a low number of species of specialized organisms such as the crustaceans Eurydice naylori and Gastrosaccus spp. and the polychaetes Ophelia bicornis and Scolelepis squamata. The distribution and abundance of macrofauna were clearly affected by exposure degree and emersion time. The combined monitoring of benthic macrofauna and pore waters chemistry allowed us to estimate (1) the macrofauna oxygen uptake, calculated with a standard allometric relationship using biomass data, and (2) the total benthic oxygen uptake, calculated from the oxygen deficit measured in pore waters. This revealed that benthic macrofauna respiration represented a variable but low (<10%) contribution to the total benthic oxygen consumption. This suggests that oxygen was mainly consumed by microbial respiration.

  7. FORMING SELF-ASSEMBLED CELL ARRAYS AND MEASURING THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION RATE OF A SINGLE LIVE CELL.

    PubMed

    Etzkorn, James R; McQuaide, Sarah C; Anderson, Judy B; Meldrum, Deirdre R; Parviz, Babak A

    2009-06-01

    We report a method for forming arrays of live single cells on a chip using polymer micro-traps made of SU8. We have studied the toxicity of the microfabricated structures and the associated environment for two cell lines. We also report a method for measuring the oxygen consumption rate of a single cell using optical interrogation of molecular oxygen sensors placed in micromachined micro-wells by temporarily sealing the cells in the micro-traps. The new techniques presented here add to the collection of tools available for performing "single-cell" biology. A single-cell self-assembly yield of 61% was achieved with oxygen draw down rates of 0.83, 0.82, and 0.71 fmol/minute on three isolated live A549 cells.

  8. Prediction of oxygen consumption in cardiac rehabilitation patients performing leg ergometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, John Gershwin

    The purpose of this study was two-fold. First, to determine the validity of the ACSM leg ergometry equation in the prediction of steady-state oxygen consumption (VO2) in a heterogeneous population of cardiac patients. Second, to determine whether a more accurate prediction equation could be developed for use in the cardiac population. Thirty-one cardiac rehabilitation patients participated in the study of which 24 were men and 7 were women. Biometric variables (mean +/- sd) of the participants were as follows: age = 61.9 +/- 9.5 years; height = 172.6 +/- 1.6 cm; and body mass = 82.3 +/- 10.6 kg. Subjects exercised on a MonarchTM cycle ergometer at 0, 180, 360, 540 and 720 kgm ˙ min-1. The length of each stage was five minutes. Heart rate, ECG, and VO2 were continuously monitored. Blood pressure and heart rate were collected at the end of each stage. Steady state VO 2 was calculated for each stage using the average of the last two minutes. Correlation coefficients, standard error of estimate, coefficient of determination, total error, and mean bias were used to determine the accuracy of the ACSM equation (1995). The analysis found the ACSM equation to be a valid means of estimating VO2 in cardiac patients. Simple linear regression was used to develop a new equation. Regression analysis found workload to be a significant predictor of VO2. The following equation is the result: VO2 = (1.6 x kgm ˙ min-1) + 444 ml ˙ min-1. The r of the equation was .78 (p < .05) and the standard error of estimate was 211 ml ˙ min-1. Analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences between means for actual and predicted VO2 values for each equation. The analysis found the ACSM and new equation to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO2 during unloaded pedaling. Furthermore, the ACSM equation was found to significantly (p < .05) under predict VO 2 during the first loaded stage of exercise. When the accuracy of the ACSM and new equations were compared based on

  9. Observed change in peak oxygen consumption after aortic valve replacement and its predictors

    PubMed Central

    Le, Van Doan Tuyet; Jensen, Gunnar Vagn Hagemann; Kjøller-Hansen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the change in peak oxygen consumption (pVO2) and determine its outcome predictors after aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic stenosis (AS). Methods Patients with AS and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction who were referred for single AVR had cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to and 9 months post-AVR. Predictors of outcome for pVO2 were determined by multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses. A significant change in pVO2 was defined as a relative change that was more than twice the coefficient of repeatability by test–retest (>10%). Results The pre-AVR characteristics of the 37 study patients included the following: median age (range) 72 (46–83) years, aortic valve area index (AVAI) 0.41 (SD 0.11) cm2/m2, mean gradient (MG) 49.1 (SD 15.3) mm Hg and New York Heart Association (NYHA)≥II 27 (73%). Pre-AVR and post-AVR mean pVO2 was 18.5 and 18.4 mL/kg/m2 (87% of the predicted), respectively, but the change from pre-AVR was heterogeneous. The relative change in pVO2 was positively associated with the preoperative MG (β=0.50, p=0.001) and negatively associated with brain natriuretic peptide > upper level of normal according to age and gender (β=−0.40, p=0.009). A relative increase in pVO2 exceeding 10% was found in 9 (24%), predicted by lower pre-AVR AVAI (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.82, p=0.027) and lower peak O2 pulse (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99, p=0.045). Decreases in pVO2 exceeding 10% were found in 11 (30%) and predicted by lower MG (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99, p=0.033). Conclusions Change in pVO2 was heterogeneous. Predictors of favourable and unfavourable outcomes for pVO2 were identified. PMID:27252876

  10. Solute transport and oxygen consumption along the nephrons: effects of Na+ transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T; Laghmani, Kamel; Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-12-01

    Sodium and its associated anions are the major determinant of extracellular fluid volume, and the reabsorption of Na(+) by the kidney plays a crucial role in long-term blood pressure control. The goal of this study was to investigate the extent to which inhibitors of transepithelial Na(+) transport (TNa) along the nephron alter urinary solute excretion and TNa efficiency and how those effects may vary along different nephron segments. To accomplish that goal, we used the multinephron model developed in the companion study (28). That model represents detailed transcellular and paracellular transport processes along the nephrons of a rat kidney. We simulated the inhibition of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE3), the bumetanide-sensitive Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter (NKCC2), the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), and the amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channel (ENaC). Under baseline conditions, NHE3, NKCC2, NCC, and ENaC reabsorb 36, 22, 4, and 7%, respectively, of filtered Na(+) The model predicted that inhibition of NHE3 substantially reduced proximal tubule TNa and oxygen consumption (QO2 ). Whole-kidney TNa efficiency, as reflected by the number of moles of Na(+) reabsorbed per moles of O2 consumed (denoted by the ratio TNa/QO2 ), decreased by ∼20% with 80% inhibition of NHE3. NKCC2 inhibition simulations predicted a substantial reduction in thick ascending limb TNa and QO2 ; however, the effect on whole-kidney TNa/QO2 was minor. Tubular K(+) transport was also substantially impaired, resulting in elevated urinary K(+) excretion. The most notable effect of NCC inhibition was to increase the excretion of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-); its impact on whole-kidney TNa and its efficiency was minor. Inhibition of ENaC was predicted to have opposite effects on the excretion of Na(+) (increased) and K(+) (decreased) and to have only a minor impact on whole-kidney TNa and TNa/QO2 Overall, model predictions agree well with measured changes in Na(+) and K(+) excretion in response to

  11. Cardiovascular determinants of maximal oxygen consumption in upright and supine posture at the end of prolonged bed rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Bringard, Aurélien; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Adami, Alessandra; De Roia, Gabriela; Lador, Frédéric; Lucini, Daniela; Pizzinelli, Paolo; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2010-06-30

    We tested the hypothesis that, after bed rest, maximal oxygen consumption ( VO₂max ) decreases more upright than supine, because of adequate cardiovascular response supine, but not upright. On 9 subjects, we determined VO₂max and maximal cardiac output (Q ) upright and supine, before and after (reambulation day upright, the following day supine) 35-day bed rest, by classical steady state protocol. Oxygen consumption, heart rate (f(H)) and stroke volume (Q(st)) were measured by a metabolic cart, electrocardiography and Modelflow from pulse pressure profiles, respectively. We computed Q as f(H) times Q(st), and systemic oxygen flow ( QaO₂) as Q. times arterial oxygen concentration, obtained after haemoglobin and arterial oxygen saturation measurements. Before bed rest, all parameters at maximal exercise were similar upright and supine. After bed rest, VO₂max was lower (p<0.05) than before, both upright (-38.6%) and supine (-17.0%), being 30.8% higher supine than upright. Maximal Q(st) decreased upright (-44.3%), but not supine (+3.7%), being 98.9% higher supine than upright. Maximal Q decreased upright (-45.1%), but not supine (+9.0%), being higher supine than upright (+98.4%). Maximal QaO₂ decreased upright (-37.8%), but not supine (+14.8%), being higher (+74.8%) upright than supine. After bed rest, the cardiovascular response (i) did not affect VO₂max supine, (ii) partially explained the VO₂max decrease upright, and (iii) caused the VO₂max differences between postures. We speculate that impaired peripheral oxygen transfer and/or utilisation may explain the VO₂max decrease supine and the fraction of VO₂max decrease upright unexplained by cardiovascular responses.

  12. In-airway molecular flow sensing: A new technology for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of oxygen consumption in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Ciaffoni, Luca; O’Neill, David P.; Couper, John H.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Hancock, Gus; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    There are no satisfactory methods for monitoring oxygen consumption in critical care. To address this, we adapted laser absorption spectroscopy to provide measurements of O2, CO2, and water vapor within the airway every 10 ms. The analyzer is integrated within a novel respiratory flow meter that is an order of magnitude more precise than other flow meters. Such precision, coupled with the accurate alignment of gas concentrations with respiratory flow, makes possible the determination of O2 consumption by direct integration over time of the product of O2 concentration and flow. The precision is illustrated by integrating the balance gas (N2 plus Ar) flow and showing that this exchange was near zero. Measured O2 consumption changed by <5% between air and O2 breathing. Clinical capability was illustrated by recording O2 consumption during an aortic aneurysm repair. This device now makes easy, accurate, and noninvasive measurement of O2 consumption for intubated patients in critical care possible. PMID:27532048

  13. Respiratory oxygen consumption in the seagrass Zostera marina varies on a diel basis and is partly affected by light.

    PubMed

    Rasmusson, Lina M; Lauritano, Chiara; Procaccini, Gabriele; Gullström, Martin; Buapet, Pimchanok; Björk, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The seagrass Zostera marina is an important marine ecosystem engineer, greatly influencing oxygen and carbon fluctuations in temperate coastal areas. Although photosynthetically driven gas fluxes are well studied, the impact of the plant's mitochondrial respiration on overall CO2 and O2 fluxes in marine vegetated areas is not yet understood. Likewise, the gene expression in relation to the respiratory pathway has not been well analyzed in seagrasses. This study uses a combined approach, studying respiratory oxygen consumption rates in darkness simultaneously with changes in gene expression, with the aim of examining how respiratory oxygen consumption fluctuates on a diel basis. Measurements were first made in a field study where samples were taken directly from the ocean to the laboratory for estimations of respiratory rates. This was followed by a laboratory study where measurements of respiration and expression of genes known to be involved in mitochondrial respiration were conducted for 5 days under light conditions mimicking natural summer light (i.e., 15 h of light and 9 h of darkness), followed by 3 days of constant darkness to detect the presence of a potential circadian clock. In the field study, there was a clear diel variation in respiratory oxygen consumption with the highest rates in the late evening and at night (0.766 and 0.869 µmol O2 m(-2) s(-1), respectively). These repetitive diel patterns were not seen in the laboratory, where water conditions (temperature, pH, and oxygen) showed minor fluctuations and only light varied. The gene expression analysis did not give clear evidence on drivers behind the respiratory fluxes; however, expression levels of the selected genes generally increased when the seagrass was kept in constant darkness. While light may influence mitochondrial respiratory fluxes, it appears that other environmental factors (e.g., temperature, pH, or oxygen) could be of significance too. As seagrasses substantially alter the

  14. Low energy consumption method for separating gaseous mixtures and in particular for medium purity oxygen production

    DOEpatents

    Jujasz, Albert J.; Burkhart, James A.; Greenberg, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    A method for the separation of gaseous mixtures such as air and for producing medium purity oxygen, comprising compressing the gaseous mixture in a first compressor to about 3.9-4.1 atmospheres pressure, passing said compressed gaseous mixture in heat exchange relationship with sub-ambient temperature gaseous nitrogen, dividing the cooled, pressurized gaseous mixture into first and second streams, introducing the first stream into the high pressure chamber of a double rectification column, separating the gaseous mixture in the rectification column into a liquid oxygen-enriched stream and a gaseous nitrogen stream and supplying the gaseous nitrogen stream for cooling the compressed gaseous mixture, removing the liquid oxygen-enriched stream from the low pressure chamber of the rectification column and pumping the liquid, oxygen-enriched steam to a predetermined pressure, cooling the second stream, condensing the cooled second stream and evaporating the oxygen-enriched stream in an evaporator-condenser, delivering the condensed second stream to the high pressure chamber of the rectification column, and heating the oxygen-enriched stream and blending the oxygen-enriched stream with a compressed blend-air stream to the desired oxygen concentration.

  15. Mode of exercise and sex are not important for oxygen consumption during and in recovery from sprint interval training.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Logan K; Couture, Katie M; Hazell, Tom J

    2014-12-01

    Most sprint interval training (SIT) research involves cycling as the mode of exercise and whether running SIT elicits a similar excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) response to cycling SIT is unknown. As running is a more whole-body-natured exercise, the potential EPOC response could be greater when using a running session compared with a cycling session. The purpose of the current study was to determine the acute effects of a running versus cycling SIT session on EPOC and whether potential sex differences exist. Sixteen healthy recreationally active individuals (8 males and 8 females) had their gas exchange measured over ∼2.5 h under 3 experimental sessions: (i) a cycle SIT session, (ii) a run SIT session, and (iii) a control (CTRL; no exercise) session. Diet was controlled. During exercise, both SIT modes increased oxygen consumption (cycle: male, 1.967 ± 0.343; female, 1.739 ± 0.296 L·min(-1); run: male, 2.169 ± 0.369; female, 1.791 ± 0.481 L·min(-1)) versus CTRL (male, 0.425 ± 0.065 L·min(-1); female, 0.357 ± 0.067; P < 0.001), but not compared with each other (P = 0.234). In the first hour postexercise, oxygen consumption was still increased following both run (male, 0.590 ± 0.065; female, 0.449 ± 0.084) and cycle SIT (male, 0.556 ± 0.069; female, 0.481 ± 0.110 L·min(-1)) versus CTRL and oxygen consumption was maintained through the second hour postexercise (CTRL: male, 0.410 ± 0.048; female, 0.332 ± 0.062; cycle: male, 0.430 ± 0.047; female, 0.395 ± 0.087; run: male, 0.463 ± 0.051; female, 0.374 ± 0.087 L·min(-1)). The total EPOC was not significantly different between modes of exercise or males and females (P > 0.05). Our data demonstrate that the mode of exercise during SIT (cycling or running) is not important to O2 consumption and that males and females respond similarly.

  16. Simple model of dissolved oxygen consumption in a bay within high organic loading: an applied remediation tool.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, Ramón; Vargas, José; Pagliero, Liliana

    2006-07-01

    San Vicente Bay is a coastal shallow embayment in Central Chile with multiple uses, one of which is receiving wastewater from industrial fisheries, steel mill effluents, and domestic sewage. A simulation model was developed and applied to dissolved oxygen consumption by organic residues released into this embayment. Three compartments were established as function of: depth, circulation and outfall location. The model compartments had different volumes, and their oxygen saturation value was used as baseline. The parameters: (a) BOD5 of the industrial and urban effluents, (b) oxygen demand by organic sediments, (c) respiration, (d) photosynthesis and (e) re-aeration were included in the model. Iteration results of the model showed severe alterations in Compartment 1, with a decrease of 65% in the oxygen below saturation. Compartment 2 showed a small decline (10%) and compartment 3 did not show apparent changes in oxygen values. Measures recommended for remediation were to decrease the BOD5 loading by 30% in the affected sector. Iteration of the model for 200 h following recommendations derived from the preceding results produced an increase in saturation of 60% (5 ml O2 L(-1)), which suggested an improvement of the environmental conditions.

  17. An innovative coupling between column leaching and oxygen consumption tests to assess behavior of contaminated marine dredged sediments.

