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Sample records for myoglobinuria

  1. Mitochondrial anomalies in a Swiss family with autosomal dominant myoglobinuria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-du Pan, R.C.; Favre, H.; Junod, A.

    1997-04-14

    We report on a Swiss family in which 10 individuals of both sexes in 4 successive generations suffered from myoglobinuria, precipitated by febrile illness. It is the second family described with autosomal dominant inheritance of myoglobinuria. Four individuals suffered acute renal failure, which in two was reversible only after dialysis. In a recent case, a mitochondrial disorder was suspected because of an abnormal increase in lactate levels during an exercise test and because of a subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in a muscle biopsy, associated with a lack of cytochrome C oxidase in some muscle fibers. No mutation in the mitochondrial DNA was identified. Along with the inheritance pattern, these findings suggest that the myoglobinuria in this family is caused by a nuclear-encoded mutation affecting the respiratory chain. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Myoglobinuria with acute renal failure and hot kidneys seen on bone imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, K.J.; Sty, J.R.; Johnson, F.; Tisdale, P.

    1984-09-01

    We report a case of myoglobinuria secondary to prolonged seizures. The child showed ''hot kidneys'' with bone scintigraphy. The disease entity and etiologies of nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis are discussed.

  3. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy.

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Guide for Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... not supplements may be needed. Myoglobinuria (Urine looks coca-cola colored because it contains breakdown products of muscle ... a sign of breakdown of muscle (urine looks coca- cola colored because it contains breakdown products of muscle ...

  5. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

    PubMed

    Papasotiriou, Marios; Betsi, Grigoria; Tsironi, Maria; Assimakopoulos, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by muscle injury, drugs or alcohol and presents with muscle weakness and pain. It is characterized by rise in serum creatine kinase, aminotransferases and electrolytes as well as myoglobinuria. Myoglobinuria may cause acute kidney injury by direct proximal tubule cytotoxicity, renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation and distal tubule obstruction. Muscle pain and weakness as well as vascular injury have been reported after acupuncture. We report a case of severe rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

  6. Case Report: Red Urine After Day Care Strabismus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Caroline, Pregardien; Marie-Cécile, Nassogne; Demet, Yuksel; Francis, Veyckemans

    2017-02-15

    In the absence of surgery on the urinary tract, the emission of red urine after anesthesia should be considered as a diagnostic emergency because it can be a sign of hematuria, hemoglobinuria, blood transfusion reaction, significant myoglobinuria, or porphyria.This case describes the management of a 12-year-old boy who presented red urine at the day care unit after strabismus surgery.

  7. Endpoint measures in the mdx mouse relevant for muscular dystrophy pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yvonne M.; Rader, Erik P.; Crawford, Robert W.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of mobility influences the quality of life for patients with neuromuscular diseases. Common measures of mobility and chronic muscle damage are the six-minute walk test and serum creatine kinase. Despite extensive pre-clinical studies of therapeutic approaches, characterization of these measures is incomplete. To address this, a six-minute ambulation assay, serum creatine kinase, and myoglobinuria were investigated for the mdx mouse, a dystrophinopathy mouse model commonly used in pre-clinical studies. Mdx mice ambulated shorter distances than normal controls, a disparity accentuated after mild exercise. An asymmetric pathophysiology in mdx mice was unmasked with exercise, and peak measurements of serum creatine kinase and myoglobinuria were identified. Our data highlights the necessity to consider asymmetric pathology and timing of biomarkers when testing potential therapies for muscular dystrophy. PMID:22154712

  8. "Abdominal crunch"-induced rhabdomyolysis presenting as right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Haas, D C; Bohnker, B K

    1999-02-01

    A young, active duty sailor presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. History, physical, and laboratory findings initially suggested cholecystitis or related disease. Further evaluation found myoglobinuria and a recently increased exercise program, leading to the diagnosis of exercise-induced right upper abdominal wall rhabdomyolysis. Although not a common cause of abdominal pain, this diagnosis should be considered in the patient with abdominal pain and a recently increased exercise program, particularly exercises of the abdominal wall such as "abdominal crunches."

  9. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Presenting with Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang-Bum; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging febrile illness. While many kinds of severe complications including acute renal failure have been reported, rhabdomyolysis is rarely reported in association with SFTS. A 54-year-old female farmer was admitted with fever and diffuse myalgia. Laboratory finding showed thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, azotemia, extremely elevated muscle enzyme levels and myoglobinuria. We describe a fatal case of rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure complicated by SFTS. PMID:28271645

  10. Subatmospheric pressure wound therapy and the vacuum-assisted closure device: basic science and current clinical successes.

    PubMed

    Plikaitis, Christina M; Molnar, Joseph A

    2006-03-01

    This article reviews the development, current theories behind the mechanism of action and clinical use of subatmospheric pressure wound therapy with the vacuum-assisted closure device. An evolving list of indications for subatmospheric pressure therapy is discussed including its use in chronic wounds, traumatic wounds and orthopedic salvage, infected sternal wounds, management of the open abdomen, enterocutaneous fistulae, burn wounds, skin grafts and dermal substitutes, as well as systemic disease processes, such as myoglobinuria. The vacuum-assisted closure device Instill system is also reviewed, in which subatmospheric pressure therapy has been combined with the instillation of therapeutic solutions for the treatment of difficult infected wounds.

