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Sample records for myocyte enhancer factor-2

  1. Regulation of Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 Transcription Factors by Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2011-01-01

    Various isoforms of myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) constitute a group of nuclear proteins found to play important roles in increasing types of cells. In neurons, MEF2s are required to regulate neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, as well as survival. MEF2s promote the survival of several types of neurons under different conditions. In cellular models, negative regulation of MEF2s by stress and toxic signals contributes to neuronal death. In contrast, enhancing MEF2 activity not only protects cultured primary neurons from death in vitro but also attenuates the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in a 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. In this work, the mechanisms of regulation of MEF2 function by several well-known neurotoxins and their implications in various neurodegenerative diseases are reviewed. PMID:21741404

  2. Expression of myocyte enhancer factor-2 and downstream genes in ground squirrel skeletal muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2010-11-01

    Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) transcription factors regulate the expression of a variety of genes encoding contractile proteins and other proteins associated with muscle performance. We proposed that changes in MEF2 levels and expression of selected downstream targets would aid the skeletal muscle of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus) in meeting metabolic challenges associated with winter hibernation; e.g., cycles of torpor-arousal, body temperature that can fall to near 0°C, long periods of inactivity that could lead to atrophy. MEF2A protein levels were significantly elevated when animals were in torpor (maximally 2.8-fold higher than in active squirrels) and the amount of phosphorylated active MEF2A Thr312 increased during entrance into torpor. MEF2C levels also rose significantly during entrance and torpor as did the amount of phosphorylated MEF2C Ser387. Furthermore, both MEF2 members showed elevated amounts in the nuclear fraction during torpor as well as enhanced binding to DNA indicating that MEF2-mediated gene expression was up-regulated in torpid animals. Indeed, the protein products of two MEF2 downstream gene targets increased in muscle during torpor (glucose transporter isoforms 4; GLUT4) or early arousal (myogenic differentiation; MyoD). Significant increases in Glut4 and MyoD mRNA transcript levels correlated with the rise in protein product levels and provided further support for the activation of MEF2-mediated gene expression in the hibernator. Transcript levels of Mef2a and Mef2c also showed time-dependent patterns with levels of both being highest during arousal from torpor. The data suggest a significant role for MEF2-mediated gene transcription in the selective adjustment of muscle protein complement over the course of torpor-arousal cycles.

  3. Polymorphism of chicken myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor 2A gene and its association with chicken carcass traits.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yiping; Jiang, Xiaosong; Du, Huarui; Li, Xiaocheng; Zhu, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor 2A (MEF2A) gene is a member of the myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor 2 (MEF2) protein family which involved in vertebrate skeletal muscle development and differentiation. The aim of the current study is to investigate the potential associations between MEF2A gene SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and the carcass traits in 471 chicken samples from four populations. Three new SNPs (T46023C, A72626G, and T89232G) were detected in the chicken MEF2A gene. The T46023C genotypes were associated with live body weight (BW), carcass weight (CW), eviscerated weight, semi-eviscerated weight (SEW), and leg muscle weight (LMW) (P < 0.05); the A72626G genotypes were associated with BW, CW, LMW (P < 0.01) and breast muscle weight (BMW), leg muscle percentage (LMP) (P < 0.05); whereas the T89232G genotypes were associated with carcass percentage (CP) and semi-eviscerated percentage (SEP) (P < 0.05). The haplotypes constructed on the three SNPs were associated with BW, CW, LMW (P < 0.01), SEW, BMW, CP (P < 0.05). Significantly and suggestive dominant effects of diplotype H1H2 were observed for BW, CW, SEW, BMW and CP, whereas diplotype H5H5 had a negative effect on BW, CW, SEW, BMW and LMW. Our results suggest that the MEF2A gene may be a potential marker affecting the muscle trait of chickens.

  4. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c, an osteoblast transcription factor identified by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-enhanced mineralization.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Alexandre S; Stephens, Sebastien R; Hobbs, Carl; Hutmacher, Deitmar W; Bacic-Welsh, Desa; Woodruff, Maria Ann; Morrison, Nigel A

    2011-08-26

    Rapid mineralization of cultured osteoblasts could be a useful characteristic in stem cell-mediated therapies for fracture and other orthopedic problems. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a small amphipathic solvent molecule capable of stimulating cell differentiation. We report that, in primary human osteoblasts, DMSO dose-dependently enhanced the expression of osteoblast differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization. Furthermore, similar DMSO-mediated mineralization enhancement was observed in primary osteoblast-like cells differentiated from mouse mesenchymal cells derived from fat, a promising source of starter cells for cell-based therapy. Using a convenient mouse pre-osteoblast model cell line MC3T3-E1, we further investigated this phenomenon showing that numerous osteoblast-expressed genes were elevated in response to DMSO treatment and correlated with enhanced mineralization. Myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) was identified as the transcription factor most induced by DMSO, among the numerous DMSO-induced genes, suggesting a role for Mef2c in osteoblast gene regulation. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of Mef2c in osteoblast-like cells in mouse mandible, cortical, and trabecular bone. shRNAi-mediated Mef2c gene silencing resulted in defective osteoblast differentiation, decreased alkaline phosphatase activity, and matrix mineralization and knockdown of osteoblast specific gene expression, including osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. A flow on knockdown of bone-specific transcription factors, Runx2 and osterix by shRNAi knockdown of Mef2c, suggests that Mef2c lies upstream of these two important factors in the cascade of gene expression in osteoblasts.

  5. Dynamic Phosphorylation of the Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2Cα1 Splice Variant Promotes Skeletal Muscle Regeneration and Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Baruffaldi, Fiorenza; Montarras, Didier; Basile, Valentina; De Feo, Luca; Badodi, Sara; Ganassi, Massimo; Battini, Renata; Nicoletti, Carmine; Imbriano, Carol; Musarò, Antonio; Molinari, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The transcription factor MEF2C (Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2C) plays an established role in the early steps of myogenic differentiation. However, the involvement of MEF2C in adult myogenesis and in muscle regeneration has not yet been systematically investigated. Alternative splicing of mammalian MEF2C transcripts gives rise to two mutually exclusive protein variants: MEF2Cα2 which exerts a positive control of myogenic differentiation, and MEF2Cα1, in which the α1 domain acts as trans-repressor of the MEF2C pro-differentiation activity itself. However, MEF2Cα1 variants are persistently expressed in differentiating cultured myocytes, suggesting a role in adult myogenesis. We found that overexpression of both MEF2Cα1/α2 proteins in a mouse model of muscle injury promotes muscle regeneration and hypertrophy, with each isoform promoting different stages of myogenesis. Besides the ability of MEF2Cα2 to increase differentiation, we found that overexpressed MEF2Cα1 enhances both proliferation and differentiation of primary myoblasts, and activates the AKT/mTOR/S6K anabolic signaling pathway in newly formed myofibers. The multiple activities of MEF2Cα1 are modulated by phosphorylation of Ser98 and Ser110, two amino acid residues located in the α1 domain of MEF2Cα1. These specific phosphorylations allow the interaction of MEF2Cα1 with the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase PIN1, a regulator of MEF2C functions. Overall, in this study we established a novel regulatory mechanism in which the expression and the phosphorylation of MEF2Cα1 are critically required to sustain the adult myogenesis. The described molecular mechanism will represent a new potential target for the development of therapeutical strategies to treat muscle-wasting diseases. Stem Cells 2017;35:725-738.

  6. PC4 Coactivates MyoD by Relieving the Histone Deacetylase 4-Mediated Inhibition of Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2C

    PubMed Central

    Micheli, Laura; Leonardi, Luca; Conti, Filippo; Buanne, Pasquale; Canu, Nadia; Caruso, Maurizia; Tirone, Felice

    2005-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) negatively regulates skeletal myogenesis by associating with the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors. Our data indicate that the gene PC4 (interferon-related developmental regulator 1 [IFRD1], Tis7), which we have previously shown to be required for myoblast differentiation, is both induced by MyoD and potentiates the transcriptional activity of MyoD, thus revealing a positive regulatory loop between these molecules. Enhancement by PC4 of MyoD-dependent activation of muscle gene promoters occurs selectively through MEF2 binding sites. Furthermore, PC4 localizes in the nucleus of differentiating myoblasts, associates with MEF2C, and is able to counteract the HDAC4-mediated inhibition of MEF2C. This latter action can be explained by the observed ability of PC4 to dose dependently displace HDAC4 from MEF2C. Consistently, we have observed that (i) the region of PC4 that binds MEF2C is sufficient to counteract the inhibition by HDAC4; (ii) PC4, although able to bind HDAC4, does not inhibit the enzymatic activity of HDAC4; and (iii) PC4 overcomes the inhibition mediated by the amino-terminal domain of HDAC4, which associates with MEF2C but not with PC4. Together, our findings strongly suggest that PC4 acts as a coactivator of MyoD and MEF2C by removing the inhibitory effect of HDAC4, thus exerting a pivotal function during myogenesis. PMID:15743821

  7. Localization of myocyte enhancer factor 2 in the rodent forebrain: regionally-specific cytoplasmic expression of MEF2A.

    PubMed

    Neely, M Diana; Robert, Elizabeth M; Baucum, Anthony J; Colbran, Roger J; Muly, E Chris; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2009-06-05

    The transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) is expressed throughout the central nervous system, where four MEF2 isoforms play important roles in neuronal survival and differentiation and in synapse formation and maintenance. It is therefore somewhat surprising that there is a lack of detailed information on the localization of MEF2 isoforms in the mammalian brain. We have analyzed the regional, cellular, and subcellular expression of MEF2A and MEF2D in the rodent brain. These two MEF2 isoforms were co-expressed in virtually all neurons in the cortex and the striatum, but were not detected in astrocytes. MEF2A and MEF2D were localized to the nuclei of neurons in many forebrain areas, consistent with their roles as transcriptional regulators. However, in several subcortical sites we observed extensive cytoplasmic expression of MEF2A but not MEF2D. MEF2A was particularly enriched in processes of neurons in the lateral septum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, as well as in several other limbic sites, including the central amygdala and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and thalamus. Ultrastructural examination similarly revealed MEF2A-ir in axons and dendrites as well as MEF2A-ir nuclei in the lateral septum and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis neurons. This study demonstrates for the first time extensive cytoplasmic localization of a MEF2 transcription factor in the mammalian brain in vivo. The extranuclear localization of MEF2A suggests novel roles for MEF2A in specific neuronal populations.

  8. Identification of a new hybrid serum response factor and myocyte enhancer factor 2-binding element in MyoD enhancer required for MyoD expression during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    L'honore, Aurore; Rana, Vanessa; Arsic, Nikola; Franckhauser, Celine; Lamb, Ned J; Fernandez, Anne

    2007-06-01

    MyoD is a critical myogenic factor induced rapidly upon activation of quiescent satellite cells, and required for their differentiation during muscle regeneration. One of the two enhancers of MyoD, the distal regulatory region, is essential for MyoD expression in postnatal muscle. This enhancer contains a functional divergent serum response factor (SRF)-binding CArG element required for MyoD expression during myoblast growth and muscle regeneration in vivo. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and microinjection analyses show this element is a hybrid SRF- and MEF2 Binding (SMB) sequence where myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) complexes can compete out binding of SRF at the onset of differentiation. As cells differentiate into postmitotic myotubes, MyoD expression no longer requires SRF but instead MEF2 binding to this dual-specificity element. As such, the MyoD enhancer SMB element is the site for a molecular relay where MyoD expression is first initiated in activated satellite cells in an SRF-dependent manner and then increased and maintained by MEF2 binding in differentiated myotubes. Therefore, SMB is a DNA element with dual and stage-specific binding activity, which modulates the effects of regulatory proteins critical in controlling the balance between proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D regulates ectoderm specification and adhesion properties of animal cap cells in the early Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed

    Katz Imberman, Sandra; Kolpakova, Alina; Keren, Aviad; Bengal, Eyal

    2015-08-01

    In Xenopus, animal cap (AC) cells give rise to ectoderm and its derivatives: epidermis and the central nervous system. Ectoderm has long been considered a default pathway of embryonic development, with cells that are not under the influence of vegetal Nodal signaling adopting an ectodermal program of gene expression. In the present study, we describe the involvement of the animally-localized maternal transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor (Mef) 2D in regulating the identity of AC cells. We find that Mef2D is required for the formation of both ectodermal lineages: neural and epidermis. Gain and loss of function experiments indicate that Mef2D regulates early gastrula expression of key ectodermal/epidermal genes in the animal region. Mef2D controls the activity of zygotic bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling known to dictate the epidermal differentiation program. Exogenous expression of Mef2D in vegetal blastomeres was sufficient to induce ectopic expression of ectoderm/epidermal genes in the vegetal half of the embryo, when Nodal signaling was inhibited. Depletion of Mef2D caused a loss of AC cell adhesion that was rescued by the expression of E-cadherin or bone morphogenetic protein 4. In addition, expression of Mef2D in the prospective endoderm caused unusual aggregation of vegetal cells with animal cells in vitro and inappropriate segregation to other germ layers in vivo. Mef2D cooperates with another animally-expressed transcription factor, FoxI1e. Together, they regulate the expression of genes encoding signaling proteins and the transcription factors that control the regional identity of animal cells. Therefore, we describe a new role for the animally-localized Mef2D protein in early ectoderm specification, which is similar to that of the vegetally-localized VegT in endoderm and mesoderm formation.

  10. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases and Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 Proteins Regulate the Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition of Somatic Cell Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Qiang; Qing, Xiaobing; Ying, Yue; Wu, Haitao; Benda, Christina; Lin, Jiao; Huang, Zhijian; Liu, Longqi; Xu, Yan; Bao, Xichen; Qin, Baoming; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) and myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins compose a signaling module that orchestrates lineage specification during embryogenesis. We show here that this module also regulates the generation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells by defined transcription factors. Class IIa HDACs and MEF2 proteins rise steadily during fibroblast reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells. MEF2 proteins tend to block the process by inducing the expression of Tgfβ cytokines, which impairs the necessary phase of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Conversely, class IIa HDACs endeavor to suppress the activity of MEF2 proteins, thus enhancing the MET and colony formation efficiency. Our work highlights an unexpected role for a developmental axis in somatic cell reprogramming and provides new insight into how the MET is regulated in this context. PMID:23467414

  11. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  12. Interactions between mitochondria and the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) regulate neuronal structural and functional plasticity and metaplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Brusco, Janaina; Haas, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    The classical view of mitochondria as housekeeping organelles acting in the background to simply maintain cellular energy demands has been challenged by mounting evidence of their direct and active participation in synaptic plasticity in neurons. Time-lapse imaging has revealed that mitochondria are motile in dendrites, with their localization and fusion and fission events regulated by synaptic activity. The positioning of mitochondria directly influences function of nearby synapses through multiple pathways including control over local concentrations of ATP, Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have also shown that mitochondrial protein cascades, classically associated with apoptosis, are involved in neural plasticity in healthy cells. These findings link mitochondria to the plasticity- and metaplasticity-associated activity-dependent transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), further repositioning mitochondria as potential command centres for regulation of synaptic plasticity. Intriguingly, MEF2 and mitochondrial functions appear to be intricately intertwined, as MEF2 is a target of mitochondrial apoptotic caspases and, in turn, MEF2 regulates mitochondrial genome transcription essential for production of superoxidase and hydrogen peroxidase. Here, we review evidence supporting mitochondria as central organelles controlling the spatiotemporal expression of neuronal plasticity, and attempt to disentangle the MEF2–mitochondria relationship mediating these functions. PMID:25581818

  13. Autism-Associated Chromatin Regulator Brg1/SmarcA4 Is Required for Synapse Development and Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2-Mediated Synapse Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zilai; Cao, Mou; Chang, Chia-Wei; Wang, Cindy; Shi, Xuanming; Zhan, Xiaoming; Birnbaum, Shari G.; Bezprozvanny, Ilya; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Synapse development requires normal neuronal activities and the precise expression of synapse-related genes. Dysregulation of synaptic genes results in neurological diseases such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Mutations in genes encoding chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1/SmarcA4 and its associated proteins are the genetic causes of several developmental diseases with neurological defects and autistic symptoms. Recent large-scale genomic studies predicted Brg1/SmarcA4 as one of the key nodes of the ASD gene network. We report that Brg1 deletion in early postnatal hippocampal neurons led to reduced dendritic spine density and maturation and impaired synapse activities. In developing mice, neuronal Brg1 deletion caused severe neurological defects. Gene expression analyses indicated that Brg1 regulates a significant number of genes known to be involved in synapse function and implicated in ASD. We found that Brg1 is required for dendritic spine/synapse elimination mediated by the ASD-associated transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and that Brg1 regulates the activity-induced expression of a specific subset of genes that overlap significantly with the targets of MEF2. Our analyses showed that Brg1 interacts with MEF2 and that MEF2 is required for Brg1 recruitment to target genes in response to neuron activation. Thus, Brg1 plays important roles in both synapse development/maturation and MEF2-mediated synapse remodeling. Our study reveals specific functions of the epigenetic regulator Brg1 in synapse development and provides insights into its role in neurological diseases such as ASD. PMID:26459759

  14. Assignment of human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) to human chromosome 5q14 and evidence that MEF2C is evolutionarily conserved

    SciTech Connect

    Krainc, D.; Lipton, S.A.; Haas, M.; Ward, D.C.

    1995-10-10

    Human myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2C (hMEF2C) belongs to the MEF2 subfamily of the MADS (MCM1, AGAMOUS, DEF A, serum response factor) family of transcription factors. Members of the MADS family share a conserved domain - the MADS domain - that is necessary for DNA binding. Highly conserved versions of the MADS domain and of an adjacent domain that is known as the MEF2 domain are found in members of the MEF2 subfamily. Both of these domains are necessary for binding to the MEF2 regulatory element. This regulatory element is known to be functionally important in a variety of muscle-specific genes and possibly in the brain creatine kinase gene. The MEF2C gene product activates transcription by binding to the MEF2 element. hMEF2C is expressed at high levels in postmitotic neurons in the brain, where it is most abundant in the cerebral cortex, and is also expressed in differentiated myotubes. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of a rat homologue of MEF2C, and a mouse homologue has been cloned. The mouse gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 13 in a region that is syntenic to human 5q13-q15. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Perturbation of transcription factor Nur77 expression mediated by myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) regulates dopaminergic neuron loss in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP).

    PubMed

    Mount, Matthew P; Zhang, Yi; Amini, Mandana; Callaghan, Steve; Kulczycki, Jerzy; Mao, Zixu; Slack, Ruth S; Anisman, Hymie; Park, David S

    2013-05-17

    We have earlier reported the critical nature of calpain-CDK5-MEF2 signaling in governing dopaminergic neuronal loss in vivo. CDK5 mediates phosphorylation of the neuronal survival factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) leading to its inactivation and loss. However, the downstream factors that mediate MEF2-regulated survival are unknown. Presently, we define Nur77 as one such critical downstream survival effector. Following 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in vivo, Nur77 expression in the nigrostriatal region is dramatically reduced. This loss is attenuated by expression of MEF2. Importantly, MEF2 constitutively binds to the Nur77 promoter in neurons under basal conditions. This binding is lost following 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium treatment. Nur77 deficiency results in significant sensitization to dopaminergic loss following 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium/MPTP treatment, in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Nur77-deficient MPTP-treated mice displayed significantly reduced levels of dopamine and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the striatum as well as elevated post synaptic FosB activity, indicative of increased nigrostriatal damage when compared with WT MPTP-treated controls. Importantly, this sensitization in Nur77-deficient mice was rescued with ectopic Nur77 expression in the nigrostriatal system. These results indicate that the inactivation of Nur77, induced by loss of MEF2 activity, plays a critical role in nigrostriatal degeneration in vivo.

  16. [Regulation of myostatin promoter activity by myocyte enhancer factor 2].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Deng, Jie; Zhang, Junlin; Cheng, De; Wang, Huayan

    2012-08-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily that functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation in mammals. The transcriptional regulation of Mstn is controlled by multiple genes including MEF2, which raise the importance of identifying the binding sites of MEF2 on myostatin promoter region and mechanisms underlying. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of MEF2 on porcine Mstn promoter activity in C2C12 cells. Sequence analysis of the 1 969 bp porcine Mstn promoter region revealed that it contained three potential MEF2 motifs. Using a serial deletion strategy, we tested the activity of several promoter fragments by luciferase assay. Overexpression of MEF2C, but not MEF2A increased Mstn promoter activity in all the promoter fragments with MEF2 motifs by two to six folds, in both C2C12 myoblasts and myotubes. When we transfected exogenous MEF2C, Mstn mRNA level was also upregulated in C2C12 cells, but the protein level was only significantly increased in myotubes. Thus, we propose that MEF2C could modulate and restrain myogenesis by Mstn activation and Mstn-dependent gene processing in porcine. Our research also provided potential targets and an effective molecule to regulate Mstn expression and gave a new way to explore the functional performance of Mstn.

  17. Overexpression of miR-18a negatively regulates myocyte enhancer factor 2D to increase the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier via Krüppel-like factor 4-mediated downregulation of zonula occluden-1, claudin-5, and occludin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Yu; Zhao, Li-Ni; Wang, Ping; Miao, Yin-Sha; Liu, Yun-Hui; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Jun; Li, Zhen; Li, Zhi-Qing; Xue, Yi-Xue

    2015-12-01

    miR-18a represses angiogenesis and tumor evasion by weakening vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor-β signaling to prolong the survival of glioma patients, although it is thought to be an oncogene. This study investigates the potential effects of miR-18a on the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier (BTB) and its possible molecular mechanisms. An in vitro BTB model was successfully established. The endogenous expression of miR-18a in glioma vascular endothelial cells (GECs) was significantly lower than that in normal vascular ECs, and the overexpression of miR-18a significantly increased the permeability of the BTB as well as downregulating the mRNA and protein expressions of tight junction-related proteins zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, and occludin in GECs. Dual luciferase reporter assays revealed that miR-18a bound to the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D). The overexpression of both miR-18a and MEF2D with the 3'UTR significantly weakened the effect caused by miR-18a of decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of ZO-1, claudin-5 and occludin and of increasing the permeability of the BTB. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that MEF2D could directly bind to KLF4 promoter. This study shows that miR-18a targets and negatively regulates MEF2D, which further regulates tight junction-related proteins ZO-1, claudin-5, and occludin through transactivation of KLF4 and, finally, changes the permeability of the BTB. MiR-18a should garner growing attention because it might serve as a potential target in opening the BTB and providing a new strategy for the treatment of gliomas.

  18. Nitrate-containing beetroot enhances myocyte metabolism and mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roger A; Gannon, Nicholas P; Carriker, Colin R

    2016-01-01

    Beetroot ( tián cài) juice consumption is of current interest for improving aerobic performance by acting as a vasodilator and possibly through alterations in skeletal muscle metabolism and physiology. This work explored the effects of a commercially available beetroot supplement on metabolism, gene expression, and mitochondrial content in cultured myocytes. C2C12 myocytes were treated with various concentrations of the beetroot supplement for various durations. Glycolytic metabolism and oxidative metabolism were quantified via measurement of extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption, respectively. Metabolic gene expression was measured using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and mitochondrial content was assessed with flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cells treated with beetroot exhibited significantly increased oxidative metabolism, concurrently with elevated metabolic gene expression including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha, nuclear respiratory factor 1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and glucose transporter 4, leading to increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our data show that treatment with a beetroot supplement increases basal oxidative metabolism. Our observations are also among the first to demonstrate that beetroot extract is an inducer of metabolic gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis. These observations support the need for further investigation into the therapeutic and pharmacological effects of nitrate-containing supplements for health and athletic benefits.

  19. Alterations in action potential profile enhance excitation-contraction coupling in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Rajan; Ramirez, Rafael J; Kaprielian, Roger; Backx, Peter H

    2001-01-01

    Action potential (AP) prolongation typically occurs in heart disease due to reductions in transient outward potassium currents (Ito), and is associated with increased Ca2+ transients. We investigated the underlying mechanisms responsible for enhanced Ca2+ transients in normal isolated rat ventricular myocytes in response to the AP changes that occur following myocardial infarction. Normal myocytes stimulated with a train of long post-myocardial infarction (MI) APs showed a 2.2-fold elevation of the peak Ca2+ transient and a 2.7-fold augmentation of fractional cell shortening, relative to myocytes stimulated with a short control AP. The steady-state Ca2+ load of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was increased 2.0-fold when myocytes were stimulated with trains of long post-MI APs (111 ± 21.6 μmol l−1) compared with short control APs (56 ± 7.2 μmol l−1). Under conditions of equal SR Ca2+ load, long post-MI APs still resulted in a 1.7-fold increase in peak [Ca2+]i and a 3.8-fold increase in fractional cell shortening relative to short control APs, establishing that changes in the triggering of SR Ca2+ release are largely responsible for elevated Ca2+ transients following AP prolongation. Fractional SR Ca2+ release calculated from the measured SR Ca2+ load and the integrated SR Ca2+ fluxes was 24 ± 3 and 11 ± 2 % following post-MI and control APs, respectively. The fractional release (FR) of Ca2+ from the SR divided by the integrated L-type Ca2+ flux (FR/∫FCa,L) was increased 1.2-fold by post-MI APs compared with control APs. Similar increases in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling gains were observed establishing enhanced E-C coupling efficiency. Our findings demonstrate that AP prolongation alone can markedly enhance E-C coupling in normal myocytes through increases in the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) trigger combined with modest enhancements in Ca2+ release efficiency. We propose that such changes in AP profile in diseased myocardium may contribute

  20. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  1. Transforming growth factor-{beta}2 enhances differentiation of cardiac myocytes from embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinender . E-mail: Dinender.Kumar@uvm.edu; Sun, Baiming

    2005-06-24

    Stem cell therapy holds great promise for the treatment of injured myocardium, but is challenged by a limited supply of appropriate cells. Three different isoforms of transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) -{beta}1, -{beta}2, and -{beta}3 exhibit distinct regulatory effects on cell growth, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development. We compared the effects of these three different isoforms on cardiomyocyte differentiation from embryonic stem (ES) cells. In contrast to TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3, treatment of mouse ES cells with TGF-{beta}2 isoform significantly increased embryoid body (EB) proliferation as well as the extent of the EB outgrowth that beat rhythmically. At 17 days, 49% of the EBs treated with TGF-{beta}2 exhibited spontaneous beating compared with 15% in controls. Cardiac myocyte specific protein markers sarcomeric myosin and {alpha}-actin were demonstrated in beating EBs and cells isolated from EBs. In conclusion, TGF-{beta}2 but not TGF-{beta}1, or -{beta}3 promotes cardiac myocyte differentiation from ES cells.

  2. Transcription factor 4 and myocyte enhancer factor 2C mutations are not common causes of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armani, Roksana; Archer, Hayley; Clarke, Angus; Vasudevan, Pradeep; Zweier, Christiane; Ho, Gladys; Williamson, Sarah; Cloosterman, Desiree; Yang, Nan; Christodoulou, John

    2012-04-01

    The systematic screening of Rett syndrome (RTT) patients for pathogenetic sequence variations has focused on three genes that have been associated with RTT or related clinical phenotypes, namely MECP2, CDKL5, and FOXG1. More recently, it has been suggested that phenotypes associated with TCF4 and MEF2C mutations may represent a form of RTT. Here we report on the screening of the TCF4 and MEF2C genes in a cohort of 81 classical, atypical, and incomplete atypical RTT patients harboring no known mutations in MECP2, CDKL5, and FOXG1 genes. No pathogenetic sequence variations were identified in the MEF2C gene in our cohort. However, a frameshift mutation in TCF4 was identified in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of "variant" RTT, in whom the clinical evolution later raised the possibility of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. Although our results suggest that these genes are not commonly associated with RTT, we note the clinical similarity between RTT and Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, and suggest that RTT patients with no mutation identified in MECP2 be considered for molecular screening of the TCF4 gene.

  3. Neuropeptide Y rapidly enhances [Ca2+]i transients and Ca2+ sparks in adult rat ventricular myocytes through Y1 receptor and PLC activation.

    PubMed

    Heredia, María del Puy; Delgado, Carmen; Pereira, Laetitia; Perrier, Romain; Richard, Sylvain; Vassort, Guy; Bénitah, Jean-Pierre; Gómez, Ana María

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is the most abundant peptide in the mammalian heart, but its cardiac actions are not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect of NPY in intracellular Ca2+ release, using isolated rat cardiac myocytes and confocal microscopy. Cardiac myocytes were field-stimulated at 1 Hz. The evoked [Ca2+]i transient was of higher amplitude and of faster decay in the presence of 100 nM NPY. Cell contraction was also increased by NPY. We analyzed the occurrence of Ca2+ sparks and their characteristics after NPY application. NPY significantly increased Ca2+ sparks frequency in quiescent cells. The Ca2+ spark amplitude was enhanced by NPY but the other characteristics of Ca2+ sparks were not significantly altered. Because cardiac myocytes express both Y1 and Y2 NPY receptors, we repeated the experiments in the presence of the receptor blockers, BIBP3226 and BIIE0246. We found that Y1 NPY receptor blockade completely inhibited NPY effects on [Ca2+]i transient. PTX-sensitive G-proteins and/or phospholypase C (PLC) have been invoked to mediate NPY effects in other cell types. We tested these two hypotheses. In PTX-treated myocytes NPY was still effective, which suggests that the observed NPY actions are not mediated by PTX-sensitive G-proteins. In contrast, the increase in [Ca2+]i transient by NPY was completely inhibited by the PLC inhibitor U73122. In conclusion, we find that NPY has a positive inotropic effect in isolated rat cardiac myocytes, which involves increase in Ca2+ release after activation of Y1 NPY receptor and subsequent stimulation of PLC.

  4. MicroRNA-1 transfected embryonic stem cells enhance cardiac myocyte differentiation and inhibit apoptosis by modulating the PTEN/Akt pathway in the infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Glass, Carley; Singla, Dinender K

    2011-11-01

    microRNAs (miRs) have emerged as critical modulators of various physiological processes including stem cell differentiation. Indeed, miR-1 has been reported to play an integral role in the regulation of cardiac muscle progenitor cell differentiation. However, whether overexpression of miR-1 in embryonic stem (ES) cells (miR-1-ES cells) will enhance cardiac myocyte differentiation following transplantation into the infarcted myocardium is unknown. In the present study, myocardial infarction (MI) was produced in C57BL/6 mice by left anterior descending artery ligation. miR-1-ES cells, ES cells, or culture medium (control) was transplanted into the border zone of the infarcted heart, and 2 wk post-MI, cardiac myocyte differentiation, adverse ventricular remodeling, and cardiac function were assessed. We provide evidence demonstrating enhanced cardiac myocyte commitment of transplanted miR-1-ES cells in the mouse infarcted heart as compared with ES cells. Assessment of apoptosis revealed that overexpression of miR-1 in transplanted ES cells protected host myocardium from MI-induced apoptosis through activation of p-AKT and inhibition of caspase-3, phosphatase and tensin homolog, and superoxide production. A significant reduction in interstitial and vascular fibrosis was quantified in miR-1-ES cell and ES cell transplanted groups compared with control MI. However, no statistical significance between miR-1-ES cell and ES cell groups was observed. Finally, mice receiving miR-1-ES cell transplantation post-MI had significantly improved heart function compared with respective controls (P < 0.05). Our data suggest miR-1 drives cardiac myocyte differentiation from transplanted ES cells and inhibits apoptosis post-MI, ultimately giving rise to enhanced cardiac repair, regeneration, and function.

  5. Myogenin induces the myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor MEF-2 independently of other muscle-specific gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Cserjesi, P; Olson, E N

    1991-01-01

    The myocyte-specific enhancer-binding factor MEF-2 is a nuclear factor that interacts with a conserved element in the muscle creatine kinase and myosin light-chain 1/3 enhancers (L. A. Gossett, D. J. Kelvin, E. A. Sternberg, and E. N. Olson, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:5022-5033, 1989). We show in this study that MEF-2 is regulated by the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin and that mitogenic signals block this regulatory interaction. Induction of MEF-2 by myogenin occurs in transfected 10T1/2 cells that have been converted to myoblasts by myogenin, as well as in CV-1 kidney cells that do not activate the myogenic program in response to myogenin. Through mutagenesis of the MEF-2 site, we further defined the binding site requirements for MEF-2 and identified potential MEF-2 sites within numerous muscle-specific regulatory regions. The MEF-2 site was also found to bind a ubiquitous nuclear factor whose binding specificity was similar to but distinct from that of MEF-2. Our results reveal that MEF-2 is controlled, either directly or indirectly, by a myogenin-dependent regulatory pathway and suggest that growth factor signals suppress MEF-2 expression through repression of myogenin expression or activity. The ability of myogenin to induce MEF-2 activity in CV-1 cells, which do not activate downstream genes associated with terminal differentiation, also demonstrates that myogenin retains limited function within cell types that are nonpermissive for myogenesis and suggests that MEF-2 is regulated independently of other muscle-specific genes. Images PMID:1656214

  6. Changes in Intracellular Na+ following Enhancement of Late Na+ Current in Virtual Human Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Karen; Trenor, Beatriz; Giles, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    The slowly inactivating or late Na+ current, INa-L, can contribute to the initiation of both atrial and ventricular rhythm disturbances in the human heart. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these pro-arrhythmic influences are not fully understood. At present, the major working hypothesis is that the Na+ influx corresponding to INa-L significantly increases intracellular Na+, [Na+]i; and the resulting reduction in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ reduces and (may reverse) Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These changes increase intracellular Ca2+, [Ca2+]i; which may further enhance INa-L due to calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of the Na+ channels. This paper is based on mathematical simulations using the O'Hara et al (2011) model of baseline or healthy human ventricular action potential waveforms(s) and its [Ca2+]i homeostasis mechanisms. Somewhat surprisingly, our results reveal only very small changes (≤ 1.5 mM) in [Na+]i even when INa-L is increased 5-fold and steady-state stimulation rate is approximately 2 times the normal human heart rate (i.e. 2 Hz). Previous work done using well-established models of the rabbit and human ventricular action potential in heart failure settings also reported little or no change in [Na+]i when INa-L was increased. Based on our simulations, the major short-term effect of markedly augmenting INa-L is a significant prolongation of the action potential and an associated increase in the likelihood of reactivation of the L-type Ca2+ current, ICa-L. Furthermore, this action potential prolongation does not contribute to [Na+]i increase.

  7. Changes in Intracellular Na+ following Enhancement of Late Na+ Current in Virtual Human Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Wayne R.

    2016-01-01

    The slowly inactivating or late Na+ current, INa-L, can contribute to the initiation of both atrial and ventricular rhythm disturbances in the human heart. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these pro-arrhythmic influences are not fully understood. At present, the major working hypothesis is that the Na+ influx corresponding to INa-L significantly increases intracellular Na+, [Na+]i; and the resulting reduction in the electrochemical driving force for Na+ reduces and (may reverse) Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These changes increase intracellular Ca2+, [Ca2+]i; which may further enhance INa-L due to calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of the Na+ channels. This paper is based on mathematical simulations using the O’Hara et al (2011) model of baseline or healthy human ventricular action potential waveforms(s) and its [Ca2+]i homeostasis mechanisms. Somewhat surprisingly, our results reveal only very small changes (≤ 1.5 mM) in [Na+]i even when INa-L is increased 5-fold and steady-state stimulation rate is approximately 2 times the normal human heart rate (i.e. 2 Hz). Previous work done using well-established models of the rabbit and human ventricular action potential in heart failure settings also reported little or no change in [Na+]i when INa-L was increased. Based on our simulations, the major short-term effect of markedly augmenting INa-L is a significant prolongation of the action potential and an associated increase in the likelihood of reactivation of the L-type Ca2+ current, ICa-L. Furthermore, this action potential prolongation does not contribute to [Na+]i increase. PMID:27875582

  8. Enhanced effect of VEGF165 on L-type calcium currents in guinea-pig cardiac ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenlu; Gao, Chuanyu; Qi, Datun; Zhang, You; Hao, Peiyuan; Dai, Guoyou; Yan, Ganxin

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms of vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165) on electrical properties of cardiomyocytes have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that VEGF165, an angiogenesis-initiating factor, affects L-type calcium currents (ICa,L) and cell membrane potential in cardiac myocytes by acting on VEGF type-2 receptors (VEGFR2). ICa,L and action potentials (AP) were recorded by the whole-cell patch clamp method in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes treated with different concentrations of VEGF165 proteins. Using a VEGFR2 inhibitor, we also tested the receptor of VEGF165 in cardiomyocytes. We found that VEGF165 increased ICa,L in a concentration-dependent manner. SU5416, a VEGFR2 inhibitor, almost completely eliminated VEGF165-induced ICa,L increase. VEGF165 had no significant influence on action potential 90 (APD90) and other properties of AP. We conclude that in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, ICa,L can be increased by VEGF165 in a concentration-dependent manner through binding to VEGFR2 without causing any significant alteration to action potential duration. Results of this study may further expound the safety of VEGF165 when used in the intervention of heart diseases.

  9. Inhibition of muscarinic K+ current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes by PD 81,723, an allosteric enhancer of adenosine binding to A1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brandts, B; Bünemann, M; Hluchy, J; Sabin, G V; Pott, L

    1997-01-01

    PD 81,723 has been shown to enhance binding of adenosine to A1 receptors by stabilizing G protein-receptor coupling (‘allosteric enhancement'). Evidence has been provided that in the perfused hearts and isolated atria PD 81,723 causes a sensitization to adenosine via this mechanism. We have studied the effect of PD 81,723 in guinea-pig isolated atrial myocytes by use of whole-cell measurement of the muscarinic K+ current (IK(ACh)) activated by different Gi-coupled receptors (A1, M2, sphingolipid). PD 81,273 caused inhibition of IK(ACh) (IC50≃5 μM) activated by either of the three receptors. Receptor-independent IK(ACh) in cells loaded with GTP-γ-S and background IK(ACh), which contributes to the resting conductance of atrial myocytes, were equally sensitive to PD 81,723. At no combination of concentrations of adenosine and PD 81,723 could an enhancing effect be detected. The compound was active from the outside only. Loading of the cells with PD 81,723 (50 μM) via the patch pipette did not affect either IK(ACh) or its sensitivity to adenosine. We suggest that PD 81,723 acts as an inhibitor of inward rectifying K+ channels; this is supported by the finding that ventricular IK1, which shares a large degree of homology with the proteins (GIRK1/GIRK4) forming IK(ACh) but is not G protein-gated, was also blocked by this compound. It is concluded that the functional effects of PD 81,723 described in the literature are not mediated by the A1 adenosine receptor-Gi-IK(ACh) pathway. PMID:9249260

  10. Enhancement of energy production by black ginger extract containing polymethoxy flavonoids in myocytes through improving glucose, lactic acid and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kazuya; Takeda, Shogo; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Nakamura, Seikou; Matsuda, Hisashi; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Enhancement of muscular energy production is thought to improve locomotive functions and prevent metabolic syndromes including diabetes and lipidemia. Black ginger (Kaempferia parviflora) has been cultivated for traditional medicine in Thailand. Recent studies have shown that black ginger extract (KPE) activated brown adipocytes and lipolysis in white adipose tissue, which may cure obesity-related dysfunction of lipid metabolism. However, the effect of KPE on glucose and lipid utilization in muscle cells has not been examined yet. Hence, we evaluated the effect of KPE and its constituents on energy metabolism in pre-differentiated (p) and differentiated (d) C2C12 myoblasts. KPE (0.1-10 μg/ml) was added to pC2C12 cells in the differentiation process for a week or used to treat dC2C12 cells for 24 h. After culturing, parameters of glucose and lipid metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis were assessed. In terms of the results, KPE enhanced the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and lactic acid as well as the mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 in both types of cells. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α was enhanced in pC2C12 cells. In addition, KPE enhanced the production of ATP and mitochondrial biogenesis. Polymethoxy flavonoids in KPE including 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone enhanced the expression of GLUT4 and PGC-1α. Moreover, KPE and 5,7-dimethoxyflavone enhanced the phosphorylation of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In conclusion, KPE and its polymethoxy flavonoids were found to enhance energy metabolism in myocytes. KPE may improve the dysfunction of muscle metabolism that leads to metabolic syndrome and locomotive dysfunction.

  11. MicroRNA-23a reduces slow myosin heavy chain isoforms composition through myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and potentially influences meat quality.

    PubMed

    Shen, Linyuan; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Shunhua; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jingyong; Zhu, Li

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs that participate in the regulation of a variety of biological processes. Muscle fiber types were very important to meat quality traits, however, the molecular mechanism by which miRNAs regulate the muscle fiber type composition is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether miRNA-23a can affect muscle fiber type composition. Luciferase reporter assays proved that miRNA-23a directly targets the 3' untranslated region (UTRs) of MEF2c. Overexpression of miRNA-23a significantly suppressed the expression of MEF2c both in mRNA and protein levels, thus caused down-regulation of the expression of some key downstream genes of MEF2c (PGC1-α, NRF1 and mtTFA). More interestingly, overexpression of miRNA-23a significantly restrained the myogenic differentiation and decreased the ratio of slow myosin heavy chain in myoblasts (p<0.05). Our findings hinted a novel role of miRNA-23a in the epigenetic regulation of meat quality via decreasing the ratio of slow myosin heavy chain isoforms.

  12. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    MIYAHARA, Daichi; OISHI, Isao; MAKINO, Ryuichi; KURUMISAWA, Nozomi; NAKAYA, Ryuma; ONO, Tamao; KAGAMI, Hiroshi; TAGAMI, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  13. Exogenous insulin-like growth factor 2 administration enhances memory consolidation and persistence in a time-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younghwan; Lee, Young Woo; Gao, Qingtao; Lee, Younghwa; Lee, Hyung Eun; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-10-05

    Memory consolidation is an important process for the formation of long-term memory. We have previously reported that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances memory consolidation within 9h after initial learning. Recent studies suggest that insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) significantly enhances memory consolidation and prevents forgetting. Thus, we hypothesized that IGF2 exerts its activity on cognitive performance in a time-dependent manner as observed in our previous study. In the one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task, we demonstrate that a bilateral injection of IGF2 into the dorsal hippocampus 6 or 9 h after training significantly enhanced the step-through latencies compared with the vehicle-treated controls in the retention trial, which was conducted 24 h after the acquisition trial. However, 12h post-training, IGF2 injection did not increase the step-through latencies. Intriguingly, in the retention trial at 21 days after the training, hippocampal IGF2 injection 6, 9 or 12 h after the acquisition trial significantly increased the step-through latencies compared with the vehicle-treated controls. IGF2 administration at 9 h and 12 h after the acquisition trial significantly increased discrimination index and exploration time on the novel-located object in the test trial at 24 h and 21 days, respectively, after the acquisition trial in the novel location recognition task. In addition, IGF2-induced an increase in the step-through latencies in the retention trial 24 h or 21 days, respectively, after the initial learning was completely abolished by co-injected anti-IGF2 receptor antibody. These results suggest that IGF2 enhances memory consolidation within 9h after initial learning, and increased IGF2 within the 12 h after the acquisition trial, which represents a delayed consolidation phase, is also critical for memory persistence.

  14. Myocyte-specific M-CAT and MEF-1 elements regulate G-protein gamma 3 gene (gamma3) expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    McWhinney, Charlene; Robishaw, Janet D

    2008-07-01

    Little is known regarding the mechanisms that control the expression of G-protein alpha, beta, and gamma subtypes. We have previously shown that the G-protein gamma(3) gene is expressed in the heart, brain, lung, spleen, kidney, muscle, and testis in mice. We have also reported that the G-protein gamma(3) subunit is expressed in rat cardiac myocytes, but not in cardiac fibroblasts. Other studies have shown that the gamma(3) subunit couples to the angiotensin A1A receptor in portal vein myocytes, and has been shown to mediate beta-adrenergic desensitization in cardiac myocytes treated with atorvastatin. In the present study, we evaluated G-protein gamma(3) promoter-luciferase reporter constructs in primary myocytes to identify key regulatory promoter regions. We identified two important regions of the promoter (upstream promoter region [UPR] and downstream promoter region [DPR]), which are required for expression in cardiac myocytes. We observed that removal of 48 bp in the UPR diminished gene transcription by 75%, and that the UPR contains consensus elements for myocyte-specific M-CAT and myocyte enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) elements. The UPR and DPR share transcription factor elements for myocyte-specific M-CAT element. We observed that cardiac myocyte proteins bind to gamma(3) oligonucleotides containing transcription factor elements for myocyte-specific M-CAT and MEF-1. Myocyte-specific M-CAT proteins were supershifted with transcriptional enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) antibodies binding to the gamma(3) M-CAT element, which is in agreement with reports showing that the M-CAT element binds the TEF-1 family of transcription factors. The 150 bp DPR contains three M-CAT elements, an INR element, an upstream stimulatory factor 1 element, and the transcription start site. We have shown that myocyte gamma(3) gene expression is regulated by myocyte-specific M-CAT and MEF-1 elements.

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2 delivery from spinal cord bridges to enhance angiogenesis following injury.

    PubMed

    De Laporte, Laura; des Rieux, Anne; Tuinstra, Hannah M; Zelivyanskaya, Marina L; De Clerck, Nora M; Postnov, Andrei A; Préat, Véronique; Shea, Lonnie D

    2011-09-01

    The host response to spinal cord injury can lead to an ischemic environment that can induce cell death and limits cell transplantation approaches to promote spinal cord regeneration. Spinal cord bridges that provide a localized and sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) were investigated for their ability to promote angiogenesis and nerve growth within the injury. Bridges were fabricated by fusion of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres using a gas foaming/particulate leaching technique, and proteins were incorporated by encapsulation into the microspheres and/or mixing with the microspheres before foaming. Compared to the mixing method, encapsulation reduced the losses during leaching and had a slower protein release, while VEGF was released more rapidly than FGF-2. In vivo implantation of bridges loaded with VEGF enhanced the levels of VEGF within the injury at 1 week, and bridges releasing VEGF and FGF-2 increased the infiltration of endothelial cells and the formation of blood vessel at 6 weeks postimplantation. Additionally, substantial neurofilament staining was observed within the bridge; however, no significant difference was observed between bridges with or without protein. Bridges releasing angiogenic factors may provide an approach to overcome an ischemic environment that limits regeneration and cell transplantation-based approaches.

  16. Microfluidic Screening Reveals Heparan Sulfate Enhances Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth by Modulating Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Transport.

    PubMed

    Titmarsh, Drew M; Tan, Clarissa L L; Glass, Nick R; Nurcombe, Victor; Cooper-White, Justin J; Cool, Simon M

    2017-04-01

    Cost-effective expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) remains a key challenge for their widespread clinical deployment. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is a key hMSC mitogen often supplemented to increase hMSC growth rates. However, hMSCs also produce endogenous FGF-2, which critically interacts with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS). We assessed the interplay of FGF-2 with a heparan sulfate variant (HS8) engineered to bind FGF-2 and potentiate its activity. Bone marrow-derived hMSCs were screened in perfused microbioreactor arrays (MBAs), showing that HS8 (50 μg/ml) increased hMSC proliferation and cell number after 3 days, with an effect equivalent to FGF-2 (50 ng/ml). In combination, the effects of HS8 and FGF-2 were additive. Differential cell responses, from upstream to downstream culture chambers under constant flow of media in the MBA, provided insights into modulation of FGF-2 transport by HS8. HS8 treatment induced proliferation mainly in the downstream chambers, suggesting a requirement for endogenous FGF-2 accumulation, whereas responses to FGF-2 occurred primarily in the upstream chambers. Adding HS8 along with FGF-2, however, maximized the range of FGF-2 effectiveness. Measurements of FGF-2 in static cultures then revealed that this was because HS8 caused increased endogenous FGF-2 production and liberated FGF-2 from the cell surface into the supernatant. HS8 also sustained levels of supplemented FGF-2 available over 3 days. These results suggest HS8 enhances hMSC proliferation and expansion by leveraging endogenous FGF-2 production and maximizing the effect of supplemented FGF-2. This is an exciting strategy for cost-effective expansion of hMSCs. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1178-1190.

  17. Regulation of L-type calcium channel by phospholemman in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Chen, Xiongwen; Houser, Steven R; Peterson, Blaise Z; Tucker, Amy L; Feldman, Arthur M; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated whether phospholemman (PLM) regulates L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) in mouse ventricular myocytes. Expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels between wild-type (WT) and PLM knockout (KO) hearts was similar. Compared to WT myocytes, peak ICa (at -10 mV) from KO myocytes was ~41% larger, the inactivation time constant (τ(inact)) of ICa was ~39% longer, but deactivation time constant (τ(deact)) was similar. In the presence of isoproterenol (1 μM), peak ICa was ~48% larger and τ(inact) was ~144% higher in KO myocytes. With Ba(2+) as the permeant ion, PLM enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation but had no effect on τ(deact). To dissect the molecular determinants by which PLM regulated ICa, we expressed PLM mutants by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultured KO myocytes. After 24h in culture, KO myocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) had significantly larger peak ICa and longer τ(inact) than KO myocytes expressing WT PLM; thereby independently confirming the observations in freshly isolated myocytes. Compared to KO myocytes expressing GFP, KO myocytes expressing the cytoplasmic domain truncation mutant (TM43), the non-phosphorylatable S68A mutant, the phosphomimetic S68E mutant, and the signature PFXYD to alanine (ALL5) mutant all resulted in lower peak ICa. Expressing PLM mutants did not alter expression of α1-subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cultured KO myocytes. Our results suggested that both the extracellular PFXYD motif and the transmembrane domain of PLM but not the cytoplasmic tail were necessary for regulation of peak ICa amplitude. We conclude that PLM limits Ca(2+) influx in cardiac myocytes by reducing maximal ICa and accelerating voltage-dependent inactivation.

  18. Syndecan-4 proteoliposomes enhance fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)–induced proliferation, migration, and neovascularization of ischemic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eugene; Albadawi, Hassan; Watkins, Michael T.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Baker, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    Ischemia of the myocardium and lower limbs is a common consequence of arterial disease and a major source of morbidity and mortality in modernized countries. Inducing neovascularization for the treatment of ischemia is an appealing therapeutic strategy for patients for whom traditional treatment modalities cannot be performed or are ineffective. In the past, the stimulation of blood vessel growth was pursued using direct delivery of growth factors, angiogenic gene therapy, or cellular therapy. Although therapeutic angiogenesis holds great promise for treating patients with ischemia, current methods have not found success in clinical trials. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was one of the first growth factors to be tested for use in therapeutic angiogenesis. Here, we present a method for improving the biological activity of FGF-2 by codelivering the growth factor with a liposomally embedded coreceptor, syndecan-4. This technique was shown to increase FGF-2 cellular signaling, uptake, and nuclear localization in comparison with FGF-2 alone. Delivery of syndecan-4 proteoliposomes also increased endothelial proliferation, migration, and angiogenic tube formation in response to FGF-2. Using an animal model of limb ischemia, syndecan-4 proteoliposomes markedly improved the neovascularization following femoral artery ligation and recovery of perfusion of the ischemic limb. Taken together, these results support liposomal delivery of syndecan-4 as an effective means to improving the potential of using growth factors to achieve therapeutic neovascularization of ischemic tissue. PMID:22307630

  19. Heat shock factor 2 is associated with the occurrence of lung cancer by enhancing the expression of heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yun-Hua; Cheng, Hong-Zhong; Peng, Hao; Tang, Shi-Cong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly lung cancer. Heat shock proteins and their upstream heat shock factors are involved in the occurrence of cancer and have been widely researched. However, the role of heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) in lung cancer remains unclear. In the present study, expression levels of HSF2 in lung cancer tissues from 50 lung cancer patients were detected by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and 76% (38/50) were upregulated compared with the matched normal tissues. This suggested possible involvement of HSF2 in lung cancer. To additionally investigate the role of HSF2 in lung cancer occurrence, a plasmid encoding HSF2 was constructed. HSF2 was over expressed in normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and lung cancer A549 cells. The results showed that HSF2 overexpression promoted cell proliferation and cell migration in BEAS-2B and A549 cells. Additional experiments showed that the HSF2-induced cell proliferation and cell migration were dependent on induction of HSPs, particularly HSP27 and HSP90, as co-transfection of HSP27 small interfering RNA (siRNA) or HSP90 siRNA attenuated HSF2-induced cell growth and migration. In conclusion, the present study showed that HSF2 is aberrantly expressed in lung cancer, and it may be an upstream regulator of HSPs, which may strongly affect cell growth and cell migration. Additional studies are required to explain the detailed mechanism between lung cancer, HSF2, HSPs and other possible signaling pathways. PMID:28101237

  20. Fibroblast growth factor 2 retargeted adenovirus has redirected cellular tropism: evidence for reduced toxicity and enhanced antitumor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, D L; Gonzalez, A M; Printz, M A; Doukas, J; Ying, W; D'Andrea, M; Hoganson, D K; Curiel, D T; Douglas, J T; Sosnowski, B A; Baird, A; Aukerman, S L; Pierce, G F

    1999-06-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) have been used as vectors to deliver genes to a wide variety of tissues. Despite achieving high expression levels in vivo, Ad vectors display normal tissue toxicity, transient expression, and antivector immune responses that limit therapeutic potential. To circumvent these problems, several retargeting strategies to abrogate native tropism and redirect Ad uptake through defined receptors have been attempted. Despite success in cell culture, in vivo results have generally not shown sufficient selectivity for target tissues. We have previously identified (C. K. Goldman et al., Cancer Res., 57: 1447-1451, 1997) the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) ligand and receptor families as conferring sufficient specificity and binding affinity to be useful for targeting DNA in vivo. In the present studies, we retargeted Ad using basic FGF (FGF2) as a targeting ligand. Cellular uptake is redirected through high-affinity FGF receptors (FGFRs) and not the more ubiquitous lower-affinity Ad receptors. Initial in vitro experiments demonstrated a 10- to 100-fold increase in gene expression in numerous FGFR positive (FGFR+) cell lines using FGF2-Ad when compared with Ad. To determine whether increased selectivity could be detected in vivo, FGF2-Ad was administered i.v. to normal mice. FGF2-Ad demonstrates markedly decreased hepatic toxicity and liver transgene expression compared with Ad treatment. Importantly, FGF2-Ad encoding the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene transduces Ad-resistant FGFR+ tumor cells both ex vivo and in vivo, which results in substantially enhanced survival (180-260%) when the prodrug ganciclovir is administered. Because FGFRs are up-regulated on many types of malignant or injured cells, this broadly useful method to redirect native Ad tropism and to increase the potency of gene expression may offer significant therapeutic advantages.

  1. Vgl-4, a novel member of the vestigial-like family of transcription cofactors, regulates alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Huei; Mullett, Steven J; Stewart, Alexandre F R

    2004-07-16

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle genes are regulated by the transcriptional enhancer factor (TEF-1) family of transcription factors. In skeletal muscle, TEF-1 factors interact with a skeletal muscle-specific cofactor called Vestigial-like 2 (Vgl-2) that is related to the Drosophila protein Vestigial. Here, we characterize Vgl-4, the only member of the Vestigial-like family expressed in the heart. Unlike other members of the Vgl family that have a single TEF-1 interaction domain called the tondu (TDU) motif, Vgl-4 has two TDU motifs in its carboxyl-terminal domain. Like other Vgl factors, Vgl-4 physically interacts with TEF-1 in an immunoprecipitation assay. Vgl-4 functionally interacts with TEF-1 and also with myocyte enhancer factor 2 in a mammalian two-hybrid assay. Overexpression of Vgl-4 in cardiac myocytes interfered with the basal expression and alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of a TEF-1-dependent skeletal alpha-actin promoter. In cardiac myocytes cultured in serum and in serum-free medium, a myc-tagged Vgl-4 protein was located in the nucleus and cytoplasm but was exported from the nucleus when cells were treated with alpha1-adrenergic receptor agonist. A chimeric nuclear-retained Vgl-4 protein inhibited alpha1-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation. In contrast, deletion of the TDU motifs of Vgl-4 prevented Vgl-4 nuclear localization, relieved Vgl-4 interference of basal activity, and enhanced alpha1-adrenergic up-regulation of the skeletal alpha-actin promoter. Nuclear export of Vgl-4 is dependent on the nuclear exportin CRM-1. These results suggest that Vgl-4 modulates the activity of TEF-1 factors and counteracts alpha1-adrenergic activation of gene expression in cardiac myocytes.

  2. Cell contact as an independent factor modulating cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and survival in long-term primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. A.; Decker, M. L.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Janes, D. M.; Decker, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes maintained in cell culture develop hypertrophy both in response to mechanical loading as well as to receptor-mediated signaling mechanisms. However, it has been shown that the hypertrophic response to these stimuli may be modulated through effects of intercellular contact achieved by maintaining cells at different plating densities. In this study, we show that the myocyte plating density affects not only the hypertrophic response and features of the differentiated phenotype of isolated adult myocytes, but also plays a significant role influencing myocyte survival in vitro. The native rod-shaped phenotype of freshly isolated adult myocytes persists in an environment which minimizes myocyte attachment and spreading on the substratum. However, these conditions are not optimal for long-term maintenance of cultured adult cardiac myocytes. Conditions which promote myocyte attachment and spreading on the substratum, on the other hand, also promote the re-establishment of new intercellular contacts between myocytes. These contacts appear to play a significant role in the development of spontaneous activity, which enhances the redevelopment of highly differentiated contractile, junctional, and sarcoplasmic reticulum structures in the cultured adult cardiomyocyte. Although it has previously been shown that adult cardiac myocytes are typically quiescent in culture, the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists stimulates beating and myocyte hypertrophy, and thereby serves to increase the level of intercellular contact as well. However, in densely-plated cultures with intrinsically high levels of intercellular contact, spontaneous contractile activity develops without the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists. In this study, we compare the function, morphology, and natural history of adult feline cardiomyocytes which have been maintained in cultures with different levels of intercellular contact, with and without the addition of beta-adrenergic agonists

  3. Salvianolic acid B inhibits autophagy and protects starving cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiao; Liu, Jian-xun; Li, Xin-zhi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective or lethal role of autophagy and the effects of Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) on autophagy in starving myocytes. Methods: Cardiac myocytes were incubated under starvation conditions (GD) for 0, 1, 2, 3, and 6 h. Autophagic flux in starving cells was measured via chloroquine (3 μmol/L). After myocytes were treated with Sal B (50 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of chloroquine (3 μmol/L) under GD 3 h, the amount of LC3-II, the abundance of LC3-positive fluorescent dots in cells, cell viability and cellular ATP levels were determined using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, MTT assay and luminometer, respectively. Moreover, electron microscopy (EM) and immunofluorescent duel labeling of LC3 and Caspase-8 were used to examine the characteristics of autophagy and apoptosis. Results: Immunoblot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II in starving cells increased in a time-dependent manner accompanied by increased LC3-positive fluorescence and decreased cell viability and ATP content. Sal B (50 μmol/L) inhibited the increase in LC3-II, reduced the abundance of LC3 immunofluorescence and intensity of Caspase-8 fluorescence, and enhanced cellular viability and ATP levels in myocytes under GD 3 h, regardless of whether chloroquine was present. Conclusion: Autophagy induced by starvation for 3 h led to cell injury. Sal B protected starving cells by blocking the early stage of autophagic flux and inhibiting apoptosis that occurred during autophagy. PMID:21113177

  4. Rat cardiac myocyte adenosine transport and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.A.; Rovetto, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the importance of myocardial adenosine and adenine nucleotide metabolism, the adenosine salvage pathway in ventricular myocytes was studied. Accurate estimates of transport rates, separate from metabolic fllux, were determined. Adenosine influx was constant between 3 and 60 s. Adenosine metabolism maintained intracellular adenosine concentrations < 10% of the extracellular adenosine concentrations and thus unidirectional influx could be measured. Myocytes transported adenosine via saturable and nonsaturable processes. A minimum estimate of the V/sub max/ of myocytic adenosine kinase indicated the saturable component of adenosine influx was independent of adenosine kinase activity. Saturable transport was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and verapamil. Extracellular adenosine taken up myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine taken up by myocytes was rapidly phosphorylated to adenine nucleotides. Not all extracellular adenosine, though, was phosphorylated on entering myocytes, since free, as opposed to protein-bound, intracellular adenosine was detected after digitonin extraction of cells in the presence of 1 mM ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid.

  5. Neutrophil adherence to isolated adult canine myocytes. Evidence for a CD18-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Entman, M L; Youker, K; Shappell, S B; Siegel, C; Rothlein, R; Dreyer, W J; Schmalstieg, F C; Smith, C W

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes were isolated from adult dogs and incubated with isolated canine neutrophils (PMN). Intercellular adhesion was low and unchanged by stimulation of the PMN with zymosan activated serum or platelet activating factor (PAF) at concentrations that significantly enhance PMN adhesion to protein-coated glass and canine endothelial cell monolayers. Intercellular adhesion was significantly increased only when both myocytes and PMN were stimulated (e.g., myocytes incubated with IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, or phorbol myristate acetate, and PMN were chemotactically stimulated). Inhibitors of protein synthesis diminished the IL-1 beta-induced effect by greater than 80%. The IL-1 beta, PAF-stimulated PMN-myocyte adhesion was associated with substantial H2O2 production. Under conditions with low PMN-myocyte adhesion (i.e., IL-1 beta alone, PAF alone, or no stimulus) H2O2 production was generally less than 5% of that occurring with high adhesion. An anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody (R15.7) inhibited stimulated PMN-myocyte adhesion by greater than 95% and reduced H2O2 production by greater than 90%. Control isotype-matched, binding, and nonbinding antibodies were without effect on adherence or H2O2 production. The results indicate that cytokine stimulation of adult myocytes induces expression of a ligand involved in CD18-dependent adherence of canine neutrophils. Images PMID:1970581

  6. MicroRNAs in the Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2)-regulated Gtl2-Dio3 Noncoding RNA Locus Promote Cardiomyocyte Proliferation by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amanda L; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-09-18

    Understanding cell cycle regulation in postmitotic cardiomyocytes may lead to new therapeutic approaches to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. We have demonstrated previously that microRNAs encoded by the Gtl2-Dio3 noncoding RNA locus function downstream of the MEF2A transcription factor in skeletal muscle regeneration. We have also reported expression of these miRNAs in the heart. Here we investigated the role of two Gtl2-Dio3 miRNAs, miR-410 and miR-495, in cardiac muscle. Overexpression of miR-410 and miR-495 robustly stimulated cardiomyocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Interestingly, unlike our findings in skeletal muscle, these miRNAs did not modulate the activity of the WNT signaling pathway. Instead, these miRNAs targeted Cited2, a coactivator required for proper cardiac development. Consistent with miR-410 and miR-495 overexpression, siRNA knockdown of Cited2 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in robust proliferation. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of Cdkn1c/p57/Kip2, a cell cycle inhibitor, and increased expression of VEGFA, a growth factor with proliferation-promoting effects. Therefore, miR-410 and miR-495 are among a growing number of miRNAs that have the ability to potently stimulate neonatal cardiomyocyte proliferation.

  7. Phosphoproteomic profiling of the myocyte.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Cordwell, Stuart J; White, Melanie Y

    2011-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation underpins major cellular processes including energy metabolism, signal transduction, excitation-contraction coupling, apoptosis, and cell survival mechanisms and is thus critical to the myocyte. Targeted approaches, whereby a handful of phosphoproteins are investigated, can suffer from a relatively narrow view of cellular phosphorylation. In contrast, recent technical advances have allowed for the comprehensive documentation of phosphorylation events in complex biological environments, providing a deeper view of the "phosphoproteome." A global, high-throughput characterization of the myocardial phosphoproteome, however, has not yet been achieved. Efficient analysis of phosphorylated proteins and their roles in a dynamic cellular environment requires high-resolution strategies that can identify, localize, and quantify many thousands of phosphorylation sites in a single experiment. Such an approach requires specific enrichment and purification techniques, developed to align with high-end instrumentation for analysis. Cutting-edge phosphoproteomics is no longer restricted to gel-based technology, instead focusing on affinity enrichment prior to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. We will describe the best current methods and how they can be applied, as well as the challenges associated with them. We also present current phosphoproteomic investigations in the myocyte and its subcompartments. Although the techniques and instrumentation required to achieve the goal of a myocardial phosphoprotein catalog in physiological and diseased states are highly specialized, the potential biological insight provided by such an approach makes phosphoproteomics an important new avenue of investigation for the cardiovascular researcher.

  8. An optimized dosing regimen of cimaglermin (neuregulin 1β3, glial growth factor 2) enhances molecular markers of neuroplasticity and functional recovery after permanent ischemic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Tom J.; Huang, Zhihong; Pavlopoulos, Elias; Finklestein, Seth P.; Ren, Jingmei; Caggiano, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cimaglermin (neuregulin 1β3, glial growth factor 2) is a neuregulin growth factor family member in clinical development for chronic heart failure. Previously, in a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) rat stroke model, systemic cimaglermin treatment initiated up to 7 days after ischemia onset promoted recovery without reduced lesion volume. Presented here to extend the evidence are two studies that use a rat stroke model to evaluate the effects of cimaglermin dose level and dose frequency initiated 24 hr after pMCAO. Forelimb‐ and hindlimb‐placing scores (proprioceptive behavioral tests), body‐swing symmetry, and infarct volume were compared between treatment groups (n = 12/group). Possible mechanisms underlying cimaglermin‐mediated neurologic recovery were examined through axonal growth and synapse formation histological markers. Cimaglermin was evaluated over a wider dose range (0.02, 0.1, or 1.0 mg/kg) than doses previously shown to be effective but used the same dosing regimen (2 weeks of daily intravenous administration, then 1 week without treatment). The dose‐frequency study used the dose‐ranging study's most effective dose (1.0 mg/kg) to compare daily, once per week, and twice per week dosing for 3 weeks (then 1 week without treatment). Dose‐ and frequency‐dependent functional improvements were observed with cimaglermin without reduced lesion volume. Cimaglermin treatment significantly increased growth‐associated protein 43 expression in both hemispheres (particularly somatosensory and motor cortices) and also increased synaptophysin expression. These data indicate that cimaglermin enhances recovery after stroke. Immunohistochemical changes were consistent with axonal sprouting and synapse formation but not acute neuroprotection. Cimaglermin represents a potential clinical development candidate for ischemic stroke treatment. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  9. Redox signaling in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Celio X.C.; Anilkumar, Narayana; Zhang, Min; Brewer, Alison C.; Shah, Ajay M.

    2011-01-01

    The heart has complex mechanisms that facilitate the maintenance of an oxygen supply–demand balance necessary for its contractile function in response to physiological fluctuations in workload as well as in response to chronic stresses such as hypoxia, ischemia, and overload. Redox-sensitive signaling pathways are centrally involved in many of these homeostatic and stress-response mechanisms. Here, we review the main redox-regulated pathways that are involved in cardiac myocyte excitation–contraction coupling, differentiation, hypertrophy, and stress responses. We discuss specific sources of endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (e.g., mitochondria and NADPH oxidases of the Nox family), the particular pathways and processes that they affect, the role of modulators such as thioredoxin, and the specific molecular mechanisms that are involved—where this knowledge is available. A better understanding of this complex regulatory system may allow the development of more specific therapeutic strategies for heart diseases. PMID:21236334

  10. MondoA coordinately regulates skeletal myocyte lipid homeostasis and insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Byungyong; Soundarapandian, Mangala M.; Sessions, Hampton; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Roth, Gregory P.; Sugarman, Eliot; Koo, Ada; Malany, Siobhan; Wang, Miao; Yea, Kyungmoo; Brooks, Jeanne; Leone, Teresa C.; Han, Xianlin; Vega, Rick B.

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular lipid accumulation is a common manifestation of chronic caloric excess and obesity that is strongly associated with insulin resistance. The mechanistic links between lipid accumulation in myocytes and insulin resistance are not completely understood. In this work, we used a high-throughput chemical biology screen to identify a small-molecule probe, SBI-477, that coordinately inhibited triacylglyceride (TAG) synthesis and enhanced basal glucose uptake in human skeletal myocytes. We then determined that SBI-477 stimulated insulin signaling by deactivating the transcription factor MondoA, leading to reduced expression of the insulin pathway suppressors thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) and arrestin domain–containing 4 (ARRDC4). Depleting MondoA in myocytes reproduced the effects of SBI-477 on glucose uptake and myocyte lipid accumulation. Furthermore, an analog of SBI-477 suppressed TXNIP expression, reduced muscle and liver TAG levels, enhanced insulin signaling, and improved glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. These results identify a key role for MondoA-directed programs in the coordinated control of myocyte lipid balance and insulin signaling and suggest that this pathway may have potential as a therapeutic target for insulin resistance and lipotoxicity. PMID:27500491

  11. Mechano-chemo-transduction in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T

    2017-01-18

    The heart has the ability to adjust to changing mechanical loads. The Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect describe exquisite intrinsic mechanisms the heart has for autoregulating the force of contraction to maintain cardiac output under preload and afterload. Although these mechanisms have been known for more than a century, their cellular and molecular underpinnings are still debated. How does the cardiac myocyte sense a change in preload or afterload? How does the myocyte adjust its response to compensate for such changes? In cardiac myocytes Ca(2+) is a crucial regulator of contractile force and in this review we compare and contrast recent results from different labs that address two important questions. The "dimensionality" of the mechanical milieu under which experiments are carried out provide important clues to the location of the mechanosensors and the kinds of mechanical forces they can sense and respond to. As a first approximation, sensors inside the myocyte appear to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) while sensors on the cell surface appear to also modulate nitric oxide (NO) signalling; both signalling pathways affect Ca(2+) handling. Undoubtedly, further studies will add layers to this simplified picture. Clarifying the intimate links from cellular mechanics to ROS and NO signalling and to Ca(2+) handling will deepen our understanding of the Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect, and also provide a unified view on how arrhythmias may arise in seemingly disparate diseases that have in common altered myocyte mechanics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of ventricular myocyte electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Barbara; Dong, Min; Cheng, Lan; Liou, Shian-Ren; Yan, Qinghong; Park, Ji Young; Shiang, Elaine; Sanguinetti, Michael; Wang, Hong-Sheng; McKinnon, David

    2008-11-12

    The relative importance of regulatory versus structural evolution for the evolution of different biological systems is a subject of controversy. The primacy of regulatory evolution in the diversification of morphological traits has been promoted by many evolutionary developmental biologists. For physiological traits, however, the role of regulatory evolution has received less attention or has been considered to be relatively unimportant. To address this issue for electrophysiological systems, we examined the importance of regulatory and structural evolution in the evolution of the electrophysiological function of cardiac myocytes in mammals. In particular, two related phenomena were studied: the change in action potential morphology in small mammals and the scaling of action potential duration across mammalian phylogeny. In general, the functional properties of the ion channels involved in ventricular action potential repolarization were found to be relatively invariant. In contrast, there were large changes in the expression levels of multiple ion channel and transporter genes. For the Kv2.1 and Kv4.2 potassium channel genes, which are primary determinants of the action potential morphology in small mammals, the functional properties of the proximal promoter regions were found to vary in concordance with species-dependent differences in mRNA expression, suggesting that evolution of cis-regulatory elements is the primary determinant of this trait. Scaling of action potential duration was found to be a complex phenomenon, involving changes in the expression of a large number of channels and transporters. In this case, it is concluded that regulatory evolution is the predominant mechanism by which the scaling is achieved.