    PubMed

    Couvidat, Julien; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Chatain, Vincent; Zhang, Fan; Bouzahzah, Hassan

    2015-07-01

    Contaminated dredged sediments are often considered hazardous wastes, so they have to be adequately managed to avoid leaching of pollutants. The mobility of inorganic contaminants is a major concern. Metal sulfides (mainly framboïdal pyrite, copper, and zinc sulfides) have been investigated in this study as an important reactive metal-bearing phase sensitive to atmospheric oxygen action. An oxygen consumption test (OC-Test) has been adapted to assess the reactivity of dredged sediments when exposed to atmospheric oxygen. An experimental column set-up has been developed allowing the coupling between leaching and oxygen consumption test to investigate the reactivity of the sediment. This reactivity, which consisted of sulfide oxidation, was found to occur for saturation degree between 60 and 90 % and until the 20th testing week, through significant sulfates releases. These latter were assumed to come from sulfide oxidation in the first step of the test, then probably from gypsum dissolution. Confrontation results of OC-Test and leachate quality shows that Cu was well correlated to sulfates releases, which in turn, leads to Ca and Mg dissolution (buffer effect). Cu, and mostly Zn, was associated to organic matter, phyllosilicates, and other minerals through organo-clay complexes. This research confirmed that the OC-Test, originally developed for mine tailings, could be a useful tool in the dredged sediment field which can allow for intrinsic characterization of reactivity of a material suspected to readily reacting with oxygen and for better understanding of geochemical processes that affect pollutants behavior, conversion, and transfer in the environment.

  18. Influence of simulated microgravity on the maximal oxygen consumption of nontrained and trained rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, Christopher R.; Monnin, Kimberly A.; Sebastian, Lisa A.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of microgravity and endurance training (TR) on maximal O2 consumption was investigated in trained and nontrained (NT) rats subjected to head-down suspension (HDS) by comparing maximal O2 consumption, treadmill run time (RT), and mechanical efficiency (ME) of treadmill running in HDS rats, both NT and TR, and in respective cage controls. It was found that HDS for 28 days was associated with significant reduction in absolute maximal O2 consumption in both TR and NT rats. Relative maximal O2 consumption, however, was significantly reduced in TR but not NT rats. Reductions in RT and ME occurring in both TR and NT rats after 28 days of HDS were similar. The TR rats exhibited greater diuretic, natriuretic, and kaliuretic responses to HDS than the NT rats.

  19. Influence of simulated microgravity on the maximal oxygen consumption of nontrained and trained rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, Christopher R.; Monnin, Kimberly A.; Sebastian, Lisa A.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of microgravity and endurance training (TR) on maximal O2 consumption was investigated in trained and nontrained (NT) rats subjected to head-down suspension (HDS) by comparing maximal O2 consumption, treadmill run time (RT), and mechanical efficiency (ME) of treadmill running in HDS rats, both NT and TR, and in respective cage controls. It was found that HDS for 28 days was associated with significant reduction in absolute maximal O2 consumption in both TR and NT rats. Relative maximal O2 consumption, however, was significantly reduced in TR but not NT rats. Reductions in RT and ME occurring in both TR and NT rats after 28 days of HDS were similar. The TR rats exhibited greater diuretic, natriuretic, and kaliuretic responses to HDS than the NT rats.

  20. Modeling the fluid-dynamics and oxygen consumption in a porous scaffold stimulated by cyclic squeeze pressure.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Marco; Giusti, Serena; Nascimento, Diana; Silva, Ana; Boschetti, Federica; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2016-08-01

    The architecture and dynamic physical environment of tissues can be recreated in-vitro by combining 3D porous scaffolds and bioreactors able to apply controlled mechanical stimuli on cells. In such systems, the entity of the stimuli and the distribution of nutrients within the engineered construct depend on the micro-structure of the scaffolds. In this work, we present a new approach for optimizing computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) models for the investigation of fluid-induced forces generated by cyclic squeeze pressure within a porous construct, coupled with oxygen consumption of cardiomyocytes. A 2D axial symmetric macro-scaled model of a squeeze pressure bioreactor chamber was used as starting point for generating time dependent pressure profiles. Subsequently the fluid movement generated by the pressure fields was coupled with a complete 3D micro-scaled model of a porous protein cryogel. Oxygen transport and consumption inside the scaffold was evaluated considering a homogeneous distribution of cardiomyocytes throughout the structure, as confirmed by preliminary cell culture experiments. The results show that a 3D description of the system, coupling a porous geometry and time dependent pressure driven flow with fluid-structure-interaction provides an accurate and meaningful description of the microenvironment in terms of shear stress and oxygen distribution than simple stationary 2D models. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sensitivity of Hypoxia Predictions for the Northern Gulf of Mexico to Sediment Oxygen Consumption and Model Nesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Katja; Hu, Jiatang; Laurent, Arnaud; Marta-Almeida, Martinho; Hetland, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Interannual variations of the hypoxic area that develops every summer over the Texas-Louisiana Shelf are large. The 2008 Action Plan put forth by an alliance of multiple state and federal agencies and tribes calls for a decrease of the hypoxic area through nutrient management in the watershed. Realistic models help build mechanistic understanding of the processes underlying hypoxia formation and are thus indispensable for devising efficient nutrient reduction strategies. Here we present such a model, evaluate its hypoxia predictions against monitoring observations and assess the sensitivity of hypoxia predictions to model resolution, variations in sediment oxygen consumption and choice of physical horizontal boundary conditions. We find that hypoxia predictions on the shelf are very sensitive to the parameterization of sediment oxygen consumption, a result of the fact that hypoxic conditions are restricted to a relatively thin layer above the bottom over most of the shelf. We also show that the strength of vertical stratification is an important predictor of oxygen concentration in bottom waters and that modification of physical horizontal boundary conditions can have a large effect on hypoxia predictions.

  2. The collaboration of Antoine and Marie-Anne Lavoisier and the first measurements of human oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2013-12-01

    Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) was one of the most eminent scientists of the late 18th century. He is often referred to as the father of chemistry, in part because of his book Elementary Treatise on Chemistry. In addition he was a major figure in respiratory physiology, being the first person to recognize the true nature of oxygen, elucidating the similarities between respiration and combustion, and making the first measurements of human oxygen consumption under various conditions. Less well known are the contributions made by his wife, Marie-Anne Lavoisier. However, she was responsible for drawings of the experiments on oxygen consumption when the French revolution was imminent. These are of great interest because written descriptions are not available. Possible interpretations of the experiments are given here. In addition, her translations from English to French of papers by Priestley and others were critical in Lavoisier's demolition of the erroneous phlogiston theory. She also provided the engravings for her husband's textbook, thus documenting the extensive new equipment that he developed. In addition she undertook editorial work, for example in preparing his posthumous memoirs. The scientific collaboration of this husband-wife team is perhaps unique among the giants of respiratory physiology.

  3. Investigation of myocardial photodynamic revascularization method on ischemic rat myocardium model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilchenko, S. Yu.; Stratonnikov, A. A.; Volkova, A. I.; Loschenov, V. B.; Sheptak, E. A.; Kharnas, S. S.

    2006-08-01

    Ischemic heart disease is one of the leading reasons of invalidisation and death rate of able-bodied citizens in the world. There are many various surgical and medicamentous methods of its treatment for today, however all these methods have restrictions in application. Our work was directed at initiation possibility clarification of ischemic myocardium revascularization by means of making necrosis with photodynamic therapy. The investigation was carried out in rats with the ischemia artificial made by means of left coronary artery ligation. Level of Photosense photosensitizer accumulation in ischemic and normal rat myocardium zones was defined. Myocardial photodynamic revascularization procedure of ischemic rat myocardium was carried out. Morphological analysis of the myocardium preparations showed the presence of active revascularization of ischemic myocardium after photodynamic therapy. The method of ischemia level estimation based on spectral optical definition of blood oxygen saturation was developed.

  4. Usefulness of cardiac index and peak exercise oxygen consumption for determining priority for cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Methvin, Amanda; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Malik, Adnan; Anarado, Perry; Chowdhury, Mahdi; Hussain, Imad; Book, Wendy M; Laskar, Sonjoy R; Vega, J David; Smith, Andrew L; Butler, Javed

    2010-05-01

    Decisions regarding cardiac transplantation listing are difficult in patients with heart failure who have relatively discordant peak exercise oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) and cardiac index (CI) values. One hundred five patients with heart failure who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and right-sided cardiac catheterization for transplantation evaluation were studied. Patients were divided into 4 groups on the basis of peak Vo(2) and CI: group 1, Vo(2) > or = 12 ml/min/kg, CI > or = 1.8 L/min/m(2) (n = 30); group 2, Vo(2) > or = 12 ml/min/kg, CI <1.8, L/min/m(2) (n = 27); group 3, Vo(2) <12 ml/min/kg, CI > or = 1.8 L/min/m(2) (n = 25); and group 4, Vo(2) <12 ml/min/kg, CI <1.8 L/min/m(2) (n = 23). Groups were compared for event-free (death or ventricular assist device) survival. The overall CI was 1.9 + or - 0.4 L/min/m(2) and peak Vo(2) was 12.4 + or - 2.8 ml/min/kg; values in the 4 groups were as follows: group 1, peak Vo(2) 14.7 + or - 2.1 ml/min/kg, CI 2.2 + or - 0.3 L/min/m(2); group 2, peak VO(2) 14.2 + or - 1.3 ml/min/kg, CI 1.5 + or - 0.2 L/min/m(2); group 3, peak Vo(2) 10.2 + or - 1.3 ml/min/kg, CI 2.1 + or - 0.3 L/min/m(2); and group 4, peak Vo(2) 9.7 + or - 2.0 ml/min/kg, CI 1.6 + or - 0.2 L/min/m(2). After a median follow-up period of 3.7 years, 28 patients (26.0%) had events. Event-free survival was 96%, 95%, 96%, and 79% for 6 months (p = 0.04); 88%, 81%, 90%, and 73% for 12 months (p = 0.09); 88%, 73%, 85%, and 65% for 18 months (p = 0.11); and 83%, 73%, 79%, and 53% for 24 months (p = 0.06) for groups 1 to 4, respectively. Median survival was 5.1, 3.0, 3.9, and 2.6 years, respectively, in groups 1 to 4 (p = 0.052). In conclusion, almost half the patients had relatively discordant peak Vo(2) and CI measurements. Patients with lower peak Vo(2) values but relatively preserved CI values had survival comparable to post-transplantation survival, whereas those with low CI but preserved Vo(2) had a lower survival rate. These results suggest that the

  5. Rhythms of locomotion and oxygen consumption in the estuarine amphipod Corophium volutator (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Morgan, E

    1984-01-01

    The estuarine amphipod Corophium volutator exhibits an endogenous circatidal rhythm of swimming activity, with maxima occurring just after the expected time of high water, under constant laboratory conditions. Oxygen uptake by Corophium is also subject to modulation across the tidal cycle. The period of highest oxygen uptake occurs during the ebb tide, in phase with the period of maximum swimming activity. A second increase in oxygen uptake during the early flood tide is thought to reflect either in-burrow activity or a previously described rhythm of emergence. This being so, this aspect of the animal's respiratory metabolism may be regulated by an autonomous oscillator independent of that governing the animal's swimming behaviour.

  6. Relationship between level of forage intake, blood flow and oxygen consumption by splanchnic tissues of sheep fed a tropical grass forage.

    PubMed

    Hentz, F; Kozloski, G V; Zeni, D; Brun, M V; Stefanello, S

    2017-02-01

    Four Polwarth castrated male sheep (42 ± 4.4 kg live weight (LW) surgically implanted with chronic indwelling catheters into the mesenteric, portal and hepatic veins, housed in metabolism cages and offered Cynodon sp. hay at rates (g of dry matter (DM)/kg LW) of 7, 14, 21 or ad libitum, were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experiment to evaluate the effect of the level of forage intake on blood flow and oxygen consumption by the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver and total splanchnic tissues (ST). The portal blood flow and the oxygen consumption by PDV linearly increased at increased organic matter (OM) intake. No effect of level of OM intake was obtained for the hepatic artery blood flow and oxygen consumption by liver. As a consequence, the level of OM intake only tended to directly affect hepatic blood flow and oxygen consumption by total ST. Oxygen consumption was linearly and positively related to blood flow across PDV, liver and total ST. The heat production by PDV and total ST, as proportion of metabolizable energy (ME) intake, decreased curvilinearly at increased ME intake. In conclusion, the oxygen consumption by PDV, but not by liver, was directly related to the level of forage intake by sheep. Moreover, when ingested at levels below maintenance, most of ME was spent as heat produced by ST. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Nitrate-Containing Beetroot Juice Reduces Oxygen Consumption During Submaximal Exercise in Low but Not High Aerobically Fit Male Runners.

    PubMed

    Carriker, Colin R; Vaughan, Roger A; VanDusseldorp, Trisha A; Johnson, Kelly E; Beltz, Nicholas M; McCormick, James J; Cole, Nathan H; Gibson, Ann L

    2016-12-31

    to examine the effect of a 4-day NO3- loading protocol on the submaximal oxygen cost of both low fit and high fit participants at five different exercise intensities. participants were initially assigned to a placebo (PL; negligible NO3-) or inorganic nitrate-rich (NR; 6.2 mmol nitrate/day) group; double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover. Participants completed three trials (T1, T2 and T3). T1 included a maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) treadmill test. A 6-day washout, minimizing nitrate consumption, preceded T2. Each of the four days prior to T2 and T3, participants consumed either PL or NR; final dose 2.5 hours prior to exercise. A 14-day washout followed T2. T2 and T3 consisted of 5-minute submaximal treadmill bouts (45, 60, 70, 80 and 85% VO2max) determined during T1. Low fit nitrate-supplemented participants consumed less oxygen (p<0.05) at lower workloads (45% and 60% VO2max) compared to placebo trials; changes not observed in high fit participants. The two lowest intensity workloads of 45 and 60% VO2max revealed the greatest correlation (r=0.54, p=0.09 and r=0.79, p<0.05; respectively). No differences were found between conditions for heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio or rating of perceived exertion for either fitness group. Nitrate consumption promotes reduced oxygen consumption at lower exercise intensities in low fit, but not high fit males. Lesser fit individuals may receive greater benefit than higher fit participants exercising at intensities <60% VO2max.

  8. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and AV optimization increase myocardial oxygen consumption, but increase cardiac function more than proportionally.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Andreas; Pabari, Punam A; Mayet, Jamil; Peters, Nicholas S; Davies, D Wyn; Lim, P Boon; Lefroy, David; Hughes, Alun D; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Francis, Darrel P; Whinnett, Zachary I

    2014-02-01

    The mechanoenergetic effects of atrioventricular delay optimization during biventricular pacing ("cardiac resynchronization therapy", CRT) are unknown. Eleven patients with heart failure and left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent invasive measurements of left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, aortic flow velocity-time-integral (VTI) and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) at 4 pacing states: biventricular pacing (with VV 0 ms) at AVD 40 ms (AV-40), AVD 120 ms (AV-120, a common nominal AV delay), at their pre-identified individualised haemodynamic optimum (AV-Opt); and intrinsic conduction (LBBB). AV-120, relative to LBBB, increased LV developed pressure by a mean of 11(SEM 2)%, p=0.001, and aortic VTI by 11(SEM 3)%, p=0.002, but also increased MVO2 by 11(SEM 5)%, p=0.04. AV-Opt further increased LV developed pressure by a mean of 2(SEM 1)%, p=0.035 and aortic VTI by 4(SEM 1)%, p=0.017. MVO2 trended further up by 7(SEM 5)%, p=0.22. Mechanoenergetics at AV-40 were no different from LBBB. The 4 states lay on a straight line for Δexternal work (ΔLV developed pressure × Δaortic VTI) against ΔMVO2, with slope 1.80, significantly >1 (p=0.02). Biventricular pacing and atrioventricular delay optimization increased external cardiac work done but also myocardial oxygen consumption. Nevertheless, the increase in cardiac work was ~80% greater than the increase in oxygen consumption, signifying an improvement in cardiac mechanoenergetics. Finally, the incremental effect of optimization on external work was approximately one-third beyond that of nominal AV pacing, along the same favourable efficiency trajectory, suggesting that AV delay dominates the biventricular pacing effect - which may therefore not be mainly "resynchronization". © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurement of Oxygen Consumption Using the Canadian Clearance Diving Apparatus (CCDA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    tem for the measurement of Vo in water. * iii INTRODUCTION In semi- closed circuit underwater breathing apparatus (SCCBA) the oxygen partial pressure...13 9 9 0 0 ii ABSTRACT The Canadian Clearance Diving Apparatus (CCDA) was modified to serve as a 100% oxygen rebreathing ...were open- circuit , compressed-air systems based upon the principles used in the LRBS. In the LRBA and UMAS, the subject inspired gas from a bag

  10. Effects of iron in streams on gill morphology, oxygen consumption, and phytoplankton/benthic invertebrate distribution. Completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, E.C.; Hinton, D.E.; Werner, D.K.; Gerber, R.B.; Becker, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    The project covered many aspects of the influence of iron on aquatic organisms at a four-tier level: cellular, phytoplankton, invertebrate, and fish. One other section dealt with the statistical distribution of total iron in the waters of West Virginia. The iron content of the waters, along with manganese and conductivity, were associated with mucous cell structure changes in trout perch and bluntnose minnow. Higher iron levels were found to increase oxygen consumption rates in the amphipod Gammarus minus. Overall, about 30 percent of the time, the 1 mg/l regulatory limit was exceeded from water sampled throughout the state.