  11. [Myoglobinuric renal failure in hyperosmolar diabetic coma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rumpf, K W; Kaiser, H; Gröne, H J; Trapp, V E; Meinck, H M; Goebel, H H; Kunze, E; Kreuzer, H; Scheler, F

    1981-05-29

    Acute rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinuric renal failure occurred in a 66-year-old woman who was in hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic coma. No previous description of such a case has been found. The clinical picture was characterized by the typical findings of hyperosmolar coma, in addition to excessive serum creatine kinase and myoglobin levels and massive myoglobinuria with acute renal failure. The rhabdomyolysis became fully manifest only under insulin treatment, possibly the result of insulin-induced hypophosphataemia, which seems to be of importance in the causation of the rhabdomyolysis.

  12. [Rhabdomyolysis in a well-trained woman after unusually intense exercise].

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christian; Jensen, Mogens Pfeiffer

    2014-06-16

    A 35-year-old woman was acutely hospitalized with oedema of the upper limbs, reduced force, severe movement reduction and muscle pain in both upper extremities. Her symptoms started after three days of intense exercise doing kayaking and a lot of pull-ups in crossfit. Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome, characterized by muscle necrosis. Usually there is a marked elevation of creatine kinase (CK) concentration with symptoms as described and myoglobinuria (dark coloured urine). After hard muscular work there will often be asymptomatic, but significant elevations in CK concentration, and in rare cases life-threatening rhabdomyolysis with electrolyte imbalances and acute kidney failure.

  13. Severe rhabdomyolysis without renal injury associated with lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Norberto; Aldana, Norberto Navarrete

    2013-01-01

    Lightning strikes cause injuries in multiple systems and organs. Early recognition of lightning injury syndromes and anticipation of harmful complications can improve outcomes for these patients. The author has presented a case report of a patient who was struck by lightning and exhibited extensive soft tissue injury with myoglobinuria. He was treated with delayed fasciotomy and had evidence of severe muscle injury with markedly elevated creatine kinase levels that gradually improved with aggressive fluid infusion. The patient did not require alkalinization of urine, mannitol, or dialysis, and his renal function remained normal.

  14. PubMed Central

    Dallaire, M; Chamberland, M

    1994-01-01

    Combinations of lovastatin and other drugs have been reported to cause rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. The authors report such a case in a 72-year-old man who had been receiving atenolol, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), dipyridamole, lovastatin, danazol, prednisone and doxycycline. The ASA, lovastatin and danazol were discontinued. The symptoms resolved, and laboratory test results were normal within 2 weeks. Lovastatin was strongly suspected; danazol was the most likely potentiator by diminishing the metabolism of lovastatin and its metabolites in the liver or by having a direct toxic effect on the muscles. PMID:8199978

  15. Adam (MDMA) and Eve (MDEA) misuse: an immunohistochemical study on three fatal cases.

    PubMed

    Fineschi, V; Centini, F; Mazzeo, E; Turillazzi, E

    1999-09-30

    Three fatal cases of MDMA/MDEA misuse have been examined. These referred to white males between 19 and 20 years of age, in which post-mortem toxicology showed the presence of MDMA (in one case), MDEA (in one case) and both (in one case). The clinical data were analysed and the histopathological findings were studied following immunohistochemical investigations. A complete immunohistochemical study has made it possible to demonstrate rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria with alterations of the organs typical of a DIC. Clinical, histopathological and toxicological data suggest that severe or fatal complications following ecstasy ingestion could be related to idiosyncratic response.

  16. [McArdle disease presenting with rhabdomyolisis and acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui; Castro, Rui; Costa, Alexandre; Taipa, Ricardo; Vizcaíno, Ramon; Morgado, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    McArdle disease typically presents in childhood or young adults with myalgia, exercise intolerance, cramps and myoglobinuria. Deficiency of myophosphorylase enzyme results in inability to degrade glycogen stores, causing glycogen accumulation in muscle tissue and energy deficit. Evolution with rhabdomiolysis may occur and can be complicated with acute kidney injury but rarely, in about 11% of cases, is the initial disease manifestation. We report a case of McArdle Disease in a 38-year-old male patient. The disease went unrecognized despite previous symptoms (myalgia, exercise intolerance and single myoglobinuria episode) until an episode of rhabdomyolisis complicated with oliguric acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. The kidney biopsy showed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Despite normalization of renal function, muscle lysis markers remained abnormal. Metabolic myopathy was suspected and a muscle biopsy was performed. It showed subsarcolemic glycogen deposition and absence of myophosphorylase activity. This case-report underlines the importance of considering metabolic myopathy in patients with acute kidney injury and severe rhabdomyolisis.

  17. Rhabdomyolysis and Cardiomyopathy in a 20-Year-Old Patient with CPT II Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vavlukis, M.; Eftimov, A.; Zafirovska, P.; Caparovska, E.; Pocesta, B.; Kedev, S.; Dimovski, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To raise the awareness of adult-onset carnitite palmitoyltransferase II deficiency (CPT II) by describing clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of the disease occurring in early adulthood. Method. Review of the case characteristics and literature review. Results. We report on a 20-year-old man presenting with dyspnea, fatigue, fever, and myoglobinuria. This was the second episode with such symptoms (the previous one being three years earlier). The symptoms occurred after intense physical work, followed by a viral infection resulting in fever treated with NSAIDs. Massive rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed, resulting in acute renal failure necessitating plasmapheresis and hemodialysis, acute hepatic lesion, and respiratory insufficiency. Additionally, our patient had cardiomyopathy with volume overload. After a detailed workup, CPT II deficiency was suspected. We did a sequencing analysis for exons 1, 3, and 4 of the CPT II gene and found that the patient was homozygote for Ser 113 Leu mutation in exon 3 of the CPT II gene. The patient recovery was complete except for the cardiomiopathy with mildly impaired systolic function. Conclusion. Whenever a patient suffers recurrent episodes of myalgia, followed by myoglobinuria due to rhabdomyolysis, we should always consider the possibility of this rare condition. The definitive diagnose of this condition is achieved by genetic testing. PMID:24563797