  13. Direct contact between sympathetic neurons and rat cardiac myocytes in vitro increases expression of functional calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, S; Barnett, J V; Sen, L; Galper, J B; Smith, T W; Marsh, J D

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that direct contact between sympathetic neurons and myocytes regulates expression and function of cardiac Ca channels, we prepared cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with and without sympathetic ganglia. Contractile properties of myocytes were assessed by an optical-video system. Contractility-pCa curves showed a 60% greater increase in contractility for innervated myocytes compared with control cells at 6.3 mM [Ca]0 (n = 8, P less than 0.05). Cells grown in medium conditioned by growth of ganglia and myocytes were indistinguishable physiologically from control cells. [Bay K 8644]-contractility curves revealed a 60 +/- 10% enhancement of the contractility response at 10(-6) M for innervated cells compared with control cells. The increased response to Bay K 8644 was not blocked by alpha- or beta-adrenergic antagonists. Moreover, increased efficacy of Bay K 8644 was maintained for at least 24 h after denervation produced by removal of ganglia from the culture. Dihydropyridine binding sites were assessed with the L channel-specific radioligand 3[H]PN200-110. PN200-110 binding sites were increased by innervation (51 +/- 5 to 108 +/- 20 fmol/mg protein, P less than 0.01), with no change in KD. Peak current-voltage curves were determined by whole-cell voltage clamp techniques for myocytes contacted by a neuron, control myocytes, and myocytes grown in conditioned medium. Current density of L-type Ca channels was significantly higher in innervated myocytes (10.5 +/- 0.4 pA/pF, n = 5) than in control myocytes (5.9 +/- 0.3 pA/pF, n = 8, P less than 0.01) or myocytes grown in conditioned medium (6.2 +/- 0.2 pA/pF, n = 10, P less than 0.01). Thus, physical contact between a sympathetic neuron and previously uninnervated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes increases expression of functional L-type calcium channels as judged by contractile responses to Ca0 and Bay K 8644, as well as by electrophysiological and radioligand binding properties

  14. Integrative modeling of the cardiac ventricular myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Cortassa, Sonia; O'Rourke, Brian; Hashambhoy, Yasmin L.; Rice, John Jeremy; Greenstein, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology is a discipline with a rich 50-year history of experimental research coupled with integrative modeling which has enabled us to achieve a quantitative understanding of the relationships between molecular function and the integrated behavior of the cardiac myocyte in health and disease. In this paper, we review the development of integrative computational models of the cardiac myocyte. We begin with a historical overview of key cardiac cell models that helped shape the field. We then narrow our focus to models of the cardiac ventricular myocyte and describe these models in the context of their subcellular functional systems including dynamic models of voltage-gated ion channels, mitochondrial energy production, ATP-dependent and electrogenic membrane transporters, intracellular Ca dynamics, mechanical contraction, and regulatory signal transduction pathways. We describe key advances and limitations of the models as well as point to new directions for future modeling research. PMID:20865780

  15. Cyclic GMP protein kinase activity is reduced in thyroxine-induced hypertrophic cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Qihang; Scholz, Peter M; Weiss, Harvey R

    2003-12-01

    1. We tested the hypothesis that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase has major negative functional effects in cardiac myocytes and that the importance of this pathway is reduced in thyroxine (T4; 0.5 mg/kg per day for 16 days) hypertrophic myocytes. 2. Using isolated ventricular myocytes from control (n = 7) and T4-treated (n = 9) rabbit hypertrophic hearts, myocyte shortening was studied with a video edge detector. Oxygen consumption was measured using O2 electrodes. Protein phosphorylation was measured autoradiographically. 3. Data were collected following treatment with: (i) 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (PCPT; 10-7 or 10-5 mol/L); (ii) 8-bromo-cAMP (10-5 mol/L) followed by PCPT; (iii) beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-monophosphorothioate, SP-isomer (SP; 10-7 or 10-5 mol/L); or (iv) 8-bromo-cAMP (10-5 mol/L) followed by SP. 4. There were no significant differences between groups in baseline percentage shortening (Pcs; 4.9 +/- 0.2 vs 5.6 +/- 0.4% for control and T4 groups, respectively) and maximal rate of shortening (Rs; 64.8 +/- 5.9 vs 79.9 +/- 7.1 micro m/ s for control and T4 groups, respectively). Both SP and PCPT decreased Pcs (-43 vs-21% for control and T4 groups, respectively) and Rs (-36 vs-22% for control and T4 groups, respectively), but the effect was significantly reduced in T4 myocytes. 8-Bromo-cAMP similarly increased Pcs (28 vs 23% for control and T4 groups, respectively) and Rs (20 vs 19% for control and T4 groups, respectively). After 8-bromo-cAMP, SP and PCPT decreased Pcs (-34%) and Rs (-29%) less in the control group. However, the effects of these drugs were not altered in T4 myocytes (Pcs -24%; Rs -22%). Both PCPT and cAMP phosphorylated the same five protein bands. In T4 myocytes, these five bands were enhanced less. 5. We conclude that, in control ventricular myocytes, the cGMP-dependent protein kinase exerted major negative functional effects but, in T4-induced hypertrophic myocytes, the importance of

  16. C-reactive protein augments hypoxia-induced apoptosis through mitochondrion-dependent pathway in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Wang, Junhong; Zhu, Shushu; Chen, Xiangjian; Wu, Hengfang; Yang, Di; Zhang, Jinan

    2008-03-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important predictive factor for cardiac disorders including acute myocardial infarction. Therapeutic inhibition of CRP has been shown to be a promising new approach to cardioprotection in acute myocardial infarction in rat models, but the direct effects of CRP on cardiac myocytes are poorly defined. In this study, we investigated the effects of CRP on cardiac myocytes and its molecular mechanism involved. Neonatal rat cardiac myocytes were exposed to hypoxia for 8 h. Hypoxia induced myocyte apoptosis under serum-deprived conditions, which was accompanied by cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytosol, as well as activation of Caspase-9, Caspase-3. Hypoxia also increased Bax and decreased Bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, thereby significantly increasing Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Cotreatment of CRP (100 mug/ml) under hypoxia significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic myocytes, translocation of cytochrome c, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and the activity of Caspase-9 and Caspase-3. However, no effects were observed on myocyte apoptosis when cotreatment of CRP under normoxia. Furthermore, Bcl-2 overexpression significantly improved cellular viability through inhibition of hypoxia or cotreatment with CRP induced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio changes and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, and significantly blocked the activity of Caspase-9 and Caspase-3. The present study demonstrates that CRP could enhance apoptosis in hypoxia-stimulated myocytes through the mitochondrion-dependent pathway but CRP alone has no effects on neonatal rat cardiac myocytes under normoxia. Bcl-2 overexpression might prevent CRP-induced apoptosis by inhibiting cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and block activation of Caspase-9 and Caspase-3.

  17. Mechanically induced orientation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, J.-L.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1990-01-01

    The present study describes the spatial orientation of a population of freshly isolated adult rat cardiac myocytes using a computerized mechanical cell stimulator device for tissue cultured cells. A continuous unidirectional stretch of the substratum at 60 to 400 microns/min for 120 to 30 min, respectively, during the cell attachment period in a serum-free medium was found to induce a significant threefold increase in the number of rod-shaped myocytes oriented parallel to the direction of movement. The myocytes orient less well with unidirectional substratum stretching after their adhesion to the substratum. Adult myocytes plated onto a substratum undergoing continuous 10-percent stretch-relaxation cycling show no significant change in the myocyte orientation or cytoskeletal organization. In addition to the type of mechanical activity, orientation of rod-shaped myocytes is dependent on the speed of the substratum, the final stretch amplitude, and the timing between initiation of substratum stretching and adhesion of myocytes to the substratum.

  18. Myocyte cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia contribute to ventricular wall remodeling in anemia-induced cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Olivetti, G.; Quaini, F.; Lagrasta, C.; Ricci, R.; Tiberti, G.; Capasso, J. M.; Anversa, P.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effects of chronic anemia on the functional and structural characteristics of the heart, 1-month-old male rats were fed a diet deficient in iron and copper, which led to a hemoglobin concentration of 4.63 g/dl, for 8 weeks. At sacrifice, under fentanyl citrate and droperidol anesthesia, systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures were decreased, whereas differential pressure was increased. Left ventricular systolic pressure and the ventricular rate of pressure rise (mmHg/s) were reduced by 9% and 14%, respectively. Moreover, developed peak systolic ventricular pressure and maximal dP/dt diminished 14% and 12%. After perfusion fixation of the coronary vasculature and the myocardium, at a left ventricular intracavitary pressure equal to the in vivo measured end diastolic pressure, a 10% thickening of the left ventricular wall was measured in association with a 13% increase in the equatorial cavitary diameter and a 44% augmentation in ventricular mass. The 52% hypertrophy of the right ventricle was characterized by an 11% thicker wall and a 37% larger ventricular area. The 33% expansion in the aggregate myocyte volume of the left ventricle was found to be due to a 14% myocyte cellular hypertrophy and a 17% myocyte cellular hyperplasia. These cellular parameters were calculated from the estimation of the number of myocyte nuclei per unit volume of myocardium in situ and the evaluation of the distribution of nuclei per cell in enzymatically dissociated myocytes. Myocyte cellular hyperplasia provoked a 9% increase in the absolute number of cells across the left ventricular wall. In contrast, myocyte cellular hypertrophy (42%) was responsible for the increase in myocyte volume of the right ventricle. The proliferative response of left ventricular myocytes was not capable of restoring diastolic cell stress, which was enhanced by the changes in ventricular anatomy with anemia. In conclusion, chronic anemia induced an unbalanced load on the left

  19. [Fibroblast growth factor-2].

    PubMed

    Faitová, J

    2004-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 is a member of a large family of proteins that bind heparin and heparan sulfate and modulate the function of a wide range of cell types. FGF-2 occurs in several isoforms resulting from alternative initiations of traslation: an 18 kDa cytoplasmic isoform and four larger molecular weight nuclear isoforms (22, 22.5, 24 and 34 kDa). It acts mainly through a paracrine/autocrine mechanism involving high affinity transmembrane receptors and heparan sulfate proteoglycan low affinity receptors. It is expressed mostly in tissues of mesoderm and neuroectoderm origin, and plays an important role in mesoderm induction, stimulates the growth and development of the new blood vessels (angiogenesis), normal wound healing and tissue development. FGF-2 positively regulates hematopoiesis by acting on various cellular targets: stromal cells, early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and possibly some mature blood cells. FGF-2 is a potent hematopoietic growth factor that is likely to play an important role in physiological and pathological hematopoiesis.

  20. Loss of hypoxia-inducible factor 2 alpha in the lung alveolar epithelium of mice leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation in cobalt-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Proper, Steven P; Saini, Yogesh; Greenwood, Krista K; Bramble, Lori A; Downing, Nathaniel J; Harkema, Jack R; Lapres, John J

    2014-02-01

    Hard metal lung disease (HMLD) is an occupational lung disease specific to inhalation of cobalt-containing particles whose mechanism is largely unknown. Cobalt is a known hypoxia mimic and stabilizer of the alpha subunits of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Previous work revealed that though HIF1α contrib utes to cobalt toxicity in vitro, loss of HIF1α in the alveolar epithelial cells does not provide in vivo protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation. HIF1α and HIF2α show unique tissue expression profiles, and HIF2α is known to be the predominant HIF mRNA isoform in the adult lung. Thus, if HIF2α activation by cobalt contributes to pathophysiology of HMLD, we hypothesized that loss of HIF2α in lung epithelium would provide protection from cobalt-induced inflammation. Mice with HIF2α-deficiency in Club and alveolar type II epithelial cells (ATIIs) (HIF2α(Δ/Δ)) were exposed to cobalt (60 µg/day) or saline using a subacute occupational exposure model. Bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity, cytokines, qRT-PCR, and histopathology were analyzed. Results show that loss of HIF2α leads to enhanced eosinophilic inflammation and increased goblet cell metaplasia. Additionally, control mice demonstrated a mild recovery from cobalt-induced lung injury compared with HIF2α(Δ/Δ) mice, suggesting a role for epithelial HIF2α in repair mechanisms. The expression of important cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-10, displayed significant differences following cobalt exposure when HIF2α(Δ/Δ) and control mice were compared. In summary, our data suggest that although loss of HIF2α does not afford protection from cobalt-induced lung inflammation, epithelial HIF2α signaling does play an important role in modulating the inflammatory and repair response in the lung.

  1. Adipose triglyceride lipase deletion from adipocytes, but not skeletal myocytes, impairs acute exercise performance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, John J.; Sitnick, Mitch T.; Schoiswohl, Gabriele; Wills, Rachel C.; Basantani, Mahesh K.; Cai, Lingzhi; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triacylglycerol hydrolysis in virtually all cells, including adipocytes and skeletal myocytes, and hence, plays a critical role in mobilizing fatty acids. Global ATGL deficiency promotes skeletal myopathy and exercise intolerance in mice and humans, and yet the tissue-specific contributions to these phenotypes remain unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the relative contribution of ATGL-mediated triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipocytes vs. skeletal myocytes to acute exercise performance. To achieve this goal, we generated murine models with adipocyte- and skeletal myocyte-specific targeted deletion of ATGL. We then subjected untrained mice to acute peak and submaximal exercise interventions and assessed exercise performance and energy substrate metabolism. Impaired ATGL-mediated lipolysis within adipocytes reduced peak and submaximal exercise performance, reduced peripheral energy substrate availability, shifted energy substrate preference toward carbohydrate oxidation, and decreased HSL Ser660 phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiration within skeletal muscle. In contrast, impaired ATGL-mediated lipolysis within skeletal myocytes was not sufficient to reduce peak and submaximal exercise performance or peripheral energy substrate availability and instead tended to enhance metabolic flexibility during peak exercise. Furthermore, the expanded intramyocellular triacylglycerol pool in these mice was reduced following exercise in association with preserved HSL phosphorylation, suggesting that HSL may compensate for impaired ATGL action in skeletal muscle during exercise. These data suggest that adipocyte rather than skeletal myocyte ATGL-mediated lipolysis plays a greater role during acute exercise in part because of compensatory mechanisms that maintain lipolysis in muscle, but not adipose tissue, when ATGL is absent. PMID:25783895

  2. Modulation of excitability, membrane currents and survival of cardiac myocytes by N-acylethanolamines.

    PubMed

    Voitychuk, Oleg I; Asmolkova, Valentyna S; Gula, Nadiya M; Sotkis, Ganna V; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Howarth, Frank C; Oz, Murat; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2012-09-01

    N-acylethanolamines (NAE) are endogenously produced lipids playing important roles in a diverse range of physiological and pathological conditions. In the present study, using whole-cell patch clamp technique, we have for the first time investigated the effects of the most abundantly produced NAEs, N-stearoylethanolamine (SEA) and N-oleoylethanolamine (OEA), on electric excitability and membrane currents in cardiomyocytes isolated from endocardial, epicardial, and atrial regions of neonatal rat heart. SEA and OEA (1-10μM) attenuated electrical activity of the myocytes from all regions of the cardiac muscle by hyperpolarizing resting potential, reducing amplitude, and shortening the duration of the action potential. However, the magnitudes of these effects varied significantly depending on the type of cardiac myocyte (i.e., endocardial, epicardial, atrial) with OEA being generally more potent. OEA and to a lesser extent SEA suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner currents through voltage-gated Na(+) (VGSC) and L-type Ca(2+) (VGCC) channels, but induced variable cardiac myocyte type-dependent effects on background K(+) and Cl(-) conductance. The mechanisms of inhibitory action of OEA on cardiac VGSCs and VGCCs involved influence on channels' activation/inactivation gating and partial blockade of ion permeation. OEA also enhanced the viability of cardiac myocytes by reducing necrosis without a significant effect on apoptosis. We conclude that SEA and OEA attenuate the excitability of cardiac myocytes mainly through inhibition of VGSCs and VGCC-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Since NAEs are known to increase during tissue ischemia and infarction, these effects of NAEs may mediate some of their cardioprotective actions during these pathological conditions.

  3. Novel Protective Role of Endogenous Cardiac Myocyte P2X4 Receptors in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tiehong; Shen, Jian-bing; Yang, Ronghua; Redden, John; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Grady, James; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Liang, Bruce T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF), despite continuing progress, remains a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) have emerged as potentially important molecules in regulating cardiac function and as potential targets for HF therapy. Transgenic P2X4R overexpression can protect against HF, but this does not explain the role of native cardiac P2X4R. Our goal is to define the physiological role of endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4R under basal conditions and during HF induced by myocardial infarction or pressure overload. Methods and Results Mice established with conditional cardiac-specific P2X4R knockout were subjected to left anterior descending coronary artery ligation–induced postinfarct or transverse aorta constriction–induced pressure overload HF. Knockout cardiac myocytes did not show P2X4R by immunoblotting or by any response to the P2X4R-specific allosteric enhancer ivermectin. Knockout hearts showed normal basal cardiac function but depressed contractile performance in postinfarct and pressure overload models of HF by in vivo echocardiography and ex vivo isolated working heart parameters. P2X4R coimmunoprecipitated and colocalized with nitric oxide synthase 3 (eNOS) in wild-type cardiac myocytes. Mice with cardiac-specific P2X4R overexpression had increased S-nitrosylation, cyclic GMP, NO formation, and were protected from postinfarct and pressure overload HF. Inhibitor of eNOS, L-N5-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine hydrochloride, blocked the salutary effect of cardiac P2X4R overexpression in postinfarct and pressure overload HF as did eNOS knockout. Conclusions This study establishes a new protective role for endogenous cardiac myocyte P2X4R in HF and is the first to demonstrate a physical interaction between the myocyte receptor and eNOS, a mediator of HF protection. PMID:24622244

  4. Distinct effects of Abelson kinase mutations on myocytes and neurons in dissociated Drosophila embryonic cultures: mimicking of high temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijuan; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) is known to regulate axon guidance, muscle development, and cell-cell interaction in vivo. The Drosophila primary culture system offers advantages in exploring the cellular mechanisms mediated by Abl with utilizing various experimental manipulations. Here we demonstrate that single-embryo cultures exhibit stage-dependent characteristics of cellular differentiation and developmental progression in neurons and myocytes, as well as nerve-muscle contacts. In particular, muscle development critically depends on the stage of dissociated embryos. In wild-type (WT) cultures derived from embryos before stage 12, muscle cells remained within cell clusters and were rarely detected. Interestingly, abundant myocytes were spotted in Abl mutant cultures, exhibiting enhanced myocyte movement and fusion, as well as neuron-muscle contacts even in cultures dissociated from younger, stage 10 embryos. Notably, Abl myocytes frequently displayed well-expanded lamellipodia. Conversely, Abl neurons were characterized with fewer large veil-like lamellipodia, but instead had increased numbers of filopodia and darker nodes along neurites. These distinct phenotypes were equally evident in both homo- and hetero-zygous cultures (Abl/Abl vs. Abl/+) of different alleles (Abl(1) and Abl(4) ) indicating dominant mutational effects. Strikingly, in WT cultures derived from stage 10 embryos, high temperature (HT) incubation promoted muscle migration and fusion, partially mimicking the advanced muscle development typical of Abl cultures. However, HT enhanced neuronal growth with increased numbers of enlarged lamellipodia, distinct from the characteristic Abl neuronal morphology. Intriguingly, HT incubation also promoted Abl lamellipodia expansion, with a much greater effect on nerve cells than muscle. Our results suggest that Abl is an essential regulator for myocyte and neuron development and that high-temperature incubation partially mimics the faster muscle development

  5. Signaling Pathways in Cardiac Myocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Peng; Liu, Yuening

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, the number 1 cause of death worldwide, are frequently associated with apoptotic death of cardiac myocytes. Since cardiomyocyte apoptosis is a highly regulated process, pharmacological intervention of apoptosis pathways may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders including myocardial infarction, ischemia/reperfusion injury, chemotherapy cardiotoxicity, and end-stage heart failure. Despite rapid growth of our knowledge in apoptosis signaling pathways, a clinically applicable treatment targeting this cellular process is currently unavailable. To help identify potential innovative directions for future research, it is necessary to have a full understanding of the apoptotic pathways currently known to be functional in cardiac myocytes. Here, we summarize recent progress in the regulation of cardiomyocyte apoptosis by multiple signaling molecules and pathways, with a focus on the involvement of these pathways in the pathogenesis of heart disease. In addition, we provide an update regarding bench to bedside translation of this knowledge and discuss unanswered questions that need further investigation. PMID:28101515

  6. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  7. Quality Metrics for Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Sean P.; Pasqualini, Francesco; Grosberg, Anna; Park, Sung Jin; Aratyn-Schaus, Yvonne; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Advances in stem cell manufacturing methods have made it possible to produce stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes at industrial scales for in vitro muscle physiology research purposes. Although FDA-mandated quality assurance metrics address safety issues in the manufacture of stem cell-based products, no standardized guidelines currently exist for the evaluation of stem cell-derived myocyte functionality. As a result, it is unclear whether the various stem cell-derived myocyte cell lines on the market perform similarly, or whether any of them accurately recapitulate the characteristics of native cardiac myocytes. We propose a multiparametric quality assessment rubric in which genetic, structural, electrophysiological, and contractile measurements are coupled with comparison against values for these measurements that are representative of the ventricular myocyte phenotype. We demonstrated this procedure using commercially available, mass-produced murine embryonic stem cell- and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived myocytes compared with a neonatal mouse ventricular myocyte target phenotype in coupled in vitro assays. PMID:24672752

  8. Physiological changes induced in cardiac myocytes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hassin, D.; Fixler, R.; Shimoni, Y.; Rubinstein, E.; Raz, S.; Gotsman, M.S.; Hasin, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The lethal hit induced by viral specific, sensitized, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) attacking virus-infected heart cells is important in the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis and reflects the key role of CTL in this immune response. The mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Studies of the physiological changes induced in mengovirus-infected, cultured, neonatal, rat heart cells by CTL that had been previously sensitized by the same virus are presented. The CTL were obtained from spleens of mengovirus-infected, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matched adult rats. Cell wall motion was measured by an optical method, action potentials with intracellular microelectrodes, and total exchangeable calcium content by /sup 45/Ca tracer measurements after loading the myocytes with /sup 45/Ca and then exposing them to CTL. After 50 min (mean time) of exposing mengovirus-infected myocytes to the CTL, the mechanical relaxation of the myocyte was slowed, with a subsequent slowing of beating rate and a reduced amplitude of contraction. Impaired relaxation progressed, and prolonged oscillatory contractions lasting up to several seconds appeared, with accompanying oscillations in the prolonged plateau phase of the action potentials. Arrest of the myocyte contractions appeared 98 min (mean time) after exposure to CTL. It is concluded that infection of cultured myocytes with mengovirus predisposes them to attack by mengovirus specific CTL, and that persistent dysfunction of the myocyte is preceded by reversible changes in membrane potential and contraction. This is suggestive of an altered calcium handling by the myocytes possibly resulting in the cytotoxic effect.

  9. Phenotypic screen quantifying differential regulation of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy identifies CITED4 regulation of myocyte elongation

    PubMed Central

    Ryall, Karen A.; Bezzerides, Vassilios J.; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is controlled by a highly connected signaling network with many effectors of cardiac myocyte size. Quantification of the contribution of individual pathways to specific changes in shape and transcript abundance is needed to better understand hypertrophy signaling and to improve heart failure therapies. We stimulated cardiac myocytes with 15 hypertrophic agonists and quantitatively characterized differential regulation of 5 shape features using high-throughput microscopy and transcript levels of 12 genes using qPCR. Transcripts measured were associated with phenotypes including fibrosis, cell death, contractility, proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammation, and the fetal cardiac gene program. While hypertrophy pathways are highly connected, the agonist screen revealed distinct hypertrophy phenotypic signatures for the 15 receptor agonists. We then used k-means clustering of inputs and outputs to identify a network map linking input modules to output modules. Five modules were identified within inputs and outputs with many maladaptive outputs grouping together in one module: Bax, C/EBPβ, Serca2a, TNFα, and CTGF. Subsequently, we identified mechanisms underlying two correlations revealed in the agonist screen: correlation between regulators of fibrosis and cell death signaling (CTGF and Bax mRNA) caused by AngII; and myocyte proliferation (CITED4 mRNA) and elongation caused by Nrg1. Follow-up experiments revealed positive regulation of Bax mRNA level by CTGF and an incoherent feedforward loop linking Nrg1, CITED4 and elongation. With this agonist screen, we identified the most influential inputs in the cardiac hypertrophy signaling network for a variety of features related to pathological and protective hypertrophy signaling and shared regulation among cardiac myocyte phenotypes. PMID:24613264

  10. Contribution of I Ks to ventricular repolarization in canine myocytes.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Balázs; Magyar, János; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Birinyi, Péter; Nánási, Péter P; Bányász, Tamás

    2006-09-01

    The role of the slow delayed rectifier K(+) current (I (Ks)) in cardiac repolarization seems to be largely influenced by the experimental conditions including the species and tissue studied. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of I (Ks) to repolarization in canine ventricular myocytes by measuring the frequency dependent action potential lengthening effect of 10 microM chromanol 293B using sharp microelectrodes. Pretreatment with isoproterenol (2 nM), E-4031 (1 microM), and injection of inward current pulses were applied to modify action potential configuration. Chromanol alone caused moderate but statistically significant lengthening of action potentials at cycle lengths longer than 500 ms. The lengthening effect of chromanol, which was strongly enhanced in the presence of either isoproterenol or E-4031, was proportional to the amplitude of plateau, whereas poor correlation was found with action potential duration. Similar results were obtained when action potential configuration was modified by injection of depolarizing current pulses. Computer simulations revealed that activation of I (Ks) is a sharp function of the plateau amplitude within the physiological range, while elongation of repolarization may enhance I (Ks) only when it is excessive. It was concluded that the effect of I (Ks) on ventricular repolarization critically depends on the level of action potential plateau; however, other factors, like action potential duration, cycle length, or suppression of other K(+) currents can also influence its contribution.

  11. Aged garlic extract enhances heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit expression via the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-antioxidant response element signaling pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kei; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Morihara, Naoaki

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway defends cells against oxidative stress and regulates the cellular redox balance. Activation of this pathway induces a variety of antioxidant enzymes, resulting in the protection of our bodies against oxidative damage. It has been reported that aged garlic extract (AGE), a garlic preparation that is rich in water-soluble cysteinyl moieties, reduces oxidative stress and helps to ameliorate of cardiovascular, renal and hepatic diseases. We hypothesized that AGE enhances the expression of antioxidant enzymes via the Nrf2-ARE pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture. Gene expression of antioxidant enzymes was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes expression were evaluated using western blotting analyses. We found that AGE promoted the accumulation of Nrf2 into the nucleus in a time- and dose-dependent manner and increased the gene expression and polypeptide level of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Moreover, the effect of AGE in elevating the gene expression of HO-1 and GCLM was found to be mediated via Nrf2 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that AGE induces the expression of HO-1 and GCLM, which are antioxidant enzymes, via activation of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway.

  12. Delayed remote ischemic preconditioning produces an additive cardioprotection to sevoflurane postconditioning through an enhanced heme oxygenase 1 level partly via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenghui; Li, Huatong; Yao, Yuntai; Li, Lihuan

    2014-11-01

    Although both sevoflurane postconditioning (SPoC) and delayed remote ischemic preconditioning (DRIPC) have been proved effective in various animal and human studies, the combined effect of these 2 strategies remains unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate this effect and elucidate the related signal mechanisms in a Langendorff perfused rat heart model. After 30-minute balanced perfusion, isolated hearts were subjected to 30-minute ischemia followed by 60-minute reperfusion except 90-minute perfusion for control. A synergic cardioprotective effect of SPoC (3% v/v) and DRIPC (4 cycles 5-minute occlusion/5-minute reflow at the unilateral hindlimb once per day for 3 days before heart isolation) was observed with facilitated cardiac functional recovery and decreased cardiac enzyme release. The infarct size-limiting effect was more pronounced in the combined group (6.76% ± 2.18%) than in the SPoC group (16.50% ± 4.55%, P < .001) or in the DRIPC group (10.22% ± 2.57%, P = .047). Subsequent analysis revealed that an enhanced heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression, but not protein kinase B/AKt or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 activation, was involved in the synergic cardioprotective effect, which was further confirmed in the messenger RNA level of HO-1. Such trend was also observed in the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, an upstream regulation of HO-1. In addition, correlation analysis showed a significantly positive relationship between HO-1 expression and Nrf2 translocation (r = 0.729, P < .001). Hence, we conclude that DRIPC may produce an additive cardioprotection to SPoC through an enhanced HO-1 expression partly via Nrf2 translocation.

  13. Effects of mitoxantrone on excitation-contraction coupling in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, G X; Zhou, X B; Korth, M

    2000-05-01

    The mechanisms of the inotropic effect of mitoxantrone (MTO), a synthetic dihydroxyanthracenedione derivative with antineoplastic activity, was investigated in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using whole-cell patch-clamp methods combined with fura-2 fluorescence and cell-edge tracking techniques. In right ventricular papillary muscles, 30 microM MTO increased isometric force of contraction as well as action potential duration (APD) in a time-dependent manner. The force of contraction was increased approximately 3-fold within 4 h. This positive inotropic effect was accompanied by a prolongation of time to peak force and relaxation time. In current-clamped single myocytes treated with 30 microM MTO for 30 min, an increase of cell shortening by 77% and a prolongation of APD by 19% was observed. Peak amplitude of the intracellular Ca(2+) transients was also increased by 10%. The contribution of APD prolongation to the enhancement of cell shortening induced by MTO was assessed by clamping control myocytes with action potentials of various duration. Prolongation of APD(90) (ADP measured at 90% of repolarization) by 24% led to an increase of cell shortening by 13%. When the cells were clamped by an action potential with constant APD, MTO still caused an increase of cell shortening by 59% within 30 min. No increase of the peak intracellular Ca(2+) transients, however, was observed under this condition. We conclude that both the APD prolongation and a direct interaction with the contractile proteins contributed to the positive inotropic effect of MTO.

  14. Mild electrical pulse current stimulation upregulates S100A4 and promotes cardiogenesis in MSC and cardiac myocytes coculture monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Zhang, Changhai; Nong, Yaoming; Yao, Qing; Song, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    < 0.01) and 6 h/day group (P < 0.05). Since coculture was used as stimuli, immunofluorescence was used to visualize the changes during EPCS for the purpose of elucidating the impact of EPCS on cardiac myocytes and MSCs. We found that after 5 days exposure, EPCS can enhance the expression of S100A4, which is 2.33 fold in cardiac myocytes (P < 0.01) and 1.99 fold in MSCs (P < 0.01) in gray value. A significant increasing expression of the myocyte enhancer factor (MEF) and GATA4 is detected in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes (P < 0.01) compared with cotemporary coculture monolayer in the control group. Also, EPCS can trigger the assembly of MEF2c in the nuclei. In addition, more cardiac myocytes were found to have two nuclei. But MSCs fail to active MEF2C transcriptional factor like that in cardiac myocytes after EPCS exposure. The elevation of MEF2 in both cytoplasm and nuclei of cardiac myocytes can always make a clear distinction of the cardiac myocytes and MSCs in coculture. Some factors show strong upregulation tendency with EPCS in both cardiac myocytes and MSCs-these include the troponin T (P < 0.01) and Cx43 (P < 0.05) in cardiac myocytes, and troponin T (P < 0.01) and Cx43 (P < 0.01) in MSCs. Collagen I expression is not affected with EPCS. In conclusion, mild EPCS can upregulate the secretion of S100A4 in both cardiac myocytes and MSCs, which is a factor supporting the cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis; it further triggers the development of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes through upregulation of MEF2C and GATA4, the number of cardiac myocytes with two nuclei increases with EPCS, but this phenomenon does not appear in MSCs. Despite this, Cx43 and troponin T in both cardiac myocytes and MSCs are very sensitive to EPCS. EPCS can act as an effective and multi-targeted physical intervention method in cardiomyogenesis.

  15. [Ultrastructural features of femoral artery myocytes during experimental leg lengthening].

    PubMed

    Ir'ianov, Iu M; Migalkin, N S; Kniazeva, L M

    1984-11-01

    Femoral arteries in mature dogs have been studied electron microscopically at various stages of the shin lengthening performed after G. A. Ilizarov method. Certain ultrastructural signs demonstrating biosynthetic and secretory activation of myocytes directed to intensification of elastogenetic processes have been revealed. Immature elastic fibers are forming around myocytes as aggregations of microfibrils, later accumulations of amorphous material appear in them. On the 28th, 42d days of distraction, hyperproduction of intra- and extracellular vesicles is noted, as well as that of intracellular matrix. Cytoplasmic islets of myocytes and intercellular connections increase in number. In the subintimal layer, of the tunica media and at its border with adventitium, longitudinally situating fasciculi of smooth muscle cells are forming. The myocytic ultrastructural peculiarities noted, the new formations of elastic elements depend, at early stages of the experiment, on changes of regional hemodynamics, and at advanced stages - also on the effect of longitudinally acting tension stress.

  16. The Unfolded Protein Response Regulates Uterine Myocyte Antioxidant Responsiveness During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramnarayanan, Saiprasad; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara; Ingles, Judith; Park-York, MieJung; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Condon, Jennifer C

    2016-12-01

    There is considerable evidence that implicates oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of human pregnancy complications. However, the role and the mechanism of maintaining an antioxidant prosurvival uterine environment during normal pregnancy is largely unresolved. Herein we report that the highly active uterine unfolded protein response plays a key role in promoting antioxidant activity in the uterine myocyte across gestation. The unfolded protein response (UPR) senses the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and activates a signaling network that consists of the transmembrane protein kinase eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha kinase 3/PKR-like-ER kinase (EIF2AK3), which acts to decrease protein translation levels, allowing for a lowered need for protein folding during periods of ER stress. However, independent of its translational regulatory capacity, EIF2AK3-dependent signals elicit the activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2) in response to oxidative stress. NFE2L2 binds to antioxidant response elements in the promoters of a variety of antioxidant genes that minimize the opportunities for generation of reactive oxygen intermediates. Our analysis demonstrates that in the absence of EIF2AK3, the uterine myocyte experiences increased levels of reactive oxygen species due to decreased NFE2L2 activation. Elevated levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species were observed in the EIF2AK3 null cells, and this was associated with the onset of apoptotic cell death. These findings confirm the prosurvival and antioxidant role of UPR-mediated EIF2AK3 activation in the context of the human uterine myocyte.

  17. Acute Simvastatin Inhibits KATP Channels of Porcine Coronary Artery Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Rachel Wai Sum; Kong, Siu Kai; Ngai, Sai Ming; Wan, Song; Ho, Ho Pui; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man; Chan, Shun Wan; Leung, George Pak Heng; Kwan, Yiu Wa

    2013-01-01

    Background Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors) consumption provides beneficial effects on cardiovascular systems. However, effects of statins on vascular KATP channel gatings are unknown. Methods Pig left anterior descending coronary artery and human left internal mammary artery were isolated and endothelium-denuded for tension measurements and Western immunoblots. Enzymatically-dissociated/cultured arterial myocytes were used for patch-clamp electrophysiological studies and for [Ca2+]i, [ATP]i and [glucose]o uptake measurements. Results The cromakalim (10 nM to 10 µM)- and pinacidil (10 nM to 10 µM)-induced concentration-dependent relaxation of porcine coronary artery was inhibited by simvastatin (3 and 10 µM). Simvastatin (1, 3 and 10 µM) suppressed (in okadaic acid (10 nM)-sensitive manner) cromakalim (10 µM)- and pinacidil (10 µM)-mediated opening of whole-cell KATP channels of arterial myocytes. Simvastatin (10 µM) and AICAR (1 mM) elicited a time-dependent, compound C (1 µM)-sensitive [3H]-2-deoxy-glucose uptake and an increase in [ATP]i levels. A time (2–30 min)- and concentration (0.1–10 µM)-dependent increase by simvastatin of p-AMPKα-Thr172 and p-PP2A-Tyr307 expression was observed. The enhanced p-AMPKα-Thr172 expression was inhibited by compound C, ryanodine (100 µM) and KN93 (10 µM). Simvastatin-induced p-PP2A-Tyr307 expression was suppressed by okadaic acid, compound C, ryanodine, KN93, phloridzin (1 mM), ouabain (10 µM), and in [glucose]o-free or [Na+]o-free conditions. Conclusions Simvastatin causes ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release which is important for AMPKα-Thr172 phosphorylation via Ca2+/CaMK II. AMPKα-Thr172 phosphorylation causes [glucose]o uptake (and an [ATP]i increase), closure of KATP channels, and phosphorylation of AMPKα-Thr172 and PP2A-Tyr307 resulted. Phosphorylation of PP2A-Tyr307 occurs at a site downstream of AMPKα-Thr172 phosphorylation. PMID:23799098

  18. Transcriptional repression of Kruppel like factor-2 by the adaptor protein p66shc

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Hoffman, Timothy A.; DeRicco, Jeremy; Naqvi, Asma; Jain, Mukesh K.; Irani, Kaikobad

    2009-01-01

    The adaptor protein p66shc promotes cellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanistic relationship between p66shc and the kruppel like factor-2 (KLF2) transcription factor and show that this relationship has biological relevance to p66shc-regulated cellular oxidant level, as well as KLF2-induced target gene expression. Genetic knockout of p66shc in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) stimulates activity of the core KLF2 promoter and increases KLF2 mRNA and protein expression. Similarly, shRNA-induced knockdown of p66shc increases KLF2-promoter activity in HeLa cells. The increase in KLF2-promoter activity in p66shc-knockout MEFs is dependent on a myocyte enhancing factor-2A (MEF2A)-binding sequence in the core KLF2 promoter. Short-hairpin RNA-induced knockdown of p66shc in endothelial cells also stimulates KLF2 mRNA and protein expression, as well as expression of the endothelial KLF2 target gene thrombomodulin. MEF2A protein and mRNA are more abundant in p66shc-knockout MEFs, resulting in greater occupancy of the KLF2 promoter by MEF2A. In endothelial cells, the increase in KLF2 and thrombomodulin protein by shRNA-induced decrease in p66shc expression is partly abrogated by knockdown of MEF2A. Finally, knockdown of KLF2 abolishes the decrease in the cellular reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide observed with knockdown of p66shc, and KLF2 overexpression suppresses cellular hydrogen peroxide levels, independent of p66shc expression. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which p66shc promotes cellular oxidative stress, through suppression of MEF2A expression and consequent repression of KLF2 transcription.—Kumar, A., Hoffman, T. A., DeRicco, J., Naqvi, A., Jain, M. K., Irani, K. Transcriptional repression of Kruppel like factor-2 by the adaptor protein p66shc. PMID:19696221

  19. Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 coordinates dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase/PPAR-γ/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathways that enhance nitric oxide generation in human glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zaiming; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) degrades asymmetric dimethylarginine, which inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS). Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional factor that binds to antioxidant response elements and transcribes many antioxidant genes. Because the promoters of the human DDAH-1 and DDAH-2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and PPAR-γ genes contain 2 to 3 putative antioxidant response elements, we hypothesized that they were regulated by Nrf2/antioxidant response element. Incubation of human renal glomerular endothelial cells with the Nrf2 activator tert-butylhydroquinone (20 μmol·L(-1)) significantly (P<0.05) increased NO and activities of NOS and DDAH and decreased asymmetric dimethylarginine. It upregulated genes for hemoxygenase-1, eNOS, DDAH-1, DDAH-2, and PPAR-γ and partitioned Nrf2 into the nucleus. Knockdown of Nrf2 abolished these effects. Nrf2 bound to one antioxidant response element on DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 and PPAR-γ promoters but not to the eNOS promoter. An increased eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS (P-eNOSser-1177) expression with tert-butylhydroquinone was prevented by knockdown of PPAR-γ. Expression of Nrf2 was reduced by knockdown of PPAR-γ, whereas PPAR-γ was reduced by knockdown of Nrf2, thereby demonstrating 2-way positive interactions. Thus, Nrf2 transcribes HO-1 and other genes to reduce reactive oxygen species, and DDAH-1 and DDAH-2 to reduce asymmetric dimethylarginine and PPAR-γ to increase eNOS and its phosphorylation and activity thereby coordinating 3 pathways that enhance endothelial NO generation.

  20. Stem Cell Stimulation of Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Brian R.; Canty, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodeling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted during the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone marrow- and peripheral blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the preclinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair, and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischemic heart disease patients. PMID:23577634

  1. Stem cell stimulation of endogenous myocyte regeneration.

    PubMed

    Weil, Brian R; Canty, John M

    2013-08-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodelling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted over the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone-marrow- and peripheral-blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischaemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the pre-clinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  2. Glycolytic oscillations in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Hai; Yang, Ling; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N

    2008-12-26

    Previous studies have shown that glycolysis can oscillate periodically, driven by feedback loops in regulation of key glycolytic enzymes by free ADP and other metabolites. Here we show both theoretically and experimentally in cardiac myocytes that when the capacity of oxidative phosphorylation and the creatine kinase system to buffer the cellular ATP/ADP ratio is suppressed, glycolysis can cause large scale periodic oscillations in cellular ATP levels (0.02-0.067 Hz), monitored from glibenclamide-sensitive changes in action potential duration or intracellular free Mg2+. Action potential duration oscillations originate primarily from glycolysis, since they 1) occur in the presence of cyanide or rotenone, 2) are suppressed by iodoacetate, 3) are accompanied by at most very small mitochondrial membrane potential oscillations, and 4) exhibit an anti-phase relationship to NADH fluorescence. By uncoupling energy supply-demand balance, glycolytic oscillations may promote injury and electrophysiological heterogeneity during acute metabolic stresses, such as acute myocardial ischemia in which both oxidative phosphorylation and creatine kinase activity are inhibited.

  3. Benchmarking electrophysiological models of human atrial myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelms, Mathias; Hettmann, Hanne; Maleckar, Mary M.; Koivumäki, Jussi T.; Dössel, Olaf; Seemann, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of cardiac electrophysiology is an insightful method to investigate the underlying mechanisms responsible for arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF). In past years, five models of human atrial electrophysiology with different formulations of ionic currents, and consequently diverging properties, have been published. The aim of this work is to give an overview of strengths and weaknesses of these models depending on the purpose and the general requirements of simulations. Therefore, these models were systematically benchmarked with respect to general mathematical properties and their ability to reproduce certain electrophysiological phenomena, such as action potential (AP) alternans. To assess the models' ability to replicate modified properties of human myocytes and tissue in cardiac disease, electrical remodeling in chronic atrial fibrillation (cAF) was chosen as test case. The healthy and remodeled model variants were compared with experimental results in single-cell, 1D and 2D tissue simulations to investigate AP and restitution properties, as well as the initiation of reentrant circuits. PMID:23316167

  4. Allicin inhibits transient outward potassium currents in mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    CAO, HONG; HUANG, CONGXIN; WANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    Allicin is the active constituent of garlic, a widely used spice and food. The remedial properties of garlic have also been extensively researched and it has been demonstrated that allicin is able to inhibit the transient outward potassium current (Ito) in atrial myocytes. However, the direct effect of allicin on Ito in ventricular myocytes has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of allicin on Ito in ventricular myocytes isolated from mice were investigated, using the whole-cell patch recording technique. The results revealed that Ito current was not significantly suppressed by allicin in the low-dose group (10 µmol/l; P>0.05). However, Ito was significantly inhibited by higher doses of allicin (30, 100 and 300 µmol/l; P<0.05 vs. control; n=6) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50=41.6 µmol/l). In addition, a high concentration of allicin (≥100 µmol/l) was able to accelerate the voltage-dependent inactivation of Ito in mouse ventricular myocytes. In conclusion, the present study revealed that allicin inhibited the Ito in mouse ventricular myocytes, which may be the mechanism through which allicin exerts its antiarrhythmic effect. PMID:27168824

  5. Oxidative stress decreases microtubule growth and stability in ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Drum, Benjamin M L; Yuan, Can; Li, Lei; Liu, Qinghang; Wordeman, Linda; Santana, L Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Microtubules (MTs) have many roles in ventricular myocytes, including structural stability, morphological integrity, and protein trafficking. However, despite their functional importance, dynamic MTs had never been visualized in living adult myocytes. Using adeno-associated viral vectors expressing the MT-associated protein plus end binding protein 3 (EB3) tagged with EGFP, we were able to perform live imaging and thus capture and quantify MT dynamics in ventricular myocytes in real time under physiological conditions. Super-resolution nanoscopy revealed that EB1 associated in puncta along the length of MTs in ventricular myocytes. The vast (~80%) majority of MTs grew perpendicular to T-tubules at a rate of 0.06μm∗s(-1) and growth was preferentially (82%) confined to a single sarcomere. Microtubule catastrophe rate was lower near the Z-line than M-line. Hydrogen peroxide increased the rate of catastrophe of MTs ~7-fold, suggesting that oxidative stress destabilizes these structures in ventricular myocytes. We also quantified MT dynamics after myocardial infarction (MI), a pathological condition associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our data indicate that the catastrophe rate of MTs increases following MI. This contributed to decreased transient outward K(+) currents by decreasing the surface expression of Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 channels after MI. On the basis of these data, we conclude that, under physiological conditions, MT growth is directionally biased and that increased ROS production during MI disrupts MT dynamics, decreasing K(+) channel trafficking.

  6. Dynamic investigation of Drosophila myocytes with second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Catherine; Stewart, Bryan; Cisek, Richard; Prent, Nicole; Major, Arkady; Barzda, Virginijus

    2006-09-01

    The functional dynamics and structure of both larval and adult Drosophila melanogaster muscle were investigated with a nonlinear multimodal microscope. Imaging was carried out using a home built microscope capable of recording the multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation signals simultaneously at a scanning rate of up to ~12 frames/sec. The sample was excited by a home built femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at 840 nm, or by a Yb-ion doped potassium gadolinium tungstate (Yb:KGW) crystal based oscillator at 1042 nm. There was no observable damage detected in the myocyte after prolonged scanning with either of the lasers. Microscopic second harmonic generation (SHG) appears particularly strong in the myocytes. This allows the fast contraction dynamics of the myocytes to be followed. The larger sarcomere size observed in the larvae myocytes is especially well suited for studying the contraction dynamics. Microscopic imaging of muscle contractions showed different relaxation and contraction rates. The SHG intensities were significantly higher in the relaxed state of the myocyte compared to the contracted state. The imaging also revealed disappearance of SHG signal in highly stretched sarcomeres, indicating that SHG diminishes in the disordered structures. The study illustrates that SHG microscopy, combined with other nonlinear contrast mechanisms, can help to elucidate physiological mechanisms of contraction. This study also provides further insight into the mechanisms of harmonic generation in biological tissue and shows that crystalline arrangement of macromolecules has a determining factor for the high efficiency second harmonic generation from the bulk structures.

  7. Myomaker mediates fusion of fast myocytes in zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Landemaine, Aurélie; Rescan, Pierre-Yves; Gabillard, Jean-Charles

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Myomaker is transiently expressed in fast myocytes during embryonic myogenesis. • Myomaker is essential for fast myocyte fusion in zebrafish. • The function of myomaker is conserved among Teleostomi. - Abstract: Myomaker (also called Tmem8c), a new membrane activator of myocyte fusion was recently discovered in mice. Using whole mount in situ hybridization on zebrafish embryos at different stages of embryonic development, we show that myomaker is transiently expressed in fast myocytes forming the bulk of zebrafish myotome. Zebrafish embryos injected with morpholino targeted against myomaker were alive after yolk resorption and appeared morphologically normal, but they were unable to swim, even under effect of a tactile stimulation. Confocal observations showed a marked phenotype characterized by the persistence of mononucleated muscle cells in the fast myotome at developmental stages where these cells normally fuse to form multinucleated myotubes. This indicates that myomaker is essential for myocyte fusion in zebrafish. Thus, there is an evolutionary conservation of myomaker expression and function among Teleostomi.

  8. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal–nuclear–chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  9. Nuclear morphology and deformation in engineered cardiac myocytes and tissues.

    PubMed

    Bray, Mark-Anthony P; Adams, William J; Geisse, Nicholas A; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Parker, Kevin K

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering requires finely-tuned manipulation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment to optimize internal myocardial organization. The myocyte nucleus is mechanically connected to the cell membrane via cytoskeletal elements, making it a target for the cellular response to perturbation of the ECM. However, the role of ECM spatial configuration and myocyte shape on nuclear location and morphology is unknown. In this study, printed ECM proteins were used to configure the geometry of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Engineered one- and two-dimensional tissue constructs and single myocyte islands were assayed using live fluorescence imaging to examine nuclear position, morphology and motion as a function of the imposed ECM geometry during diastolic relaxation and systolic contraction. Image analysis showed that anisotropic tissue constructs cultured on microfabricated ECM lines possessed a high degree of nuclear alignment similar to that found in vivo; nuclei in isotropic tissues were polymorphic in shape with an apparently random orientation. Nuclear eccentricity was also increased for the anisotropic tissues, suggesting that intracellular forces deform the nucleus as the cell is spatially confined. During systole, nuclei experienced increasing spatial confinement in magnitude and direction of displacement as tissue anisotropy increased, yielding anisotropic deformation. Thus, the nature of nuclear displacement and deformation during systole appears to rely on a combination of the passive myofibril spatial organization and the active stress fields induced by contraction. Such findings have implications in understanding the genomic consequences and functional response of cardiac myocytes to their ECM surroundings under conditions of disease.

  10. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal-nuclear-chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations.

  11. The evolutionary origin of bilaterian smooth and striated myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Thibaut; Fischer, Antje HL; Steinmetz, Patrick RH; Lauri, Antonella; Bertucci, Paola; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    The dichotomy between smooth and striated myocytes is fundamental for bilaterian musculature, but its evolutionary origin is unsolved. In particular, interrelationships of visceral smooth muscles remain unclear. Absent in fly and nematode, they have not yet been characterized molecularly outside vertebrates. Here, we characterize expression profile, ultrastructure, contractility and innervation of the musculature in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii and identify smooth muscles around the midgut, hindgut and heart that resemble their vertebrate counterparts in molecular fingerprint, contraction speed and nervous control. Our data suggest that both visceral smooth and somatic striated myocytes were present in the protostome-deuterostome ancestor and that smooth myocytes later co-opted the striated contractile module repeatedly – for example, in vertebrate heart evolution. During these smooth-to-striated myocyte conversions, the core regulatory complex of transcription factors conveying myocyte identity remained unchanged, reflecting a general principle in cell type evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19607.001 PMID:27906129

  12. The pacemaker current in cardiac Purkinje myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    It is generally assumed that in cardiac Purkinje fibers the hyperpolarization activated inward current i(f) underlies the pacemaker potential. Because some findings are at odds with this interpretation, we used the whole cell patch clamp method to study the currents in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization in single canine Purkinje myocytes, a preparation where many confounding limitations can be avoided. In Tyrode solution ([K+]o = 5.4 mM), hyperpolarizing steps from Vh = -50 mV resulted in a time-dependent inwardly increasing current in the voltage range of diastolic depolarization. This time- dependent current (iKdd) appeared around -60 mV and reversed near EK. Small superimposed hyperpolarizing steps (5 mV) applied during the voltage clamp step showed that the slope conductance decreases during the development of this time-dependent current. Decreasing [K+]o from 5.4 to 2.7 mM shifted the reversal potential to a more negative value, near the corresponding EK. Increasing [K+]o to 10.8 mM almost abolished iKdd. Cs+ (2 mM) markedly reduced or blocked the time-dependent current at potentials positive and negative to EK. Ba2+ (4 mM) abolished the time-dependent current in its usual range of potentials and unmasked another time-dependent current (presumably i(f)) with a threshold of approximately -90 mV (> 20 mV negative to that of the time-dependent current in Tyrode solution). During more negative steps, i(f) increased in size and did not reverse. During i(f) the slope conductance measured with small (8-10 mV) superimposed clamp steps increased. High [K+]o (10.8 mM) markedly increased and Cs+ (2 mM) blocked i(f). We conclude that: (a) in the absence of Ba2+, a time-dependent current does reverse near EK and its reversal is unrelated to K+ depletion; (b) the slope conductance of that time-dependent current decreases in the absence of K+ depletion at potentials positive to EK where inactivation of iK1 is unlikely to occur. (c) Ba2+ blocks this time

  13. Overexpression of connexin 43 using a retroviral vector improves electrical coupling of skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Ma, Yu-Ling; Themis, Michael; Patel, Pravina; Spohr, Hilmar; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Ullrich, Nina D; Kienast, Yvonne; Coutelle, Charles; Peters, Nicholas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Organ transplantation is presently often the only available option to repair a damaged heart. As heart donors are scarce, engineering of cardiac grafts from autologous skeletal myoblasts is a promising novel therapeutic strategy. The functionality of skeletal muscle cells in the heart milieu is, however, limited because of their inability to integrate electrically and mechanically into the myocardium. Therefore, in pursuit of improved cardiac integration of skeletal muscle grafts we sought to modify primary skeletal myoblasts by overexpression of the main gap-junctional protein connexin 43 and to study electrical coupling of connexin 43 overexpressing myoblasts to cardiac myocytes in vitro. Methods To create an efficient means for overexpression of connexin 43 in skeletal myoblasts we constructed a bicistronic retroviral vector MLV-CX43-EGFP expressing the human connexin 43 cDNA and the marker EGFP gene. This vector was employed to transduce primary rat skeletal myoblasts in optimised conditions involving a concomitant use of the retrovirus immobilising protein RetroNectin® and the polycation transduction enhancer Transfectam®. The EGFP-positive transduced cells were then enriched by flow cytometry. Results More than four-fold overexpression of connexin 43 in the transduced skeletal myoblasts, compared with non-transduced cells, was shown by Western blotting. Functionality of the overexpressed connexin 43 was demonstrated by microinjection of a fluorescent dye showing enhanced gap-junctional intercellular transfer in connexin 43 transduced myoblasts compared with transfer in non-transduced myoblasts. Rat cardiac myocytes were cultured in multielectrode array culture dishes together with connexin 43/EGFP transduced skeletal myoblasts, control non-transduced skeletal myoblasts or alone. Extracellular field action potential activation rates in the co-cultures of connexin 43 transduced skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes were significantly higher than

  14. LabHEART: an interactive computer model of rabbit ventricular myocyte ion channels and Ca transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puglisi, J. L.; Bers, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    An interactive computer program, LabHEART, was developed to simulate the action potential (AP), ionic currents, and Ca handling mechanisms in a rabbit ventricular myocyte. User-oriented, its design allows switching between voltage and current clamp and easy on-line manipulation of key parameters to change the original formulation. The model reproduces normal rabbit ventricular myocyte currents, Ca transients, and APs. We also changed parameters to simulate data from heart failure (HF) myocytes, including reduced transient outward (I(to)) and inward rectifying K currents (I(K1)), enhanced Na/Ca exchange expression, and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase function, but unaltered Ca current density. These changes caused reduced Ca transient amplitude and increased AP duration (especially at lower frequency) as observed experimentally. The model shows that the increased Na/Ca exchange current (I(NaCa)) in HF lowers the intracellular [Ca] threshold for a triggered AP from 800 to 540 nM. Similarly, the decrease in I(K1) reduces the threshold to 600 nM. Changes in I(to) have no effect. Combining enhanced Na/Ca exchange with reduced I(K1) (as in HF) lowers the threshold to trigger an AP to 380 nM. These changes reproduce experimental results in HF, where the contributions of different factors are not readily distinguishable. We conclude that the triggered APs that contribute to nonreentrant ventricular tachycardia in HF are due approximately equally (and nearly additively) to alterations in I(NaCa) and I(K1). A free copy of this software can be obtained at http://www.meddean.luc.edu/lumen/DeptWebs/physio/bers.html.

  15. Some growth factors stimulate cultured adult rabbit ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in the absence of mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, R. S.; Cook, M. G.; Behnke-Barclay, M.; Decker, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Cultured adult rabbit cardiac myocytes treated with recombinant growth factors display enhanced rates of protein accumulation (ie, growth) in response to insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), but epidermal growth factor, acidic or basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor failed to increase contractile protein synthesis or growth of the heart cells. Insulin and IGF-1 increased growth rates by stimulating anabolic while simultaneously inhibiting catabolic pathways, whereas IGF-2 elevated growth modestly by apparently inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis. Neutralizing antibodies directed against either IGF-1 or IGF-2 or IGF binding protein 3 blocked protein accumulation. A monoclonal antibody directed against the IGF-1 receptor also inhibited changes in protein turnover provoked by recombinant human IGF-1 but not IGF-2. Of the other growth factors tested, only transforming growth factor-beta 1 increased the fractional rate of myosin heavy chain (MHC) synthesis, with beta-MHC synthesis being elevated and alpha-MHC synthesis being suppressed. However, the other growth factors were able to modestly stimulate the rate of DNA synthesis in this preparation. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling revealed that these growth factors increased DNA synthesis in myocytes and nonmyocytes alike, but the heart cells displayed neither karyokinesis or cytokinesis. In contrast, cocultures of cardiac myocytes and nonmyocytes and nonmyocyte-conditioned culture medium failed to enhance the rate of cardiac MHC synthesis or its accumulation, implying that quiescent heart cells do not respond to "conditioning" by cardiac nonmyocytes. These findings demonstrated that insulin and the IGFs promote passively loaded cultured adult rabbit heart cells to hypertrophy but suggest that other growth factors tested may be limited in this regard.

  16. Inhibition of cAMP-Dependent PKA Activates β2-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 via Raf-1/MEK/ERK and IP3-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Atrial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, X.; Maxwell, J. T.; Mignery, G. A.; Samarel, A. M.; Lipsius, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported in atrial myocytes that inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by laminin (LMN)-integrin signaling activates β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). The present study sought to determine the signaling mechanisms by which inhibition of PKA activates β2-AR stimulation of cPLA2. We therefore determined the effects of zinterol (0.1 μM; zint-β2-AR) to stimulate ICa,L in atrial myocytes in the absence (+PKA) and presence (-PKA) of the PKA inhibitor (1 μM) KT5720 and compared these results with atrial myocytes attached to laminin (+LMN). Inhibition of Raf-1 (10 μM GW5074), phospholipase C (PLC; 0.5 μM edelfosine), PKC (4 μM chelerythrine) or IP3 receptor (IP3R) signaling (2 μM 2-APB) significantly inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in–PKA but not +PKA myocytes. Western blots showed that zint-β2-AR stimulation increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in–PKA compared to +PKA myocytes. Adenoviral (Adv) expression of dominant negative (dn) -PKCα, dn-Raf-1 or an IP3 affinity trap, each inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in + LMN myocytes compared to control +LMN myocytes infected with Adv-βgal. In +LMN myocytes, zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L was enhanced by adenoviral overexpression of wild-type cPLA2 and inhibited by double dn-cPLA2S505A/S515A mutant compared to control +LMN myocytes infected with Adv-βgal. In–PKA myocytes depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores by 5 μM thapsigargin failed to inhibit zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L via cPLA2. However, disruption of caveolae formation by 10 mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in–PKA myocytes significantly more than in +PKA myocytes. We conclude that inhibition of PKA removes inhibition of Raf-1 and thereby allows β2-AR stimulation to act via PKCα/Raf-1/MEK/ERK1/2 and IP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling to stimulate cPLA2 signaling within caveolae. These findings may be relevant to the

  17. Myomaker mediates fusion of fast myocytes in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Landemaine, Aurélie; Rescan, Pierre-Yves; Gabillard, Jean-Charles

    2014-09-05

    Myomaker (also called Tmem8c), a new membrane activator of myocyte fusion was recently discovered in mice. Using whole mount in situ hybridization on zebrafish embryos at different stages of embryonic development, we show that myomaker is transiently expressed in fast myocytes forming the bulk of zebrafish myotome. Zebrafish embryos injected with morpholino targeted against myomaker were alive after yolk resorption and appeared morphologically normal, but they were unable to swim, even under effect of a tactile stimulation. Confocal observations showed a marked phenotype characterized by the persistence of mononucleated muscle cells in the fast myotome at developmental stages where these cells normally fuse to form multinucleated myotubes. This indicates that myomaker is essential for myocyte fusion in zebrafish. Thus, there is an evolutionary conservation of myomaker expression and function among Teleostomi.

  18. Photoelectric recording of mechanical responses of cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R; Wiemer, J; Dembski, J; Haas, H G

    1987-04-01

    A method to monitor contraction of isolated myocytes by transmicroscopic photometry is illustrated. Two photodiodes are mounted inside an inverse microscope used for visual control of a cell. Illumination of one diode varies in proportion to changes in cell length. The contraction signal is amplified in a comparator circuit. Spatial resolution of the device is in the order of 1 micron which corresponds to about 5% of cell shortening in the fully activated state of contraction. The method was tested on isolated myocytes from guinea-pig ventricle. Optical records of contraction in response to action potentials or during voltage clamp compare well with the contractile behavior of multicellular preparations.

  19. ErbB4 localization to cardiac myocyte nuclei, and its role in myocyte DNA damage response

    SciTech Connect

    Icli, Basak; Bharti, Ajit; Pentassuglia, Laura; Peng, Xuyang; Sawyer, Douglas B.

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ErbB4 localizes to cardiac myocyte nuclei as a full-length receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myocytes express predominantly JM-a/CYT-1 ErbB4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocyte p53 activation in response to doxorubicin requires ErbB4 activity. -- Abstract: The intracellular domain of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase is known to translocate to the nucleus of cells where it can regulate p53 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ErbB4 can localize to the nucleus of adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM), and regulate p53 in these cells. We demonstrate that ErbB4 does locate to the nucleus of cardiac myocytes as a full-length protein, although nuclear location occurs as a full-length protein that does not require Protein Kinase C or {gamma}-secretase activity. Consistent with this we found that only the non-cleavable JM-b isoform of ErbB4 is expressed in ARVM. Doxorubicin was used to examine ErbB4 role in regulation of a DNA damage response in ARVM. Doxorubicin induced p53 and p21 was suppressed by treatment with AG1478, an EGFR and ErbB4 kinase inhibitor, or suppression of ErbB4 expression with small interfering RNA. Thus ErbB4 localizes to the nucleus as a full-length protein, and plays a role in the DNA damage response induced by doxorubicin in cardiac myocytes.

  20. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  1. Integration of differentiation signals during indirect flight muscle formation by a novel enhancer of Drosophila vestigial gene.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Frédéric; Kasherov, Petar; Grenetier, Sabrina; Dutriaux, Annie; Zider, Alain; Silber, Joël; Lalouette, Alexis

    2009-08-15

    The gene vestigial (vg) plays a key role in indirect flight muscle (IFM) development. We show here that vg is controlled by the Notch anti-myogenic signaling pathway in myoblasts and is regulated by a novel 822 bp enhancer during IFM differentiation. Interestingly, this muscle enhancer is activated in developing fibers and in a small number of myoblasts before the fusion of myoblasts with the developing muscle fibers. Moreover, we show that this enhancer is activated by Drosophila Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (MEF2), Scalloped (SD) and VG but repressed by Twist, demonstrating a sensitivity to differentiation in vivo. In vitro experiments reveal that SD can directly bind this enhancer and MEF2 can physically interact with both SD and TWI. Cumulatively, our data reveal the interplay between different myogenic factors responsible for the expression of an enhancer activated during muscle differentiation.

  2. The Frank-Starling mechanism in vertebrate cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Shiels, Holly A; White, Ed

    2008-07-01

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart applies to all classes of vertebrates. It describes how stretch of cardiac muscle, up to an optimum length, increases contractility thereby linking cardiac ejection to cardiac filling. The cellular mechanisms underlying the Frank-Starling response include an increase in myofilament sensitivity for Ca2+, decreased myofilament lattice spacing and increased thin filament cooperativity. Stretching of mammalian, amphibian and fish cardiac myocytes reveal that the functional peak of the sarcomere length (SL)-tension relationship occurs at longer SL in the non-mammalian classes. These findings correlate with in vivo cardiac function as non-mammalian vertebrates, such as fish, vary stroke volume to a relatively larger extent than mammals. Thus, it seems the length-dependent properties of individual myocytes are modified to accommodate differences in organ function, and the high extensibility of certain hearts is matched by the extensibility of their myocytes. Reasons for the differences between classes are still to be elucidated, however, the structure of mammalian ventricular myocytes, with larger widths and higher levels of passive stiffness than those from other vertebrate classes may be implicated.

  3. Isorhamnetin protects rat ventricular myocytes from ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Najuan; Pei, Fei; Wei, Huaying; Zhang, Tongtong; Yang, Chao; Ma, Gang; Yang, Chunlei

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) has been known to cause damages to ventricular myocytes. Isorhamnetin, one member of flavonoid compounds, has cardioprotective effect, the effect that suggests a possible treatment for I/R damages. In the present investigation, we found that isorhamnetin could significantly promote the viability of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes that were exposed to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in vitro. Ventricular myocytes were obtained from neonatal SD rats, and then were divided randomly into three groups, namely I/R-/isor-, I/R+/isor- and I/R+/isor+ group. Before the whole experiment, the most appropriate concentration of isorhamnetin (4 μM) was determined by MTT assay. Our results showed that isorhamnetin could alleviate the damages of I/R to ventricular myocytes through inhibiting lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and repressing apoptosis. Compared with the counterpart of the I/R+/isor- group, LDH activity in the isorhamnetin-treated group weakened, halving from 24.1 ± 2.3 to 11.4 ± 1.2U/L. Additionally, flow cytometry showed the apparently increased apoptosis rate induced by I/R, the result that was further confirmed by transmission electron microscope. Administration of isorhamnetin, however, assuaged the apoptosis induced by I/R. Corresponding to the reduced apoptosis rate in the I/R+/isor+ group, western blotting assay showed increased amount of Bcl-2 and p53, decreased amount of Bax, and nuclear accumulation of NF-κB/p65.

  4. Caveolin Contributes to the Modulation of Basal and β-Adrenoceptor Stimulated Function of the Adult Rat Ventricular Myocyte by Simvastatin: A Novel Pleiotropic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shailesh R.; Harvey, Robert D.; Porter, Karen E.; Calaghan, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The number of people taking statins is increasing across the globe, highlighting the importance of fully understanding statins' effects on the cardiovascular system. The beneficial impact of statins extends well beyond regression of atherosclerosis to include direct effects on tissues of the cardiovascular system (‘pleiotropic effects’). Pleiotropic effects on the cardiac myocyte are often overlooked. Here we consider the contribution of the caveolin protein, whose expression and cellular distribution is dependent on cholesterol, to statin effects on the cardiac myocyte. Caveolin is a structural and regulatory component of caveolae, and is a key regulator of cardiac contractile function and adrenergic responsiveness. We employed an experimental model in which inhibition of myocyte HMG CoA reductase could be studied in the absence of paracrine influences from non-myocyte cells. Adult rat ventricular myocytes were treated with 10 µM simvastatin for 2 days. Simvastatin treatment reduced myocyte cholesterol, caveolin 3 and caveolar density. Negative inotropic and positive lusitropic effects (with corresponding changes in [Ca2+]i) were seen in statin-treated cells. Simvastatin significantly potentiated the inotropic response to β2-, but not β1-, adrenoceptor stimulation. Under conditions of β2-adrenoceptor stimulation, phosphorylation of phospholamban at Ser16 and troponin I at Ser23/24 was enhanced with statin treatment. Simvastatin increased NO production without significant effects on eNOS expression or phosphorylation (Ser1177), consistent with the reduced expression of caveolin 3, its constitutive inhibitor. In conclusion, statin treatment can reduce caveolin 3 expression, with functional consequences consistent with the known role of caveolae in the cardiac cell. These data are likely to be of significance, particularly during the early phases of statin treatment, and in patients with heart failure who have altered β-adrenoceptor signalling. In addition

  5. Loss of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase general control nonderepressible 2 protects mice from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure without affecting ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Kwak, Dongmin; Liu, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xinli; Wang, Huan; Guo, Haipeng; Xu, Dachun; Yan, Shuo; McFalls, Edward O; Lu, Fei; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-01-01

    In response to several stresses, including nutrient deprivation, general control nonderepressible 2 kinase (GCN2) attenuates mRNA translation by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor 2α(Ser51). Energy starvation is known to exacerbate congestive heart failure, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α(Ser51) phosphorylation is increased in the failing heart. However, the effect of GCN2 during the evolution of congestive heart failure has not been tested. In this study, we examined the influence of GCN2 expression in response to a cardiac stress by inducing chronic pressure overload with transverse aortic constriction in wild-type and GCN2 knockout mice. Under basal conditions, GCN2 knockout mice had normal left ventricular structure and function, but after transverse aortic constriction, they demonstrated less contractile dysfunction, less increase in lung weight, less increase in lung inflammation and vascular remodeling, and less myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis compared with wild-type mice, despite an equivalent degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. As expected, GCN2 knockout attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced cardiac eukaryotic initiation factor 2α(Ser51) phosphorylation and preserved sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase expression compared with wild-type mice. Interestingly, the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 was significantly elevated in GCN2 knockout hearts, whereas in isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes, selective knockdown of GCN2 increased Bcl-2 protein expression and enhanced myocyte resistance to an apoptotic stress. Collectively, our data support the notion that GCN2 impairs the ventricular adaptation to chronic pressure overload by reducing Bcl-2 expression and increasing cardiomyocyte susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. Our findings suggest that strategies to reduce GCN2 activity in cardiac tissue may be a novel approach to attenuate congestive heart failure development.

  6. Effects of parabolic flight on the cytoskeleton in cultured cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Li, Y. H.; Dai, Z. Q.; Nie, J. L.; Tan, Y. J.; Yu, J. R.

    As intracellular load-bearing structure cytoskeleton is hypothesized to play a crucial role in gravity perception and transduction of cells Recent data show that the cytoskeleton including actin microfilaments and microtubules is involved in modulating both the electrical activity and mechanical activity of myocardium Using fluorescence-labeling of cells with specific antibodies or agentsLwe found discontinued abruption of microtubules and enhanced polymerization of filamentous F actin in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes after exposure to the acute gravitational changes micro- and hyper-gravity in parabolic flight By staining of globular monomeric G actin and F-actin with Alexa Fluor conjugated DNase I and Texas red-phalloidin respectively confocal microscopy demonstrated more prominent structure of F-actin and decreased cytosolic G-actin in flight cells implying a shift in the F G equilibrium in favor of F-actin Using specific antibody against phosphorylated activated forms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK and focal adhesion kinase FAK we found that active ERK is co-localized with reorganized F-actin in flight cells while active FAK did not show evident collateral distribution with actin cytoskeleton indicating that ERK but not FAK might be involved in parabolic flight-induced polymerization of F-actin These results suggest that gravitational changes induced by parabolic flight substantially affected the distribution and organization of the actin microfilaments and microtubules in cultured cardiac myocytes and ERK might participate in the

  7. Dynamics of Ca2+-dependent Cl- channel modulation by niflumic acid in rabbit coronary arterial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Jonathan; Greenwood, Iain A; Leblanc, Normand

    2005-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (Cl(Ca)) are crucial regulators of vascular tone by promoting a depolarizing influence on the resting membrane potential of vascular smooth muscle cells. Niflumic acid (NFA), a potent blocker of Cl(Ca) in vascular myocytes, was shown recently to cause inhibition and paradoxical stimulation of sustained calcium-activated chloride currents [I(Cl(Ca))] in rabbit pulmonary artery myocytes. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether NFA produced a similar dual effect in coronary artery smooth muscle cells and to determine the concentration-dependence and dynamics of such a phenomenon. Sustained I(Cl(Ca)) evoked by intracellular Ca(2+) clamped at 500 nM were dose-dependently inhibited by NFA (IC(50) = 159 microM) and transiently augmented in a concentration-independent manner (10 microM to 1 mM) approximately 2-fold after NFA removal. However, the time to peak and duration of NFA-enhanced I(Cl(Ca)) increased in a concentration-dependent fashion. Moreover, the rate of recovery was reduced by membrane depolarization, suggesting the involvement of a voltage-dependent step in the interaction of NFA, leading to stimulation of I(Cl(Ca)). Computer simulations derived from a kinetic model involving low (K(i) = 1.25 mM) and high (K(i) < 30 microM) affinity sites could reproduce the properties of the NFA-modulated I(Cl(Ca)) fairly well.

  8. Integrins and Integrin-Associated Proteins in the Cardiac Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that are expressed in all cells, including those in the heart. They participate in multiple critical cellular processes including adhesion, extracellular matrix organization, signaling, survival, and proliferation. Particularly relevant for a contracting muscle cell, integrins are mechanotransducers, translating mechanical to biochemical information. While it is likely that cardiovascular clinicians and scientists have highest recognition of integrins in the cardiovascular system from drugs used to inhibit platelet aggregation, the focus of this article will be on the role of integrins specifically in the cardiac myocyte. Following a general introduction to integrin biology, the manuscript will discuss important work on integrin signaling, mechanotransduction, and lessons learned about integrin function from a range of model organisms. Then we will detail work on integrin-related proteins in the myocyte, how integrins may interact with ion channels and mediate viral uptake into cells, and also play a role in stem cell biology. Finally, we will discuss directions for future study. PMID:24481847

  9. Phospholemman Overexpression Inhibits Na+-K+-ATPase in Adult Rat Cardiac Myocytes: Relevance to Decreased Na+ pump Activity in Post-Infarction Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Moorman, J. Randall; Ahlers, Belinda A.; Carl, Lois L.; Lake, Douglas E.; Song, Jianliang; Mounsey, J. Paul; Tucker, Amy L.; Chan, Yiu-mo; Rothblum, Lawrence I.; Stahl, Richard C.; Carey, David J.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA levels of phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family of small single-span membrane proteins with putative ion-transport regulatory properties, were increased in postinfarction (MI) rat myocytes. We tested the hypothesis that the previously observed reduction in Na+-K+-ATPase activity in MI rat myocytes was due to PLM overexpression. In rat hearts harvested 3 and 7 days post-MI, PLM protein expression was increased by 2- and 4-fold, respectively. To simulate increased PLM expression post-MI, PLM was overexpressed in normal adult rat myocytes by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. PLM overexpression did not affect the relative level of phosphorylation on serine68 of PLM. Na+-K+-ATPase activity was measured as ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+ pump current (Ip). Compared to control myocytes overexpressing green fluorescent protein alone, Ip measured in myocytes overexpressing PLM was significantly (P<0.0001) lower at similar membrane voltages, pipette Na+ ([Na+]pip) and extracellular K+ concentrations ([K+]o). From −70 to +60 mV, neither [Na+]pip nor [K+]o required to attain half-maximal Ip was significantly different between control and PLM myocytes. This phenotype of decreased Vmax without appreciable changes in Km for Na+ and K+ in PLM overexpressed myocytes was similar to that observed in MI rat myocytes. Inhibition of Ip by PLM overexpression was not due to decreased Na+-K+-ATPase expression since there were no changes in either protein or messenger RNA levels of either α1 or α2 isoforms of Na+-K+-ATPase. In native rat cardiac myocytes, PLM co-immunoprecipitated with α-subunits of Na+-K+-ATPase. Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase by PLM overexpression, in addition to previously reported decrease in Na+-K+-ATPase expression, may explain altered Vmax but not Km of Na+-K+-ATPase in postinfarction rat myocytes. PMID:16195392

  10. Cardiac myocyte exosomes: stability, HSP60, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Malik, Z A; Kott, K S; Poe, A J; Kuo, T; Chen, L; Ferrara, K W; Knowlton, A A

    2013-04-01

    Exosomes, which are 50- to 100-nm-diameter lipid vesicles, have been implicated in intercellular communication, including transmitting malignancy, and as a way for viral particles to evade detection while spreading to new cells. Previously, we demonstrated that adult cardiac myocytes release heat shock protein (HSP)60 in exosomes. Extracellular HSP60, when not in exosomes, causes cardiac myocyte apoptosis via the activation of Toll-like receptor 4. Thus, release of HSP60 from exosomes would be damaging to the surrounding cardiac myocytes. We hypothesized that 1) pathological changes in the environment, such as fever, change in pH, or ethanol consumption, would increase exosome permeability; 2) different exosome inducers would result in different exosomal protein content; 3) ethanol at "physiological" concentrations would cause exosome release; and 4) ROS production is an underlying mechanism of increased exosome production. We found the following: first, exosomes retained their protein cargo under different physiological/pathological conditions, based on Western blot analyses. Second, mass spectrometry demonstrated that the protein content of cardiac exosomes differed significantly from other types of exosomes in the literature and contained cytosolic, sarcomeric, and mitochondrial proteins. Third, ethanol did not affect exosome stability but greatly increased the production of exosomes by cardiac myocytes. Fourth, ethanol- and hypoxia/reoxygenation-derived exosomes had different protein content. Finally, ROS inhibition reduced exosome production but did not completely inhibit it. In conclusion, exosomal protein content is influenced by the cell source and stimulus for exosome formation. ROS stimulate exosome production. The functions of exosomes remain to be fully elucidated.