  11. Impact of wine production on the fractionation of copper and iron in Chardonnay wine: Implications for oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Rousseva, Michaela; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R; Clark, Andrew C

    2016-07-15

    Copper and iron in wine can influence oxidative, reductive and colloidal stability. The current study utilises a solid phase extraction technique to fractionate these metals into hydrophobic, cationic and residual forms, with quantification by ICP-OES. The impact of aspects of wine production on the metal fractions was examined, along with the relationship between metal fractions and oxygen decay rates. Addition of copper and iron to juice, followed by fermentation, favoured an increase in all of their respective metal fractions in the wine, with the largest increase observed for the cationic form of iron. Bentonite fining of the protein-containing wines led to a significant reduction in the cationic fraction of copper and an increase in the cationic form of iron. Total copper correlated more closely with oxygen consumption in the wine compared to total iron, and the residual and cationic forms of copper provided the largest contribution to this impact.

  12. The effect of exercise intensity and excess postexercise oxygen consumption on postprandial blood lipids in physically inactive men.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Laurel A; Papadakis, Zacharias; Rogers, Katie M; Moncada-Jiménez, José; Taylor, J Kyle; Grandjean, Peter W

    2017-09-01

    Reductions in postprandial lipemia have been observed following aerobic exercise of sufficient energy expenditure. Increased excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) has been documented when comparing high- versus low-intensity exercise. The contribution of EPOC energy expenditure to alterations in postprandial lipemia has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low- and high-intensity exercise on postprandial lipemia in healthy, sedentary, overweight and obese men (age, 43 ± 10 years; peak oxygen consumption, 31.1 ± 7.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); body mass index, 31.8 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)) and to determine the contribution of EPOC to reductions in postprandial lipemia. Participants completed 4 conditions: nonexercise control, low-intensity exercise at 40%-50% oxygen uptake reserve (LI), high-intensity exercise at 70%-80% oxygen uptake reserve (HI), and HI plus EPOC re-feeding (HI+EERM), where the difference in EPOC energy expenditure between LI and HI was re-fed in the form of a sports nutrition bar (Premier Nutrition Corp., Emeryville, Calif., USA). Two hours following exercise participants ingested a high-fat (1010 kcals, 99 g sat fat) test meal. Blood samples were obtained before exercise, before the test meal, and at 2, 4, and 6 h postprandially. Triglyceride incremental area under the curve was significantly reduced following LI, HI, and HI+EERM when compared with nonexercise control (p < 0.05) with no differences between the exercise conditions (p > 0.05). In conclusions, prior LI and HI exercise equally attenuated postprandial triglyceride responses to the test meal. The extra energy expended during EPOC does not contribute significantly to exercise energy expenditure or to reductions in postprandial lipemia in overweight men.

  13. Direct measurements of the light dependence of gross photosynthesis and oxygen consumption in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleul, B.; Park, J.; Brown, C. M.; Bidle, K. D.; Lee, S.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    For decades, a lack of understanding of how respiration is influenced by light has been stymying our ability to quantitatively analyze how phytoplankton allocate carbon in situ and the biological mechanisms that participate to the fate of blooms. Using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS), the light dependencies of gross photosynthesis and oxygen uptake rates were measured during the bloom demises of two prymnesiophytes, in two open ocean regions. In the North Atlantic, dominated by Emiliania huxleyi, respiration was independent of irradiance and was higher than the gross photosynthetic rate at all irradiances. In the Amundsen Sea (Antarctica), dominated by Phaeocystis antarctica, the situation was very different. Dark respiration was one order of magnitude lower than the maximal gross photosynthetic rate. ut the oxygen uptake rate increased by 10 fold at surface irradiances, where it becomes higher than gross photosynthesis. Our results suggest that the light dependence of oxygen uptake in P. antarctica has two sources: one is independent of photosynthesis, and is possibly associated with the photo-reduction of O2 mediated by dissolved organic matter; the second reflects the activity of an oxidase fueled in the light with photosynthetic electron flow. Interestingly, these dramatic light-dependent changes in oxygen uptake were not reproduced in nutrient-replete P. antarctica cultures, in the laboratory. Our measurements highlight the importance of improving our understanding of oxygen consuming reactions in the euphotic zone, which is critical to investigating the physiology of phytoplankton and tracing the fate of phytoplankton blooms.

  14. Oxygen consumption by a sediment bed for stagnant water: comparison to SOD with fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    A model of sedimentary oxygen demand (SOD) for stagnant water in a lake or a reservoir is presented. For the purposes of this paper, stagnant water is defined as the bottom layer of stratified water columns in relatively unproductive systems that are underlain by silt and sand-dominated sediments with low-organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). The modeling results are compared to those with fluid flow to investigate how flow over the sediment surface raises SOD compared to stagnant water, depending on flow velocity and biochemical activity in the sediment. SOD is found to be substantially limited by oxygen transfer in the water column when water is stagnant. When flow over the sediment surface is present, SOD becomes larger than that for stagnant water, depending on flow velocity and the biochemical oxygen uptake rate in the sediment. Flow over the sediment surface causes an insignificant raise in SOD when the biochemical oxygen uptake rate is small. The difference between SOD with fluid flow and SOD for stagnant water becomes significant as the biochemical oxygen uptake rate becomes larger, i.e. SOD is 10-100 times larger when flow over the sediment surface is present.

  15. Development of oxygen consumption analysis with an on-chip electrochemical device and simulation.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Kaoru; Yasumi, Masahiro; Ushio, Hiroshi; Shunori, Atsushi; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2017-09-06

    The O2 consumption rate of embryos has been attracting much attention as a key indicator of cell metabolisms and development. In this study, we propose an on-chip device that enables the accurate, easy, and non-invasive measurement of O2 consumption rates of single embryos. Pt electrodes and micropits for embryo settlement were fabricated on Si chips via microfabrication techniques. The configuration of the device enables the detection of O2 concentration profiles surrounding the embryos by settling embryos into the pits with a mouth pipette. Moreover, as the detection is based on an electrochemical method, the influence of O2 consumption on the electrodes was also considered. By using a simulator (COMSOL Multiphysics), we estimated the O2 concentration profiles in the device with and without the effects of the electrodes. Based on the simulation results, we developed a normalization process to calculate the precise O2 consumption rate of the sample. Finally, using both the measurement system and the algorithm for the analysis, the respiratory activities of mouse embryos were successfully measured.

  16. Nitrification and its oxygen consumption along the turbid Changjiang River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, S. S.-Y.; Hsu, T.-C.; Liu, J.-W.; Xie, X.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, J.; Wang, H.; Yang, J.-Y. T.; Hsu, S.-C.; Dai, M.; Kao, S.-J.

    2013-05-01

    Nitrification rates of bulk water (NRb) and particle free (NRpf, particle > 3 μm eliminated) were determined along the Changjiang River plume in August 2011 by nitrogen isotope tracer technique. Dissolved oxygen (DO), community respiration rate (CR), nutrients, dissolved organic nitrogen, total suspended matter (TSM), particulate organic carbon/nitrogen (POC/PON), acid-leachable iron and manganese on suspended particles and both archaeal and β-proteobacterial amoA abundance on size-fractioned particle (> 3 μm and 0.22-3 μm) were measured. The NRb ranged from undetectable up to 4.6 μmol L-1 d-1 peaking at salinity of ~ 29. NRb values were positively correlated with ammonia concentration suggesting the importance of substrate in nitrification. In river mouth and inner plume, NRb was much higher than NRpf indicating nitrifying bacteria is mainly particle-associated, which was supported by amoA gene abundance and regression analysis of TSM and NRb. The estimated oxygen demand of nitrification accounted for 0.4% to 317% of CR. The nitrification oxygen demand is much higher than Redfield model's estimation (23%) indicating that oxygen might not be the sole oxidant though DO was sufficient (> 58 μmol kg-1). The excess nitrification oxygen demand showed tendency to occur at lower DO samples accompanying with higher acid-leachable Fe/Mn, which implied reactive Fe3+/Mn4+ may play a role as oxidant in nitrification process. Stoichiometric calculation suggested reactive Fe on particles was even 10-fold the oxidant demand for complete ammonia oxidation along all areas of the plume. The involvement of reactive iron and manganese in nitrification process in oxygenated water further complicated the nitrogen cycling in turbid river plume.

  17. The maximum oxygen consumption and aerobic scope of birds and mammals: getting to the heart of the matter.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C M

    1999-01-01

    Resting or basal metabolic rates, compared across a wide range of organisms, scale with respect to body mass as approximately the 0.75 power. This relationship has recently been linked to the fractal geometry of the appropriate transport system or, in the case of birds and mammals, the blood vascular system. However, the structural features of the blood vascular system should more closely reflect maximal aerobic metabolic rates rather than submaximal function. Thus, the maximal aerobic metabolic rates of birds and mammals should also scale as approximately the 0.75 power. A review of the literature on maximal oxygen consumption and factorial aerobic scope (maximum oxygen consumption divided by basal metabolic rate) suggests that body mass influences the capacity of the cardiovascular system to raise metabolic rates above those at rest. The results show that the maximum sustainable metabolic rates of both birds and mammals are similar and scale as approximately the 0.88 +/- 0.02 power of body mass (and aerobic scope as approximately the 0.15 +/- 0.05 power), when the measurements are standardized with respect to the differences in relative heart mass and haemoglobin concentration between species. The maximum heart beat frequency of birds and mammals is predicted to scale as the -0.12 +/- 0.02 power of body mass, while that at rest should scale as -0.27 +/- 0.04. PMID:10629977

  18. Cold-induced vasodilatation of finger and maximal oxygen consumption of young female athletes born in Hokkaido

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Koya

    1990-03-01

    To determine whether there is a direct correlation between endurance capacity and cold tolerance, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD), we measured these factors in 14 young female athletes born in Hokkaido, Japan's northernmost island. We determined the VO2max by a standard incremental test on a cycle ergometer and measured the oxygen consumption (VO2) by means of the Douglas-bag method. We determined the CIVD reaction by measuring the skin temperature of the left middle finger during immersion in cold water at 0°C for 20 min. The athletes showed significant positive correlations between VO2max, expressed as l/min, and CIVD as well as other peripheral cold tolerance indexes (resistance index against frostbite and CIVD index). The body weight VO2max (VO2max/kg body weight) failed to correlate significantly with either the CIVD or with other cold tolerance indexes. These results suggest that CIVD in females may depend on factors other than those determined in this study, in addition to the functional spread of the vascular beds in peripheral tissues, including striated muscle; it is known that the size and the vascular bed in this tissue are affected by exercise training and that this results in the elevation of VO2max and VO2max/kg body weight.

  19. Growth, Oxygen Consumption, and Behavioral Responses of Danio rerio to Variation in Dietary Protein and Lipid Levels.

    PubMed

    O'Brine, Timothy M; Vrtělová, Jana; Snellgrove, Donna L; Davies, Simon J; Sloman, Katherine A

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the welfare of ornamental fish. Diet can significantly impact the welfare of fish, which can manifest as changes in the fish's physical health and behavior. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is a popular ornamental species; however, little is known about their nutritional requirements with possible implications for their welfare. Here, we investigated the effect of diets with increasing crude protein (iso-caloric diets) and lipid (iso-nitrogenous diets) on the growth performance, oxygen consumption, and behavior of zebrafish. We found no significant effects of crude protein (32%-75%) or lipid (8%-16%) on the specific growth rate or oxygen consumption of fish fed 5% of their body mass (BM)/day, although the highest crude protein and lipid diet resulted in an increase in condition factor. Furthermore, the crude protein diets did not affect zebrafish behavior when fed a 2% BM ration, once a day. This study has shown that a diet with 32% crude protein and a diet with 8% crude lipid, when fed at a 5% BM ration, were sufficient to meet the growth requirements of our zebrafish. These diets supported the fish's physical health and thus benefited their welfare.

  20. Benthic nutrient fluxes and sediment oxygen consumption in a full-scale facultative pond in Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Faleschini, M; Esteves, J L

    2013-01-01

    The study of benthic metabolism is an interesting tool to understand the process that occurs in bottom water at wastewater stabilization ponds. Here, rates of benthic oxygen consumption and nutrient exchange across the water-sludge interface were measured in situ using a benthic chamber. The research was carried out during autumn, winter, and summer at a municipal facultative stabilization pond working in a temperate region (Puerto Madryn city, Argentina). Both a site near the raw wastewater inlet (Inlet station) and a site near the outlet (Outlet station) were sampled. Important seasonal and spatial patterns were identified as being related to benthic fluxes. Ammonium release ranged from undetectable (autumn/summer - Inlet station) to +30.7 kg-NH4(+) ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn - Outlet station), denitrification ranged from undetectable (winter - in both sites) to -4.0 kg-NO3(-) ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn - Outlet station), and oxygen consumption ranged from 0.07 kg-O2ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn/summer - Outlet station) to 0.84 kg-O2ha(-1) d(-1) (autumn - Inlet station). During the warmer months, the mineralization of organic matter from the bottom pond acts as a source of nutrients, which seem to support the important development of phytoplankton and nitrification activity recorded in the surface water. Bottom processes could be related to the advanced degree and efficiency of the treatment, the temperature, and probably the strong and frequent wind present in the region.

  1. Oxygen consumption of a pneumatically controlled ventilator in a field anesthesia machine.

    PubMed

    Szpisjak, Dale F; Javernick, Elizabeth N; Kyle, Richard R; Austin, Paul N

    2008-12-01

    Field anesthesia machines (FAM) have been developed for remote locations where reliable supplies of compressed medical gases or electricity may be absent. In place of electricity, pneumatically controlled ventilators use compressed gas to power timing circuitry and actuate valves. We sought to determine the total O(2) consumption and ventilator gas consumption (drive gas [DG] plus pneumatic control [PC] gas) of a FAM's pneumatically controlled ventilator in mechanical models of high (HC) and low (LC) total thoracic compliance. The amount of total O(2) consumed by the Magellan-2200 (Oceanic Medical Products, Atchison, KS) FAM with pneumatically controlled ventilator was calculated using the ideal gas law and the measured mass of O(2) consumed from E cylinders. DG to the bellows canister assembly was measured with the Wright Respirometer Mk 8 (Ferraris Respiratory Europe, Hertford, UK). PC gas consumption was calculated by subtracting DG and fresh gas flow (FGF) from the total O(2) consumed from the E cylinder. The delivered tidal volume (V(T)) was measured with a pneumotach (Hans Rudolph, KS City, MO). Three different V(T) were tested (500, 750, and 1000 mL) with two lung models (HC and LC) using the Vent Aid Training Test Lung (MI Instruments, Grand Rapids, MI). Respiratory variables included an I:E of 1:2, FGF of 1 L/min, and respiratory rate of 10 breaths/min. Total O(2) consumption was directly proportional to V(T) and inversely proportional to compliance. The smallest total O(2) consumption rate (including FGF) was 9.3 +/- 0.4 L/min in the HC-500 model and the largest was 15.9 +/- 0.5 L/min in the LC-1000 model (P < 0.001). The mean PC circuitry consumption was 3.9 +/- 0.24 L/min or 390 mL +/- 24 mL/breath. To prepare for loss of central DG supply, patient safety will be improved by estimating cylinder duration for low total thoracic compliance. Using data from the smaller compliance and greatest V(T) model (LC-1000), a full O(2) E cylinder would be depleted in

  2. Effect of Endotoxin on Oxygen Consumption By a Flow-Controlled Canine Hind-Limb Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    a reduction in the cardiac metabolic units of the periphery, (3) the red bloodq output and a widening of the central arteriovenous cell or...explained readily by the reduction in takeoff of the profunda femoris artery; the internal + SNum ber Volume 88 Effect of endotoxin on oxygen

  3. Oxygen Consumption in the First Stages of Strenuous Work as a Function of Prior Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutin, Bernard; And Others

    This study examined the extent to which 10 minutes of prior exercise (PE) at a workload adjusted to maintain a heart rate (HR) of 140 beats per minute could facilitate the mobilization of the oxygen transport system in a strenuous criterion task (CT). The control treatment involved completion of the CT following 10 minutes of rest on the…

  4. Measurement of Diaphragmatic Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in the Dog by the Kety-Schmidt Technique

    PubMed Central

    Rochester, Dudley F.