  18. Familial combined deficiency of muscle carnitine and carnitine palmityl transferase (CPT).

    PubMed

    Skard Heier, M; Dietrichson, P; Landaas, S

    1986-12-01

    Two patients, brother and sister, aged 19 and 16, with combined, partial deficiency of carnitine palmityltransferase (CPT) are reported. Both patients had recurrent exercise-related myoglobinuria. The brother had also experienced an episode of transient renal failure associated with myoglobinuria. Both had elevated CK and myoglobin in plasma between attacks. There was a normal production of lactate in ischaemic forearm exercise, but elevated levels of NH3, resulting in an increased NH3/lactate ratio; 48-h fasting caused no significant changes in cholesterol, triglycerides or glucose, no rise of CK, and a normal ketogenic response, indicating no hepatic enzyme deficiency. Muscle biopsy showed slight changes of myopathy in both patients, with scattered atrophic fibres, but no lipid accumulation or other specific changes. Biochemical analysis of muscle tissue revealed a reduction of carnitine to 48% and 40% and a reduction of CPT to 55% and 59% of normal values, which is similar to the findings in the only previous report of combined partial carnitine and CPT deficiency. The heterogeneity of the laboratory findings in CPT deficiencies and the value of the various diagnostic procedures in metabolic myopathies are discussed.

  19. Factors in delayed muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Abraham, W M

    1977-01-01

    The possible causes of delayed muscle soreness which occur 24 to 48 hr after exercise were examined from three different approaches, each designed to test an existing hypothesis. Surface electromyograms were used to evaluate the muscle spasm theory; the possibility of actual muscle cell damage was monitored by the presence of myoglobinuria, while the ratio of hydroxyproline/creatinine (OHP/Cr) in 24 hr urine collection was used as a marker for connective tissue involvement. In the first study, although all volunteers developed muscle soreness 24 and 48 hr after exercise, no change in the EMG activity of the sore muscles was observed. Myoglobin excretion was found in 88% of the subjects who developed soreness. However, in a second study, 92% of the subject who performed both moderate and heavy exercise but did not develop muscle soreness had myoglobinuria. In contrast, during a third experiment subjects on gelatin-free diets showed an increase (P less than .1) in the OHP/Cr between control (.020+/-.001) and 48 hr post-exercise (.002+/-.001, X+/-SE). Soreness resulted in all cases. When the OHP/Cr value is taken for the day of maximal soreness, the post-exercise mean increases to .024+/-.001 and the level of significance rises (P less than .005). These observations support the concept that exercise induced soreness may be related to disruption of the connective tissue elements in the muscle and/or their attachments.

  20. Spinning Out of Control: A 19-Year-Old Female with Spinning-Related Exertional Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Daniel J; Han, Sukgu; Wong, Alex K

    2016-01-01

    Thigh compartment syndrome (TCS) is a rare condition caused by high pressures within the fascial compartments of the thigh, impeding capillary flow and leading to decreased perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and necrosis. TCS is most frequently associated with trauma and anticoagulation but has also rarely been associated with exercise-related injury. We present the case of a 19-year-old female who reported painful swelling in her thighs and darkening of her urine after participating in a spinning class. On physical examination, the patient was found to have tight, painful thigh compartments with extreme tenderness on passive motion. Labs revealed a marked elevation of creatine kinase and leukocytosis. The patient was diagnosed with TCS and underwent emergent decompression fasciotomy and aggressive IV fluids for protection against myoglobinuria. Due to high clinical suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and early surgery, the patient experienced excellent recovery without functional deficits.  PMID:28123920

  1. Inborn Errors of Energy Metabolism Associated with Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anibh M.; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Illsinger, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Inherited neuromuscular disorders affect approximately one in 3,500 children. Structural muscular defects are most common; however functional impairment of skeletal and cardiac muscle in both children and adults may be caused by inborn errors of energy metabolism as well. Patients suffering from metabolic myopathies due to compromised energy metabolism may present with exercise intolerance, muscle pain, reversible or progressive muscle weakness, and myoglobinuria. In this review, the physiology of energy metabolism in muscle is described, followed by the presentation of distinct disorders affecting skeletal and cardiac muscle: glycogen storage diseases types III, V, VII, fatty acid oxidation defects, and respiratory chain defects (i.e., mitochondriopathies). The diagnostic work-up and therapeutic options in these disorders are discussed. PMID:20589068

  2. Glycyrrhizic acid toxicity caused by consumption of licorice candy cigars.

    PubMed

    Johns, Christine

    2009-01-01

    A 49-year-old female physician presented with peripheral edema, weight gain and relative hypertension caused by the consumption of licorice candy cigars containing glycyrrhizic acid (GZA) found in natural licorice extract. Although the patient's response to GZA resolved spontaneously, emergency physician awareness of the toxic effects of natural licorice extract may avert symptom progression in early-identified cases. The benefits of natural licorice extract as a flavour enhancer and herbal medicine are recognized worldwide. The Canadian public is likely not generally aware of the toxic potential of GZA, or that it may be present in the following commonly consumed products: black licorice, chewing gum, herbal teas, soft drinks, tobaccos and herbal remedies for cough, stomach ailments and constipation. Emergency physicians should inquire about the consumption of products that may contain natural licorice extract when patients present with unexplained hypertension, hypokalemia, edema, rhabdomyolysis or myoglobinuria.