  11. A unified theory of calcium alternans in ventricular myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhilin; Liu, Michael B.; Nivala, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) alternans is a dynamical phenomenon in ventricular myocytes, which is linked to the genesis of lethal arrhythmias. Iterated map models of intracellular Ca2+ cycling dynamics in ventricular myocytes under periodic pacing have been developed to study the mechanisms of Ca2+ alternans. Two mechanisms of Ca2+ alternans have been demonstrated in these models: one relies mainly on fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and uptake, and the other on refractoriness and other properties of Ca2+ sparks. Each of the two mechanisms can partially explain the experimental observations, but both have their inconsistencies with the experimental results. Here we developed an iterated map model that is composed of two coupled iterated maps, which unifies the two mechanisms into a single cohesive mathematical framework. The unified theory can consistently explain the seemingly contradictory experimental observations and shows that the two mechanisms work synergistically to promote Ca2+ alternans. Predictions of the theory were examined in a physiologically-detailed spatial Ca2+ cycling model of ventricular myocytes.

  12. A unified theory of calcium alternans in ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhilin; Liu, Michael B.; Nivala, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) alternans is a dynamical phenomenon in ventricular myocytes, which is linked to the genesis of lethal arrhythmias. Iterated map models of intracellular Ca2+ cycling dynamics in ventricular myocytes under periodic pacing have been developed to study the mechanisms of Ca2+ alternans. Two mechanisms of Ca2+ alternans have been demonstrated in these models: one relies mainly on fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and uptake, and the other on refractoriness and other properties of Ca2+ sparks. Each of the two mechanisms can partially explain the experimental observations, but both have their inconsistencies with the experimental results. Here we developed an iterated map model that is composed of two coupled iterated maps, which unifies the two mechanisms into a single cohesive mathematical framework. The unified theory can consistently explain the seemingly contradictory experimental observations and shows that the two mechanisms work synergistically to promote Ca2+ alternans. Predictions of the theory were examined in a physiologically-detailed spatial Ca2+ cycling model of ventricular myocytes. PMID:27762397

  13. Nanoscale three-dimensional imaging of the human myocyte.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Yang, Fei; Holzem, Katherine M; Van Leer, Brandon; Bugge, Cliff; Laughner, Jacob I; Green, Karen; Efimov, Igor R

    2014-10-01

    The ventricular human myocyte is spatially organized for optimal ATP and Ca(2+) delivery to sarcomeric myosin and ionic pumps during every excitation-contraction cycle. Comprehension of three-dimensional geometry of the tightly packed ultrastructure has been derived from discontinuous two-dimensional images, but has never been precisely reconstructed or analyzed in human myocardium. Using a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope, we created nanoscale resolution serial images to quantify the three-dimensional ultrastructure of a human left ventricular myocyte. Transverse tubules (t-tubule), lipid droplets, A-bands, and mitochondria occupy 1.8, 1.9, 10.8, and 27.9% of the myocyte volume, respectively. The complex t-tubule system has a small tortuosity (1.04±0.01), and is composed of long transverse segments with diameters of 317±24nm and short branches. Our data indicates that lipid droplets located well beneath the sarcolemma are proximal to t-tubules, where 59% (13 of 22) of lipid droplet centroids are within 0.50μm of a t-tubule. This spatial association could have an important implication in the development and treatment of heart failure because it connects two independently known pathophysiological alterations, a substrate switch from fatty acids to glucose and t-tubular derangement.

  14. Nanoscale Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Human Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Yang, Fei; Holzem, Katherine M.; Van Leer, Brandon; Bugge, Cliff; Laughner, Jacob I.; Green, Karen; Efimov, Igor R.

    2014-01-01

    The ventricular human myocyte is spatially organized for optimal ATP and Ca2+ delivery to sarcomeric myosin and ionic pumps during every excitation-contraction cycle. Comprehension of three-dimensional geometry of the tightly packed ultrastructure has been derived from discontinuous two-dimensional images, but has never been precisely reconstructed or analyzed in human myocardium. Using a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope, we created nanoscale resolution serial images to quantify the three-dimensional ultrastructure of a human left ventricular myocyte. Transverse tubules (t-tubule), lipid droplets, A-bands, and mitochondria occupy 1.8, 1.9, 10.8, and 27.9% of the myocyte volume, respectively. The complex t-tubule system has a small tortuosity (1.04 ± 0.01), and is composed of long transverse segments with diameters of 317 ± 24 nm and short branches. Our data indicates that lipid droplets located well beneath the sarcolemma are proximal to t-tubules, where 59% (13 of 22) of lipid droplet centroids are within 0.50 μm of a t-tubule. This spatial association could have an important implication in the development and treatment of heart failure because it connects two independently known pathophysiological alterations, a substrate switch from fatty acids to glucose and t-tubular derangement. PMID:25160725

  15. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts enhance endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression through 5'-AMP activated protein kinase/Surtuin 1-Krüpple like factor 2 pathway and modulate blood pressure in ouabain induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaopei; Liu, Xiangju; Feng, Hua; Zhao, Shaohua; Gao, Haiqing

    2012-01-01

    Grape seed proanthocyanidin extracts (GSPE) belonging to polyphenols, possess various biological effects including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant, anti-aging, anti-atherosclerosis, etc. GSPE is potential in regulating endothelial function. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear yet. In this study, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knocking down, we proved that GSPE increase endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in human umbilical vessel cells (HUVECs) in vitro, which was attributed to its transcription factor Krüpple like factor 2 (KLF2) induction. Furthermore, GSPE activate 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increase surtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein level, critical for KLF2 induction. We also illuminated the role of GSPE in hypertension treatment. By chronic administration of GSPE in ouabain induced hypertensive rats model, we access the effect of GSPE on blood pressure regulation and the possible mechanisms involved. After 5 weeks feeding, GSPE significantly block the ouabain induced blood pressure increase. The aortic NO production impaired by ouabain was improved. In conclusion, GSPE increase eNOS expression and NO production in an AMPK/SIRT1 dependent manner through KLF2 induction, and attenuate ouabain induced hypertension.

  16. Voltage and Calcium Dual Channel Optical Mapping of Cultured HL-1 Atrial Myocyte Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weiwei; Fast, Vladimir G.; Ye, Tong; Ai, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Optical mapping has proven to be a valuable technique to detect cardiac electrical activity on both intact ex vivo hearts and in cultured myocyte monolayers. HL-1 cells have been widely used as a 2-Dimensional cellular model for studying diverse aspects of cardiac physiology. However, it has been a great challenge to optically map calcium (Ca) transients and action potentials simultaneously from the same field of view in a cultured HL-1 atrial cell monolayer. This is because special handling and care is required to prepare healthy cells that can be electrically captured and optically mapped. Therefore, we have developed an optimal working protocol for dual channel optical mapping. In this manuscript, we have described in detail how to perform the dual channel optical mapping experiment. This protocol is a useful tool to enhance the understanding of action potential propagation and Ca kinetics in arrhythmia development. PMID:25867896

  17. The Heart: Mostly Postmitotic or Mostly Premitotic? Myocyte Cell Cycle, Senescence and Quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of myocyte division and myocyte-mediated regeneration has re-emerged in the past five years through development of sophisticated transgenic mice and carbon-dating of cells. Although, recently, a couple of studies have been conducted as an attempt to intervene in myocyte division, the efficiency in adult animals remains discouragingly low. Re-enforcing myocyte division is a vision that has been desired for decades, leading to years of experience in myocytes resistance to pro-proliferative stimuli. Previous attempts have indeed provided a platform for basic knowledge on molecular players and signaling in myocytes. However, natural biological processes such as hypertrophy and binucleation provide layers of complexity in interpretation of previous and current findings. A major hurdle in mediating myocyte division is a lack of insight in the myocyte cell cycle. To date, no knowledge is gained on myoycte cell cycle progression and/or duration. The current review will provide an overview of previous and current literature on myocytes cell cycle and division. Furthermore, this overview will point-out the limitations of current approaches and focus on re-igniting basic questions that may be essential in understand myocardial resistance to division. PMID:25442430

  18. Sympathetic neurons are a powerful driver of myocyte function in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Hege E.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Many therapeutic interventions in disease states of heightened cardiac sympathetic activity are targeted to the myocytes. However, emerging clinical data highlights a dominant role in disease progression by the neurons themselves. Here we describe a novel experimental model of the peripheral neuro-cardiac axis to study the neuron’s ability to drive a myocyte cAMP phenotype. We employed a co-culture of neonatal ventricular myocytes and sympathetic stellate neurons from normal (WKY) and pro-hypertensive (SHR) rats that are sympathetically hyper-responsive and measured nicotine evoked cAMP responses in the myocytes using a fourth generation FRET cAMP sensor. We demonstrated the dominant role of neurons in driving the myocyte ß-adrenergic phenotype, where SHR cultures elicited heightened myocyte cAMP responses during neural activation. Moreover, cross-culturing healthy neurons onto diseased myocytes rescued the diseased cAMP response of the myocyte. Conversely, healthy myocytes developed a diseased cAMP response if diseased neurons were introduced. Our results provide evidence for a dominant role played by the neuron in driving the adrenergic phenotype seen in cardiovascular disease. We also highlight the potential of using healthy neurons to turn down the gain of neurotransmission, akin to a smart pre-synaptic ß-blocker. PMID:27966588

  19. Colony-stimulating factor 2 enhances the developmental competence of yak (Poephagus grunniens) preimplantation embryos by modulating the expression of heat shock protein 70 kDa 1A.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zexing; Pan, Yangyang; Cui, Yan; Peng, Xiumei; Chen, Ping; Fan, Jiangfeng; Li, Guyue; Zhao, Tian; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Shujian; Yu, Sijiu

    2017-04-15

    Colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2) is known to promote the development and survival of rodents and ruminants preimplantation embryos; however, the effect of CSF2 on yak embryos has not been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of CSF2 on the developmental competence of yak embryos cultured in vitro in modified synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) medium and on the expression pattern of heat shock protein 70 kDa 1A (HSPA1A). In each experiment, cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were matured in vitro and fertilized with frozen-thawed semen. Zygotes were treated with varying concentrations of CSF2 (0, 10, 50, 100 ng/mL) until day 8 after fertilization. Embryo development was calculated as the percentage of oocytes that formed embryos at the 2-cell, 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell, morula and blastocyst stages. The total cell numbers (TCN) per blastocyst and their allocation to the inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) lineages were determined using differential CDX2 staining. The expression of HSPA1A was examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunochemistry to determine the mRNA and protein levels. The results showed that treatment with 50 ng/mL CSF2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the rate of blastocyst formation (19.01% versus 9.93%) and the TCN per blastocyst (96.94 versus 81.41) compared to the control group. However, no significant differences were observed in the other stages of development. qRT-PCR analysis confirmed that treatment with 50 ng/mL CSF2 significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the expression of HSPA1A mRNA in blastocysts cultured in vitro relative to the control group, but there were no significant differences between the other treatment groups. Immunocytochemical analysis confirmed that HSPA1A protein accumulation was gradually reduced in yak blastocysts cultured in 0, 10, 100 or 50 ng/mL CSF2, however, no significant differences were observed between the 10 and 100 ng/mL treatments (P > 0.05). In

  20. Myomaker is required for the fusion of fast-twitch myocytes in the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weibin; Roy, Sudipto

    2017-03-01

    During skeletal muscle development, myocytes aggregate and fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers. Inhibition of myocyte fusion is thought to significantly derail the differentiation of functional muscle fibers. Despite the purported importance of fusion in myogenesis, in vivo studies of this process in vertebrates are rather limited. Myomaker, a multipass transmembrane protein, has been shown to be the first muscle-specific fusion protein essential for myocyte fusion in the mouse. We have generated loss-of-function alleles in zebrafish myomaker, and found that fusion of myocytes into syncytial fast-twitch muscles was significantly compromised. However, mutant myocytes could be recruited to fuse with wild-type myocytes in chimeric embryos, albeit rather inefficiently. Conversely, overexpression of Myomaker was sufficient to induce hyperfusion among fast-twitch myocytes, and it also induced fusion among slow-twitch myocytes that are normally fusion-incompetent. In line with this, Myomaker overexpression also triggered fusion in another myocyte fusion mutant compromised in the function of the junctional cell adhesion molecule, Jam2a. We also provide evidence that Rac, a regulator of actin cytoskeleton, requires Myomaker activity to induce fusion, and that an approximately 3kb of myomaker promoter sequence, with multiple E-box motifs, is sufficient to direct expression within the fast-twitch muscle lineage. Taken together, our findings underscore a conserved role for Myomaker in vertebrate myocyte fusion. Strikingly, and in contrast to the mouse, homozygous myomaker mutants are viable and do not exhibit discernible locomotory defects. Thus, in the zebrafish, myocyte fusion is not an absolute requirement for skeletal muscle morphogenesis and function.

  1. Metabolic coupling of glutathione between mouse and quail cardiac myocytes and its protective role against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T Y; Yamamoto, I; Kanno, Y; Shiba, Y; Goshima, K

    1994-05-01

    Cultured quail myocytes were much more resistant to H2O2 toxicity than cultured mouse myocytes. The intracellular concentration of glutathione ([GSH]i) and the activity of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) in quail heart cells were about five and three times higher, respectively, than in mouse heart cells, although catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx) activity was similar in both. Preloading of gamma-glutamylcysteine monoethyl ester (gamma-GCE), a membrane-permeating GSH precursor, increased the H2O2 resistance of cultured mouse myocytes. These observations suggest that the high [GSH]i and the high activity of gamma-GCS in quail myocytes are responsible for their high resistance to H2O2. Both H2O2 sensitivity and [GSH]i of mosaic sheets composed of equal amounts of mouse and quail myocytes approximated those of sheets composed entirely of quail myocytes. From these observations, it is hypothesized that GSH was transferred from quail myocytes to mouse myocytes, probably through gap junctions between them, and that quail myocytes resynthesized GSH by a feedback mechanism, thus maintaining their intracellular GSH levels. When the fluorescent dye lucifer yellow was injected into a beating quail myocyte in a mosaic sheet, it spread to neighboring mouse myocytes but not to neighboring L cells (a cell line derived from mouse connective tissue). These observations indicate that existence of gap junctions in the region of cell contact between mouse and quail myocytes but not between quail myocytes and L cells. When quail myocytes preloaded with [3H]gamma-GCE were cocultured with mouse myocytes and L cells, the radioactivity was transmitted to neighboring mouse myocytes but not L cells. These observations show that GSH and/or its precursors can be transmitted from quail myocytes to mouse myocytes through gap junctions and that this can protect mouse myocytes from H2O2 toxicity. Mouse myocyte sheets composed of 10(4) cells or more showed higher resistance

  2. Myocyte Dedifferentiation Drives Extraocular Muscle Regeneration in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kasprick, Daniel S.; Junttila, Tyler L.; Grzegorski, Steven J.; Louie, Ke'ale W.; Chiari, Estelle F.; Kish, Phillip E.; Kahana, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize the injury response of extraocular muscles (EOMs) in adult zebrafish. Methods Adult zebrafish underwent lateral rectus (LR) muscle myectomy surgery to remove 50% of the muscle, followed by molecular and cellular characterization of the tissue response to the injury. Results Following myectomy, the LR muscle regenerated an anatomically correct and functional muscle within 7 to 10 days post injury (DPI). Following injury, the residual muscle stump was replaced by a mesenchymal cell population that lost cell polarity and expressed mesenchymal markers. Next, a robust proliferative burst repopulated the area of the regenerating muscle. Regenerating cells expressed myod, identifying them as myoblasts. However, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy failed to identify classic Pax7-positive satellite cells in control or injured EOMs. Instead, some proliferating nuclei were noted to express mef2c at the very earliest point in the proliferative burst, suggesting myonuclear reprogramming and dedifferentiation. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of regenerating cells followed by a second myectomy without repeat labeling resulted in a twice-regenerated muscle broadly populated by BrdU-labeled nuclei with minimal apparent dilution of the BrdU signal. A double-pulse experiment using BrdU and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) identified double-labeled nuclei, confirming the shared progenitor lineage. Rapid regeneration occurred despite a cell cycle length of 19.1 hours, whereas 72% of the regenerating muscle nuclei entered the cell cycle by 48 hours post injury (HPI). Dextran lineage tracing revealed that residual myocytes were responsible for muscle regeneration. Conclusions EOM regeneration in adult zebrafish occurs by dedifferentiation of residual myocytes involving a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition. A mechanistic understanding of myocyte reprogramming may facilitate novel approaches to the development of molecular

  3. Transformation of adult rat cardiac myocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Tamas; Lozinskiy, Ilya; Payne, Charles E; Edelmann, Stephanie; Norton, Byron; Chen, Biyi; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2008-03-01

    We characterized the morphological, electrical and mechanical alterations of cardiomyocytes in long-term cell culture. Morphometric parameters, sarcomere length, T-tubule density, cell capacitance, L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)), inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)), cytosolic calcium transients, action potential and contractile parameters of adult rat ventricular myocytes were determined on each day of 5 days in culture. We also analysed the health of the myocytes using an apoptotic/necrotic viability assay. The data show that myocytes undergo profound morphological and functional changes during culture. We observed a progressive reduction in the cell area (from 2502 +/- 70 microm(2) on day 0 to 1432 +/- 50 microm(2) on day 5), T-tubule density, systolic shortening (from 0.11 +/- 0.02 to 0.05 +/- 0.01 microm) and amplitude of calcium transients (from 1.54 +/- 0.19 to 0.67 +/- 0.19) over 5 days of culture. The negative force-frequency relationship, characteristic of rat myocardium, was maintained during the first 2 days but diminished thereafter. Cell capacitance (from 156 +/- 8 to 105 +/- 11 pF) and membrane currents were also reduced (I(Ca,L), from 3.98 +/- 0.39 to 2.12 +/- 0.37 pA pF; and I(K1), from 34.34p +/- 2.31 to 18.00 +/- 5.97 pA pF(-1)). We observed progressive depolarization of the resting membrane potential during culture (from 77.3 +/- 2.5 to 34.2 +/- 5.9 mV) and, consequently, action potential morphology was profoundly altered as well. The results of the viability assays indicate that these alterations could not be attributed to either apoptosis or necrosis but are rather an adaptation to the culture conditions over time.

  4. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF.

  5. N-acetylcysteine reverses cardiac myocyte dysfunction in a rodent model of behavioral stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fangping; Hadfield, Jessalyn M.; Berzingi, Chalak; Hollander, John M.; Miller, Diane B.; Nichols, Cody E.

    2013-01-01

    Compelling clinical reports reveal that behavioral stress alone is sufficient to cause reversible myocardial dysfunction in selected individuals. We developed a rodent stress cardiomyopathy model by a combination of prenatal and postnatal behavioral stresses (Stress). We previously reported a decrease in percent fractional shortening by echo, both systolic and diastolic dysfunction by catheter-based hemodynamics, as well as attenuated hemodynamic and inotropic responses to the β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO) in Stress rats compared with matched controls (Kan H, Birkle D, Jain AC, Failinger C, Xie S, Finkel MS. J Appl Physiol 98: 77–82, 2005). We now report enhanced catecholamine responses to behavioral stress, as evidenced by increased circulating plasma levels of norepinephrine (P < 0.01) and epinephrine (P < 0.01) in Stress rats vs. controls. Cardiac myocytes isolated from Stress rats also reveal evidence of oxidative stress, as indicated by decreased ATP, increased GSSG, and decreased GSH-to-GSSG ratio in the presence of increased GSH peroxidase and catalase activities (P < 0.01, for each). We also report blunted inotropic and intracellular Ca2+ concentration responses to extracellular Ca2+ (P < 0.05), as well as altered inotropic responses to the intracellular calcium regulator, caffeine (20 mM; P < 0.01). Treatment of cardiac myocytes with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (10−3 M) normalized calcium handling in response to ISO and extracellular Ca2+ concentration and inotropic response to caffeine (P < 0.01, for each). NAC also attenuated the blunted inotropic response to ISO and Ca2+ (P < 0.01, for each). Surprisingly, NAC did not reverse the changes in GSH, GSSG, or GSH-to-GSSG ratio. These data support a GSH-independent salutary effect of NAC on intracellular calcium signaling in this rodent model of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:23722706

  6. On the mechanism of cesium-induced voltage and current tails in single ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, J B; Vassalle, M

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different concentrations of cesium modify membrane potentials and currents were investigated in guinea pig single ventricular myocytes. In a dose-dependent manner, cesium reversibly decreases the resting potential and action potential amplitude and duration, and induces a diastolic decaying voltage tail (Vex), which increases at more negative and reverses at less negative potentials. In voltage-clamped myocytes, Cs+ increases the holding current, increases the outward current at plateau levels while decreasing it at potentials closer to resting potential, induces an inward tail current (Iex) on return to resting potential and causes a negative shift of the threshold for the inward current. During depolarizing ramps, Cs+ decreases the outward current negative to inward rectification range, whereas it increases the current past that range. During repolarizing ramps, Cs+ shifts the threshold for removal of inward rectification negative slope to less negative values. Cs+-induced voltage and current tails are increased by repetitive activity, caffeine (5 mM) and high [Ca2+]O (8.1 mM), and are reduced by low Ca2+ (0.45 mM), Cd2+ (0.2 mM) and Ni2+ (2 mM). Ni2+ also abolishes the tail current that follows steps more positive than ECa. We conclude that Cs+ (1) decreases the resting potential by decreasing the outward current at more negative potentials, (2) shortens the action potential by increasing the outward current at potentials positive to the negative slope of inward rectification, and (3) induces diastolic tails through a Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which apparently is an enhanced electrogenic Na-Ca exchange.

  7. Isolation of cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts from neonatal rat pups.

    PubMed

    Golden, Honey B; Gollapudi, Deepika; Gerilechaogetu, Fnu; Li, Jieli; Cristales, Ricardo J; Peng, Xu; Dostal, David E

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and fibroblasts (FBs) serve as in vitro models for studying fundamental mechanisms underlying cardiac pathologies, as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets. Both cell types are relatively easy to culture as monolayers and can be manipulated using molecular and pharmacological tools. Because NRVM cease to proliferate after birth, and FBs undergo phenotypic changes and senescence after a few passages in tissue culture, primary cultures of both cell types are required for experiments. Below we describe methods that provide good cell yield and viability of primary cultures of NRVM and FBs from 0 to 3-day-old neonatal rat pups.

  8. Effects of Na+ Current and Mechanogated Channels in Myofibroblasts on Myocyte Excitability and Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingtao; Lin, Jialun; Han, Guilai

    2016-01-01

    Fibrotic remodeling, characterized by fibroblast phenotype switching, is often associated with atrial fibrillation and heart failure. This study aimed to investigate the effects on electrotonic myofibroblast-myocyte (Mfb-M) coupling on cardiac myocytes excitability and repolarization of the voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) and single mechanogated channels (MGCs) in human atrial Mfbs. Mathematical modeling was developed from a combination of (1) models of the human atrial myocyte (including the stretch activated ion channel current, ISAC) and Mfb and (2) our formulation of currents through VGSCs (INa_Mfb) and MGCs (IMGC_Mfb) based upon experimental findings. The effects of changes in the intercellular coupling conductance, the number of coupled Mfbs, and the basic cycle length on the myocyte action potential were simulated. The results demonstrated that the integration of ISAC, INa_Mfb, and IMGC_Mfb reduced the amplitude of the myocyte membrane potential (Vmax) and the action potential duration (APD), increased the depolarization of the resting myocyte membrane potential (Vrest), and made it easy to trigger spontaneous excitement in myocytes. For Mfbs, significant electrotonic depolarizations were exhibited with the addition of INa_Mfb and IMGC_Mfb. Our results indicated that ISAC, INa_Mfb, and IMGC_Mfb significantly influenced myocytes and Mfbs properties and should be considered in future cardiac pathological mathematical modeling. PMID:27980607

  9. Regulation of cardiac myocyte contractility by phospholemman: Na+/Ca2+ exchange versus Na+ -K+ -ATPase.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, JuFang; Cheskis, Ellina; Chan, Tung O; Feldman, Arthur M; Tucker, Amy L; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2008-10-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) regulates cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in cardiac myocytes. PLM, when phosphorylated at Ser(68), disinhibits Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase but inhibits NCX1. PLM regulates cardiac contractility by modulating Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and/or NCX1. In this study, we first demonstrated that adult mouse cardiac myocytes cultured for 48 h had normal surface membrane areas, t-tubules, and NCX1 and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase levels, and retained near normal contractility, but alpha(1)-subunit of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase was slightly decreased. Differences in contractility between myocytes isolated from wild-type (WT) and PLM knockout (KO) hearts were preserved after 48 h of culture. Infection with adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) did not affect contractility at 48 h. When WT PLM was overexpressed in PLM KO myocytes, contractility and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) transients reverted back to those observed in cultured WT myocytes. Both Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase current (I(pump)) and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current (I(NaCa)) in PLM KO myocytes rescued with WT PLM were depressed compared with PLM KO myocytes. Overexpressing the PLMS68E mutant (phosphomimetic) in PLM KO myocytes resulted in the suppression of I(NaCa) but had no effect on I(pump). Contractility, [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitudes, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) contents in PLM KO myocytes overexpressing the PLMS68E mutant were depressed compared with PLM KO myocytes overexpressing GFP. Overexpressing the PLMS68A mutant (mimicking unphosphorylated PLM) in PLM KO myocytes had no effect on I(NaCa) but decreased I(pump). Contractility, [Ca(2+)](i) transient amplitudes, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) contents in PLM KO myocytes overexpressing the S68A mutant were similar to PLM KO myocytes overexpressing GFP. We conclude that at the single-myocyte level, PLM affects cardiac contractility and [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis primarily by its direct

  10. Myocyte repolarization modulates myocardial function in aging dogs.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Signore, Sergio; Qanud, Khaled; Borghetti, Giulia; Meo, Marianna; Cannata, Antonio; Zhou, Yu; Wybieralska, Ewa; Luciani, Marco; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Zhang, Eric; Matsuda, Alex; Webster, Andrew; Cimini, Maria; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; D'Alessandro, David A; Wunimenghe, Oriyanhan; Michler, Robert E; Royer, Christopher; Goichberg, Polina; Leri, Annarosa; Barrett, Edward G; Anversa, Piero; Hintze, Thomas H; Rota, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Studies of myocardial aging are complex and the mechanisms involved in the deterioration of ventricular performance and decreased functional reserve of the old heart remain to be properly defined. We have studied a colony of beagle dogs from 3 to 14 yr of age kept under a highly regulated environment to define the effects of aging on the myocardium. Ventricular, myocardial, and myocyte function, together with anatomical and structural properties of the organ and cardiomyocytes, were evaluated. Ventricular hypertrophy was not observed with aging and the structural composition of the myocardium was modestly affected. Alterations in the myocyte compartment were identified in aged dogs, and these factors negatively interfere with the contractile reserve typical of the young heart. The duration of the action potential is prolonged in old cardiomyocytes contributing to the slower electrical recovery of the myocardium. Also, the remodeled repolarization of cardiomyocytes with aging provides inotropic support to the senescent muscle but compromises its contractile reserve, rendering the old heart ineffective under conditions of high hemodynamic demand. The defects in the electrical and mechanical properties of cardiomyocytes with aging suggest that this cell population is an important determinant of the cardiac senescent phenotype. Collectively, the delayed electrical repolarization of aging cardiomyocytes may be viewed as a critical variable of the aging myopathy and its propensity to evolve into ventricular decompensation under stressful conditions.

  11. Erythromycin contracts rabbit colon myocytes via occupation of motilin receptors.

    PubMed

    Hasler, W L; Heldsinger, A; Chung, O Y

    1992-01-01

    Erythromycin stimulates gastroduodenal motility via action on motilin receptors. We evaluated erythromycin as a colonic muscle motilin agonist using in vitro rabbit colon studies. Isolated myocytes contracted to erythromycin with a half-maximal effective concentration of 2 pM and peak shortening of 22.4 +/- 2.5% at 1 nM, which was superimposable with the response to motilin. 125I-labeled motilin binding to colon muscle homogenates was saturable and specific with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.39 nM and maximal binding (Bmax) of 41 +/- 3 fmol/mg protein. Motilin displaced specifically bound 125I-motilin, with a Kd of 0.31 nM. Erythromycin displaced 125I-motilin but was less potent, with an inhibitory constant of 84.0 nM. Bmax values from displacement studies were similar to the Scatchard data. Motilin receptor protection from alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide preserved contraction to motilin and erythromycin but not acetylcholine or cholecystokinin, whereas protection with erythromycin preserved contraction to motilin but not other agonists. In conclusion, erythromycin binds to colon muscle motilin receptors present in densities similar to reported values for the upper gut. Furthermore, erythromycin contracts colonic myocytes via specific action on motilin receptors. Thus erythromycin may have colonic motor-stimulating properties by action on motilin receptors.

  12. Microfluidic partitioning of the extracellular space around single cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes the partitioning of the extracellular space around an electrically activated single cardiac myocyte, constrained within a microfluidic device. Central to this new method is the production of a hydrophobic gap-structure, which divides the extracellular space into two distinct microfluidic pools. The content of these pools was controlled using a pair of concentric automated pipets (subsequently called "dual superfusion pipet"), each providing the ability to dispense (i.e., the source, inner pipet) and aspirate (the sink, outer pipet) a buffer solution (perfusate) into each of the two pools. For rapid solution switching around the cell, additional dual superfusion pipets were inserted into the microchannel for defined time periods using a piezostepper, enabling us to add a test solution, such as a drug. Three distinct areas of the cell were manipulated, namely, the microfluidic environment, the cellular membrane, and the intracellular space. Planar integrated microelectrodes enabled the electrical stimulation of the cardiomyocyte and the recording of the evoked action potential. The device was mounted on an inverted microscope to allow simultaneous sarcomere length and epifluorescence measurements during evoked electrical activity, including, for example, the response of the stimulated end of the cardiac myocyte in comparison with the untreated cell end.

  13. Profound regulation of Na/K pump activity by transient elevations of cytoplasmic calcium in murine cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang-Min; Deisl, Christine; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Small changes of Na/K pump activity regulate internal Ca release in cardiac myocytes via Na/Ca exchange. We now show conversely that transient elevations of cytoplasmic Ca strongly regulate cardiac Na/K pumps. When cytoplasmic Na is submaximal, Na/K pump currents decay rapidly during extracellular K application and multiple results suggest that an inactivation mechanism is involved. Brief activation of Ca influx by reverse Na/Ca exchange enhances pump currents and attenuates current decay, while repeated Ca elevations suppress pump currents. Pump current enhancement reverses over 3 min, and results are similar in myocytes lacking the regulatory protein, phospholemman. Classical signaling mechanisms, including Ca-activated protein kinases and reactive oxygen, are evidently not involved. Electrogenic signals mediated by intramembrane movement of hydrophobic ions, such as hexyltriphenylphosphonium (C6TPP), increase and decrease in parallel with pump currents. Thus, transient Ca elevation and Na/K pump inactivation cause opposing sarcolemma changes that may affect diverse membrane processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19267.001 PMID:27627745

  14. Local control of β-adrenergic stimulation: Effects on ventricular myocyte electrophysiology and Ca2+-transient1

    PubMed Central

    Heijman, Jordi; Volders, Paul G.A.; Westra, Ronald L.; Rudy, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    Local signaling domains and numerous interacting molecular pathways and substrates contribute to the whole-cell response of myocytes during β-adrenergic stimulation (βARS). We aimed to elucidate the quantitative contribution of substrates and their local signaling environments during βARS to the canine epicardial ventricular myocyte electrophysiology and calcium transient (CaT). We present a computational compartmental model of βARS and its electrophysiological effects. Novel aspects of the model include localized signaling domains, incorporation of β1 and β2 receptor isoforms, a detailed population-based approach to integrate the βAR and Ca2+/Calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling pathways and their effects on a wide range of substrates that affect whole-cell electrophysiology and CaT. The model identifies major roles for phosphodiesterases, adenylyl cyclases, PKA and restricted diffusion in the control of local cAMP levels and shows that activation of specific cAMP domains by different receptor isoforms allows for specific control of action potential and CaT properties. In addition, the model predicts increased CaMKII activity during βARS due to rate-dependent accumulation and increased Ca2+ cycling. CaMKII inhibition, reduced compartmentation, and selective blockade of β1AR are predicted to reduce the occurrence of delayed afterdepolarizations during βARS. Finally, the relative contribution of each PKA substrate to whole-cell electrophysiology is quantified by comparing simulations with and without phosphorylation of each target. In conclusion, this model enhances our understanding of localized βAR signaling and its whole-cell effects in ventricular myocytes by incorporating receptor isoforms, multiple pathways and a detailed representation of multiple-target phosphorylation; it provides a basis for further studies of βARS under pathological conditions. PMID:21345340

  15. Glycolytic inhibition: effects on diastolic relaxation and intracellular calcium handling in hypertrophied rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kagaya, Y; Weinberg, E O; Ito, N; Mochizuki, T; Barry, W H; Lorell, B H

    1995-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that glycolytic inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose causes greater impairment of diastolic relaxation and intracellular calcium handling in well-oxygenated hypertrophied adult rat myocytes compared with control myocytes. We simultaneously measured cell motion and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) with indo-1 in isolated paced myocytes from aortic-banded rats and sham-operated rats. There was no difference in either the end-diastolic or peak-systolic [Ca2+]i between control and hypertrophied myocytes (97 +/- 18 vs. 105 +/- 15 nM, 467 +/- 92 vs. 556 +/- 67 nM, respectively). Myocytes were first superfused with oxygenated Hepes-buffered solution containing 1.2 mM CaCl2, 5.6 mM glucose, and 5 mM acetate, and paced at 3 Hz at 36 degrees C. Exposure to 20 mM 2-deoxyglucose as substitution of glucose for 15 min caused an upward shift of end-diastolic cell position in both control (n = 5) and hypertrophied myocytes (n = 10) (P < 0.001 vs. baseline), indicating an impaired extent of relaxation. Hypertrophied myocytes, however, showed a greater upward shift in end-diastolic cell position and slowing of relaxation compared with control myocytes (delta 144 +/- 28 vs. 55 +/- 15% of baseline diastolic position, P < 0.02). Exposure to 2-deoxyglucose increased end-diastolic [Ca2+]i in both groups (P < 0.001 vs. baseline), but there was no difference between hypertrophied and control myocytes (218 +/- 38 vs. 183 +/- 29 nM, respectively). The effects of 2-deoxyglucose were corroborated in isolated oxygenated perfused hearts in which glycolytic inhibition which caused severe elevation of isovolumic diastolic pressure and prolongation of relaxation in the hypertrophied hearts compared with controls. In summary, the inhibition of the glycolytic pathway impairs diastolic relaxation to a greater extent in hypertrophied myocytes than in control myocytes even in well-oxygenated conditions. The severe impairment of diastolic relaxation induced by 2

  16. Effects of phorbol ester on contraction, intracellular pH and intracellular Ca2+ in isolated mammalian ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, K T; Harding, S E

    1991-01-01

    1. We have investigated the actions of certain phorbol esters on the intracellular pH, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility of isolated rat and guinea-pig cardiac myocytes. Intracellular pH was measured using 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and intracellular Ca2+ was measured using Fura-2. 2. Application of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (also called phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) (TPA) (which activates protein kinase C) to rat cardiac myocytes significantly increased cell shortening by 116 +/- 34% (n = 8) (p less than 0.02). The rate of change of cell length during contraction (i.e. +dL/dt) increased from 67.2 +/- 8.7 microns/s to 127.7 +/- 14.1 microns/s (n = 7). The rate of change of cell length during relaxation (-dL/dt) increased from 55.8 +/- 7.4 microns/s to 118.9 +/- 12.1 microns/s (n = 7). Time to peak shortening was unchanged. 3. Application of 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, which does not activate protein kinase C, did not affect rat myocyte contractility. An insignificant decrease in contractility (by 7.5 +/- 7.5%) was observed (n = 5). The positive inotropic effect of TPA may therefore be evoked through an activation of protein kinase C. 4. In rat myocytes we have measured the changes of pHi and contractility (cell shortening) during an alkalosis and acidosis induced by exposure to and subsequent removal of NH4Cl both in the presence and absence of TPA. Recovery times from an acid load were significantly (p less than 0.05) enhanced by 15.1 +/- 6.9% (n = 13) in the presence of TPA. Recovery times of cell shortening were also more rapid (p less than 0.05) by an average of 59.1 +/- 10.6% (n = 5) in the presence of TPA. Recovery times were unchanged in the presence of 4-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (which does not activate protein kinase C). 5. Since pHi recovery of an isolated myocyte from an acid load is partially inhibited by the presence of 1 mM-amiloride and inhibited by removing extracellular Na

  17. Direct toxic effects of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke on cardiac myocytes at clinically relevant concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Shigeyuki; Zhang Xiuquan; Kadono, Toshie; Matsuoka, Nobuhiro; Rollins, Douglas; Badger, Troy; Rodesch, Christopher K.; Barry, William H.

    2009-04-01

    Aims: Our goal was to determine if clinically relevant concentrations of aqueous extract of cigarette smoke (CSE) have direct deleterious effects on ventricular myocytes during simulated ischemia, and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Methods: CSE was prepared with a smoking chamber. Ischemia was simulated by metabolic inhibition (MI) with cyanide (CN) and 0 glucose. Adult rabbit and mouse ventricular myocyte [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was measured by flow cytometry using fluo-3. Mitochondrial [Ca{sup 2+}] was measured with confocal microscopy, and Rhod-2 fluorescence. The mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) was detected by TMRM fluorescence and myocyte contracture. Myocyte oxidative stress was quantified by dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence with confocal microscopy. Results: CSE 0.1% increased myocyte contracture caused by MI. The nicotine concentration (HPLC) in 0.1% CSE was 15 ng/ml, similar to that in humans after smoking cigarettes. CSE 0.1% increased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uptake, and increased the susceptibility of mitochondria to the MPT. CSE 0.1% increased DCF fluorescence in isolated myocytes, and increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in paced myocytes exposed to 2.0 mM CN, 0 glucose (P-MI). These effects were inhibited by the superoxide scavenger Tiron. The effect of CSE on [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} during P-MI was also prevented by ranolazine. Conclusions: CSE in clinically relevant concentrations increases myocyte [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} during simulated ischemia, and increases myocyte susceptibility to the MPT. These effects appear to be mediated at least in part by oxidative radicals in CSE, and likely contribute to the effects of cigarette smoke to increase myocardial infarct size, and to decrease angina threshold.

  18. Vector-averaged gravity alters myocyte and neuron properties in cell culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, Raphael; Hoeger, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    The effect of changes in the gravitational field of developing neurons and myocytes on the development of these cells was investigated using observations of rotated cultures of embryonic spinal neurons and myocytes in a horizontal clinostat, in which rotation produces, from the cells' perspective, a 'vector-free' gravity environment by continous averaging of the vector, thus simulating the microgravity of space. It was found that, at rotation rates between 1 and 50 rpm, cellular and nuclear areas of myocytes become significantly enlarged and the number of presumptive nucleoli increase; in neurons, frequent and large swellings appeared along neuritic shafts. Some of these changes were reversible after the cessation of rotation.

  19. Cardiac sodium channel palmitoylation regulates channel availability and myocyte excitability with implications for arrhythmia generation

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zifan; Xiao, Yucheng; Meng, Jingwei; Hudmon, Andy; Cummins, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav1.5) play an essential role in regulating cardiac electric activity by initiating and propagating action potentials in the heart. Altered Nav1.5 function is associated with multiple cardiac diseases including long-QT3 and Brugada syndrome. Here, we show that Nav1.5 is subject to palmitoylation, a reversible post-translational lipid modification. Palmitoylation increases channel availability and late sodium current activity, leading to enhanced cardiac excitability and prolonged action potential duration. In contrast, blocking palmitoylation increases closed-state channel inactivation and reduces myocyte excitability. We identify four cysteines as possible Nav1.5 palmitoylation substrates. A mutation of one of these is associated with cardiac arrhythmia (C981F), induces a significant enhancement of channel closed-state inactivation and ablates sensitivity to depalmitoylation. Our data indicate that alterations in palmitoylation can substantially control Nav1.5 function and cardiac excitability and this form of post-translational modification is likely an important contributor to acquired and congenital arrhythmias. PMID:27337590

  20. Regulation of Ca2+ and electrical alternans in cardiac myocytes: role of CAMKII and repolarizing currents.

    PubMed

    Livshitz, Leonid M; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-06-01

    Alternans of cardiac repolarization is associated with arrhythmias and sudden death. At the cellular level, alternans involves beat-to-beat oscillation of the action potential (AP) and possibly Ca(2+) transient (CaT). Because of experimental difficulty in independently controlling the Ca(2+) and electrical subsystems, mathematical modeling provides additional insights into mechanisms and causality. Pacing protocols were conducted in a canine ventricular myocyte model with the following results: 1) CaT alternans results from refractoriness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release system; alternation of the L-type calcium current has a negligible effect; 2) CaT-AP coupling during late AP occurs through the sodium-calcium exchanger and underlies AP duration (APD) alternans; 3) increased Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity extends the range of CaT and APD alternans to slower frequencies and increases alternans magnitude; its decrease suppresses CaT and APD alternans, exerting an antiarrhythmic effect; and 4) increase of the rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) also suppresses APD alternans but without suppressing CaT alternans. Thus CaMKII inhibition eliminates APD alternans by eliminating its cause (CaT alternans) while I(Kr) enhancement does so by weakening CaT-APD coupling. The simulations identify combined CaMKII inhibition and I(Kr) enhancement as a possible antiarrhythmic intervention.

  1. Criticality in intracellular calcium signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Nivala, Michael; Ko, Christopher Y; Nivala, Melissa; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2012-06-06

    Calcium (Ca) is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates many biological functions. The elementary events of local Ca signaling are Ca sparks, which occur randomly in time and space, and integrate to produce global signaling events such as intra- and intercellular Ca waves and whole-cell Ca oscillations. Despite extensive experimental characterization in many systems, the transition from local random to global synchronous events is still poorly understood. Here we show that criticality, a ubiquitous dynamical phenomenon in nature, is responsible for the transition from local to global Ca signaling. We demonstrate this first in a computational model of Ca signaling in a cardiac myocyte and then experimentally in mouse ventricular myocytes, complemented by a theoretical agent-based model to delineate the underlying dynamics. We show that the interaction between the Ca release units via Ca-induced Ca release causes self-organization of Ca spark clusters. When the coupling between Ca release units is weak, the cluster-size distribution is exponential. As the interactions become strong, the cluster-size distribution changes to a power-law distribution, which is characteristic of criticality in thermodynamic and complex nonlinear systems, and facilitates the formation and propagation of Ca waves and whole-cell Ca oscillations. Our findings illustrate how criticality is harnessed by a biological cell to regulate Ca signaling via self-organization of random subcellular events into cellular-scale oscillations, and provide a general theoretical framework for the transition from local Ca signaling to global Ca signaling in biological cells.

  2. l-Arginine currents in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Peluffo, R Daniel

    2007-01-01

    l-Arginine (l-Arg) is a basic amino acid that plays a central role in the biosynthesis of nitric oxide, creatine, agmantine, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Most tissues, including myocardium, must import l-Arg from the circulation to ensure adequate intracellular levels of this amino acid. This study reports novel l-Arg-activated inward currents in whole-cell voltage-clamped rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Ion-substitution experiments identified extracellular l-Arg as the charge-carrying cationic species responsible for these currents, which, thus, represent l-Arg import into cardiac myocytes. This result was independently confirmed by an increase in myocyte nitric oxide production upon extracellular application of l-Arg. The inward movement of Arg molecules was found to be passive and independent of Na2+, K2+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. The process displayed saturation and membrane potential (Vm)-dependent kinetics, with a K0.5 for l-Arg that increased from 5 mm at hyperpolarizing Vm to 20 mm at +40 mV. l-Lysine and l-ornithine but not d-Arg produced currents with characteristics similar to that activated by l-Arg indicating that the transport process is stereospecific for cationic l-amino acids. l-Arg current was fully blocked after brief incubation with 0.2 mmN-ethylmaleimide. These features suggest that the activity of the low-affinity, high-capacity CAT-2A member of the y2+ family of transporters is responsible for l-Arg currents in acutely isolated cardiomyocytes. Regardless of the mechanism, we hypothesize that a low-affinity arginine transport process in heart, by ensuring substrate availability for sustained NO production, might play a cardio-protective role during catabolic states known to increase Arg plasma levels severalfold. PMID:17303641

  3. Trafficking of an endogenous potassium channel in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiantian; Cheng, Yvonne; Dou, Ying; Goonesekara, Charitha; David, Jens-Peter; Steele, David F.; Huang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The roles of several small GTPases in the expression of an endogenous potassium current, Ito,f, in adult rat ventricular myocytes have been investigated. The results indicate that forward trafficking of newly synthesized Kv4.2, which underlies Ito,f in these cells, requires both Rab1 and Sar1 function. Expression of a Rab1 dominant negative (DN) reduced Ito,f current density by roughly one-half relative to control, mCherry-transfected myocytes. Similarly, expression of a Sar1DN nearly halved Ito,f current density. Rab11 is not essential to trafficking of Kv4.2, as expression of a Rab11DN had no effect on Ito,f over the time frames investigated here. In a process dependent on intact endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport, however, overexpression of wild-type Rab11 resulted in a doubling of Ito,f density; block of ER-to-Golgi traffic by Brefeldin A completely abrogated the effect. Also implicated in the trafficking of Kv4.2 are Rab5 and Rab4. Rab5DN expression increased endogenous Ito,f by two- to threefold, nonadditively with inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis. And, in a phenomenon similar to that previously reported for myoblast-expressed Kv1.5, Rab4DN expression roughly doubled endogenous peak transient currents. Colocalization experiments confirmed the involvement of Rab4 in postinternalization trafficking of Kv4.2. There was little role evident for the lysosome in the degradation of internalized Kv4.2, as overexpression of neither wild-type nor DN isoforms of Rab7 had any effect on Ito,f. Instead, degradation may depend largely on the proteasome; the proteasome inhibitor MG132 significantly increased Ito,f density. PMID:22914645

  4. Intracellular calcium handling in ventricular myocytes from mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Iwan A; Allen, David G

    2007-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal degenerative disease of skeletal muscle, characterized by the absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Some DMD patients show a dilated cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure. This study explores the possibility that dystrophin is involved in the regulation of a stretch-activated channel (SAC), which in the absence of dystrophin has increased activity and allows greater Ca(2+) into cardiomyocytes. Because cardiac failure only appears late in the progression of DMD, we examined age-related effects in the mdx mouse, an animal model of DMD. Ca(2+) measurements using a fluorescent Ca(2+)-sensitive dye fluo-4 were performed on single ventricular myocytes from mdx and wild-type mice. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry were performed on whole hearts to determine expression levels of key proteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Old mdx mice had raised resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Isolated ventricular myocytes from young and old mdx mice displayed abnormal Ca(2+) transients, increased protein expression of the ryanodine receptor, and decreased protein expression of serine-16-phosphorylated phospholamban. Caffeine-induced Ca(2+) transients showed that the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger function was increased in old mdx mice. Two SAC inhibitors streptomycin and GsMTx-4 both reduced resting [Ca(2+)](i) in old mdx mice, suggesting that SACs may be involved in the Ca(2+)-handling abnormalities in these animals. This finding was supported by immunoblotting data, which demonstrated that old mdx mice had increased protein expression of canonical transient receptor potential channel 1, a likely candidate protein for SACs. SACs may play a role in the pathogenesis of the heart failure associated with DMD. Early in the disease process and before the onset of clinical symptoms increased, SAC activity may underlie the abnormal Ca(2+) handling in young mdx mice.

  5. Variations in local calcium signaling in adjacent cardiac myocytes of the intact mouse heart detected with two-dimensional confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Karin P.; Hohendanner, Felix; Blatter, Lothar A.; Pieske, Burkert M.; Heinzel, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Dyssynchronous local Ca release within individual cardiac myocytes has been linked to cellular contractile dysfunction. Differences in Ca kinetics in adjacent cells may also provide a substrate for inefficient contraction and arrhythmias. In a new approach we quantify variation in local Ca transients between adjacent myocytes in the whole heart. Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts were loaded with Fluo-8 AM to detect Ca and Di-4-ANEPPS to visualize cell membranes. A spinning disc confocal microscope with a fast camera allowed us to record Ca signals within an area of 465 μm by 315 μm with an acquisition speed of 55 fps. Images from multiple transients recorded at steady state were registered to their time point in the cardiac cycle to restore averaged local Ca transients with a higher temporal resolution. Local Ca transients within and between adjacent myocytes were compared with regard to amplitude, time to peak and decay at steady state stimulation (250 ms cycle length). Image registration from multiple sequential Ca transients allowed reconstruction of high temporal resolution (2.4 ± 1.3 ms) local CaT in 2D image sets (N = 4 hearts, n = 8 regions). During steady state stimulation, spatial Ca gradients were homogeneous within cells in both directions and independent of distance between measured points. Variation in CaT amplitudes was similar across the short and the long side of neighboring cells. Variations in TAU and TTP were similar in both directions. Isoproterenol enhanced the CaT but not the overall pattern of spatial heterogeneities. Here we detected and analyzed local Ca signals in intact mouse hearts with high temporal and spatial resolution, taking into account 2D arrangement of the cells. We observed significant differences in the variation of CaT amplitude along the long and short axis of cardiac myocytes. Variations of Ca signals between neighboring cells may contribute to the substrate of cardiac remodeling. PMID:25628569

  6. De Novo Human Cardiac Myocytes for Medical Research: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Veronique; Cheng, Kang; Liao, Shudan; Lu, Aizhu; Zheng, Yong; Chen, Yawen; Xie, Yucai

    2017-01-01

    The advent of cellular reprogramming technology has revolutionized biomedical research. De novo human cardiac myocytes can now be obtained from direct reprogramming of somatic cells (such as fibroblasts), from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which are reprogrammed from somatic cells), and from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Such de novo human cardiac myocytes hold great promise for in vitro disease modeling and drug screening and in vivo cell therapy of heart disease. Here, we review the technique advancements for generating de novo human cardiac myocytes. We also discuss several challenges for the use of such cells in research and regenerative medicine, such as the immature phenotype and heterogeneity of de novo cardiac myocytes obtained with existing protocols. We focus on the recent advancements in addressing such challenges. PMID:28303153

  7. Characterization of human septic sera induced gene expression modulation in human myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Shaimaa; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Omri, Abdelwahab; Narain, Ravin; Passi, Kalpdrum; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Kumar, Anand; Parissenti, Amadeo; Kumar, Aseem

    2009-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the gene expression changes that occurs during sepsis, we have performed a cDNA microarray study utilizing a tissue culture model that mimics human sepsis. This study utilized an in vitro model of cultured human fetal cardiac myocytes treated with 10% sera from septic patients or 10% sera from healthy volunteers. A 1700 cDNA expression microarray was used to compare the transcription profile from human cardiac myocytes treated with septic sera vs normal sera. Septic sera treatment of myocytes resulted in the down-regulation of 178 genes and the up-regulation of 4 genes. Our data indicate that septic sera induced cell cycle, metabolic, transcription factor and apoptotic gene expression changes in human myocytes. Identification and characterization of gene expression changes that occur during sepsis may lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:19684886

  8. Effects of troglitazone and pioglitazone on the action potentials and membrane currents of rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Watanabe, T

    1998-09-18

    The effects of the antidiabetic thiazolidinediones troglitazone and pioglitazone on action potentials and membrane currents were studied in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly reduced excitability of the myocytes and modified their action potential configuration. It significantly increased the stimulation threshold required to elicit action potentials and decreased action potential amplitude and the maximum upstroke velocity of the action potentials. The Inhibition of the maximum upstroke velocity by troglitazone was also significant at 1 microM. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that troglitazone (10 microM) reversibly inhibited both the slow inward Ca2+ current and the steady-state K+ current. In contrast to troglitazone, pioglitazone (1-10 microM) had no significant effect on the excitability, action potential configuration, or membrane currents of myocytes. These results suggest that troglitazone, but not pioglitazone, modulates Na+, Ca2+ and K+ currents, leading to the changes in excitability and action potential configuration of ventricular myocytes.

  9. Ontogeny of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Tibbits, Glen F

    2008-02-01

    It is commonly accepted that L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) is the dominant mode of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in the adult mammalian heart and that there is no appreciable CICR in neonates. However, we have observed that cell contraction in the neonatal heart was significantly decreased after sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) depletion with caffeine. Therefore, the present study investigated the developmental changes of CICR in rabbit ventricular myocytes at 3, 10, 20, and 56 days of age. We found that the inhibitory effect of the L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) inhibitor nifedipine (Nif; 15 microM) caused an increasingly larger reduction of Ca(2+) transients on depolarization in older age groups [from approximately 15% in 3-day-old (3d) myocytes to approximately 90% in 56-day-old (56d) myocytes]. The remaining Ca(2+) transient in the presence of Nif in younger age groups was eliminated by the inhibition of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) with the subsequent addition of 10 microM KB-R7943 (KB-R). Furthermore, Ca(2+) transients were significantly reduced in magnitude after the depletion of SR Ca(2+) with caffeine in all age groups, although the effect was significantly greater in the older age groups (from approximately 40% in 3d myocytes up to approximately 70% in 56d myocytes). This SR Ca(2+)-sensitive Ca(2+) transient in the earliest developmental stage was insensitive to Nif but was sensitive to the subsequent addition of KB-R, indicating the presence of NCX-mediated CICR that decreased significantly with age (from approximately 37% in 3d myocytes to approximately 0.5% in 56d myocytes). In contrast, the I(Ca)-mediated CICR increased significantly with age (from approximately 10% in 3d myocytes to approximately 70% in 56d myocytes). The CICR gain as estimated by the integral of the CICR Ca(2+) transient divided by the integral of its Ca(2+) transient trigger was smaller when mediated by NCX ( approximately 1.0 for 3d

  10. Systems analysis of PKA-mediated phosphorylation gradients in live cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Jin; Martin, Jody C.; Peng, Lili X.; Stenbit, Antine E.; Tsien, Roger Y.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    Compartmentation and dynamics of cAMP and PKA signaling are important determinants of specificity among cAMP’s myriad cellular roles. Both cardiac inotropy and the progression of heart disease are affected by spatiotemporal variations in cAMP/PKA signaling, yet the dynamic patterns of PKA-mediated phosphorylation that influence differential responses to agonists have not been characterized. We performed live-cell imaging and systems modeling of PKA-mediated phosphorylation in neonatal cardiac myocytes in response to G-protein coupled receptor stimuli and UV photolysis of “caged” cAMP. cAMP accumulation was rate-limiting in PKA-mediated phosphorylation downstream of the β-adrenergic receptor. Prostaglandin E1 stimulated higher PKA activity in the cytosol than at the sarcolemma, whereas isoproterenol triggered faster sarcolemmal responses than cytosolic, likely due to restricted cAMP diffusion from submembrane compartments. Localized UV photolysis of caged cAMP triggered gradients of PKA-mediated phosphorylation, enhanced by phosphodiesterase activity and PKA-mediated buffering of cAMP. These findings indicate that combining live-cell FRET imaging and mechanistic computational models can provide quantitative understanding of spatiotemporal signaling. PMID:16905651

  11. Exploration of Pharmacophore in Chrysosplenol C as Activator in Ventricular Myocyte Contraction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chrysosplenol C (4′,5,6-trihydroxy-3,3′,7-trimethoxyflavone) isolated from Miliusa balansae has unique structural features as a reversible inotropic agent independent of β-adrenergic signaling and with selective activation of cardiac myosin ATPase. Hence, a series of chrysosplenol analogues were synthesized and explored for identification of pharmacophore that is essential for the increasing contractility in rat ventricular myocytes. Analogue 7-chloro-2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-methoxy-4H-chromen-4-one showed highly potent contractility (54.8% at 10 μM) through activating cardiac myosin ATPase (38.7% at 10 μM). Our systematic structure–activity relationship study revealed that flavonoid nucleus of chrososplenol C appears to be an essential basic skeleton and hydrophobic substituent at position 7 of chromenone such as methoxy or chloro enhances the activity. Additionally, our ATPase study suggested that these chrysosplenol analogues have selectivity toward cardiac myosin activation. Thus, the novel flavonone with 3-/7-hydrophobic substituent and 3′-hydrogen bonding donor function is a novel scaffold for discovery of a new positive inotropic agent. PMID:26191362

  12. An Experimental Model Using Cultured Cardiac Myocytes for a Study of the Generation of Premature Ventricular Contractions Under Ultrasound Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Masaya

    2011-09-01

    It is known that use of a contrast agents in echocardiography increases the probability of generation of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). As a basic study to elucidate the mechanisms and to reduce adverse effects, the generation of PVCs was investigated using cultured cardiac myocytes instead of the intact heart in vivo. Cardiac myocytes were isolated from neonatal rats and cultured on a cover slip. The myocyte sample was exposed to pulsed ultrasound with microbubbles adjacent to the myocytes, and generation of PVCs was examined with ultrasound exposure at various delay times after onset of myocyte contraction. The experimental results showed that generation of PVCs had a stable threshold delay time and that PVCs were generated only when myocytes were exposed to ultrasound with delay times longer than the threshold. The results indicate that the model used in this study is useful for revealing the mechanisms by which PVCs are induced by ultrasound exposure.

  13. Modeling CICR in rat ventricular myocytes: voltage clamp studies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The past thirty-five years have seen an intense search for the molecular mechanisms underlying calcium-induced calcium-release (CICR) in cardiac myocytes, with voltage clamp (VC) studies being the leading tool employed. Several VC protocols including lowering of extracellular calcium to affect Ca2+ loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and administration of blockers caffeine and thapsigargin have been utilized to probe the phenomena surrounding SR Ca2+ release. Here, we develop a deterministic mathematical model of a rat ventricular myocyte under VC conditions, to better understand mechanisms underlying the response of an isolated cell to calcium perturbation. Motivation for the study was to pinpoint key control variables influencing CICR and examine the role of CICR in the context of a physiological control system regulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]myo). Methods The cell model consists of an electrical-equivalent model for the cell membrane and a fluid-compartment model describing the flux of ionic species between the extracellular and several intracellular compartments (cell cytosol, SR and the dyadic coupling unit (DCU), in which resides the mechanistic basis of CICR). The DCU is described as a controller-actuator mechanism, internally stabilized by negative feedback control of the unit's two diametrically-opposed Ca2+ channels (trigger-channel and release-channel). It releases Ca2+ flux into the cyto-plasm and is in turn enclosed within a negative feedback loop involving the SERCA pump, regulating[Ca2+]myo. Results Our model reproduces measured VC data published by several laboratories, and generates graded Ca2+ release at high Ca2+ gain in a homeostatically-controlled environment where [Ca2+]myo is precisely regulated. We elucidate the importance of the DCU elements in this process, particularly the role of the ryanodine receptor in controlling SR Ca2+ release, its activation by trigger Ca2+, and its refractory characteristics

  14. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca2+ homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Arthur M.; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J.; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na+-K+-ATPase and L-type Ca2+ channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca2+ channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca2+]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content but not Na+/Ca2+ exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca2+ uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyrl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca2+ entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure. PMID:26796036

  15. Regional differences in action potential characteristics and membrane currents of guinea-pig left ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Main, M C; Bryant, S M; Hart, G

    1998-11-01

    Regional differences in action potential characteristics and membrane currents were investigated in subendocardial, midmyocardial and subepicardial myocytes isolated from the left ventricular free wall of guinea-pig hearts. Action potential duration (APD) was dependent on the region of origin of the myocytes (P < 0.01, ANOVA). Mean action potential duration at 90 % repolarization (APD90) was 237 +/- 8 ms in subendocardial (n = 30 myocytes), 251 +/- 7 ms in midmyocardial (n = 30) and 204 +/- 7 ms in subepicardial myocytes (n = 36). L-type calcium current (ICa) density and background potassium current (IK1) density were similar in the three regions studied. Delayed rectifier current (IK) was measured as deactivating tail current, elicited on repolarization back to -45 mV after 2 s step depolarizations to test potentials ranging from -10 to +80 mV. Mean IK density (after a step to +80 mV) was larger in subepicardial myocytes (1.59 +/- 0.16 pA pF-1, n = 16) than in either subendocardial (1.16 +/- 0.12 pA pF-1, n = 17) or midmyocardial (1. 13 +/- 0.11 pA pF-1, n = 21) myocytes (P < 0.05, ANOVA). The La3+-insensitive current (IKs) elicited on repolarization back to -45 mV after a 250 ms step depolarization to +60 mV was similar in the three regions studied. The La3+-sensitive tail current, (IKr) was greater in subepicardial (0.50 +/- 0.04 pA pF-1, n = 11) than in subendocardial (0.25 +/- 0.05 pA pF-1, n = 9) or in midmyocardial myocytes (0.38 +/- 0.05 pA pF-1, n = 11, P < 0.05, ANOVA). The contribution of a Na+ background current to regional differences in APD was assessed by application of 0.1 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX). TTX-induced shortening of APD90 was greater in subendocardial myocytes (35.7 +/- 7.1 %, n = 11) than in midmyocardial (15.7 +/- 3. 8 %, n = 10) and subepicardial (20.2 +/- 4.3 %, n = 11) myocytes (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Regional differences in action potential characteristics between subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial myocytes isolated from

  16. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca(2+) homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Arthur M; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D; Tilley, Douglas G; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2016-03-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and L-type Ca(2+) channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca(2+) channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content but not Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca(2+) uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca(2+) entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca(2+) channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure.

  17. β-adrenergic effects on cardiac myofilaments and contraction in an integrated rabbit ventricular myocyte model

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Jorge A.; Morotti, Stefano; Lascano, Elena C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Grandi, Eleonora; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    A five-state model of myofilament contraction was integrated into a well-established rabbit ventricular myocyte model of ion channels, Ca2+ transporters and kinase signaling to analyze the relative contribution of different phosphorylation targets to the overall mechanical response driven by β-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS). β-AS effect on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling, Ca2+, K+ and Cl− currents, and Na+/K+-ATPase properties were included based on experimental data. The inotropic effect on the myofilaments was represented as reduced myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (XBCa) and titin stiffness, and increased cross-bridge (XB) cycling rate (XBcy). Assuming independent roles of XBCa and XBcy, the model reproduced experimental β-AS responses on action potentials and Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics. It also replicated the behavior of force-Ca2+, release-restretch, length-step, stiffness-frequency and force-velocity relationships, and increased force and shortening in isometric and isotonic twitch contractions. The β-AS effect was then switched off from individual targets to analyze their relative impact on contractility. Preventing β-AS effects on L-type Ca2+ channels or phospholamban limited Ca2+ transients and contractile responses in parallel, while blocking phospholemman and K+ channel (IKs) effects enhanced Ca2+ and inotropy. Removal of β-AS effects from XBCa enhanced contractile force while decreasing peak Ca2+ (due to greater Ca2+ buffering), but had less effect on shortening. Conversely, preventing β-AS effects on XBcy preserved Ca2+ transient effects, but blunted inotropy (both isometric force and especially shortening). Removal of titin effects had little impact on contraction. Finally, exclusion of β-AS from XBCa and XBcy while preserving effects on other targets resulted in preserved peak isometric force response (with slower kinetics) but nearly abolished enhanced shortening. β-AS effects on XBCa vs. XBcy have greater impact on isometric

  18. β-adrenergic effects on cardiac myofilaments and contraction in an integrated rabbit ventricular myocyte model.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Morotti, Stefano; Lascano, Elena C; Gomes, Aldrin V; Grandi, Eleonora; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    A five-state model of myofilament contraction was integrated into a well-established rabbit ventricular myocyte model of ion channels, Ca(2+) transporters and kinase signaling to analyze the relative contribution of different phosphorylation targets to the overall mechanical response driven by β-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS). β-AS effect on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) handling, Ca(2+), K(+) and Cl(-) currents, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase properties was included based on experimental data. The inotropic effect on the myofilaments was represented as reduced myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity (XBCa) and titin stiffness, and increased cross-bridge (XB) cycling rate (XBcy). Assuming independent roles of XBCa and XBcy, the model reproduced experimental β-AS responses on action potentials and Ca(2+) transient amplitude and kinetics. It also replicated the behavior of force-Ca(2+), release-restretch, length-step, stiffness-frequency and force-velocity relationships, and increased force and shortening in isometric and isotonic twitch contractions. The β-AS effect was then switched off from individual targets to analyze their relative impact on contractility. Preventing β-AS effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels or phospholamban limited Ca(2+) transients and contractile responses in parallel, while blocking phospholemman and K(+) channel (IKs) effects enhanced Ca(2+) and inotropy. Removal of β-AS effects from XBCa enhanced contractile force while decreasing peak Ca(2+) (due to greater Ca(2+) buffering), but had less effect on shortening. Conversely, preventing β-AS effects on XBcy preserved Ca(2+) transient effects, but blunted inotropy (both isometric force and especially shortening). Removal of titin effects had little impact on contraction. Finally, exclusion of β-AS from XBCa and XBcy while preserving effects on other targets resulted in preserved peak isometric force response (with slower kinetics) but nearly abolished enhanced shortening. β-AS effects on XBCa and XBcy

  19. Methamphetamine oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and functional deficits are modulated by nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2.

    PubMed

    Ramkissoon, Annmarie; Wells, Peter G

    2015-12-01

    Activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors like nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) can enhance the transcription of cytoprotective genes during oxidative stress. We investigated whether Nrf2 is activated by methamphetamine (METH) thereby altering neurotoxicity in Nrf2 +/+ and -/- adult mouse brain. A single dose of METH can induce the mRNA levels of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant and cytoprotective proteins in mouse brain. Multiple-day dosing with METH enhanced DNA oxidation and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter staining in the striatum, indicating dopaminergic nerve terminal toxicity, which was more severe in -/- mice, as were deficits in motor coordination and olfactory discrimination. These Nrf2-dependent effects were independent of changes in METH metabolism or the induction of hyperthermia. Similarly, METH increased striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein, indicating neurotoxicity. METH neurotoxicity was also observed in the glial cells and in the GABAergic system of the olfactory bulbs and was enhanced in -/- mice, whereas dopaminergic parameters were unaffected. With one-day dosing of METH, there were no differences between +/+ and -/- mice in either basal or METH-enhanced DNA oxidation and neurotoxicity markers. Nrf2-mediated pathways accordingly may protect against the neurodegenerative effects and functional deficits initiated by METH and perhaps other reactive oxygen species-enhancing neurotoxicants, when there is time for transcriptional activation and protein induction. In human users of METH, this mechanism may be essential when differences in drug abuse patterns may alter the induction and duration of Nrf2 activation thereby modulating susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of METH.

  20. Impact of myocyte strain on cardiac myofilament activation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2011-07-01

    When cardiac myocytes are stretched by a longitudinal strain, they develop proportionally more active force at a given sub-maximal Ca(2+) concentration than they did at the shorter length. This is known as length-dependent activation. It is one of the most important contributors to the Frank-Starling relationship, a critical part of normal cardiovascular function. Despite intense research efforts, the mechanistic basis of the Frank-Starling relationship remains unclear. Potential mechanisms involving myofibrillar lattice spacing, titin-based effects, and cooperative activation have all been proposed. This review summarizes some of these mechanisms and discusses two additional potential theories that reflect the effects of localized strains that occur within and between half-sarcomeres. The main conclusion is that the Frank-Starling relationship is probably the integrated result of many interacting molecular mechanisms. Multiscale computational modeling may therefore provide the best way of determining the key processes that underlie length-dependent activation and their relative strengths.

  1. Myocyte renewal and therapeutic myocardial regeneration using various progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Emiko; Hosoda, Toru

    2014-11-01

    Whereas the demand on effective treatment options for chronic heart failure is dramatically increasing, the recent recognition of physiological and pathological myocyte turnover in the adult human heart provided a fundamental basis for the therapeutic regeneration. Divergent modalities were experimentally introduced to this field, and selected ones have been applied clinically; the history began with skeletal myoblasts and bone-marrow-derived cells, and lately mesenchymal stem/stromal cells and resident cardiac cells joined the repertoire. Among them, autologous transplantation of c-kit-positive cardiac stem cells in patients with chronic ventricular dysfunction resulted in an outstanding outcome with long-lasting effects without increasing major adverse events. To further optimize currently available approaches, we have to consider multiple factors, such as the targeting disease, the cell population and number to be administered, and the timing and the route of cell delivery. Exploration of the consequence of the previous clinical trials would allow us to envision an ideal cellular therapy for various cardiovascular disorders.

  2. Syzygium aromaticum L. (Clove) extract regulates energy metabolism in myocytes.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zheng; Moss-Pierce, Tijuana; Ford, Paul; Jiang, T Alan

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide. Herbs and spices have been used for the treatment of diabetes for centuries in folk medicine. Syzygium aromaticum L. (Clove) extracts (SE) have been shown to perform comparably to insulin by significantly reducing blood glucose levels in animal models; however, the mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the effects of clove on metabolism in C2C12 myocytes and demonstrated that SE significantly increases glucose consumption. The phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), as well as its substrate, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) was increased by SE treatment. SE also transcriptionally regulates genes involved in metabolism, including sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1α). Nicotinamide, an SIRT1 inhibitor, diminished SE's effects on glucose consumption. Furthermore, treatment with SE dose-dependently increases muscle glycolysis and mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity. Overall, our study suggests that SE has the potential to increase muscle glycolysis and mitochondria function by activating both AMPK and SIRT1 pathways.

  3. Electrophysiological Determination of Submembrane Na(+) Concentration in Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Bence; Bányász, Tamás; Shannon, Thomas R; Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T

    2016-09-20

    In the heart, Na(+) is a key modulator of the action potential, Ca(2+) homeostasis, energetics, and contractility. Because Na(+) currents and cotransport fluxes depend on the Na(+) concentration in the submembrane region, it is necessary to accurately estimate the submembrane Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]sm). Current methods using Na(+)-sensitive fluorescent indicators or Na(+) -sensitive electrodes cannot measure [Na(+)]sm. However, electrophysiology methods are ideal for measuring [Na(+)]sm. In this article, we develop patch-clamp protocols and experimental conditions to determine the upper bound of [Na(+)]sm at the peak of action potential and its lower bound at the resting state. During the cardiac cycle, the value of [Na(+)]sm is constrained within these bounds. We conducted experiments in rabbit ventricular myocytes at body temperature and found that 1) at a low pacing frequency of 0.5 Hz, the upper and lower bounds converge at 9 mM, constraining the [Na(+)]sm value to ∼9 mM; 2) at 2 Hz pacing frequency, [Na(+)]sm is bounded between 9 mM at resting state and 11.5 mM; and 3) the cells can maintain [Na(+)]sm to the above values, despite changes in the pipette Na(+) concentration, showing autoregulation of Na(+) in beating cardiomyocytes.