    1974-01-01

    To assess energy expenditure of the diaphragm directly, a method was devised for percutaneous catheterization of the left inferior phrenic vein in dogs. Necropsy studies, including retrograde injection of india ink and measurement of radioactivity in diaphragmatic muscle strips, suggested that the territory drained by the inferior phrenic vein was uniformly perfused, and that there were no major anastomoses between this bed and adjacent ones. Diaphragmatic blood flow (˙Q di) was calculated from the integrated diaphragmatic arteriovenous difference of 85Kr by the Kety-Schmidt technique. Diaphragmatic oxygen consumption (˙Vo2 di) was determined as the product of ˙Q di and the diaphragmatic arteriovenous oxygen content difference [(A-V)O2 di]. When lightly anesthetized dogs breathed quietly, ˙Q di was 22±SD 6 ml/min/100 g, (A-V)O2 di was 6.1±SD 2.5 ml/100 ml, and ˙VO2 di averaged 1.2±SD 0.3 ml/min/100 g. This represented 1.0±SD 0.2% of total body oxygen consumption. ˙VO2 di remained relatively constant during quiet breathing, whereas ˙Q di varied directly with cardiac output and reciprocally with (A-V)O2 di. The oxygen consumption of the noncontracting diaphragm was 60±SD 20% of the level measured during quiet breathing. The energy expended by the diaphragm to support simple hyperventilation was small. A 100% increase in minute ventilation, induced by inhalation of 5% CO2 in 21% or 14% O2, increased ˙Q di 13%, (A-V)O2 di 19%, and ˙VO2 di 40%. The diaphragm consumed 0.13±SD 0.09 ml O2 for each additional liter of ventilation. In four dogs, pneumonia appeared to increase ˙VO2 both by increasing minute ventilation and by increasing the energy cost per liter of ventilation. PMID:4825221

  5. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT.

  6. Effects of nitrous oxide on oxygen consumption by isolated cerebral cortex mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.L.; Pelligrino, D.A.; Miletich, D.J.; Albrecht, R.F.

    1986-04-01

    The influence of N2O on O2 consumption by mitochondria isolated from the cerebral cortex of goats was examined in incubations preequilibrated with N2O-O2 or N2-O2. Rates of O2 consumption were measured polarographically in a closed system while adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation was maximal (after addition of excess adenosine diphosphate (ADP), state 3 respiration) and then when it was at zero (after addition of excess oligomycin, state 4 respiration). Compared with 90% N2, 90% N2O produced no change in the rate of state 3 respiration; but an observed 9% decrease in the state 4 rate and an 11% increase in the state 3: state 4 ratio were statistically significant (P less than 0.05). These differences were not seen with N2 and N2O at 70% rather than at 90%, or when succinate rather than pyruvate-malate was used as the respiratory substrate. We conclude the following: Unlike other inhalation anesthetics, N2O at comparable anesthetic concentrations does not inhibit mitochondrial electron transport or ATP formation coupled to it (oxidative phosphorylation). N2O does inhibit one or more other processes, as yet unidentified, which are energetically coupled to electron transport. The increased cerebral O2 consumption that accompanies N2O anesthesia cannot be attributed to a direct effect of N2O on mitochondrial respiration.

  7. The cost of muscle power production: muscle oxygen consumption per unit work increases at low temperatures in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Tallis, Jason A; James, Rob S

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic energy (ATP) supply to muscle is essential to support activity and behaviour. It is expected, therefore, that there is strong selection to maximise muscle power output for a given rate of ATP use. However, the viscosity and stiffness of muscle increases with a decrease in temperature, which means that more ATP may be required to achieve a given work output. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ATP use increases at lower temperatures for a given power output in Xenopus laevis. To account for temperature variation at different time scales, we considered the interaction between acclimation for 4 weeks (to 15 or 25°C) and acute exposure to these temperatures. Cold-acclimated frogs had greater sprint speed at 15°C than warm-acclimated animals. However, acclimation temperature did not affect isolated gastrocnemius muscle biomechanics. Isolated muscle produced greater tetanus force, and faster isometric force generation and relaxation, and generated more work loop power at 25°C than at 15°C acute test temperature. Oxygen consumption of isolated muscle at rest did not change with test temperature, but oxygen consumption while muscle was performing work was significantly higher at 15°C than at 25°C, regardless of acclimation conditions. Muscle therefore consumed significantly more oxygen at 15°C for a given work output than at 25°C, and plastic responses did not modify this thermodynamic effect. The metabolic cost of muscle performance and activity therefore increased with a decrease in temperature. To maintain activity across a range of temperature, animals must increase ATP production or face an allocation trade-off at lower temperatures. Our data demonstrate the potential energetic benefits of warming up muscle before activity, which is seen in diverse groups of animals such as bees, which warm flight muscle before take-off, and humans performing warm ups before exercise. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Effect of BMI, Body Fat Percentage and Fat Free Mass on Maximal Oxygen Consumption in Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Himel; Mishra, Snigdha Prava

    2017-06-01

    Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is an important measure of cardiorespiratory capacity of an individual at a given degree of fitness and oxygen availability. Risk of cardiovascular diseases increases with increasing degree of obesity and a low level of VO2max has been established as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. To determine VO2max in young adults and to find its correlation with Body Mass Index (BMI), Body Fat% and Fat Free Mass (FFM). Fifty four (male=30, female=24) healthy young adults of age group18-25 years after screening by Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) participated in the study. Height was measured by stadiometer. Weight was measured by digital weighing scale with 0.1 kg sensitivity. Body fat% was measured by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) method. FFM was calculated by subtracting fat mass from the body weight. VO2max (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)) was obtained by Submaximal Exercise Test (SET) by first two stages of Bruce Protocol with the basis of linear relationship between Heart Rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2). Data were analysed statistically in GraphPad Prism software version 6.01 for windows. VO2max (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)) of male (43.25±7.25) was significantly (p<0.001) higher than female (31.65±2.10). BMI showed weak negative correlation (r= -0.3232, p=0.0171) with VO2max but Body Fat% showed strong negative correlation (r= -0.7505, p<0.001) with VO2max. FFM positively correlated (r=0.3727, p=0.0055) with VO2max. Increased body fat is associated with decreased level of VO2max in young adults. Obesity in terms of Fat% is a better parameter than BMI for prediction of low VO2max.

  9. Sensitivity of hypoxia predictions for the northern Gulf of Mexico to sediment oxygen consumption and model nesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Katja; Hu, Jiatang; Laurent, Arnaud; Marta-Almeida, Martinho; Hetland, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Every summer, a large area (15,000 km2 on average) over the Texas-Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico turns hypoxic due to decay of organic matter that is primarily derived from nutrient inputs from the Mississippi/Atchafalaya River System. Interannual variability in the size of the hypoxic zone is large. The 2008 Action Plan put forth by the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, an alliance of multiple state and federal agencies and tribes, calls for a reduction of the size of the hypoxic zone through nutrient management in the watershed. Comprehensive models help build mechanistic understanding of the processes underlying hypoxia formation and variability and are thus indispensable tools for devising efficient nutrient reduction strategies and for building reasonable expectations as to what responses can be expected for a given nutrient reduction. Here we present such a model, evaluate its hypoxia simulations against monitoring observations, and assess the sensitivity of the hypoxia simulations to model resolution, variations in sediment oxygen consumption, and choice of physical horizontal boundary conditions. We find that hypoxia simulations on the shelf are very sensitive to the parameterization of sediment oxygen consumption, a result of the fact that hypoxic conditions are restricted to a relatively thin layer above the bottom over most of the shelf. We show that the strength of vertical stratification is an important predictor of dissolved oxygen concentration in bottom waters and that modification of physical horizontal boundary conditions can have a large effect on hypoxia simulations because it can affect stratification strength.

  10. Oxygen Consumption by Red Wines. Part II: Differential Effects on Color and Chemical Composition Caused by Oxygen Taken in Different Sulfur Dioxide-Related Oxidation Contexts.

    PubMed

    Carrascon, Vanesa; Fernandez-Zurbano, Purificación; Bueno, Mónica; Ferreira, Vicente

    2015-12-30

    Chemical changes caused by oxidation of red wines during 5 consecutive air-saturation cycles have been assessed. In order to investigate the existing relationship between the effects caused by O2 and the levels and consumption rates of wine SO2, the total oxygen consumed by the wines (16-25 mg/L) was subdivided into different nonmutually exclusive categories. The ones found most influential on chemical changes were the O2 consumed in the first saturation without equivalent SO2 consumption (O2preSO2) and the O2 consumed when levels of free SO2 were below 5 mg/L (radical forming O2). Chromatic changes were strongly related to both O2 categories, even though anthocyanidin degradation was not related to any O2 category. Radical forming O2 prevented both formation of red pigments and reduction of epigallocatechin and other proanthocyanidins, induced accumulation of phenolic acids, and caused losses of β-damascenone and whiskylactone without evidence of acetaldehyde formation. O2preSO2 seemed to play a key role in the formation of blue pigments and in the decrease of Folin index and of many important aroma compounds.

  11. Nitrification and its oxygen consumption along the turbid Chang Jiang River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, S. S.-Y.; Hsu, T.-C.; Liu, J.-w.; Xie, X.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, J.; Wang, H.; Yang, J.-Y. T.; Hsu, S.-C.; Dai, M.; Kao, S.-J.

    2014-04-01

    Nitrification is a series of processes that oxidizes ammonia to nitrate, which contributes to hypoxia development in coastal oceans, especially in eutrophicated regions. The nitrification rate of bulk water (NRb) and particle free water (NRpf, particle > 3 μm eliminated) were determined along the Chang Jiang River plume in August 2011 by nitrogen isotope tracer technique. Measurements of dissolved oxygen (DO), community respiration rate (CR), nutrients, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), total suspended matter (TSM), particulate organic carbon/nitrogen (POC / PON), acid-leachable iron and manganese on suspended particles and both archaeal and β-proteobacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA) abundance on size-fractioned particles (> 3 μm and 0.22-3 μm) were conducted. The NRb ranged from undetectable up to 4.6 μmol L-1 day-1, peaking at a salinity of ~ 29. NRb values were positively correlated with ammonium concentration, suggesting the importance of substrate in nitrification. In the river mouth and the inner plume, NRb was much higher than NRpf, indicating that the nitrifying microorganism is mainly particle associated, which was supported by its significant correlation with amoA gene abundance and TSM concentration. The estimated oxygen demands of nitrification accounted for 0.32 to 318% of CR, in which 50% samples demanded more oxygen than that predicted by by the Redfield model (23%), indicating that oxygen might not be the sole oxidant though DO was sufficient (> 58 μmol kg-1) throughout the observation period. The excess nitrification-associated oxygen demand (NOD) showed a tendency to occur at lower DO samples accompanied by higher acid-leachable Fe / Mn, which implied reactive Fe3+ / Mn4+ may play a role as oxidant in the nitrification process. Stoichiometric calculation suggested that reactive Fe on particles was 10 times the oxidant demand required to complete ammonia oxidation in the entire plume. The potential involvement of reactive

  12. Oxygen consumption in the shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, exposed to fluctuating temperatures and food contaminated with the diaromatic petroleum hydrocarbon, dimethylnaphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, T. M.

    1983-04-01

    Oxygen consumption rates ( V˙o 2) in the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio were determined after a 32 day exposure to fluctuating temperatures (FT) (18-22°C) and/or dimethylnaphthalene (DMN)-contaminated food (0·24 μg DMN g wet wt -1) and again after a 16 day recovery period of stable temperatures (20°C) and uncontaminated food. Ingestion of DMN-contaminated food for 32 days resulted in elevated V˙>o 2 in shrimp exposed to declining oxygen concentrations. After the 32 day exposure period, FT had no significant effect on V˙o 2 at 15, 20 and 25°C, tissue V˙o 2 and V˙o 2 in declining oxygen. Hemolymph copper concentrations were significantly depressed in shrimp exposed to DMN-contaminated food. After the 16 day recovery period, shrimp from the FT regime exhibited depressed V˙o 2 when exposed to 25°C but not to 15°C. These depressed respiratory rates were offset by the stimulatory effect of DMN-contaminated food. These respiration studies were generally unproductive in explaining the previously reported effects of FT and DMN-contaminated food on the survival of P. pugio under hypoxic conditions.

  13. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption in permeabilized fibers and its link to colour changes in bovine M. semimembranosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Phung, V T; Khatri, M; Liland, K H; Slinde, E; Sørheim, O; Almøy, T; Saarem, K; Egelandsdal, B

    2013-01-01

    Animal and muscle characteristics were recorded for 41 cattle. The oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of M. semimembranosus was measured between 3.0-6.4h post mortem (PM3-6) and after 3 weeks in a vacuum pack at 4°C. Colour change measurements were performed following the 3 weeks using reflectance spectra (400-1,100 nm) and the colour coordinates L, a and b, with the samples being packaged in oxygen permeable film and stored at 4°C for 167 h. Significant individual animal differences in OCR at PM3-6 were found for mitochondrial complexes I and II. OCR of complex I declined with increased temperature and time PM, while residual oxygen-consuming side-reactions (ROX) did not. OCR of stored muscles was dominated by complex II respiration. A three-way regression between samples, colour variables collected upon air exposure and OCR of 3 weeks old fibres revealed a positive relationship between OCR and complex II activity and also between OCR and OCR(ROX). The presence of complex I and β-oxidation activities increased metmyoglobin formation.

  14. Improving the Accuracy of Predicting Maximal Oxygen Consumption (VO2pk)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan E.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Feiveson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Maximal oxygen (VO2pk) is the maximum amount of oxygen that the body can use during intense exercise and is used for benchmarking endurance exercise capacity. The most accurate method to determineVO2pk requires continuous measurements of ventilation and gas exchange during an exercise test to maximal effort, which necessitates expensive equipment, a trained staff, and time to set-up the equipment. For astronauts, accurate VO2pk measures are important to assess mission critical task performance capabilities and to prescribe exercise intensities to optimize performance. Currently, astronauts perform submaximal exercise tests during flight to predict VO2pk; however, while submaximal VO2pk prediction equations provide reliable estimates of mean VO2pk for populations, they can be unacceptably inaccurate for a given individual. The error in current predictions and logistical limitations of measuring VO2pk, particularly during spaceflight, highlights the need for improved estimation methods.

  15. Effect of flow rate on growth and oxygen consumption of biofilm in gravity sewer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingwei; Li, Muzhi; He, Qiang; Sun, Xingfu; Zhou, Xiangren; Su, Zhenping; Ai, Hainan

    2017-01-01

    The function of sewer as reactors must rely on the biofilm in it. In this paper, the formation, structure, oxygen transfer, and activity of the biofilm under different hydraulic conditions were studied by the microelectrode technology, oxygen uptake rate (OUR) technology, and 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing technology. Results showed that when the wall-shear stresses were 1.12, 1.29, and 1.45 Pa, the porosity of the steady-state biofilm were 69.1, 64.4, and 55.1 %, respectively. The maximum values of OUR were 0.033, 0.027, and 0.022 mg/(L*s), respectively, and the COD removal efficiency in the sewers reached 40, 35, and 32 %, respectively. The research findings had an important significance on how to improve the treatment efficiency of the sewers. Fig. a Graphical Abstract.

  16. Total, chemical, and biological oxygen consumption of the sediments in the Ziya River watershed, China.

    PubMed

    Rong, Nan; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-07-01

    Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) is a critical dissolved oxygen (DO) sink in many rivers. Understanding the relative contributions of the biological and chemical components of SOD would improve our knowledge of the potential environmental harm SOD could cause and allow appropriate management systems to be developed. A various inhibitors addition technique was conducted to measure the total, chemical, and biological SOD of sediment samples from 13 sites in the Ziya River watershed, a severely polluted and anoxic river system in the north of China. The results showed that the major component of SOD was chemical SOD due to iron predominate. The ferrous SOD accounted for 21.6-78.9 % of the total SOD and 33.26-96.79 % of the chemical SOD. Biological SOD represented 41.13 % of the overall SOD averagely. Sulfide SOD accounted for 1.78-45.71 % of the total SOD and it was the secondary predominate of the chemical SOD. Manganous SOD accounted for 1.2-16.6 % of the total SOD and it was insignificant at many sites. Only four kinds of benthos were collected in the Ziya River watershed, resulting from the low DO concentration in the sediment surface due to SOD. This study would be helpful for understanding and preventing the potential sediment oxygen depletion during river restoration.