  3. Spinning Out of Control: A 19-Year-Old Female with Spinning-Related Exertional Thigh Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, Daniel J; Badash, Ido; Han, Sukgu; Wong, Alex K

    2016-12-24

    Thigh compartment syndrome (TCS) is a rare condition caused by high pressures within the fascial compartments of the thigh, impeding capillary flow and leading to decreased perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and necrosis. TCS is most frequently associated with trauma and anticoagulation but has also rarely been associated with exercise-related injury. We present the case of a 19-year-old female who reported painful swelling in her thighs and darkening of her urine after participating in a spinning class. On physical examination, the patient was found to have tight, painful thigh compartments with extreme tenderness on passive motion. Labs revealed a marked elevation of creatine kinase and leukocytosis. The patient was diagnosed with TCS and underwent emergent decompression fasciotomy and aggressive IV fluids for protection against myoglobinuria. Due to high clinical suspicion, prompt diagnosis, and early surgery, the patient experienced excellent recovery without functional deficits.

  4. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  5. Clinical protocol for the management of malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Kollmann-Camaiora, A; Alsina, E; Domínguez, A; Del Blanco, B; Yepes, M J; Guerrero, J L; García, A

    2017-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a hypermetabolic syndrome that appears in susceptible patients after exposure to certain anaesthetic drugs (succinylcholine, inhalation anaesthetics). Its incidence in Spain is 1 in 40,000 adults, with a 10% mortality rate. It is induced by an abnormal regulation of the ryanodine receptors, producing a massive release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the striate muscle. Clinical manifestations include: CO2 increase, tachycardia, haemodynamic instability, metabolic and respiratory acidosis, profuse sweating, hyperpyrexia, CPK increase, myoglobinuria, kidney failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and ending in cardiac arrest. Dantrolene sodium is a ryanodine receptor antagonist, and inhibits the release of intracellular calcium. Definitive diagnosis is achieved by the exposure of muscle fibres to caffeine and halothane. Protocols can help guarantee a reliable and secure management when this severe event occurs.

  6. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  7. [Peripheral nerve and spinal cord complication in intravenous heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, A; Kuntzer, T; Ladbon, N; Janzer, R C; Yersin, B; Regli, F

    1996-11-01

    The neurological complications observed in 6 HIV negative intravenous drug users are reported. Four developed acute neuromuscular involvement in a lumbosacral or brachial distribution with rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, hypovolemia, renal and hepatic failure in the 3 most severely affected patients. Despite evidence of immunologic abnormalities and especially presence of anti-heroin antibodies, we feel that causative mechanisms include mixed compression and ischemia with an underlying toxic myopathy, resulting in segmental myopathy with secondary compression of peripheral nerves. Two patients developed myelopathy with acute or chronic onset. The mechanisms were vascular with spinal cord infarction in the acute form and probably infectious with secondary compressive arachnoiditis in the chronic form. In these 2 patients with myelopathy, outcome was poor.

  8. Compartment syndrome following total knee arthroplasty: clinical results of late fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Kang, Dong-Geun; Cho, Kye-Youl; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Kang-Il

    2014-09-01

    Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a rare complication. Because of its rarity, it may be overlooked and misdiagnosed as peroneal nerve palsy or deep vein thrombosis. This misdiagnosis could have a profound impact on the patient's outcome. We report a case of a 77-year-old female who developed unilateral compartment syndrome in the calf after staged bilateral TKA at an outside clinic. The patient presented with medical complications related to compartment syndrome: rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria, which caused acute renal failure. Thus, we performed late fasciotomy one week after symptom onset to debride necrotic tissue and salvage the compartment. In the discussion section, we will discuss risk factors for compartment syndrome after TKA, results of late fasciotomy and other indications for surgical treatment of compartment syndrome.

  9. Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, 2011-2015.

    PubMed

    Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

    2016-03-01

    Among active component members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps in 2015, there were 456 incident episodes of rhabdomyolysis likely due to physical exertion or heat stress ("exertional rhabdomyolysis"). Annual rates of incident diagnoses of exertional rhabdomyolysis increased 17% between 2014 and 2015. In 2015, the highest incidence rates occurred in service members who were male; younger than 20 years of age; black, non-Hispanic; members of the Marine Corps and Army; recruit trainees; and in combat-specific occupations. Most cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis were diagnosed at installations that support basic combat/recruit training or major ground combat units of the Army or Marine Corps. Medical care providers should consider exertional rhabdomyolysis in the differential diagnosis when service members (particularly recruits) present with muscular pain and swelling, limited range of motion, or the excretion of dark urine (e.g., myoglobinuria) after strenuous physical activity, particularly in hot, humid weather.