  4. Analysis of Cardiac Myocyte Maturation Using CASAAV, A Platform for Rapid Dissection of Cardiac Myocyte Gene Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuxuan; VanDusen, Nathan J; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Weiliang; Sethi, Isha; Guatimosim, Silvia; Ma, Qing; Jardin, Blake D; Ai, Yulan; Zhang, Donghui; Chen, Biyi; Guo, Ang; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Song, Long-Sheng; Pu, William T

    2017-03-29

    Rationale: Loss-of-function studies in cardiac myocytes (CMs) are currently limited by the need for appropriate conditional knockout alleles. The factors that regulate CM maturation are poorly understood. Prior studies on CM maturation have been confounded by heart dysfunction caused by whole organ gene inactivation. Objective: To develop a new technical platform to rapidly characterize cell-autonomous gene function in postnatal murine CMs and apply it to identify genes that regulate T-tubules, a hallmark of mature cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results: We developed CASAAV (CRISPR/Cas9-AAV9-based somatic mutagenesis), a platform in which AAV9 delivers tandem guide RNAs targeting a gene of interest and cardiac troponin T promoter (cTNT)-driven Cre to Rosa(Cas9GFP/Cas9GFP) neonatal mice. When directed against junctophilin-2 (Jph2), a gene previously implicated in T-tubule maturation, we achieved efficient, rapid, and CM-specific JPH2 depletion. High-dose AAV9 ablated JPH2 in 64% CMs and caused lethal heart failure, whereas low-dose AAV9 ablated JPH2 in 22% CMs and preserved normal heart function. In the context of preserved heart function, CMs lacking JPH2 developed T-tubules that were nearly morphologically normal, indicating that JPH2 does not have a major, cell-autonomous role in T-tubule maturation. However, in hearts with severe dysfunction, both AAV-transduced and non-transduced CMs exhibited T-tubule disruption, which was more severe in the transduced subset. These data indicate that cardiac dysfunction disrupts T-tubule structure, and that JPH2 protects T-tubules in this context. We then used CASAAV to screen 8 additional genes for required, cell-autonomous roles in T-tubule formation. We identified ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) as a novel, cell-autonomously required T-tubule maturation factor. Conclusions: CASAAV is a powerful tool to study cell-autonomous gene functions. Genetic mosaics are invaluable to accurately define cell-autonomous gene function. JPH2

  5. Azimilide causes reverse rate-dependent block while reducing both components of delayed-rectifier current in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Gintant, G A

    1998-06-01

    Most class III antiarrhythmic drugs reduce the rapidly activating component of delayed-rectifier current (IKr) without affecting the slowly activating component (IKs). Recently the novel antiarrhythmic agent azimilide (NE-10064) was reported to enhance IKs at low (nanomolar) concentrations and to block both IKr and IKs at higher (micromolar) concentrations. Further to understand the electrophysiologic effects of azimilide, we compared its effects on IKr and IKs (by using whole cell clamp techniques) and action potentials (microelectrode and perforated-patch techniques) on canine ventricular myocytes. A lower azimilide concentration (50 nM) did not enhance IKs. In contrast, a therapeutic azimilide concentration (2 microM) was equieffective in reducing IKr (300-ms isochrones) and IKs (3-s isochrones) by approximately 40% during depolarizing test pulses, as well as reducing IKr (38% decrease) and IKs (33% decrease) tail currents on repolarization. Block of IKs was independent of voltage at positive test potentials. In action-potential studies, 50 nM azimilide had no effect on the action-potential duration (APD), whereas 2 microM azimilide delayed repolarization and caused reverse rate-dependent effects on the APD. Whereas the extent of APD prolongation by azimilide was not correlated with the drug-free APD, azimilide preferentially exaggerated the APD-rate relationship of myocytes displaying the steepest APD-rate relationship under drug-free conditions. In conclusion, therapeutic concentrations of azimilide that cause comparable reduction of canine ventricular IKr and IKs exert reverse rate-dependent effects, which are dependent on the steepness of the APD-rate relationship.

  6. Contractile reserve and calcium regulation are depressed in myocytes from chronically unloaded hearts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kenta; Nakayama, Masaharu; Hasan, Faisal; Yan, Xinhua; Schneider, Michael D.; Lorell, Beverly H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cardiac unloading of the normal heart results in the reduction of left ventricular (LV) mass, but effects on myocyte contractile function are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac unloading and reduction in LV mass were induced by heterotopic heart transplantation to the abdominal aorta in isogenic rats. Contractility and [Ca(2+)](i) regulation in LV myocytes were studied at both 2 and 5 weeks after transplantation. Native in situ hearts from recipient animals were used as the controls for all experiments. Contractile function indices in myocytes from 2-week unloaded and native (control) hearts were similar under baseline conditions (0.5 Hz, 1.2 mmol/L [Ca(2+)](o), and 36 degrees C) and in response to stimulation with high [Ca(2+)](o) (range 2.5 to 4.0 mmol/L). In myocytes from 5-week unloaded hearts, there were no differences in fractional cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) at baseline; however, time to 50% relengthening and time to 50% decline in [Ca(2+)](i) were prolonged compared with controls. Severe defects in fractional cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) were elicited in myocytes from 5-week unloaded hearts in response to high [Ca(2+)](o). However, there were no differences in the contractile response to isoproterenol between myocytes from unloaded and native hearts. In 5-week unloaded hearts, but not in 2-week unloaded hearts, LV protein levels of phospholamban were increased (345% of native heart values). Protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger were not changed. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic unloading of the normal heart caused a time-dependent depression of myocyte contractile function, suggesting the potential for impaired performance in states associated with prolonged cardiac atrophy.

  7. Inhibition of fibroblast proliferation in cardiac myocyte cultures by surface microtopography.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Samuel Y; Hartman, Thomas J; Ahluwalia, Neil; Vidula, Himabindu; Desai, Tejal A; Russell, Brenda

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac myocyte cultures usually require pharmacological intervention to prevent overproliferation of contaminating nonmyocytes. Our aim is to prevent excessive fibroblast cell proliferation without the use of cytostatins. We have produced a silicone surface with 10-microm vertical projections that we term "pegs," to which over 80% of rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts attach within 48 h after plating. There was a 50% decrease in cell proliferation by 5 days of culture compared with flat membranes (P < 0.001) and a concomitant 60% decrease (P < 0.01) in cyclin D1 protein levels, suggesting a G1/S1 cell cycle arrest due to microtopography. Inhibition of Rho kinase with 5 or 20 microM Y-27632 reduced attachment of fibroblasts to the pegs by over 50% (P < 0.001), suggesting that this signaling pathway plays an important role in the process. Using mobile and immobile 10-microm polystyrene spheres, we show that reactive forces are important for inhibiting fibroblast cell proliferation, because mobile spheres failed to reduce cell proliferation. In primary myocyte cultures, pegs also inhibit fibroblast proliferation in the absence of cytostatins. The ratio of aminopropeptide of collagen protein from fibroblasts to myosin from myocytes was significantly reduced in cultures from pegged surfaces (P < 0.01), suggesting an increase in the proportion of myocytes on the pegged surfaces. Connexin43 protein expression was also increased, suggesting improved myocyte-myocyte interaction in the presence of pegs. We conclude that this microtextured culture system is useful for preventing proliferation of fibroblasts in myocyte cultures and may ultimately be useful for tissue engineering applications in vivo.

  8. Contractile reserve and intracellular calcium regulation in mouse myocytes from normal and hypertrophied failing hearts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Yan, X.; Tajima, M.; Su, Z.; Barry, W. H.; Lorell, B. H.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Mouse myocyte contractility and the changes induced by pressure overload are not fully understood. We studied contractile reserve in isolated left ventricular myocytes from mice with ascending aortic stenosis (AS) during compensatory hypertrophy (4-week AS) and the later stage of early failure (7-week AS) and from control mice. Myocyte contraction and [Ca(2+)](i) transients with fluo-3 were measured simultaneously. At baseline (0.5 Hz, 1.5 mmol/L [Ca(2+)](o), 25 degrees C), the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) in 7-week AS were not different from those of controls, whereas contraction, relaxation, and the decline of [Ca(2+)](i) transients were slower. In response to the challenge of high [Ca(2+)](o), fractional cell shortening was severely depressed with reduced peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) in 7-week AS compared with controls. In response to rapid pacing stimulation, cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) increased in controls, but this response was depressed in 7-week AS. In contrast, the responses to both challenge with high [Ca(2+)](o) and rapid pacing in 4-week AS were similar to those of controls. Although protein levels of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger were increased in both 4-week and 7-week AS, the ratio of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase to phospholamban protein levels was depressed in 7-week AS compared with controls but not in 4-week AS. This was associated with an impaired capacity to increase sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load during high work states in 7-week AS myocytes. In hypertrophied failing mouse myocytes, depressed contractile reserve is related to an impaired augmentation of systolic [Ca(2+)](i) and SR Ca(2+) load and simulates findings in human failing myocytes.

  9. VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 pathway promotes myocyte hypertrophy and survival in the infarcted myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tieqiang; Zhao, Wenyuan; Meng, Weixin; Liu, Chang; Chen, Yuanjian; Gerling, Ivan C; Weber, Karl T; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Kumar, Rahul; Sun, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have shown that in addition to angio/lymphangiogenesis, the VEGF family is involved in other cellular actions. We have recently reported that enhanced VEGF-C and VEGFR-3 in the infarcted rat myocardium, suggesting the paracrine/autocrine function of VEGF-C on cardiac remodeling. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that VEGF-C regulates cardiomyocyte growth and survival in the infarcted myocardium. Methods and results: Gene profiling and VEGFR-3 expression of cardiomyocytes were assessed by laser capture microdissection/microarray and immunohistochemistry in the normal and infarcted myocardium. The effect of VEGF-C on myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis during normoxia and hypoxia was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. VEGFR-3 was minimally expressed in cardiomyocytes of the normal and noninfarcted myocardium, while markedly elevated in the surviving cardiomyocytes of the infarcted myocardium and border zone. Genes altered in the surviving cardiomyocytes were associated with the networks regulating cellular growth and survival. VEGF-C significantly increased the expression of atrial natriuretic factor (ANP), brain natriuretic factor (BNP), and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC), markers of hypertrophy, in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Hypoxia caused neonatal cardiomyocyte atrophy, which was prevented by VEGF-C treatment. Hypoxia significantly enhanced apoptotic mediators, including cleaved caspase 3, 8, and 9, and Bax in neonatal cardiomyocytes, which were abolished by VEGF-C treatment. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 pathway exerts a beneficial role in the infarcted myocardium by promoting compensatory cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and survival. PMID:26064438

  10. Differential effects of hypoxic and hyperoxic stress-induced hypertrophy in cultured chick fetal cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Greco, Allison A; Gomez, George

    2014-02-01

    The adult heart responds to contraction demands by hypertrophy, or enlargement, of cardiac myocytes. Adaptive hypertrophy can occur in response to hyperoxic conditions such as exercise, while pathological factors that result in hypoxia ultimately result in heart failure. The difference in the outcomes produced by pathologically versus physiologically induced hypertrophy suggests that the cellular signaling pathways or conditions of myocytes may be different at the cellular level. The structural and functional changes in myocytes resulting from hyperoxia (simulated using hydrogen peroxide) and hypoxia (using oxygen deprivation) were tested on fetal chick cardiac myocytes grown in vitro. Structural changes were measured using immunostaining for α-sarcomeric actin or MyoD, while functional changes were assessed using immunostaining for calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMKII) and by measuring intracellular calcium fluxes using live cell fluorescence imaging. Both hypoxic and hyperoxic stress resulted in an upregulation of actin and MyoD expression. Similarly, voltage-gated channels governing myocyte depolarization and the regulation of CaMK were unchanged by hyperoxic or hypoxic conditions. However, the dynamic features of calcium fluxes elicited by caffeine or epinephrine were different in cells subjected to hypoxia versus hyperoxia, suggesting that these different conditions differentially affect components of ligand-activated signaling pathways that regulate calcium. Our results suggest that changes in signaling pathways, rather than structural organization, may mediate the different outcomes associated with hyperoxia-induced versus hypoxia-induced hypertrophy, and these changes are likely initiated at the cellular level.

  11. Simultaneous orientation and cellular force measurements in adult cardiac myocytes using three-dimensional polymeric microstructures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Lim, Chee Chew; Sawyer, Douglas Brian; Liao, Ronglih; Zhang, Xin

    2007-09-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to monitor contractile function in isolated cardiac myocytes. While invaluable observations have been gained from these methodologies in understanding the contractile processes of the heart, they are invariably limited by their in vitro conditions. The present challenge is to develop innovative assays to mimic the in vivo milieu so as to allow a more physiological assessment of cardiac myocyte contractile forces. Here we demonstrate the use of a silicone elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), to simultaneously orient adult cardiac myocytes in primary culture and measure the cellular forces in a three-dimensional substrate. The realignment of adult cardiac myocytes in long-term culture (7 days) was achieved due to directional reassembly of the myofibrils along the parallel polymeric sidewalls. The cellular mechanical forces were recorded in situ by observing the deformation of the micropillars embedded in the substrate. By coupling the cellular mechanical force measurements with on-chip cell orientation, this novel assay is expected to provide a means of a more physiological assessment of single cardiac myocyte contractile function and may facilitate the future development of in vitro assembled functional cardiac tissue.

  12. Three-dimensional alignment of the aggregated myocytes in the normal and hypertrophic murine heart.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Boris; Fedarava, Katsiaryna; Falkenberg, Jan; Rothaus, Kai; Bodhey, Narendra K; Reischauer, Carolin; Kozerke, Sebastian; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Westermann, Dirk; Lunkenheimer, Paul P; Anderson, Robert H; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus

    2009-09-01

    Several observations suggest that the transmission of myocardial forces is influenced in part by the spatial arrangement of the myocytes aggregated together within ventricular mass. Our aim was to assess, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), any differences in the three-dimensional arrangement of these myocytes in the normal heart compared with the hypertrophic murine myocardium. We induced ventricular hypertrophy in seven mice by infusion of angiotensin II through a subcutaneous pump, with seven other mice serving as controls. DT-MRI of explanted hearts was performed at 3.0 Tesla. We used the primary eigenvector in each voxel to determine the three-dimensional orientation of aggregated myocytes in respect to their helical angles and their transmural courses (intruding angles). Compared with controls, the hypertrophic hearts showed significant increases in myocardial mass and the outer radius of the left ventricular chamber (P < 0.05). In both groups, a significant change was noted from positive intruding angles at the base to negative angles at the ventricular apex (P < 0.01). Compared with controls, the hypertrophied hearts had significantly larger intruding angles of the aggregated myocytes, notably in the apical and basal slices (P < 0.001). In both groups, the helical angles were greatest in midventricular sections, albeit with significantly smaller angles in the mice with hypertrophied myocardium (P < 0.01). The use of DT-MRI revealed significant differences in helix and intruding angles of the myocytes in the mice with hypertrophied myocardium.

  13. Heat stress responses modulate calcium regulations and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Huang, Chun-Feng; Cheng, Chen-Chuan; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2010-04-01

    Heat stress-induced responses change the ionic currents and calcium homeostasis. However, the molecular insights into the heat stress responses on calcium homeostasis remain unclear. The purposes of this study were to examine the mechanisms of heat stress responses on calcium handling and electrophysiological characteristics in atrial myocytes. We used indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique and whole-cell patch clamp to investigate the intracellular calcium, action potentials, and ionic currents in isolated rabbit single atrial cardiomyocytes with or without (control) exposure to heat stress (43 degrees C, 15 min) 5+/-1 h before experiments. The expressions of sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA2a), and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in the control and heat stress-treated atrial myocytes were evaluated by Western blot and real-time PCR. As compared with control myocytes, the heat stress-treated myocytes had larger sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and larger intracellular calcium transient with a shorter decay portion. Heat stress-treated myocytes also had larger L-type calcium currents, transient outward potassium currents, but smaller NCX currents. Heat stress responses increased the protein expressions, SERCA2a, NCX, and heat shock protein. However, heat stress responses did not change the RNA expression of SERCA2a and NCX. In conclusion, heat stress responses change calcium handling through protein but not RNA regulation.

  14. Metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Shenouda, Sylvia K; Varner, Kurt J; Carvalho, Felix; Lucchesi, Pamela A

    2009-03-01

    Repeated administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy) produces eccentric left ventricular (LV) dilation and diastolic dysfunction. While the mechanism(s) underlying this toxicity are unknown, oxidative stress plays an important role. MDMA is metabolized into redox cycling metabolites that produce superoxide. In this study, we demonstrated that metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes. Metabolites of MDMA used in this study included alpha-methyl dopamine, N-methyl alpha-methyl dopamine and 2,5-bis(glutathion-S-yl)-alpha-MeDA. Dihydroethidium was used to detect drug-induced increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in ventricular myocytes. Contractile function and changes in intracellular calcium transients were measured in paced (1 Hz), Fura-2 AM loaded, myocytes using the IonOptix system. Production of ROS in ventricular myocytes treated with MDMA was not different from control. In contrast, all three metabolites of MDMA exhibited time- and concentration-dependent increases in ROS that were prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). The metabolites of MDMA, but not MDMA alone, significantly decreased contractility and impaired relaxation in myocytes stimulated at 1 Hz. These effects were prevented by NAC. Together, these data suggest that MDMA-induced oxidative stress in the left ventricle can be due, at least in part, to the metabolism of MDMA to redox active metabolites.

  15. Malonyl-CoA metabolism in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, C; Saggerson, E D

    2000-01-01

    (1) Malonyl-CoA is thought to play a signalling role in fuel-selection in cardiac muscle, but the rate at which the concentration of this potential signal can be changed has not previously been investigated. (2) Rapid changes in cellular malonyl-CoA could be observed when rat cardiac myocytes were incubated in glucose-free medium followed by re-addition of 5 mM glucose, or when cells were transferred from a medium containing glucose to a glucose-free medium. On addition of glucose, malonyl-CoA increased by 62% to a new steady-state level, at a rate of at least 0.4 nmol/g dry wt. per min. The half-time of this change was less than 3 min. After removal of glucose the malonyl-CoA content was estimated to decline by 0.43-0.55 nmol/g dry wt. per min. (3) Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MDC) is a possible route for disposal of malonyl-CoA. No evidence was obtained for a cytosolic activity of MDC in rat heart where most of the activity was found in the mitochondrial fraction. MDC in the mitochondrial matrix was not accessible to extramitochondrial malonyl-CoA. However, approx. 16% of the MDC activity in mitochondria was overt, in a manner that could not be explained by mitochondrial leakage. It is suggested that this, as yet uncharacterized, overt MDC activity could provide a route for disposal of cytosolic malonyl-CoA in the heart. (4) No activity of the condensing enzyme for the fatty acid elongation system could be detected in any heart subcellular fraction using two assay systems. A previous suggestion [Awan and Saggerson (1993) Biochem. J. 295, 61-66] that this could provide a route for disposal of cytosolic malonyl-CoA in heart should therefore be abandoned. PMID:10926826

  16. Hyperoxia Induces Inflammation and Cytotoxicity in Human Adult Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christina; Wu, Jing; Tiboldi, Akos; Hess, Moritz; Mitulovic, Goran; Kaun, Christoph; Krychtiuk, Konstantin Alexander; Wojta, Johann; Ullrich, Roman; Tretter, Eva Verena; Markstaller, Klaus; Klein, Klaus Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Supplemental oxygen (O2) is used as adjunct therapy in anesthesia, emergency, and intensive care medicine. We hypothesized that excessive O2 levels (hyperoxia) can directly injure human adult cardiac myocytes (HACMs). HACMs obtained from the explanted hearts of transplantation patients were exposed to constant hyperoxia (95% O2), intermittent hyperoxia (alternating 10 min exposures to 5% and 95% O2), constant normoxia (21% O2), or constant mild hypoxia (5% O2) using a bioreactor. Changes in cell morphology, viability as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and trypan blue (TB) staining, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and various pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin, IL; chemokine C-X-C motif ligand, CXC; granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, G-CSF; intercellular adhesion molecule, ICAM; chemokine C-C motif ligand, CCL) were compared among treatment groups at baseline (0 h) and after 8, 24, and 72 h of treatment. Changes in HACM protein expression were determined by quantitative proteomic analysis after 48 h of exposure. Compared with constant normoxia and mild hypoxia, constant hyperoxia resulted in a higher TB-positive cell count, greater release of LDH, and elevated secretion of VEGF, MIF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, CXCL-1, CXCL-10, G-CSF, ICAM-1, CCL-3, and CCL-5. Cellular inflammation and cytotoxicity gradually increased and was highest after 72 h of constant and intermittent hyperoxia. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed that hypoxic and hyperoxic O2 exposure differently altered the expression levels of proteins involved in cell-cycle regulation, energy metabolism, and cell signaling. In conclusion, constant and intermittent hyperoxia induced inflammation and cytotoxicity in HACMs. Cell injury occurred earliest and was greatest after constant hyperoxia, but even relatively brief repeating hyperoxic episodes induced a substantial inflammatory response.

  17. IGF-I and amino acids effects through TOR signaling on proliferation and differentiation of gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Emilio J; Lutfi, Esmail; Jiménez-Amilburu, Vanesa; Riera-Codina, Miquel; Capilla, Encarnación; Navarro, Isabel; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2014-09-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and development is controlled by nutritional (amino acids, AA) as well as hormonal factors (insulin-like growth factor, IGF-I); however, how its interaction modulates muscle mass in fish is not clearly elucidated. The purpose of this study was to analyze the development of gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes to describe the effects of AA and IGF-I on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression, as well as on the transduction pathways involved in its signaling (TOR/AKT). Our results showed that AA and IGF-I separately increased the number of PCNA-positive cells and, together produced a synergistic effect. Furthermore, AA and IGF-I, combined or separately, increased significantly Myogenin protein expression, whereas MyoD was not affected. These results indicate a role for these factors in myocyte proliferation and differentiation. At the mRNA level, AA significantly enhanced PCNA expression, but no effects were observed on the expression of the MRFs or AKT2 and FOXO3 upon treatment. Nonetheless, we demonstrated for the first time in gilthead sea bream that AA significantly increased the gene expression of TOR and its downstream effectors 4EBP1 and 70S6K, with IGF-I having a supporting role on 4EBP1 up-regulation. Moreover, AA and IGF-I also activated TOR and AKT by phosphorylation, respectively, being this activation decreased by specific inhibitors. In summary, the present study demonstrates the importance of TOR signaling on the stimulatory role of AA and IGF-I in gilthead sea bream myogenesis and contributes to better understand the potential regulation of muscle growth and development in fish.

  18. Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells can transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Tomohiko; Fujie, Masaki; Endo, Tuyoshi; Kano, Koichiro

    2008-12-19

    We have previously reported the establishment of preadipocyte cell lines, termed dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells, from mature adipocytes of various animals. DFAT cells possess long-term viability and can redifferentiate into adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, DFAT cells can transdifferentiate into osteoblasts and chondrocytes under appropriate culture conditions. However, it is unclear whether DFAT cells are capable of transdifferentiating into skeletal myocytes, which is common in the mesodermal lineage. Here, we show that DFAT cells can be induced to transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro. Myogenic induction of DFAT cells resulted in the expression of MyoD and myogenin, followed by cell fusion and formation of multinucleated cells expressing sarcomeric myosin heavy chain. These results indicate that DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes can transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro.

  19. Electrical coupling of single cardiac rat myocytes to field-effect and bipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Kind, Thomas; Issing, Matthias; Arnold, Rüdiger; Müller, Bernt

    2002-12-01

    A novel bipolar transistor for extracellular recording the electrical activity of biological cells is presented, and the electrical behavior compared with the field-effect transistor (FET). Electrical coupling is examined between single cells separated from the heart of adults rats (cardiac myocytes) and both types of transistors. To initiate a local extracellular voltage, the cells are periodically stimulated by a patch pipette in voltage clamp and current clamp mode. The local extracellular voltage is measured by the planar integrated electronic sensors: the bipolar and the FET. The small signal transistor currents correspond to the local extracellular voltage. The two types of sensor transistors used here were developed and manufactured in the laboratory of our institute. The manufacturing process and the interfaces between myocytes and transistors are described. The recordings are interpreted by way of simulation based on the point-contact model and the single cardiac myocyte model.

  20. Fibroblast–myocyte electrotonic coupling: Does it occur in native cardiac tissue?☆

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Peter; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Heterocellular electrotonic coupling between cardiac myocytes and non-excitable connective tissue cells has been a long-established and well-researched fact in vitro. Whether or not such coupling exists in vivo has been a matter of considerable debate. This paper reviews the development of experimental insight and conceptual views on this topic, describes evidence in favour of and against the presence of such coupling in native myocardium, and identifies directions for further study needed to resolve the riddle, perhaps less so in terms of principal presence which has been demonstrated, but undoubtedly in terms of extent, regulation, patho-physiological context, and actual relevance of cardiac myocyte–non-myocyte coupling in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Myocyte-Fibroblast Signalling in Myocardium." PMID:24412581

  1. Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells can transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kazama, Tomohiko; Fujie, Masaki; Endo, Tuyoshi; Kano, Koichiro

    2008-12-19

    We have previously reported the establishment of preadipocyte cell lines, termed dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells, from mature adipocytes of various animals. DFAT cells possess long-term viability and can redifferentiate into adipocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, DFAT cells can transdifferentiate into osteoblasts and chondrocytes under appropriate culture conditions. However, it is unclear whether DFAT cells are capable of transdifferentiating into skeletal myocytes, which is common in the mesodermal lineage. Here, we show that DFAT cells can be induced to transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro. Myogenic induction of DFAT cells resulted in the expression of MyoD and myogenin, followed by cell fusion and formation of multinucleated cells expressing sarcomeric myosin heavy chain. These results indicate that DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes can transdifferentiate into skeletal myocytes in vitro.

  2. Fibroblast-Myocyte Coupling in the Heart: Potential Relevance for Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Ongstad, Emily; Kohl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte-fibroblast electrotonic coupling is a well-established fact in vitro. Indirect evidence of its presence in vivo exists, but few functional studies have been published. This review describes the current knowledge of fibroblast-myocyte electrical signalling in the heart. Further research is needed to understand the frequency and extent of heterocellular interactions in vivo in order to gain a better understanding of their relevance in healthy and diseased myocardium. It is hoped that associated insight into myocyte-fibroblast coupling in the heart may lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets and the development of agents for improving outcomes of myocardial scarring and fibrosis. This article is part of a special issue entitled “Exploring Fibrosis as the Next Target for Myocardial Remodeling.” PMID:26774702

  3. Increased Apoptosis and Myocyte Enlargement with Decreased Cardiac Mass; Distinctive Features of the Aging Male, but not Female, Monkey Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Vatner, Stephen F.; Shen, You-Tang; Rossi, Franco; Tian, Yimin; Peppas, Athanasios; Resuello, Ranillo R.G.; Natividad, Filipinas F.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    We studied gender-specific changes in aging cardiomyopathy in a primate model, Macaca fascicularis, free of the major human diseases, complicating the interpretation of data specific to aging in humans. Left ventricular (LV) weight/body weight decreased, p<0.05, in old males, but did not change in old females. However, despite the decrease in LV weight, mean myocyte cross-sectional area in the old males increased by 51%. This increase in myocyte size was not uniform in old males, i.e., it was manifest in only 20–30% of all the myocytes from old males. In old males there was a 4-fold increase in frequency of myocyte apoptosis without any increase in proliferation-capable myocytes assessed by Ki-67 expression. Apoptosis was unchanged in old female monkey hearts, whereas the frequency of myocytes expressing Ki-67 declined 90%. These results, opposite to findings from rodent studies, indicate distinct differences in which male and female monkeys maintain functional heart mass during aging. The old male hearts demonstrated increased apoptosis, which more than offset the myocyte hypertrophy, which interestingly was not uniform, without a significant increase in myocyte proliferation. PMID:17720187

  4. Pacemaker current i(f) in adult canine cardiac ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Chang, F; Cohen, I S

    1995-01-01

    1. Single cells enzymatically isolated from canine ventricle and canine Purkinje fibres were studied with the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and the properties of the pacemaker current i(f) compared. 2. Steady-state i(f) activation occurred in canine ventricular myocytes at more negative potentials (-120 to -170 mV) than in canine Purkinje cells (-80 to -130 mV). 3. Reversal potentials were obtained in various extracellular Na+ (140, 79 or 37 mM) and K+ concentrations (25, 9 or 5.4 mM) to determine the ionic selectivity of i(f) in the ventricle. The results suggest that this current was carried by both sodium and potassium ions. 4. The plots of the time constants of i(f) activation against voltage were 'bell shaped' in both canine ventricular and Purkinje myocytes. The curve for the ventricular myocytes was shifted about 30 mV in the negative direction. In both ventricular and Purkinje myocytes, the fully activated I-V relationship exhibited outward rectification in 5.4 mM extracellular K+. 5. Calyculin A (0.5 microM) increased i(f) by shifting its activation to more positive potentials in ventricular myocytes. Protein kinase inhibition by H-7 (200 microM) or H-8 (100 microM) reversed the positive voltage shift of i(f) activation. This effect of calyculin A also occurred when the permeabilized patch was used for whole-cell recording. 6. These results indicate i(f) is present in ventricular myocytes. If shifted to more positive potentials i(f) could play a role in ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias. The negative shift of i(f) in the ventricle might play a role in differentiating non-pacing regions of the heart from those regions that pace. PMID:7545232

  5. Oxidative metabolism in guinea pig ventricular myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L E; Carlos, H; Amian, A; Moon, K E

    1987-07-01

    Surface structures on guinea pig ventricular myocytes were protected from proteolytic enzyme activity with 100 KIU.ml-2 aprotinin during mechanical disaggregation. Intact myocytes, approximately 7.5 X 10(6) cells.g-1 ventricular wet weight, were separated from debris and damaged cells using Cytodex I tissue culture supports. Cellular ultrastructure did not differ from that observed in intact tissue. Neither spontaneous contractions nor contracture were ever observed in these myocytes in calcium concentrations of 10 mmol.litre-1. Dinitrophenol (0.2 mmol. litre-1) uncoupled respiration in the myocytes but only after the sarcolemma had been disrupted with Triton X100. The adenosine diphosphate to oxygen ratio of mitochondria isolated from the myocytes was 2.4(0.2) and the respiratory control index 2.6(0.3). Calcium (1.8 mmol.litre-1) increased oxygen uptake in the presence of 10 mmol.litre-1 pyruvate or 11 mmol.litre-1 glucose but not 17 mmol. litre-1 succinate. Succinate dependent oxygen consumption was greater than pyruvate dependent oxygen consumption (1090.0(190.0) and 40.1(0.8) nl.min-1.mg-1 protein respectively). The Crabtree effect was present. Oxidative metabolism was normal in cells stored at 10 degrees C for seven days but deteriorated rapidly thereafter. The results indicate that myocytes disaggregated by this procedure retain many of the morphological and metabolic characteristics of intact cardiac muscle cells and are relatively homogeneous with respect to calcium tolerance and metabolic function.

  6. Analysis of Tubular Membrane Networks in Cardiac Myocytes from Atria and Ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Tobias; Lehnart, Stephan E.

    2014-01-01

    In cardiac myocytes a complex network of membrane tubules - the transverse-axial tubule system (TATS) - controls deep intracellular signaling functions. While the outer surface membrane and associated TATS membrane components appear to be continuous, there are substantial differences in lipid and protein content. In ventricular myocytes (VMs), certain TATS components are highly abundant contributing to rectilinear tubule networks and regular branching 3D architectures. It is thought that peripheral TATS components propagate action potentials from the cell surface to thousands of remote intracellular sarcoendoplasmic reticulum (SER) membrane contact domains, thereby activating intracellular Ca2+ release units (CRUs). In contrast to VMs, the organization and functional role of TATS membranes in atrial myocytes (AMs) is significantly different and much less understood. Taken together, quantitative structural characterization of TATS membrane networks in healthy and diseased myocytes is an essential prerequisite towards better understanding of functional plasticity and pathophysiological reorganization. Here, we present a strategic combination of protocols for direct quantitative analysis of TATS membrane networks in living VMs and AMs. For this, we accompany primary cell isolations of mouse VMs and/or AMs with critical quality control steps and direct membrane staining protocols for fluorescence imaging of TATS membranes. Using an optimized workflow for confocal or superresolution TATS image processing, binarized and skeletonized data are generated for quantitative analysis of the TATS network and its components. Unlike previously published indirect regional aggregate image analysis strategies, our protocols enable direct characterization of specific components and derive complex physiological properties of TATS membrane networks in living myocytes with high throughput and open access software tools. In summary, the combined protocol strategy can be readily applied

  7. Multimodal SHG-2PF Imaging of Microdomain Ca2+-Contraction Coupling in Live cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Samir; Izu, Leighton T.; Mao, Ziliang; Jian, Zhong; Landas, Trevor; Lerner, Aaron; Shimkunas, Rafael; Woldeyesus, Rahwa; Bossuyt, Julie; Wood, Brittani; Chen, Yi-Je; Matthews, Dennis L.; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Lam, Kit S.; Chen-Izu, Ye; Chan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale cardiac myocyte contraction is caused by Ca2+ binding to troponin C, which triggers the cross-bridge power stroke and myofilament sliding in sarcomeres. Synchronized Ca2+ release causes whole cell contraction and is readily observable with current microscopy techniques. However, it is unknown whether localized Ca2+ release, such as Ca2+ sparks and waves, can cause local sarcomere contraction. Contemporary imaging methods fall short of measuring microdomain Ca2+-contraction coupling in live cardiac myocytes. Objective To develop a method for imaging sarcomere-level Ca2+-contraction coupling in healthy and disease-model cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results Freshly isolated cardiac myocytes were loaded with the Ca2+-indicator Fluo-4. A confocal microscope equipped with a femtosecond-pulsed near-infrared laser was used to simultaneously excite second harmonic generation (SHG) from A-bands of myofibrils and two-photon fluorescence (2PF) from Fluo-4. Ca2+ signals and sarcomere strain correlated in space and time with short delays. Furthermore, Ca2+ sparks and waves caused contractions in subcellular microdomains, revealing a previously underappreciated role for these events in generating subcellular strain during diastole. Ca2+ activity and sarcomere strain were also imaged in paced cardiac myocytes under mechanical load, revealing spontaneous Ca2+ waves and correlated local contraction in pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Multi-modal SHG-2PF microscopy enables the simultaneous observation of Ca2+ release and mechanical strain at the sub-sarcomere level in living cardiac myocytes. The method benefits from the label-free nature of SHG, which allows A-bands to be imaged independently of T-tubule morphology and simultaneously with Ca2+ indicators. SHG-2PF imaging is widely applicable to the study of Ca2+-contraction coupling and mechano-chemo-transduction in both health and disease. PMID:26643875

  8. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal and adverse myocyte remodeling postmyocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Hardwick, Jean C; Wright, Gary L; Ryan, Shannon; Li, Ying; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates myocardial infarction (MI)-induced remodeling of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), along with the cardiac tissue it regulates. Guinea pigs underwent VNS implantation on the right cervical vagus. Two weeks later, MI was produced by ligating the ventral descending coronary artery. VNS stimulation started 7 days post-MI (20 Hz, 0.9 ± 0.2 mA, 14 s on, 48 s off; VNS-MI, n = 7) and was compared with time-matched MI animals with sham VNS (MI n = 7) vs. untreated controls (n = 8). Echocardiograms were performed before and at 90 days post-MI. At termination, IC neuronal intracellular voltage recordings were obtained from whole-mount neuronal plexuses. MI increased left ventricular end systolic volume (LVESV) 30% (P = 0.027) and reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF) 6.5% (P < 0.001) at 90 days post-MI compared with baseline. In the VNS-MI group, LVESV and LVEF did not differ from baseline. IC neurons showed depolarization of resting membrane potentials and increased input resistance in MI compared with VNS-MI and sham controls (P < 0.05). Neuronal excitability and sensitivity to norepinephrine increased in MI and VNS-MI groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Synaptic efficacy, as determined by evoked responses to stimulating input axons, was reduced in VNS-MI compared with MI or controls (P < 0.05). VNS induced changes in myocytes, consistent with enhanced glycogenolysis, and blunted the MI-induced increase in the proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (P < 0.05). VNS mitigates MI-induced remodeling of the ICNS, correspondingly preserving ventricular function via both neural and cardiomyocyte-dependent actions.

  9. Current-Voltage Relationship for Late Na(+) Current in Adult Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Clark, R B; Giles, W R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that the slowly inactivating component of the Na(+) current (INa-L) in the mammalian heart is a significant regulator of the action potential waveform. This insight has led to detailed studies of the role of INa-L in a number of important and challenging pathophysiological settings. These include genetically based ventricular arrhythmias (LQT 1, 2, and 3), ventricular arrhythmias arising from progressive cardiomyopathies (including diabetic), and proarrhythmic abnormalities that develop during local or global ventricular ischemia. Inhibition of INa-L may also be a useful strategy for management of atrial flutter and fibrillation. Many important biophysical parameters that characterize INa-L have been identified; and INa-L as an antiarrhythmia drug target has been studied extensively. However, relatively little information is available regarding (1) the ion transfer or current-voltage relationship for INa-L or (2) the time course of its reactivation at membrane potentials similar to the resting or diastolic membrane potential in mammalian ventricle. This chapter is based on our preliminary findings concerning these two very important physiological/biophysical descriptors for INa-L. Our results were obtained using whole-cell voltage clamp methods applied to enzymatically isolated rat ventricular myocytes. A chemical agent, BDF 9148, which was once considered to be a drug candidate in the Na(+)-dependent inotropic agent category has been used to markedly enhance INa-L current. BDF acts in a potent, selective, and reversible fashion. These BDF 9148 effects are compared and contrasted with the prototypical activator of INa-L, a sea anemone toxin, ATX II.

  10. Post-translational modifications of tubulin and microtubule stability in adult rat ventricular myocytes and immortalized HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Belmadani, Souad; Poüs, Christian; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Méry, Pierre-François

    2004-03-01

    Little is known about the subcellular distribution and the dynamics of tubulins in adult cardiac myocytes although both are modified during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Using confocal microscopy, we examined post-translational modifications of tubulin in fully differentiated ventricular myocytes isolated from adult rat hearts, as well as in immortalized and dividing HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Detyrosinated Glu-alpha-tubulin was the most abundant post-translationally modified tubulin found in ventricular myocytes, while acetylated- and delta2-alpha-tubulins were found in lower amounts or absent. In contrast, dividing HL-1 cardiomyocytes exhibited high levels of tyrosinated or acetylated alpha-tubulins. A mild nocodazole treatment (0.1 microM, 1 h) disrupted microtubules in HL-1 myocytes, but not in adult ventricular myocytes. A stronger treatment (10 microM, 2 h) was required to disassemble tubulins in adult myocytes. Glu-alpha-tubulin containing microtubules were more resistant to nocodazole treatment in HL-1 cardiomyocytes than in ventricular myocytes. Endogenous activation of the cAMP pathway with the forskolin analog L858051 (20 microM) or the beta-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline (10 microM) disrupted the most labile microtubules in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. In contrast, isoprenaline (10 microM), cholera toxin (200 ng/ml, a G(S)-protein activator), L858051 (20 microM) or forskolin (10 microM) had no effect on the microtubule network in ventricular myocytes. In addition, intracellular Ca2+ accumulation induced either by thapsigargin (2 microM) or caffeine (10 mM) did not modify microtubule stability in ventricular myocytes. Our data demonstrate the unique stability of the microtubule network in adult cardiac myocytes. We speculate that microtubule stability is required to support cellular integrity during cardiac contraction.

  11. Intrinsic cytosolic calcium buffering properties of single rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, J R; Bassani, J W; Bers, D M

    1994-01-01

    Intracellular passive Ca2+, buffering was measured in voltage-clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Cells were loaded with indo-1 (K+ salt) to an estimated cytosolic concentration of 44 +/- 5 microM (Mean +/- SEM, n = 5), and accessible cell volume was estimated to be 24.5 +/- 3.6 pl. Ca2+ transport by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase and sarcolemmal Na-Ca exchange was inhibited by treatment with thapsigargin and Na-free solutions, respectively. Extracellular [Ca2+] was maintained at 10 mM and, in some experiments, the mitochondrial uncoupler "1799" was used to assess the degree of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. To perform single cell titrations, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) was increased progressively by a train of depolarizing voltage clamp pulses from -40 to +10 mV. The total Ca2+ gain with each pulse was calculated by integration of the Ca current and then analyzed as a function of the rapid change in [Ca2+]i during the pulse. In the range of [Ca2+]i from 0.1 to 2 microM, overall cell buffering was well described as a single lumped Michaelis-Menten type species with an apparent dissociation constant, KD, of of 0.63 +/- 0.07 microM (n = 5) and a binding capacity, Bmax, of 162 +/- 15 mumol/l cell H2O. Correction for buffering attributable to cytosolic indo-1 gives intrinsic cytosolic Ca2+ buffering parameters of KD = 0.96 +/- 0.18 microM and Bmax = 123 +/- 18 mumol/l cell H2O. The fast Ca2+ buffering measured in this manner agrees reasonably with the characteristics of known rapid Ca buffers (e.g., troponin C, calmodulin, and SR Ca-ATPase), but is only about half of the total Ca2+ buffering measured at equilibrium. Inclusion of slow Ca buffers such as the Ca/Mg sites on troponin C and myosin can account for the differences between fast Ca2+ buffering in phase with the Ca current measured in the present experiments and equilibrium Ca2+ buffering. The present data indicate that a rapid rise of [Ca2+]i from 0.1 to 1 microM during a contraction requires

  12. IP3R and RyR calcium channels are involved in neonatal rat cardiac myocyte hypertrophy induced by tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Jun; Guo, Lian-Yi; Wang, Hong-Xin; Yao, Yu-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate which calcium channels are involved in cardiac myocyte hypertrophy induced by TNF-α, cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with 100 μg/L TNF-α. In addition, three different calcium channel blockers (2-APB, ryanodine and nifedipine) were used, and the effects of each calcium channel blocker on cardiac hypertrophy induced by TNF-α were carefully observed. Measurements included cytosolic calcium transients ([Ca2+]i), the level of intracellular calcium in individual cells, cell protein content, cell protein synthesis and cell volume. We found that the IP3R inhibitor (2-APB) and RyR inhibitor (ryanodine) both had significant suppressive effects on the level of [Ca2+]i, calcium concentration, cell protein content, cell protein synthesis and cell volume of cardiomyocytes treated with TNF-α (P<0.01). Moreover, their combined effects were significantly enhanced compared with their single effects (P<0.01). However, the inhibitor of the L type Ca2+ channel nifedipine exhibited no significant suppressive effects on the increase in [Ca2+]i, calcium concentration, cell protein content, cell protein synthesis and cell volume of cardiomyocytes induced by TNF-α (P>0.05). Our results suggest that TNF-α probably induces cardiac myocyte hypertrophy by activating IP3R and RyR calcium channels, which control the release of calcium ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, extracellular calcium influx, which is mainly regulated by the L type Ca2+ channel, may not be involved in cardiac myocyte hypertrophy induced by TNF-α. PMID:28337264

  13. EXPOSURE OF CULTURED MYOCYTES TO ZINC RESULTS IN ALTERED BEAT RATE AND INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of cultured myocytes to zinc results in altered beat rate and intercellular communication

    Graff, Donald W, Devlin, Robert B, Brackhan, Joseph A, Muller-Borer, Barbara J, Bowman, Jill S, Cascio, Wayne E.

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particulate matter (...

  14. CHOP deficiency prevents methylglyoxal-induced myocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dae-Hwan; Han, Jung-Hwa; Lee, Tae-Jin; Shishido, Tetsuro; Lim, Jae Hyang; Kim, Geun-Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that methylglyoxal (MGO) plasma levels are closely linked to diabetes and the exacerbation of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Recently, it was established that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress importantly contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its cardiovascular complications. The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism by which diabetes instigates cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction via MGO-mediated myocyte apoptosis. Intriguingly, the MGO activated unfolded protein response pathway accompanying apoptotic events, such as cleavages of PARP-1 and caspase-3. In addition, Western blot analysis revealed that MGO-induced myocyte apoptosis was inhibited by depletion of CHOP with siRNA against Ddit3, the gene name for rat CHOP. To investigate the physiologic roles of CHOP in vivo, glucose tolerance and cardiac dysfunction were assessed in CHOP-deficient mice. No significant difference was observed between CHOP KO and littermate naïve controls in terms of the MGO-induced impairment of glucose tolerance. In contrast, myocyte apoptosis, inflammation, and cardiac dysfunction were significantly diminished in CHOP KO compared with littermate naïve controls. These results showed that CHOP is the key signal for myocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction induced by MGO. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of CHOP inhibition in the management of diabetic cardiovascular complications including diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  15. Effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean-derived ingredients used in aquaculture feeds may contain phytoestrogens, but it is unknown if these compounds can mimic the catabolic effects of estradiol in fish muscle. Six day-old rainbow trout primary myocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations (10 nM – 100 µM) of either geniste...

  16. Cardiac p300 Is Involved in Myocyte Growth with Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yanazume, Tetsuhiko; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Wada, Hiromichi; Matsumori, Akira; Kawase, Yosuke; Hirai, Maretoshi; Kita, Toru

    2003-01-01

    A variety of stresses on the heart initiate a number of subcellular signaling pathways, which finally reach the nuclei of cardiac myocytes and cause myocyte hypertrophy with heart failure. However, common nuclear pathways that lead to this state are unknown. A zinc finger protein, GATA-4, is one of the transcription factors that mediate changes in gene expression during myocardial-cell hypertrophy. p300 not only acts as a transcriptional coactivator of GATA-4, but also possesses an intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activity. In primary cardiac myocytes derived from neonatal rats, we show that stimulation with phenylephrine increased an acetylated form of GATA-4 and its DNA-binding activity, as well as expression of p300. A dominant-negative mutant of p300 suppressed phenylephrine-induced nuclear acetylation, activation of GATA-4-dependent endothelin-1 promoters, and hypertrophic responses, such as increase in cell size and sarcomere organization. In sharp contrast to the activation of cardiac MEK-1, which phosphorylates GATA-4 and causes compensated hypertrophy in vivo, p300-mediated acetylation of mouse cardiac nuclear proteins, including GATA-4, results in marked eccentric dilatation and systolic dysfunction. These findings suggest that p300-mediated nuclear acetylation plays a critical role in the development of myocyte hypertrophy and represents a pathway that leads to decompensated heart failure. PMID:12724418

  17. Oxygen radical-mediated injury of myocytes-protection by propranolol.

    PubMed

    Mak, I T; Kramer, J H; Freedman, A M; Tse, S Y; Weglicki, W B

    1990-06-01

    UIe effects of propranolol and atenolol on free radical mediated injury in myocytes were examined. Freshly isolated adult canine myocytes were incubated with a superoxide generating (from dihydroxyfumarate) and Fe-catalyzed free radical system. Exposure of the myocytes to free radicals for 20 min resulted in more than a 5-fold increase in thiobarbituric acid reactant (peroxide) formation and elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity released into the media compared to controls. Ultrastructurally, severe sarcolemmal damage, mitochondrial and myofibril derangements were evident. At 40 min, cellular viability (trypan blue exclusion) in the samples exposed to free radicals decreased to about one-third of controls; concomitantly, major losses in total cellular phospholipids occurred. When the cells were pretreated with 200 microM propranolol before the addition of free radicals, both peroxide formation and increased LDH release were inhibited; in agreement, complete ultrastructural preservation was observed. In addition, the subsequent losses in cellular viability and phospholipids were prevented. For comparison, the more water soluble beta-blocker, atenolol at 200 microM was shown ineffective in providing significant protection against the induced injury. The results suggest that propranolol may provide antiperoxidative protection to myocytes when elevated levels of free radicals are present.

  18. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  19. Effects of cannabidiol on contractions and calcium signaling in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ramez M; Al Kury, Lina T; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Qureshi, Anwar; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Shuba, Yaroslav M; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-04-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), a major nonpsychotropic cannabinoid found in Cannabis plant, has been shown to influence cardiovascular functions under various physiological and pathological conditions. In the present study, the effects of CBD on contractility and electrophysiological properties of rat ventricular myocytes were investigated. Video edge detection was used to measure myocyte shortening. Intracellular Ca(2+) was measured in cells loaded with the Ca(2+) sensitive fluorescent indicator fura-2 AM. Whole-cell patch clamp was used to measure action potential and Ca(2+) currents. Radioligand binding was employed to study pharmacological characteristics of CBD binding. CBD (1μM) caused a significant decrease in the amplitudes of electrically evoked myocyte shortening and Ca(2+) transients. However, the amplitudes of caffeine-evoked Ca(2+) transients and the rate of recovery of electrically evoked Ca(2+) transients following caffeine application were not altered. CBD (1μM) significantly decreased the duration of APs. Further studies on L-type Ca(2+) channels indicated that CBD inhibits these channels with IC50 of 0.1μM in a voltage-independent manner. Radioligand studies indicated that the specific binding of [(3)H]Isradipine, was not altered significantly by CBD. The results suggest that CBD depresses myocyte contractility by suppressing L-type Ca(2+) channels at a site different than dihydropyridine binding site and inhibits excitation-contraction coupling in cardiomyocytes.

  20. Calcium waves in rat cardiac myocytes underlie the principles of self-organization in excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wussling, Manfred; Mair, Thomas

    The propagation dynamics of traveling calcium waves in rat cardiac myocytes have been investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. We found, that the calcium waves behave as reaction-diffusion waves, demonstrating the velocity-curvature relationship as well as the dispersion relation. We conclude that thes spatio-temporal pattern of calcium are governed by the properties of an excitable medium.

  1. Excavatolide B Modulates the Electrophysiological Characteristics and Calcium Homeostasis of Atrial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hwong-Ru; Tai, Buh-Yuan; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Chen, Ping-Nan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng

    2017-01-01

    Severe bacterial infections caused by sepsis always result in profound physiological changes, including fever, hypotension, arrhythmia, necrosis of tissue, systemic multi-organ dysfunction, and finally death. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provokes an inflammatory response under sepsis, which may increase propensity to arrhythmogenesis. Excavatolide B (EXCB) possesses potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is not clear whether EXCB could modulate the electrophysiological characteristics and calcium homeostasis of atrial myocytes. This study investigated the effects of EXCB on the atrial myocytes exposed to lipopolysaccharide. A whole-cell patch clamp and indo-1 fluorimetric ratio technique was employed to record the action potential (AP), ionic currents, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in single, isolated rabbit left atrial (LA) cardiomyocytes, with and without LPS (1 μg/mL) and LPS + EXCB administration (10 μM) for 6 ± 1 h, in order to investigate the role of EXCB on atrial electrophysiology. In the presence of LPS, EXCB-treated LA myocytes (n = 13) had a longer AP duration at 20% (29 ± 2 vs. 20 ± 2 ms, p < 0.05), 50% (52 ± 4 vs. 40 ± 3 ms, p < 0.05), and 90% (85 ± 5 vs. 68 ± 3 ms, p < 0.05), compared to the LPS-treated cells (n = 12). LPS-treated LA myocytes showed a higher late sodium current, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current, transient outward current, and delayed rectifier potassium current, but a lower l-type Ca2+ current, than the control LA myocytes. Treatment with EXCB reversed the LPS-induced alterations of the ionic currents. LPS-treated, EXCB-treated, and control LA myocytes exhibited similar Na+ currents. In addition, the LPS-treated LA myocytes exhibited a lower [Ca2+]i content and higher sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, than the controls. EXCB reversed the LPS-induced calcium alterations. In conclusion, EXCB modulates LPS-induced LA electrophysiological characteristics and calcium homeostasis, which may contribute to attenuating

  2. Myocyte apoptosis during acute myocardial infarction in the mouse localizes to hypoxic regions but occurs independently of p53.

    PubMed Central

    Bialik, S; Geenen, D L; Sasson, I E; Cheng, R; Horner, J W; Evans, S M; Lord, E M; Koch, C J; Kitsis, R N

    1997-01-01

    Significant numbers of myocytes die by apoptosis during myocardial infarction. The molecular mechanism of this process, however, remains largely unexplored. To facilitate a molecular genetic analysis, we have developed a model of ischemia-induced cardiac myocyte apoptosis in the mouse. Surgical occlusion of the left coronary artery results in apoptosis, as indicated by the presence of nucleosome ladders and in situ DNA strand breaks. Apoptosis occurs mainly in cardiac myocytes, and is shown for the first time to be limited to hypoxic regions during acute infarction. Since hypoxia-induced apoptosis in other cell types is dependent on p53, and p53 is induced by hypoxia in cardiac myocytes, we investigated the necessity of p53 for myocyte apoptosis during myocardial infarction. Myocyte apoptosis occurs as readily, however, in the hearts of mice nullizygous for p53 as in wild-type littermates. These data demonstrate the existence of a p53-independent pathway that mediates myocyte apoptosis during myocardial infarction. PMID:9294101

  3. -Adrenergic receptors on rat ventricular myocytes: characteristics and linkage to cAMP metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    When incubated with purified cardiomyocytes from adult rat ventricle, the 1-antagonist (TH)prazosin binds to a single class of sites with high affinity. Competition for (TH)prazosin binding by the 2-selective antagonist yohimbine and the nonselective -antagonist phentolamine demonstrates that these receptors are of the 1-subtype. In addition, incubation of myocyte membranes with (TH)yohimbine results in no measurable specific binding. Agonist competition for (TH)prazosin binding to membranes prepared from purified myocytes demonstrates the presence of two components of binding: 28% of 1-receptors interact with norepinephrine with high affinity (K/sub D/ = 36 nM), whereas the majority of receptors (72%) have a low affinity for agonist (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). After addition of 10 M GTP, norepinephrine competes for (TH)prazosin binding to a single class of sites with lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). Incubation of intact myocytes for 2 min with 1 M norepinephrine leads to significantly less cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation than stimulation with either norepinephrine plus prazosin or isoproterenol. Likewise, incubation of intact myocytes with 10 W M norepinephrine leads to significantly less activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase than when myocytes are stimulated by both norepinephrine and the 1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin or the US -adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. They conclude that the cardiomyocyte 1 receptor is coupled to a guanine nucleotide-binding protein, that 1-receptors are functionally linked to decreased intracellular cAMP content, and that this change in cellular cAMP is expressed as described activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  4. Restoring forces in cardiac myocytes. Insight from relaxations induced by photolysis of caged ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Niggli, E; Lederer, W J

    1991-01-01

    Concentration jumps of intracellular ATP were produced by photolysis of P3-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE)-caged ATP and were used to investigate the passive relengthening properties in unloaded cardiac myocytes. Patch-clamp pipettes in the whole-cell mode were used to voltage-clamp the myocytes and to load the cells with caged ATP while optical methods were applied to record sarcomere length or cell length simultaneously. Cell length was varied using energy deprivation contractures while intracellular Ca2+ was controlled with EGTA. At sarcomere lengths between 1.8 and 1.4 microns cellular relengthening after photolysis of caged ATP was rapid (t1/2 approximately 100 ms) and could be well described by a simple mechanical model. However, ATP jumps made at sarcomere lengths approximately 1.1 microns led to slow relengthening (t1/2 approximately seconds), comparable to the slow reextensions observed in skinned myocytes after bulk solution changes. We attribute the slow and incomplete relengthening of intact and skinned myocytes after severe rigor shortening to deformation and alteration of structural elements inside the cell. Relengthening from intermediate sarcomere lengths in intact cells is elastic and provides information about the underlying relengthening forces inside the cell. The data do not support the presence of a significant discontinuity in elastic modulus at a sarcomere length of approximately 1.6 microns expected from ultrastructural features of the sarcomeres and from observations in skinned myocytes. Our results suggest that the cell length measurements usually performed in this preparation provide an adequate description of the force produced by the unloaded cell in the steady state. The results also provide a way to estimate the error arising from viscous forces during rapid shortening. PMID:1868157

  5. Regulation of Ca2+ and electrical alternans in cardiac myocytes: Role of CaMKII and repolarizing currents

    PubMed Central

    Livshitz, Leonid M.; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Alternans of cardiac repolarization is associated with arrhythmias and sudden death. At the cellular level, alternans involves beat-to-beat oscillation of the action potential (AP) and possibly Ca2+ transient (CaT). Because of experimental difficulty in independently controlling the Ca2+ and electrical subsystems, mathematical modelling provides additional insights into mechanisms and causality. Pacing protocols were conducted in a canine ventricular myocyte model with the following results: 1. (I) CaT alternans results from refractoriness of the SR Ca2+ release system; alternation of the L-type calcium current (ICa(L)) has a negligible effect; (II) CaT-AP coupling during late AP occurs through the sodium-calcium exchanger (INaCa) and underlies APD alternans; (III) Increased Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity extends the range of CaT and APD alternans to slower frequencies and increases alternans magnitude; its decrease suppresses CaT and APD alternans, exerting an antiarrhythmic effect; (IV). Increase of the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) also suppresses APD alternans, but without suppressing CaT alternans. Thus, CaMKII inhibition eliminates APD alternans by eliminating its cause (CaT alternans), while IKr enhancement does so by weakening CaT-APD coupling. The simulations identify combined CaMKII inhibition and IKr enhancement as a possible antiar-rhythmic intervention. PMID:17277017

  6. Influence of semicrystalline order on the second-harmonic generation efficiency in the anisotropic bands of myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Catherine; Prent, Nicole; Green, Chantal; Cisek, Richard; Major, Arkady; Stewart, Bryan; Barzda, Virginijus

    2007-04-01

    The influence of semicrystalline order on the second-harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency in the anisotropic bands of Drosophila melanogaster sarcomeres from larval and adult muscle has been investigated. Differences in the semicrystalline order were obtained by using wild-type and mutant strains containing different amounts of headless myosin. The reduction in semicrystalline order without altering the chemical composition of myofibrils was achieved by observing highly stretched sarcomeres and by inducing a loss of viability in myocytes. In all cases the reduction of semicrystalline order in anisotropic bands of myocytes resulted in a substantial decrease in SHG. Second-harmonic imaging during periodic contractions of myocytes revealed higher intensities when sarcomeres were in the relaxed state compared with the contracted state. This study demonstrates that an ordered semicrystalline arrangement of anisotropic bands plays a determining role in the efficiency of SHG in myocytes.

  7. Study of proliferative processes and nuclear estradiol and progesterone receptors in myocytes in pregnant and postpartum mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Skurupiy, V A; Obedinskaya, K S

    2012-08-01

    Numerical densities of the nuclei were morhometrically evaluated in all myocytes and myocytes expressing nuclear estrogen- and progesterone-receptor complexes, which were revealed immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies in C57Bl/6 mice. It was shown that the above quantitative parameters of myometrial cells after the first pregnancy were similar to those in nonpregnant mice by day 10 after delivery. In the third pregnancy, especially developed after the second interrupted pregnancy, proliferation processes in the myometrium were not completed by postpartum day 10, but dramatically progressed. It was associated with a significant decrease in the fraction of myocytes carrying nuclear hormone-receptor complexes with estradiol and progesterone and their disturbed physiological relations in the myometrium during and after pregnancy probably due to dedifferentiation of a considerable part of myocytes.

  8. The cardiotoxicity and myocyte damage caused by small molecule anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors is correlated with lack of target specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2010-04-15

    The use of the new anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) has revolutionized the treatment of certain cancers. However, the use of some of these results in cardiotoxicity. Large-scale profiling data recently made available for the binding of 7 of the 9 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases has allowed us to correlate kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with TKI-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The tyrosine kinase selectivity scores, but not the serine-threonine kinase scores, were highly correlated with the myocyte damaging effects of the TKIs. Additionally, we showed that damage to myocytes gave a good rank order correlation with clinical cardiotoxicity. Finally, strength of TKI binding to colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) was highly correlated with myocyte damage, thus possibly implicating this kinase in contributing to TKI-induced cardiotoxicity.

  9. Intracellular sodium affects ouabain interaction with the Na/K pump in cultured chick cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Whether a given dose of ouabain will produce inotropic or toxic effects depends on factors that affect the apparent affinity (K0.5) of the Na/K pump for ouabain. To accurately resolve these factors, especially the effect of intracellular Na concentration (Nai), we have applied three complementary techniques for measuring the K0.5 for ouabain in cultured embryonic chick cardiac myocytes. Under control conditions with 5.4 mM Ko, the value of the K0.5 for ouabain was 20.6 +/- 1.2, 12.3 +/- 1.7, and 6.6 +/- 0.4 microM, measured by voltage-clamp, Na-selective microelectrode, and equilibrium [3H]ouabain-binding techniques, respectively. A significant difference in the three techniques was the time of exposure to ouabain (30 s-30 min). Since increased duration of exposure to ouabain would increase Nai, monensin was used to raise Nai to investigate what effect Nai might have on the apparent affinity of block by ouabain. Monensin enhanced the rise in Na content induced by 1 microM ouabain. In the presence of 1 microM [3H]ouabain, total binding was found to be a saturating function of Na content. Using the voltage- clamp method, we found that the value of the K0.5 for ouabain was lowered by nearly an order of magnitude in the presence of 3 microM monensin to 2.4 +/- 0.2 microM and the magnitude of the Na/K pump current was increased about threefold. Modeling the Na/K pump as a cyclic sequence of states with a single state having high affinity for ouabain shows that changes in Nai alone are sufficient to cause a 10- fold change in K0.5. These results suggest that Nai reduces the value of the apparent affinity of the Na/K pump for ouabain in 5.4 mM Ko by increasing its turnover rate, thus increasing the availability of the conformation of the Na/K pump that binds ouabain with high affinity. PMID:2299333

  10. Speckle based configuration for simultaneous in vitro inspection of mechanical contractions of cardiac myocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Mark; Fixler, Dror; Shainberg, Asher; Zlochiver, Sharon; Micó, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-04-01

    In this manuscript we propose optical lensless configuration for a remote non-contact measuring of mechanical contractions of vast number of cardiac myocytes. All the myocytes were taken from rats, and the measurements were done in an in vitro mode. The optical method is based on temporal analysis of secondary reflected speckle patterns generated in lensless microscope configuration. The processing involves analyzing the movement and the change in the statistics of the generated secondary speckle patterns that are created on top of the cell culture when it is illuminated by a spot of laser beam. The main advantage of the proposed system is the ability to measure many cells simultaneously (approximately one thousand cells) and to extract the statistical data of their movement at once. The presented experimental results also include investigation the effect of isoproteranol on cells contraction process.

  11. Gaining myocytes or losing fibroblasts: Challenges in cardiac fibroblast reprogramming for infarct repair.

    PubMed

    Nagalingam, Raghu S; Safi, Hamza A; Czubryt, Michael P

    2016-04-01

    Unlike most somatic tissues, the heart possesses a very limited inherent ability to repair itself following damage. Attempts to therapeutically salvage the myocardium after infarction, either by sparing surviving myocytes or by injection of exogenous cells of varied provenance, have met with limited success. Cardiac fibroblasts are numerous, resistant to hypoxia, and amenable to phenotype reprogramming to cardiomyocytes - a potential panacea to an intractable problem. However, the long-term effects of mass conversion of fibroblasts are as-yet unknown. Since fibroblasts play key roles in normal cardiac function, treating these cells as a ready source of replacements for myocytes may have the effect of swapping one problem for another. This review briefly examines the roles of cardiac fibroblasts, recaps the strides made so far in their reprogramming to cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and discusses the potential ramifications of large-scale cellular identity swapping. While such therapy offers great promise, the potential repercussions require consideration and careful study.

  12. Speckle-based configuration for simultaneous in vitro inspection of mechanical contractions of cardiac myocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Mark; Fixler, Dror; Shainberg, Asher; Zlochiver, Sharon; Micó, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-10-01

    An optical lensless configuration for a remote noncontact measuring of mechanical contractions of a vast number of cardiac myocytes is proposed. All the myocytes were taken from rats, and the measurements were done in an in vitro mode. The optical method is based on temporal analysis of secondary reflected speckle patterns generated in lensless microscope configuration. The processing involves analyzing the movement and the change in the statistics of the secondary speckle patterns that are created on top of the cell culture when it is illuminated by a spot of laser beam. The main advantage of the proposed system is the ability to measure many cells simultaneously (∼1000 cells) and to extract the statistical data of their movement at once. The presented experimental results also include investigation of the effect of isoproteranol on cell contraction process.

  13. Maturation status of sarcomere structure and function in human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Bedada, Fikru B; Wheelwright, Matthew; Metzger, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Human heart failure due to myocardial infarction is a major health concern. The paucity of organs for transplantation limits curative approaches for the diseased and failing adult heart. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-CMs) have the potential to provide a long-term, viable, regenerative-medicine alternative. Significant progress has been made with regard to efficient cardiac myocyte generation from hiPSCs. However, directing hiPSC-CMs to acquire the physiological structure, gene expression profile and function akin to mature cardiac tissue remains a major obstacle. Thus, hiPSC-CMs have several hurdles to overcome before they find their way into translational medicine. In this review, we address the progress that has been made, the void in knowledge and the challenges that remain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Computational Approach to Measuring Myocyte Disarray in Animal Models of Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie

    2017-04-06

    In cardiovascular disease research, studies often include measuring cardiac function and performing histological examination of heart tissue. After measuring contractility, hearts from animals such as mice and rats are often frozen or fixed, sliced, and stained to quantify the morphology of various structures such as extracellular matrix proteins, cell nuclei, and F-actin. Traditional scoring methods have largely consisted of assessing sections of images for the presence or absence of myocyte disarray. These approaches require unbiased manual assessment, which can require extra personnel, and are not scalable to the quantity of data that can be generated by modern automated experimental techniques. Here, we describe an automated image analysis approach for unbiased numerical measurement of myocyte disarray. We provide step-by-step instructions for image preparation as well as a basic Matlab script for measurements. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Calcium-sensing receptor activation contributed to apoptosis stimulates TRPC6 channel in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yi-hua; Li, Yong-quan; Feng, Shan-li; Li, Bao-xin; Pan, Zhen-wei; Xu, Chang-qing; Li, Ting-ting; Yang, Bao-feng

    2010-04-16

    Capacitative calcium entry (CCE) refers to the influx of calcium through plasma membrane channels activated on depletion of endoplasmic sarcoplasmic/reticulum (ER/SR) Ca{sup 2+} stores, which is performed mainly by the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and plays an important role in mediating cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, there are no data regarding the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart. In this study, in rat neonatal myocytes, by Ca{sup 2+} imaging, we found that the depletion of ER/SR Ca{sup 2+} stores by thapsigargin (TG) elicited a transient rise in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), followed by sustained increase depending on extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. But, TRP channels inhibitor (SKF96365), not L-type channels or the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger inhibitors, inhibited [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} relatively high. Then, we found that the stimulation of CaR with its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or by an increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+}([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) increased the concentration of intracelluar Ca{sup 2+}, whereas, the sustained elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of SKF96365. Similarly, the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Western blot analysis showed that GdCl{sub 3} increased the expression of TRPC6, which was reversed by SKF96365. Additionally, SKF96365 reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by GdCl{sub 3}. Our results suggested that CCE exhibited in rat neonatal myocytes and CaR activation induced Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cationic channels TRPCs to gate the CCE, for which TRPC6 was one of the most likely candidates. TRPC6 channel was functionally coupled with CaR to enhance the cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  16. Comparison of sarcolemmal calcium channel current in rabbit and rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, W; Ginsburg, K S; Bers, D M

    1996-01-01

    1. Fundamental properties of Ca2+ channel currents in rat and rabbit ventricular myocytes were measured using whole cell voltage clamp. 2. In rat, as compared with rabbit myocytes, Ca2+ channel current (ICa) was half-activated at about 10 mV more negative potential, decayed slower, was half-inactivated (in steady state) at about 5 mV more positive potential, and recovered faster from inactivation. 3. These features result in a larger steady-state window current in rat, and also suggest that under comparable voltage clamp conditions, including action potential (AP) clamp, more Ca2+ influx would be expected in rat myocytes. 4. Ca2+ channel current carried by Na+ and Cs+ in the absence of divalent ions (Ins) also activated at more negative potential and decayed more slowly in rat. 5. The reversal potential for Ins was 6 mV more positive in rabbit, consistent with a larger permeability ratio (PNa/PCs) in rabbit than in rat. ICa also reversed at slightly more positive potentials in rabbit (such that PCa/PCs might also be higher). 6. Ca2+ influx was calculated by integration of ICa evoked by voltage clamp pulses (either square pulses or pulses based on recorded rabbit or rat APs). For a given clamp waveform, the Ca2+ influx was up to 25% greater in rat, as predicted from the fundamental properties of ICa and Ins. 7. However, the longer duration of the AP in rabbit myocytes compensated for the difference in influx, such that the integrated Ca2+ influx via ICa in response to the species-appropriate waveform was about twice as large as that seen in rat. PMID:8799895

  17. Interactions between endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide influence cultured chick cardiac myocyte contractility.

    PubMed

    Bézie, Y; Mesnard, L; Longrois, D; Samson, F; Perret, C; Mercadier, J J; Laurent, S

    1996-09-12

    We have previously shown that rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reduces the contractility of cultured, spontaneously beating chick embryo ventricular cells, an effect opposite to that of endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 has been described as a secretagogue for natriuretic peptides in vitro and in vivo. Natriuretic peptides can inhibit endothelin-1 secretion from cultured endothelial cells, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to determine whether ANP attenuated the endothelin-1-induced increase in myocyte contractility. Using a video-microscopy system we studied the contractility of isolated cultured chick ventricular myocytes in response to endothelin-1, chicken natriuretic peptide (ChNP), and both. We also used Northern blot analysis to study the time course of ChNP expression in response to endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 (10(-8) M) increased chick cardiomyocyte contractility by 20-25% between 5 and 15 min (P < 0.05). Although ChNP (3 x 10(-7) M) did not significantly change the amplitude of contraction in basal conditions, it prevented the endothelin-1-induced increase in contractility (P < 0.05) when perfused prior to endothelin-1, and reversed it when perfused 5 min after endothelin-1 exposure (P < 0.05). Endothelin-1 significantly increased the accumulation of ChNP mRNA in chick ventricular myocytes as early as the 30 min after exposure (P < 0.05), with a maximal effect after 2 h of stimulation (P < 0.01); no effect was observed after 4 h. These data support an interaction between endothelin-1 and natriuretic peptides as autocrine/paracrine factors regulating the contractile function of chick cardiac myocytes, as well as their antagonistic effects on cardiac cell contractility. The early and transient expression of ChNP mRNA in response to endothelin-1 may be involved in this interaction.

  18. Progesterone Protects Against BPA-induced Arrhythmias in Female Rat Cardiac Myocytes via Rapid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianyong; Hong, Kui; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2017-01-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that has a range of potential adverse health effects. Previously we showed that acute exposure to BPA promoted arrhythmias in female rat hearts through estrogen receptor rapid signaling. Progesterone (P4) and estrogen have antagonistic or complementary actions in a number of tissues and systems. In the current study, we examined the influence, and possible protective effect, of P4 on the rapid cardiac actions of BPA in female rat cardiac myocytes. Preincubation with physiological concentration (1 nM) of P4 abolished BPA-induced triggered activities in female cardiac myocytes. Further, P4 abrogated BPA-induced alterations in Ca2+ handling including elevated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak and Ca2+ load. Key to the inhibitory effect of P4 is its blockade of BPA-induced increase in the phosphorylation of phospholamban. At myocyte and protein levels, these inhibitory actions of P4 were blocked by pretreatment with the nuclear P4 receptor (nPR) antagonist RU486. Analysis using membrane impermeable BSA-conjugated P4 suggested that the actions of P4 were mediated by membrane-initiated signaling. The inhibitory G (Gi) protein and phophoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), but not tyrosine protein kinase activation, were involved in the observed effects of P4. In conclusion, P4 exerts an acute protective effect against BPA-induced arrhythmogenesis in female cardiac myocytes, through nPR and the Gi/PI3K signaling pathway. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the impact of EDCs in the context of native hormonals, and may provide potential therapeutic strategies for the protection against the cardiac toxicities associated with BPA exposure.