  17. Oxygen transport and consumption by suspended cells in microgravity: a multiphase analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ohwon; Devarakonda, Surendra B; Sankovic, John M; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2008-01-01

    A rotating bioreactor for the cell/tissue culture should be operated to obtain sufficient nutrient transfer and avoid damage to the culture materials. Thus, the objective of the present study is to determine the appropriate suspension conditions for the bead/cell distribution and evaluate oxygen transport in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. A numerical analysis of the RWV bioreactor is conducted by incorporating the Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase and oxygen transport equations. The bead size and rotating speed are the control variables in the calculations. The present results show that the rotating speed for appropriate suspensions needs to be increased as the size of the bead/cell increases: 10 rpm for 200 microm; 12 rpm for 300 microm; 14 rpm for 400 microm; 18 rpm for 600 microm. As the rotating speed and the bead size increase from 10 rpm/200 microm to 18 rpm/600 microm, the mean oxygen concentration in the 80% midzone of the vessel is increased by approximately 85% after 1-h rotation due to the high convective flow for 18 rpm/600 microm case as compared to 10 rpm/200 microm case. The present results may serve as criteria to set the operating parameters for a RWV bioreactor, such as the size of beads and the rotating speed, according to the growth of cell aggregates. In addition, it might provide a design parameter for an advanced suspension bioreactor for 3-D engineered cell and tissue cultures. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Functional imaging of muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption in the knee extensor muscles during isometric contractions by spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kek, Khai Jun; Miyakawa, Takahiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we showed that exercise type- and intensity-dependent regional differences in muscle oxygenation and oxygen consumption rate (Vo II) of the knee extensor muscles could be imaged in real time with a multi-channel spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SR-NIRS) imaging device. Healthy subjects performed isometric knee extension exercise for 30 s (without- or with-leg-press action) at different exercise intensities [10%, 40% and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)]. "Separation-type" probes were attached to the skin over the major knee extensor muscles: vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM). Placement of the probes enabled simultaneously measurement of 12 sites over a skin area of about 30 cm2 (temporal resolution = 0.25 s). Local Vo II of each muscle, resting Vo II (Vo II, rest) and recovery Vo II (Vo II, rec ), were determined with arterial occlusion before the start and after the end of contraction, respectively. There was no significant difference between the values of Vo II rest, in the muscles. However, during knee extension exercise without-leg-press action, Vo II rec, value of the RF was significantly greater than the values of the VL and VM at all exercise intensities. In contrast, during exercise with-leg-press action, Vo II rec, values of the RF and VM were greater than those of the VL, especially during exercise at 40% and 70% MVC. In summary, the regional differences in muscle oxygenation and Vo II of the knee extensor muscles, probably due to the differences in relative contributions of muscles to exercise and in muscle architecture, were imaged using SR-NIRS.

  19. Moderate dose of watercress and red radish does not reduce oxygen consumption during graded exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Meamarbashi, Abbas; Alipour, Meysam

    2014-07-01

    Very recent studies have reported positive effects of dietary nitrate on the oxygen consumption during exercise. This research aimed to study the effect of moderate dose of high-nitrate vegetables, watercress (Nasturtium officinale) and red radish (Raphanus sativus) compared with a control group on the incremental treadmill exercise test following a standard Bruce protocol controlled by computer. Group 1 consumed 100 g watercress (n=11, 109.5 mg nitrate/day), and group 2 consumed 100 g red radish (n=11, mg 173.2 mg nitrate/day) for seven days, and control group (n=14) was prohibited from high nitrate intake. During exercise, watercress group showed significant changes in the maximum values of Respiratory Exchange Ratio (RER) (p<0.05), End-Tidal O2 Fraction (FETO2) (p<0.05), and energy consumption from carbohydrate (p<0.01). Red radish group had a significant increase in the VCO2 (p<0.01), RER (p<0.01), VT (p<0.05), VCO2/kg (p<0.05), and energy consumption from carbohydrates (p<0.01). When all groups in the same workload were normalized by the subject's body mass, watercress had a significant increase in the total expired CO2 (p<0.05), RER (p<0.05), FETO2 (p<0.05), and energy consumption from carbohydrates (p<0.05) compared with the control group. Similar comparison between red radish and control group revealed a significant increase during pre-test in the total CO2 production (p<0.05), VCO2 (p<0.05), RER (p<0.01), VT (p<0.05), and VCO2/kg (p<0.05). Conclusion : Current results indicate higher carbon dioxide production in the experimental groups in the same workload. This might have a negative impact on the exercise performance. Further investigations with controlled exercise program will be necessary.

  20. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    PubMed

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  1. Beta adrenergic receptor blockade of feline myocardium. Cardiac mechanics, energetics, and beta adrenoceptor regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G; Kent, R L; McGonigle, P; Watanabe, A M

    1986-01-01

    Myocardial oxygen consumption is regulated by interrelated mechanical and inotropic conditions; there is a parallel increase in the aerobic metabolism and inotropic state during beta-adrenergic stimulation under fixed mechanical conditions. In contrast, there is some evidence that beta-blockade may reduce oxygen consumption through effects independent of its influence on mechanical conditions and contractile state, and that prolonged beta-blockade may sensitize the myocardium to beta-adrenergic stimulation. To clarify these two points, the present study examined the relationship of myocardial energetics to mechanics and inotropism during acute beta-blockade and after the withdrawal of long-term beta-blockade, whereupon the basis for any effect observed was sought by characterizing the number, affinity, and affinity states of the beta-receptors as well as the coupling of activated beta-receptors to cyclic AMP generation. Studies of right ventricular papillary muscles from control and chronically beta-blocked cats demonstrated contractile and energetic properties as well as dose-response behavior and inotropic specificity suggestive of an increase in myocardial sensitivity to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation in the latter group. Assays of cardiac beta-adrenoceptors from further groups of control and pretreated cats, both in cardiac tissue and in isolated cardiac muscle cells, failed to define a difference between the two groups either in terms of receptor number and affinity or in terms of the proportion of receptors in the high-affinity state. However, coupling of the activated beta-adrenoceptors to cyclic AMP generation was enhanced in cardiac muscle cells from chronically beta-blocked cats. These data demonstrate that beta-adrenoceptor blockade (a) produces parallel effects on inotropic state and oxygen consumption without an independent effect on either and (b) increases myocardial sensitivity to beta-adrenergic stimulation after beta-blockade withdrawal, not by "up

  2. Restoration of Normal Cerebral Oxygen Consumption with Rapamycin Treatment in a Rat Model of Autism–Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Oak Z.; Wu, Chang-Chih; Liu, Xia; Rah, Kang H.; Jacinto, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is associated with autism spectrum disorders and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction and unrestrained signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin can mitigate some of the phenotypic abnormalities associated with TSC and autism, but whether this is due to the mTOR-related function in energy metabolism remains to be elucidated. In young Eker rats, an animal model of TSC and autism, which harbors a germ line heterozygous Tsc2 mutation, we previously reported that cerebral oxygen consumption was pronouncedly elevated. Young (4 weeks) male control Long–Evans and Eker rats were divided into control and rapamycin-treated (20 mg/kg once daily for 2 days) animals. Cerebral regional blood flow (14C-iodoantipyrine) and O2 consumption (cryomicrospectrophotometry) were determined in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. We found significantly increased basal O2 consumption in the cortex (8.7 ± 1.5 ml O2/min/100 g Eker vs. 2.7 ± 0.2 control), hippocampus, pons and cerebellum. Regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 extractions were also elevated in all brain regions. Rapamycin had no significant effect on O2 consumption in any brain region of the control rats, but significantly reduced consumption in the cortex (4.1 ± 0.3) and all other examined regions of the Eker rats. Phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K1 was similar in the two groups and equally reduced by rapamycin. Thus, a rapamycin-sensitive, mTOR-dependent but S6K1-independent, signal led to enhanced oxidative metabolism in the Eker brain. We found decreased Akt phosphorylation in Eker but not Long–Evans rat brains, suggesting that this may be related to the increased cerebral O2 consumption in the Eker rat. Our findings suggest that rapamycin targeting of Akt to restore normal cerebral metabolism could have therapeutic potential in tuberous sclerosis and autism. PMID:26048361

  3. Restoration of Normal Cerebral Oxygen Consumption with Rapamycin Treatment in a Rat Model of Autism-Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Oak Z; Wu, Chang-Chih; Liu, Xia; Rah, Kang H; Jacinto, Estela; Weiss, Harvey R

    2015-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TSC) is associated with autism spectrum disorders and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction and unrestrained signaling of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin can mitigate some of the phenotypic abnormalities associated with TSC and autism, but whether this is due to the mTOR-related function in energy metabolism remains to be elucidated. In young Eker rats, an animal model of TSC and autism, which harbors a germ line heterozygous Tsc2 mutation, we previously reported that cerebral oxygen consumption was pronouncedly elevated. Young (4 weeks) male control Long-Evans and Eker rats were divided into control and rapamycin-treated (20 mg/kg once daily for 2 days) animals. Cerebral regional blood flow ((14)C-iodoantipyrine) and O2 consumption (cryomicrospectrophotometry) were determined in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. We found significantly increased basal O2 consumption in the cortex (8.7 ± 1.5 ml O2/min/100 g Eker vs. 2.7 ± 0.2 control), hippocampus, pons and cerebellum. Regional cerebral blood flow and cerebral O2 extractions were also elevated in all brain regions. Rapamycin had no significant effect on O2 consumption in any brain region of the control rats, but significantly reduced consumption in the cortex (4.1 ± 0.3) and all other examined regions of the Eker rats. Phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K1 was similar in the two groups and equally reduced by rapamycin. Thus, a rapamycin-sensitive, mTOR-dependent but S6K1-independent, signal led to enhanced oxidative metabolism in the Eker brain. We found decreased Akt phosphorylation in Eker but not Long-Evans rat brains, suggesting that this may be related to the increased cerebral O2 consumption in the Eker rat. Our findings suggest that rapamycin targeting of Akt to restore normal cerebral metabolism could have therapeutic potential in tuberous sclerosis and autism.

  4. Event-Associated Oxygen Consumption Rate Increases ca. Five-Fold When Interictal Activity Transforms into Seizure-Like Events In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Schoknecht, Karl; Berndt, Nikolaus; Rösner, Jörg; Heinemann, Uwe; Dreier, Jens P; Kovács, Richard; Friedman, Alon; Liotta, Agustin

    2017-09-07

    Neuronal injury due to seizures may result from a mismatch of energy demand and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. However, ATP demand and oxygen consumption rates have not been accurately determined, yet, for different patterns of epileptic activity, such as interictal and ictal events. We studied interictal-like and seizure-like epileptiform activity induced by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline alone, and with co-application of the M-current blocker XE-991, in rat hippocampal slices. Metabolic changes were investigated based on recording partial oxygen pressure, extracellular potassium concentration, and intracellular flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) redox potential. Recorded data were used to calculate oxygen consumption and relative ATP consumption rates, cellular ATP depletion, and changes in FAD/FADH₂ ratio by applying a reactive-diffusion and a two compartment metabolic model. Oxygen-consumption rates were ca. five times higher during seizure activity than interictal activity. Additionally, ATP consumption was higher during seizure activity (~94% above control) than interictal activity (~15% above control). Modeling of FAD transients based on partial pressure of oxygen recordings confirmed increased energy demand during both seizure and interictal activity and predicted actual FAD autofluorescence recordings, thereby validating the model. Quantifying metabolic alterations during epileptiform activity has translational relevance as it may help to understand the contribution of energy supply and demand mismatches to seizure-induced injury.

  5. Intermediates of Krebs cycle correct the depression of the whole body oxygen consumption and lethal cooling in barbiturate poisoning in rat.

    PubMed

    Ivnitsky, Jury Ju; Schäfer, Timur V; Malakhovsky, Vladimir N; Rejniuk, Vladimir L

    2004-10-01

    Rats poisoned with one LD50 of thiopental or amytal are shown to increase oxygen consumption when intraperitoneally given sucinate, malate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, dimethylsuccinate or glutamate (the Krebs cycle intermediates or their precursors) but not when given glucose, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate or nicotinate (energy substrates of other metabolic stages etc). Survival was increased with succinate or malate from control groups, which ranged from 30-83% to 87-100%. These effects were unrelated to respiratory depression or hypoxia as judged by little or no effect of succinate on ventilation indices and by the lack of effect of oxygen administration. Body cooling of comatose rats at ambient temperature approximately 19 degrees C became slower with succinate, the rate of cooling correlated well with oxygen consumption decrease. Succinate had no potency to modify oxygen consumption and body temperature in intact rats. A condition for antidote effect of the Krebs intermediate was sufficiently high dosage (5 mmol/kg), further dose increase made no odds. Repeated dosing of succinate had more marked protective effect, than a single one, to oxygen consumption and tended to promote the attenuation of lethal effect of barbiturates. These data suggest that suppression of whole body oxygen consumption with barbiturate overdose could be an important contributor to both body cooling and mortality. Intermediates of Krebs cycle, not only succinate, may have a pronounced therapeutic effect under the proper treatment regimen. Availability of Krebs cycle intermediates may be a limiting factor for the whole body oxygen consumption in barbiturate coma, its role in brain needs further elucidation.

  6. Effect of temperature on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis Chen) following exhaustive exercise.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ling-Qing; Zhang, Yao-Guang; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2010-12-01

    The effects of temperature on resting oxygen consumption rate (MO2rest) and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) after exhaustive exercise (chasing) were measured in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis) (8.40±0.30 g, n=40) to test whether temperature has a significant influence on MO2rest, maximum post-exercise oxygen consumption rate (MO2peak) and EPOC and to investigate how metabolic scope (MS: MO2peak - MO2rest) varies with acclimation temperature. The MO2rest increased from 64.7 (10°C) to 160.3 mg O2 h(-1) kg(-1) (25°C) (P<0.05) and reached a plateau between 25 and 30°C. The post-exercise MO2 in all temperature groups increased immediately to the peak values and then decreased slowly to a steady state that was higher than the pre-exercise MO2. The MO2peak did not significantly differ among the 20, 25 and 30°C groups, though these values were much higher than those of the lower temperature groups (10 and 15°C) (P<0.05). The duration of EPOC varied from 32.9 min at 10°C to 345 min at 20°C, depending on the acclimation temperatures. The MS values of the lower temperature groups (10 and 15°C) were significantly smaller than those of the higher temperature groups (20, 25 and 30°C) (P<0.05). The magnitude of EPOC varied ninefold among all of the temperature groups and was the largest for the 20°C temperature group (about 422.4 mg O2 kg(-1)). These results suggested that (1) the acclimation temperature had a significant effect on maintenance metabolism (as indicated by MO2rest) and the post-exercise metabolic recovery process (as indicated by MO2peak, duration and magnitude of EPOC), and (2) the change of the MS as a function of acclimation temperature in juvenile southern catfish might be related to their high degree of physiological flexibility, which allows them to adapt to changes in environmental conditions in their habitat in the Yangtze River and the Jialing River.