  10. McArdle disease: a case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Alberto; Oliveira, Narciso; Rocha, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    McArdle disease (glycogen storage disease type V) is a pure myopathy caused by an inherited deficit of myophosphorylase. The disease exhibits clinical heterogeneity, but patients typically experience exercise intolerance, acute crises of early fatigue, and contractures, sometimes with rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria, triggered by static muscle contractions or dynamic exercise. We present the case of a 54-year-old man with a lifelong history of fatigability, worsening on exertion. Laboratory evaluation revealed significant elevations in levels of creatine kinase (7924 U/L), lactate dehydrogenase (624 U/L), and myoglobulin (671 ng/mL). A muscle biopsy confirmed the presence of McArdle disease. This case report illustrates how, due to embarrassment, the patient hid his symptoms for many years and was eventually extremely relieved and “liberated” once McArdle disease was diagnosed 40 years later. PMID:23754915

  11. McArdle Disease Misdiagnosed as Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Chatfield, Sherryl; Junejo, Muhammad Hyder; Booth, Suzanne; Pattni, Jatin; Godfrey, Richard; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 44 Final Diagnosis: McArdle disease Symptoms: Exercise intolerance • muscle contracture • myalgia • myoglobinuria • recurrent rhabdomyolysis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: McArdle disease is a glycogen storage disorder mainly characterized by exercise intolerance. Prolonged muscle contracture is also a feature of this condition and may lead to rhabdomyolysis (RM), which is a serious event characterized by acute skeletal muscle damage. Case Report: A 44-year-old female patient presented with an acute contracture of the posterior neck muscles, causing severe nuchal rigidity. The contracture was induced during a dental extraction as she held her mouth open for a prolonged period, with her neck in a rigid position. She presented with severe pain in her ear and head, as well as fever, vomiting, and confusion. Based on her symptoms, she was initially misdiagnosed with bacterial meningitis and experienced an acute allergic reaction to the systemic penicillin she was subsequently administered. Lumbar puncture results were normal. High serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, recurrent exercise-related muscle symptoms, and a previous history of recurrent myoglobinuria raised the suspicion of an underlying neuromuscular condition. McArdle disease was confirmed by muscle biopsy and a genetic test, which revealed that the patient was homozygous for the R50X mutation in the PYGM gene. Conclusions: This case illustrates that even seemingly innocuous movements, if rapid isotonic or prolonged isometric in nature, can elicit a muscle contracture in McArdle disease patients. Here, we highlight the need for careful management in this patient population even during routine healthcare procedures. The allergic reaction to antibiotics emphasises that misdiagnoses may result in iatrogenic harm. PMID:27899787

  12. Unveiling the Metabolic Changes on Muscle Cell Metabolism Underlying p-Phenylenediamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marín de Mas, Igor; Marín, Silvia; Pachón, Gisela; Rodríguez-Prados, Juan C.; Vizán, Pedro; Centelles, Josep J.; Tauler, Romà; Azqueta, Amaya; Selivanov, Vitaly; López de Ceraín, Adela; Cascante, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a disorder characterized by acute damage of the sarcolemma of the skeletal muscle leading to release of potentially toxic muscle cell components into the circulation, most notably creatine phosphokinase (CK) and myoglobulin, and is frequently accompanied by myoglobinuria. In the present work, we evaluated the toxicity of p-phenylenediamine (PPD), a main component of hair dyes which is reported to induce rhabdomyolysis. We studied the metabolic effect of this compound in vivo with Wistar rats and in vitro with C2C12 muscle cells. To this aim we have combined multi-omic experimental measurements with computational approaches using model-driven methods. The integrative study presented here has unveiled the metabolic disorders associated to PPD exposure that may underlay the aberrant metabolism observed in rhabdomyolys disease. Animals treated with lower doses of PPD (10 and 20 mg/kg) showed depressed activity and myoglobinuria after 10 h of treatment. We measured the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and creatine kinase (CK) in rats after 24, 48, and 72 h of PPD exposure. At all times, treatment with PPD at higher doses (40 and 60 mg/kg) showed an increase of AST and ALT, and also an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and CK after 24 h. Blood packed cell volume and hemoglobin levels, as well as organs weight at 48 and 72 h, were also measured. No significant differences were observed in these parameters under any condition. PPD induce cell cycle arrest in S phase and apoptosis (40% or early apoptotic cells) on mus musculus mouse C2C12 cells after 24 h of treatment. Incubation of mus musculus mouse C2C12 cells with [1,2-13C2]-glucose during 24 h, subsequent quantification of 13C isotopologues distribution in key metabolites of glucose metabolic network and a computational fluxomic analysis using in-house developed software (Isodyn) showed that PPD is inhibiting glycolysis, non-oxidative pentose

  13. Unveiling the Metabolic Changes on Muscle Cell Metabolism Underlying p-Phenylenediamine Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marín de Mas, Igor; Marín, Silvia; Pachón, Gisela; Rodríguez-Prados, Juan C; Vizán, Pedro; Centelles, Josep J; Tauler, Romà; Azqueta, Amaya; Selivanov, Vitaly; López de Ceraín, Adela; Cascante, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a disorder characterized by acute damage of the sarcolemma of the skeletal muscle leading to release of potentially toxic muscle cell components into the circulation, most notably creatine phosphokinase (CK) and myoglobulin, and is frequently accompanied by myoglobinuria. In the present work, we evaluated the toxicity of p-phenylenediamine (PPD), a main component of hair dyes which is reported to induce rhabdomyolysis. We studied the metabolic effect of this compound in vivo with Wistar rats and in vitro with C2C12 muscle cells. To this aim we have combined multi-omic experimental measurements with computational approaches using model-driven methods. The integrative study presented here has unveiled the metabolic disorders associated to PPD exposure that may underlay the aberrant metabolism observed in rhabdomyolys disease. Animals treated with lower doses of PPD (10 and 20 mg/kg) showed depressed activity and myoglobinuria after 10 h of treatment. We measured the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and creatine kinase (CK) in rats after 24, 48, and 72 h of PPD exposure. At all times, treatment with PPD at higher doses (40 and 60 mg/kg) showed an increase of AST and ALT, and also an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and CK after 24 h. Blood packed cell volume and hemoglobin levels, as well as organs weight at 48 and 72 h, were also measured. No significant differences were observed in these parameters under any condition. PPD induce cell cycle arrest in S phase and apoptosis (40% or early apoptotic cells) on mus musculus mouse C2C12 cells after 24 h of treatment. Incubation of mus musculus mouse C2C12 cells with [1,2-(13)C2]-glucose during 24 h, subsequent quantification of (13)C isotopologues distribution in key metabolites of glucose metabolic network and a computational fluxomic analysis using in-house developed software (Isodyn) showed that PPD is inhibiting glycolysis, non-oxidative pentose