  19. 9-Phenanthrol inhibits recombinant and arterial myocyte TMEM16A channels

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Sarah K; Wang, Qian; Bulley, Simon; Neeb, Zachary P; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes), intravascular pressure stimulates membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction (the myogenic response). Ion channels proposed to mediate pressure-induced depolarization include several transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, including TRPM4, and transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CaCC). 9-Phenanthrol, a putative selective TRPM4 channel inhibitor, abolishes myogenic tone in cerebral arteries, suggesting that either TRPM4 is essential for pressure-induced depolarization, upstream of activation of other ion channels or that 9-phenanthrol is non-selective. Here, we tested the hypothesis that 9-phenanthrol is also a TMEM16A channel blocker, an ion channel for which few inhibitors have been identified. Experimental Approach Patch clamp electrophysiology was used to measure rat cerebral artery myocyte and human recombinant TMEM16A (rTMEM16A) currents or currents generated by recombinant bestrophin-1, another Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, expressed in HEK293 cells. Key Results 9-Phenanthrol blocked myocyte TMEM16A currents activated by either intracellular Ca2+ or Eact, a TMEM16A channel activator. In contrast, 9-phenanthrol did not alter recombinant bestrophin-1 currents. 9-Phenanthrol reduced arterial myocyte TMEM16A currents with an IC50 of ∼12 μM. Cell-attached patch recordings indicated that 9-phenanthrol reduced single rTMEM16A channel open probability and mean open time, and increased mean closed time without affecting the amplitude. Conclusions and Implications These data identify 9-phenanthrol as a novel TMEM16A channel blocker and provide an explanation for the previous observation that 9-phenanthrol abolishes myogenic tone when both TRPM4 and TMEM16A channels contribute to this response. 9-Phenanthrol may be a promising candidate from which to develop TMEM16A channel-specific inhibitors. PMID:25573456

  20. Optimal range for parvalbumin as relaxing agent in adult cardiac myocytes: gene transfer and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Pierre; Metzger, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) has recently been shown to increase the relaxation rate when expressed in intact isolated cardiac myocytes via adenovirus gene transfer. We report here a combined experimental and mathematical modeling approach to determine the dose-response and the sarcomere length (SL) shortening-frequency relationship of PV in adult rat cardiac myocytes in primary culture. The dose-response was obtained experimentally by observing the PV-transduced myocytes at different time points after gene transfer. Calcium transients and unloaded mechanical contractions were measured. The results were as follows. At low estimated [PV] (approximately 0.01 mM), contractile parameters were unchanged; at intermediate [PV], relaxation rate of the mechanical contraction and the decay rate of the calcium transient increased with little effects on amplitude; and at high [PV] (approximately 0.1 mM), relaxation rate was further increased, but the amplitudes of the mechanical contraction and the calcium transient were diminished when compared with control myocytes. The SL shortening-frequency relationship exhibited a biphasic response to increasing stimulus frequency in controls (decrease in amplitude and re-lengthening time from 0.2 to 1.0 Hz followed by an increase in these parameters from 2.0 to 4.0 Hz). The effect of PV was to flatten this frequency response. This flattening effect was partly explained by a reduction in the variation in fractional binding of PV to calcium during beats at high frequency. In conclusion, experimental results and mathematical modeling indicate that there is an optimal PV range for which relaxation rate is increased with little effect on contractile amplitude and that PV effectiveness decreases as the stimulus frequency increases. PMID:11964244

  1. Intracellular tortuosity underlies slow cAMP diffusion in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark; Lomas, Oliver; Jalink, Kees; Ford, Kerrie L.; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Aims 3′,5′-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signals in the heart are often confined to concentration microdomains shaped by cAMP diffusion and enzymatic degradation. While the importance of phosphodiesterases (degradative enzymes) in sculpting cAMP microdomains is well established in cardiomyocytes, less is known about cAMP diffusivity (DcAMP) and factors affecting it. Many earlier studies have reported fast diffusivity, which argues against sharply defined microdomains. Methods and results [cAMP] dynamics in the cytoplasm of adult rat ventricular myocytes were imaged using a fourth generation genetically encoded FRET-based sensor. The [cAMP]-response to the addition and removal of isoproterenol (β-adrenoceptor agonist) quantified the rates of cAMP synthesis and degradation. To obtain a read out of DcAMP, a stable [cAMP] gradient was generated using a microfluidic device which delivered agonist to one half of the myocyte only. After accounting for phosphodiesterase activity, DcAMP was calculated to be 32 µm2/s; an order of magnitude lower than in water. Diffusivity was independent of the amount of cAMP produced. Saturating cAMP-binding sites with the analogue 6-Bnz-cAMP did not accelerate DcAMP, arguing against a role of buffering in restricting cAMP mobility. cAMP diffused at a comparable rate to chemically unrelated but similar sized molecules, arguing for a common physical cause of restricted diffusivity. Lower mitochondrial density and order in neonatal cardiac myocytes allowed for faster diffusion, demonstrating the importance of mitochondria as physical barriers to cAMP mobility. Conclusion In adult cardiac myocytes, tortuosity due to physical barriers, notably mitochondria, restricts cAMP diffusion to levels that are more compatible with microdomain signalling. PMID:27089919

  2. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, M.J.; Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N.; Bridgland-Taylor, M.; Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility.

  3. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1–5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  4. Dinitrophenol pretreatment of rat ventricular myocytes protects against damage by metabolic inhibition and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, G C; Lawrence, C L; Standen, N B

    2002-05-01

    We have investigated the protective effects of pretreatment with the mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol on the cellular damage induced by metabolic inhibition (with cyanide and iodoacetic acid) and reperfusion in freshly isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. Damage was assessed from changes in cell length and morphology measured using video microscopy. Intracellular Ca(2+), mitochondrial membrane potential, and NADH were measured using fura-2, tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester and autofluorescence, respectively. During metabolic inhibition myocytes developed rigor, and on reperfusion 73.6+/-8.1% hypercontracted and 10.8+/-6.7% recovered contractile function in response to electrical stimulation. Intracellular Ca(2+) increased substantially, indicated by a rise in the fura-2 ratio (340/380 nm) on reperfusion from 0.86+/-0.04 to 1.93+/-0.18. Myocytes pretreated with substrate-free Tyrode containing 50 microm dinitrophenol showed reduced reperfusion injury: 29.0+/-7.4% of cells hypercontracted and 65.3+/-7.3% recovered contractile function (P<0.001 vs control). The fura-2 ratio on reperfusion was also lower at 1.01+/-0.08. Fluorescence measurements showed that dinitrophenol caused mitochondrial depolarisation, and decreased NADH. The presence of the substrates glucose and pyruvate reduced these effects, and abolished the protection against damage by metabolic inhibition and reperfusion. However protection was unaffected by block of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Thus the protective effects of pretreatment with dinitrophenol may result from a reduction in NADH in response to mitochondrial depolarisation.

  5. Cyclin D2 induces proliferation of cardiac myocytes and represses hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Busk, Peter K. . E-mail: pkbu@novonordisk.com; Hinrichsen, Rebecca; Bartkova, Jirina; Hansen, Ane H.; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Bartek, Jiri; Haunso, Stig

    2005-03-10

    The myocytes of the adult mammalian heart are considered unable to divide. Instead, mitogens induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. We have investigated the effect of adenoviral overexpression of cyclin D2 on myocyte proliferation and morphology. Cardiomyocytes in culture were identified by established markers. Cyclin D2 induced DNA synthesis and proliferation of cardiomyocytes and impaired hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II and serum. At the molecular level, cyclin D2 activated CDK4/6 and lead to pRB phosphorylation and downregulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}. Expression of the CDK4/6 inhibitor p16 inhibited proliferation and cyclin D2 overexpressing myocytes became hypertrophic under such conditions. Inhibition of hypertrophy by cyclin D2 correlated with downregulation of p27{sup Kip1}. These data show that hypertrophy and proliferation are highly related processes and suggest that cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is due to low amounts of cell cycle activators unable to overcome the block imposed by cell cycle inhibitors. Cell cycle entry upon hypertrophy may be converted to cell division by increased expression of activators such as cyclin D2.

  6. Computational Approaches to Understanding the Role of Fibroblast-Myocyte Interactions in Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tashalee R.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The adult heart is composed of a dense network of cardiomyocytes surrounded by nonmyocytes, the most abundant of which are cardiac fibroblasts. Several cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction or dilated cardiomyopathy, are associated with an increased density of fibroblasts, that is, fibrosis. Fibroblasts play a significant role in the development of electrical and mechanical dysfunction of the heart; however the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. One widely studied mechanism suggests that fibroblasts produce excess extracellular matrix, resulting in collagenous septa. These collagenous septa slow propagation, cause zig-zag conduction paths, and decouple cardiomyocytes resulting in a substrate for arrhythmia. Another emerging mechanism suggests that fibroblasts promote arrhythmogenesis through direct electrical interactions with cardiomyocytes via gap junctions. Due to the challenges of investigating fibroblast-myocyte coupling in native cardiac tissue, computational modeling and in vitro experiments have facilitated the investigation into the mechanisms underlying fibroblast-mediated changes in cardiomyocyte action potential morphology, conduction velocity, spontaneous excitability, and vulnerability to reentry. In this paper, we summarize the major findings of the existing computational studies investigating the implications of fibroblast-myocyte interactions in the normal and diseased heart. We then present investigations from our group into the potential role of voltage-dependent gap junctions in fibroblast-myocyte interactions. PMID:26601107

  7. Mathematical Models of Atrial and Ventricular Myocytes from the Rabbit Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphey, Carey Richard

    Mathematical models of rabbit atrial and ventricular myocytes that are based on quantitative voltage clamp data from emzymatically isolated cardiac myocytes have been developed. These models are capable of accurately simulating the transmembrane ionic currents recorded in response to a step change in membrane potential (whole-cell voltage clamp response), the nonpropagated membrane action potential (MAP), and the frequency-dependent action potential waveshape changes occurring in response to variations in rate of stimulation. Rectangular pulse, ramp and action potential voltage -clamp measurements of the transmembrane ionic currents have allowed us to model a number of processes thought to be important during repolarization. These computations provide important biophysical insights into the electrophysiological activity of atrial and ventricular cells and their associated intra- and extracellular ionic concentration changes. The present model also has useful predictive capabilities. We have used the model to: (1) estimate the intracellular Ca^{2+} transient in these myocytes and to compare the relative occupancy of the Ca^{2+} binding sites in the contractile proteins with known cellular mechanical activity, and (2) predict the response of the atrial cell to potassium current blockade via BaCl_2 to the bathing medium.

  8. A computational model of the human left-ventricular epicardial myocyte.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Vivek; Mazhari, Reza; Winslow, Raimond L

    2004-09-01

    A computational model of the human left-ventricular epicardial myocyte is presented. Models of each of the major ionic currents present in these cells are formulated and validated using experimental data obtained from studies of recombinant human ion channels and/or whole-cell recording from single myocytes isolated from human left-ventricular subepicardium. Continuous-time Markov chain models for the gating of the fast Na(+) current, transient outward current, rapid component of the delayed rectifier current, and the L-type calcium current are modified to represent human data at physiological temperature. A new model for the gating of the slow component of the delayed rectifier current is formulated and validated against experimental data. Properties of calcium handling and exchanger currents are altered to appropriately represent the dynamics of intracellular ion concentrations. The model is able to both reproduce and predict a wide range of behaviors observed experimentally including action potential morphology, ionic currents, intracellular calcium transients, frequency dependence of action-potential duration, Ca(2+)-frequency relations, and extrasystolic restitution/post-extrasystolic potentiation. The model therefore serves as a useful tool for investigating mechanisms of arrhythmia and consequences of drug-channel interactions in the human left-ventricular myocyte.

  9. Formulation and In vitro Interaction of Rhodamine-B Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles with Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jonderian, Antranik; Maalouf, Rita

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize rhodamine B (Rh B) loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide; PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and their interactions with cardiac myocytes. PLGA NPs were formulated using single emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The influence of varying parameters such as the stabilizer concentration, the sonication time, and the organic to aqueous ratio were investigated. The diameter, the dispersity, the encapsulation efficiency and the zeta potential of the optimized NPs were about 184 nm, 0.19, 40% and -21.7 mV, respectively. In vitro release showed that 29% of the Rh B was released within the first 8 h. Scanning electron microscopy measurements performed on the optimized NPs showed smooth surface and spherical shapes. No significant cytotoxic or apoptotic effects were observed on cardiac myocytes after 24 and 48 h of exposure with concentrations up to 200 μg/mL. The kinetic of the intracellular uptake was confirmed by confocal microscopy and cells took up PLGA NPs within the 1st hours. Interestingly, our data show an increase in the NPs’ uptake with time of exposure. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that the designed NPs can be used as potential probes for drug delivery in cardiac myocytes. PMID:27999542

  10. Quantification of Myocyte Chemotaxis: A Role for FAK in Regulating Directional Motility

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Britni; Hakim, Zeenat S.; Cameron, Morgan V.; Smithies, Oliver; Taylor, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of a fully functional four-chambered heart involves an intricate and complex series of events that includes precise spatial–temporal regulation of cell specification, proliferation, and migration. The formation of the ventricular septum during mid-gestation ensures the unidirectional flow of blood, and is necessary for postnatal viability. Notably, a majority of all congenital malformations of the cardiovascular system in humans involve septal abnormalities which afflict 1 out of 100 newborn children in the United States. Thus, a clear understanding of the precise mechanisms involved in this morphogenetic event will undoubtedly reveal important therapeutic targets. The final step in valvuloseptal morphogenesis occurs, in part, by directed movement of flanking myocytes into the cushion mesenchyme. In order to identify the molecular mechanisms that regulate this critical myocyte function, we have developed two in vitro methodologies; a transwell assay to assess population changes in motility and a single-cell tracking assay to identify signals that drive the coordinated movement of these cells. These methods have proven effective to identify focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as an intracellular component that is critical for myocyte chemotaxis. PMID:22222526

  11. Pannexin 1 Constitutes the Large Conductance Cation Channel of Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kienitz, Marie-Cecile; Bender, Kirsten; Dermietzel, Rolf; Pott, Lutz; Zoidl, Georg

    2011-01-01

    A large conductance (∼300 picosiemens) channel (LCC) of unknown molecular identity, activated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, particularly when augmented by caffeine, has been described previously in isolated cardiac myocytes. A potential candidate for this channel is pannexin 1 (Panx1), which has been shown to form large ion channels when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. Panx1 function is implicated in ATP-mediated auto-/paracrine signaling, and a crucial role in several cell death pathways has been suggested. Here, we demonstrate that after culturing for 4 days LCC activity is no longer detected in myocytes but can be rescued by adenoviral gene transfer of Panx1. Endogenous LCCs and those related to expression of Panx1 share key pharmacological properties previously used for identifying and characterizing Panx1 channels. These data demonstrate that Panx1 constitutes the LCC of cardiac myocytes. Sporadic openings of single Panx1 channels in the absence of Ca2+ release can trigger action potentials, suggesting that Panx1 channels potentially promote arrhythmogenic activities. PMID:21041301

  12. Reduced efficiency of sarcolipin-dependent respiration in myocytes from humans with severe obesity

    PubMed Central

    Paran, Christopher W.; Verkerke, Anthony R.P.; Heden, Timothy D.; Park, Sanghee; Zou, Kai; Lawson, Heather A.; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Houmard, Joseph A.; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sarcolipin (SLN) regulates muscle energy expenditure through its action on sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pump. It is unknown whether SLN-dependent respiration has relevance to human obesity, but whole-transcriptome gene expression profiling revealed that SLN was more highly expressed in myocytes from individuals with severe obesity (OB) than in lean controls (LN). The purpose of this study was to examine SLN-dependent cellular respiratory rates in LN and OB human muscles. Design and Methods Primary myocytes were isolated from muscle biopsy from seven LN and OB Caucasian females. Cellular respiration was assessed with and without lentivirus-mediated SLN knockdown in LN and OB myocytes. Results SLN mRNA and protein abundance was greater in OB compared to LN cells. Despite elevated SLN levels in wildtype OB cells, respiratory rates among SLN-deficient cells were higher in OB compared to LN. Obesity-induced reduction in efficiency of SLN-dependent respiration was associated with altered SR phospholipidome. Conclusions SLN-dependent respiration is reduced in muscles from humans with severe obesity compared to lean controls. Identification of molecular mechanism that affects SLN-efficiency might promote an increase in skeletal muscle energy expenditure. PMID:25970801

  13. Global Intracoronary Infusion of Allogeneic Cardiosphere-Derived Cells Improves Ventricular Function and Stimulates Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration throughout the Heart in Swine with Hibernating Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Gen; Weil, Brian R.; Leiker, Merced M.; Ribbeck, Amanda E.; Young, Rebeccah F.; Cimato, Thomas R.; Canty, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) improve ventricular function and reduce fibrotic volume when administered via an infarct-related artery using the “stop-flow” technique. Unfortunately, myocyte loss and dysfunction occur globally in many patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, necessitating an approach to distribute CDCs throughout the entire heart. We therefore determined whether global intracoronary infusion of CDCs under continuous flow improves contractile function and stimulates new myocyte formation. Methods and Results Swine with hibernating myocardium from a chronic LAD occlusion were studied 3-months after instrumentation (n = 25). CDCs isolated from myocardial biopsies were infused into each major coronary artery (∼33×106 icCDCs). Global icCDC infusion was safe and while ∼3% of injected CDCs were retained, they did not affect ventricular function or myocyte proliferation in normal animals. In contrast, four-weeks after icCDCs were administered to animals with hibernating myocardium, %LADWT increased from 23±6 to 51±5% (p<0.01). In diseased hearts, myocyte proliferation (phospho-histone-H3) increased in hibernating and remote regions with a concomitant increase in myocyte nuclear density. These effects were accompanied by reductions in myocyte diameter consistent with new myocyte formation. Only rare myocytes arose from sex-mismatched donor CDCs. Conclusions Global icCDC infusion under continuous flow is feasible and improves contractile function, regresses myocyte cellular hypertrophy and increases myocyte proliferation in diseased but not normal hearts. New myocytes arising via differentiation of injected cells are rare, implicating stimulation of endogenous myocyte regeneration as the primary mechanism of repair. PMID:25402428

  14. Validation of an in vitro contractility assay using canine ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harmer, A.R. Abi-Gerges, N.; Morton, M.J.; Pullen, G.F.; Valentin, J.P.; Pollard, C.E.

    2012-04-15

    Measurement of cardiac contractility is a logical part of pre-clinical safety assessment in a drug discovery project, particularly if a risk has been identified or is suspected based on the primary- or non-target pharmacology. However, there are limited validated assays available that can be used to screen several compounds in order to identify and eliminate inotropic liability from a chemical series. We have therefore sought to develop an in vitro model with sufficient throughput for this purpose. Dog ventricular myocytes were isolated using a collagenase perfusion technique and placed in a perfused recording chamber on the stage of a microscope at ∼ 36 °C. Myocytes were stimulated to contract at a pacing frequency of 1 Hz and a digital, cell geometry measurement system (IonOptix™) was used to measure sarcomere shortening in single myocytes. After perfusion with vehicle (0.1% DMSO), concentration–effect curves were constructed for each compound in 4–30 myocytes taken from 1 or 2 dog hearts. The validation test-set was 22 negative and 8 positive inotropes, and 21 inactive compounds, as defined by their effect in dog, cynolomolgous monkey or humans. By comparing the outcome of the assay to the known in vivo contractility effects, the assay sensitivity was 81%, specificity was 75%, and accuracy was 78%. With a throughput of 6–8 compounds/week from 1 cell isolation, this assay may be of value to drug discovery projects to screen for direct contractility effects and, if a hazard is identified, help identify inactive compounds. -- Highlights: ► Cardiac contractility is an important physiological function of the heart. ► Assessment of contractility is a logical part of pre-clinical drug safety testing. ► There are limited validated assays that predict effects of compounds on contractility. ► Using dog myocytes, we have developed an in vitro cardiac contractility assay. ► The assay predicted the in vivo contractility with a good level of accuracy.

  15. Ca2+ transients in cardiac myocytes measured with high and low affinity Ca2+ indicators.

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, J R; Konishi, M

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) transients were measured in voltage-clamped rat cardiac myocytes with fura-2 or furaptra to quantitate rapid changes in [Ca2+]i. Patch electrode solutions contained the K+ salt of fura-2 (50 microM) or furaptra (300 microM). With identical experimental conditions, peak amplitude of stimulated [Ca2+]i transients in furaptra-loaded myocytes was 4- to 6-fold greater than that in fura-2-loaded cells. To determine the reason for this discrepancy, intracellular fura-2 Ca2+ buffering, kinetics of Ca2+ binding, and optical properties were examined. Decreasing cellular fura-2 concentration by lowering electrode fura-2 concentration 5-fold, decreased the difference between the amplitudes of [Ca2+]i transients in fura-2 and furaptra-loaded myocytes by twofold. Thus, fura-2 buffers [Ca2+]i under these conditions; however, Ca2+ buffering is not the only factor that explains the different amplitudes of the [Ca2+]i transients measured with these indicators. From the temporal comparison of the [Ca2+]i transients measured with fura-2 and furaptra, the apparent reverse rate constant for Ca2+ binding of fura-2 was at least 65s-1, much faster than previously reported in skeletal muscle fibers. These binding kinetics do not explain the difference in the size of the [Ca2+]i transients reported by fura-2 and furaptra. Parameters for fura-2 calibration, Rmin, Rmax, and beta, were obtained in salt solutions (in vitro) and in myocytes exposed to the Ca2+ ionophore, 4-Br A23187, in EGTA-buffered solutions (in situ). Calibration of fura-2 fluorescence signals with these in situ parameters yielded [Ca2+]i transients whose peak amplitude was 50-100% larger than those calculated with in vitro parameters. Thus, in vitro calibration of fura-2 fluorescence significantly underestimates the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient. These data suggest that the difference in amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients in fura-2 and furaptra-loaded myocytes is due, in part, to Ca2

  16. Phorbol ester activation of chloride current in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Shuba, L. M.; Asai, T.; McDonald, T. F.

    1996-01-01

    1. Although earlier studies with phorbol esters indicate that protein kinase C (PKC) may be an important regulator of Cl- current (Icl) in cardiac cells, there is a need for additional quantitative data and investigation of conflicting findings. Our objectives were to measure the magnitude, time course, and concentration-dependence of Icl activated in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), evaluate its PKC dependence, and examine its modification by external and internal ions. 2. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to apply short depolarizing and hyperpolarizing pulses to myocytes superfused with Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-free solution (36 degrees C) and dialysed with Cs+ solution. Stimulation of membrane currents by PMA (threshold < or = 1nM, EC50 approximately equal to 14 nM, maximal 40% increase with > or = 100 nM) plateaued within 6-10 min. 3. PMA-activated current was time-independent, and suppressed by l mM 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid (9-AC). Its reversal potential (Erev) was sensitive to changes in the Cl- gradient, and outward rectification of the current-voltage (I-V) relationship was more pronounced with 30 mM than 140 mM Cl- dialysate. 4. The relative permeability of PMA-activated channels estimated from Erev measurements was I- > Cl- > > aspartate. Channel activation was independent of external Na+. 5. PMA failed to activate Icl in myocytes pretreated with 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7) or dialysed with pCa 10.5 solution. Lack of response to 4 alpha-phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (alpha PDD) was a further indication of mediation by PKC. 6. Icl induced by 2 microM forskolin was far larger than that induced by PMA, suggesting that endogenous protein kinase A is a much stronger Cl- channel activator than endogenous PKC in these myocytes. 7. The macroscopic properties of PMA-induced Icl appear to be indistinguishable from those of PKA-activated Icl. We discount stimulation of PKA by PMA as an

  17. Uniaxial cyclic strain enhances adipose-derived stem cell fusion with skeletal myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens Isak; Juhl, Morten; Nielsen, Thøger; Emmersen, Jeppe; Fink, Trine; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Uniaxial cyclic tensile strain (CTS) applied to ASCs alone or in coculture with myogenic precursors. • CTS promoted the formation of a highly ordered array of parallel ASCs. • Without biochemical supplements, CTS did not support advanced myogenic differentiation of ASCs. • Mechanical stimulation of cocultures boosted fusion of ASCs with skeletal myoblasts. - Abstract: Although adult muscle tissue possesses an exceptional capacity for regeneration, in the case of large defects, the restoration to original state is not possible. A well-known source for the de novo regeneration is the adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), which can be readily isolated and have been shown to have a broad differentiation and regenerative potential. In this work, we employed uniaxial cyclic tensile strain (CTS), to mechanically stimulate human ASCs to participate in the formation skeletal myotubes in an in vitro model of myogenesis. The application of CTS for 48 h resulted in the formation of a highly ordered array of parallel ASCs, but failed to support skeletal muscle terminal differentiation. When the same stimulation paradigm was applied to cocultures with mouse skeletal muscle myoblasts, the percentage of ASCs contributing to the formation of myotubes significantly exceeded the levels reported in the literature hitherto. In perspective, the mechanical strain may be used to increase the efficiency of incorporation of ASCs in the skeletal muscles, which could be found useful in diverse traumatic or pathologic scenarios.

  18. Effects of tanshinone VI on the hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and fibrosis of cardiac fibroblasts of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Maki, Toshiyuki; Kawahara, Yuji; Tanonaka, Kouichi; Yagi, Akira; Takeo, Satoshi

    2002-12-01

    The possible effects of tanshinone VI (tsh), a diterpene from the root of Tan-Shen (Salvia miltiorrhiza, Bunge (Labiatae)) on hypertrophy and fibrosis in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts were examined. Tsh had no significant effect on protein synthesis, which was evaluated by [3H]-leucine incorporation into the acid insoluble fraction in the cells, in the absence of stimulatory factors in cardiac myocytes. The amount of protein produced in cardiac myocytes was increased by 10(-8) M endothelin-1 (ET-1), 10(-6) M phenylephrine (PE), or 10(-8) M insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), suggesting that hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes in vitro was induced by these factors. The ET-1-, PE-, or IGF-1-induced increase in protein synthesis was attenuated by treatment with 10(-5) M tsh. Treatment with 10(-5) M tsh significantly decreased the synthesis of collagen by cardiac fibroblasts, which was evaluated by [3H]-proline incorpolation into acid-insoluble fraction of the fiblobrasts, in the absence of stimulatory factors for the production. Fetal bovine serum (FBS) or IGF-1 increased collagen synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner. The increase at 5% FBS or 10(-8) M IGF-1 was inhibited by 10(-5) M tsh. Fibroblast-conditioned medium (FB-CM) increased protein synthesis in cardiac myocytes in a concentration-dependent manner (10; - 100 %). Tsh attenuated the FB-CM-induced increase in protein synthesis by cardiac myocytes. These results show that tsh may attenuate the humoral factor-induced hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and fibrosis of cardiac fibroblasts. The findings suggest that tsh may improve the development of cardiac remodeling under pathophysiological conditions. Abbreviations. ANP:atrial natriuretic peptide DMEM:Dulbecco-modified Eagle's medium ET-1:endothelin-1 FB-CM:fibroblast-conditioned medium FBS:fetal bovine serum IGF-1:insulin-like growth factor-1 PE:phenylephrine tsh:tanshinone VI

  19. Myocyte contractility can be maintained by storing cells with the myosin ATPase inhibitor 2,3 butanedione monoxime

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Mechas, Charles; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2015-01-01

    Isolated intact myocytes can be used to investigate contractile mechanisms and to screen new therapeutic compounds. These experiments typically require euthanizing an animal and isolating fresh cells each day or analyzing cultured myocytes, which quickly lose their rod-shaped morphology. Recent data suggest that the viability of canine myocytes can be prolonged using low temperature and N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (an inhibitor of skeletal myosin ATPase). We performed similar studies in rat myocytes in order to test whether the cardiac myosin ATPase inhibitors 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (BDM) and blebbistatin help to maintain cell-level function over multiple days. Myocytes were isolated from rats and separated into batches that were stored at 4°C in a HEPES-buffered solution that contained 0.5 mmol L−1 Ca2+ and (1) no myosin ATPase inhibitors; (2) 10 mmol L−1 BDM; or (3) 3 μmol L−1 blebbistatin. Functional viability of myocytes was assessed up to 3 days after the isolation by measuring calcium transients and unloaded shortening profiles induced by electrical stimuli in inhibitor-free Tyrode's solution. Cells stored without myosin ATPase inhibitors had altered morphology (fewer rod-shaped cells, shorter diastolic sarcomere lengths, and membrane blebbing) and were not viable for contractile assays after 24 h. Cells stored in BDM maintained morphology and contractile function for 48 h. Storage in blebbistatin maintained cell morphology for 72 h but inhibited contractility. These data show that storing cells with myosin ATPase inhibitors can extend the viability of myocytes that will be used for functional assays. This may help to refine and reduce the use of animals in experiments. PMID:26116551

  20. p21-activated kinase1 (Pak1) is a negative regulator of NADPH-oxidase 2 in ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeSantiago, Jaime; Bare, Dan J; Xiao, Lei; Ke, Yunbo; Solaro, R. John; Banach, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic conditions reduce the activity of the p21-activated kinase (Pak1) resulting in increased arrhythmic activity. Triggered arrhythmic activity during ischemia is based on changes in cellular ionic balance and the cells Ca2+ handling properties. In the current study we used isolated mouse ventricular myocytes (VMs) deficient for the expression of Pak1 (Pak1-/-) to determine the mechanism by which Pak1 influences the generation of arrhythmic activity during simulated ischemia. The Ca2+ transient amplitude and kinetics did not significantly change in wild type (WT) and Pak1-/- VMs during 15 min of simulated ischemia. However, Pak1-/- VMs exhibited an exaggerated increase in [Ca2+]i, which resulted in spontaneous Ca2+ release events and waves. The Ca2+ overload in Pak1-/- VMs could be suppressed with a reverse mode blocker (KB-R7943) of the sodium calcium exchanger (NCX), a cytoplasmic scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS; TEMPOL) or a RAC1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Measurements of the cytoplasmic ROS levels revealed that decreased Pak1 activity in Pak1-/- VMs or VMs treated with the Pak1 inhibitor (IPA3) enhanced cellular ROS production. The Pak1 dependent increase in ROS was attenuated in VMs deficient for NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2; p47phox-/-) or in VMs where NOX2 was inhibited (gp91ds-tat). Voltage clamp recordings showed increased NCX activity in Pak1-/- VMs that depended on enhanced NOX2 induced ROS production. The exaggerated Ca2+ overload in Pak1-/- VMs could be mimicked by low concentrations of ouabain. Overall our data show that Pak1 is a critical negative regulator of NOX2 dependent ROS production and that a latent ROS dependent stimulation of NCX activity can predispose VMs to Ca2+ overload under conditions where no significant changes in excitation-contraction coupling are yet evident. PMID:24380729

  1. Hypertension-induced remodeling of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling in ventricular myocytes occurs prior to hypertrophy development.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Chen, Ling; Bányász, Tamás; McCulle, Stacey L; Norton, Byron; Scharf, Steven M; Agarwal, Anuj; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2007-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for developing cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Previous studies show that hypertrophied and failing hearts display alterations in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. However, it is unclear whether remodeling of the E-C coupling system occurs before or after heart disease development. We hypothesized that hypertension might cause changes in the E-C coupling system that, in turn, induce hypertrophy. Here we tested this hypothesis by utilizing the progressive development of hypertensive heart disease in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) to identify a window period when SHR had just developed hypertension but had not yet developed hypertrophy. We found the following major changes in cardiac E-C coupling during this window period. 1) Using echocardiography and hemodynamics measurements, we found a decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output after the onset of hypertension. 2) Studies in isolated ventricular myocytes showed that myocardial contraction was also enhanced at the same time. 3) The action potential became prolonged. 4) The E-C coupling gain was increased. 5) The systolic Ca(2+) transient was augmented. These data show that profound changes in E-C coupling already occur at the onset of hypertension and precede hypertrophy development. Prolonged action potential and increased E-C coupling gain synergistically increase the Ca(2+) transient. Functionally, augmented Ca(2+) transient causes enhancement of myocardial contraction that can partially compensate for the greater workload to maintain cardiac output. The increased Ca(2+) signaling cascade as a molecular mechanism linking hypertension to cardiac hypertrophy development is also discussed.

  2. Molecular variants of KCNQ channels expressed in murine portal vein myocytes: a role in delayed rectifier current.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Susumu; Sergeant, Gerard P; Greenwood, Iain A; Horowitz, Burton

    2003-05-16

    We have analyzed the expression of KCNQ genes in murine portal vein myocytes and determined that of the 5 known KCNQ channels, only KCNQ1 was expressed. In addition to the full-length KCNQ1 transcript, a novel spliced form (termed KCNQ1b) was detected that had a 63 amino acid truncation at the C-terminus. KCNQ1b was not detected in heart or brain but represented approximately half the KCNQ1 transcripts expressed in PV. Antibodies specific for KCNQ1a stained cell membranes from portal vein myocytes and HEK cells expressing the channel. However, because the antibodies were generated against an epitope in the deleted, C-terminal portion of the protein, these antibodies did not stain HEK cells expressing KCNQ1b. In murine portal vein myocytes, in the presence of 5 mmol/L 4-aminopyridine, an outwardly rectifying K+ current was recorded that was sensitive to linopirdine, a specific blocker of KCNQ channels. Currents produced by the heterologous expression of KCNQ1a or KCNQ1b were inhibited by similar concentrations of linopirdine, and linopirdine prolonged the time-course of the action potential in isolated portal vein myocytes. Our data suggest that these two KCNQ1 splice forms are expressed in murine portal vein and contribute to the delayed rectifier current in these myocytes.

  3. Myocyte-Derived Hsp90 Modulates Collagen Upregulation via Biphasic Activation of STAT-3 in Fibroblasts during Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ritwik; Bansal, Trisha; Rana, Santanu; Datta, Kaberi; Datta Chaudhuri, Ratul; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2017-03-15

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3)-mediated signaling in relation to upregulated collagen expression in fibroblasts during cardiac hypertrophy is well defined. Our recent findings have identified heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) to be a critical modulator of fibrotic signaling in cardiac fibroblasts in this disease milieu. The present study was therefore intended to analyze the role of Hsp90 in the STAT-3-mediated collagen upregulation process. Our data revealed a significant difference between in vivo and in vitro results, pointing to a possible involvement of myocyte-fibroblast cross talk in this process. Cardiomyocyte-targeted knockdown of Hsp90 in rats (Rattus norvegicus) in which the renal artery was ligated showed downregulated collagen synthesis. Furthermore, the results obtained with cardiac fibroblasts conditioned with Hsp90-inhibited hypertrophied myocyte supernatant pointed toward cardiomyocytes' role in the regulation of collagen expression in fibroblasts during hypertrophy. Our study also revealed a novel signaling mechanism where myocyte-derived Hsp90 orchestrates not only p65-mediated interleukin-6 (IL-6) synthesis but also its release in exosomal vesicles. Such myocyte-derived exosomes and myocyte-secreted IL-6 are responsible in unison for the biphasic activation of STAT-3 signaling in cardiac fibroblasts that culminates in excess collagen synthesis, leading to severely compromised cardiac function during cardiac hypertrophy.

  4. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-1 in the heart is coupled with myocyte proliferation in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, K; Cheng, W; Ferber, A; Kajstura, J; Li, P; Li, B; Olivetti, G; Homcy, C J; Baserga, R; Anversa, P

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated in which the cDNA for the human insulin-like growth factor 1B (IGF-1B) was placed under the control of a rat alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter. In mice heterozygous for the transgene, IGF-1B mRNA was not detectable in the fetal heart at the end of gestation, was present in modest levels at 1 day after birth, and increased progressively with postnatal maturation, reaching a peak at 75 days. Myocytes isolated from transgenic mice secreted 1.15 +/- 0.25 ng of IGF-1 per 10(6) cells per 24 hr versus 0.27 +/- 0.10 ng in myocytes from homozygous wild-type littermates. The plasma level of IGF-1 increased 84% in transgenic mice. Heart weight was comparable in wild-type littermates and transgenic mice up to 45 days of age, but a 42%, 45%, 62%, and 51% increase was found at 75, 135, 210, and 300 days, respectively, after birth. At 45, 75, and 210 days, the number of myocytes in the heart was 21%, 31%, and 55% higher, respectively, in transgenic animals. In contrast, myocyte cell volume was comparable in transgenic and control mice at all ages. In conclusion, overexpression of IGF-1 in myocytes leads to cardiomegaly mediated by an increased number of cells in the heart. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8710922

  5. Testosterone induces an intracellular calcium increase by a nongenomic mechanism in cultured rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel; Chiong, Mario; Soto, Dagoberto; Parra, Valentina; Diaz-Araya, Guillermo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Lavandero, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    Androgens are associated with important effects on the heart, such as hypertrophy or apoptosis. These responses involve the intracellular androgen receptor. However, the mechanisms of how androgens activate several membrane signaling pathways are not fully elucidated. We have investigated the effect of testosterone on intracellular calcium in cultured rat cardiac myocytes. Using fluo3-AM and epifluorescence microscopy, we found that exposure to testosterone rapidly (1-7 min) led to an increase of intracellular Ca2+, an effect that persisted in the absence of external Ca2+. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that these effects occurred before translocation of the intracellular androgen receptor to the perinuclear zone. Pretreatment of the cells with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethylester and thapsigargin blocked this response, suggesting the involvement of internal Ca2+ stores. U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, and xestospongin C, an inhibitor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, abolished the Ca2+ signal. The rise in intracellular Ca2+ was not inhibited by cyproterone, an antagonist of intracellular androgen receptor. Moreover, the cell impermeant testosterone-BSA complex also produced the Ca2+ signal, indicating its origin in the plasma membrane. This effect was observed in cultured neonatal and adult rat cardiac myocytes. Pertussis toxin and the adenoviral transduction of beta- adrenergic receptor kinase carboxy terminal peptide, a peptide inhibitor of betagamma-subunits of G protein, abolished the testosterone-induced Ca2+ release. In summary, this is the first study of rapid, nongenomic intracellular Ca2+ signaling of testosterone in cardiac myocytes. Using various inhibitors and testosterone-BSA complex, the mechanism for the rapid, testosterone-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ is through activation of a plasma membrane receptor associated with a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein-phospholipase C

  6. Activation of PKN mediates survival of cardiac myocytes in the heart during ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Hiromitsu; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Shao, Dan; Yang, Yanfei; Maejima, Yasuhiro; Zhai, Peiyong; Yehia, Ghassan; Yamada, Chikaomi; Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The function of PKN, a stress-activated protein kinase, in the heart is poorly understood. Objective We investigated the functional role of PKN during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Methods and Results PKN is phosphorylated at Thr774 in hearts subjected to ischemia and reperfusion. Myocardial infarction/area at risk (MI/AAR) produced by 45 min ischemia and 24 hours reperfusion was significantly smaller in transgenic mice with cardiac specific overexpression of constitutively active (CA) PKN (Tg-CAPKN) than in non-transgenic (NTg) mice (15 ± 5 vs 38 ± 5%, p<0.01). The number of TUNEL positive nuclei was significantly lower in Tg-CAPKN (0.3 ± 0.2 vs 1.0 ± 0.2%, p<0.05). Both MI/AAR (63 ± 9 vs 45 ± 8%, p<0.05) and the number of TUNEL positive cells (7.9 ± 1.0 vs 1.3 ± 0.9%, p<0.05) were greater in transgenic mice with cardiac specific overexpression of dominant negative PKN (Tg-DNPKN) than in NTg mice. Thr774 phosphorylation of PKN was also observed in response to H2O2 in cultured cardiac myocytes. Stimulation of PKN prevented, whereas inhibition of PKN aggravated cell death induced by H2O2, suggesting that the cell protective effect of PKN is cell-autonomous in cardiac myocytes. PKN induced phosphorylation of alpha B crystallin and increased cardiac proteasome activity. The infarct reducing effect in Tg-CAPKN mice was partially inhibited by epoxomicin, a proteasome inhibitor. Conclusion PKN is activated by I/R and inhibits apoptosis of cardiac myocytes, thereby protecting the heart from I/R injury. PKN mediates phosphorylation of alpha B crystallin and stimulation of proteasome activity, which in part mediates the protective effect of PKN in the heart. PMID:20595653

  7. Elevated Cytosolic Na+ Increases Mitochondrial Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Failing Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Liu, Ting; Knopp, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Ong, Mei Fang; Böhm, Michael; O'Rourke, Brian; Maack, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Background —Oxidative stress is causally linked to the progression of heart failure, and mitochondria are critical sources of reactive oxygen species in failing myocardium. We previously observed that in heart failure, elevated cytosolic Na+ ([Na+]i) reduces mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) by accelerating Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Because the regeneration of antioxidative enzymes requires NADPH, which is indirectly regenerated by the Krebs cycle, and Krebs cycle dehydrogenases are activated by [Ca2+]m, we speculated that in failing myocytes, elevated [Na+]i promotes oxidative stress. Methods and Results —We used a patch-clamp–based approach to simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and, alternatively, mitochondrial H2O2 together with NAD(P)H in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Cells were depolarized in a voltage-clamp mode (3 Hz), and a transition of workload was induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. During this transition, NAD(P)H initially oxidized but recovered when [Ca2+]m increased. The transient oxidation of NAD(P)H was closely associated with an increase in mitochondrial H2O2 formation. This reactive oxygen species formation was potentiated when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was blocked (by Ru360) or Ca2+ efflux was accelerated (by elevation of [Na+]i). In failing myocytes, H2O2 formation was increased, which was prevented by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Conclusions —Besides matching energy supply and demand, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake critically regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In heart failure, elevated [Na+]i promotes reactive oxygen species formation by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. This novel mechanism, by which defects in ion homeostasis induce oxidative stress, represents a potential drug target to reduce reactive oxygen species production in the failing heart. PMID:20351235

  8. Regulation of intracellular calcium by bupivacaine isomers in cardiac myocytes from Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chedid, Núbia G B; Sudo, Roberto T; Aguiar, Marli I S; Trachez, Margarete M; Masuda, Masako O; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2006-03-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of a racemic mixture of bupivacaine (RS(+/-)bupivacaine) and its isomers (S(-)bupivacaine and R(+)bupivacaine) on the Ca2+ handling by ventricular myocytes from Wistar rats. Single ventricular myocytes were enzymatically isolated and loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2-am to estimate intracellular Ca2+ concentration during contraction and relaxation cycles. S(-)bupivacaine (10 muM) significantly increased peak amplitude and the rate of increase of Ca2+ transients in 155% +/- 54% (P < 0.05) and 194% +/- 94% (P < 0.01) of control. However, exposure to R(+)bupivacaine had no effect on either peak amplitude or rate of increase at any concentration tested. Saponin-skinned ventricular fibers were used to investigate the effect of bupivacaine on the intracellular Ca2+ regulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and on the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile system. S(-), R(+), and RS(+/-)bupivacaine induced Ca2+ release from SR (P < 0.01). In SR-disrupted skinned ventricular cells, bupivacaine and its isomers (5 mM) increased the sensitivity of contractile system to Ca(2+). S(-), RS(+/-), and R(+)bupivacaine significantly increased pCa50 from 5.8 +/- 0.1, 5.8 +/- 0.1, and 5.8 +/- 0.1, to 6.1 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.05), 6.0 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.05), and 6.1 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.05). Ca2+ release from SR through RyR2 activation could explain the increase of Ca2+ transients in cardiac cells. Increased intracellular Ca2+ in cardiac myocytes display a stereoselectivity to S(-)bupivacaine.

  9. Decreased transient outward K+ current in ventricular myocytes from acromegalic rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, X P; Best, P M

    1991-03-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure are common to acromegalic patients who have abnormally high serum growth hormone (GH). While the function of cardiac muscle is clearly affected by chronically elevated GH, the electrical activity of myocytes from hearts with GH-dependent hypertrophy has not been studied. We used adult, female Wistar-Furth rats with induced GH-secreting tumors to study the effect of excessive GH on ion channels of cardiac myocytes. GH-secreting tumors were induced by subcutaneous inoculation of GH3 cells. Eight weeks after inoculation, the rats had doubled their body weight and heart size compared with age-matched controls. There were no differences in either action potential amplitude or resting potential of right ventricular myocytes from control and tumor-bearing rats. However, action potential duration increased significantly in tumor-bearing rats; the time to 50% repolarization was 23 +/- 14 ms (n = 10) compared with 6.6 +/- 1.5 ms (n = 14) in controls. The prolongation of the action potential was mainly due to a decrease in density of a transient outward current (It,o) carried by K+. The normalized conductance for It,o decreased from 0.53 +/- 0.10 nS/pF (n = 25) in controls to 0.33 +/- 0.09 nS/pF (n = 26) in tumor-bearing rats. The decrease in It,o) and increase in heart weight occurred with a similar time course. The increased action potential duration prolongs Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels in the tumor-bearing animals; this may be important in cardiovascular adaptation.

  10. Dynamics of Muscle Microcirculatory and Blood-myocyte O2 Flux During Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Poole, David C.; Copp, Steven W.; Hirai, Daniel M.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2011-01-01

    The O2 requirements of contracting skeletal muscle may increase 100-fold above rest. In 1919 August Krogh’s brilliant insights recognized the capillary as the principal site for this increased blood-myocyte O2 flux. Based on the premise that most capillaries did not sustain RBC flux at rest Krogh proposed that capillary recruitment (i.e., initiation of red blood cell (RBC) flux in previously non-flowing capillaries) increased the capillary surface area available for O2 flux and reduced mean capillary-to-mitochondrial diffusion distances. More modern experimental approaches reveal that most muscle capillaries may support RBC flux at rest. Thus, rather than contraction-induced capillary recruitment per se, increased RBC flux and hematocrit within already-flowing capillaries likely elevate perfusive and diffusive O2 conductances and hence blood-myocyte O2 flux. Additional surface area for O2 exchange is recruited but, crucially, this may occur along the length of already-flowing capillaries (i.e. longitudinal recruitment). Today, the capillary is still considered the principal site for O2 and substrate delivery to contracting skeletal muscle. Indeed, the presence of very low intramyocyte O2 partial pressures (PO2’s) and the absence of PO2 gradients, whilst refuting the relevance of diffusion distances, place an even greater importance on capillary hemodynamics. This emergent picture calls for a paradigm-shift in our understanding of the function of capillaries by de-emphasizing de novo ‘capillary recruitment.’ Diseases such as heart failure impair blood-myocyte O2 flux, in part, by decreasing the proportion of RBC-flowing capillaries. Knowledge of capillary function in healthy muscle is requisite for identification of pathology and efficient design of therapeutic treatments. PMID:21199399

  11. Structural and molecular mechanisms of gap junction remodeling in epicardial border zone myocytes following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kieken, Fabien; Mutsaers, Nancy; Dolmatova, Elena; Virgil, Kelly; Wit, Andrew L; Kellezi, Admir; Hirst-Jensen, Bethany J; Duffy, Heather S; Sorgen, Paul L

    2009-05-08

    Lateralization of the ventricular gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) occurs in epicardial border zone myocytes following myocardial infarction (MI) and is arrhythmogenic. Alterations in Cx43 protein partners have been hypothesized to play a role in lateralization although mechanisms by which this occurs are unknown. To examine potential mechanisms we did nuclear magnetic resonance, yeast 2-hybrid, and surface plasmon resonance studies and found that the SH3 domain of the tyrosine kinase c-Src binds to the Cx43 scaffolding protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) with a higher affinity than does Cx43. This suggests c-Src outcompetes Cx43 for binding to ZO-1, thus acting as a chaperone for ZO-1 and causing unhooking from Cx43. To determine whether c-Src/ZO-1 interactions affect Cx43 lateralization within the epicardial border zone, we performed Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunolocalization for active c-Src (p-cSrc) post-MI using a canine model of coronary occlusion. We found that post-MI p-cSrc interacts with ZO-1 as Cx43 begins to decrease its interaction with ZO-1 and undergo initial loss of intercalated disk localization. This indicates that the molecular mechanisms by which Cx43 is lost from the intercalated disk following MI includes an interaction of p-cSrc with ZO-1 and subsequent loss of scaffolding of Cx43 leaving Cx43 free to diffuse in myocyte membranes from areas of high Cx43, as at the intercalated disk, to regions of lower Cx43 content, the lateral myocyte membrane. Therefore shifts in Cx43 protein partners may underlie, in part, arrhythmogenesis in the post-MI heart.

  12. Analysis of factors affecting Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation dynamics of L-type Ca(2+) current of cardiac myocytes in pulmonary vein of rabbit.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ju Seok; Kim, Won Tae; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Hyun A; Shim, Eun Bo; Youm, Jae Boum; Leem, Chae Hun

    2012-09-15

    L-type Ca(2+) channels (ICaLs) are inactivated by an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)], known as Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI). CDI is also induced by Ca(2+) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), known as release-dependent inhibition (RDI). As both CDI and RDI occur in the junctional subsarcolemmal nanospace (JSS), we investigated which factors are involved within the JSS using isolated cardiac myocytes from the main pulmonary vein of the rabbit. Using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, RDI was readily observed with the application of a pre-pulse followed by a test pulse, during which the ICaLs exhibited a decrease in peak current amplitude and a slower inactivation. A fast acting Ca(2+) chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), abolished this effect. As the time interval between the pre-pulse and test pulse increased, the ICaLs exhibited greater recovery and the RDI was relieved. Inhibition of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) or the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) greatly attenuated RDI and facilitated ICaL recovery. Removal of extracellular Na(+),which inhibits the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange (Incx), greatly enhanced RDI and slowed ICaL recovery, suggesting that Incx critically controls the [Ca(2+)] in the JSS. We incorporated the Ca(2+)-binding kinetics of the ICaL into a previously published computational model. By assuming two Ca(2+)-binding sites in the ICaL, of which one is of low-affinity with fast kinetics and the other is of high-affinity with slower kinetics, the new model was able to successfully reproduce RDI and its regulation by Incx. The model suggests that Incx accelerates Ca(2+) removal from the JSS to downregulate CDI and attenuates SR Ca(2+) refilling. The model may be useful to elucidate complex mechanisms involved in excitation–contraction coupling in myocytes.

  13. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB during doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells and myocytes is pro-apoptotic: the role of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suwei; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Konorev, Eugene; Kalivendi, Shasi; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2002-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anti-tumour drug. Cardiotoxicity is a major toxic side effect of DOX therapy. Although recent studies implicated an apoptotic pathway in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, the mechanism of DOX-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of reactive oxygen species and the nuclear transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) during apoptosis induced by DOX in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) and adult rat cardiomyocytes. DOX-induced NF-kappaB activation is both dose- and time-dependent, as demonstrated using electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and luciferase and p65 (Rel A) nuclear-translocation assays. Addition of a cell-permeant iron metalloporphyrin significantly suppressed NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis induced by DOX. Overexpression of glutathione peroxidase, which detoxifies cellular H(2)O(2), significantly decreased DOX-induced NF-kappaB activation and apoptosis. Inhibition of DOX-induced NF-kappaB activation by a cell-permeant peptide SN50 that blocks translocation of the NF-kappaB complex into the nucleus greatly diminished DOX-induced apoptosis. Apoptosis was inhibited when IkappaB mutant vector, another NF-kappaB inhibitor, was added to DOX-treated BAECs. These results suggest that NF-kappaB activation in DOX-treated endothelial cells and myocytes is pro-apoptotic, in contrast with DOX-treated cancer cells, where NF-kappaB activation is anti-apoptotic. Removal of intracellular H(2)O(2) protects endothelial cells and myocytes from DOX-induced apoptosis, possibly by inhibiting NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of DOX. PMID:12139490

  14. Functional, electrophysiological and molecular docking analysis of the modulation of Cav1.2 channels in rat vascular myocytes by murrayafoline A

    PubMed Central

    Saponara, S; Durante, M; Spiga, O; Mugnai, P; Sgaragli, G; Huong, TT; Khanh, PN; Son, NT; Cuong, NM

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The carbazole alkaloid murrayafoline A (MuA) enhances contractility and the Ca2+ currents carried by the Cav1.2 channels [ICa1.2] of rat cardiomyocytes. As only few drugs stimulate ICa1.2, this study was designed to analyse the effects of MuA on vascular Cav1.2 channels. Experimental Approach Vascular activity was assessed on rat aorta rings mounted in organ baths. Cav1.2 Ba2+ current [IBa1.2] was recorded in single rat aorta and tail artery myocytes by the patch‐clamp technique. Docking at a 3D model of the rat, α1c central pore subunit of the Cav1.2 channel was simulated in silico. Key Results In rat aorta rings MuA, at concentrations ≤14.2 μM, increased 30 mM K+‐induced tone and shifted the concentration‐response curve to K+ to the left. Conversely, at concentrations >14.2 μM, it relaxed high K+ depolarized rings and antagonized Bay K 8644‐induced contraction. In single myocytes, MuA stimulated IBa1.2 in a concentration‐dependent, bell‐shaped manner; stimulation was stable, incompletely reversible upon drug washout and accompanied by a leftward shift of the voltage‐dependent activation curve. MuA docked at the α1C subunit central pore differently from nifedipine and Bay K 8644, although apparently interacting with the same amino acids of the pocket. Neither Bay K 8644‐induced stimulation nor nifedipine‐induced block of IBa1.2 was modified by MuA. Conclusions and Implications Murrayafoline A is a naturally occurring vasoactive agent able to modulate Cav1.2 channels and dock at the α1C subunit central pore in a manner that differed from that of dihydropyridines. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society PMID:26493241

  15. Ca(2+) release events in cardiac myocytes up close: insights from fast confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Shkryl, Vyacheslav M; Blatter, Lothar A

    2013-01-01

    The spatio-temporal properties of Ca(2+) transients during excitation-contraction coupling and elementary Ca(2+) release events (Ca(2+) sparks) were studied in atrial and ventricular myocytes with ultra-fast confocal microscopy using a Zeiss LSM 5 LIVE system that allows sampling rates of up to 60 kHz. Ca(2+) sparks which originated from subsarcolemmal junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (j-SR) release sites in atrial myocytes were anisotropic and elongated in the longitudinal direction of the cell. Ca(2+) sparks in atrial cells originating from non-junctional SR and in ventricular myocytes were symmetrical. Ca(2+) spark recording in line scan mode at 40,000 lines/s uncovered step-like increases of [Ca(2+)]i. 2-D imaging of Ca(2+) transients revealed an asynchronous activation of release sites and allowed the sequential recording of Ca(2+) entry through surface membrane Ca(2+) channels and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. With a latency of 2.5 ms after application of an electrical stimulus, Ca(2+) entry could be detected that was followed by SR Ca(2+) release after an additional 3 ms delay. Maximum Ca(2+) release was observed 4 ms after the beginning of release. The timing of Ca(2+) entry and release was confirmed by simultaneous [Ca(2+)]i and membrane current measurements using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. In atrial cells activation of discrete individual release sites of the j-SR led to spatially restricted Ca(2+) release events that fused into a peripheral ring of elevated [Ca(2+)]i that subsequently propagated in a wave-like fashion towards the center of the cell. In ventricular myocytes asynchronous Ca(2+) release signals from discrete sites with no preferential subcellular location preceded the whole-cell Ca(2+) transient. In summary, ultra-fast confocal imaging allows investigation of Ca(2+) signals with a time resolution similar to patch clamp technique, however in a less invasive fashion.

  16. GSK-3β/NFAT Signaling Is Involved in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Duran, Javier; Oyarce, Cesar; Pavez, Mario; Valladares, Denisse; Basualto-Alarcon, Carla; Lagos, Daniel; Barrientos, Genaro; Troncoso, Mayarling Francisca; Ibarra, Cristian; Estrada, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone induces cardiac hypertrophy through a mechanism that involves a concerted crosstalk between cytosolic and nuclear signaling pathways. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) is associated with the promotion of cardiac hypertrophy, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is considered to function as a negative regulator, mainly by modulating NFAT activity. However, the role played by calcineurin-NFAT and GSK-3β signaling in testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy has remained unknown. Here, we determined that testosterone stimulates cardiac myocyte hypertrophy through NFAT activation and GSK-3β inhibition. Testosterone increased the activity of NFAT-luciferase (NFAT-Luc) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with the activity peaking after 24 h of stimulation with 100 nM testosterone. NFAT-Luc activity induced by testosterone was blocked by the calcineurin inhibitors FK506 and cyclosporine A and by 11R-VIVIT, a specific peptide inhibitor of NFAT. Conversely, testosterone inhibited GSK-3β activity as determined by increased GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9 and β-catenin protein accumulation, and also by reduction in β-catenin phosphorylation at residues Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41. GSK-3β inhibition with 1-azakenpaullone or a GSK-3β-targeting siRNA increased NFAT-Luc activity, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (GSK-3βS9A) inhibited NFAT-Luc activation mediated by testosterone. Testosterone-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy was established by increased cardiac myocyte size and [3H]-leucine incorporation (as a measurement of cellular protein synthesis). Calcineurin-NFAT inhibition abolished and GSK-3β inhibition promoted the hypertrophy stimulated by testosterone. GSK-3β activation by GSK-3βS9A blocked the increase of hypertrophic markers induced by testosterone. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular androgen receptor prevented testosterone-induced NFAT-Luc activation. Collectively, these results suggest that

  17. GSK-3β/NFAT Signaling Is Involved in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Javier; Oyarce, Cesar; Pavez, Mario; Valladares, Denisse; Basualto-Alarcon, Carla; Lagos, Daniel; Barrientos, Genaro; Troncoso, Mayarling Francisca; Ibarra, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone induces cardiac hypertrophy through a mechanism that involves a concerted crosstalk between cytosolic and nuclear signaling pathways. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) is associated with the promotion of cardiac hypertrophy, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is considered to function as a negative regulator, mainly by modulating NFAT activity. However, the role played by calcineurin-NFAT and GSK-3β signaling in testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy has remained unknown. Here, we determined that testosterone stimulates cardiac myocyte hypertrophy through NFAT activation and GSK-3β inhibition. Testosterone increased the activity of NFAT-luciferase (NFAT-Luc) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with the activity peaking after 24 h of stimulation with 100 nM testosterone. NFAT-Luc activity induced by testosterone was blocked by the calcineurin inhibitors FK506 and cyclosporine A and by 11R-VIVIT, a specific peptide inhibitor of NFAT. Conversely, testosterone inhibited GSK-3β activity as determined by increased GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9 and β-catenin protein accumulation, and also by reduction in β-catenin phosphorylation at residues Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41. GSK-3β inhibition with 1-azakenpaullone or a GSK-3β-targeting siRNA increased NFAT-Luc activity, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active GSK-3β mutant (GSK-3βS9A) inhibited NFAT-Luc activation mediated by testosterone. Testosterone-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy was established by increased cardiac myocyte size and [3H]-leucine incorporation (as a measurement of cellular protein synthesis). Calcineurin-NFAT inhibition abolished and GSK-3β inhibition promoted the hypertrophy stimulated by testosterone. GSK-3β activation by GSK-3βS9A blocked the increase of hypertrophic markers induced by testosterone. Moreover, inhibition of intracellular androgen receptor prevented testosterone-induced NFAT-Luc activation. Collectively, these results suggest that

  18. [THE EXCESS OF PALMITIC FATTY ACID IN FOOD AS MAIN CAUSE OF LIPOIDOSIS OF INSULIN-DEPENDENT CELLS: SKELETAL MYOCYTES, CARDIO-MYOCYTES, PERIPORTAL HEPATOCYTES, KUPFFER MACROPHAGES AND B-CELLS OF PANCREAS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-02-01

    In phylogenesis, becoming of biologicalfunctions and biological reactions proceeds with the purpose ofpermanent increasing of "kinetic perfection ". The main role belongs to factors ofphysical, chemical and biological kinetics, their evaluation using systemic approach technique under permanent effect of natural selection. The late-in-phylogenesis insulin, proceeded with, in development of biological function of locomotion, specialization of insulin-dependent cells: skeletal myocytes, syncytium of cardiomyocytes, subcutaneous adipocytes, periportal hepatocytes, Kupffer's macrophages and β-cells of islets of pancreas. The insulin initiated formation of new, late in phylogenesis, large pool of fatty cells-subcutaneous adipocytes that increased kinetic parameters of biological function of locomotion. In realization of biological function of locomotion only adipocytes absorb exogenous mono unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in the form of triglycerides in composition of oleic and palmitic lipoproteins of very low density using apoE/B-100 endocytosis. The rest of insulin-dependent cells absorb fatty acids in the form of unesterified fatty acids from associates with albumin and under effect of CD36 of translocase offatty acids. The insulin in all insulin-depended cells inhibits biological reaction of lipolysis enhancing contributing into development of lipoidosis. The insulin expresses transfer offatty acids in the form of unsaturated fatty acids from adipocytes into matrix of mitochondria. The insulin supplies insulin-dependent cells with substrates for acquiring energy subject to that in pool of unsaturated fatty acids in adipocytes prevails hydrophobic palmitic unsaturated fatiy acid that slowly passes into matrix through external membrane ofmitochondria; oxidases of mitochondria so slowly implement its β-oxidation that content of exogenous palmitic unsaturatedfatty acid can't be higher than phylogenetic, physiological level - 15% of all amount offatty acids

  19. Dilated cardiomyopathy mutations in δ-sarcoglycan exert a dominant-negative effect on cardiac myocyte mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew D; Witcher, Marc; Gopal, Anoop; Michele, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    Delta-sarcoglycan is a component of the sarcoglycan subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex located at the plasma membrane of muscle cells. While recessive mutations in δ-sarcoglycan cause limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F, dominant mutations in δ-sarcoglycan have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The purpose of this study was to investigate functional cellular defects present in adult cardiac myocytes expressing mutant δ-sarcoglycans harboring the dominant inherited DCM mutations R71T or R97Q. This study demonstrates that DCM mutant δ-sarcoglycans can be stably expressed in adult rat cardiac myocytes and traffic similarly to wild-type δ-sarcoglycan to the plasma membrane, without perturbing assembly of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. However, expression of DCM mutant δ-sarcoglycan in adult rat cardiac myocytes is sufficient to alter cardiac myocyte plasma membrane stability in the presence of mechanical strain. Upon cyclical cell stretching, cardiac myocytes expressing mutant δ-sarcoglycan R97Q or R71T have increased cell-impermeant dye uptake and undergo contractures at greater frequencies than myocytes expressing normal δ-sarcoglycan. Additionally, the R71T mutation creates an ectopic N-linked glycosylation site that results in aberrant glycosylation of the extracellular domain of δ-sarcoglycan. Therefore, appropriate glycosylation of δ-sarcoglycan may also be necessary for proper δ-sarcoglycan function and overall dystrophin-glycoprotein complex function. These studies demonstrate that DCM mutations in δ-sarcoglycan can exert a dominant negative effect on dystrophin-glycoprotein complex function leading to myocardial mechanical instability that may underlie the pathogenesis of δ-sarcoglycan-associated DCM.

  20. Identification of cardiac progenitors that survive in the ischemic human heart after ventricular myocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Nozuchi, Nozomi; Nishino, Yuka; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Sugihara, Hiroyuki; Matsuura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Atypically-shaped cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are beating heart cells identified in the cultures of cardiomyocyte-removed fractions obtained from adult mouse hearts. Since ACMs spontaneously develop into beating cells in the absence of hormones or chemicals, these cells are likely to be a type of cardiac progenitors rather than stem cells. “Native ACMs” are found as small interstitial cells among ventricular myocytes that co-express cellular prion protein (PrP) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) in mouse and human heart tissues. However, the endogenous behavior of human ACMs is unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that PrP+ cTnT+ cells are present in the human heart tissue with myocardial infarction (MI). These cells were mainly found in the border of necrotic cardiomyocytes caused by infarcts and also in the hibernating myocardium subjected to the chronic ischemia. The ratio of PrP+ cTnT+ cells to the total cells observed in the normal heart tissue section of mouse and human was estimated to range from 0.3–0.8%. Notably, living human PrP+ cTnT+ cells were identified in the cultures obtained at pathological autopsy despite exposure to lethal ischemic conditions for hours after death. These findings suggest that ACMs could survive in the ischemic human heart and develop into a sub-population of cardiac myocytes. PMID:28120944

  1. Executioner Caspase-3 and 7 Deficiency Reduces Myocyte Number in the Developing Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Maria; López, Juan Antonio; Serafín, Anna; Rongvaux, Anthony; Inserte, Javier; García-Dorado, David; Flavell, Richard; Llovera, Marta; Cañas, Xavier; Vázquez, Jesús; Sanchis, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Executioner caspase-3 and -7 are proteases promoting cell death but non-apoptotic roles are being discovered. The heart expresses caspases only during development, suggesting they contribute to the organ maturation process. Therefore, we aimed at identifying novel functions of caspases in heart development. We induced simultaneous deletion of executioner caspase-3 and -7 in the mouse myocardium and studied its effects. Caspase knockout hearts are hypoplastic at birth, reaching normal weight progressively through myocyte hypertrophy. To identify the molecular pathways involved in these effects, we used microarray-based transcriptomics and multiplexed quantitative proteomics to compare wild type and executioner caspase-deficient myocardium at different developmental stages. Transcriptomics showed reduced expression of genes promoting DNA replication and cell cycle progression in the neonatal caspase-deficient heart suggesting reduced myocyte proliferation, and expression of non-cardiac isoforms of structural proteins in the adult null myocardium. Proteomics showed reduced abundance of proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation accompanied by increased abundance of glycolytic enzymes underscoring retarded metabolic maturation of the caspase-null myocardium. Correlation between mRNA expression and protein abundance of relevant genes was confirmed, but transcriptomics and proteomics indentified complementary molecular pathways influenced by caspases in the developing heart. Forced expression of wild type or proteolytically inactive caspases in cultured cardiomyocytes induced expression of genes promoting cell division. The results reveal that executioner caspases can modulate heart’s cellularity and maturation during development, contributing novel information about caspase biology and heart development. PMID:26121671

  2. Calmodulin binding proteins provide domains of local Ca2+ signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Bers, Donald M

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) acts as a common Ca(2+) sensor for many signaling pathways, transducing local Ca(2+) signals into specific cellular outcomes. Many of CaM's signaling functions can be explained by its unique biochemical properties, including high and low affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites with slow and fast kinetics, respectively. CaM is expected to have a limited spatial range of action, emphasizing its role in local Ca(2+) signaling. Interactions with target proteins further fine-tune CaM signal transduction. Here, we focus on only three specific cellular targets for CaM signaling in cardiac myocytes: the L-type Ca(2+) channel, the ryanodine receptor, and the IP(3) receptor. We elaborate a working hypothesis that each channel is regulated by two distinct functional populations of CaM: dedicated CaM and promiscuous CaM. Dedicated CaM is typically tethered to each channel and directly regulates channel activity. In addition, a local pool of promiscuous CaM appears poised to sense local Ca(2+) signals and trigger downstream pathways such as Ca(2+)/CaM dependent-protein kinase II and calcineurin. Understanding how promiscuous CaM coordinates multiple distinct signaling pathways remains a challenge, but is aided by the use of mathematical modeling and a new generation of fluorescent biosensors. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes."

  3. High frequency stimulation of cardiac myocytes: A theoretical and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Seth H.

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) has recently been identified as a novel approach for terminating life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. HFS elevates myocyte membrane potential and blocks electrical conduction for the duration of the stimulus. However, low amplitude HFS can induce rapidly firing action potentials, which may reinitiate an arrhythmia. The cellular level mechanisms underlying HFS-induced electrical activity are not well understood. Using a multiscale method, we show that a minimal myocyte model qualitatively reproduces the influence of HFS on cardiac electrical activity. Theoretical analysis and simulations suggest that persistent activation and de-inactivation of ionic currents, in particular a fast inward window current, underlie HFS-induced action potentials and membrane potential elevation, providing hypotheses for future experiments. We derive analytical expressions to describe how HFS modifies ionic current amplitude and gating dynamics. We show how fast inward current parameters influence the parameter regimes for HFS-induced electrical activity, demonstrating how the efficacy of HFS as a therapy for terminating arrhythmias may depend on the presence of pathological conditions or pharmacological treatments. Finally, we demonstrate that HFS terminates cardiac arrhythmias in a one-dimensional ring of cardiac tissue. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to characterize the influence of HFS on ionic current gating dynamics, provide new insight into HFS of the myocardium, and suggest mechanisms underlying HFS-induced electrical activity.

  4. Pertussis toxin treatment attenuates some effects of insulin in BC3H-1 murine myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, L.M.; Hewlett, E.L.; Romero, G.; Rogol, A.D.

    1988-05-05

    The effects of pertussis toxin (PT) treatment on insulin-stimulated myristoyl-diacylglycerol (DAG) generation, hexose transport, and thymidine incorporation were studied in differentiated BC3H-1 mycocytes. Insulin treatment caused a biphasic increase in myristoyl-DAG production which was abolished in myocytes treated with PT. There was no effect of PT treatment on basal (nonstimulated) myristoyl-DAG production. Insulin-stimulated hydrolysis of a membrane phosphatidylinositol glycan was blocked by PT treatment. ADP-ribosylation of BC3H-1 plasma membranes with (/sup 32/P)NAD revealed a 40-kDa protein as the major PT substrate in vivo and in vitro. The time course and dose dependence of the effects of PT on diacylglycerol generation correlated with the in vivo ADP-ribosylation of the 40-kDa substrate. Pertussis toxin treatment resulted in a 71% attenuation of insulin-stimulated hexose uptake without effect on either basal or phorbol ester-stimulated uptake. The stimulatory effects of insulin and fetal calf serum on (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into quiescent myocytes were attenuated by 61 and 59%, respectively, when PT was added coincidently with the growth factors. Nonstimulated and EGF-stimulated (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation was unaffected by PT treatment. These data suggest that a PT-sensitive G protein is involved in the cellular signaling mechanisms of insulin.

  5. Expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP) in human cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Schock, H W; Herbert, Z; Sigusch, H; Figulla, H R; Jirikowski, G F; Lotze, U

    2006-04-01

    Cardiomyocytes are known to be androgen targets. Changing systemic steroid levels are thought to be linked to various cardiac ailments, including dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The mode of action of gonadal steroid hormones on the human heart is unknown to date. In the present study, we used high-resolution immunocytochemistry on semithin sections (1 microm thick), IN SITU hybridization, and mass spectrometry to investigate the expression of androgen-binding protein (ABP) in human myocardial biopsies taken from male patients with DCM. We observed distinct cytoplasmic ABP immunoreactivity in a fraction of the myocytes. IN SITU hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide probes revealed specific hybridization signals in these cells. A portion of the ABP-positive cells contained immunostaining for androgen receptor. With SELDI TOF mass spectrometry of affinity purified tissue extracts of human myocardium, we confirmed the presence of a 50 kDa protein similar to ABP. Our observations provide evidence of an intrinsic expression of ABP in human heart. ABP may be secreted from myocytes in a paracrine manner perhaps to influence the bioavailabity of gonadal steroids in myocardium.

  6. A Computational Model Integrating Electrophysiology, Contraction, and Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in the Ventricular Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A.; O'Rourke, Brian; Jacques, Robert; Tseng, Hsiang-Jer; Marbán, Eduardo; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2006-01-01

    An intricate network of reactions is involved in matching energy supply with demand in the heart. This complexity arises because energy production both modulates and is modulated by the electrophysiological and contractile activity of the cardiac myocyte. Here, we present an integrated mathematical model of the cardiac cell that links excitation-contraction coupling with mitochondrial energy generation. The dynamics of the model are described by a system of 50 ordinary differential equations. The formulation explicitly incorporates cytoplasmic ATP-consuming processes associated with force generation and ion transport, as well as the creatine kinase reaction. Changes in the electrical and contractile activity of the myocyte are coupled to mitochondrial energetics through the ATP, Ca2+, and Na+ concentrations in the myoplasmic and mitochondrial matrix compartments. The pseudo steady-state relationship between force and oxygen consumption at various stimulus frequencies and external Ca2+ concentrations is reproduced in both model simulations and direct experiments in cardiac trabeculae under normoxic conditions, recapitulating the linearity between cardiac work and respiration in the heart. Importantly, the model can also reproduce the rapid time-dependent changes in mitochondrial NADH and Ca2+ in response to abrupt changes in workload. The steady-state and dynamic responses of the model were conferred by ADP-dependent stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent regulation of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, illustrating how the model can be used as a tool for investigating mechanisms underlying metabolic control in the heart. PMID:16679365

  7. A chloride current component induced by hypertrophy in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Bénitah, J P; Gómez, A M; Delgado, C; Lorente, P; Lederer, W J

    1997-05-01

    The effect of hypertrophy on membrane currents of rat left ventricular myocytes was studied with the whole cell voltage-clamp method. We found that the slope of the total time-independent current density-voltage relationship was increased in hypertrophied cells. No change in the zero-current potential was observed. Surprisingly, the dominant time-independent current, the inward rectifier K+ current (measured as the Ba(2+)-sensitive current density) was unchanged. We therefore investigated the identity of the outwardly rectifying Ba(2+)-resistant current seen in the hypertrophied rat ventricular myocytes but not present in control cells. We found that this current 1) was not carried by monovalent cations, 2) was partially blocked by anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-AC), and 3) was sensitive to variations in extracellular Cl concentration. These findings are consistent with the current being carried at least partially by Cl-. The presence of an additional Cl(-)-dependent component in hypertrophied cells is supported by the actions of 9-AC on the measured action potentials (APs). 9-AC had no effect on control cells APs but prolonged hypertrophied cell APs. We conclude that a Cl- current component develops in hypertrophied rat heart cells. This component appears to shorten the AP duration and might thus provide protection from cardiac arrhythmias.