  7. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and AV optimization increase myocardial oxygen consumption, but increase cardiac function more than proportionally☆

    PubMed Central

    Kyriacou, Andreas; Pabari, Punam A.; Mayet, Jamil; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn; Lim, P. Boon; Lefroy, David; Hughes, Alun D.; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Francis, Darrel P.; I.Whinnett, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanoenergetic effects of atrioventricular delay optimization during biventricular pacing (“cardiac resynchronization therapy”, CRT) are unknown. Methods Eleven patients with heart failure and left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent invasive measurements of left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, aortic flow velocity-time-integral (VTI) and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) at 4 pacing states: biventricular pacing (with VV 0 ms) at AVD 40 ms (AV-40), AVD 120 ms (AV-120, a common nominal AV delay), at their pre-identified individualised haemodynamic optimum (AV-Opt); and intrinsic conduction (LBBB). Results AV-120, relative to LBBB, increased LV developed pressure by a mean of 11(SEM 2)%, p = 0.001, and aortic VTI by 11(SEM 3)%, p = 0.002, but also increased MVO2 by 11(SEM 5)%, p = 0.04. AV-Opt further increased LV developed pressure by a mean of 2(SEM 1)%, p = 0.035 and aortic VTI by 4(SEM 1)%, p = 0.017. MVO2 trended further up by 7(SEM 5)%, p = 0.22. Mechanoenergetics at AV-40 were no different from LBBB. The 4 states lay on a straight line for Δexternal work (ΔLV developed pressure × Δaortic VTI) against ΔMVO2, with slope 1.80, significantly > 1 (p = 0.02). Conclusions Biventricular pacing and atrioventricular delay optimization increased external cardiac work done but also myocardial oxygen consumption. Nevertheless, the increase in cardiac work was ~ 80% greater than the increase in oxygen consumption, signifying an improvement in cardiac mechanoenergetics. Finally, the incremental effect of optimization on external work was approximately one-third beyond that of nominal AV pacing, along the same favourable efficiency trajectory, suggesting that AV delay dominates the biventricular pacing effect — which may therefore not be mainly “resynchronization”. PMID:24332598

  8. Diffusion and consumption of oxygen in the superfused retina of the drone (Apis mellifera) in darkness

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Double-barreled O2 microelectrodes were used to study O2 diffusion and consumption in the superfused drone (Apis mellifera) retina in darkness at 22 degrees C. Po2 was measured at different sites in the bath and retinas. It was found that diffusion was essentially in one dimension and that the rate of O2 consumption (Q) was practically constant (on the macroscale) down to Po2 s less than 20 mm Hg, a situation that greatly simplified the analysis. The value obtained for Q was 18 +/- 0.7 (SEM) microliter O2/cm3 tissue . min (n = 10), and Krogh's permeation coefficient (alpha D) was 3.24 +/- 0.18 (SEM) X 10(-5) ml O1/min . atm . cm (n = 10). Calculations indicate that only a small fraction of this Q in darkness is necessary for the energy requirements of the sodium pump. the diffusion coefficient (D) in the retina was measured by abruptly cutting off diffusion from the bath and analyzing the time-course of the fall in Po2 at the surface of the tissue. The mean value of D was 1.03 +/- 0.08 (SEM) X 10(-5) cm2/s (n = 10). From alpha D and D, the solubility coefficient alpha was calculated to be 54 +/- 4.0 (SEM) microliter O2 STP/cm3 . atm (n = 10), approximately 1.8 times that for water. PMID:7264598

  9. Oxygen consumption during maximal exercise in Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    Olfert, I Mark; Balouch, Jamal; Mathieu-Costello, Odile

    2004-08-01

    We characterized O2 consumption (VO2) during treadmill exercise in 12-, 24-, and 35-month-old Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid (F344BNF1) rats. When accounting for differences in body mass (Mb), (O2)peak decreased by 10% and 33% in 24- and 35-month-old rats, respectively, compared with rats at 12 months (analysis of covariance, p < .01). O2 cost per unit work at VO2peak (i.e., VO2peak/work) was greater in 35-month-old rats compared with 12- and 24-month-old rats (p < .001). During submaximal exercise, the O2 cost was greater in 24- and 35-month-old than 12-month-old rats (p < .01). Analysis of covariance revealed similar patterns irrespective of differences in Mb or lean Mb as covariates. The underlying mechanism responsible for increasing O2 consumption in aged F344BNF1 rats during exercise, although partly explained by mechanical inefficiencies of locomotion, still remains to be determined. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  10. The effects of hypothermia on myocardial oxygen consumption and transmural coronary blood flow in the potassium-arrested heart.

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W R; Sink, J D; Hill, R C; Wechsler, A S; Sabiston, D C

    1979-01-01

    Hypothermia remains the primary adjunct employed to lower cellular metabolism during various cardiac procedures. In these experiments, left ventricular myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) and transmural blood flow (TBF) were measured during cardiopulmonary bypass with the range of temperatures used clinically. Determinations were made in empty beating normothermic hearts and after potassium cardioplegia at 37, 32, 28, 22, 18, and 15 degrees (K+ = 15--37 meq/L: Hct 25 volumes %). Oxygen content of the total coronary sinus collection was compared with a large volume arterial sample using a Lex-O2-Con-TL analyzer (vs Van Slyke, R = 0.98). Transmural blood flow was measured at each temperature using microspheres (8 microns), and perfusion was maintained at 80 mmHg. Asystole (37 degrees) alone decreased MVO2 from 5.18 +/- 0.55 to 1.85 +/- 0.20 ml O2/min/100 g of left ventricle or approximately 65% (p less than 0.001). With progressive cooling to 15 degrees an additional 82% decrement in oxygen uptake occurred during asystole (p less than 0.001). During asystole at 37 degrees the decrease in MVO2 was reflected mainly by a large decrement (p less than 0.01) in TBF (1.27 +/- 0.19 to 0.74 +/- 0.17 ml/min/g of mean left ventricular flow). However, with cooling below 32 degrees, the arteriovenous oxygen difference narrowed progressively (p less than 0.001) while TBF paradoxically returned to control levels. Endocardial/epicardial flow ratios were not altered by cooling. These data not only confirm earlier reports describing a sequential drop in MVO2 with incremental myocardial cooling, but also establish MVO2 levels for perfused hearts arrested by potassium at lower temperatures (18--15 degrees). Moreover, as transmural blood flow becomes independent of metabolic necessity during hypothermia, coronary autoregulation appears to be impaired, possibly affecting detrimental tissue over perfusion. PMID:464672

  11. Impact of extreme oxygen consumption by pollutants on macroinvertebrate assemblages in plain rivers of the Ziya River Basin, north China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuekui; Rong, Nan; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the impact of oxygen depletion on macroinvertebrate community structure in benthic space. Macroinvertebrate assemblages and potential of dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption were investigated simultaneously in the plain rivers of the Ziya River Basin. The degree of DO depletion was represented by sediment oxygen demand (SOD) and DO, chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4 (+)-N) in the overlying water. The results showed an all-around hypoxia environment formed, and the values of DO, SOD, CODCr, and NH4 (+)-N were separately 0.11-4.03 mg L(-1), 0.41-2.60 g m(-2) day(-1), 27.50-410.00 mg L(-1), and 1.79-101.41 mg L(-1). There was an abnormal macroinvertebrate assemblage, and only 3 classes, Insecta, Gastropoda, and Oligochaeta, were found, which included 9 orders, 30 families, and 54 genera. The biodiversity was at a low level, and Shannon-Wiener index was 0.00-1.72. SOD, and NH4 (+)-N had major impact on the macroinvertebrate community, and the former had negative effect on most taxa, for instance, Nais, Branchiura, Paraleptophlebia, etc., which were sensitive or had a moderate-high tolerance to pollution. NH4 (+)-N had both positive and negative impacts on benthic animals, for instance, Dicrotendipes, Gomphus, Cricotopus, etc., for the former, and Procladius, Limnodrilus, Hippeutis, etc., for the latter. They all had a moderate-high tolerance to pollution. It is significant to improve DO condition and macroinvertebrate diversity in river harnessing and management.

  12. Oxygen Consumption and Usage During Physical Exercise: The Balance Between Oxidative Stress and ROS-Dependent Adaptive Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhongfu; Koltai, Erika; Ohno, Hideki; Atalay, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The complexity of human DNA has been affected by aerobic metabolism, including endurance exercise and oxygen toxicity. Aerobic endurance exercise could play an important role in the evolution of Homo sapiens, and oxygen was not important just for survival, but it was crucial to redox-mediated adaptation. The metabolic challenge during physical exercise results in an elevated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are important modulators of muscle contraction, antioxidant protection, and oxidative damage repair, which at moderate levels generate physiological responses. Several factors of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and SIRT1, are modulated by exercise-associated changes in the redox milieu. PGC-1α activation could result in decreased oxidative challenge, either by upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and/or by an increased number of mitochondria that allows lower levels of respiratory activity for the same degree of ATP generation. Endogenous thiol antioxidants glutathione and thioredoxin are modulated with high oxygen consumption and ROS generation during physical exercise, controlling cellular function through redox-sensitive signaling and protein–protein interactions. Endurance exercise-related angiogenesis, up to a significant degree, is regulated by ROS-mediated activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Moreover, the exercise-associated ROS production could be important to DNA methylation and post-translation modifications of histone residues, which create heritable adaptive conditions based on epigenetic features of chromosomes. Accumulating data indicate that exercise with moderate intensity has systemic and complex health-promoting effects, which undoubtedly involve regulation of redox homeostasis and signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1208–1246. PMID:22978553

  13. Oxygen consumption and usage during physical exercise: the balance between oxidative stress and ROS-dependent adaptive signaling.

    PubMed

    Radak, Zsolt; Zhao, Zhongfu; Koltai, Erika; Ohno, Hideki; Atalay, Mustafa

    2013-04-01

    The complexity of human DNA has been affected by aerobic metabolism, including endurance exercise and oxygen toxicity. Aerobic endurance exercise could play an important role in the evolution of Homo sapiens, and oxygen was not important just for survival, but it was crucial to redox-mediated adaptation. The metabolic challenge during physical exercise results in an elevated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are important modulators of muscle contraction, antioxidant protection, and oxidative damage repair, which at moderate levels generate physiological responses. Several factors of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), mitogen-activated protein kinase, and SIRT1, are modulated by exercise-associated changes in the redox milieu. PGC-1α activation could result in decreased oxidative challenge, either by upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and/or by an increased number of mitochondria that allows lower levels of respiratory activity for the same degree of ATP generation. Endogenous thiol antioxidants glutathione and thioredoxin are modulated with high oxygen consumption and ROS generation during physical exercise, controlling cellular function through redox-sensitive signaling and protein-protein interactions. Endurance exercise-related angiogenesis, up to a significant degree, is regulated by ROS-mediated activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Moreover, the exercise-associated ROS production could be important to DNA methylation and post-translation modifications of histone residues, which create heritable adaptive conditions based on epigenetic features of chromosomes. Accumulating data indicate that exercise with moderate intensity has systemic and complex health-promoting effects, which undoubtedly involve regulation of redox homeostasis and signaling.

  14. The relationship between energy-dependent phagocytosis and the rate of oxygen consumption in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Skriver, L; Nilsson, J R

    1978-12-01

    The induction of high rates of food vacuole formation in Tetrahymena pyriformis increased the rate of respiration in exponentially growing cells by 17% and in starving cells by 47.5%. The increased rate of oxygen uptake was caused by phagocytosis itself, as shown by comparing the rates of respiration of a Tetrahymena mutant exposed to particles at the permissive or restrictive temperatures for food vacuole formation. During cell division, heat-synchronized cells in rich, particle-supplemented medium showed a significant decrease in the rate of respiration. Furthermore, dimethyl sulphoxide, in concentrations sufficient to block food vacuole formation, suppressed the rate of respiration to a level similar to that of starved cells. Cytochalasin B, fowever, did not reduce the rate of oxygen uptake despite the inability of the cells to complete the formation of food vacuoles during treatment; a possible explanation for this finding is discussed. There was a strong correlation between formation of food vacuoles and a high metabolic rate in Tetrahymena.

  15. On the Mechanism by Which Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate Their Oxygen Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Emilio; Brown, Guy Charles; Foxwell, Neale; Moncada, Salvador

    1999-02-01

    Two enzymes, soluble guanylyl cyclase and cytochrome c oxidase, have been shown to be exquisitely sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) at low physiological concentrations. Activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase by endogenous NO and the consequent increase in the second messenger cyclic GMP are now known to control a variety of biological functions. Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is inhibited by NO. However, it is not clear whether NO produced by the constitutive NO synthase interacts with cytochrome c oxidase, nor is it known what the biological consequences of such an interaction might be. We now show that NO generated by vascular endothelial cells under basal and stimulated conditions modulates the respiration of these cells in response to acute changes in oxygen concentration. This action occurs at the cytochrome c oxidase and depends on influx of calcium. Thus, NO plays a physiological role in adjusting the capacity of this enzyme to use oxygen, allowing endothelial cells to adapt to acute changes in their environment.

  16. [Cardiac index, oxygen and serum lactate consumption in infants with hypovolemic and septic shock].

    PubMed

    Gaytán Becerril, A; Olvera Hidalgo, C; Vieto Rodríguez, E E; Chávez Angeles, D S; Elena Salas, M

    1980-01-01

    Determination was made of cardiac output (using the stain dilution technique), gases in blood and serum lactate levels in eight infants with hypovolemic shock and sixteen with septic shock. The data were carried to indexes (values per square meter of body surface). In children with hypovolemic shock the cardiac index was 1.88 +/- 0.031/min/m,2 while in septic patients it was 4.02 +/- 1.011/min/m2. The peripheral resistances were 3,079 din/min/cm.5 in hypovolemic cases and 907 din/min in the septic. In both groups serum lactante levels rised close to 4 mM 61. Oxigen consumption was found low in hypovolemic patients and slightly high in the septic. It is concluded that our data are similar to those reported in similar studies in adults and hypodynamic shock is shown in hypovolemic patients, while hyperdynamic shock appears in septic cases.

  17. The effects of dietary deprivation on body temperature and oxygen consumption in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Wallace, G M; Pfeiffer, E W

    1992-04-01

    1. Body temperature (Tb) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were compared between fed (Control), food and water deprived (FWD), and water deprived (WD) black-tailed prairie dogs, in the month of January. 2. Mean Tb of Control black-tailed prairie dogs (36.2 degrees C) was significantly different from FWD (33.4 degrees C) and WD (30.4 degrees C) black-tailed prairie dogs. 3. VO2 was not significantly different between FWD and Control black-tailed prairie dogs (4.4 and 4.0 ml O2/kg/hr, respectively), while VO2 was significantly different between WD and Control animals (2.9 and 4.0 ml O2/kg/hr, respectively). 4. These findings are discussed as possible mechanisms for conserving body water.

  18. Oxygen consumption and active sodium and chloride transport in bovine tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, J; Durand-Arczynska, W; Schoenenweid, F

    1986-01-01

    The O2 consumption (Jr) and the short-circuit current (Ji) were measured simultaneously in bovine tracheal epithelium in vitro. In this tissue, Ji is the sum of two active transport processes, Cl- secretion and Na+ absorption. Jr was determined from the decrease of PO2 in the incubation solution, at 37 +/- 0.05 degrees C and at a PO2 around 600 torr. Microbial contamination and leaks of dissolved O2 from the solution never exceeded 4% of the rate of PO2 decrease due to the O2 consumption of the tissue. Ji and Jr were stable over 5 h of incubation under standard conditions. Ji was 106 +/- 4 nequiv min-1 cm-2 and Jr was 39.8 +/- 1.1 nmol O2 min-1 cm-2 (mean +/- S.E., n = 46). Ji was varied with several agents known to affect ion transport across the tracheal epithelium. Na+ absorption was inhibited partly with amiloride or completely following Na+ substitution with choline. Cl- secretion was selectively suppressed by furosemide. Ji was also reduced to a very low level, using ouabain or K+ suppression to inhibit the Na+-K+-ATPase. All these manoeuvres resulted in significant reductions of both Ji and Jr. Basal Jr was not affected when Ji was modified. A plot of the relative change in suprabasal Jr versus the relative change of Ji gave a straight line (r = 0.98, n = 60). A plot using absolute values yielded a stoichiometric ratio of 13.9 ions per O2 molecule, for Na+ as well as for Cl-. The stoichiometric ratio was also calculated for each experiment. Its mean value was 14.9 ions per O2 molecule. The population of the ratios was widely dispersed, but this was explained as a predictable statistical phenomenon. PMID:3723416

  19. Changes during eating in oxygen consumption, cardiac function and body fluids of sheep

    PubMed Central

    Christopherson, R. J.; Webster, A. J. F.