  14. Rhabdomyolysis: an evaluation of 475 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Melli, Giorgia; Chaudhry, Vinay; Cornblath, David R

    2005-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a common and potentially lethal clinical syndrome that results from acute muscle fiber necrosis with leakage of muscle constituents into blood. Myoglobinuria is the most significant consequence, leading to acute renal failure (ARF) in 15%-33% of patients with rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis occurs from inherited diseases, toxins, muscle compression or overexertion, or inflammatory processes, among other disorders. In some cases, no cause is found. We describe 475 patients from the Johns Hopkins Hospital inpatient records between January 1993 and December 2001 for the following discharge diagnosis codes: myoglobinuria, rhabdomyolysis, myopathy, toxic myopathy, malignant hyperthermia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and polymyositis. Of 1362 patients, 475 patients with an acute neuromuscular illness with serum creatine kinase (CK) more than 5 times the upper limit of normal (>975 IU/L) were included. Patients with recent myocardial infarction or stroke were excluded. The etiology was assigned by chart review. For all, the highest values of serum CK, serum creatinine and urine myoglobin, hemoglobin, and red blood cells were recorded. Forty-one patients had muscle biopsy within at least 2 months from the onset of rhabdomyolysis.Of the 475 patients, 151 were female and 324 were male (median age, 47 yr; range, 4-95 yr). Exogenous toxins were the most common cause of rhabdomyolysis, with illicit drugs, alcohol, and prescribed drugs responsible for 46%. Among the medical drugs, antipsychotics, statins, zidovudine, colchicine, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and lithium were the most frequently involved. In 60% of all cases, multiple factors were present. In 11% of all cases, rhabdomyolysis was recurrent. Underlying myopathy or muscle metabolic defects were responsible for 10% of cases, in which there was a high percentage of recurrence, only 1 etiologic factor, and a low incidence of ARF. In 7%, no cause was found. ARF was present in 218 (46

  15. Influence of the Environment on Body Temperature of Racing Greyhounds

    PubMed Central

    McNicholl, Jane; Howarth, Gordon S.; Hazel, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Heat strain is a potential risk factor for racing greyhounds in hot climates. However, there have been limited studies into the incidence of heat strain (when excess heat causes physiological or pathological effects) in racing greyhounds. The aim of this study was to determine if heat strain occurs in racing greyhounds, and, if so, whether environmental factors (e.g., ambient temperature and relative humidity) or dog-related factors (e.g., sex, bodyweight, color) are associated with the risk of heat strain. A total of 229 greyhounds were included in over 46 race meetings and seven different race venues in South Australia, Australia. Rectal temperatures of dogs were measured pre- and postrace and urine samples collected for analysis of myoglobinuria. Ambient temperature at race times ranged between 11.0 and 40.8°C and relative humidity ranged from 17 to 92%. There was a mean increase in greyhound rectal temperature of 2.1°C (range 1.1–3.1°C). A small but significant association was present between ambient temperature and increase in rectal temperature (r2 = 0.033, P = 0.007). The mean ambient temperature at race time, of dogs with postrace rectal temperature of or exceeding 41.5°C, was significantly greater than at race time of dogs with a postrace rectal temperature ≤41.5°C (31.2 vs. 27.3°C, respectively, P = 0.004). When the ambient temperature reached 38oC, over one-third (39%) of dogs had a rectal temperature >41.5°C. Over half of postrace urine samples were positive by Dipstick reading for hemoglobin/myoglobin, and of 77 urine samples positive for Dipstick readings, 95% were positive for myoglobin. However, urinary myoglobin levels were not associated with ambient temperature or postrace rectal temperatures. The mean increase in rectal temperature was greater in dark (black, blue, brindle) than light (fawn and white) colored greyhounds. The results suggest heat strain occurs in racing greyhounds, evidenced by postrace rectal temperatures

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected gluteal compartment syndrome with rhabdomyolysis in a bodybuilder

    PubMed Central

    Woon, Colin YL; Patel, Kushal R; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is a rare condition. We present a case of gluteal muscle strain with hematoma formation, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superinfection, leading to acute GCS, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. This combination of diagnoses has not been reported in the literature. A 36-year-old Caucasian male presented with buttock pain, swelling and fever after lifting weights. Gluteal compartment pressure was markedly elevated compared with the contralateral side. Investigations revealed elevated white blood cell, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactic acid. Urinalysis was consistent with myoglobinuria. Magnetic resonance imaging showed increased T2 signal in the gluteus maximus and a central hematoma. Cultures taken from the emergency debridement and fasciotomy revealed MRSA. He had repeat, debridement 2 d later, and delayed primary closure 3 d after. GCS is rare and must be suspected when patients present with pain and swelling after an inciting event. They are easily diagnosed with compartment pressure monitoring. The treatment of gluteal abscess and compartment syndrome is the same and involves rapid surgical debridement. PMID:27190761