  8. Effects of NIP-141 on K currents in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Seki, Akiko; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    A novel benzopyran derivative, NIP-141, effectively terminates experimental atrial fibrillation in canine hearts by prolonging atrial refractoriness. However, the effects of this drug on human atrial myocytes are unknown. This experiment evaluated the effects of NIP-141 on K currents in isolated human atrial myocytes using a whole-cell voltage-clamp method. NIP-141 inhibited the transient outward current (I(to)) and the ultra-rapid delayed rectifier K current (I(Kur)), each in a dose-dependent manner, with half-maximal inhibition concentrations of 16.3 microM and 5.3 microM, respectively (n = 5). NIP-141 inhibited both K currents in a voltage- and use-independent fashion, and it preferentially blocked them in the open state and dissociated rapidly from the channel. Because both K currents contribute significantly to the repolarization of the atrial action potential, these findings suggest that NIP-141 may terminate atrial fibrillation by prolonging action potential duration.

  9. Myocyte androgen receptors increase metabolic rate and improve body composition by reducing fat mass.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Shannon M; Rao, Pengcheng; Niel, Lee; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Stagljar, Marijana; Monks, D Ashley

    2010-07-01

    Testosterone and other androgens are thought to increase lean body mass and reduce fat body mass in men by activating the androgen receptor. However, the clinical potential of androgens for improving body composition is hampered by our limited understanding of the tissues and cells that promote such changes. Here we show that selective overexpression of androgen receptor in muscle cells (myocytes) of transgenic male rats both increases lean mass percentage and reduces fat mass. Similar changes in body composition are observed in human skeletal actin promoter driving expression of androgen receptor (HSA-AR) transgenic mice and result from acute testosterone treatment of transgenic female HSA-AR rats. These shifts in body composition in HSA-AR transgenic male rats are associated with hypertrophy of type IIb myofibers and decreased size of adipocytes. Metabolic analyses of transgenic males show higher activity of mitochondrial enzymes in skeletal muscle and increased O(2) consumption by the rats. These results indicate that androgen signaling in myocytes not only increases muscle mass but also reduces fat body mass, likely via increases in oxidative metabolism.

  10. Ultrarapid delayed rectifier current inactivation in human atrial myocytes: properties and consequences.

    PubMed

    Feng, J; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Nattel, S

    1998-11-01

    The ultrarapid delayed rectifier current (IK,ur) plays a significant role in human atrial repolarization and is generally believed to show little rate dependence because of slow and partial inactivation. This study was designed to evaluate in detail the properties and consequences of IK,ur inactivation in isolated human atrial myocytes. IK,ur inactivated with a biexponential time course and a half-inactivation voltage of -7.5 +/- 0.6 mV (mean +/- SE), with complete inactivation during 50-s pulses to voltages positive to +10 mV (37 degreesC). Recovery from inactivation proceeded slowly, with time constants of 0.42 +/- 0.06 and 7.9 +/- 0.9 s at -80 mV (37 degreesC). Substantial frequency dependence was observed at 37 degreesC over a clinically relevant range of frequencies. Inactivation was faster and occurred at more positive voltages at 37 degreesC compared with room temperature. The voltage and time dependencies of Kv1.5 inactivation were studied in Xenopus oocytes to avoid overlapping currents and strongly resembled those of IK,ur in native myocytes. We conclude that, while IK,ur inactivation is slow, it is extensive, and slow recovery from inactivation confers important frequency dependence with significant consequences for understanding the role of IK,ur in human atrial repolarization.

  11. Human myocytes are protected from titin aggregation-induced stiffening by small heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kötter, Sebastian; Unger, Andreas; Hamdani, Nazha; Lang, Patrick; Vorgerd, Matthias; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2014-01-01

    In myocytes, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are preferentially translocated under stress to the sarcomeres. The functional implications of this translocation are poorly understood. We show here that HSP27 and αB-crystallin associated with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain-containing regions, but not the disordered PEVK domain (titin region rich in proline, glutamate, valine, and lysine), of the titin springs. In sarcomeres, sHSP binding to titin was actin filament independent and promoted by factors that increased titin Ig unfolding, including sarcomere stretch and the expression of stiff titin isoforms. Titin spring elements behaved predominantly as monomers in vitro. However, unfolded Ig segments aggregated, preferentially under acidic conditions, and αB-crystallin prevented this aggregation. Disordered regions did not aggregate. Promoting titin Ig unfolding in cardiomyocytes caused elevated stiffness under acidic stress, but HSP27 or αB-crystallin suppressed this stiffening. In diseased human muscle and heart, both sHSPs associated with the titin springs, in contrast to the cytosolic/Z-disk localization seen in healthy muscle/heart. We conclude that aggregation of unfolded titin Ig domains stiffens myocytes and that sHSPs translocate to these domains to prevent this aggregation. PMID:24421331

  12. High frequency stimulation of cardiac myocytes: a theoretical and computational study.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) has recently been identified as a novel approach for terminating life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. HFS elevates myocyte membrane potential and blocks electrical conduction for the duration of the stimulus. However, low amplitude HFS can induce rapidly firing action potentials, which may reinitiate an arrhythmia. The cellular level mechanisms underlying HFS-induced electrical activity are not well understood. Using a multiscale method, we show that a minimal myocyte model qualitatively reproduces the influence of HFS on cardiac electrical activity. Theoretical analysis and simulations suggest that persistent activation and de-inactivation of ionic currents, in particular a fast inward window current, underlie HFS-induced action potentials and membrane potential elevation, providing hypotheses for future experiments. We derive analytical expressions to describe how HFS modifies ionic current amplitude and gating dynamics. We show how fast inward current parameters influence the parameter regimes for HFS-induced electrical activity, demonstrating how the efficacy of HFS as a therapy for terminating arrhythmias may depend on the presence of pathological conditions or pharmacological treatments. Finally, we demonstrate that HFS terminates cardiac arrhythmias in a one-dimensional ring of cardiac tissue. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to characterize the influence of HFS on ionic current gating dynamics, provide new insight into HFS of the myocardium, and suggest mechanisms underlying HFS-induced electrical activity.

  13. Mitogenic cardiomyopathy: a lethal neonatal familial dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by myocyte hyperplasia and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kenneth T E; Taylor, Glenn P; Meschino, Wendy S; Kantor, Paul F; Cutz, Ernest

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a heterogenous group of conditions of which dilated cardiomyopathies are the most common clinicomorphologic subtype. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of many cases of dilated cardiomyopathies remain unknown. We describe a series of 5 cases of a rare but clinically and histologically distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy that was uniformly lethal in early infancy. The 5 cases include 2 pairs of siblings. There was parental consanguinity in 1 of the 2 pairs of siblings. Death occurred in early infancy (range, 22-67 days; mean, 42 days) after a short history of general lethargy, decreased feeding, respiratory distress, or cyanosis. There was no specific birth or early neonatal problems. Autopsy revealed congestive cardiac failure and enlarged, dilated hearts with ventricular dilatation more pronounced than atrial dilatation, and endocardial fibroelastosis. Histology showed prominent hypertrophic nuclear changes of cardiac myofibers and markedly increased myocyte mitotic activity including occasional atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemical staining for Mib1 showed a markedly increased proliferative index of 10% to 20%. Ancillary investigations, including molecular studies, did not reveal a primary cause for the cardiomyopathies. This distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by unusual histologic features of myocyte nuclear hypertrophy and marked mitotic activity is lethal in early infancy. Its occurrence in 2 pairs of siblings suggests familial inheritance. Although the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, it is important to recognize this distinctive entity for purposes of genetic counseling.

  14. Restoration of β -Adrenergic Signaling in Failing Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes via Adenoviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shahab A.; Skaer, Christine A.; Kypson, Alan P.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Peppel, Karsten C.; Glower, Donald D.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Koch, Walter J.

    1997-10-01

    Cardiovascular gene therapy is a novel approach to the treatment of diseases such as congestive heart failure (CHF). Gene transfer to the heart would allow for the replacement of defective or missing cellular proteins that may improve cardiac performance. Our laboratory has been focusing on the feasibility of restoring β -adrenergic signaling deficiencies that are a characteristic of chronic CHF. We have now studied isolated ventricular myocytes from rabbits that have been chronically paced to produce hemodynamic failure. We document molecular β -adrenergic signaling defects including down-regulation of myocardial β -adrenergic receptors (β -ARs), functional β -AR uncoupling, and an upregulation of the β -AR kinase (β ARK1). Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of the human β 2-AR or an inhibitor of β ARK1 to these failing myocytes led to the restoration of β -AR signaling. These results demonstrate that defects present in this critical myocardial signaling pathway can be corrected in vitro using genetic modification and raise the possibility of novel inotropic therapies for CHF including the inhibition of β ARK1 activity in the heart.

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  16. Gravitational Bending of Starlight: Does the Factor 2 Vindicate Einstein?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambuya, Golden G.

    2015-07-01

    As currently understood, the predictions of Newtonian and Einsteinian gravitation on the issue of the gravitational bending of starlight differ by a watershed factor "2" and this factor has been used to post Einsteinian gravitation as the superior gravitational model. The pioneering May 29, 1919, total eclipse observational measurements led by Sir Arthur S. Eddington heralded Einsteinian gravitation as the new superior model of gravitation by confirming this factor "2" which is assumed to be a prerogative prediction of Einsteinian gravitation. Subsequent eclipse observational measurements in the years (1922 - 1973) have reasonably agreed with the Eddington team. However, apart from the most precise quasar observational measurements made using the latest technologies of Very Large Baseline Array (VLBA), the factor "2" as measured in total eclipse observations is not exactly reproduced with the same hairs-breath accuracy as in the case of the VLBA measurements. Our result unequivocally demonstrates that if one where to preserve the identity of the inertia and gravitational mass of the photon in their calculations in the framework of Newtonian gravitation, the Newtonian gravitational paradigm can be brought into complete tandem with both the VLBA and eclipse observational measurements. Given the present result, the dominance of the Einsteinian gravitational paradigm since the Eddington measurement, and, the centrality and importance of this factor "2" in posting the Einsteinian paradigm as the superior model, this letter brings the reader to ponder and rethink the position of this factor "2" vis-a-vis its importance in overthrowing Newtonian gravitation as first assumed by the Eddington team.

  17. Histamine activates Cl- and K+ currents in guinea-pig tracheal myocytes: convergence with muscarinic signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Janssen, L J; Sims, S M

    1993-06-01

    .3 +/- 0.8 min. GTP gamma S elicited inward current and oscillations; both effects were enhanced by histamine. GTP gamma S also reduced t1/2 to 1.4 +/- 0.1 min. Pertussis toxin did not alter the amplitude or time course of Ihist. 7. We conclude that in guinea-pig tracheal myocytes, binding of histamine to H1 receptors leads to release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and subsequent activation of Cl- and K+ conductances as well as contraction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ACh elicits similar physiological responses due to a convergence of the histaminergic and muscarinic signalling pathways.

  18. Malonyl-CoA metabolism in cardiac myocytes and its relevance to the control of fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Awan, M M; Saggerson, E D

    1993-01-01

    1. Viable myocytes were obtained from rat hearts. Oxidation of [1-14C]palmitate by these cells could be decreased by the addition of glucose (5 mM) or lactate (2 mM). In the presence of glucose, insulin decreased and adrenaline increased palmitate oxidation. 2. The myocytes contained activities of ATP citrate-lyase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and the condensing enzyme of the fatty acid elongation system. No fatty acid synthase activity was demonstrable in myocytes. 3. In rat hearts perfused with 5 mM glucose, malonyl-CoA content was acutely raised by insulin. In the presence of glucose+insulin, perfusion with palmitate or adrenaline decreased the malonyl-CoA content. 4. It is concluded that malonyl-CoA can be synthesized within cardiac myocytes and that the level of this metabolite can be acutely regulated. This is likely to have consequences for the regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase in the heart. PMID:8216240

  19. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Seob; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Oh, Jaewon; Jin, Taewon; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Sungha; Lee, Sang-Hak; Chung, Ji Hyung; Kang, Seok-Min

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN.

  20. Towards computational modeling of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac myocytes: reconstruction of structures and proteins from confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Frank B; Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Goldhaber, Joshua I; Bridge, John H B

    2009-01-01

    Computational models of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in myocytes are valuable tools for studying the signaling cascade that transduces transmembrane voltage into mechanical responses. A key component of these models is the appropriate description of structures involved in EC coupling, such as the sarcolemma and ion channels. This study aims at developing an approach for spatial reconstruction of these structures. We exemplified our approach by reconstructing clusters of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) together with the sarcolemma of rabbit ventricular myocytes. The reconstructions were based on dual labeling and three-dimensional (3D) confocal imaging of segments of fixed and permeabilized myocytes lying flat or on end. The imaging led to 3D stacks of cross-sections through myocytes. Methods of digital image processing were applied to deconvolve, filter and segment these stacks. Finally, we created point meshes representing RyR distributions together with volume and surface meshes of the sarcolemma. We suggest that these meshes are suitable for computational studies of structure-function relationships in EC coupling. We propose that this approach can be extended to reconstruct other structures and proteins involved in EC coupling.

  1. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B. Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage.

  2. Local calcium gradients during excitation–contraction coupling and alternans in atrial myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Lothar A; Kockskämper, Jens; Sheehan, Katherine A; Zima, Aleksey V; Hüser, Jörg; Lipsius, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Subcellular Ca2+ signalling during normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling and during Ca2+ alternans was studied in atrial myocytes using fast confocal microscopy and measurement of Ca2+ currents (ICa). Ca2+ alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient, causes electromechanical alternans, which has been implicated in the generation of cardiac fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Cat atrial myocytes lack transverse tubules and contain sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of the junctional (j-SR) and non-junctional (nj-SR) types, both of which have ryanodine-receptor calcium release channels. During E-C coupling, Ca2+ entering through voltage-gated membrane Ca2+ channels (ICa) triggers Ca2+ release at discrete peripheral j-SR release sites. The discrete Ca2+ spark-like increases of [Ca2+]i then fuse into a peripheral ‘ring’ of elevated [Ca2+]i, followed by propagation (via calcium-induced Ca2+ release, CICR) to the cell centre, resulting in contraction. Interrupting ICa instantaneously terminates j-SR Ca2+ release, whereas nj-SR Ca2+ release continues. Increasing the stimulation frequency or inhibition of glycolysis elicits Ca2+ alternans. The spatiotemporal [Ca2+]i pattern during alternans shows marked subcellular heterogeneities including longitudinal and transverse gradients of [Ca2+]i and neighbouring subcellular regions alternating out of phase. Moreover, focal inhibition of glycolysis causes spatially restricted Ca2+ alternans, further emphasising the local character of this phenomenon. When two adjacent regions within a myocyte alternate out of phase, delayed propagating Ca2+ waves develop at their border. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that (1) during normal E-C coupling the atrial [Ca2+]i transient is the result of the spatiotemporal summation of Ca2+ release from individual release sites of the peripheral j-SR and the central nj-SR, activated in a centripetal fashion by CICR via ICa and Ca2+ release from j

  3. Activation and propagation of Ca(2+) release during excitation-contraction coupling in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kockskämper, J; Sheehan, K A; Bare, D J; Lipsius, S L; Mignery, G A; Blatter, L A

    2001-11-01

    Fast two-dimensional confocal microscopy and the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-4 were used to study excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in cat atrial myocytes which lack transverse tubules and contain both subsarcolemmal junctional (j-SR) and central nonjunctional (nj-SR) sarcoplasmic reticulum. Action potentials elicited by field stimulation induced transient increases of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) that were highly inhomogeneous. Increases started at distinct subsarcolemmal release sites spaced approximately 2 microm apart. The amplitude and the latency of Ca(2+) release from these sites varied from beat to beat. Subsarcolemmal release fused to build a peripheral ring of elevated [Ca(2+)](i), which actively propagated to the center of the cells via Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Resting myocytes exhibited spontaneous Ca(2+) release events, including Ca(2+) sparks and local (microscopic) or global (macroscopic) [Ca(2+)](i) waves. The microscopic [Ca(2+)](i) waves propagated in a saltatory fashion along the sarcolemma ("coupled" Ca(2+) sparks) revealing the sequential activation of Ca(2+) release sites of the j-SR. Moreover, during global [Ca(2+)](i) waves, Ca(2+) release was evident from individual nj-SR sites. Ca(2+) release sites were arranged in a regular three-dimensional grid as deduced from the functional data and shown by immunostaining of ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release channels. The longitudinal and transverse distances between individual Ca(2+) release sites were both approximately 2 microm. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed a continuous sarcotubular network and one peripheral coupling of j-SR with the sarcolemma per sarcomere. The results demonstrate directly that, in cat atrial myocytes, the action potential-induced whole-cell [Ca(2+)](i) transient is the spatio-temporal summation of Ca(2+) release from subsarcolemmal and central sites. First, j-SR sites are activated in a stochastic fashion by the opening of voltage

  4. Nitric oxide regulates the calcium current in isolated human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kirstein, M; Rivet-Bastide, M; Hatem, S; Bénardeau, A; Mercadier, J J; Fischmeister, R

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac Ca2+ current (ICa) was shown to be regulated by cGMP in a number of different species. Recently, we found that the NO-donor SIN-1 (3-morpholino-sydnonimine) exerts a dual regulation of ICa in frog ventricular myocytes via an accumulation of cGMP. To examine whether NO also regulates Ca2+ channels in human heart, we investigated the effects of SIN-1 on ICa in isolated human atrial myocytes. An extracellular application of SIN-1 produced a profound stimulatory effect on basal ICa at concentrations > 1 pM. Indeed, 10 pM SIN-1 induced a approximately 35% increase in ICa. The stimulatory effect of SIN-1 was maximal at 1 nM (approximately 2-fold increase in ICa) and was comparable with the effect of a saturating concentration (1 microM) of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic agonist. Increasing the concentration of SIN-1 to 1-100 microM reduced the stimulatory effect in two thirds of the cells. The stimulatory effect of SIN-1 was not mimicked by SIN-1C, the cleavage product of SIN-1 produced after liberation of NO. This suggests that NO mediates the effects of SIN-1 on ICa. Because, in frog heart, the stimulatory effect of SIN-1 on ICa was found to be due to cGMP-induced inhibition of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase (cGI-PDE), we compared the effects of SIN-1 and milrinone, a cGI-PDE selective inhibitor, on ICa in human. Milrinone (10 microM) induced a strong stimulation of ICa (approximately 150%), demonstrating that cGI-PDE controls the amplitude of basal ICa in this tissue. In the presence of milrinone, SIN-1 (0.1-1 nM) had no stimulatory effect on ICa, suggesting that the effects of SIN-1 and MIL were not additive. We conclude that NO may stimulate ICa in human atrial myocytes via inhibition of the cGI-PDE. Images PMID:7860763

  5. [Effect of the active nitrogen and oxygen metabolities on the level of cGMP in uterus myocytes].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, Iu V; Tuhaĭ, V A

    2006-01-01

    The level of cGMP in myocytes of uterus of rats at an action active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen (NO, NO2- and H2O2) in the conditions of influence of progesteron on myocytes was studied. Cell suspension was selected with the use of collagenase and soy-bean inhibitor of tripsin. Determining the amount of cGMP was conducted with the use of standard kit produced by "Amersham" (Great Britain). The basal level of cGMP in unactivated myocytes made 1.5 +/- 0.17 pmol cGMP/mg of protein (n = 5). It is shown that incubation of myocytes with 0.1 mM acetylcholin during 1 hour resulted in 2 times growth of cGMP content in suspension approximately, this increase is fully supressed in the presenced 0.1 mM methilene blue, that specifies activity of soluble cGMP in myocytes. Treatment of cells with 10 nM progesteron during 1 hour did not cause substantial changes in the level of cGMP. At the same time addition of 0.1 mM sodium nitroprussid or 10 nM H2O2 to suspension resulted in such conditions in the increase of level of cGMP to 3.1 +/- 0.6 and 6.8 +/- 0.4 pmol cGMP/mg of protein. Poor penetration of NO2- (10 nM) to the cells did not cause changes in the level of cGMP. The results got by us testify that the long-term influence of active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen, instead of progesteron, provides the increase of the level of cGMP in the myometrium.

  6. A Na+-activated K+ current (IK,Na) is present in guinea-pig but not rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, C; Rodrigo, G C

    1999-05-01

    The effects of removing extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the membrane potential, membrane current and intracellular Na+ activity (aiNa) were investigated in guinea-pig and rat ventricular myocytes. Membrane potential was recorded with a patch pipette and whole-cell membrane currents using a single-electrode voltage clamp. Both guinea-pig and rat cells depolarize when the bathing Ca2+ and Mg2+ are removed and the steady-state aiNa increases rapidly from a resting value of 6.4+/- 0.6 mM to 33+/-3.8 mM in guinea-pig (n=9) and from 8.9+/-0.8 mM to 29.3+/-3.0 mM (n=5) in rat ventricular myocytes. Guinea-pig myocytes partially repolarized when, in addition to removal of the bathing Ca2+ and Mg2+, K+ was also removed, however rat cells remained depolarized. A large diltiazem-sensitive inward current was recorded in guinea-pig and rat myocytes, voltage-clamped at -20 mV, when the bathing divalent cations were removed. When the bathing K+ was removed after Ca2+ and Mg2+ depletion, a large outward K+ current developed in guinea-pig, but not in rat myocytes. This current had a reversal potential of -80+/-0.7 mV and was not inhibited by high Mg2+ or glybenclamide indicating that it is not due to activation of non-selective cation or adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K channels. The current was not activated when Li+ replaced the bathing Na+ and was blocked by R-56865, suggesting that it was due to the activation of KNa channels.

  7. Spatiotemporal Regulation of an Hcn4 Enhancer Defines a Role for Mef2c and HDACs in Cardiac Electrical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Vasanth; Evangelista, Melissa; Huang, Yu; Srivastava, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Regional differences in cardiomyocyte automaticity permit the sinoatrial node (SAN) to function as the leading cardiac pacemaker and the atrioventricular (AV) junction as a subsidiary pacemaker. The regulatory mechanisms controlling the distribution of automaticity within the heart are not understood. To understand regional variation in cardiac automaticity, we carried out an in vivo analysis of cis-regulatory elements that control expression of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated ion channel 4 (Hcn4). Using transgenic mice, we found that spatial and temporal patterning of Hcn4 expression in the AV conduction system required cis-regulatory elements with multiple conserved fragments. One highly conserved region, which contained a myocyte enhancer factor 2C (Mef2C) binding site previously described in vitro, induced reporter expression specifically in the embryonic non-chamber myocardium and the postnatal AV bundle in a Mef2c-dependent manner in vivo. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in cultured transgenic embryos showed expansion of reporter activity to working myocardium. In adult animals, hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction, which causes translocation of HDACs out of the nucleus, resulted in ectopic activation of the Hcn4 enhancer in working myocardium, recapitulating pathological electrical remodeling. These findings reveal mechanisms that control the distribution of automaticity among cardiomyocytes during development and in response to stress. PMID:23085412

  8. Satellite cells derived from obese humans with type 2 diabetes and differentiated into myocytes in vitro exhibit abnormal response to IL-6.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Camilla; Nielsen, Søren; Kelly, Meghan; Broholm, Christa; Nielsen, Anders Rinnov; Taudorf, Sarah; Pedersen, Maria; Fischer, Christian P; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with chronically elevated systemic levels of IL-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a role in skeletal muscle metabolism that signals through the IL-6 receptor (IL-6Rα). We hypothesized that skeletal muscle in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes develops a resistance to IL-6. By utilizing western blot analysis, we demonstrate that IL-6Rα protein was down regulated in skeletal muscle biopsies from obese persons with and without type 2 diabetes. To further investigate the status of IL-6 signaling in skeletal muscle in obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, we isolated satellite cells from skeletal muscle of people that were healthy (He), obese (Ob) or were obese and had type 2 diabetes (DM), and differentiated them in vitro into myocytes. Down-regulation of IL-6Rα was conserved in Ob myocytes. In addition, acute IL-6 administration for 30, 60 and 120 minutes, resulted in a down-regulation of IL-6Rα protein in Ob myocytes compared to both He myocytes (P<0.05) and DM myocytes (P<0.05). Interestingly, there was a strong time-dependent regulation of IL-6Rα protein in response to IL-6 (P<0.001) in He myocytes, not present in the other groups. Assessing downstream signaling, DM, but not Ob myocytes demonstrated a trend towards an increased protein phosphorylation of STAT3 in DM myocytes (P = 0.067) accompanied by a reduced SOCS3 protein induction (P<0.05), in response to IL-6 administration. Despite this loss of negative control, IL-6 failed to increase AMPKα2 activity and IL-6 mRNA expression in DM myocytes. There was no difference in fusion capacity of myocytes between cell groups. Our data suggest that negative control of IL-6 signaling is increased in myocytes in obesity, whereas a dysfunctional IL-6 signaling is established further downstream of IL-6Rα in DM myocytes, possibly representing a novel mechanism by which skeletal muscle function is compromised in type 2 diabetes.

  9. Myogenic Enhancers Regulate Expression of the Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy-Associated DUX4 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Himeda, Charis L.; Debarnot, Céline; Homma, Sachiko; Beermann, Mary Lou; Miller, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is linked to epigenetic dysregulation of the chromosome 4q35 D4Z4 macrosatellite. However, this does not account for the tissue specificity of FSHD pathology, which requires stable expression of an alternative full-length mRNA splice form of DUX4 (DUX4-fl) from the D4Z4 array in skeletal muscle. Here, we describe the identification of two enhancers, DUX4 myogenic enhancer 1 (DME1) and DME2 which activate DUX4-fl expression in skeletal myocytes but not fibroblasts. Analysis of the chromatin revealed histone modifications and RNA polymerase II occupancy consistent with DME1 and DME2 being functional enhancers. Chromosome conformation capture analysis confirmed association of DME1 and DME2 with the DUX4 promoter in vivo. The strong interaction between DME2 and the DUX4 promoter in both FSHD and unaffected primary myocytes was greatly reduced in fibroblasts, suggesting a muscle-specific interaction. Nucleosome occupancy and methylome sequencing analysis indicated that in most FSHD myocytes, both enhancers are associated with nucleosomes but have hypomethylated DNA, consistent with a permissive transcriptional state, sporadic occupancy, and the observed DUX4 expression in rare myonuclei. Our data support a model in which these myogenic enhancers associate with the DUX4 promoter in skeletal myocytes and activate transcription when epigenetically derepressed in FSHD, resulting in the pathological misexpression of DUX4-fl. PMID:24636994

  10. Autoanti-idiotypes exhibit mimicry of myocyte antigens in virus-induced myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Paque, R E; Miller, R

    1991-01-01

    Mice infected with coxsackievirus B develop immunologically mediated inflammatory myocarditis in heart tissue that results in the development of autoantibodies with multiple idiotypes. The specificity and temporal development of autoantibodies produced during coxsackievirus B3 infection were assessed. Antiviral idiotypes and anti-idiotypic antibodies against coxsackievirus B3 idiotypes were detected and quantitated over 21- and 42-day periods, respectively. Both polyclonal and monoclonal anti-idiotypes exhibited greater but nonspecific binding to heart, liver, kidney, and spleen cells from virus-exposed animals and normal tissue. Binding of anti-idiotypes was also demonstrated to myosin and to solubilized heart-associated antigens but not to virus. Western immunoblot analysis revealed that monoclonal and polyclonal anti-idiotypes selectively bound to hypertonic, salt-extracted, solubilized proteins of myocyte extracts of virus-exposed animals. Images PMID:1845881

  11. Risperidone prolongs cardiac action potential through reduction of K+ currents in rabbit myocytes.

    PubMed

    Gluais, Pascale; Bastide, Michèle; Caron, Jacques; Adamantidis, Monique

    2002-05-31

    Prolongation of QT interval by antipsychotic drugs is an unwanted side effect that may lead to ventricular arrhythmias. The antipsychotic agent risperidone has been shown to cause QT prolongation, especially in case of overdosage. We investigated risperidone effects on action potentials recorded from rabbit Purkinje fibers and ventricular myocardium and on potassium currents recorded from atrial and ventricular rabbit isolated myocytes. The results showed that (1) risperidone (0.1-3 microM) exerted potent lengthening effects on action potential duration in both tissues with higher potency in Purkinje fibers and caused the development of early afterdepolarizations at low stimulation rate; (2) risperidone (0.03-0.3 microM) reduced significantly the current density of the delayed rectifier current and at 30 microM decreased the transient outward and the inward rectifier currents. This study might explain QT prolongation observed in some patients treated with risperidone and gives enlightenment on the risk of cardiac adverse events.

  12. Mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes in a cell culture dish.

    PubMed

    Glass, Carley; Singla, Reetu; Arora, Anshu; Singla, Dinender K

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent stem cells capable of self-renewal and have broad differentiation potential yielding cell types from all three germ layers. In the absence of differentiation inhibitory factors, when cultured in suspension, ES cells spontaneously differentiate and form three-dimensional cell aggregates termed embryoid bodies (EBs). Although various methods exist for the generation of EBs, the hanging drop method offers reproducibility and homogeneity from a predetermined number of ES cells. Herein, we describe the in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into cardiac myocytes using the hanging drop method and immunocytochemistry to identify cardiomyogenic differentiation. In brief, ES cells, placed in droplets on the lid of culture dishes following a 2-day incubation, yield embryoid bodies, which are resuspended and plated. 1-2 weeks following plating of the EBs, spontaneous beating areas can be observed and staining for specific cardiac markers can be achieved.

  13. Optimized formulation of multivesicular liposomes loaded with oleanolic acid enhanced anticancer effect in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunlong; Luo, Yuling; Li, Chunhong; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Pi, Chao; Yu, Lu; Wang, Shurong; Zhong, Zhirong

    2017-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the main causes leading to the death of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Multivesicular liposomes loaded with oleanolic acid (OA-MVLs) have been well demonstrated to suppress survival, growth and angiogenesis of HCC cells. Emerging evidence demonstrates that OA was able to suppress the invasion of HCC cells by down-regulating myocyte enhancer factor-2. We hypothesized that the optimized OA-MVLs could inhibit the migration and invasion of HCC cells. In this study, we utilized central composite design and response surface methodology to assess the influence of some parameters on particle size and encapsulation efficiency and obtain the optimized formulation of OA-MVLs. Subsequently, the human HCC cell lines SMMC-7721 and HepG2 were treated with different doses of OA-MVLs and OA, respectively. Cellular survival, adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro were evaluated. We found that the optimized OA-MVLs significantly decreased the ability of HCC cells to adhere, migrate and invade in vitro. Furthermore, OA-MVLs significantly inhibited the survival of HCC cells at 160 µmol/L but showed no obvious inhibition effect on the cell vitality of normal liver cells. Our findings indicate that OA-MVLs did inhibit the cell survival, adhesion, invasion and metastasis of HCC cells in vitro. Although the involved mechanisms are still unclear, our findings can contribute to a better development of a preventive and therapeutic strategy for human HCC. PMID:28392677

  14. Effects of acetylcholine on the Na(+)-K+ pump current in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Mathias, R T; Cohen, I S; Baldo, G J

    1997-01-01

    1. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to study the effects of acetylcholine (ACh) on Na(+)-K+ pump current (Ip) in acutely isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Studies were performed in the absence and presence of the beta-agonist isoprenaline (Iso). 2. ACh had no effect on Ip at low or high [Ca2+]i at any voltage in the absence of Iso. Iso alone inhibited Ip at low [Ca2+]i and shifted the Ip-V relationship at high [Ca2+]i in a negative direction. Addition of 1 microM ACh reversed these effects of Iso. K0.5 for the effects of ACh was about 16 nM, regardless of [Ca2+]i. 3. The actions of ACh on the heart are usually mediated via muscarinic receptors. Atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, blocked the effects of ACh on Ip in the presence of Iso, suggesting that these effects are also mediated by muscarinic receptors. 4. Muscarinic receptors are usually coupled to a Gi protein, leading to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and a reduction of cAMP levels. We have shown previously that basal levels of cAMP are very low in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, and that a membrane-permeant cAMP analogue, chlorophenylthio-cAMP (CPTcAMP), mimics the effects of Iso. ACh did not reverse the effects of CPTcAMP, supporting the hypothesis that the effects of ACh on Ip are also mediated via inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. 5. The present results suggest that a high level of parasympathetic tone alone does not affect the activity of ventricular Na(+)-K+ pumps. However, if sympathetic tone is high, then muscarinic stimulation can reciprocally modulate Na(+)-K+ pump activity. PMID:9218213

  15. Dissociation of insulin receptor phosphorylation and stimulation of glucose transport in BC3H-1 myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mojsilovic, L.P.; Standaert, M.L.; Rosic, N.K.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated insulin receptor phosphorylation in differentiated cultured BC3H-1 myocytes. As for other insulin-responsive cell systems in partially purified wheat germ agglutinin receptor preparations, insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of its own receptor (95K ..beta..-subunits) in a dose dependent manner (0-400 nM), as identified by immunoprecipitation with antiinsulin receptor antibodies and SDS-PAGE. In the same preparations they show that 12-0-tetradecanyl phorbol acetate (TPA), which in many respect ..beta..-subunits in the same dose dependent manner (0-5 ..mu..M). In addition, antiinsulin receptor antibodies (B-10) also induced phosphorylation of mimics insulin action, also induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and HPLC tryptic maps of the /sup 32/P-labeled ..beta..-subunit were identical to those for insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation. However, while insulin and TPA are potent stimulators of glucose transport in these muscle cells, the antireceptor antibodies alone failed to provoke glucose transport at any concentration. The specificity and activity of these antibodies were confirmed in their system by their ability to inhibit insulin binding and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Their results indicate that phosphorylation of insulin receptor is not a crucial event in mediating insulin action, at least with respect to glucose transport. While the effects of the B-10 antibody in the BC3H-1 myocyte differ from those in the adipocyte, their results provide independent confirmation of their essential conclusion that phosphorylation of the insulin receptor may not be necessary nor sufficient for its acute action in promoting glucose transport.

  16. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by sigma-receptors in cardiac myocytes and heterologous systems.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Molly; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Riemer, Logan; Ramos-Serrano, Andrea; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-05-01

    The sigma-receptor, a broadly distributed integral membrane protein with a novel structure, is known to modulate various voltage-gated K(+) and Ca(2+) channels through a mechanism that involves neither G proteins nor phosphorylation. The present study investigated the modulation of the heart voltage-gated Na(+) channel (Na(v)1.5) by sigma-receptors. The sigma(1)-receptor ligands [SKF-10047 and (+)-pentazocine] and sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands (haloperidol and ditolylguanidine) all reversibly inhibited Na(v)1.5 channels to varying degrees in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells and COS-7 cells, but the sigma(1)-receptor ligands were less effective in COS-7 cells. The same four ligands also inhibited Na(+) current in neonatal mouse cardiac myocytes. In sigma(1)-receptor knockout myocytes, the sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands were far less effective in modulating Na(+) current, but the sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands modulated Na(+) channels as well as in wild type. Photolabeling with the sigma(1)-receptor photoprobe [(125)I]-iodoazidococaine demonstrated that sigma(1)-receptors were abundant in heart and HEK-293 cells, but scarce in COS-7 cells. This difference was consistent with the greater efficacy of sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands in HEK-293 cells than in COS-7 cells. sigma-Receptors modulated Na(+) channels despite the omission of GTP and ATP from the patch pipette solution. sigma-Receptor-mediated inhibition of Na(+) current had little if any voltage dependence and produced no change in channel kinetics. Na(+) channels represent a new addition to the large number of voltage-gated ion channels modulated by sigma-receptors. The modulation of Na(v)1.5 channels by sigma-receptors in the heart suggests an important pathway by which drugs can alter cardiac excitability and rhythmicity.

  17. A Computational Model of Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [Ca2+] in Paced Rat Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Woo; Jang, Chang Han; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Leem, Chae Hun; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a series of experiment demonstrating the role of mitochondria in the cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ transients and compared the results with those from computer simulation. In rat ventricular myocytes, increasing the rate of stimulation (1~3 Hz) made both the diastolic and systolic [Ca2+] bigger in mitochondria as well as in cytosol. As L-type Ca2+ channel has key influence on the amplitude of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, the relation between stimulus frequency and the amplitude of Ca2+ transients was examined under the low density (1/10 of control) of L-type Ca2+ channel in model simulation, where the relation was reversed. In experiment, block of Ca2+ uniporter on mitochondrial inner membrane significantly reduced the amplitude of mitochondrial Ca2+ transients, while it failed to affect the cytosolic Ca2+ transients. In computer simulation, the amplitude of cytosolic Ca2+ transients was not affected by removal of Ca2+ uniporter. The application of carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) known as a protonophore on mitochondrial membrane to rat ventricular myocytes gradually increased the diastolic [Ca2+] in cytosol and eventually abolished the Ca2+ transients, which was similarly reproduced in computer simulation. The model study suggests that the relative contribution of L-type Ca2+ channel to total transsarcolemmal Ca2+ flux could determine whether the cytosolic Ca2+ transients become bigger or smaller with higher stimulus frequency. The present study also suggests that cytosolic Ca2+ affects mitochondrial Ca2+ in a beat-to-beat manner, however, removal of Ca2+ influx mechanism into mitochondria does not affect the amplitude of cytosolic Ca2+ transients. PMID:21994480

  18. Stochastic initiation and termination of calcium-mediated triggered activity in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Qu, Zhilin; Karma, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes normally initiate action potentials in response to a current stimulus that depolarizes the membrane above an excitation threshold. Aberrant excitation can also occur due to spontaneous calcium (Ca2+) release (SCR) from intracellular stores after the end of a preceding action potential. SCR drives the Na+/Ca2+ exchange current inducing a “delayed afterdepolarization” that can in turn trigger an action potential if the excitation threshold is reached. This “triggered activity” is known to cause arrhythmias, but how it is initiated and terminated is not understood. Using computer simulations of a ventricular myocyte model, we show that initiation and termination are inherently random events. We determine the probability of those events from statistical measurements of the number of beats before initiation and before termination, respectively, which follow geometric distributions. Moreover, we elucidate the origin of randomness by a statistical analysis of SCR events, which do not follow a Poisson process observed in other eukaryotic cells. Due to synchronization of Ca2+ releases during the action potential upstroke, waiting times of SCR events after the upstroke are narrowly distributed, whereas SCR amplitudes follow a broad normal distribution with a width determined by fluctuations in the number of independent Ca2+ wave foci. This distribution enables us to compute the probabilities of initiation and termination of bursts of triggered activity that are maintained by a positive feedback between the action potential upstroke and SCR. Our results establish a theoretical framework for interpreting complex and varied manifestations of triggered activity relevant to cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:28049836

  19. Culture and adenoviral infection of sinoatrial node myocytes from adult mice

    PubMed Central

    St. Clair, Joshua R.; Sharpe, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker myocytes in the sinoatrial node of the heart initiate each heartbeat by firing spontaneous action potentials. However, the molecular processes that underlie pacemaking are incompletely understood, in part because of our limited ability to manipulate protein expression within the native cellular context of sinoatrial node myocytes (SAMs). Here we describe a new method for the culture of fully differentiated SAMs from adult mice, and we demonstrate that robust expression of introduced proteins can be achieved within 24–48 h in vitro via adenoviral gene transfer. Comparison of morphological and electrophysiological characteristics of 48 h-cultured versus acutely isolated SAMs revealed only minor changes in vitro. Specifically, we found that cells tended to flatten in culture but retained an overall normal morphology, with no significant changes in cellular dimensions or membrane capacitance. Cultured cells beat spontaneously and, in patch-clamp recordings, the spontaneous action potential firing rate did not differ between cultured and acutely isolated cells, despite modest changes in a subset of action potential waveform parameters. The biophysical properties of two membrane currents that are critical for pacemaker activity in SAMs, the “funny current” (If) and voltage-gated Ca2+ currents (ICa), were also indistinguishable between cultured and acutely isolated cells. This new method for culture and adenoviral infection of fully-differentiated SAMs from the adult mouse heart expands the range of experimental techniques that can be applied to study the molecular physiology of cardiac pacemaking because it will enable studies in which protein expression levels can be modified or genetically encoded reporter molecules expressed within SAMs. PMID:26001410

  20. Effects of intracellular calcium on sodium current density in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Chiamvimonvat, N; Kargacin, M E; Clark, R B; Duff, H J

    1995-01-01

    1. Na+ channel mRNA levels in the heart can be modulated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). We have investigated whether this regulation of Na+ channel biosynthesis by cytosolic Ca2+ translates into functional Na+ channels that can be detected electrophysiologically. 2. Whole-cell Na+ currents (INa) were recorded using patch-clamp techniques from single ventricular myocytes isolated from neonatal rats and maintained in tissue culture for 24 h. Na+ current density, measured at a membrane potential of -10 mV, was significantly decreased in the cells which were exposed for 24 h to culture medium containing 10 mM of both external Ca2+ and K+ in order to raise [Ca2+]i compared with control cells which were maintained in culture medium containing 2 and 5 mM of Ca2+ and K+, respectively. In contrast, Na+ current density (at -10 mV) was significantly increased in cells exposed for 24 h to 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA AM; a cell membrane-permeable Ca2+ chelator) which lowered the average [Ca2+]i compared with control. 3. Changes in current density were not associated with changes in the voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of INa. There were no changes in single-channel conductances. 4. It is concluded that Na+ current density in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes is modulated by [Ca2+]i. The findings suggest that the differences in current density are attributable to a change in Na+ channel numbers rather than to changes in single-channel conductance or gating. These changes are consistent with the previously documented modulation of Na+ channel biosynthesis by cytosolic Ca2+. PMID:7650605

  1. Xanthohumol Modulates Calcium Signaling in Rat Ventricular Myocytes: Possible Antiarrhythmic Properties.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Cot, Juan Jose; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia is a major cause of mortality in cardiovascular pathologies. A host of drugs targeted to sarcolemmal Na(+), Ca(2+), and K(+) channels has had limited success clinically. Recently, Ca(2+) signaling has been target of pharmacotherapy based on finding that leaky ryanodine receptors elevate local Ca(2+) concentrations causing membrane depolarizations that trigger arrhythmias. In this study, we report that xanthohumol, an antioxidant extracted from hops showing therapeutic effects in other pathologies, suppresses aberrant ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) release. The effects of xanthohumol (5-1000 nM) on Ca(2+) signaling pathways were probed in isolated rat ventricular myocytes incubated with Fluo-4 AM using the perforated patch-clamp technique. We found that 5-50 nM xanthohumol reduced the frequency of spontaneously occurring Ca(2+) sparks (>threefold) and Ca(2+) waves in control myocytes and in cells subjected to Ca(2+) overload caused by the following: 1) exposure to low K(+) solutions, 2) periods of high frequency electrical stimulation, 3) exposures to isoproterenol, or 4) caffeine. At room temperatures, 50-100 nM xanthohumol reduced the rate of relaxation of electrically- or caffeine-triggered Ca(2+)transients, without suppressing ICa, but this effect was small and reversed by isoproterenol at physiologic temperatures. Xanthohumol also suppressed the Ca(2+) content of the SR and its rate of recirculation. The stabilizing effects of xanthohumol on the frequency of spontaneously triggered Ca(2+) sparks and waves combined with its antioxidant properties, and lack of significant effects on Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels, may provide this compound with clinically desirable antiarrhythmic properties.

  2. The cellular force-frequency response in ventricular myocytes from the varanid lizard, Varanus exanthematicus

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Gina L. J.; Patrick, Simon M.; Shiels, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying the negative force-frequency relationship (FFR) in the ventricle of the varanid lizard, Varanus exanthematicus, we measured sarcomere and cell shortening, intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), action potentials (APs), and K+ currents in isolated ventricular myocytes. Experiments were conducted between 0.2 and 1.0 Hz, which spans the physiological range of in vivo heart rates at 20–22°C for this species. As stimulation frequency increased, diastolic length, percent change in sarcomere length, and relaxation time all decreased significantly. Shortening velocity was unaffected. These changes corresponded to a faster rate of rise of [Ca2+]i, a decrease in [Ca2+]i transient amplitude, and a seven-fold increase in diastolic [Ca2+]i. The time constant for the decay of the Ca2+ transient (τ) decreased at higher frequencies, indicating a frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation (FDAR) but then reached a plateau at moderate frequencies and did not change above 0.5 Hz. The rate of rise of the AP was unaffected, but the AP duration (APD) decreased with increasing frequency. Peak depolarization tended to decrease, but it was only significant at 1.0 Hz. The decrease in APD was not due to frequency-dependent changes in the delayed inward rectifier (IKr) or the transient outward (Ito) current, as neither appeared to be present in varanid ventricular myocytes. Our results suggest that a negative FFR relationship in varanid lizard ventricle is caused by decreased amplitude of the Ca2+ transient coupled with an increase in diastolic Ca2+, which leads to incomplete relaxation between beats at high frequencies. This coincides with shortened APD at higher frequencies. PMID:20053961

  3. Alpha 1-adrenergic agonists selectively suppress voltage-dependent K+ current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Apkon, M; Nerbonne, J M

    1988-01-01

    The effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agonists on the waveforms of action potentials and voltage-gated ionic currents were examined in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. After "puffer" applications of either of two alpha 1 agonists, phenylephrine and methoxamine, action-potential durations were increased. In voltage-clamped cells, phenylephrine (5-20 microM) or methoxamine (5-10 microM) reduced the amplitudes of Ca2+-independent voltage-activated outward K+ currents (Iout); neither the kinetics nor the voltage-dependent properties of Iout were significantly affected. The effects of phenylephrine or methoxamine on Iout were larger and longer-lasting at higher concentrations and after prolonged or repeated exposures; in all experiments, however, Iout recovered completely when puffer applications were discontinued. The suppression of Iout is attributed to the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, as neither beta- nor alpha 2-adrenergic agonists had measurable effects on Iout; in addition, the effect of phenylephrine was attenuated in the presence of the alpha antagonist phentolamine (10 microM), but not in the presence of the beta antagonist propranolol (10 microM). Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, in contrast, were not altered measurably by phenylephrine or methoxamine and no currents were activated directly by these agents. Suppression of Iout was also observed during puffer applications of either of two protein kinase C activators, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (10 nM-1 microM) and 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (60 microM). We conclude that the activation of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in adult rat ventricular myocytes leads to action-potential prolongation as a result of the specific suppression of Iout and that this effect may be mediated by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:2903506

  4. Skeletal myocyte hypertrophy requires mTOR kinase activity and S6K1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Hyun . E-mail: ihpark@uiuc.edu; Erbay, Ebru; Nuzzi, Paul; Chen Jie

    2005-09-10

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and growth, with the ribosomal subunit S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) as one of the key downstream signaling effectors. A critical role of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle differentiation has been identified recently, and an unusual regulatory mechanism independent of mTOR kinase activity and S6K1 is revealed. An mTOR pathway has also been reported to regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy, but the regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we report the investigation of mTOR's function in insulin growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Added at a later stage when rapamycin no longer had any effect on normal myocyte differentiation, rapamycin completely blocked myocyte hypertrophy as measured by myotube diameter. Importantly, a concerted increase of average myonuclei per myotube was observed in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes, which was also inhibited by rapamycin added at a time when it no longer affected normal differentiation. The mTOR protein level, its catalytic activity, its phosphorylation on Ser2448, and the activity of S6K1 were all found increased in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes compared to unstimulated myotubes. Using C2C12 cells stably expressing rapamycin-resistant forms of mTOR and S6K1, we provide genetic evidence for the requirement of mTOR and its downstream effector S6K1 in the regulation of myotube hypertrophy. Our results suggest distinct mTOR signaling mechanisms in different stages of skeletal muscle development: While mTOR regulates the initial myoblast differentiation in a kinase-independent and S6K1-independent manner, the hypertrophic function of mTOR requires its kinase activity and employs S6K1 as a downstream effector.

  5. Caffeine-activated large-conductance plasma membrane cation channels in cardiac myocytes: characteristics and significance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-An; Tuft, Richard A; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Fogarty, Kevin E; Singer, Joshua J; Zou, Hui

    2007-10-01

    Caffeine-activated, large-conductance, nonselective cation channels (LCCs) have been found in the plasma membrane of isolated cardiac myocytes in several species. However, little is known about the effects of opening these channels. To examine such effects and to further understand the caffeine-activation mechanism, we carried out studies using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques with freshly isolated cardiac myocytes from rats and mice. Unlike previous studies, thapsigargin was used so that both the effect of opening LCCs and the action of caffeine were independent of Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. These Ca(2+)-permeable LCCs were found in a majority of the cells from atria and ventricles, with a conductance of approximately 370 pS in rat atria. Caffeine and all its direct metabolic products (theophylline, theobromine, and paraxanthine) activated the channel, while isocaffeine did not. Although they share some similarities with ryanodine receptors (RyRs, the openings of which give rise to Ca(2+) sparks), LCCs also showed some different characteristics. With simultaneous Ca(2+) imaging and current recording, the localized fluorescence increase due to Ca(2+) entry through a single opening of an LCC (SCCaFT) was detected. When membrane potential, instead of current, was recorded, SCCaFT-like fluorescence transients (indicating single LCC openings) were found to accompany membrane depolarizations. To our knowledge, this is the first report directly linking membrane potential changes to a single opening of an ion channel. Moreover, these events in cardiac cells suggest a possible additional mechanism by which caffeine and theophylline contribute to the generation of cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. Toward an Integrative Computational Model of the Guinea Pig Cardiac Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Laura Doyle; Greenstein, Joseph L.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2012-01-01

    The local control theory of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling asserts that regulation of calcium (Ca2+) release occurs at the nanodomain level, where openings of single L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs) trigger openings of small clusters of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) co-localized within the dyad. A consequence of local control is that the whole-cell Ca2+ transient is a smooth continuous function of influx of Ca2+ through LCCs. While this so-called graded release property has been known for some time, its functional importance to the integrated behavior of the cardiac ventricular myocyte has not been fully appreciated. We previously formulated a biophysically based model, in which LCCs and RyRs interact via a coarse-grained representation of the dyadic space. The model captures key features of local control using a low-dimensional system of ordinary differential equations. Voltage-dependent gain and graded Ca2+ release are emergent properties of this model by virtue of the fact that model formulation is closely based on the sub-cellular basis of local control. In this current work, we have incorporated this graded release model into a prior model of guinea pig ventricular myocyte electrophysiology, metabolism, and isometric force production. The resulting integrative model predicts the experimentally observed causal relationship between action potential (AP) shape and timing of Ca2+ and force transients, a relationship that is not explained by models lacking the graded release property. Model results suggest that even relatively subtle changes in AP morphology that may result, for example, from remodeling of membrane transporter expression in disease or spatial variation in cell properties, may have major impact on the temporal waveform of Ca2+ transients, thus influencing tissue level electromechanical function. PMID:22783206

  7. Unifying principles of calcium wave propagation - Insights from a three-dimensional model for atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Thul, R; Rietdorf, K; Bootman, M D; Coombes, S

    2015-09-01

    Atrial myocytes in a number of species lack transverse tubules. As a consequence the intracellular calcium signals occurring during each heartbeat exhibit complex spatio-temporal dynamics. These calcium patterns arise from saltatory calcium waves that propagate via successive rounds of diffusion and calcium-induced calcium release. The many parameters that impinge on calcium-induced calcium release and calcium signal propagation make it difficult to know a priori whether calcium waves will successfully travel, or be extinguished. In this study, we describe in detail a mathematical model of calcium signalling that allows the effect of such parameters to be independently assessed. A key aspect of the model is to follow the triggering and evolution of calcium signals within a realistic three-dimensional cellular volume of an atrial myocyte, but with low computational costs. This is achieved by solving the linear transport equation for calcium analytically between calcium release events and by expressing the onset of calcium liberation as a threshold process. The model makes non-intuitive predictions about calcium signal propagation. For example, our modelling illustrates that the boundary of a cell produces a wave-guiding effect that enables calcium ions to propagate further and for longer, and can subtly alter the pattern of calcium wave movement. The high spatial resolution of the modelling framework allows the study of any arrangement of calcium release sites. We demonstrate that even small variations in randomly positioned release sites cause highly heterogeneous cellular responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  8. Phosphatidic acid stimulates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in adult cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kurz, T; Wolf, R A; Corr, P B

    1993-03-01

    The cellular content of phosphatidic acid can increase in response to several agonists either by phosphorylation of diacylglycerol after phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of phospholipids or directly through activation of phospholipase D. Although previous findings indicated that the generation of phosphatidic acid was exclusively a means of regulation of the cellular concentration of diacylglycerol, more recent studies have indicated that phosphatidic acid may also directly regulate several cellular functions. Accordingly, the present study was performed to assess whether phosphatidic acid could stimulate cardiac phospholipase C in intact adult rabbit ventricular myocytes. The mass of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins (1,4,5)P3] was determined by a specific and sensitive binding protein assay and by direct mass measurement using anion exchange chromatography for separation of selected inositol phosphates and gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for quantification of inositol monophosphate (IP1), inositol bisphosphate (IP2), inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP4). Phosphatidic acid (10(-9)-10(-6) M) elicited a rapid concentration-dependent increase in Ins (1,4,5)P3 accumulation, with the peak fourfold to fivefold increase at 30 seconds of stimulation; the concentration required for 50% of maximal stimulation was 4.4 x 10(-8) M. The time course of individual inositol phosphates indicated a successive increase in the mass of IP3, IP4, IP2, and IP1 in response to stimulation with phosphatidic acid. The production of Ins (1,4,5)P3 in response to phosphatidic acid was not altered in the absence of extracellular calcium or in the presence of extracellular EGTA (10(-3) M). Thus, these findings indicate that phosphatidic acid is a potent activator of inositol phosphate production in adult ventricular myocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Metabolic stress in isolated mouse ventricular myocytes leads to remodeling of t tubules.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lu-Feng; Wang, Fuzhen; Lopatin, Anatoli N

    2011-11-01

    Cardiac ventricular myocytes possess an extensive t-tubular system that facilitates the propagation of membrane potential across the cell body. It is well established that ionic currents at the restricted t-tubular space may lead to significant changes in ion concentrations, which, in turn, may affect t-tubular membrane potential. In this study, we used the whole cell patch-clamp technique to study accumulation and depletion of t-tubular potassium by measuring inward rectifier potassium tail currents (I(K1,tail)), and inward rectifier potassium current (I(K1)) "inactivation". At room temperatures and in the absence of Mg(2+) ions in pipette solution, the amplitude of I(K1,tail) measured ~10 min after the establishment of whole cell configuration was reduced by ~18%, but declined nearly twofold in the presence of 1 mM cyanide. At ~35°C I(K1,tail) was essentially preserved in intact cells, but its amplitude declined by ~85% within 5 min of cell dialysis, even in the absence of cyanide. Intracellular Mg(2+) ions played protective role at all temperatures. Decline of I(K1,tail) was accompanied by characteristic changes in its kinetics, as well as by changes in the kinetics of I(K1) inactivation, a marker of depletion of t-tubular K(+). The data point to remodeling of t tubules as the primary reason for the observed effects. Consistent with this, detubulation of myocytes using formamide-induced osmotic stress significantly reduced I(K1,tail), as well as the inactivation of inward I(K1). Overall, the data provide strong evidence that changes in t tubule volume/structure may occur on a short time scale in response to various types of stress.

  10. Choline chloride activates time-dependent and time-independent K+ currents in dog atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Fermini, B; Nattel, S

    1994-01-01

    Using the whole cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique, we studied the effect of isotonic replacement of bath sodium chloride (NaCl) by choline chloride (ChCl) in dog atrial myocytes. Our results show that ChCl triggered 1) activation of a time-independent background current, characterized by a shift of the holding current in the outward direction at potentials positive to the K+ equilibrium potential (EK), and 2) activation of a time- and voltage-dependent outward current, following depolarizing voltage steps positive to EK. Because the choline-induced current obtained by depolarizing steps exhibited properties similar to the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK), we named it IKCh. The amplitude of IKCh was determined by extracellular ChCl concentration, and this current was generally undetectable in the absence of ChCl. IKCh was not activated by acetylcholine (0.001-1.0 mM) or carbachol (10 microM) and could not be recorded in the absence of ChCl or when external NaCl was replaced by sucrose or tetramethylammonium chloride. IKCh was inhibited by atropine (0.01-1.0 microM) but not by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine (up to 10 microM). This current was carried mainly by K+ and was inhibited by CsCl (120 mM, in the pipette) or barium (1 mM, in the bath). We conclude that in dog atrial myocytes, ChCl activates a background conductance comparable to ACh-dependent K+ current, together with a time-dependent K+ current showing properties similar to IK.

  11. SKF-96365 strongly inhibits voltage-gated sodium current in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kui-Hao; Liu, Hui; Yang, Lei; Jin, Man-Wen; Li, Gui-Rong

    2015-06-01

    SKF-96365 (1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxy-phenyl) propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H-imidazole hydrochloride) is a general TRPC channel antagonist commonly used to characterize the potential functions of TRPC channels in cardiovascular system. Recent reports showed that SKF-96365 induced a reduction in cardiac conduction. The present study investigates whether the reduced cardiac conduction caused by SKF-96365 is related to the blockade of voltage-gated sodium current (I Na) in rat ventricular myocytes using the whole-cell patch voltage-clamp technique. It was found that SKF-96365 inhibited I Na in rat ventricular myocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound (1 μM) negatively shifted the potential of I Na availability by 9.5 mV, increased the closed-state inactivation of I Na, and slowed the recovery of I Na from inactivation. The inhibition of cardiac I Na by SKF-96365 was use-dependent and frequency-dependent, and the IC₅₀ was decreased from 1.36 μM at 0.5 Hz to 1.03, 0.81, 0.61, 0.56 μM at 1, 2, 5, 10 Hz, respectively. However, the selective TRPC3 antagonist Pyr3 decreased cardiac I Na by 8.5% at 10 μM with a weak use and frequency dependence. These results demonstrate that the TRPC channel antagonist SKF-96365 strongly blocks cardiac I Na in use-dependent and frequency-dependent manners. Caution should be taken for interpreting the alteration of cardiac electrical activity when SKF-96365 is used in native cells as a TRPC antagonist.

  12. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P.; Fonseca, Tatiana L.; Ignacio, Daniele L.; Fernandes, Gustavo W.; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M.; Lartey, Lattoya J.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Ribeiro, Miriam O.; Gereben, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:26214036

  13. QT-screen: high-throughput cardiac safety pharmacology by extracellular electrophysiology on primary cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas; Leisgen, Christine; Gonser, Barbara; Günther, Elke

    2004-10-01

    Cardiac safety pharmacology focuses mostly on the drug-induced prolongation of the QT interval in the electrocardiogram. A prolonged QT interval is an important indicator for an increased risk of severe ventricular arrhythmia. Guidelines demand safety tests addressing QT prolongation in vitro and in vivo before a drug enters clinical trials. If safety risks will be detected not until an advanced stage of preclinical drug development, a considerable sum of money has already been invested into the drug development process. To prevent this, high-throughput systems have been developed to obtain information on the potential toxicity of a substance earlier. We will discuss in this publication that the QT-Screen system, which is based on primary cardiac myocytes, is able to provide a sufficient throughput for secondary screening. With this system, extracellular field potentials can be recorded from spontaneously beating cultures of mammalian or avian ventricular cardiac myocytes simultaneously on 96 channels. The system includes software-controlled and automated eight-channel liquid handling, data acquisition, and analysis. These features allow a user-friendly and unsupervised operation. The throughput is over 100 compounds in six replicates and with full dose-response relationships per day. This equals a maximum of approximately 6,000 data points per day at an average cost for consumables of 0.20 US pennies (U.S.) per data point. The system is intended for a non-good laboratory practice-compliant screening; however, it can be adapted to be used in a good laboratory practice environment.

  14. Action potential duration determines sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ reloading in mammalian ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Rosana A; Altamirano, Julio; Puglisi, José L; Bers, Donald M

    2004-01-01

    After sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ depletion in intact ventricular myocytes, electrical activity promotes SR Ca2+ reloading and recovery of twitch amplitude. In ferret, recovery of twitch and caffeine-induced contracture required fewer twitches than in rabbit or rat. In rat, there was no difference in action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90) at steady state (SS) versus at the first post-depletion (PD) twitch. The SS APD90 was similar in ferret and rabbit (but longer than in rat). However, compared to SS, the PD APD90 was lengthened in ferret, but shortened in rabbit. When rabbit myocytes were subjected to AP-clamp patterns during SR Ca2+ reloading (ferret- or rabbit-type APs), reloading was much faster using the ferret AP templates. We conclude that the faster SR Ca2+ refilling in ferret is due to the increased Ca2+ influx during the longer PD AP. The PD versus SS APD90 difference was suppressed by thapsigargin in ferret (indicating Ca2+ dependence). In rabbit, the PD AP shortening depended on the preceding diastolic interval (rather than Ca2+), because rest produced the same AP shortening, and SS APD90 increased as a function of frequency (in contrast to ferret). Transient outward current (Ito) was larger and recovered from inactivation much faster in ferret than in rabbit. Moreover, slow Ito recovery (τ ∼ 3 s) in rabbit was a much larger fraction of Ito. Our data and a computational model (including two Ito components) suggest that in rabbit the slowly recovering Ito is responsible for short post-rest and PD APs, for the unusual frequency dependence of APD90, and ultimately for the slower post-depletion SR Ca2+ reloading. PMID:15243136

  15. Inorganic polyphosphate is a potent activator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Seidlmayer, Lea K; Gomez-Garcia, Maria R; Blatter, Lothar A; Pavlov, Evgeny; Dedkova, Elena N

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by excessive Ca2+ accumulation is a major contributor to cardiac cell and tissue damage during myocardial infarction and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). At the molecular level, mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by Ca2+-dependent opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, which leads to the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), disruption of adenosine triphosphate production, and ultimately cell death. Although the role of Ca2+ for induction of mPTP opening is established, the exact molecular mechanism of this process is not understood. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the adverse effect of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation is mediated by its interaction with inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a polymer of orthophosphates linked by phosphoanhydride bonds. We found that cardiac mitochondria contained significant amounts (280±60 pmol/mg of protein) of short-chain polyP with an average length of 25 orthophosphates. To test the role of polyP for mPTP activity, we investigated kinetics of Ca2+ uptake and release, ΔΨm and Ca2+-induced mPTP opening in polyP-depleted mitochondria. polyP depletion was achieved by mitochondria-targeted expression of a polyP-hydrolyzing enzyme. Depletion of polyP in mitochondria of rabbit ventricular myocytes led to significant inhibition of mPTP opening without affecting mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration by itself. This effect was observed when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was stimulated by increasing cytosolic [Ca2+] in permeabilized myocytes mimicking mitochondrial Ca2+ overload observed during IRI. Our findings suggest that inorganic polyP is a previously unrecognized major activator of mPTP. We propose that the adverse effect of polyphosphate might be caused by its ability to form stable complexes with Ca2+ and directly contribute to inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

  16. Swelling-induced Cl- current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes: inhibition by glibenclamide.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, M; Matsuura, H; Ehara, T

    1997-01-01

    1. Whole-cell currents were recorded from guinea-pig atrial myocytes using the patch-clamp technique under conditions designed to block K+ channels, Ca2+ channels and electrogenic transporters. 2. Exposure of atrial myocytes to the hyposmotic external solution (Na+ reduction to about 70% of control) resulted in hyposmotic cell swelling which was associated with activation of an outwardly rectifying Cl- current (ICl,swell). 3. Whereas the activation of ICl,swell was not significantly affected by replacement of ATP in the pipette solution with the non-hydrolysable ATP analogue 5'-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), its activation was greatly reduced in cells dialysed with an ATP-free pipette solution, thus indicating that the activation process of ICl,swell requires the presence of intracellular ATP, but not its hydrolysis. 4. Bath application of glibenclamide produced a concentration-dependent block of ICl,swell with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 60.0 microM and a Hill coefficient of 2.1. The maximal effect (100% inhibition) was obtained with 500 microM glibenclamide. The steady-state inhibition showed little voltage dependence, while glibenclamide at concentrations of more than 100 microM inhibited the outward ICl,swell more rapidly than the inward ICl,swell. The glibenclamide inhibition was fully reversible after removal of the drug, even when a maximal effect (full inhibition) was achieved at a high drug concentration (500 microM). 5. These results show that (i) glibenclamide is one of the most potent inhibitors of guinea-pig atrial ICl,swell, and (ii) atrial ICl,swell and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- currents are almost equally sensitive to inhibition by glibenclamide. Images Figure 1 PMID:9409470

  17. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P; Fonseca, Tatiana L; Ignacio, Daniele L; Fernandes, Gustavo W; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M; Lartey, Lattoya J; Ribeiro, Marcelo B; Ribeiro, Miriam O; Gereben, Balazs; Bianco, Antonio C

    2015-10-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers.

  18. Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate induced Ca2+ release and excitation–contraction coupling in atrial myocytes from normal and failing hearts

    PubMed Central

    Hohendanner, Felix; Walther, Stefanie; Maxwell, Joshua T; Kettlewell, Sarah; Awad, Sawsan; Smith, Godfrey L; Lonchyna, Vassyl A; Blatter, Lothar A

    2015-01-01

    We studied excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ release in normal and heart failure (HF) rabbit atrial cells. Left ventricular HF was induced by combined volume and pressure overload. In HF atrial myocytes diastolic [Ca2+]i was increased, action potential (AP)-induced Ca2+ transients (CaTs) were larger in amplitude, primarily due to enhanced Ca2+ release from central non-junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and centripetal propagation of activation was accelerated, whereas HF ventricular CaTs were depressed. The larger CaTs were due to enhanced IP3 receptor-induced Ca2+ release (IICR) and reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering, consistent with a reduced mitochondrial density and Ca2+ uptake capacity in HF. Elementary IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release events (Ca2+ puffs) were more frequent in HF atrial myoctes and were detected more often in central regions of the non-junctional SR compared to normal cells. HF cells had an overall higher frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves and a larger fraction of waves (termed arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves) triggered APs and global CaTs. The higher propensity of arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves resulted from the combined action of enhanced IICR and increased activity of sarcolemmal Na+–Ca2+ exchange depolarizing the cell membrane. In conclusion, the data support the hypothesis that in atrial myocytes from hearts with left ventricular failure, enhanced CaTs during ECC exert positive inotropic effects on atrial contractility which facilitates ventricular filling and contributes to maintaining cardiac output. However, HF atrial cells were also more susceptible to developing arrhythmogenic Ca2+ waves which might form the substrate for atrial rhythm disorders frequently encountered in HF. Key points Impaired calcium (Ca2+) signalling is the main contributor to depressed ventricular contractile function and occurrence of arrhythmia in heart failure (HF). Here we report that in atrial cells

  19. Single adult rabbit and rat cardiac myocytes retain the Ca2+- and species-dependent systolic and diastolic contractile properties of intact muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The systolic and diastolic properties of single myocytes and intact papillary muscles isolated from hearts of adult rats and rabbits were examined at 37 degrees C over a range of stimulation frequencies and bathing [Ca2+]o (Cao). In both rabbit myocytes and intact muscles bathed in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted in a positive staircase of twitch performance. During stimulation at 2 min-1, twitch performance also increased with increases in Cao up to 20 mM. In the absence of stimulation, both rabbit myocytes and muscles were completely quiescent in less than 15 mM Cao. Further increases in Cao caused the appearance of spontaneous asynchronous contractile waves in myocytes and in intact muscles caused scattered light intensity fluctuations (SLIF), which were previously demonstrated to be caused by Ca2+-dependent spontaneous contractile waves. In contrast to rabbit preparations, intact rat papillary muscles exhibited SLIF in 1.0 mM Cao. Two populations of rat myocytes were observed in 1 mM Cao: approximately 85% of unstimulated cells exhibited low-frequency (3-4 min-1) spontaneous contractile waves, whereas 15%, during a 1-min observation period, were quiescent. In a given Cao, the contractile wave frequency in myocytes and SLIF in intact muscles were constant for long periods of time. In both intact rat muscles and myocytes with spontaneous waves, in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted, on the average, in a 65% reduction in steady state twitch amplitude. Of the rat myocytes that did not manifest waves, some had a positive, some had a flat, and some had a negative staircase; the average steady state twitch amplitude of these cells during stimulation at 120 min-1 was 30% greater than that at 6 min-1. In contrast to rabbit preparations, twitch performance during stimulation at 2 min-1 saturated at 1.5 mM Cao in both intact rat muscles and in the myocytes with spontaneous waves. We

  20. Heterogeneity of Kv2.1 mRNA expression and delayed rectifier current in single isolated myocytes from rat left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J H; Volk, T; Ehmke, H

    2001-03-16

    Expression of the voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv2.1, a possible molecular correlate for the cardiac delayed rectifier current (I(K)), has recently been shown to vary between individual ventricular myocytes. The functional consequences of this cell-to-cell heterogeneity in Kv2.1 expression are not known. Using multiplex single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we detected Kv2.1 mRNA in 47% of isolated midmyocardial myocytes from the rat left ventricular free wall that were positive for alpha-myosin heavy chain mRNA (n=74). Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrated marked differences in the magnitude of I(K) (200 to 1450 pA at V(Pip)=40 mV) between individual myocytes of the same origin. Furthermore, the tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive outward current (I(TEA)), known to be partly encoded by Kv2.1 in mice, revealed a wide range of current magnitudes between single cells (150 to 1130 pA at V(Pip)=40 mV). Combined patch-clamp recordings and multiplex single-cell RT-PCR analysis of the same myocytes, however, showed no differences in I(K) or I(TEA) magnitude or inactivation kinetics between myocytes expressing Kv2.1 mRNA and those that did not express Kv2.1 mRNA. In contrast, in all midmyocardial myocytes expressing the transient outward potassium current (I(to1)), Kv4 mRNA, which has been shown to underlie I(to1), was detected (n=10). These results indicate that I(K) heterogeneity among individual left ventricular myocytes cannot be explained by the distribution pattern of Kv2.1 mRNA. Other mechanisms besides Kv2.1 mRNA expression appear to determine magnitude and kinetics of I(K) in rat ventricular myocytes.

  1. Effects of potassium channel openers on Na+ and K+ currents in rabbit sinus node and atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Cohen, I S

    1995-05-12

    The effects of the potassium channel openers (KCOs) Cromakalim and Lemakalim on rabbit sinoatrial and atrial myocytes were examined by means of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Lemakalin (up to 100 microM) had no effect on potassium current in sinoatrial cells. Both Lemakalim and Cromakalim (100 microM) displayed a two-fold action on atrial myocytes: (1) they increased an outwardly rectifying conductance at potentials positive to EK and, (2) they markedly decreased a TTX-sensitive Na+ current active in the voltage range -50/-30 mV. This novel action on TTX-sensitive currents is of particular interest since these two benzopyrans have been thought to specifically target potassium channels.