    1972-01-01

    1. A study was made of the changes taking place in O2 consumption, cardiac function and the volume and composition of the body fluids of sheep while they consumed a meal of hay. 2. During eating Pa, CO2 and Pv, CO2 both increased, pH decreased and free plasma [HCO3-] increased. Venous haematocrit increased sharply at the beginning of the meal, and declined slowly after feed was removed. 3. Arterial PO2 did not change significantly during eating. However Pv, O2 fell slightly but significantly. The O2 saturation of venous blood fell due to the decline in pH. Estimated CO2 in arterial blood increased as a consequence of increased haemoglobin content. The net effect was to increase arteriovenous difference in O2 content from 4·4 ml./100 ml. before eating to 6·0 ml./100 ml. at the end of the meal. 4. O2 consumption increased about 60% during eating and fell rapidly thereafter. Heart rate followed a similar pattern. Cardiac output however increased only about 17%, from 6 to 7 l./min. Consequently stroke volume declined throughout the meal from 76 to 52 ml./beat. 5. Plasma volume, estimated from measurements of T-1824, declined sharply by about 300 ml. at the beginning of the meal and recovered slowly after feed was removed. Blood volume declined less because of a rise in circulating erythrocytes. 6. Extracellular fluid volume was estimated from measurements of thiocyanate and thiosulphate spaces. Thiocyanate space measurements were abandoned after thiocyanate was found to be concentrated in saliva. Considerable random variation occurred in measurements of changes in extracellular fluid from thiosulphate disappearance but the results did reveal a significant fall of 1000-1500 ml. in extracellular fluid volume during eating. 7. The significance of these interrelated changes is discussed in relation to the maintenance of homoeostasis during eating in the sheep. PMID:5020986

  20. Oxygen consumption and filtering rate of Daphnia Pulex after exposure to water-soluble fractions of naphthalene, phenanthrene, No. 2 fuel oil, and coal-tar creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, J.G.; Buikema, A.L.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of short-term exposure to water-soluble fractions (WSF) of naphthalene, phenanthrene, No. 2 fuel oil, and coal-tar creosote upon oxygen consumption and filtering rates of Daphnia pulex are examined. Approximately 60 young Daphnia were exposed to test solutions of LC20 and LC30 concentrations of WSF for at least three molt cycles. Oxygen consumption was determined by the azide modification of the Winkler Method (American Public Health Association et al. 1975). Algal counts were made for experimental and control bottles using an Electrozone electronic particle counter interfaced with a PDP-11 minicomputer. Filtering rates were computed and expressed as ml/Daphnia/day. Results indicate no significant differences in oxygen consumption rates. However, changes in filtering rates may be a sensitive indicator of sublethal stress. 3 tables (JMT)

  1. Effects of metal contamination in situ on osmoregulation and oxygen consumption in the mudflat fiddler crab Uca rapax (Ocypodidae, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Capparelli, Mariana V; Abessa, Denis M; McNamara, John C

    2016-01-01

    The contamination of estuaries by metals can impose additional stresses on estuarine species, which may exhibit a limited capability to adjust their regulatory processes and maintain physiological homeostasis. The mudflat fiddler crab Uca rapax is a typical estuarine crab, abundant in both pristine and contaminated areas along the Atlantic coast of Brazil. This study evaluates osmotic and ionic regulatory ability and gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in different salinities (<0.5, 25 and 60‰ S) and oxygen consumption rates at different temperatures (15, 25 and 35°C) in U. rapax collected from localities along the coast of São Paulo State showing different histories of metal contamination (most contaminated Ilha Diana, Santos>Rio Itapanhaú, Bertioga>Picinguaba, Ubatuba [pristine reference site]). Our findings show that the contamination of U. rapax by metals in situ leads to bioaccumulation and induces biochemical and physiological changes compared to crabs from the pristine locality. U. rapax from the contaminated sites exhibit stronger hyper- and hypo-osmotic regulatory abilities and show greater gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities than crabs from the pristine site, revealing that the underlying biochemical machinery can maintain systemic physiological processes functioning well. However, oxygen consumption, particularly at elevated temperatures, decreases in crabs showing high bioaccumulation titers but increases in crabs with low/moderate bioaccumulation levels. These data show that U. rapax chronically contaminated in situ exhibits compensatory biochemical and physiological adjustments, and reveal the importance of studies on organisms exposed to metals in situ, particularly estuarine invertebrates subject to frequent changes in natural environmental parameters like salinity and temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. In vitro measurements of oxygen consumption rates in hTERT-RPE cells exposed to low levels of red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Castellanos, Cherry C.

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to 2.88 J/cm2 of red light induces an adaptive response against a lethal pulse of 2.0 μm laser radiation in hTERT-RPE cells in vitro, but not in a knockdown mutant for vascular endothelial growth factor c (VEGF-C). The generally accepted initiation sequence for photobiomodulation is that absorption of red light by cytochome c oxidase (CCOX) of the electron transport chain increases the binding affinity of CCOX for O2 vs. nitric oxide (NO). This results in displacement of NO by O2 in the active site of CCOX, thereby increasing cellular respiration and intracellular ATP. We've previously reported that red-light exposure induces a small, but consistently reproducible, increase in NO levels in these cells. But the relative importance of NO and oxidative phosphorylation is unclear because little is known about the relative contributions of NO and ATP to the response. However, if NO dissociation from CCOX actually increases oxidative phosphorylation, one should see a corresponding increase in oxygen consumption. A Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in normal and mutant cells as a proxy for oxidative phosphorylation. Both basal respiration and maximum respiration rates in normal cells are significantly higher than in the mutant. The normal cells have a significant amount of "excess capacity," whereas the VEGF-C(KD) have little or none. The OCR in exposed normal cells is lower than in unexposed cells when measured immediately after exposure. The exposures used for these experiments had no effect on the OCR in mutant cells.

  3. Measurement of oxygen consumption in children undergoing cardiac catheterization: comparison between mass spectrometry and the breath-by-breath method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long; Cui, Yong; Pharis, Scott; Walsh, Mark; Atallah, Joseph; Tan, Meng-Wei; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, J Y; Adatia, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Accurate measurement of oxygen consumption (VO2) is important to precise calculation of blood flow using the Fick equation. This study aimed to validate the breath-by-breath method (BBBM) of measuring oxygen consumption VO2 compared with respiratory mass spectroscopy (MS) for intubated children during cardiac catheterization. The study used MS and BBBM to measure VO2 continuously and simultaneously for 10 min in consecutive anesthetized children undergoing cardiac catheterization who were intubated with a cuffed endotracheal tube, ventilated mechanically, and hemodynamically stable, with normal body temperature. From 26 patients, 520 data points were obtained. The mean VO2 was 94.5 ml/min (95 % confidence interval [CI] 65.7-123.3 ml/min) as measured by MS and 91.4 ml/min (95 % CI 64.9-117.9 ml/min) as measured by BBBM. The mean difference in VO2 measurements between MS and BBBM (3.1 ml/min; 95 % CI -1.7 to +7.9 ml/min) was not significant (p = 0.19). The MS and BBBM VO2 measurements were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.98; P < 0.0001). Bland-Altman analysis showed good correspondence between MS and BBBM, with a mean difference of -3.01 and 95 % limits of agreement ranging from -26.2 to +20.0. The mean VO2 indexed to body surface area did not differ significantly between MS and BBBM (3.4 ml/min m(2); 95 % CI -1.4 to 8.2; p = 0.162). The mean difference and limits of agreement were -3.8 ml/min m(2) (range, -19.9 to 26.7). Both MS and BBBM may be used to measure VO2 in anesthetized intubated children undergoing cardiac catheterization. The two methods demonstrated excellent agreement. However, BBBM may be more suited to clinical use with children.

  4. The effects of physical fitness and body composition on oxygen consumption and heart rate recovery after high-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Campos, E Z; Bastos, F N; Papoti, M; Freitas Junior, I F; Gobatto, C A; Balikian Junior, P

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential relationship between excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), heart rate recovery (HRR) and their respective time constants (tvo2 and t HR) and body composition and aerobic fitness (VO2max) variables after an anaerobic effort. 14 professional cyclists (age=28.4±4.8 years, height=176.0±6.7 cm, body mass=74.4±8.1 kg, VO2max=66.8±7.6 mL·kg - 1·min - 1) were recruited. Each athlete made 3 visits to the laboratory with 24 h between each visit. During the first visit, a total and segmental body composition assessment was carried out. During the second, the athletes undertook an incremental test to determine VO2max. In the final visit, EPOC (15-min) and HRR were measured after an all-out 30 s Wingate test. The results showed that EPOC is positively associated with % body fat (r=0.64), total body fat (r=0.73), fat-free mass (r=0.61) and lower limb fat-free mass (r=0.55) and negatively associated with HRR (r= - 0.53, p<0.05 for all). HRR had a significant negative correlation with total body fat and % body fat (r= - 0.62, r= - 0.56 respectively, p<0.05 for all). These findings indicate that VO2max does not influence HRR or EPOC after high-intensity exercise. Even in short-term exercise, the major metabolic disturbance due to higher muscle mass and total muscle mass may increase EPOC. However, body fat impedes HRR and delays recovery of oxygen consumption after effort in highly trained athletes.

  5. Validation of measurement protocols to assess oxygen consumption and blood flow in the human forearm by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beekvelt, Mireille C.; Colier, Willy N.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Hopman, Maria T.; Wevers, Ron A.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1997-12-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to monitor oxygenation changes in muscle. Quantitative values for O2 consumption, blood flow and venous saturation have been reported by several investigators. The amount of these measurements is, however, still limited and complete validation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the different NIRS methods to calculate O2 consumption (VO2) and forearm blood flow (FBF) and to validate the data with the accepted method of strain-gauge plethysmography and blood sampling. Thirteen subjects were tested in rest and during static isometric handgrip exercise at 10% MVC. The NIRS optodes were positioned on the flexor region of the arm. A significant correlation was found between plethysmograph data and NIRS [tHb] during venous occlusion in rest (r EQ 0.925 - 0.994, P < 0.05) as well as during exercise (r equals 0.895 - 0.990, P < 0.05). No correlation was found, however, for the calculated FBF and VO2 values between NIRS and the combination of plethysmography and blood sampling. In rest nor during exercise. It seems that although NIRS is a good qualitative monitoring technique, quantification is difficult due to the great variability that is found between the subjects.

  6. Validation of measurement protocols to assess oxygen consumption and blood flow in the human forearm by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beekvelt, Mireille C. P.; Colier, Willy N.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Wevers, Ron A.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1998-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to monitor oxygenation changes in muscle. Quantitative values for O2 consumption, blood flow and venous saturation have been reported by several investigators. The amount of these measurements is, however, still limited and complete validation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the different NIRS methods to calculate O2 consumption (VO2) and forearm blood flow (FBF) and to validate the data with the accepted method of strain-gauge plethysmography and blood sampling. Thirteen subjects were tested in rest and during static isometric handgrip exercise at 10% MVC. The NIRS optodes were positioned on the flexor region of the arm. A significant correlation was found between plethysmograph data and NIRS [tHb] during venous occlusion in rest (r EQ 0.925 - 0.994, P < 0.05) as well as during exercise (r equals 0.895 - 0.990, P < 0.05). No correlation was found, however, for the calculated FBF and VO2 values between NIRS and the combination of plethysmography and blood sampling. In rest nor during exercise. It seems that although NIRS is a good qualitative monitoring technique, quantification is difficult due to the great variability that is found between the subjects.

  7. Quantification of Low-Level Drug Effects Using Real-Time, in vitro Measurement of Oxygen Consumption Rate.

    PubMed

    Neal, Adam; Rountree, Austin M; Philips, Craig W; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Williams, Dominic P; Newham, Peter; Khalil, Gamal; Cook, Daniel L; Sweet, Ian R

    2015-12-01

    There is a general need to detect toxic effects of drugs during preclinical screening. We propose that increased sensitivity of xenobiotics toxicity combined with improved in vitro physiological recapitulation will more accurately assess potentially toxic perturbations of cellular biochemistry that are near in vivo pharmacological exposure levels. Importantly, measurement of such cytopathologies avoids activating mechanisms mediating toxicity at suprapharmacologic levels not relevant to in vivo effects. We present a sensitive method to measure changes in oxygen consumption rate (OCR), a well-established parameter reflecting a potential hazard, in response to exposure to pharmacologic levels of drugs using a flow culture system and state of the art oxygen sensing system. We tested metformin and acetaminophen on rat liver slices to illustrate the method. The features of the method include continuous and very stable measurement of OCR over the course of 48 h in liver slices in a continuous flow chamber with the ability to resolve changes as small as 0.3%/h. Kinetic modeling of metformin inhibition of OCR over a wide range of concentrations revealed both a slow and fast mechanism, where the fast mechanism activated only at concentrations above 0.6 mM. For both drugs, small amounts of inhibition were reversible, but higher decrements were irreversible. Overall the study highlights the advantages of measuring low-level toxicity so as to avoid the common extrapolations made about drug toxicity based on effects of drugs tested at suprapharmacologic levels.

  8. Zinc-induced structural effects enhance oxygen consumption and superoxide generation in synthetic pheomelanins on UVA/visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Panzella, Lucia; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; d'Ischia, Marco; Napolitano, Alessandra; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    The abnormal susceptibility of red-haired individuals to UV-induced inflammation and skin cancers is commonly attributed to the marked photoreactivity of pheomelanin pigments, which would be responsible for the sustained generation of reactive oxygen species in the skin following sun exposure. The structural factors determining pheomelanin photolability remain mostly unknown. Here, we describe the effects of zinc ions, typically found at high levels in red hair, in enhancing both oxygen consumption and superoxide production in model pheomelanin pigments following irradiation with UVA and visible light. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry and EPR-spin trapping experiments with synthetic pheomelanins, prepared by oxidation of dopa and cysteine or isomeric cysteinyldopas under different conditions, indicate a higher photoreactivity of the pigments prepared in the presence of zinc ions compared with those obtained in the absence of the metal. Quantitative analysis of thiazole-containing structural markers of the synthetic pheomelanins provides evidence that the effect of zinc ions is due to modification of the formation pathway and structural features of the pigments. Overall, these results point to a hitherto unrecognized critical role of zinc ions in pheomelanogenesis, which may affect the intrinsic photoreactivity of the pigment.

  9. Contributions to elevated metabolism during recovery: dissecting the excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) in the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis).

    PubMed

    Hancock, Thomas V; Gleeson, Todd T

    2008-01-01

    The excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), a measure of recovery costs, is known to be large in ectothermic vertebrates such as the desert iguana (Dipsosaurus dorsalis), especially after vigorous activity. To analyze the cause of these large recovery costs in a terrestrial ectotherm, Dipsosaurus were run for 15 s at maximal-intensity (distance 35.0+/-1.9 m; 2.33+/-0.13 m s(-1)) while O(2) uptake was monitored via open-flow respirometry. Muscle metabolites (adenylates, phosphocreatine, and lactate) were measured at rest and after 0, 3, 10, and 60 min of recovery. Cardiac and ventilatory activity during rest and recovery were measured, as were whole-body lactate and blood lactate, which were used to estimate total muscle activity. This vigorous activity was supported primarily by glycolysis (65%) and phosphocreatine hydrolysis (29%), with only a small contribution from aerobic metabolism (2.5%). Aerobic recovery lasted 43.8+/-4.6 min, and EPOC measured 0.166+/-0.025 mL O(2) g(-1). This was a large proportion (98%) of the total suprabasal metabolic cost of the activity to the animal. The various contributions to EPOC after this short but vigorous activity were quantified, and a majority of EPOC was accounted for. The two primary causes of EPOC were phosphocreatine repletion (32%-50%) and lactate glycogenesis (30%-47%). Four other components played smaller roles: ATP repletion (8%-13%), elevated ventilatory activity (2%), elevated cardiac activity (2%), and oxygen store resaturation (1%).

  10. Ultraviolet radiation has no effect on respiratory oxygen consumption or enhanced post-illumination respiration in three species of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Heraud, Philip; Beardall, John

    2002-11-01

    A 30-min exposure to UV-B radiation (1.1 Wm(-2), unweighted) from a xenon arc lamp caused pronounced inhibition (33-78%) of net photosynthetic oxygen production in three species of microalgae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin, Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher and Wolozynskia sp., however, no statistical differences (t-test, alpha=0.05) in dark-respiration rates were found between the control group and the UV-treated group, for any of the species tested. These results indicate: (i) that the respiratory processes responsible for oxygen consumption do not sustain any appreciable impairment registered in the first half-hour after ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure; and (ii) any change in respiration that may occur in response to increased repair demands is not detected in this period. Dark-respiration rates were observed to be significantly higher in all species tested (17-29%; t-test, alpha=0.05) following illumination with photosynthetically active radiation, compared to dark-respiration before illumination. This increase, interpreted as enhanced post-illumination respiration (EPIR), was observed in all three species. The magnitude of this increase was not affected by prior exposure to UVR.