  17. Management of neuroleptic malignant syndrome--a series of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Kurien, T; Rajeev, K K; Abraham, O C; Archana, S; Cherian, A M

    1993-02-01

    Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS) is a rare and life threatening complication of treatment with Neuroleptic medication. Phenothiazine and butyrophenones are most frequently implicated in this syndrome even though there are case reports with other drugs. In this paper we describe the classical presentation of this syndrome in eight cases who had been on either a butyrophenone, a phenothiazine or a combination of these drugs. In addition some of our patients were also on either Lithium and/or Amitrytiline for control of depressive symptoms. Fever, muscule rigidity and elevated CPK are the important criteria for diagnosis and they were noted in all our patients. In addition four of our patients fulfilled five of the six minor criteria laid down by Levenson. Both Sinemet and Bromocriptine were found to be effective in the treatment of seven of the eight cases. However treatment with Dantroline sodium was associated with severe muscle wasting in one of our cases and the drug had to be discontinued. Two of our patients developed suspected myoglobinuria with dark coloured urine and progressive renal failure. One patient died after development of renal failure, pulmonary edema and hyperkalemia as a consequence of this disorders.

  18. Crush syndrome chez l’adulte et problematique de sa prise en charge a la phase aiguë

    PubMed Central

    Hemou, P.F.; Sama, H.D.; Tchétikè, P.; Potkar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Crush syndrome is defined as the local and systemic response to a traumatic rhabdomyolysis caused by compartment syndrome (prolonged compression of a large muscle mass leading to ischemia). It is not usually an isolated event, and may go unnoticed in the first 24 to 48 hours of a severe polytrauma. Ignored crush syndrome can lead to acute renal failure secondary to myoglobinuria occurring in a hypovolemic patient, with acidosis and hyperkalaemia. Crush syndrome is a medical and surgical emergency, frequently occurring after disasters such as earthquakes or major explosions with collapse of buildings. The acute revascularization syndrome that can occur after decompression (either surgical, or removing the weight from the crushed body part or removing a tourniquet) can cause irreversible cardiac arrest due to acute hyperkalaemia and hypovolemia. Early fluid resuscitation (starting pre-hospital and lasting over the first 24 hours) is crucial to restore and maintain normovolemia, and a urine output of 1-2ml/kg/hour is recommended during the first 24 hours. Diuretics may help to maintain this high urine output, and preventing tubular precipitate of myoglobin in acidic urine via bicarbonate may be useful. Early nutrition targets may be obtained using early “prophylactic” haemodialysis. PMID:27777548

  19. [Unusual and fatal type of burn injury: hot air sauna burn].

    PubMed

    García-Tutor, E; Koljonen, V

    2007-01-01

    Sauna bathing is a popular recreational activity in Finland and is generally considered safe even for pregnant women and patients suffering from heart problems; but mixing alcohol with sauna bathing can be hazardous. In the normal Finnish recreational sauna the temperature is usually between 80 and 90 degrees C. A wide variety of burn injuries, in all age groups, are related to sauna bathing; scalds and contact burns account for over 85% while hot air, steam and flame burns for only 15%. Dehydration in patients under the influence of alcohol heightens the risk of hypotension which impairs skin blood circulation. This increased warming of the skin is an effect that is more marked on the outer and upper parts of the body exposed to hot air. Such patients require intensive care on admission: fluid replacement according to the Parkland formula, forced diuresis and immediate correction of acidosis and myoglobinuria. These patients have significant rhabdomyolysis on admission. The best predictor of survival is the creatine kinase level on the second post-injury day. CT scans are necessary to diagnose the underlying conditions of unconsciousness. The necrotic area extends to subcutaneous fat tissue and even to the underlying muscles. The level of excision is typically fascial and, in some areas, layers of the muscle must be removed. Owing to the popularity of sauna bathing throughout the world, it is important to know the extent of damage in this type of injury, in order not to underestimate the severity of such lesions.

  20. Treatment Opportunities in Patients With Metabolic Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Vissing, John

    2017-09-21

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders affecting utilization of carbohydrates or fat in the skeletal muscle. Adult patients with metabolic myopathies typically present with exercise-induced pain, contractures or stiffness, fatigue, and myoglobinuria. Symptoms are related to energy failure. Purpose of review In this review, the current treatment options, including exercise therapy, dietary treatment, pharmacological supplementation, gene transcription, and enzyme replacement therapy, are described. Recent findings Recognition of the metabolic block in the metabolic myopathies has started the development of new therapeutic options. Enzyme replacement therapy with rGAA has revolutionized treatment of early onset Pompe disease. Supplements of riboflavin, carnitine, and sucrose show promise in patients with respectively riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, primary carnitine deficiency, and McArdle disease. Treatment with citric acid cycle intermediates supply by triheptanoin seems promising in patients with glucogenoses, and studies are ongoing in patients with McArdle disease. Summary Treatment of metabolic myopathies primarily relies on avoiding precipitating factors and dietary supplements that bypass the metabolic block. Only a few of the used supplements are validated, and further studies are needed to define efficacious treatments. Further potential treatment targets are molecular therapies aimed at enzyme correction, such as chaperone therapy, gene therapy, gene expression therapy, and enzyme replacement therapies.