  2. Characterization of the hyperpolarization-activated current, I(f), in ventricular myocytes isolated from hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cerbai, E; Barbieri, M; Mugelli, A

    1994-01-01

    1. Left ventricular myocytes isolated from the heart of young (2-month-old) and old (18- to 20-month-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were studied in the whole-cell configuration. Since multicellular preparations from old SHRs show a diastolic depolarization phase, we performed experiments to test whether it was associated with the presence of a hyperpolarization-activated If-like current. 2. In control Tyrode solution, a time-dependent increasing inward current activated by hyperpolarization was recorded in myocytes from old SHRs showing a diastolic depolarization phase. A barium-insensitive, caesium-sensitive, time-dependent inward current was recorded in a minority (4 of 33) of cells from young SHRs (membrane capacitance, 160 +/- 7 pF) but in 93% (25 of 27, P < 0.01) of myocytes from old SHRs (membrane capacitance, 355 +/- 19 pF, P < 0.01). 3. The current was fully activated at -120 mV and voltage of half-maximal activation was -88.1 +/- 1.5 mV; it was blocked by extracellular CsCl (4 mM) in a voltage-dependent manner. Reducing [K+]o from 25 to 5.4 mM caused a shift of the reversal potential from -17.3 +/- 3.8 to -25.7 +/- 2.7 mV and a 60% decrease of current conductance. 4. These findings suggest that an If-like current is present in rat ventricular myocytes from old SHRs, where it might favour the occurrence of spontaneous action potentials. PMID:7707227

  3. Kinetic evidence distinguishing volume-sensitive chloride current from other types in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Shuba, L M; Ogura, T; McDonald, T F

    1996-01-01

    1. Kinase-mediated chloride currents (ICl) in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes were activated by application of phorbol ester or forskolin, and compared with currents induced by hyposmotic swelling. Swelling-activated current was identified as ICl from changes in reversal potential, outward rectification and conductance when the Cl-gradient was modified. 2. Kinase-stimulated currents were relatively time and voltage independent, whereas hyposmotic swelling-stimulated (hyposmotic-stimulated) currents inactivated during 100 ms pulses to positive potentials. Forskolin stimulated time-independent ICl in myocytes with current unresponsive to hyposmotic superfusion, and superimposed a similar pedestal on time-dependent ICl in swollen myocytes. 3. Less negative holding potentials depressed hyposmotic-stimulated ICl tested at +80 mV; inhibition was half-maximal at -25 mV. Pulses from -80 to +80 mV inactivated up to 75% of ICl along a multi-exponential time course; repolarization elicited inwardly developing tail currents whose time courses suggest complex gating. 4. Hyperpolarizations, after strongly-inactivating depolarizations, triggered reactivating tail currents whose amplitude and configuration were dependent on voltage and Cl-gradients; tails were large and inwardly developing at potentials negative to the calculated Cl-equilibrium potential (ECl), small and outwardly developing at potentials positive to ECl, and time independent near ECl. 5. These results suggest that the volume-sensitive Cl- channels investigated here are distinct from other Cl- channels in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. However, their voltage-dependent properties strongly resemble those of volume-sensitive Cl- channels in certain epithelial cells. PMID:9011623

  4. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Action Potential and Transient Outward Potassium Current in Ventricular Myocytes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhou; Ren, Yi-Peng; Lu, Cai-Yi; Li, Yang; Xu, Qiang; Peng, Li; Fan, Yong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep deprivation contributes to the development and recurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. However, the electrophysiological changes in ventricular myocytes in sleep deprivation are still unknown. Material/Methods Sleep deprivation was induced by modified multiple platform technique. Fifty rats were assigned to control and sleep deprivation 1, 3, 5, and 7 days groups, and single ventricular myocytes were enzymatically dissociated from rat hearts. Action potential duration (APD) and transient outward current (Ito) were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results Compared with the control group, the phases of APD of ventricular myocytes in 3, 5, and 7 days groups were prolonged and APD at 20% and 50% level of repolarization (APD20 and APD50) was significantly elongated (The APD20 values of control, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days groups: 5.66±0.16 ms, 5.77±0.20 ms, 8.28±0.30 ms, 11.56±0.32 ms, 13.24±0.56 ms. The APD50 values: 50.66±2.16 ms, 52.77±3.20 ms, 65.28±5.30 ms, 83.56±7.32 ms, 89.24±5.56 ms. P<0.01, n=18). The current densities of Ito significantly decreased. The current density-voltage (I–V) curve of Ito was vitally suppressed downward. The steady-state inactivation curve and steady-state activation curve of Ito were shifted to left and right, respectively, in sleep deprivation rats. The inactivation recovery time of Ito was markedly retarded and the time of closed-state inactivation was markedly accelerated in 3, 5, and 7 days groups. Conclusions APD of ventricular myocytes in sleep deprivation rats was significantly prolonged, which could be attributed to decreased activation and accelerated inactivation of Ito. PMID:25694200

  5. Activation of muscarinic K+ current in guinea-pig atrial myocytes by a serum factor.

    PubMed Central

    Banach, K; Hüser, J; Lipp, P; Wellner, M C; Pott, L

    1993-01-01

    1. Atrial myocytes obtained by enzymatic perfusion of hearts from adult guinea-pigs and cultured for 0-14 days were studied using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. 2. Superfusion of the myocytes with diluted sera (1:100 to 1:10,000) from different species (human, horse, guinea-pig) evoked an inward rectifying K+ current. The voltage-dependent properties of this current were identical to those of the K+ current activated by acetylcholine (IK(ACh)). Current density in the presence of horse serum (1:100) approximately corresponded to the non-desensitizing fraction of IK(ACh) during superfusion with 1-2 x 10(-6) M ACh. 3. During a maximal serum-evoked current, application of ACh (10(-6) M) failed to evoke additional K+ current. After switching superfusion from serum-containing to serum-free solution, the K+ current decayed 1-2 orders of magnitude slower than ACh-activated IK(ACh). During the decay of the serum-evoked current, a proportional increase in responsiveness to ACh was recorded. During submaximal activation of K+ current by serum, a saturating concentration of ACh resulted in a total current that was identical to the current evoked by ACh alone minus the desensitizing component. Thus, activation of K+ current by serum caused desensitization of IK(ACh). From these results it is concluded that sera contain a factor that activates the same population of K+ channels as ACh. 4. Irreversible activation of IK(ACh) by ACh in myocytes dialysed with the GTP-analogue GTP-gamma-S abolished sensitivity to serum and vice versa. 5. The effect of serum was not modified by atropine (10(-6) M) which completely blocked the response to 2 x 10(-6) M ACh. Furthermore, theophylline (1 mM), which completely inhibited IK(ACh) activation by adenosine (100 microM), failed to inhibit the effect of serum. Thus, neither muscarinic nor purinergic (A1) receptors are involved. 6. The peptide somatostatin (10(-6) M) and the alpha 1-agonist phenylephrine (1 microM) which previously have

  6. Genistein directly induces cardiac CFTR chloride current by a tyrosine kinase-independent and protein kinase A-independent pathway in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C E; Chen, S A; Chang, M S; Lin, C I; Luk, H N

    1997-06-09

    With one-suction electrode voltage-clamp technique, we demonstrated that genistein, a tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor, could directly activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) chloride current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. The activation showed concentration-dependent effect with the estimated IC50 of 39.7 microM. Tyrphostin 51, another TK inhibitor, had no effect, suggesting that genistein's effect might be unrelated to TK inhibition. After the chloride current had been activated by the maximally elevated intracellular cAMP content by saturating concentration of isoproterenol, forskolin and IBMX, genistein could further enhance the current. Pre-treatment with saturating concentration of a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, or other protein kinase inhibitors H-8 and H-9 in the perfusate or intracellularly could not prevent the activation of the current by genistein, suggesting a PKA-independent activity. Furthermore, saturating concentration of calyculin A, a specific inhibitor of phosphotase 1 and 2A, in the perfusate or intracellularly could not block genistein's action. It is possible that genistein opens the channels directly or inhibits the dephosphorylation process of CFTR, which is not sensitive calyculin A.

  7. Carbon Nanohorns Promote Maturation of Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes and Inhibit Proliferation of Cardiac Fibroblasts: a Promising Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yujing; Shi, Xiaoli; Li, Yi; Tian, Lei; Bai, Rui; Wei, Yujie; Han, Dong; Liu, Huiliang; Xu, Jianxun

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) has developed rapidly, but a great challenge remains in finding practical scaffold materials for the construction of engineered cardiac tissues. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs) may be a potential candidate due to their special structure and properties. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of CNHs on the biological behavior of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) for CTE applications. CNHs were incorporated into collagen to form growth substrates for NRVMs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations demonstrated that CNHs exhibited a good affinity to collagen. Moreover, it was found that CNH-embedded substrates enhanced adhesion and proliferation of NRVMs. Immunohistochemical staining, western blot analysis, and intracellular calcium transient measurements indicated that the addition of CNHs significantly increased the expression and maturation of electrical and mechanical proteins (connexin-43 and N-cadherin). Bromodeoxyuridine staining and a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that CNHs have the ability to inhibit the proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts. These findings suggest that CNHs can have a valuable effect on the construction of engineered cardiac tissues and may be a promising scaffold for CTE.

  8. Elongation factor-2: a useful gene for arthropod phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Regier, J C; Shultz, J W

    2001-07-01

    Robust resolution of controversial higher-level groupings within Arthropoda requires additional sources of characters. Toward this end, elongation factor-2 sequences (1899 nucleotides) were generated from 17 arthropod taxa (5 chelicerates, 6 crustaceans, 3 hexapods, 3 myriapods) plus an onychophoran and a tardigrade as outgroups. Likelihood and parsimony analyses of nucleotide and amino acid data sets consistently recovered Myriapoda and major chelicerate groups with high bootstrap support. Crustacea + Hexapoda (= Pancrustacea) was recovered with moderate support, whereas the conflicting group Myriapoda + Hexapoda (= Atelocerata) was never recovered and bootstrap values were always <5%. With additional nonarthropod sequences included, one indel supports monophyly of Tardigrada, Onychophora, and Arthropoda relative to molluscan, annelidan, and mammalian outgroups. New and previously published sequences from RNA polymerase II (1038 nucleotides) and elongation factor-1alpha (1092 nucleotides) were analyzed for the same taxa. A comparison of bootstrap values from the three genes analyzed separately revealed widely varying values for some clades, although there was never strong support for conflicting groups. In combined analyses, there was strong bootstrap support for the generally accepted clades Arachnida, Arthropoda, Euchelicerata, Hexapoda, and Pycnogonida, and for Chelicerata, Myriapoda, and Pancrustacea, whose monophyly is more controversial. Recovery of some additional groups was fairly robust to method of analysis but bootstrap values were not high; these included Pancrustacea + Chelicerata, Hexapoda + Cephalocarida + Remipedia, Cephalocarida + Remipedia, and Malaocostraca + Cirripedia. Atelocerata (= Myriapoda + Hexapoda) was never recovered. Elongation factor-2 is now the second protein-encoding, nuclear gene (in addition to RNA polymerase II) to support Pancrustacea over Atelocerata. Atelocerata is widely cited in morphology-based analyses, and the

  9. The regulation of runt-related transcription factor 2 by fibroblast growth factor-2 and connexin43 requires the inositol polyphosphate/protein kinase Cδ cascade.

    PubMed

    Niger, Corinne; Luciotti, Maria A; Buo, Atum M; Hebert, Carla; Ma, Vy; Stains, Joseph P

    2013-06-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) plays a critical role in osteoblast function and bone mass accrual, yet the identity of the second messengers communicated by Cx43 gap junctions, the targets of these second messengers and how they regulate osteoblast function remain largely unknown. We have shown that alterations of Cx43 expression in osteoblasts can impact the responsiveness to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), by modulating the transcriptional activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In this study, we examined the contribution of the phospholipase Cγ1/inositol polyphosphate/protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) cascade to the Cx43-dependent transcriptional response of MC3T3 osteoblasts to FGF2. Knockdown of expression and/or inhibition of function of phospholipase Cγ1, inositol polyphosphate multikinase, which generates inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (InsP₄) and InsP₅, and inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1/2, which generates inositol pyrophosphates, prevented the ability of Cx43 to potentiate FGF2-induced signaling through Runx2. Conversely, overexpression of phospholipase Cγ1 and inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1/2 enhanced FGF2 activation of Runx2 and the effect of Cx43 overexpression on this response. Disruption of these pathways blocked the nuclear accumulation of PKCδ and the FGF2-dependent interaction of PKCδ and Runx2, reducing Runx2 transcriptional activity. These data reveal that FGF2-signaling involves the inositol polyphosphate cascade, including inositol hexakisphosphate kinase (IP6K), and demonstrate that IP6K regulates Runx2 and osteoblast gene expression. Additionally, these data implicate the water-soluble inositol polyphosphates as mediators of the Cx43-dependent amplification of the osteoblast response to FGF2, and suggest that these low molecular weight second messengers may be biologically relevant mediators of osteoblast function that are communicated by Cx43-gap junctions.

  10. Effects of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide on voltage-dependent sodium and calcium channels in rat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Al Kury, Lina T; Voitychuk, Oleg I; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Thayyullathil, Faisal T; Doroshenko, Petro; Ramez, Ali M; Shuba, Yaroslav M; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The endocannabinoid anandamide (N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide; AEA) exerts negative inotropic and antiarrhythmic effects in ventricular myocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Whole-cell patch-clamp technique and radioligand-binding methods were used to analyse the effects of anandamide in rat ventricular myocytes. KEY RESULTS In the presence of 1–10 μM AEA, suppression of both Na+ and L-type Ca2+ channels was observed. Inhibition of Na+ channels was voltage and Pertussis toxin (PTX) – independent. Radioligand-binding studies indicated that specific binding of [3H] batrachotoxin (BTX) to ventricular muscle membranes was also inhibited significantly by 10 μM metAEA, a non-metabolized AEA analogue, with a marked decrease in Bmax values but no change in Kd. Further studies on L-type Ca2+ channels indicated that AEA potently inhibited these channels (IC50 0.1 μM) in a voltage- and PTX-independent manner. AEA inhibited maximal amplitudes without affecting the kinetics of Ba2+ currents. MetAEA also inhibited Na+ and L-type Ca2+ currents. Radioligand studies indicated that specific binding of [3H]isradipine, was inhibited significantly by metAEA. (10 μM), changing Bmax but not Kd. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Results indicate that AEA inhibited the function of voltage-dependent Na+ and L-type Ca2+ channels in rat ventricular myocytes, independent of CB1 and CB2 receptor activation. PMID:24758718

  11. Physiological and ultrastructural features of human induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cell-derived skeletal myocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Gunnar; Lainé, Jeanne; Darabi, Radbod; Fournier, Emmanuel; Perlingeiro, Rita; Tabti, Nacira

    2014-06-03

    Progress has recently been made toward the production of human skeletal muscle cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the functional and ultrastructural characterization, which is crucial for disease modeling and drug discovery, remains to be documented. We show, for the first time to our knowledge, that the electrophysiological properties of human iPS-derived skeletal myocytes are strictly similar to those of their embryonic stem (ES) cell counterparts, and both are typical of aneural mammalian skeletal muscle. In both cell types, intracellular calcium signaling that links membrane depolarization to contraction occurs in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), a unique feature of skeletal muscle. Detailed analysis of the Ca(2+) signal revealed diverse kinetics of the rising phase, and hence various rates in the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This was mirrored by ultrastructural evidence of Ca(2+) release units, which varied in location, shape, and size. Thus, the excitation-contraction coupling machinery of both iPS- and ES-derived skeletal myocytes was functional and specific, but did not reach full maturity in culture. This is in contrast with the myofibrillar network, which displayed the same organization as in adult skeletal muscle. Overall, the present study validates the human iPS-based skeletal myocyte model in comparison with the embryonic system, and provides the functional and ultrastructural basis for its application to human skeletal muscle diseases.

  12. Voltage-gated calcium channel currents in human coronary myocytes. Regulation by cyclic GMP and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Quignard, J F; Frapier, J M; Harricane, M C; Albat, B; Nargeot, J; Richard, S

    1997-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels contribute to the maintenance of contractile tone in vascular myocytes and are potential targets for vasodilating agents. There is no information available about their nature and regulation in human coronary arteries. We used the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique to characterize Ca2+-channel currents immediately after enzymatic dissociation and after primary culture of coronary myocytes taken from heart transplant patients. We recorded a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type current in both freshly isolated and primary cultured cells. A T-type current was recorded only in culture. The L- (but not the T-) type current was inhibited by permeable analogues of cGMP in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was mimicked by the nitric oxide-generating agents S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine which increased intracellular cGMP. Methylene blue, known to inhibit guanylate cyclase, antagonized the effect of SNAP. Inhibitions by SNAP and cGMP were not additive and seemed to occur through a common pathway. We conclude that (a) L-type Ca2+ channels are the major pathway for voltage-gated Ca2+ entry in human coronary myocytes; (b) their inhibition by agents stimulating nitric oxide and/or intracellular cGMP production is expected to contribute to vasorelaxation and may be involved in the therapeutic effect of nitrovasodilators; and (c) the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in culture may be triggered by cell proliferation. PMID:9005986

  13. IGF-1 induces skeletal myocyte hypertrophy through calcineurin in association with GATA-2 and NF-ATc1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musaro, A.; McCullagh, K. J.; Naya, F. J.; Olson, E. N.; Rosenthal, N.

    1999-01-01

    Localized synthesis of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) has been broadly implicated in skeletal muscle growth, hypertrophy and regeneration. Virally delivered IGF-1 genes induce local skeletal muscle hypertrophy and attenuate age-related skeletal muscle atrophy, restoring and improving muscle mass and strength in mice. Here we show that the molecular pathways underlying the hypertrophic action of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle are similar to those responsible for cardiac hypertrophy. Transfected IGF-1 gene expression in postmitotic skeletal myocytes activates calcineurin-mediated calcium signalling by inducing calcineurin transcripts and nuclear localization of calcineurin protein. Expression of activated calcineurin mimics the effects of IGF-1, whereas expression of a dominant-negative calcineurin mutant or addition of cyclosporin, a calcineurin inhibitor, represses myocyte differentiation and hypertrophy. Either IGF-1 or activated calcineurin induces expression of the transcription factor GATA-2, which accumulates in a subset of myocyte nuclei, where it associates with calcineurin and a specific dephosphorylated isoform of the transcription factor NF-ATc1. Thus, IGF-1 induces calcineurin-mediated signalling and activation of GATA-2, a marker of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, which cooperates with selected NF-ATc isoforms to activate gene expression programs.

  14. Hydralazine decreases sodium nitroprusside-induced rat aortic ring relaxation and increased cGMP production by rat aortic myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, Horacio; González-Romo, Pilar; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Alcaide, Carlos; Orallo, Francisco

    2005-10-28

    Association of hydralazine with nitrova-sodilators has long been known to be beneficial in the vasodilator treatment of heart failure. We previously found that hydralazine appeared to reduce the increase in cGMP induced by sodium nitroprusside in cultured rat aortic myocytes. In order to further explore this seemingly paradoxical interaction, we extended our initial observations in rat aortic myocytes and also determined the influence of hydralazine on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings. Hydralazine produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium nitroprusside stimulation of cGMP production and caused a rightward shift of concentration-relaxation curves in aortic rings. A possible mechanism of the hydralazine-nitroprusside interaction could be the interference with bioactivation of the nitro-vasodilator to release nitric oxide. Recent evidence indicates that vascular NADH oxidase, an enzyme known to be inhibited by hydralazine, could be involved in this process. Accordingly, hydralazine was found to inhibit NADH oxidase activity in rat aortic myocytes at concentrations similar to those reducing sodium nitroprusside responses. It was concluded that antagonism of sodium nitroprusside action by hydralazine could be a consequence of interference with bioactivation of the former, apparently through inhibition of vascular NADH oxidase.

  15. Comparison of Voltage Gated K(+) Currents in Arterial Myocytes with Heterologously Expressed K v Subunits.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert H; Fromme, Samantha

    2016-12-01

    We have shown that three components contribute to functional voltage gated K(+) (K v) currents in rat small mesenteric artery myocytes: (1) Kv1.2 plus Kv1.5 with Kvβ1.2 subunits, (2) Kv2.1 probably associated with Kv9.3 subunits, and (3) Kv7.4 subunits. To confirm and address subunit stoichiometry of the first two, we have compared the biophysical properties of K v currents in small mesenteric artery myocytes with those of Kv subunits heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells using whole cell voltage clamp methods. Selective inhibitors of Kv1 (correolide, COR) and Kv2 (stromatoxin, ScTx) channels were used to separate these K v current components. Conductance-voltage and steady state inactivation data along with time constants of activation, inactivation, and deactivation of native K v components were generally well represented by those of Kv1.2-1.5-β1.2 and Kv2.1-9.3 channels. The slope of the steady state inactivation-voltage curve (availability slope) proved to be the most sensitive measure of accessory subunit presence. The availability slope curves exhibited a single peak for both native K v components. Availability slope curves for Kv1.2-1.5-β1.2 and Kv2.1-9.3 channels expressed in human embryonic kidney cells also exhibited a single peak that shifted to more depolarized voltages with increasing accessory to α subunit transfection ratio. Availability slope curves for SxTc-insensitive currents were similar to those of Kv1.2-1.5 expressed with Kvβ1.2 at a 1:5 molar ratio while curves for COR-insensitive currents closely resembled those of Kv2.1 expressed with Kv9.3 at a 1:1 molar ratio. These results support the suggested Kv subunit combinations in small mesenteric artery, and further suggest that Kv1 α and Kvβ1.2 but not Kv2.1 and Kv9.3 subunits are present in a saturated (4:4) stoichiometry.

  16. Intracellular Ca2+ transients during rapid cooling contractures in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bers, D M; Bridge, J H; Spitzer, K W

    1989-01-01

    1. We measured intracellular Ca2+ transients during rapid cooling contractures (RCCs) in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Indo-1. 2. Rapid cooling of myocytes from 22 to 0-1 degrees C induced a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i which preceded the peak of the contraction and was sometimes large enough to saturate Indo-1. This indicates that [Ca2+]i may reach greater than 10 microM during an RCC. 3. The [Ca2+]i during the RCC slowly declined from its peak value and most of this decline in [Ca2+]i can be attributed to slow reaccumulation of Ca2+ by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in the cold. RCCs induced in the absence of Cao2+, were not different from control, supporting previous conclusions that RCCs depend exclusively on intracellular Ca2+ stores. 4. RCCs are depressed by long rest periods (rest decay) or by exposure to ryanodine or caffeine, which supports conclusions that RCCs are due to Ca2+ release from the SR. The rest decay of RCCs can be almost completely prevented by applying Nao(+)-free solution during the rest period. This implies that the loss of SR Ca2+ during rest depends on the sarcolemmal Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange (and not the sarcolemmal Ca2(+)-ATPase pump). 5. Rapid rewarming during an RCC normally leads to an additional transient contraction (or rewarming spike), without any increase in [Ca2+]i. Thus, the rewarming spike might be attributable to an increase in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity induced by rewarming. 6. A second RCC is used to assess the fraction of Ca2+ which is re-sequestered by the SR during relaxation from the first RCC. In control solution progressive RCCs decline in amplitude, but in Na(+)-free, Ca2(+)-free solution they are of constant amplitude. We conclude that the SR Ca2+ pump and Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange are responsible for relaxation and that the latter may account for 20-50% of relaxation. 7. These results support the use of RCCs as a useful means of assessing SR Ca2+ content in intact cardiac muscle cells

  17. Activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in rat cardiac ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tong; Hoshi, Toshinori; Weintraub, Neal L; Spector, Arthur A; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which are cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA), on the activities of the ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels of rat cardiac myocytes, using the inside-out patch-clamp technique. In the presence of 100 μm cytoplasmic ATP, the KATP channel open probability (Po) was increased by 240 ± 60% with 0.1 μm 11,12-EET and by 400 ± 54% with 5 μm 11,12-EET (n = 5 –10, P < 0.05 vs. control), whereas neither 5 μm AA nor 5 μm 11,12-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (DHET), which is the epoxide hydrolysis product of 11,12-EET, had any effect on Po. The half-maximal activating concentration (EC50) was 18.9 ± 2.6 nm for 11,12-EET (n = 5) and 19.1 ± 4.8 nm for 8,9-EET (n = 5), P = n.s. vs. 11,12-EET). Furthermore, 11,12-EET failed to alter the inhibition of KATP channels by glyburide. Application of 11,12-EET markedly decreased the channel sensitivity to cytoplasmic ATP. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP (IC50) was increased from 21.2 ± 2.0 μm at baseline to 240 ± 60 μm with 0.1 μm 11,12-EET (n = 5, P < 0.05 vs. control) and to 780 ± 30 μm with 5 μm 11,12-EET (n = 11, P < 0.05vs. control). Increasing the ATP concentration increased the number of kinetically distinguishable closed states, promoting prolonged closure durations. 11,12-EET antagonized the effects of ATP on the kinetics of the KATP channels in a dose and voltage-dependent manner. 11,12-EET (1 μm) reduced the apparent association rate constant of ATP to the channel by 135-fold. Application of 5 μm 11,12-EET resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential in isolated cardiac myocytes, which could be blocked by glyburide. These results suggest that EETs are potent activators of the cardiac KATP channels, modulating channel behaviour by reducing the channel sensitivity to ATP. Thus, EETs could be important endogenous regulators of cardiac electrical excitability. PMID:11744757

  18. Nonuniform elasticity of titin in cardiac myocytes: a study using immunoelectron microscopy and cellular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Granzier, H; Helmes, M; Trombitás, K

    1996-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is a muscle-specific giant protein found inside the sarcomere, spanning from the Z-line to the M-line. The I-band segment of titin is considered to function as a molecular spring that develops tension when sarcomeres are stretched (passive tension). Recent studies on skeletal muscle indicate that it is not the entire I-band segment of titin that behaves as a spring; some sections are inelastic and do not take part in the development of passive tension. To better understand the mechanism of passive tension development in the heart, where passive tension plays an essential role in the pumping function, we investigated titin's elastic segment in cardiac myocytes using structural and mechanical techniques. Single cardiac myocytes were stretched by various amounts and then immunolabeled and processed for electron microscopy in the stretched state. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize different titin epitopes were used, and the locations of the titin epitopes in the sarcomere were studied as a function of sarcomere length. We found that only a small region of the I-band segment of titin is elastic; its contour length is estimated at approximately 75 nm, which is only approximately 40% of the total I-band segment of titin. Passive tension measurements indicated that the fundamental determinant of how much passive tension the heart develops is the strain of titin's elastic segment. Furthermore, we found evidence that in sarcomeres that are slack (length, approximately 1.85 microns) the elastic titin segment is highly folded on top of itself. Based on the data, we propose a two-stage mechanism of passive tension development in the heart, in which, between sarcomere lengths of approximately 1.85 microns and approximately 2.0 microns, titin's elastic segment straightens and, at lengths longer than approximately 2.0 microns, the molecular domains that make up titin's elastic segment unravel. Sarcomere shortening to lengths below slack

  19. Enhanced effect of fibroblast growth factor-2-containing dalteparin/protamine nanoparticles on hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Takabayashi, Yuki; Nambu, Masaki; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kuwabara, Masahiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Nakamura, Shingo; Hattori, Hidemi; Kiyosawa, Tomoharu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although treatments for alopecia are in high demand, not all treatments are safe and reliable. Dalteparin/protamine nanoparticles (D/P NPs) can effectively carry growth factors (GFs) such as fibroblast GF (FGF)-2. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of FGF-2-containing D/P NPs (FGF-2&D/P NPs) on hair growth. Patients and methods In this study, the participants were 12 volunteers with thin hair. One milliliter of FGF-2 (100 ng/mL) and D/P NPs (56 μg/mL) was applied and massaged on the skin of the scalp by the participants twice a day. They were evaluated for 6 months. Participants were photographed using a digital camera for general observation and a hair diagnosis system for measuring hair diameter. Results The mean diameter of the hairs was significantly higher following the application of FGF-2&D/P NPs for 6 months. Objective improvements in thin hair were observed in two cases. Nine participants experienced greater bounce and hair resilience. Conclusion The transdermal application of FGF-2&D/P NPs to the scalp can be used as a new treatment for alopecia. PMID:27274299

  20. trans-Cinnamaldehyde stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1α and PPARβ/δ leading to enhanced GLUT4 expression.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Nicholas P; Schnuck, Jamie K; Mermier, Christine M; Conn, Carole A; Vaughan, Roger A

    2015-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and chronic hyperglycemia, and is increasing in incidence and severity. This work explored the effects of trans-cinnamaldehyde (CA) on carbohydrate metabolism, mitochondrial content, and related metabolic gene and protein expression in cultured myotubes treated with various concentrations of CA for up to 24 h. CA treatment increased myotube myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) along with glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content. CA treatment also significantly increased expression of markers of improved oxidative metabolism including 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α), cytochrome c (CytC), as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and PPARβ/δ. Despite increased expression of proteins associated with improved oxidative metabolism and glucose uptake, CA-treated myotubes exhibited significantly reduced oxidative metabolism compared with controlled cells. Additionally, CA treatment increased markers of glucose-mediated lipid biosynthesis without elevated PPARγ and sterol receptor element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) expression. The ability of CA to stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 expression suggests CA may offer possible benefits for metabolic disease. However, increases in markers of fatty acid synthesis with simultaneously reduced oxidative metabolism suggest CA may have counterproductive effects for metabolic disease, warranting a need for further investigation.

  1. Transcription Factor Rational Design Improves Directed Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Skeletal Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Manuel AFV; Janssen, Josephine M; Nguyen, Quynh G; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Hauschka, Stephen D; Dickson, George; de Vries, Antoine AF

    2011-01-01

    There is great interest in transdifferentiating cells from one lineage into those of another and in dedifferentiating mature cells back into a stem/progenitor cell state by deploying naturally occurring transcription factors (TFs). Often, however, steering cellular differentiation pathways in a predictable and efficient manner remains challenging. Here, we investigated the principle of combining domains from different lineage-specific TFs to improve directed cellular differentiation. As proof-of-concept, we engineered the whole-human TF MyoDCD, which has the NH2-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) and adjacent DNA-binding motif of MyoD COOH-terminally fused to the TAD of myocardin (MyoCD). We found via reporter gene and marker protein assays as well as by a cell fusion readout system that, targeting the TAD of MyoCD to genes normally responsive to the skeletal muscle-specific TF MyoD enforces more robust myogenic reprogramming of nonmuscle cells than that achieved by the parental, prototypic master TF, MyoD. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) transduced with a codon-optimized microdystrophin gene linked to a synthetic striated muscle-specific promoter and/or with MyoD or MyoDCD were evaluated for complementing the genetic defect in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myocytes through heterotypic cell fusion. Cotransduction of hMSCs with MyoDCD and microdystrophin led to chimeric myotubes containing the highest dystrophin levels. PMID:21266958

  2. Orientation and length of mammalian skeletal myocytes in response to a unidirectional stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinsworth, A. M.; Torgan, C. E.; Nagda, S. N.; Rajalingam, R. J.; Kraus, W. E.; Truskey, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of mechanical forces exerted on mammalian skeletal muscle cells during development were studied using an in vitro model to unidirectionally stretch cultured C2C12 cells grown on silastic membrane. Previous models to date have not studied these responses of the mammalian system specifically. The silastic membrane upon which these cells were grown exhibited linear strain behavior over the range of 3.6-14.6% strain, with a Poisson's ratio of approximately 0.5. To mimic murine in utero long bone growth, cell substrates were stretched at an average strain rate of 2.36%/day for 4 days or 1.77%/day for 6 days with an overall membrane strain of 9.5% and 10.6%, respectively. Both control and stretched fibers stained positively for the contractile protein, alpha-actinin, demonstrating muscle fiber development. An effect of stretch on orientation and length of myofibers was observed. At both strain rates, stretched fibers aligned at a smaller angle relative to the direction of stretch and were significantly longer compared to randomly oriented control fibers. There was no effect of duration of stretch on orientation or length, suggesting the cellular responses are independent of strain rate for the range tested. These results demonstrate that, under conditions simulating mammalian long bone growth, cultured myocytes respond to mechanical forces by lengthening and orienting along the direction of stretch.

  3. Novel approaches to determine contractile function of the isolated adult zebrafish ventricular cardiac myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dvornikov, Alexey V; Dewan, Sukriti; Alekhina, Olga V; Pickett, F Bryan; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used extensively in cardiovascular biology, but mainly in the study of heart development. The relative ease of its genetic manipulation may indicate the suitability of this species as a cost-effective model system for the study of cardiac contractile biology. However, whether the zebrafish heart is an appropriate model system for investigations pertaining to mammalian cardiac contractile structure–function relationships remains to be resolved. Myocytes were isolated from adult zebrafish hearts by enzymatic digestion, attached to carbon rods, and twitch force and intracellular Ca2+ were measured. We observed the modulation of twitch force, but not of intracellular Ca2+, by both extracellular [Ca2+] and sarcomere length. In permeabilized cells/myofibrils, we found robust myofilament length-dependent activation. Moreover, modulation of myofilament activation–relaxation and force redevelopment kinetics by varied Ca2+ activation levels resembled that found previously in mammalian myofilaments. We conclude that the zebrafish is a valid model system for the study of cardiac contractile structure–function relationships. PMID:24591576

  4. Methods for the Isolation, Culture, and Functional Characterization of Sinoatrial Node Myocytes from Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Emily J.; St Clair, Joshua R.; Proenza, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Sinoatrial node myocytes (SAMs) act as the natural pacemakers of the heart, initiating each heart beat by generating spontaneous action potentials (APs). These pacemaker APs reflect the coordinated activity of numerous membrane currents and intracellular calcium cycling. However the precise mechanisms that drive spontaneous pacemaker activity in SAMs remain elusive. Acutely isolated SAMs are an essential preparation for experiments to dissect the molecular basis of cardiac pacemaking. However, the indistinct anatomy, complex microdissection, and finicky enzymatic digestion conditions have prevented widespread use of acutely isolated SAMs. In addition, methods were not available until recently to permit longer-term culture of SAMs for protein expression studies. Here we provide a step-by-step protocol and video demonstration for the isolation of SAMs from adult mice. A method is also demonstrated for maintaining adult mouse SAMs in vitro and for expression of exogenous proteins via adenoviral infection. Acutely isolated and cultured SAMs prepared via these methods are suitable for a variety of electrophysiological and imaging studies. PMID:27805586

  5. Ionic currents during sustained pacemaker activity in rabbit sino-atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zaza, A; Micheletti, M; Brioschi, A; Rocchetti, M

    1997-01-01

    1. The contribution of various ionic currents to diastolic depolarization (DD) in rabbit sinoatrial myocytes was evaluated by the action potential clamp technique. Individual currents were identified, during sustained pacemaking activity reproduced under voltage clamp conditions, according to their sensitivity to specific channel blockers. 2. The current sensitive to dihydropyridines (DHPs), blockers of L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L), was small and outward during most of DD. Diastolic DHP-sensitive current was affected by changes in the driving force for K+, but it was insensitive to E-4031, which blocks the current termed IK,r; it was abolished by cell dialysis with a Ca2+ chelator. 3. The current sensitive to 2 mM Cs+ (ICs), a blocker of hyperpolarization-activated current (I(f)), was inward during the whole DD and it was substantially larger than the net inward current flowing during this phase. However, diastolic IK,r, identified in the same cells as the current sensitive to the blocker E-4031, exceeded ICs 2-fold. 4. These findings suggest that: (a) Ca2+ influx during the pacemaker cycle increases a K+ conductance, thus inverting the direction of the net current generated by L-type Ca2+ channel activity during DD; (b) the magnitude of I(f) would be adequate to account fully for DD; however, the coexistence of a larger IK,r suggests that other channels besides I(f) contribute inward current during this phase. PMID:9457645

  6. Cross talk between cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts: from multiscale investigative approaches to mechanisms and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Su, J; Mende, U

    2012-12-15

    The heart is comprised of a syncytium of cardiac myocytes (CM) and surrounding nonmyocytes, the majority of which are cardiac fibroblasts (CF). CM and CF are highly interspersed in the myocardium with one CM being surrounded by one or more CF. Bidirectional cross talk between CM and CF plays important roles in determining cardiac mechanical and electrical function in both normal and diseased hearts. Genetically engineered animal models and in vitro studies have provided evidence that CM and CF can regulate each other's function. Their cross talk contributes to structural and electrical remodeling in both atria and ventricles and appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of various heart diseases that lead to heart failure and arrhythmia disorders. Mechanisms of CM-CF cross talk, which are not yet fully understood, include release of paracrine factors, direct cell-cell interactions via gap junctions and potentially adherens junctions and nanotubes, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix. In this article, we provide an overview of the existing multiscale experimental and computational approaches for the investigation of cross talk between CM and CF and review recent progress in our understanding of the functional consequences and underlying mechanisms. Targeting cross talk between CM and CF could potentially be used therapeutically for the modulation of the cardiac remodeling response in the diseased heart and may lead to new strategies for the treatment of heart failure or rhythm disturbances.

  7. Diastolic, systolic and sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca2+] during inotropic interventions in isolated rat myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, J E; Orchard, C H; Boyett, M R

    1991-01-01

    1. The fluorescent indicator Fura-2 has been used to monitor intracellular [Ca2+] (Ca2+i) in myocytes isolated from the ventricles of rat hearts. 2. The relationships between diastolic Ca2+i, systolic Ca2+i and the Ca2+ content of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR; assayed using caffeine) have been studied during changes of stimulation rate and bathing [Ca2+] (Ca2+o). 3. When stimulation rate was increased, there were increases in diastolic Ca2+i, systolic Ca2+i and the Ca2+ content of the SR. 4. The SR inhibitor ryanodine (1 mumol l-1) decreased the size of the Ca2+i transient, and abolished the increase of Ca2+i produced by caffeine (10 mmol l-1). In the presence of ryanodine, increasing stimulation rate increased diastolic Ca2+i but not systolic Ca2+i. 5. Increasing Ca2+o led to increases of diastolic Ca2+i, systolic Ca2+i and SR Ca2+ content similar to those observed during changes in stimulation rate. 6. Ryanodine altered the relationship between systolic and diastolic Ca2+i during changes of Ca2+o. 7. These results are consistent with a change of diastolic Ca2+i leading to an increase in the Ca2+ content of the SR, and hence an increase in the size of the Ca2+i transient during changes in stimulation rate and Ca2+o. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 10 PMID:1890639

  8. Effects of oleic acid on the high threshold barium current in seabass Dicentrarchus labrax ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chatelier, A; Imbert, N; Infante, J L Zambonino; McKenzie, D J; Bois, P

    2006-10-01

    The present study employed a patch clamp technique in isolated seabass ventricular myocytes to investigate the hypothesis that oleic acid (OA), a mono-unsaturated fatty acid, can exert direct effects upon whole-cell barium currents. Acute application of free OA caused a dose-dependent depression of the whole-cell barium current that was evoked by a voltage step to 0 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV. The derived 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 12.49+/-0.27 micromol l(-1). At a concentration of 30 micromol l(-1), OA significantly reduced the current density to about 45% of control values, but did not modify either the shape of the current-density voltage relationship or the apparent reversal potential. In addition, OA did not modify the voltage dependence of either steady state inactivation or activation curves. Taken together, these results indicate that physiological concentrations of free OA decrease the conductance of the L-type inward current, without altering its properties of selectivity and its voltage dependence. The inhibitory effect of OA upon the L-type calcium channel may translate, in vivo, into a protective effect against arrhythmias induced by Ca2+ overload.

  9. A novel anionic conductance affects action potential duration in isolated rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Spencer, C I; Uchida, W; Kozlowski, R Z

    2000-01-01

    Effects of extracellular anions were studied in electrophysiological experiments on freshly isolated rat ventricular myocytes. Under current-clamp, action potential duration (APD) was prolonged by reducing the extracellular Cl(-) concentration and shortened by replacement of extracellular Cl(-) with I(-). Under voltage-clamp, membrane potential steps or ramps evoked an anionic background current (I(AB)) carried by either Cl(-), Br(-), I(-) or NO(3)(-). Activation of I(AB) was Ca(2+)- and cyclic AMP-independent, and was unaffected by cell shrinkage. I(AB) was insensitive to stilbene and fenamate anion transport blockers at concentrations that inhibit Ca(2+)-, cyclic AMP- and swelling-activated Cl(-) currents in ventricular cells of other mammals. These results suggest that I(AB) may be carried by a novel class of Cl(-) channel. Correlation of anion substitution experiments on membrane current and action potentials revealed that I(AB) could play a major role in controlling rat ventricular APD. These findings have important implications for those studying cardiac Cl(-) channels as potential targets for novel antiarrythmic agents.

  10. PEDF attenuates insulin-dependent molecular pathways of glucose homeostasis in skeletal myocytes.

    PubMed

    Carnagarin, Revathy; Dharmarajan, Arun M; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-02-15

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic serpin associated with insulin resistance in metabolic disorders such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity and polycystic ovarian syndrome. While the mechanism of PEDF induced-insulin resistance of metabolic disorders has been attributed to its inflammatory and lipolytic effects, little evidence exists to support a direct role of PEDF in mediating insulin resistance. Here, we seminally provide evidence that PEDF can inhibit insulin signal transduction governing glucose homeostasis from the receptor to the effector phosphorylation through Akt/PKB-dependent and -independent pathways in mouse and human skeletal muscle cell lines. PEDF attenuates the insulin-dependent molecular axes of glucose metabolism. Exposure of skeletal myocytes to PEDF attenuates insulin-dependent insulin receptor autophosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1, and dual loop phosphorylation-activation of Akt. PEDF significantly inhibits the downstream effector - glycogen synthase kinase (and thereby the glycogenic axis of insulin signalling). PEDF turned off both the molecular switches of GLUT4 translocation: IRS-Akt/PKB-AS160 mediated and IR-pCbl-dependent GLUT4 translocation (the molecular axis of glucose uptake). These findings implicate a direct effect of PEDF on multiple insulin-dependent molecular mechanisms of glucose homeostasis in skeletal muscle cells, thereby enabling it to contribute to peripheral insulin resistance at the cellular level.

  11. Fatty acid uptake by isolated rat heart myocytes represents a carrier-mediated transport process.

    PubMed Central

    Stremmel, W

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which fatty acids enter cardiomyocytes is unclear. Therefore, the influx kinetics of [3H]oleate into isolated rat heart myocytes were examined. Cells were incubated at 37 degrees C with [3H]oleate bound to albumin in various molar ratios and the initial rate of uptake (V0) was determined as a function of the unbound oleate concentration in the medium. V0 was saturable with increasing oleate concentrations incubated (Km 78 nM; Vmax 1.9 nmol X min-1 per 10(6) cells) and temperature dependent with an optimum at 37 degrees C. Furthermore, binding of [3H]oleate to isolated plasma membranes of cardiomyocytes was saturable, revealing a KD of 42 nM, and was inhibited by heat denaturation or trypsin pretreatment of the membranes. From these membranes a single 40-kD protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids was isolated. With a monospecific antibody to this membrane protein, binding as well as cellular influx of [3H]oleate was selectively inhibited. These data indicate that at least a portion of myocardial fatty acid uptake is mediated by a specific membrane protein. Images PMID:3343344

  12. The AMPK-related kinase SNARK regulates muscle mass and myocyte survival

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Sarah J.; Rivas, Donato A.; So, Kawai; Koh, Ho-Jin; Queiroz, André Lima; Hirshman, Michael F.; Fielding, Roger A.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is critical for sustaining health; however, the mechanisms responsible for muscle loss with aging and chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, are poorly understood. We found that expression of a member of the AMPK-related kinase family, the SNF1-AMPK-related kinase (SNARK, also known as NUAK2), increased with muscle cell differentiation. SNARK expression increased in skeletal muscles from young mice exposed to metabolic stress and in muscles from healthy older human subjects. The regulation of SNARK expression in muscle with differentiation and physiological stress suggests that SNARK may function in the maintenance of muscle mass. Consistent with this hypothesis, decreased endogenous SNARK expression (using siRNA) in cultured muscle cells resulted in increased apoptosis and decreased cell survival under conditions of metabolic stress. Likewise, muscle-specific transgenic animals expressing a SNARK dominant-negative inactive mutant (SDN) had increased myonuclear apoptosis and activation of apoptotic mediators in muscle. Moreover, animals expressing SDN had severe, age-accelerated muscle atrophy and increased adiposity, consistent with sarcopenic obesity. Reduced SNARK activity, in vivo and in vitro, caused downregulation of the Rho kinase signaling pathway, a key mediator of cell survival. These findings reveal a critical role for SNARK in myocyte survival and the maintenance of muscle mass with age. PMID:26690705

  13. Adrenergic control of the ultrarapid delayed rectifier current in canine atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yue, L; Feng, J; Wang, Z; Nattel, S

    1999-04-15

    1. The effects of adrenergic stimulation on the ultrarapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKur,d) of dog atrial myocytes was studied with patch-clamp methods. 2. Isoproterenol (isoprenaline) increased IKur,d in a concentration-dependent fashion with an EC50 of 7.3 +/- 0.8 nM. The effect of isoproterenol was blocked by propranolol, mimicked by forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP, and prevented by inhibition of protein kinase A. 3. Phenylephrine (in the presence of propranolol) increased IKur,d with an EC50 of 0.49 +/- 0.06 microM. The effect of phenylephrine was blocked by prazosin, prevented by inhibition of protein kinase C, and mimicked by activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester. 4. Phenylephrine significantly abbreviated canine atrial action potential duration in the absence of tetraethylammonium (TEA). When TEA was present under both control conditions and in the presence of phenylephrine, phenylephrine failed to alter canine atrial repolarization. 5. We conclude that beta- and alpha-adrenergic stimulation increase IKur,d via protein kinase A and C, respectively, and that the induced changes in IKur,d may play a role in adrenergic control of canine atrial repolarization.

  14. Underlying mechanisms of symmetric calcium wave propagation in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Viatchenko-Karpinski, S; Lukyanenko, V; Györke, S; Wiesner, T F

    2001-01-01

    Calcium waves in heart cells are mediated by diffusion-coupled calcium-induced calcium release. The waves propagate in circular fashion. This is counterintuitive in view of the accepted ultrastructure of the cardiac myocyte. The density of calcium release sites in the transverse direction is four times higher than in the longitudinal direction. Simulations with release sites localized along Z-lines and isotropic diffusion yielded highly elliptical, nonphysiological waves. We hypothesized that subcellular organelles counteracted the higher release site density along the Z-lines by acting as transverse diffusion barriers and sites of active calcium uptake. We quantified the reduction of transverse diffusion by microinjecting cells with the nonreactive dye fluorescein. The ratio of the radial diffusion coefficient to the longitudinal coefficient was 0.39. Inhibition of mitochondrial uptake by rotenone accelerated the wave in the transverse direction. Simulations with release sites clustered at the Z-lines and a transverse diffusion coefficient 50% of the longitudinal coefficient generated waves of ellipticity 2/1 (major axis along the Z-line). Introducing additional release sites between the Z-lines at a density 20% of that on the Z-lines produced circular waves. The experiments and simulations support the presence of transverse diffusion barriers, additional uptake sites, and possibly intermediate release sites as well. PMID:11159379

  15. Reversible inhibition of gap junctional communication by tamoxifen in cultured cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, F; Hervé, J

    1997-05-01

    Gap junction channels provide a cell-to-cell conduction pathway for direct exchange of ions and small molecules. The intercellular diffusion of a fluorescent dye, quantified in cardiac myocytes from neonatal rats by monitoring the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was found to be interrupted after short-term exposure (15 min) to tamoxifen, an anti-oestrogen drug often used in the treatment of human breast cancer. This diffusional uncoupling was dose dependent, occurred in the concentration range 3-25 microM and reversed after tamoxifen withdrawal. Some possible mechanisms of junctional channel closure have been examined. The cytosolic calcium concentration, examined using the fluorescent indicator Indo-1, did not vary during the short-term action of tamoxifen. A second anti-oestrogen agent (clomiphene) was able to impair gap junctional communication, whereas a third (nafoxidine) had no effect. Protein-kinase-C-inhibitor properties of tamoxifen did not seem to be involved in its uncoupling action. The characteristics of tamoxifen's action (i.e. channel inhibition delay, active concentration range, reversibility, etc.) were very similar to the previously observed effects of several other lipophilic compounds (e. g. 17beta-oestradiol, etc.) on junctional channels, and to recently reported effects of tamoxifen on voltage-gated calcium currents.

  16. Endogenous protein phosphatase 1 runs down gap junctional communication of rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Duthe, F; Plaisance, I; Sarrouilhe, D; Hervé, J C

    2001-11-01

    Gap junctional channels are essential for normal cardiac impulse propagation. In ventricular myocytes of newborn rats, channel opening requires the presence of ATP to allow protein kinase activities; otherwise, channels are rapidly deactivated by the action of endogenous protein phosphatases (PPs). The lack of influence of Mg(2+) and of selective PP2B inhibition is not in favor of the involvements of Mg(2+)-dependent PP2C and PP2B, respectively, in the loss of channel activity. Okadaic acid (1 microM) and calyculin A (100 nM), both inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A activities, significantly retarded the loss of channel activity. However, a better preservation was obtained in the presence of selective PP1 inhibitors heparin (100 microg/ml) or protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I2; 100 nM). Conversely, the stimulation of endogenous PP1 activity by p-nitrophenyl phosphate, in the presence of ATP, led to a progressive fading of junctional currents unless I2 was simultaneously added. Together, these results suggest that a basal phosphorylation-dephosphorylation turnover regulates gap junctional communication which is rapidly deactivated by PP1 activity when the phosphorylation pathway is hindered.

  17. Apoptosis and the systolic dysfunction in congestive heart failure. Story of apoptosis interruptus and zombie myocytes.

    PubMed

    Narula, J; Arbustini, E; Chandrashekhar, Y; Schwaiger, M

    2001-02-01

    Although previously it was believed that apoptosis could not occur in the terminally differentiated tissue, such as adult heart muscle cells, recent studies in endomyocardial biopsies from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in explanted hearts from patients with end-stage heart failure undergoing cardiac transplantation have demonstrated histologic evidence of apoptosis. Whereas neurohormonal activation during heart failure leads to compensatory hemodynamic alterations, coupled with ventricular dilatation, it induces transcription factors and myocyte hypertrophy. Persistent growth stimulation in terminally differentiated cells may lead paradoxically to apoptotic cell death. The apoptosis in cardiomyopathic hearts is associated with cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytoplasm and activation of proteolytic caspase-8 and -3. Although the caspases are duly processed, the fragmentation of the nuclear proteins (including DNA) is completed less frequently, and only a variable degree of fragmentation of cytoplasmic proteins (including contractile proteins) is observed. It is hypothesized that release of cytochrome c from mitochondria should interfere with energy production and lead to functional impairment and variable loss of contractile proteins in a living heart muscle cell should contribute to systolic dysfunction. Because a nuclear blueprint is retained, however, the dysfunctional cell may continue to exist and in favorable conditions, such as with LVAD support, the apoptotic process may subside. Potential feasibility of reversal of heart failure should renew efforts to develop more targeted pharmaceutical intervention within the apoptotic cascade and allow newer paradigm for the management of heart failure.

  18. Rem-GTPase regulates cardiac myocyte L-type calcium current

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Janos; Kiper, Carmen E.; Sievert, Gail; Cai, Weikang; Shi, Geng-Xian; Crump, Shawn M.; Li, Liren; Niederer, Steven; Smith, Nic; Andres, Douglas A.; Satin, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The L-type calcium channels (LTCC) are critical for maintaining Ca2+-homeostasis. In heterologous expression studies, the RGK-class of Ras-related G-proteins regulates LTCC function; however, the physiological relevance of RGK–LTCC interactions is untested. Objective: In this report we test the hypothesis that the RGK protein, Rem, modulates native Ca2+ current (ICa,L) via LTCC in murine cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results: Rem knockout mice (Rem−/−) were engineered, and ICa,L and Ca2+-handling properties were assessed. Rem−/− ventricular cardiomyocytes displayed increased ICa,L density. ICa,L activation was shifted positive on the voltage axis, and β-adrenergic stimulation normalized this shift compared with wild-type ICa,L. Current kinetics, steady-state inactivation, and facilitation was unaffected by Rem−/−. Cell shortening was not significantly different. Increased ICa,L density in the absence of frank phenotypic differences motivated us to explore putative compensatory mechanisms. Despite the larger ICa,L density, Rem−/− cardiomyocyte Ca2+ twitch transient amplitude was significantly less than that compared with wild type. Computer simulations and immunoblot analysis suggests that relative dephosphorylation of Rem−/− LTCC can account for the paradoxical decrease of Ca2+ transients. Conclusions: This is the first demonstration that loss of an RGK protein influences ICa,L in vivo in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22854599

  19. The Effects of Puerarin on Rat Ventricular Myocytes and the Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Zhao, Manxi; Liang, Shenghui; Huang, Quanshu; Xiao, Yunchuan; Ye, Liang; Wang, Qinyi; He, Longmei; Ma, Lanxiang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Hui; Ke, Xiao; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    Puerarin, a known isoflavone, is commonly found as a Chinese herb medicine. It is widely used in China to treat cardiac diseases such as angina, cardiac infarction and arrhythmia. However, its cardioprotective mechanism remains unclear. In this study, puerarin significantly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD) with a dosage dependent manner in the micromolar range on isolated rat ventricular myocytes. However, submicromolar puerarin had no effect on resting membrane potential (RMP), action potential amplitude (APA) and maximal velocity of depolarization (Vmax) of action potential. Only above the concentration of 10 mM, puerarin exhibited more aggressive effect on action potential, and shifted RMP to the positive direction. Millimolar concentrations of puerarin significantly inhibited inward rectified K+ channels in a dosage dependent manner, and exhibited bigger effects upon Kir2.1 vs Kir2.3 in transfected HEK293 cells. As low as micromolar range concentrations of puerarin significantly inhibited Kv7.1 and IKs. These inhibitory effects may due to the direct inhibition of puerarin upon channels not via the PKA-dependent pathway. These results provided direct preclinical evidence that puerarin prolonged APD via its inhibitory effect upon Kv7.1 and IKs, contributing to a better understanding the mechanism of puerarin cardioprotection in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27762288

  20. Functional Coupling of Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, James S. K.; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dihydropyridine receptors are functionally coupled to ryanodine receptors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in triadic or diadic junctional complexes. In cardiac muscle direct physical or functional couplings have not been demonstrated. We have tested the hypothesis of functional coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in rat cardiac myocytes by comparing the efficacies of Ca2+ in triggering Ca2+ release when the ion enters the cell via the Ca2+ channels or the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger. Ca2+ transported through the Ca2+ channels was 20-160 times more effective than Ca2+ influx via the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger in gating Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting privileged communication between Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. In support of this hypothesis we found that Ca2+ channels were inactivated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, even though the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations were buffered with 10 mM EGTA. The data thus suggest privileged cross signaling between the dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors such that Ca2+ flux through either the Ca2+ channel or the ryanodine receptor alters the gating kinetics of the other channel.

  1. A factor from Trypanosoma cruzi induces repetitive cytosolic free Ca2+ transients in isolated primary canine cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, S C; Han, W; Andrews, N W; Lopez, J W; Ball, B A; Pannabecker, T L; Gilmour, R F

    1996-01-01

    An unusual 120-kDa alkaline peptidase contained in a trypomastigote soluble fraction (TSF) of Trypanosoma cruzi is associated with the induction of repetitive Ca2+ transients and subsequent invasion by the parasite of a number of mammalian cell lines, including tissue culture L6E2 myoblasts (B. A. Burleigh and N. W. Andrews, J. Biol. Chem. 270:5172-5180, 1995; S. N. J. Moreno, J. Silva, A. E. Vercesi, and R. Docampo, J. Exp. Med. 180:1535-1540, 1994; A. Rodríguez, M. G. Rioult, A. Ora, and N. W. Andrews, J. Cell Biol. 129:1263-1273, 1995; I. Tardieux, M. H. Nathanson, and N. W. Andrews, J. Exp. Med. 179:1017-1022, 1994). Using single cell spectrofluorometry and whole-cell patch clamping, we show that TSF produces rapid repetitive cytosolic Ca2+ transients (each associated with cell contraction) in primary cardiac myocytes isolated from dogs. The response of myocytes to TSF was dose dependent in that increasing numbers of cells responded to increasing concentrations of TSF. The TSF-induced Ca2+ transients could be obliterated when TSF was heated or treated with trypsin or the protease inhibitor leupeptin. Aprotinin, pepstatin A, and E-64 did not affect TSF activity. The TSF-induced Ca2+ transients and trypomastigote cell invasion could not be inhibited by alpha (prazosin)- or beta (propanolol)-adrenergic blockers or L-type Ca2+ channel blockers (verapamil, nisoldipine, or cadmium) or by removal of extracellular Ca2+. However, inhibition of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins and Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (with thapsigargin or ryanodine) prevented the TSF-induced Ca2+ transients and cell invasion by trypomastigotes. These data suggested that cardiac myocyte pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins are associated with the regulation of TSF-induced Ca2+ transients and myocyte invasion by trypomastigotes but are independent of Ca2+ entry into the cytosol via L-type Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ transients are dependent on release of Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic

  2. Fibroblast growth factor-2 stimulates adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kakudo, Natsuko . E-mail: kakudon@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Shimotsuma, Ayuko; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2007-07-27

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have demonstrated a capacity for differentiating into a variety of lineages, including bone, cartilage, or fat, depending on the inducing stimuli and specific growth and factors. It is acknowledged that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) promotes chondrogenic and inhibits osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, but thorough investigations of its effects on adipogenic differentiation are lacking. In this study, we demonstrate at the cellular and molecular levels the effect of FGF-2 on adipogenic differentiation of ASCs, as induced by an adipogenic hormonal cocktail consisting of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), dexamethasone, insulin, and indomethacin. FGF-2 significantly enhances the adipogenic differentiation of human ASCs. Furthermore, in cultures receiving FGF-2 before adipogenic induction, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2), a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, was upregulated. The results of FGF-2 supplementation suggest the potential applications of FGF-2 and ASCs in adipose tissue regeneration.

  3. Identification of autophosphorylation sites in eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pyr Dit Ruys, Sébastien; Wang, Xuemin; Smith, Ewan M.; Herinckx, Gaëtan; Hussain, Nusrat; Rider, Mark H.; Vertommen, Didier; Proud, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    eEF2K [eEF2 (eukaryotic elongation factor 2) kinase] phosphorylates and inactivates the translation elongation factor eEF2. eEF2K is not a member of the main eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, but instead belongs to a small group of so-called α-kinases. The activity of eEF2K is normally dependent upon Ca2+ and calmodulin. eEF2K has previously been shown to undergo autophosphorylation, the stoichiometry of which suggested the existence of multiple sites. In the present study we have identified several autophosphorylation sites, including Thr348, Thr353, Ser366 and Ser445, all of which are highly conserved among vertebrate eEF2Ks. We also identified a number of other sites, including Ser78, a known site of phosphorylation, and others, some of which are less well conserved. None of the sites lies in the catalytic domain, but three affect eEF2K activity. Mutation of Ser78, Thr348 and Ser366 to a non-phosphorylatable alanine residue decreased eEF2K activity. Phosphorylation of Thr348 was detected by immunoblotting after transfecting wild-type eEF2K into HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells, but not after transfection with a kinase-inactive construct, confirming that this is indeed a site of autophosphorylation. Thr348 appears to be constitutively autophosphorylated in vitro. Interestingly, other recent data suggest that the corresponding residue in other α-kinases is also autophosphorylated and contributes to the activation of these enzymes [Crawley, Gharaei, Ye, Yang, Raveh, London, Schueler-Furman, Jia and Cote (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 2607–2616]. Ser366 phosphorylation was also detected in intact cells, but was still observed in the kinase-inactive construct, demonstrating that this site is phosphorylated not only autocatalytically but also in trans by other kinases. PMID:22216903

  4. Small Molecule AKAP-Protein Kinase A (PKA) Interaction Disruptors That Activate PKA Interfere with Compartmentalized cAMP Signaling in Cardiac Myocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Frank; Szaszák, Márta; Friedl, Sabine; Drewianka, Stephan; Lorenz, Dorothea; Goncalves, Andrey; Furkert, Jens; Vargas, Carolyn; Schmieder, Peter; Götz, Frank; Zühlke, Kerstin; Moutty, Marie; Göttert, Hendrikje; Joshi, Mangesh; Reif, Bernd; Haase, Hannelore; Morano, Ingo; Grossmann, Solveig; Klukovits, Anna; Verli, Judit; Gáspár, Róbert; Noack, Claudia; Bergmann, Martin; Kass, Robert; Hampel, Kornelia; Kashin, Dmitry; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Willoughby, Debbie; Cooper, Dermot M. F.; Baillie, George S.; Houslay, Miles D.; von Kries, Jens Peter; Zimmermann, Bastian; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2011-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) tether protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins to defined intracellular sites, thereby establishing compartmentalized cAMP signaling. AKAP-PKA interactions play key roles in various cellular processes, including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractility. We discovered small molecules, 3,3′-diamino-4,4′-dihydroxydiphenylmethane (FMP-API-1) and its derivatives, which inhibit AKAP-PKA interactions in vitro and in cultured cardiac myocytes. The molecules bind to an allosteric site of regulatory subunits of PKA identifying a hitherto unrecognized region that controls AKAP-PKA interactions. FMP-API-1 also activates PKA. The net effect of FMP-API-1 is a selective interference with compartmentalized cAMP signaling. In cardiac myocytes, FMP-API-1 reveals a novel mechanism involved in terminating β-adrenoreceptor-induced cAMP synthesis. In addition, FMP-API-1 leads to an increase in contractility of cultured rat cardiac myocytes and intact hearts. Thus, FMP-API-1 represents not only a novel means to study compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signaling but, due to its effects on cardiac myocytes and intact hearts, provides the basis for a new concept in the treatment of chronic heart failure. PMID:21177871

  5. Differential regulation of Krüppel-like factor family transcription factor expression in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes: Effects of endothelin-1, oxidative stress and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Cullingford, Timothy E.; Butler, Matthew J.; Marshall, Andrew K.; Tham, El Li; Sugden, Peter H.; Clerk, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Krüppel-like transcription factors (Klfs) modulate fundamental cell processes. Cardiac myocytes are terminally-differentiated, but hypertrophy in response to stimuli such as endothelin-1. H2O2 or cytokines promote myocyte apoptosis. Microarray studies of neonatal rat myocytes identified several Klfs as endothelin-1-responsive genes. We used quantitative PCR for further analysis of Klf expression in neonatal rat myocytes. In response to endothelin-1, Klf2 mRNA expression was rapidly increased (∼ 9-fold; 15–30 min) with later increases in expression of Klf4 and Klf6 (∼ 5-fold; 30–60 min). All were regulated as immediate early genes (cycloheximide did not inhibit the increases in expression). Klf5 expression was increased at 1–2 h (∼ 13-fold) as a second phase response (cycloheximide inhibited the increase). These increases were transient and attenuated by U0126. H2O2 increased expression of Klf2, Klf4 and Klf6, but interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor α downregulated Klf2 expression with no effect on Klf4 or Klf6. Of the Klfs which repress transcription, endothelin-1 rapidly downregulated expression of Klf3, Klf11 and Klf15. The dynamic regulation of expression of multiple Klf family members in cardiac myocytes suggests that, as a family, they are actively involved in regulating phenotypic responses (hypertrophy and apoptosis) to extracellular stimuli. PMID:18406357

  6. Small molecule AKAP-protein kinase A (PKA) interaction disruptors that activate PKA interfere with compartmentalized cAMP signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Christian, Frank; Szaszák, Márta; Friedl, Sabine; Drewianka, Stephan; Lorenz, Dorothea; Goncalves, Andrey; Furkert, Jens; Vargas, Carolyn; Schmieder, Peter; Götz, Frank; Zühlke, Kerstin; Moutty, Marie; Göttert, Hendrikje; Joshi, Mangesh; Reif, Bernd; Haase, Hannelore; Morano, Ingo; Grossmann, Solveig; Klukovits, Anna; Verli, Judit; Gáspár, Róbert; Noack, Claudia; Bergmann, Martin; Kass, Robert; Hampel, Kornelia; Kashin, Dmitry; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Herberg, Friedrich W; Willoughby, Debbie; Cooper, Dermot M F; Baillie, George S; Houslay, Miles D; von Kries, Jens Peter; Zimmermann, Bastian; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2011-03-18

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) tether protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins to defined intracellular sites, thereby establishing compartmentalized cAMP signaling. AKAP-PKA interactions play key roles in various cellular processes, including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractility. We discovered small molecules, 3,3'-diamino-4,4'-dihydroxydiphenylmethane (FMP-API-1) and its derivatives, which inhibit AKAP-PKA interactions in vitro and in cultured cardiac myocytes. The molecules bind to an allosteric site of regulatory subunits of PKA identifying a hitherto unrecognized region that controls AKAP-PKA interactions. FMP-API-1 also activates PKA. The net effect of FMP-API-1 is a selective interference with compartmentalized cAMP signaling. In cardiac myocytes, FMP-API-1 reveals a novel mechanism involved in terminating β-adrenoreceptor-induced cAMP synthesis. In addition, FMP-API-1 leads to an increase in contractility of cultured rat cardiac myocytes and intact hearts. Thus, FMP-API-1 represents not only a novel means to study compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signaling but, due to its effects on cardiac myocytes and intact hearts, provides the basis for a new concept in the treatment of chronic heart failure.

  7. Two distinct types of inwardly rectifying K+ channels in bull-frog atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R B; Nakajima, T; Giles, W; Kanai, K; Momose, Y; Szabo, G

    1990-01-01

    1. Single atrial myocytes were enzymatically isolated from the bull-frog as previously described (Hume & Giles, 1981), and patch-clamp techniques were used in an attempt to identify and separate two inwardly rectifying K+ channels in this tissue. 2. Single-channel measurements consistently demonstrated the existence of two different resting K+ channels, which both exhibited strong inward rectification. The unitary conductances of these K+ channels were 34 +/- 4 and 22 +/- 3 pS (mean +/- S.D., at 22-24 degrees C) when measured with 110 mM-K+ in the pipette solution, and their mean open times were 0.87 +/- 0.33 and 129.9 +/- 49.4 ms, respectively. 3. In the absence of acetylcholine (ACh) in the pipette, openings of the larger channels with the shorter open times occurred at a very low frequency. When ACh was present in the patch pipette, the activity of this channel increased significantly, although the single-channel conductance and gating behaviour were very similar either with or without ACh in the pipette. 4. The zero-current voltage (extrapolated from the inward currents through these types of channels) depended on the extracellular K+ concentration. [K+]o, in the fashion expected for a predominantly K(+)-selective channel: it shifted by 58 mV for a tenfold change in [K+]o. Very similar results were obtained from whole-cell voltage-clamp measurements (53 mV for a tenfold change in [K+]o). 5. The conductance of both types of K+ channels depended on [K+]o. The single-channel conductances were 25 +/- 3 and 13 +/- 2 pS with 50 mM [K+]o, and 19 +/- 4 and 9 +/- 2 pS with 20 mM [K+]o, respectively. 6. These results demonstrate that two types of resting inwardly rectifying K+ channels can be identified in single atrial myocytes. One of these is an inwardly rectifying K+ channel (IK1) previously identified in whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments (Hume & Giles, 1983). The second channel is the muscarinic receptor-regulated K+ channel (IK(ACh) which was first described in

  8. Cyclic mechanical strain of myocytes modifies CapZβ1 post translationally via PKCε.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Swanson, Erik R; Li, Jieli; Mkrtschjan, Michael A; Russell, Brenda

    2015-10-01

    The heart is exquisitely sensitive to mechanical stimuli and adapts to increased demands for work by enlarging the cardiomyocytes. In order to determine links between mechano-transduction mechanisms and hypertrophy, neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) were subjected to physiologic strain for analysis of the dynamics of the actin capping protein, CapZ, and its post-translational modifications (PTM). CapZ binding rates were assessed after strain by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed by a GFP-CapZβ1 adenovirus. To assess the role of the protein kinase C epsilon isoform (PKCε), rest or cyclic strain were combined with specific PKCε activation by constitutively active PKCε, or by inhibition with dominant negative PKCε (dnPKCε) expression. Significant increases of CapZ FRAP kinetics with strain were blunted by dnPKCε, suggesting that PKCε is involved in mechano-transduction signaling. Similar combinations of strain and PKC regulation in NRVMs were studied by PTM profiles of CapZβ1 using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The significantly increased charge on CapZ seen with mechanical strain was reversed by the addition of dnPKCε. Potential clinical relevance was confirmed in vivo by PTMs of CapZ in the failing heart of one-year old transgenic mice over-expressing PKCε. Furthermore, with strain there was significant PKCε translocation to the Z-disc and co-localization with CapZβ1 or α-actinin, which was quantified on confocal images. A hypothetical model is presented proposing that one destination of the mechanotransduction signaling pathways might be for PTMs of CapZ thereby regulating actin capping and filament assembly.

  9. HIV protease inhibitors elicit volume-sensitive Cl− current in cardiac myocytes via mitochondrial ROS

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wu; Baki, Lia; Yin, Jun; Zhou, Huiping; Baumgarten, Clive M.

    2010-01-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV PI) reduce morbidity and mortality of HIV infection but cause multiple untoward effects. Because certain HIV PI evoke production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and volume-sensitive Cl− current (ICl,swell) is activated by ROS, we tested whether HIV PI stimulate ICl,swell in ventricular myocytes. Ritonavir and lopinavir elicited outwardly-rectifying Cl− currents under isosmotic conditions that were abolished by the selective ICl,swell-blocker DCPIB. In contrast, amprenavir, nelfinavir, and raltegravir, an integrase inhibitor, did not modulate ICl,swell acutely. Ritonavir also reduced action potential duration, but amprenavir did not. ICl,swell activation was attributed to ROS because ebselen, an H2O2, scavenger, suppressed ritonavir- and lopinavir-induced ICl,swell. Major ROS sources in cardiomyocytes are sarcolemmal NADPH oxidase and mitochondria. The specific NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin failed to block ritonavir- or lopinavir-induced currents, although it blocks ICl,swell elicited by osmotic swelling or stretch. In contrast, rotenone, a mitochondrial e− transport inhibitor, suppressed both ritonavir- and lopinavir-induced ICl,swell. ROS production was measured in HL-1 cardiomyocytes with C-H2DCFDA-AM and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) with JC-1. Flow cytometry confirmed that ritonavir and lopinavir but not amprenavir, nelfinavir, or raltegravir augmented ROS production, and HIV PI-induced ROS production was suppressed by rotenone but not NADPH oxidase blockade. Moreover, ritonavir, but not amprenavir, depolarized ΔΨm. These data suggest ritonavir and lopinavir activated ICl,swell via mitochondrial ROS production that was independent of NADPH oxidase. ROS-dependent modulation of ICl,swell and other ion channels by HIV PI may contribute to some of their actions in heart and perhaps other tissues. PMID:20736017

  10. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  11. A Human Ventricular Myocyte Model with a Refined Representation of Excitation-Contraction Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Himeno, Yukiko; Asakura, Keiichi; Cha, Chae Young; Memida, Hiraku; Powell, Trevor; Amano, Akira; Noma, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) occurs by a regenerative activation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) within each Ca2+-releasing unit, triggered by the activation of L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs). CICR is then terminated, most probably by depletion of Ca2+ in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Hinch et al. previously developed a tightly coupled LCC-RyR mathematical model, known as the Hinch model, that enables simulations to deal with a variety of functional states of whole-cell populations of a Ca2+-releasing unit using a personal computer. In this study, we developed a membrane excitation-contraction model of the human ventricular myocyte, which we call the human ventricular cell (HuVEC) model. This model is a hybrid of the most recent HuVEC models and the Hinch model. We modified the Hinch model to reproduce the regenerative activation and termination of CICR. In particular, we removed the inactivated RyR state and separated the single step of RyR activation by LCCs into triggering and regenerative steps. More importantly, we included the experimental measurement of a transient rise in Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+], 10–15 μM) during CICR in the vicinity of Ca2+-releasing sites, and thereby calculated the effects of the local Ca2+ gradient on CICR as well as membrane excitation. This HuVEC model successfully reconstructed both membrane excitation and key properties of CICR. The time course of CICR evoked by an action potential was accounted for by autonomous changes in an instantaneous equilibrium open probability of couplons. This autonomous time course was driven by a core feedback loop including the pivotal local [Ca2+], influenced by a time-dependent decay in the SR Ca2+ content during CICR. PMID:26200878

  12. Activation of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel by decavanadate in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, H; Kakei, M; Tanaka, H

    1993-03-23

    To evaluate the effects of decavanadate on the ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel, we applied the inside-out membrane patch-clamp technique to ventricular myocytes isolated from guinea-pig hearts. Decavanadate increased the probability of the KATP channel being open in a dose-dependent manner over the range of 0.1 to 5 mM in the presence of 0.3 mM ATP. Half-maximal activation occurred at 540 microM decavanadate and a Hill coefficient of 1.3 was obtained when the Hill equation was used to fit the dose-dependent activation for the channel by decavanadate. The half-maximum inhibition for the channel by ATP (K1/2) in the presence of 2 mM Mg2+ was 19 and 74 microM in its absence. In the presence of decavanadate, both curves shifted toward the higher concentration of ATP without a change in steepness of the slope (Hill coefficient = 2). The effect of decavanadate could be expressed by a model in which its binding prevents ATP binding from closing the channel. The estimated dissociation constant of decavanadate was 1.5 microM in the presence and 22.8 microM in the absence of Mg2+. Decavanadate reactivated the rundown channel in the absence of Mg2+ and ATP. Neither the single channel slope conductance nor the mean open and closed lifetime within the bursts of channel openings were affected by decavanadate. We conclude that internal Mg2+ is not required for the modulation produced by decavanadate, but this ion influences the channel and changes the dissociation constant of both ATP and decavanadate to the channel.

  13. Carbon nanotubes instruct physiological growth and functionally mature syncytia: nongenetic engineering of cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Valentina; Cellot, Giada; Toma, Francesca Maria; Long, Carlin S; Caldwell, John H; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Turco, Antonio; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura; Mestroni, Luisa

    2013-07-23

    Myocardial tissue engineering currently represents one of the most realistic strategies for cardiac repair. We have recently discovered the ability of carbon nanotube scaffolds to promote cell division and maturation in cardiomyocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote cardiomyocyte growth and maturation by altering the gene expression program, implementing the cell electrophysiological properties and improving networking and maturation of functional syncytia. In our study, we combine microscopy, biological and electrophysiological methodologies, and calcium imaging, to verify whether neonatal rat ventricular myocytes cultured on substrates of multiwall carbon nanotubes acquire a physiologically more mature phenotype compared to control (gelatin). We show that the carbon nanotube substrate stimulates the induction of a gene expression profile characteristic of terminal differentiation and physiological growth, with a 2-fold increase of α-myosin heavy chain (P < 0.001) and upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2a. In contrast, markers of pathological hypertrophy remain unchanged (β-myosin heavy chain, skeletal α-actin, atrial natriuretic peptide). These modifications are paralleled by an increase of connexin-43 gene expression, gap junctions and functional syncytia. Moreover, carbon nanotubes appear to exert a protective effect against the pathologic stimulus of phenylephrine. Finally, cardiomyocytes on carbon nanotubes demonstrate a more mature electrophysiological phenotype of syncytia and intracellular calcium signaling. Thus, carbon nanotubes interacting with cardiomyocytes have the ability to promote physiological growth and functional maturation. These properties are unique in the current vexing field of tissue engineering, and offer unprecedented perspectives in the development of innovative therapies for cardiac repair.