  11. Analysis of the application of the generalized monod kinetics model to describe the human corneal oxygen-consumption rate during soft contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Compañ, V; Aguilella-Arzo, M; Del Castillo, L F; Hernández, S I; Gonzalez-Meijome, J M

    2017-11-01

    This work is an analysis of the application of the generalized Monod kinetics model describing human corneal oxygen consumption during soft contact lens wear to models previously used by Chhabra et al. (J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater, 2009a;90:202-209, Optom Vis Sci 2009b;86:454-466) and Larrea and Büchler (Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2009;50:1076-1080). We use oxygen tension from in vivo estimations provided by Bonanno [Bonanno et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2002;43:371-376, and Bonanno et al 2009]. We consider four hydrogel and six silicone hydrogel lenses. The cornea is considered a single homogeneous layer, with constant oxygen permeability regardless of the type of lens worn. Our calculations yield different values for the maximum oxygen consumption rate Qc,max , whith differents oxygen tensions (high and low pc ) at the cornea-tears interface. Surprisingly, for both models, we observe an increase in oxygen consumption near an oxygen tension of 105 mmHg until a maximum is reached, then decreasing for higher levels of oxygen pressure. That is, when lowering the pressure of oxygen, the parameter Qc,max initially increases depending on the intensity of the change in pressure. Which, it could be related with the variation of the pH. Furthermore, it is also noted that to greater reductions in pressure, this parameter decreases, possibly due to changes in the concentration of glucose related to the anaerobic respiration. The averaged in vivo human corneal oxygen consumption rate of 1.47 × 10(-4) cm(3) of O2 /cm(3) tissue s, with Monod kinetics model, considering all the lenses studied, is smaller than the average oxygen consumption rate value obtained using the Larrea and Büchler model. The impact that these calculations have on the oxygen partial pressure available at different depths in the corneal tissue is presented and discussed, taking into consideration previous models used in this study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl

  12. Where the O2 goes to: preservation of human fetal oxygen delivery and consumption at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, Lucrecia; Heredia, Gladys; Illsley, Nicholas P; Torricos, Tatiana; Dolan, Caitlin; Echalar, Lourdes; Tellez, Wilma; Maldonado, Ivan; Brimacombe, Michael; Balanza, Elfride; Vargas, Enrique; Zamudio, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    Fetal growth is decreased at high altitude (> 2700 m). We hypothesized that variation in fetal O2 delivery might account for both the altitude effect and the relative preservation of fetal growth in multigenerational natives to high altitude. Participants were 168 women of European or Andean ancestry living at 3600 m or 400 m. Ancestry was genetically confirmed. Umbilical vein blood flow was measured using ultrasound and Doppler. Cord blood samples permitted calculation of fetal O2 delivery and consumption. Andean fetuses had greater blood flow and oxygen delivery than Europeans and weighed more at birth, regardless of altitude (+208 g, P < 0.0001). Fetal blood flow was decreased at 3600 m (P < 0.0001); the decrement was similar in both ancestry groups. Altitude-associated decrease in birth weight was greater in Europeans (−417 g) than Andeans (−228 g, P < 0.005). Birth weight at 3600 m was > 200 g lower for Europeans at any given level of blood flow or O2 delivery. Fetal haemoglobin concentration was increased, decreased, and the fetal / curve was left-shifted at 3600 m. Fetuses receiving less O2 extracted more (r2= 0.35, P < 0.0001). These adaptations resulted in similar fetal O2 delivery and consumption across all four groups. Increased umbilical venous O2 delivery correlated with increased fetal O2 consumption per kg weight (r2= 0.50, P < 0.0001). Blood flow (r2= 0.16, P < 0.001) and O2 delivery (r2= 0.17, P < 0.001) correlated with birth weight at 3600 m, but not at 400 m (r2= 0.04, and 0.03, respectively). We concluded that the most pronounced difference at high altitude is reduced fetal blood flow, but fetal haematological adaptation and fetal capacity to increase O2 extraction indicates that deficit in fetal oxygen delivery is unlikely to be causally associated with the altitude- and ancestry-related differences in fetal growth. PMID:19074967

  13. The relationship between heart rate and rate of oxygen consumption in Galapagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) at two different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Butler, Patrick J; Frappell, Peter B; Wang, Tobias; Wikelski, Martin

    2002-07-01

    To enable the use of heart rate (fH) for estimating field metabolic rate (FMR) in free-ranging Galapagos marine iguanas Amblyrhynchus cristatus, we determined the relationships between fH and mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption (sVO2) in seven iguanas before and during exercise on a treadmill and during the post-exercise period. The experiments were conducted at 27 and 35 degrees C, which are the temperatures that represent the lowest and highest average body temperatures of these animals in the field during summer. There were linear and significant relationships between fH and sVO2 at both temperatures (r(2)=0.86 and 0.91 at 27 degrees C and 36 degrees C, respectively). The slopes of the two regression lines did not differ, but there were significant differences in their intercepts. Thus, while heart rate can be used to predict FMR, the effects of temperature on the intercept of the regression must be taken into account when converting fH to sVO2. On the basis of our data, this can be achieved by applying the following formula: sVO2=0.0113fH-0.2983Q(10)((T(b)-27)/10). The increase in sVO2 with elevated body temperature results from an increase in fH, with no significant change in mass-specific oxygen pulse (sO(2) pulse; cardiac stroke volume times the difference in oxygen content between arterial and mixed venous blood). However, during exercise at both temperatures, increases in fH are insufficient to provide all of the additional O(2) required and there are also significant increases in the sO(2) pulses. This creates the situation whereby the same fH at the two temperatures can represent different values of sVO2.

  14. On–off asymmetries in oxygen consumption kinetics of single Xenopus laevis skeletal muscle fibres suggest higher-order control

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, Rob CI; van der Laarse, Willem J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle oxygen consumption () during exercise are not well understood. We determined whether first-order control could explain kinetics at contractions onset () and cessation () in single skeletal muscle fibres differing in oxidative capacity, and across stimulation intensities up to . Xenopus laevis fibres (n= 21) were suspended in a sealed chamber with a fast response electrode to measure every second before, during and after stimulated isometric contractions. A first-order model did not well characterise on-transient kinetics. Including a time delay (TD) in the model provided a significantly improved characterisation than a first-order fit without TD (F-ratio; P < 0.05), and revealed separate ‘activation’ and ‘exponential’ phases in 15/21 fibres contracting at (mean ± SD TD: 14 ± 3 s). On-transient kinetics () was weakly and linearly related to (R2= 0.271, P= 0.015). Off-transient kinetics, however, were first-order, and was greater in low-oxidative ( < 0.05 nmol mm−3 s−1) than high-oxidative fibres ( > 0.10 nmol mm−3 s−1; 170 ± 70 vs. 29 ± 6 s, P < 0.001). was proportional to (R2= 0.727, P < 0.001), unlike in the on-transient. The calculated oxygen deficit was larger (P < 0.05) than the post-contraction volume of consumed oxygen at all intensities except . These data show a clear dissociation between the kinetic control of at the onset and cessation of contractions and across stimulation intensities. More complex models are therefore required to understand the activation of mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle at the start of exercise. PMID:23165768

  15. High temporal resolution MRI quantification of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in response to apneic challenge.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Zachary B; Jain, Varsha; Englund, Erin K; Langham, Michael C; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-10-01

    We present a technique for quantifying global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) in absolute physiologic units at 3-second temporal resolution and apply the technique to quantify the dynamic CMRO2 response to volitional apnea. Temporal resolution of 3 seconds was achieved via a combination of view sharing and superior sagittal sinus-based estimation of total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) rather than tCBF measurement in the neck arteries. These modifications were first validated in three healthy adults and demonstrated to produce minimal errors in image-derived blood flow and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2) values. The technique was then applied in 10 healthy adults during an apnea paradigm of three repeated 30-second breath-holds. Subject-averaged baseline tCBF, arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVO2D), and CMRO2 were 48.6 ± 7.0 mL/100 g per minute, 29.4 ± 3.4 %HbO2, and 125.1 ± 11.4 μmol/100 g per minute, respectively. Subject-averaged maximum changes in tCBF and AVO2D were 43.5 ± 9.4% and -32.1 ± 5.7%, respectively, resulting in a small (6.0 ± 3.5%) but statistically significant (P=0.00044, two-tailed t-test) increase in average end-apneic CMRO2. This method could be used to investigate neurometabolic-hemodynamic relationships in normal physiology, to better define the biophysical origins of the BOLD signal, and to quantify neurometabolic responsiveness in diseases of altered neurovascular reactivity.

  16. Light-addressable measurements of cellular oxygen consumption rates in microwell arrays based on phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsu, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-01-01

    A digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) projector, which is equipped with a UV light-emitting diode as a light modulation source, has been developed to spatially direct excited light toward a microwell array device to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of single cells via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microwell array device is composed of a combination of two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) as the oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids set above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to only excite the sealed microwell for cellular OCR measurements. The OCR of baby hamster kidney-21 fibroblast cells cultivated on the PtOEP layer within a sealed microwell has been successfully measured at 104 ± 2.96 amol s−1 cell−1. Repeatable and consistent measurements indicate that the oxygen measurements did not adversely affect the physiological state of the measured cells. The OCR of the cells exhibited a good linear relationship with the diameter of the microwells, ranging from 400 to 1000 μm and containing approximately 480 to 1200 cells within a microwell. In addition, the OCR variation of single cells in situ infected by Dengue virus with a different multiplicity of infection was also successfully measured in real-time. This proposed platform provides the potential for a wide range of biological applications in cell-based biosensing, toxicology, and drug discovery. PMID:24348889

  17. Light-addressable measurements of cellular oxygen consumption rates in microwell arrays based on phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Hsu, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-01-01

    A digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) projector, which is equipped with a UV light-emitting diode as a light modulation source, has been developed to spatially direct excited light toward a microwell array device to detect the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of single cells via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The microwell array device is composed of a combination of two components: an array of glass microwells containing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP) as the oxygen-sensitive luminescent layer and a microfluidic module with pneumatically actuated glass lids set above the microwells to controllably seal the microwells of interest. By controlling the illumination pattern on the DMD, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to only excite the sealed microwell for cellular OCR measurements. The OCR of baby hamster kidney-21 fibroblast cells cultivated on the PtOEP layer within a sealed microwell has been successfully measured at 104 ± 2.96 amol s(-1) cell(-1). Repeatable and consistent measurements indicate that the oxygen measurements did not adversely affect the physiological state of the measured cells. The OCR of the cells exhibited a good linear relationship with the diameter of the microwells, ranging from 400 to 1000 μm and containing approximately 480 to 1200 cells within a microwell. In addition, the OCR variation of single cells in situ infected by Dengue virus with a different multiplicity of infection was also successfully measured in real-time. This proposed platform provides the potential for a wide range of biological applications in cell-based biosensing, toxicology, and drug discovery.

  18. Effect of continuous and intermittent bouts of isocaloric cycling and running exercise on excess postexercise oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Felipe A; Midgley, Adrian W; McNaughton, Lars R; Farinatti, Paulo T V

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) induced by isocaloric bouts of continuous and intermittent running and cycling exercise. This was a counterbalanced randomized cross-over study. Ten healthy men, aged 23-34yr, performed six bouts of exercise: (a) two maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests for running and cycling to determine exercise modality-specific peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak); and (b) four isocaloric exercise bouts (two continuous bouts expending 400kcal and two intermittent bouts split into 2×200kcal) performed at 75% of the running and cycling oxygen uptake reserve. Exercise bouts were separated by 72h and performed in a randomized, counter-balanced order. The VO2 was monitored for 60-min postexercise and for 60-min during a control non-exercise day. The VO2 was significantly greater in all exercise conditions compared to the control session (P<0.001). The combined magnitude of the EPOC from the two intermittent bouts was significantly greater than that of the continuous cycling (mean difference=3.5L, P=0.001) and running (mean difference=6.4L, P<0.001). The exercise modality had a significant effect on net EPOC, where running elicited a higher net EPOC than cycling (mean difference=2.2L, P<0.001). Intermittent exercise increased the EPOC compared to a continuous exercise bout of equivalent energy expenditure. Furthermore, the magnitude of EPOC was influenced by exercise modality, with the greatest EPOC occurring with isocaloric exercise involving larger muscle mass (i.e., treadmill running vs. cycling). Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiplexed MRI methods for rapid estimation of global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunyeol; Langham, Michael C; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E; Wehrli, Felix W

    2017-04-01

    The global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), which reflects metabolic activity of the brain under various physiologic conditions, can be quantified using a method, referred to as 'OxFlow', which simultaneously measures hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a draining vein (Yv) and total cerebral blood flow (tCBF). Conventional OxFlow (Conv-OxFlow) entails four interleaves incorporated in a single pulse sequence - two for phase-contrast based measurement of tCBF in the supplying arteries of the neck, and two to measure the intra- to extravascular phase difference in the superior sagittal sinus to derive Yv [Jain et al., JCBFM 2010]. However, this approach limits achievable temporal resolution thus precluding capture of rapid changes of brain metabolic states such as the response to apneic stimuli. Here, we developed a time-efficient, multiplexed OxFlow method and evaluated its potential for measuring dynamic alterations in global CMRO2 during a breath-hold challenge. Two different implementations of multiplexed OxFlow were investigated: 1) simultaneous-echo-refocusing based OxFlow (SER-OxFlow) and 2) simultaneous-multi-slice imaging-based dual-band OxFlow (DB-OxFlow). The two sequences were implemented on 3T scanners (Siemens TIM Trio and Prisma) and their performance was evaluated in comparison to Conv-OxFlow in ten healthy subjects for baseline CMRO2 quantification. Comparison of measured parameters (Yv, tCBF, CMRO2) revealed no significant bias of SER-OxFlow and DB-OxFlow, with respect to the reference Conv-OxFlow while improving temporal resolution two-fold (12.5 versus 25s). Further acceleration shortened scan time to 8 and 6s for SER and DB-OxFlow, respectively, for time-resolved CMRO2 measurement. The two sequences were able of capturing smooth transitions of Yv, tCBF, and CMRO2 over the time course consisting of 30s of normal breathing, 30s of volitional apnea, and 90s of recovery. While both SER- and DB-OxFlow techniques provide significantly improved

  20. Influence of mechanical and metabolic strain on the oxygen consumption slow component during forward pulled running.

    PubMed

    Avogadro, Patrick; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Belli, Alain

    2004-10-01

    The possible influence of increased eccentric mechanical work on the increase in oxygen uptake ( V(.)O(2)) after 3 min of running (Delta V(.)O(2)) was investigated through forward pulled running. Ten subjects ran at individually predetermined constant velocity on a treadmill, while being pulled forward. Ground reaction forces, expired gas and EMGs from leg muscles were collected after 3 min and at the end of the run. V(.)O(2) and mechanical work were then calculated. The amplitude of Delta V(.)O(2) was 138 (139) ml x min(-1) [mean (SD)]. Increased ventilation explained only 8% of Delta V(.)O(2). Stride frequency slightly decreased, inducing a similar decrease in internal work and total mechanical work (all P<0.01), while integrated EMG showed no modifications. It was concluded that Delta V(.)O(2) does not come from either an increase in mechanical work production or an increase in muscular activity. Delta V(.)O(2) could come from a lower muscle efficiency that could be due to a modification of fibre type recruitment.

  1. Organic matter fluxes and the sites of oxygen consumption in deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunogai, Shizuo; Noriki, Shinichiro

    1987-06-01

    Sediment trap experiments at various stations in the Pacific and Antarctic Ocean compare observed particulate organic carbon fluxes with those obtained indirectly from vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen in the Pacific deep water. The observed carbon fluxes are characterized by large spatial variation and small vertical variation. The organic carbon fluxes at the 1000 m level ranged from 2 mg C m -2 d -1 in the subtropical ocean to more than 100 mg C m -2 d -1 in the highly productive subpolar sea, and decreased by 25 ± 10% at intervals 1000 m in depth. These results suggest that much particulate matter is transferred rapidly to the bottom of comparatively small areas of the polar, subpolar, hemipelagic and coastal seas and degraded there, and that the bottom water imprint resulting from the effects of degradation of particulate matter is transported fairly quickly to the pelagic ocean by isopycnal mixing and advection. Many unsolved phenomena occurring in the deep ocean can be explained by this suggestion.

  2. Preoperative maximal exercise oxygen consumption test predicts postoperative pulmonary morbidity following major lung resection.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Ahmet Sami; Candan, Tarik; Gebitekin, Cengiz

    2007-07-01

    Pulmonary resection carries a significant morbidity and mortality. The utility of maximal oxygen uptake test (VO(2)max) to predict cardiopulmonary complications following major pulmonary resection was evaluated. Following standard preoperative work-up and VO(2)max testing, 55 patients (49 male; mean age 59 years, range 20-74) underwent major pulmonary surgery: lobectomy (n = 31), bilobectomy (n = 6) and pneumonectomy (n = 18). An investigator blinded to the preoperative assessment prospectively collected data on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. Patients were divided into two groups according to preoperative VO(2)max and also according to FEV(1). The frequency of postoperative complications in the groups was compared. Complications were observed in 19 (34.5%) patients, 11 of which were pulmonary (20%). There were two deaths (3.6%), both due to respiratory failure. Preoperative FEV(1) failed to predict postoperative respiratory complications. Five of 36 patients with a preoperative FEV(1) > 2 L suffered pulmonary complications, compared with six of 19 patients with FEV(1) < 2 L. Cardiopulmonary complications were not observed in patients with VO(2)max > 15 mL/kg/min (n = 27); however, 11 patients with VO(2)max < 15 mL/kg/min (n = 28) suffered cardiopulmonary complications (P < 0.05). VO(2)max predicts postoperative pulmonary complications following major lung resection, and the risk of complications increases significantly when the preoperative VO(2)max is less than 15 mL/kg/min.

  3. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys(118) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-11-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys(118) residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys(118) acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy.

  4. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys118 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys118 residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys118 acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy. PMID:24096875