  14. Long-Chain Fatty Acids Activate Calcium Channels in Ventricular Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, James Min-Che; Xian, Hu; Bacaner, Marvin

    1992-07-01

    Nonesterified fatty acids accumulate at sites of tissue injury and necrosis. In cardiac tissue the concentrations of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, leukotrienes, and other fatty acids increase greatly during ischemia due to receptor or nonreceptor-mediated activation of phospholipases and/or diminished reacylation. In ischemic myocardium, the time course of increase in fatty acids and tissue calcium closely parallels irreversible cardiac damage. We postulated that fatty acids released from membrane phospholipids may be involved in the increase of intracellular calcium. We report here that low concentrations (3-30 μM) of each long-chain unsaturated (oleic, linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic) and saturated (palmitic, stearic, and arachidic) fatty acid tested induced multifold increases in voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa) in cardiac myocytes. In contrast, neither short-chain fatty acids (<12 carbons) or fatty acid esters (oleic and palmitic methyl esters) had any effect on ICa, indicating that activation of calcium channels depended on chain length and required a free carboxyl group. Inhibition of protein kinases C and A, G proteins, eicosanoid production, or nonenzymatic oxidation did not block the fatty acid-induced increase in ICa. Thus, long-chain fatty acids appear to directly activate ICa, possibly by acting at some lipid sites near the channels or directly on the channel protein itself. We suggest that the combined effects of fatty acids released during ischemia on ICa may contribute to ischemia-induced pathogenic events on the heart that involve calcium, such as arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and myocardial damage due to cytotoxic calcium overload.

  15. P2Y purinergic receptor regulation of CFTR chloride channels in mouse cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Mizuma, Shintaro; Wang, Ge-Xin; Hume, Joseph R

    2004-05-01

    The intracellular signalling pathways and molecular mechanisms responsible for P2-purinoceptor-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) currents (I(Cl,ATP)) were studied in mouse ventricular myocytes. In standard NaCl-containing extracellular solutions, extracellular ATP (100 microm) activated two different currents, I(Cl,ATP) with a linear I-V relationship in symmetrical Cl(-) solutions, and an inwardly rectifying cation conductance (cationic I(ATP)). Cationic I(ATP) was selectively inhibited by Gd(3+) and Zn(2+), or by replacement of extracellular NaCl by NMDG; I(Cl,ATP) was Cl(-) selective, and inhibited by replacement of extracellular Cl(-) by Asp(-); both currents were prevented by suramin or DIDS pretreatment. In GTPgammaS-loaded cells, I(Cl,ATP) was irreversibly activated by ATP, but cationic I(ATP) was still regulated reversibly. GDPbetaS prevented activation of the I(Cl,ATP,) even though pertussis toxin pretreatment did not modulate I(Cl,ATP). These results suggest that activation of I(Cl,ATP) occurs via a G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptor. The I(Cl,ATP) persistently activated by GTPgammaS, was inhibited by glibenclamide but not by DIDS, thus exhibiting known pharmacological properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. In ventricular cells of cftr(-/-) mice, extracellular ATP activated cationic I(ATP), but failed to activate any detectable I(Cl,ATP). These results provide compelling evidence that activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels in mouse heart are coupled to G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptors.

  16. Inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated current (if) of rabbit SA node myocytes by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Accili, E A; DiFrancesco, D

    1996-03-01

    The effects of the amphiphilic substance niflumic acid (NFA) were examined in myocytes isolated from the sino-atrial node of the rabbit heart. NFA (50 and 500 microM), for 30-60 s, produced a reversible negative chronotropic effect by reducing the rate of diastolic depolarization, suggesting an inhibitory effect on the hyperpolarization-activated pacemaker current (if). NFA (from 0.05 to 500 microM) inhibited if by modifying the current kinetics, without alteration of the conductance. This was shown by evidence indicating that: (1) NFA inhibited if during hyperpolarizing pulses to the mid-point of if activation but not at fully activating voltages; (2) the slope and reversal potential of the fully activated current/voltage (I/V) relation were not altered by NFA, indicating no change in slope conductance or ion selectivity; and (3) hyperpolarizing ramp protocols confirmed the lack of action of 50 microM NFA on the fully activated current and a shift of approximately -8 mV. Although similar to inhibition by acetylcholine (ACh), inhibition by NFA was only partly additive with the action of ACh and was not altered by atropine or pertussis toxin, both of which eliminated the action of ACh. The effect of NFA was present after stimulation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and after inhibition of phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX). In cell-attached patch measurements, NFA applied externally did not affect if measured in the patch. Finally, application of NFA to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches did not alter the current in the absence or presence of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). These results suggest an external, membrane-delimited action of NFA on if.

  17. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata)

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Sheida; Nematollahi, Mohammad Ali; Mojazi Amiri, Bagher; Vélez, Emilio J.; Lutfi, Esmail; Navarro, Isabel; Capilla, Encarnación; Gutiérrez, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA) to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates the importance of

  18. Quantitative comparison of cardiac ventricular myocyte electrophysiology and response to drugs in human and nonhuman species.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Thomas; Rudy, Yoram

    2012-03-01

    Explanations for arrhythmia mechanisms at the cellular level are usually based on experiments in nonhuman myocytes. However, subtle electrophysiological differences between species may lead to different rhythmic or arrhythmic cellular behaviors and drug response given the nonlinear and highly interactive cellular system. Using detailed and quantitatively accurate mathematical models for human, dog, and guinea pig ventricular action potentials (APs), we simulated and compared cell electrophysiology mechanisms and response to drugs. Under basal conditions (absence of β-adrenergic stimulation), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase changes secondary to Na(+) accumulation determined AP rate dependence for human and dog but not for guinea pig where slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) was the major rate-dependent current. AP prolongation with reduction of rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) and I(Ks) (due to mutations or drugs) showed strong species dependence in simulations, as in experiments. For humans, AP prolongation was 80% following I(Kr) block. It was 30% for dog and 20% for guinea pig. Under basal conditions, I(Ks) block was of no consequence for human and dog, but for guinea pig, AP prolongation after I(Ks) block was severe. However, with β-adrenergic stimulation, I(Ks) played an important role in all species, particularly in AP shortening at fast rate. Quantitative comparison of AP repolarization, rate-dependence mechanisms, and drug response in human, dog, and guinea pig revealed major species differences (e.g., susceptibility to arrhythmogenic early afterdepolarizations). Extrapolation from animal to human electrophysiology and drug response requires great caution.

  19. Acidosis inhibits spontaneous activity and membrane currents in myocytes isolated from the rabbit atrioventricular node.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hongwei; Smith, Godfrey L; Orchard, Clive H; Hancox, Jules C

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence from intact hearts suggests that the function of cardiac nodal tissue may be particularly susceptible to acidosis. Little is currently known, however, about the effects of acidosis on the cellular electrophysiology of the atrioventricular node (AVN). This study was conducted, therefore, to determine the effect of acidosis on the spontaneous activity and membrane currents of myocytes isolated from the rabbit AVN, recorded at 35-37 degrees C using whole-cell patch-clamp. Reduction of extracellular pH (pH(e); from 7.4 to 6.8 or 6.3) produced pH-dependent slowing of spontaneous action potential rate and upstroke velocity, and reductions in maximum diastolic potential and action potential amplitude. Ionic current recordings under voltage-clamp indicated that acidosis (pH(e) 6.3) decreased L-type Ca current (I(Ca,L)), without significant changes in voltage-dependent activation or inactivation. Acidosis reduced the E-4031-sensitive, rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) tail amplitude at -40 mV following command pulses to between -30 and +50 mV, and accelerated tail-current deactivation. In contrast, the time-dependent hyperpolarisation-activated current, I(f), was unaffected by acidosis. Background current insensitive to E-4031 and nifedipine was reduced by acidosis. Measurement of intracellular pH (pH(i)) from undialysed cells using BCECF showed a reduction in mean pH(i) from 7.24 to 6.45 (n=17) when pH(e) was lowered from 7.4 to 6.3. We conclude that I(f) is unlikely to be involved in the response of the AVN to acidosis, whilst inhibition of I(Ca,L) and I(Kr) by acidosis are likely to play a significant role in effects on AVN cellular electrophysiology.

  20. Nongenomic steroid action: Inhibiting effects on cell-to-cell communication between rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, F; Sarrouilhe, D; Hervé, J C

    2001-01-01

    Numerous steroids are now believed to possess rapid membrane effects independent of the classical gene activation pathways and are potent modulators of membrane proteins, including voltage-and ligand-operated channels. The effects of steroids on the functional state of the intercellular channels clustered in gap junctions were compared by estimation of either the permeability for a fluorescent dye or the electrical conductance in cardiac myocytes of newborn rat. At 25 muM, the esters of 17beta-estradiol, testosterone and two other androgen hormones rapidly abolished cell-to-cell communication, whereas none of the longer chain steroids, belonging to pregnane (17alpha-hydroxypregnenolone, hydrocortisone), sterol (cholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol), bile acid (cholic and lithocholic acids) and vitamin (D3) families, lowered the junctional permeability. Altogether, no correlation with the presence or position of double bonds nor with the trans- or cis-fusion of the A and B rings was recognized. Esterification was a prerequisite for the activity of extracellularly applied steroids but the number, nature and position of ester chain(s) had no influence. 17beta-estradiol or testosterone effects were not prevented when cells were prein-cubated with blockers of the estrogen or androgen nuclear receptors (tamoxifen and cyproterone acetate, respectively). This, together with the rapid time course of the steroid effect (complete within a few minutes), in a rather high active concentration range, suggests a nongenomic mechanism of action. The reversible uncoupling effect of steroids appears to be independent of the shape of the molecules and more probably related to their size and lipo-solubility, which condition their insertion into the lipid bilayer and their subsequent disturbing effects.

  1. ATP counteracts the rundown of gap junctional channels of rat ventricular myocytes by promoting protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Verrecchia, F; Duthe, F; Duval, S; Duchatelle, I; Sarrouilhe, D; Herve, J C

    1999-04-15

    1. The degree of cell-to-cell coupling between ventricular myocytes of neonatal rats appeared well preserved when studied in the perforated version of the patch clamp technique or, in double whole-cell conditions, when ATP was present in the patch pipette solution. In contrast, when ATP was omitted, the amplitude of junctional current rapidly declined (rundown). 2. To examine the mechanism(s) of ATP action, an 'internal perfusion technique' was adapted to dual patch clamp conditions, and reintroduction of ATP partially reversed the rundown of junctional channels. 3. Cell-to-cell communication was not preserved by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue (5'-adenylimidodiphosphate, AMP-PNP), indicating that the effect most probably did not involve direct interaction of ATP with the channel-forming proteins. 4. An ATP analogue supporting protein phosphorylation but not active transport processes (adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), ATPgammaS) maintained normal intercellular communication, suggesting that the effect was due to kinase activity rather than to altered intracellular Ca2+. 5. A broad spectrum inhibitor of endogenous serine/threonine protein kinases (H7) reversibly reduced the intercellular coupling. A non-specific exogenous protein phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase) mimicked the effects of ATP deprivation. The non-specific inhibition of endogenous protein phosphatases resulted in the preservation of substantial cell-to-cell communication in ATP-free conditions. 6. The activity of gap junctional channels appears to require both the presence of ATP and protein kinase activity to counteract the tonic activity of endogenous phosphatase(s).

  2. Na+/K+ pump inhibition induces cell shrinkage in cultured chick cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Smith, T W; Rasmusson, R L; Lobaugh, L A; Lieberman, M

    1993-01-01

    Myocardial cell swelling occurs in ischemia and in reperfusion injury before the onset of irreversible injury. Swelling has been attributed to failure of the Na+/K+ pump and the accumulation of intracellular Na+. To evaluate the role of the pump-leak model of cell volume maintenance, short term changes in cell volume in response to Na+/K+ pump inhibition were studied in aggregates of cultured embryonic chick cardiac myocytes using optical and biochemical methods. Exposure to 100 microM ouabain over 20 min induced cell shrinkage of approximately 10%. Cell water was also decreased by Na+/K+ pump inhibition; incubation for 1 hr either in the presence of 100 microM ouabain or in K(+)-free solution reduced cell water by 18.4% and 28.4% respectively. When exposed to ouabain in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, the aggregates swelled by approximately 15%, indicating that extracellular Ca2+ was required for the ouabain-induced shrinkage to occur. Ouabain still caused shrinkage, however, in the presence of the Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil (10 microM) and nifedipine (10 microM), suggesting that Na+/Ca2+ exchange, rather than Ca2+ channels, is the route for Ca2+ influx during Na+/K+ pump inhibition. Efflux of amino acids (taurine, aspartate, glutamate, glycine and alanine) from confluent monolayers of chick heart cells exposed to ouabain for 20 min was nearly double that observed in control solution. These results suggest that, during Na+/K+ pump inhibition, chick heart cells can limit accumulation of intracellular sodium by means of Na+/Ca2+ exchange, and that a rise in intracellular [Ca2+], also mediated by Na+/Ca2+ exchange, promotes the loss of amino acids and ions to cause cell shrinkage. Therefore, swelling during ischemic injury may not result from Na+/K+ pump failure alone, but may reflect the exhaustion of alternative volume regulatory transport mechanisms.

  3. Effects of pioglitazone on cardiac ion currents and action potential morphology in canine ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kistamás, Kornél; Szentandrássy, Norbert; Hegyi, Bence; Ruzsnavszky, Ferenc; Váczi, Krisztina; Bárándi, László; Horváth, Balázs; Szebeni, Andrea; Magyar, János; Bányász, Tamás; Kecskeméti, Valéria; Nánási, Péter P

    2013-06-15

    Despite its widespread therapeutical use there is little information on the cellular cardiac effects of the antidiabetic drug pioglitazone in larger mammals. In the present study, therefore, the concentration-dependent effects of pioglitazone on ion currents and action potential configuration were studied in isolated canine ventricular myocytes using standard microelectrode, conventional whole cell patch clamp, and action potential voltage clamp techniques. Pioglitazone decreased the maximum velocity of depolarization and the amplitude of phase-1 repolarization at concentrations ≥3 μM. Action potentials were shortened by pioglitazone at concentrations ≥10 μM, which effect was accompanied with significant reduction of beat-to-beat variability of action potential duration. Several transmembrane ion currents, including the transient outward K(+) current (Ito), the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa), the rapid and slow components of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr and IKs, respectively), and the inward rectifier K(+) current (IK1) were inhibited by pioglitazone under conventional voltage clamp conditions. Ito was blocked significantly at concentrations ≥3 μM, ICa, IKr, IKs at concentrations ≥10 μM, while IK1 at concentrations ≥30 μM. Suppression of Ito, ICa, IKr, and IK1 has been confirmed also under action potential voltage clamp conditions. ATP-sensitive K(+) current, when activated by lemakalim, was effectively blocked by pioglitazone. Accordingly, action potentials were prolonged by 10 μM pioglitazone when the drug was applied in the presence of lemakalim. All these effects developed rapidly and were readily reversible upon washout. In conclusion, pioglitazone seems to be a harmless agent at usual therapeutic concentrations.

  4. Archaeal translation initiation revisited: the initiation factor 2 and eukaryotic initiation factor 2B alpha-beta-delta subunit families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Woese, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    As the amount of available sequence data increases, it becomes apparent that our understanding of translation initiation is far from comprehensive and that prior conclusions concerning the origin of the process are wrong. Contrary to earlier conclusions, key elements of translation initiation originated at the Universal Ancestor stage, for homologous counterparts exist in all three primary taxa. Herein, we explore the evolutionary relationships among the components of bacterial initiation factor 2 (IF-2) and eukaryotic IF-2 (eIF-2)/eIF-2B, i.e., the initiation factors involved in introducing the initiator tRNA into the translation mechanism and performing the first step in the peptide chain elongation cycle. All Archaea appear to posses a fully functional eIF-2 molecule, but they lack the associated GTP recycling function, eIF-2B (a five-subunit molecule). Yet, the Archaea do posses members of the gene family defined by the (related) eIF-2B subunits alpha, beta, and delta, although these are not specifically related to any of the three eukaryotic subunits. Additional members of this family also occur in some (but by no means all) Bacteria and even in some eukaryotes. The functional significance of the other members of this family is unclear and requires experimental resolution. Similarly, the occurrence of bacterial IF-2-like molecules in all Archaea and in some eukaryotes further complicates the picture of translation initiation. Overall, these data lend further support to the suggestion that the rudiments of translation initiation were present at the Universal Ancestor stage.

  5. Altered ventricular torsion and transmural patterns of myocyte relaxation precede heart failure in aging F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stuart G; Haynes, Premi; Kelsey Snapp, W; Nava, Kristofer E; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and explain changes in ventricular and cellular function that contribute to aging-associated cardiovascular disease in aging F344 rats. Three groups of female F344 rats, aged 6, 18, and 22 mo, were studied. Echocardiographic measurements in isoflurane-anesthetized animals showed an increase in peak left ventricular torsion between the 6- and the 18-mo-old groups that was partially reversed in the 22-mo-old animals (P < 0.05). Epicardial, midmyocardial, and endocardial myocytes were subsequently isolated from the left ventricles of each group of rats. Unloaded sarcomere shortening and Ca(2+) transients were then measured in these cells (n = >75 cells for each of the nine age-region groups). The decay time of the Ca(2+) transient and the time required for 50% length relaxation both increased with age but not uniformly across the three regions (P < 0.02). Further analysis revealed a significant shift in the transmural distribution of these properties between 18 and 22 mo of age, with the largest changes occurring in epicardial myocytes. Computational modeling suggested that these changes were due in part to slower Ca(2+) dissociation from troponin in aging epicardial myocytes. Subsequent biochemical assays revealed a >50% reduction in troponin I phosphoprotein content in 22-mo-old epicardium relative to the other regions. These data suggest that between 18 and 22 mo of age (before the onset of heart failure), F344 rats display epicardial-specific myofilament-level modifications that 1) break from the progression observed between 6 and 18 mo and 2) coincide with aberrant patterns of cardiac torsion.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of detrusor and corporal myocyte contraction: identifying targets for pharmacotherapy of bladder and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Christ, George J; Hodges, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Post-Genomic age presents many new challenges and opportunities for the improved understanding, diagnosis and treatment of human disease. The long-term goal is to identify molecular correlates of disease processes, and use this information to develop novel and more effective therapeutics. A major hurdle in this regard is ensuring that the molecular targets of interest are indeed relevant to the physiology and/or pathophysiology of the processes being studied, and, moreover, to determine if they are specific to the tissue/organ being investigated. As a first step in this direction, we have reviewed the literature pertaining to bladder and erectile physiology/pharmacology and dysfunction and attempted to summarize some of the critical molecular mechanisms regulating detrusor and corporal myocyte tone. Because of the vast amount of published data, we have limited the scope of this review to consideration of the calcium-mobilizing and calcium-sensitizing pathways in these cells. Despite obvious differences in phenotypic characteristics of the detrusor and corporal myocyte, there are some common molecular changes that may contribute to, for example, the increased myocyte contractility characteristic of bladder and erectile dysfunction (i.e. increased Rho kinase activity and decreased K+ channel function). Of course, there are also some important distinctions in the pathways that modulate contractility in these two cell types (i.e. the contribution of ryanodine-sensitive calcium stores and the nitric oxide/cGMP pathways). This report highlights some of these similarities and distinctions in the hope that it will encourage scientific discourse and research activity in this area, eventually leading to an improved quality of life for those millions of individuals that are afflicted with bladder and erectile dysfunction. PMID:16465183

  7. Statistical Metamodeling and Sequential Design of Computer Experiments to Model Glyco-Altered Gating of Sodium Channels in Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongping; Yang, Hui; Ednie, Andrew R; Bennett, Eric S

    2016-09-01

    Glycan structures account for up to 35% of the mass of cardiac sodium ( Nav ) channels. To question whether and how reduced sialylation affects Nav activity and cardiac electrical signaling, we conducted a series of in vitro experiments on ventricular apex myocytes under two different glycosylation conditions, reduced protein sialylation (ST3Gal4(-/-)) and full glycosylation (control). Although aberrant electrical signaling is observed in reduced sialylation, realizing a better understanding of mechanistic details of pathological variations in INa and AP is difficult without performing in silico studies. However, computer model of Nav channels and cardiac myocytes involves greater levels of complexity, e.g., high-dimensional parameter space, nonlinear and nonconvex equations. Traditional linear and nonlinear optimization methods have encountered many difficulties for model calibration. This paper presents a new statistical metamodeling approach for efficient computer experiments and optimization of Nav models. First, we utilize a fractional factorial design to identify control variables from the large set of model parameters, thereby reducing the dimensionality of parametric space. Further, we develop the Gaussian process model as a surrogate of expensive and time-consuming computer models and then identify the next best design point that yields the maximal probability of improvement. This process iterates until convergence, and the performance is evaluated and validated with real-world experimental data. Experimental results show the proposed algorithm achieves superior performance in modeling the kinetics of Nav channels under a variety of glycosylation conditions. As a result, in silico models provide a better understanding of glyco-altered mechanistic details in state transitions and distributions of Nav channels. Notably, ST3Gal4(-/-) myocytes are shown to have higher probabilities accumulated in intermediate inactivation during the repolarization and yield a

  8. Altered ventricular torsion and transmural patterns of myocyte relaxation precede heart failure in aging F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stuart G.; Haynes, Premi; Kelsey Snapp, W.; Nava, Kristofer E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and explain changes in ventricular and cellular function that contribute to aging-associated cardiovascular disease in aging F344 rats. Three groups of female F344 rats, aged 6, 18, and 22 mo, were studied. Echocardiographic measurements in isoflurane-anesthetized animals showed an increase in peak left ventricular torsion between the 6- and the 18-mo-old groups that was partially reversed in the 22-mo-old animals (P < 0.05). Epicardial, midmyocardial, and endocardial myocytes were subsequently isolated from the left ventricles of each group of rats. Unloaded sarcomere shortening and Ca2+ transients were then measured in these cells (n = >75 cells for each of the nine age-region groups). The decay time of the Ca2+ transient and the time required for 50% length relaxation both increased with age but not uniformly across the three regions (P < 0.02). Further analysis revealed a significant shift in the transmural distribution of these properties between 18 and 22 mo of age, with the largest changes occurring in epicardial myocytes. Computational modeling suggested that these changes were due in part to slower Ca2+ dissociation from troponin in aging epicardial myocytes. Subsequent biochemical assays revealed a >50% reduction in troponin I phosphoprotein content in 22-mo-old epicardium relative to the other regions. These data suggest that between 18 and 22 mo of age (before the onset of heart failure), F344 rats display epicardial-specific myofilament-level modifications that 1) break from the progression observed between 6 and 18 mo and 2) coincide with aberrant patterns of cardiac torsion. PMID:23792678

  9. Deficiency of methionine sulfoxide reductase A causes cellular dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in cardiac myocytes under physical and oxidative stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Changlong; Li, Yuejin; Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Guozhen; Kreymerman, Alexander; Prentice, Howard; Weissbach, Herbert; Huang, Xupei

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Deficiency of MsrA in the heart renders myocardial cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. {yields} Mitochondrial damage happens in the heart lacking MsrA. {yields} More protein oxidation in myocardial cells lacking MsrA. {yields} MsrA protects the heart against oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an enzyme that reverses oxidation of methionine in proteins. Using a MsrA gene knockout (MsrA{sup -/-}) mouse model, we have investigated the role of MsrA in the heart. Our data indicate that cellular contractility and cardiac function are not significantly changed in MsrA{sup -/-} mice if the hearts are not stressed. However, the cellular contractility, when stressed using a higher stimulation frequency (2 Hz), is significantly reduced in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes. MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes also show a significant decrease in contractility after oxidative stress using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Corresponding changes in Ca{sup 2+} transients are observed in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiomyocytes treated with 2 Hz stimulation or with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Electron microscope analyses reveal a dramatic morphological change of mitochondria in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts. Further biochemical measurements indicate that protein oxidation levels in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts are significantly higher than those in wild type controls. Our study demonstrates that the lack of MsrA in cardiac myocytes reduces myocardial cell's capability against stress stimulations resulting in a cellular dysfunction in the heart.

  10. Exercise training and detraining modify the morphological and mechanical properties of single cardiac myocytes obtained from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Carneiro-Júnior, M A; Pelúzio, M C G; Silva, C H O; Amorim, P R S; Silva, K A; Souza, M O; Castro, C A; Roman-Campos, D; Prímola-Gomes, T N; Natali, A J

    2010-11-01

    We determined the effects of exercise training and detraining on the morphological and mechanical properties of left ventricular myocytes in 4-month-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) randomly divided into the following groups: sedentary for 8 weeks (SED-8), sedentary for 12 weeks (SED-12), treadmill-running trained for 8 weeks (TRA, 16 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week), and treadmill-running trained for 8 weeks followed by 4 weeks of detraining (DET). At sacrifice, left ventricular myocytes were isolated enzymatically, and resting cell length, width, and cell shortening after stimulation at a frequency of 1 Hz (~25°C) were measured. Cell length was greater in TRA than in SED-8 (161.30 ± 1.01 vs 156.10 ± 1.02 μm, P < 0.05, 667 vs 618 cells, respectively) and remained larger after detraining. Cell width and volume were unaffected by either exercise training or detraining. Cell length to width ratio was higher in TRA than in SED-8 (8.50 ± 0.08 vs 8.22 ± 0.10, P < 0.05) and was maintained after detraining. Exercise training did not affect cell shortening, which was unchanged with detraining. TRA cells exhibited higher maximum velocity of shortening than SED-8 (102.01 ± 4.50 vs 82.01 ± 5.30 μm/s, P < 0.05, 70 cells per group), with almost complete regression after detraining. The maximum velocity of relengthening was higher in TRA cells than in SED-8 (88.20 ± 4.01 vs70.01 ± 4.80 μm/s, P < 0.05), returning to sedentary values with detraining. Therefore, exercise training affected left ventricle remodeling in SHR towards eccentric hypertrophy, which remained after detraining. It also improved single left ventricular myocyte contractile function, which was reversed by detraining.

  11. EFFICACY AND POTENCY OF CLASS I ANTIARRHYTHMIC DRUGS FOR SUPPRESSION OF Ca2+ WAVES IN PERMEABILIZED MYOCYTES LACKING CALSEQUESTRIN

    PubMed Central

    Galimberti, Eleonora Savio; Knollmann, Bjorn C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ca2+ waves can trigger ventricular arrhythmias such as catecholaminergic-polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Drugs that prevent Ca2+ waves may have antiarrhythmic properties. Here, we use permeabilized ventricular myocytes from a CPVT mouse model lacking calsequestrin (casq2) to screen all clinically available class I antiarrhythmic drugs and selected other antiarrhythmic agents for activity against Ca2+ waves. Methods and Results Casq2−/− myocytes were imaged in line-scan mode and the following Ca2+ wave parameters analyzed: wave incidence, amplitude, frequency, and propagation speed. IC50 (potency) and maximum inhibition (efficacy) were calculated for each drug. Drugs fell into 3 distinct categories. Category 1 drugs (flecainide, R-propafenone) suppressed wave parameters with the highest potency (IC50 < 10 μM) and efficacy (> 50% maximum wave inhibition). Category 2 drugs (encainide, quinidine, lidocaine, verapamil) had intermediate potency (IC50 20 μ 40 μM) and efficacy (20% - 40% maximum wave inhibition). Category 3 drugs (procainamide, disopyramide, mexilitine, cibenzoline, ranolazine) had no significant effects on Ca2+ waves at the highest concentration tested (100 μM). Propafenone was stereoselective, with R-propafenone suppressing waves more potently than S-propafenone (IC50: R-propafenone 2±0.2 μM vs. S-propafenone 54±18 μM). Both flecainide and R-propafenone decreased Ca2+ spark mass and converted propagated Ca2+ waves into non-propagated wavelets and frequent sparks, suggesting that reduction in spark mass, not spark frequency, was responsible for wave suppression. Conclusions Among all class I antiarrhythmic drugs, flecainide and R-propafenone inhibit Ca2+ waves with the highest potency and efficacy. Permeabilized casq2−/− myocytes are a simple in-vitro assay for finding drugs with activity against Ca2+ waves. PMID:21798265

  12. PGC-1{alpha} accelerates cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance without disturbing Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Min; Wang, Yanru; Qu, Aijuan

    2010-06-11

    Energy metabolism and Ca{sup 2+} handling serve critical roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) is a multi-functional coactivator that is involved in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial functional capacity and cellular energy metabolism. However, the regulation of PGC-1{alpha} in cardiac Ca{sup 2+} signaling has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we combined confocal line-scan imaging with off-line imaging processing to characterize calcium signaling in cultured adult rat ventricular myocytes expressing PGC-1{alpha} via adenoviral transduction. Our data shows that overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} improved myocyte contractility without increasing the amplitude of Ca{sup 2+} transients, suggesting that myofilament sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} increased. Interestingly, the decay kinetics of global Ca{sup 2+} transients and Ca{sup 2+} waves accelerated in PGC-1{alpha}-expressing cells, but the decay rate of caffeine-elicited Ca{sup 2+} transients showed no significant change. This suggests that sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA2a), but not Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange (NCX) contribute to PGC-1{alpha}-induced cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} clearance. Furthermore, PGC-1{alpha} induced the expression of SERCA2a in cultured cardiac myocytes. Importantly, overexpressing PGC-1{alpha} did not disturb cardiac Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, because SR Ca{sup 2+} load and the propensity for Ca{sup 2+} waves remained unchanged. These data suggest that PGC-1{alpha} can ameliorate cardiac Ca{sup 2+} cycling and improve cardiac work output in response to physiological stress. Unraveling the PGC-1{alpha}-calcium handing pathway sheds new light on the role of PGC-1{alpha} in the therapy of cardiac diseases.

  13. Ca(2+) signals mediated by Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-gated channels in rat ureteric myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Boittin, F X; Coussin, F; Morel, J L; Halet, G; Macrez, N; Mironneau, J

    2000-01-01

    Localized Ca(2+)-release signals (puffs) and propagated Ca(2+) waves were characterized in rat ureteric myocytes by confocal microscopy. Ca(2+) puffs were evoked by photorelease of low concentrations of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) from a caged precursor and by low concentrations of acetylcholine; they were also observed spontaneously in Ca(2+)-overloaded myocytes. Ca(2+) puffs showed some variability in amplitude, time course and spatial spread, suggesting that Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-gated channels exist in clusters containing variable numbers of channels and that within these clusters a variable number of channels can be recruited. Immunodetection of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) receptors revealed the existence of several spots of fluorescence in the confocal cell sections, supporting the existence of clusters of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) receptors. Strong Ins(1,4,5)P(3) photorelease and high concentrations of acetylcholine induced Ca(2+) waves that originated from an initiation site and propagated in the whole cell by spatial recruitment of neighbouring Ca(2+)-release sites. Both Ca(2+) puffs and Ca(2+) waves were blocked selectively by intracellular applications of heparin and an anti-Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-receptor antibody, but were unaffected by ryanodine and intracellular application of an anti-ryanodine receptor antibody. mRNAs encoding for the three subtypes of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) receptor and subtype 3 of ryanodine receptor were detected in these myocytes, and the maximal binding capacity of [(3)H]Ins(1,4,5)P(3) was 10- to 12-fold higher than that of [(3)H]ryanodine. These results suggest that Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-gated channels mediate a continuum of Ca(2+) signalling in smooth-muscle cells expressing a high level of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) receptors and no subtypes 1 and 2 of ryanodine receptors. PMID:10861244

  14. Pro-survival function of MEF2 in cardiomyocytes is enhanced by β-blockers

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, S; Salma, J; Wales, S; McDermott, JC

    2015-01-01

    β1-Adrenergic receptor (β1-AR) stimulation increases apoptosis in cardiomyocytes through activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) proteins function as important regulators of myocardial gene expression. Previously, we reported that PKA signaling directly represses MEF2 activity. We determined whether (a) MEF2 has a pro-survival function in cardiomyocytes, and (b) whether β-adrenergic/PKA signaling modulates MEF2 function in cardiomyocytes. Initially, we observed that siRNA-mediated gene silencing of MEF2 induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis as indicated by flow cytometry. β1-AR activation by isoproterenol represses MEF2 activity and promotes apoptosis in cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes. Importantly, β1-AR mediated apoptosis was abrogated in cardiomyocytes expressing a PKA-resistant form of MEF2D (S121/190A). We also observed that a β1-blocker, Atenolol, antagonizes isoproterenol-induced apoptosis while concomitantly enhancing MEF2 transcriptional activity. β-AR stimulation modulated MEF2 cellular localization in cardiomyocytes and this effect was reversed by β-blocker treatment. Furthermore, Kruppel-like factor 6, a MEF2 target gene in the heart, functions as a downstream pro-survival factor in cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data indicate that (a) MEF2 has an important pro-survival role in cardiomyocytes, and (b) β-adrenergic signaling antagonizes the pro-survival function of MEF2 in cardiomyocytes and β-blockers promote it. These observations have important clinical implications that may contribute to novel strategies for preventing cardiomyocyte apoptosis associated with heart pathology. PMID:27551452

  15. [Na] and [K] dependence of the Na/K pump current-voltage relationship in guinea pig ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Na/K pump current was determined between -140 and +60 mV as steady- state, strophanthidin-sensitive, whole-cell current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes, voltage-clamped and internally dialyzed via wide- tipped pipettes. Solutions were designed to minimize all other components of membrane current. A device for exchanging the solution inside the pipette permitted investigation of Na/K pump current-voltage (I-V) relationships at several levels of pipette [Na] [( Na]pip) in a single cell; the effects of changes in external [Na] [( Na]o) or external [K] [( K]o) were also studied. At 50 mM [Na]pip, 5.4 mM [K]o, and approximately 150 mM [Na]o, Na/K pump current was steeply voltage dependent at negative potentials but was approximately constant at positive potentials. Under those conditions, reduction of [Na]o enhanced pump current at negative potentials but had little effect at positive potentials: at zero [Na]o, pump current was only weakly voltage dependent. At 5.4 mM [K]o and approximately 150 mM [Na]o, reduction of [Na]pip from 50 mM scaled down the sigmoid pump I-V relationship and shifted it slightly to the right (toward more positive potentials). Pump current at 0 mV was activated by [Na]pip according to the Hill equation with best-fit K0.5 approximately equal to 11 mM and Hill coefficient nH approximately equal to 1.4. At zero [Na]o, reduction of [Na]pip seemed to simply scale down the relatively flat pump I-V relationship: Hill fit parameters for pump activation by [Na]pip at 0 mV were K0.5 approximately equal to 10 mM, nH approximately equal to 1.4. At 50 mM [Na]pip and high [Na]o, reduction of [K]o from 5.4 mM scaled down the sigmoid I-V relationship and shifted it slightly to the right: at 0 mV, K0.5 approximately equal to 1.5 mM and nH approximately equal to 1.0. At zero [Na]o, lowering [K]o simply scaled down the flat pump I-V relationships yielding, at 0 mV, K0.5 approximately equal to 0.2 mM, nH approximately equal to 1.1. The voltage

  16. Role of phospholipase D and diacylglycerol in activating constitutive TRPC-like cation channels in rabbit ear artery myocytes.

    PubMed

    Albert, A P; Piper, A S; Large, W A

    2005-08-01

    Previously we have described a constitutively active Ca2+-permeable non-selective cation channel in freshly dispersed rabbit ear artery myocytes that has similar properties to canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel proteins. In the present study we have investigated the transduction pathways responsible for stimulating constitutive channel activity in these myocytes. Application of the pharmacological inhibitors of phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase D (PC-PLD), butan-1-ol and C2 ceramide, produced marked inhibition of constitutive channel activity in cell-attached patches and also butan-1-ol produced pronounced suppression of resting membrane conductance measured with whole-cell recording whereas the inactive isomer butan-2-ol had no effect on constitutive whole-cell or channel activity. In addition butan-1-ol had no effect on channel activity evoked by the diacylglycerol (DAG) analogue 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG). Inhibitors of PC-phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) had no effect on constitutive channel activity. Application of a purified PC-PLD enzyme and its metabolite phosphatidic acid to inside-out patches markedly increased channel activity. The phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase (PAP) inhibitor dl-propranolol also inhibited constitutive and phosphatidic acid-induced increases in channel activity but had no effect on OAG-evoked responses. The DAG lipase and DAG kinase inhibitors, RHC80267 and R59949 respectively, which inhibit DAG metabolism, produced transient increases in channel activity which were mimicked by relatively high concentrations (40 microm) of OAG. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine did not prevent channel activation by OAG but blocked the secondary inhibitory response of OAG. It is proposed that endogenous DAG is involved in the activation of channel activity and that its effects on channel activity are concentration-dependent with higher concentrations of DAG also inhibiting channel

  17. Response of cardiac myocytes to a ramp increase of diacylglycerol generated by photolysis of a novel caged diacylglycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, X P; Sreekumar, R; Patel, J R; Walker, J W

    1996-01-01

    To test the responsiveness of living cells to the intracellular messenger diacylglycerol, we developed a prototype caged diacylglycerol compound, 3-O-(alpha-carboxyl-2,4-dinitrobenzyl)-1 ,2-dioctanoyl-rac-glycerol (designated alpha-carboxyl caged diC(8)), that produces dioctanoylglycerol (diC(8)) on photolysis. Alpha-Carboxyl caged diC(8) is biologically inert toward diacylglycerol kinase and protein kinase C in vitro and is readily incorporated into cardiac myocyte membranes, where it has no effect before irradiation. Exposure to near-UV light releases biologically active diC8 in good yield (quantum efficiency = 0.2). Here we examine a cellular response to controlled elevation of diC8 within single cardiac myocytes. Twitch amplitude was monitored in electrically stimulated myocytes, and a ramp increase in the concentration of diC(8) was generated by continuous irradiation of cells loaded with the caged compound. The myocyte response was biphasic with a positive inotropic phase (39% increase in twitch amplitude), followed by a large negative inotropic phase (>80% decrease). The time to peak inotropy for both phases depended on the light intensity, decreasing from 376 +/- 51 S to 44 +/- 5 s (positive phase) and 422 +/- 118 S to 51 +/- 9 S (negative phase) as the light intensity was increased eightfold. Both phases were inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelethyrine chloride. An increase in extracellular K+ from 5 mM to 20 mM to partially depolarize the cell membrane eliminated the positive inotropic phase, but the negative inotropic response was largely unaltered. The results reveal new features in the response of cardiac muscle to diacylglycerol, including a positive inotropic phase and a complex responsiveness to a simple linear increase in diacylglycerol. The effects of photoreleased diC(8) were similar to the effects of opiate agonists selective for kappa receptors, consistent with a major role for diacylglycerol in these responses. Images FIGURE 2

  18. Effects of seasonal acclimatization on action potentials and sarcolemmal K(+) currents in roach (Rutilus rutilus) cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Badr, Ahmed; Hassinen, Minna; El-Sayed, Mohamed F; Vornanen, Matti

    2017-03-01

    Temperature sensitivity of electrical excitability is a potential limiting factor for high temperature tolerance of ectotherms. The present study examines whether heat resistance of electrical excitability of cardiac myocytes is modified by seasonal thermal acclimatization in roach (Rutilus rutilus), a eurythermal teleost species. To this end, temperature dependencies of ventricular action potentials (APs), and atrial and ventricular K(+) currents were measured from winter-acclimatized (WiR) and summer-acclimatized (SuR) roach. Under patch-clamp recording conditions, ventricular APs could be triggered over a wide range of temperatures (4-43°C) with prominent changes in resting membrane potential (RMP), AP duration and amplitude. In general, APs of SuR were slightly more tolerant to high temperatures than those of WiR, e.g. the break point temperature (TBP) of RMP was 37.6±0.4°C in WiR and 41±1°C in SuR (p<0.05). Of the two major cardiac K(+) currents, the inward rectifier K(+) current (IK1) was particularly heat resistant in both SuR (TBP 39.4±0.4°C) and WiR (TBP 40.0±0.4°C) ventricular myocytes. The delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr) was not as heat resistant as IK1. Surprisingly, IKr of WiR tolerated heat better (TBP 31.9±0.8°C) than IKr of SuR (TBP 24.1±0.5°C) (p<0.05). IKr (Erg2) channel transcripts of both atrial and ventricular myocytes were up-regulated in WiR. IK1 (Kir2) channel transcripts were not affected by seasonal acclimatization, although ventricular IK1 current was up-regulated in summer. Collectively, these findings show that thermal tolerance limits of K(+) currents in isolated myocytes between seasonally acclimatized roach are much less pronounced than the heat sensitivity of ECG variables in intact fish.

  19. Induction of miR-29a by saturated fatty acids impairs insulin signaling and glucose uptake through translational repression of IRS-1 in myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won-Mo; Jeong, Hyo-Jin; Park, Seung-Yoon; Lee, Wan

    2014-06-13

    MicroRNAs have been shown to play an important role in insulin signaling but their biological function in insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids (SFA) remains largely unknown. Here, we report that SFA palmitate and high fat diet (HFD) significantly increase expression of miR-29a in myocytes. miR-29a targets IRS-1 3'UTR directly and represses IRS-1 expression at the translational level. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of miR-29a impairs insulin signaling and glucose uptake in myocytes through a substantial decrease in IRS-1. These findings suggest that the up-regulation of miR-29a by SFA is causally related to the development of insulin resistance in myocytes.

  20. Reactive oxygen species, but not Ca2+ overloading, trigger pH- and mitochondrial permeability transition-dependent death of adult rat myocytes after ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Jin, Yingai; Lemasters, John J

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the role of pH, reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca2+, and the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in pH-dependent ischemia-reperfusion injury to adult rat myocytes. Myocytes were incubated in anoxic Krebs-Ringer-HEPES buffer at pH 6.2 for 3 h to simulate ischemia. To simulate reperfusion, myocytes were reoxygenated at pH 6.2 or 7.4 for 2 h. Some myocytes were treated with MPT blockers (cyclosporin A and N-methyl-4-isoleucine cyclosporin) and antioxidants (desferal, diphenylphenylene diamine, and 2-mercaptopropionyl glycine). Mitochondrial membrane potential, inner membrane permeabilization, and ROS formation were imaged with tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester, calcein, and chloromethyldichlorofluorescein diacetate, respectively. For Ca2+ imaging, myocytes were coloaded with rhod-2 and fluo-4 to evaluate mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca2+, respectively. After 10 min of reperfusion at pH 7.4, calcein redistributed across the mitochondrial inner membrane, an event preceded by mitochondrial ROS formation and accompanied by hypercontracture, mitochondrial depolarization, and then cell death. Acidotic reperfusion, antioxidants, and MPT blockers each prevented the MPT, depolarization, hypercontraction, and cell killing. Antioxidants, but neither MPT blockers nor acidotic reperfusion, inhibited ROS formation after reperfusion. Furthermore, anoxic reperfusion at pH 7.4 prevented cell death. Both mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca2+ increased during ischemia but recovered in the first minutes of reperfusion. Mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca2+ overloading again occurred late after reperfusion. This late Ca2+ overloading was blocked by MPT inhibition. Intramitochondrial Ca2+ chelation by cold loading/warm incubation of BAPTA did not prevent cell death after reperfusion. In conclusion, mitochondrial ROS, together with normalization of pH, promote MPT onset and subsequent myocyte death after reperfusion. In contrast, Ca2+ overloading appears to be the consequence

  1. Instructive nanofibrous scaffold comprising runt-related transcription factor 2 gene delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Nelson; Ribeiro, Diana; Martins, Albino; Faria, Susana; Fonseca, Nuno A; Moreira, João N; Reis, Rui L; Neves, Nuno M

    2014-08-26

    Inducer molecules capable of regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into specific lineages have proven effective in basic science and in preclinical studies. Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) is considered to be the central gene involved in the osteoblast phenotype induction, which may be advantageous for inducing bone tissue regeneration. This work envisions the development of a platform for gene delivery, combining liposomes as gene delivery devices, with electrospun nanofiber mesh (NFM) as a tissue engineering scaffold. pDNA-loaded liposomes were immobilized at the surface of functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) NFM. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) cultured on RUNX2-loaded liposomes immobilized at the surface of electrospun PCL NFM showed enhanced levels of metabolic activity and total protein synthesis. RUNX2-loaded liposomes immobilized at the surface of electrospun PCL NFMs induce a long-term gene expression of eGFP and RUNX2 by cultured hBMSCs. Furthermore, osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs was also achieved by the overexpression of other osteogenic markers in medium free of osteogenic supplementation. These findings demonstrate that surface immobilization of RUNX2 plasmid onto elestrospun PCL NFM can produce long-term gene expression in vitro, which may be employed to enhance the osteoinductive properties of scaffolds used for bone tissue engineering strategies.

  2. Myocyte enhancer factor (MEF) 2C: a tissue-restricted member of the MEF-2 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J F; Schwarz, J J; Olson, E N

    1993-01-01

    MEF-2 is a muscle-specific DNA binding activity that recognizes an A+T-rich sequence found in the control regions of numerous muscle-specific genes. The recent cloning of MEF-2 showed that it belongs to the MADS (MCM1, Agamous, Deficiens, and serum-response factor) box family of transcription factors and that MEF-2 mRNA is expressed ubiquitously. Here we describe the cloning of a member of the MEF-2 gene family, referred to as MEF-2C, that is nearly identical to other MEF-2 gene products in the MADS box but diverges from other members of the family outside of this domain. MEF-2C binds the MEF-2 site with high affinity and can activate transcription of a reporter gene linked to tandem copies of that site. In contrast to previously described members of the MEF-2 family, MEF-2C transcripts are highly enriched in skeletal muscle, spleen, and brain of adult mice and are upregulated during myoblast differentiation. These results suggest that the MEF-2 site is a target for a diverse family of proteins that regulates transcription in a variety of cell types. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8506376

  3. Isoprenaline, Ca2+ and the Na(+)-K+ pump in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Mathias, R T; Cohen, I S; Baldo, G J

    1992-01-01

    1. The whole-cell patch clamp technique was employed to study the effects of the beta-agonist isoprenaline (ISO) on the Na(+)=K+ pump current, Ip, in acutely isolated ventricular myocytes from guinea-pig hearts. Propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, was used to demonstrate that all of the effects of ISO, stimulatory or inhibitory, are mediated by beta-receptors. 2. Below about 150 nM [Ca2+]i, we find that ISO reduces Ip, while above this [Ca2+]i ISO increases Ip. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of ISO on Ip are independent of either intracellular sodium ([Na+]i) or extracellular potassium ([K+]o). These results suggest that the end-effect of ISO is directly on the maximum pump turnover rate (Vmax) rather than indirectly through changes in [Na+]i or [K+]o or modulatory effects on Na+ or K+ affinity. 3. The maximum effect of ISO increases Ip by 25% when [Ca2+] is buffered at 1.4 microM. A half-maximal effect is reached at roughly 10 nM-ISO and a near-maximal effect by 0.5 microM. 4. The permeabilized patch technique, using amphotericin B (Horn & Marty, 1988; Rae, Cooper, Gates & Watsky, 1991), was employed to minimize changes in the normal second messenger systems and calcium buffers. In these experiments, we used a high intracellular sodium solution (pipette sodium was 50 mM), thus sodium-calcium exchange was depressed and we expected [Ca2+]i to be above 150 nM. ISO increases Ip in these conditions as in the dialysed cells. 5. Our results suggest that beta-stimulation can increase Ip, but only if [Ca2+]i is above about 150 nM. In the beating heart [Ca2+]i rises well above this value during systole and the average [Ca2+]i, which depends on heart rate, is expected to normally be above this level. During beta-stimulation, the increase in Ip along with a concomitant increase in IK (Giles, Nakajima, Ono & Shibata, 1989; Duchatelle-Gourdon, Hartzell & Lagrutta, 1989) helps prevent action potential lengthening and allows an increase in heart rate even in the

  4. Measuring and Modeling Chloride-Hydroxyl Exchange in the Guinea-Pig Ventricular Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, S. A.; Swietach, P.; Wilson, D. A.; Smith, N. P.; Vaughan-Jones, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    Protons are powerful modulators of cardiac function. Their intracellular concentration is regulated by sarcolemmal ion transporters that export or import H+-ions (or their ionic equivalent: \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{HCO}}_{3}^{-},\\hspace{.167em}{\\mathrm{OH}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). One such transporter, which imports H+-equivalents, is a putative Cl−/OH− exchanger (CHE). A strong candidate for CHE is SLC26A6 protein, a product of the SLC26A gene family of anion transporters, which has been detected in murine heart. SLC26A6 protein is suggested to be an electrogenic \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}1{\\mathrm{Cl}}^{-}/2{\\mathrm{OH}}^{-}(2{\\mathrm{HCO}}_{3}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) exchanger. Unfortunately, there is insufficient characterization of cardiac CHE against which the properties of heterologously expressed SLC26A6 can be matched. We therefore investigated the proton, Cl−, and voltage dependence of CHE activity in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, using voltage-clamp, intracellular pH fluorescence, and mathematical modeling techniques. We find that CHE activity is tightly regulated by intracellular and extracellular pH, is voltage-insensitive over a wide range (±80 mV), and displays substrate dependence suggestive of electroneutral 1Cl−/1OH− exchange. These properties exclude electrogenic SLC26A6 as sole contributor to CHE. Either the SLC26A6 product in heart is electroneutral, or CHE comprises at

  5. Modulation of the muscarinic K+ channel by P2-purinoceptors in guinea-pig atrial myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, H; Ehara, T

    1996-01-01

    1. Activation of muscarinic K+ (KACh) channels by P2-purinergic agonists, such as ATP, decreases monotonically in the continued presence of agonist. We investigated the mechanisms underlying this process of decline in guinea-pig atrial myocytes using the patch-clamp technique. 2. External ATP reversibly depressed the acetylcholine (ACh, 5.5-11 microM)-induced KACh current in a concentration-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 5.4 microM. 3. External ATP irreversibly reduced guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S)-induced KACh current both in control and pertussis toxin (PTX)-pretreated cells, suggesting (i) that the ATP-induced inhibition of KACh current occurred at some step(s) downstream from the activation of the PTX-sensitive G protein, GK, and (ii) that a PTX-insensitive G protein was involved in the signal transduction pathway. 4. The potency order of ATP analogues in reducing KACh current was ATP > or = 2-methylthio-ATP > or = alpha, beta-methylene-ATP, indicating involvement of a P2Y-type purinoceptor. 5. In the cell-attached patch recording, ATP (100 microM) applied to the bath solution reduced the activity of the KACh channels activated by ACh in the pipette, in two out of eight experiments, suggesting the possible involvement of cytosolic second messengers in the inhibition of KACh channels. 6. The ATP-induced reduction of KACh current was not affected by a protein kinase C inhibitor, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H-7), suggesting that this response was not mediated by the activation of protein kinase C. 7. These results demonstrate that, in addition to the membrane-delimited activation through GK, external ATP causes an inhibition of the KACh channel probably by activating a PTX-insensitive G protein and cytosolic second messenger(s), which may underlie the monotonic decrease of the ATP-activated KACh current. PMID:8961182

  6. Length-tension relationships of sub-epicardial and sub-endocardial single ventricular myocytes from rat and ferret hearts.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, O; Le Guennec, J Y; White, E

    2000-05-01

    In vivo the sub-epicardial myocardium (EPI) and sub-endocardial myocardium (ENDO) operate over different ranges of sarcomere length (SL). However, it has not been previously shown whether EPI and ENDO work upon different ranges of the same or differing length-tension curves. We have compared the SL-tension relationship of intact, single ventricular EPI and ENDO myocytes from rat and ferret hearts. Cells were attached to carbon fibres of known compliance in order to stretch them and to record force at rest (passive tension) and during contractions (active tension). In both species, ENDO cells were significantly stiffer (i.e. had steeper SL-passive tension relationships) than EPI cells. Ferret ENDO cells had significantly steeper SL-active tension relationships than EPI cells; rat cells tended to behave similarly but no significant regional differences in active properties were observed. There were no inter-species differences in the active and passive properties of EPI cells, but ferret ENDO cells displayed significantly steeper passive and active SL-tension relationships than rat ENDO. We conclude that in vivo, ferret EPI and ENDO myocytes will function over different ranges of different SL-tension curves. There is a close relationship between SL and active tension (the Frank-Starling law of the heart), and our observations suggest that regional differences in the response to ventricular dilation will depend on both the change in SL and differing regional slopes of the SL-active tension curves.

  7. Transgenic overexpression of Hdac3 in the heart produces increased postnatal cardiac myocyte proliferation but does not induce hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Chinmay M; Lu, Min Min; Wang, Qiaohong; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2008-09-26

    Class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs) play vital roles in regulating cardiac development, morphogenesis, and hypertrophic responses. Although the roles of Hdac1 and Hdac2, class I HDACs, in cardiac hyperplasia, growth, and hypertrophic responsiveness have been reported, the role in the heart of Hdac3, another class I HDAC, has been less well explored. Here we report that myocyte-specific overexpression of Hdac3 in mice results in cardiac abnormalities at birth. Hdac3 overexpression produces thickening of ventricular myocardium, especially the interventricular septum, and reduction of both ventricular cavities in newborn hearts. Our data suggest that increased thickness of myocardium in Hdac3-transgenic (Hdac3-Tg) mice is due to increased cardiomyocyte hyperplasia without hypertrophy. Hdac3 overexpression inhibits several cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, including Cdkn1a, Cdkn1b, Cdkn1c, Cdkn2b, and Cdkn2c. Hdac3-Tg mice did not develop cardiac hypertrophy at 3 months of age, unlike previously reported Hdac2-Tg mice. Further, Hdac3 overexpression did not augment isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy when compared with wild-type littermates. These findings identify Hdac3 as a novel regulator of cardiac myocyte proliferation during cardiac development.

  8. Influence of Thromboxane A2 on the Regulation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channels in Mouse Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Seok; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Kim, Sang Hyung; Na, Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play an important role in myocardial protection. We examined the effects of thromboxane A2 on the regulation of KATP channel activity in single ventricular myocytes. Subjects and Methods Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of adult Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by enzymatic digestion. Single channel activity was recorded by excised inside-out and cell-attached patch clamp configurations at −60 mV holding potential during the perfusion of an ATP-free K-5 solution. Results In the excised inside-out patches, the thromboxane A2 analog, U46619, decreased the KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner; however, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, did not significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of U46619. In the cell-attached patches, U46619 inhibited dinitrophenol (DNP)-induced KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner, and SQ29548 attenuated the inhibitory effects of U46619 on DNP-induced KATP channel activity. Conclusion Thromboxane A2 may inhibit KATP channel activity, and may have a harmful effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:27482267

  9. Prevention of cumene hydroperoxide induced oxidative stress in cultured neonatal rat myocytes by scavengers and enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Persoon-Rothert, M; Egas-Kenniphaas, J M; van der Valk-Kokshoorn, E J; Mauve, I; van der Laarse, A

    1990-10-01

    Oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide was studied in cultured neonatal rat myocytes. A progressive increase of irreversible cell injury as determined by leakage of the cytoplastic enzyme alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (alpha-HBDH) from the cells was noted at concentrations ranging from 25-100 microM cumene hydroperoxide (incubation time 90 min). Cumene hydroperoxide-induced damage was reduced or prevented by several compounds: the application of Trolox C, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, and of phospholipase A2 inhibitors chlorpromazine and (to a lesser extent) quinacrine prevented alpha-HBDH release. ICRF-159, a chelator of divalent cations, ascorbic acid, a potent antioxidant, and the cysteine protease inhibitor leupeptin did not reduce the cumene hydroperoxide-induced cytotoxicity. Detoxification of hydroperoxides by the glutathione peroxidase system results in an increased flux through the pentose phosphate shunt and loss of NADPH. Glucose inhibited the cumene hydroperoxide-induced alpha-HBDH release, probably by replenishing NADPH. These results indicate that cumene hydroperoxide, after exhaustion of the glutathione system, induces irreversible injury in cultured myocytes by a mechanism that depends to a large extent on deterioration of cellular membranes caused by lipid peroxidation and phospholipase activation.

  10. Evaluation of remodeling in left and right ventricular myocytes from heterozygous (mRen2)27 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Chouabe, Christophe; Ricci, Estelle; Kurdi, Mazen; Legrand, Claude; Bricca, Giampiero; Bonvallet, Robert

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac remodeling was assessed both in the pressure-overloaded left ventricle and in the normotensive right ventricle of hypertensive transgenic rats (mRen2)27 (TGR27). The present study combined histology, electrophysiology, molecular biology and biochemistry techniques. A significant increase in action potential (AP) duration was recorded both in right and left ventricular myocytes wheareas only in the latter ones were hypertrophic. The increase in AP duration is mainly supported by the reduction of the transient outward K current (I(to)) density since no significant modification was observed for the L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)), the sodium-calcium exchange current (I(NCX)), the delayed rectifier current (I(K)) and the inward rectifier current (I(K1)). The lower amplitude of I(to) current was associated with a lower Kv4.3 protein expression both in right and left ventricles while Kv4.3 mRNA levels was decreased only in left ventricle. Thus, a differential ventricular remodeling takes place in the TGR27 model. The possible cause of electrical remodeling in right ventricular myocytes of TGR27 is discussed.

  11. Cardiac myocyte diversity and a fibroblast network in the junctional region of the zebrafish heart revealed by transmission and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lafontant, Pascal J; Behzad, Ali R; Brown, Evelyn; Landry, Paul; Hu, Norman; Burns, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as an important model of heart development and regeneration. While the structural characteristics of the developing and adult zebrafish ventricle have been previously studied, little attention has been paid to the nature of the interface between the compact and spongy myocardium. Here we describe how these two distinct layers are structurally and functionally integrated. We demonstrate by transmission electron microscopy that this interface is complex and composed primarily of a junctional region occupied by collagen, as well as a population of fibroblasts that form a highly complex network. We also describe a continuum of uniquely flattened transitional cardiac myocytes that form a circumferential plate upon which the radially-oriented luminal trabeculae are anchored. In addition, we have uncovered within the transitional ring a subpopulation of markedly electron dense cardiac myocytes. At discrete intervals the transitional cardiac myocytes form contact bridges across the junctional space that are stabilized through localized desmosomes and fascia adherentes junctions with adjacent compact cardiac myocytes. Finally using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, segmentation and volume reconstruction, we confirm the three-dimensional nature of the junctional region as well as the presence of the sheet-like fibroblast network. These ultrastructural studies demonstrate the previously unrecognized complexity with which the compact and spongy layers are structurally integrated, and provide a new basis for understanding development and regeneration in the zebrafish heart.

  12. Measurement of Strain in Cardiac Myocytes at Micrometer Scale Based on Rapid Scanning Confocal Microscopy and Non-Rigid Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Lichter, J; Li, Hui; Sachse, Frank B

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of cell shortening is an important technique for assessment of physiology and pathophysiology of cardiac myocytes. Many types of heart disease are associated with decreased myocyte shortening, which is commonly caused by structural and functional remodeling. Here, we present a new approach for local measurement of 2-dimensional strain within cells at high spatial resolution. The approach applies non-rigid image registration to quantify local displacements and Cauchy strain in images of cells undergoing contraction. We extensively evaluated the approach using synthetic cell images and image sequences from rapid scanning confocal microscopy of fluorescently labeled isolated myocytes from the left ventricle of normal and diseased canine heart. Application of the approach yielded a comprehensive description of cellular strain including novel measurements of transverse strain and spatial heterogeneity of strain. Quantitative comparison with manual measurements of strain in image sequences indicated reliability of the developed approach. We suggest that the developed approach provides researchers with a novel tool to investigate contractility of cardiac myocytes at subcellular scale. In contrast to previously introduced methods for measuring cell shorting, the developed approach provides comprehensive information on the spatio-temporal distribution of 2-dimensional strain at micrometer scale.

  13. Differential effects of pertussis toxin on insulin-stimulated phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis and glycerolipid synthesis de novo. Studies in BC3H-1 myocytes and rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.M.; Standaert, M.L.; Nair, G.P.; Farese, R.V. )

    1991-04-02

    Insulin-induced increases in diacylglycerol (DAG) have been suggested to result from stimulation of de novo phosphatidic acid (PA) synthesis and phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis. Presently, the authors found that insulin decreased PC levels of BC3H-1 myocytes and rat adipocytes by approximately 10-25% within 30 s. These decreases were rapidly reversed in both cell types, apparently because of increased PC synthesis de novo. In BC3H-1 myocytes, pertussis toxin inhibited PC resynthesis and insulin effects on the pathway of de novo PA-DAG-PC synthesis, as evidenced by changes in ({sup 3}H)glycerol incorporation, but did not inhibit insulin-stimulated PC hydrolysis. Pertussis toxin also blocked the later, but not the initial, increase in DAG production in the myocytes. Phorbol esters activated PC hydrolysis in both myocytes and adipocytes, but insulin-induced stimulation of PC hydrolysis was not dependent upon activation of PKC, since this hydrolysis was not inhibited by 500 {mu}M sangivamycin, an effective PKC inhibitor. The results indicate that insulin increases DAG by pertussis toxin sensitive and insensitive (PC hydrolysis) mechanisms, which are mechanistically separate, but functionally interdependent and integrated. PC hydrolysis may contribute importantly to initial increases in DAG, but later sustained increases are apparently largely dependent on insulin-induced stimulation of the pathway of de novo phospholipid synthesis.

  14. Induced overexpression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger transgene: altered myocyte contractility, [Ca2+]i transients, SR Ca2+ contents, and action potential duration.

    PubMed

    Wang, JuFang; Chan, Tung O; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Gao, Erhe; Song, Jianliang; Koch, Walter J; Feldman, Arthur M; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2009-08-01

    We have produced mice in which expression of the rat cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) transgene was switched on when doxycycline was removed from the feed at 5 wk. At 8 to 10 wk, NCX1 expression in induced (Ind) mouse hearts was 2.5-fold higher but protein levels of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-subunits of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, phospholamban, ryanodine receptor, calsequestrin, and unphosphorylated and phosphorylated phospholemman were unchanged compared with wild-type (WT) or noninduced (non-Ind) hearts. There was no cellular hypertrophy since WT, non-Ind, and Ind myocytes had similar whole cell membrane capacitance. In Ind myocytes, NCX1 current amplitude was approximately 42% higher, L-type Ca(2+) current amplitude was unchanged, and action potential duration was prolonged compared with WT or non-Ind myocytes. Contraction and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) transient amplitudes in Ind myocytes were lower at 0.6, not different at 1.8, and higher at 5.0 mM extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) compared with WT or non-Ind myocytes. Despite similar Ca(2+) current amplitude and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) uptake, SR Ca(2+) content at 5.0 mM [Ca(2+)](o) was significantly higher in Ind compared with non-Ind myocytes, indicating that NCX1 directly contributed to SR Ca(2+) loading. Echocardiography demonstrated that heart rate, left ventricular mass, ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output were similar among the three groups of animals. In vivo close-chest catheterization demonstrated similar contractility and relaxation among the three groups of mice, both at baseline and after stimulation with isoproterenol. We conclude that induced expression of NCX1 transgene resulted in altered [Ca(2+)](i) homeostasis, myocyte contractility, and action potential morphology. In addition, heart failure did not occur 3 to 5 wk after NCX1 transgene was induced to be expressed at levels found in

  15. Role of transiently altered sarcolemmal membrane permeability and basic fibroblast growth factor release in the hypertrophic response of adult rat ventricular myocytes to increased mechanical activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, D; Pimental, D; Prasad, S; Mäki, T; Berger, H J; McNeil, P L; Smith, T W; Kelly, R A

    1996-01-01

    One of the trophic factors that has been implicated in initiating or facilitating growth in response to increased mechanical stress in several tissues and cell types is basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; FGF-2). Although mammalian cardiac muscle cells express bFGF, it is not known whether it plays a role in mediating cardiac adaptation to increased load, nor how release of the cytosolic 18-kD isoform of bFGF would be regulated in response to increased mechanical stress. To test the hypothesis that increased mechanical activity induces transient alterations in sarcolemmal permeability that allow cytosolic bFGF to be released and subsequently to act as an autocrine and paracrine growth stimulus, we examined primary isolates of adult rat ventricular myocytes maintained in serum-free, defined medium that were continually paced at 3 Hz for up to 5 d. Paced myocytes, but not nonpaced control cells, exhibited a "hypertrophic" response, which was characterized by increases in the rate of phenylalanine incorporation, total cellular protein content, and cell size. These changes could be mimicked in control cells by exogenous recombinant bFGF and could be blocked in continually paced cells by a specific neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. In addition, medium conditioned by continually paced myocytes contained significantly more bFGF measured by ELISA and more mitogenic activity for 3T3 cells, activity that could be reduced by a neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. The hypothesis that transient membrane disruptions sufficient to allow release of cytosolic bFGF occur in paced myocytes was examined by monitoring the rate of uptake into myocytes from the medium of 10-kD dextran linked to fluorescein. Paced myocytes exhibited a significantly higher rate of fluoresceinlabeled dextran uptake. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that nonlethal, transient alterations in sarcolemmal membrane permeability with release of cytosolic bFGF is one mechanism by which increased

  16. Dysregulation of catalase activity in newborn myocytes during hypoxia is mediated by c-Abl tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Liu, Jie; Boopathy, Archana V; Che, Pao Lin; Crawford, Brian H; Baroi, Gitangali; Bhutani, Srishti; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Davis, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    In the adult heart, catalase (CAT) activity increases appropriately with increasing levels of hydrogen peroxide, conferring cardioprotection. This mechanism is absent in the newborn for unknown reasons. In the present study, we examined how the posttranslational modification of CAT contributes to its activation during hypoxia/ischemia and the role of c-Abl tyrosine kinase in this process. Hypoxia studies were carried out using primary cardiomyocytes from adult (>8 weeks) and newborn rats. Following hypoxia, the ratio of phosphorylated to total CAT and c-Abl in isolated newborn rat myocytes did not increase and were significantly lower (1.3- and 4.2-fold, respectively; P < .05) than their adult counterparts. Similarly, there was a significant association (P < .0005) between c-Abl and CAT in adult cells following hypoxia (30.9 ± 8.2 to 70.7 ± 13.1 au) that was absent in newborn myocytes. Although ubiquitination of CAT was higher in newborns compared to adults following hypoxia, inhibition of this did not improve CAT activity. When a c-Abl activator (5-(1,3-diaryl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)hydantoin [DPH], 200 µmol/L) was administered prior to hypoxia, not only CAT activity was significantly increased (P < .05) but also phosphorylation levels were also significantly improved (P < .01) in these newborn myocytes. Additionally, ischemia-reperfusion (IR) studies were performed using newborn (4-5 days) rabbit hearts perfused in a Langendorff method. The DPH given as an intracardiac injection into the right ventricle of newborn rabbit resulted in a significant improvement (P < .002) in the recovery of developed pressure after IR, a key indicator of cardiac function (from 74.6% ± 6.6% to 118.7% ± 10.9%). In addition, CAT activity was increased 3.92-fold (P < .02) in the same DPH-treated hearts. Addition of DPH to adult rabbits in contrast had no significant effect (from 71.3% ± 10.7% to 59.4% ± 12.1%). Therefore, in the newborn, decreased phosphorylation of CAT by c

  17. Actin dynamics tune the integrated stress response by regulating eukaryotic initiation factor 2α dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Joseph E; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Malzer, Elke; Dominicus, Caia S; Patel, Vruti; Moorhead, Greg; Ron, David; Marciniak, Stefan J

    2015-01-01

    Four stress-sensing kinases phosphorylate the alpha subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) to activate the integrated stress response (ISR). In animals, the ISR is antagonised by selective eIF2α phosphatases comprising a catalytic protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) subunit in complex with a PPP1R15-type regulatory subunit. An unbiased search for additional conserved components of the PPP1R15-PP1 phosphatase identified monomeric G-actin. Like PP1, G-actin associated with the functional core of PPP1R15 family members and G-actin depletion, by the marine toxin jasplakinolide, destabilised the endogenous PPP1R15A-PP1 complex. The abundance of the ternary PPP1R15-PP1-G-actin complex was responsive to global changes in the polymeric status of actin, as was its eIF2α-directed phosphatase activity, while localised G-actin depletion at sites enriched for PPP1R15 enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and the downstream ISR. G-actin's role as a stabilizer of the PPP1R15-containing holophosphatase provides a mechanism for integrating signals regulating actin dynamics with stresses that trigger the ISR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04872.001 PMID:25774599

  18. beta-Adrenergic modulation of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel in isolated human ventricular myocytes. Alteration in channel response to beta-adrenergic stimulation in failing human hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Koumi, S; Backer, C L; Arentzen, C E; Sato, R

    1995-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic modulation of the inwardly-rectifying K+ channel (IK1) was examined in isolated human ventricular myocytes using patch-clamp techniques. Isoproterenol (ISO) reversibly depolarized the resting membrane potential and prolonged the action potential duration. Under the whole-cell C1- -free condition, ISO applied via the bath solution reversibly inhibited macroscopic IdK1. The reversal potential of the ISO-sensitive current was shifted by approximately 60 mV per 10-fold change in the external K+ concentration and was sensitive to Ba2+. The ISO-induced inhibition of IK1 was mimicked by forskolin and dibutyrl cAMP, and was prevented by including a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (PKI) in the pipette solution. In single-channel recordings from cell-attached patches, bath applied ISO could suppress IK1 channels by decreasing open state probability. Bath application of the purified catalytic sub-unit of PKA to inside-out patches also inhibited IK1 and the inhibition could be antagonized by alkaline phosphatase. When beta-adrenergic modulation of IK1 was compared between ventricular myocytes isolated from the failing and the nonfailing heart, channel response to ISO and PKA was significantly reduced in myocytes from the failing heart. Although ISO inhibited IK1 in a concentration-dependent fashion in both groups, a half-maximal concentration was greater in failing (0.12 microM) than in nonfailing hearts (0.023 microM). These results suggest that IK1 in human ventricular myocytes can be inhibited by a PKA-mediated phosphorylation and the modulation is significantly reduced in ventricular myocytes from the failing heart compared to the nonfailing heart. Images PMID:8675658

  19. Low K⁺ current in arterial myocytes with impaired K⁺-vasodilation and its recovery by exercise in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Yeong; Kim, Hae Jin; Zhao, Zai Hao; Jang, Ji Hyun; Jin, Chun Zi; Yoo, Hae Young; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2014-11-01

    K(+) channels determine the plasma membrane potential of vascular myocytes, influencing arterial tone. In many types of arteries, a moderate increase in [K(+)]e induces vasorelaxation by augmenting the inwardly rectifying K(+) channel current (I Kir). K(+)-vasodilation matches regional tissue activity and O2 supply. In chronic hypertension (HT), small arteries and arterioles undergo various changes; however, ion channel remodeling is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether K(+) channels and K(+)-induced vasodilation are affected in deep femoral (DFA) and cerebral artery (CA) myocytes of angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats (Ang-HT). Additionally, we tested whether regular exercise training (ET) restores HT-associated changes in K(+) channel activity. In Ang-HT, both the voltage-gated K(+) channel current (I Kv) and I Kir were decreased in DFA and CA myocytes, and were effectively restored and further increased by combined ET for 2 weeks (HT-ET). Consistently, K(+)-vasodilation of the DFA was impaired in Ang-HT, and recovered in HT-ET. Interestingly, ET did not reverse the decreased K(+)-vasodilation of CA. CA myocytes from the Ang-HT and HT-ET groups demonstrated, apart from K(+) channel changes, an increase in nonselective cationic current (I NSC). In contrast, DFA myocytes exhibited decreased I NSC in both the Ang-HT and HT-ET groups. Taken together, the decreased K(+) conductance in Ang-HT rats and its recovery by ET suggest increased peripheral arterial resistance in HT and the anti-hypertensive effects of ET, respectively. In addition, the common upregulation of I NSC in the CA in the Ang-HT and HT-ET groups might imply a protective adaptation preventing excessive cerebral blood flow under HT and strenuous exercise.

  20. Two classes of gating current from L-type Ca channels in guinea pig ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Intramembrane charge movement was recorded in guinea pig ventricular myocytes at 19-22 degrees C using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. From a holding potential of -110 mV, the dependence of intramembrane charge moved on test voltage (Q(V)) followed the sum of two Boltzmann components. One component had a transition voltage (V) of -48 mV and a total charge (Qmax) of congruent to 3 nC/microF. The other had a V of - 18 mV and a Qmax of 11 nC/microF. Ba2+ currents through Ca channels began to activate at -45 mV and peaked at congruent to -15