  1. A diagnostic algorithm for metabolic myopathies.

    PubMed

    Berardo, Andres; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2010-03-01

    Metabolic myopathies comprise a clinically and etiologically diverse group of disorders caused by defects in cellular energy metabolism, including the breakdown of carbohydrates and fatty acids to generate adenosine triphosphate, predominantly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Accordingly, the three main categories of metabolic myopathies are glycogen storage diseases, fatty acid oxidation defects, and mitochondrial disorders due to respiratory chain impairment. The wide clinical spectrum of metabolic myopathies ranges from severe infantile-onset multisystemic diseases to adult-onset isolated myopathies with exertional cramps. Diagnosing these diverse disorders often is challenging because clinical features such as recurrent myoglobinuria and exercise intolerance are common to all three types of metabolic myopathy. Nevertheless, distinct clinical manifestations are important to recognize as they can guide diagnostic testing and lead to the correct diagnosis. This article briefly reviews general clinical aspects of metabolic myopathies and highlights approaches to diagnosing the relatively more frequent subtypes (Fig. 1). Fig. 1 Clinical algorithm for patients with exercise intolerance in whom a metabolic myopathy is suspected. CK-creatine kinase; COX-cytochrome c oxidase; CPT-carnitine palmitoyl transferase; cyt b-cytochrome b; mtDNA-mitochondrial DNA; nDNA-nuclear DNA; PFK-phosphofructokinase; PGAM-phosphoglycerate mutase; PGK-phosphoglycerate kinase; PPL-myophosphorylase; RRF-ragged red fibers; TFP-trifunctional protein deficiency; VLCAD-very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase.

  2. PYGM expression analysis in white blood cells: a complementary tool for diagnosing McArdle disease?

    PubMed

    de Luna, Noemí; Brull, Astrid; Lucia, Alejandro; Santalla, Alfredo; Garatachea, Nuria; Martí, Ramon; Andreu, Antoni L; Pinós, Tomàs

    2014-12-01

    McArdle disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme myophosphorylase, resulting in exercise intolerance from childhood and acute crises of early fatigue and contractures. In severe cases, these manifestations can be accompanied by rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, and fatal renal failure. Diagnosis of McArdle disease is based on clinical diagnostic tests, together with an absence of myophosphorylase activity in skeletal muscle biopsies and genetic analysis of the myophosphorylase-encoding gene, PYGM. The recently reported association between myophosphorylase and Rac1 GTPase in a T lymphocyte cell line prompted us to study myophosphorylase expression in white blood cells (WBCs) from 20 healthy donors and 30 McArdle patients by flow cytometry using a fluorescent-labeled PYGM antibody. We found that T lymphocytes expressed myophosphorylase in healthy donors, but expression was significantly lower in McArdle patients (p<0.001). PYGM mRNA levels were also lower in white blood cells from McArdle patients. Nevertheless, in 13% of patients (who were either heterozygotes or homozygotes for the most common PYGM pathogenic mutation among Caucasians (p.R50X)), the percentage of myophosphorylase-positive white blood cells was not different compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that analysis of myophosphorylase expression in white blood cells might be a useful, less-invasive, complementary test for diagnosing McArdle disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis of snakebite and the importance of immunological tests in venom research.

    PubMed

    Theakston, R David G; Laing, Gavin D

    2014-05-23

    In many cases of envenoming following snake bite, the snake responsible for the accident remains unidentified; this frequently results in difficulty deciding which antivenom to administer to the systemically-envenomed victim, especially when only monospecific antivenoms are available. Normally the specific diagnosis of snake bite can be conveniently made using clinical and laboratory methods. Where clinical diagnosis depends upon the recognition of specific signs of envenoming in the patient, laboratory diagnosis is based on the changes which occur in envenomed victims including the detection of abnormalities in blood parameters, presence/absence of myoglobinuria, changes in certain enzyme levels, presence/absence of neurotoxic signs and the detection in the blood of specific venom antigens using immunologically-based techniques, such as enzyme immunoassay. It is the latter which is the main subject of this review, together with the application of techniques currently used to objectively assess the effectiveness of new and existing antivenoms, to assess first aid measures, to investigate the possible use of such methods in epidemiological studies, and to detect individual venom components. With this in mind, we have discussed in some detail how such techniques were developed and how they have helped in the treatment of envenoming particularly and in venom research in general.

  4. Acute exercise-induced bilateral thigh compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael R; Heck, Chris

    2009-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the thigh is rare due to the space's ability to accommodate large volumes of fluid and, with the exception of the lateral septum, its thin compliant linings. This article describes a case of bilateral exercise-induced severe compartment syndrome treated with anterior and posterior fasciotomies. A 29-year-old man was admitted to intensive care with myoglobinuria. His left thigh was evaluated 18 hours later for compartment syndrome. The patient reported that 14 hours prior to initial presentation, he had participated in a 1-hour session of vigorous basketball. He gradually developed bilateral moderately severe thigh pain and tea-colored urine. Physical examination revealed pain secondary to passive stretch of both knees at 20 degrees flexion, plus firm anterior and posterior compartments to palpation. A handheld pressure monitor revealed the following compartment pressures: left anterior 80 mm Hg; left posterior 75 mm Hg; right anterior 45 mm Hg; and right posterior 50 mm Hg. Bilateral emergent anterior and posterior compartment fasciotomies were performed. The patient developed a significant severe distal motor and sensory neurological deficit on the left side, which recovered to 3/5 motor strength and protective sensation. At 6-month follow-up, he ambulated with the assistance of a left ankle foot orthosis. Acute severe compartment syndrome can occur following vigorous exercise. We recommend fasciotomies after exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome rather than initial observation because of the severity of morbidity associated with undertreated compartment syndrome.

  5. Exertional rhabdomyolysis: physiological response or manifestation of an underlying myopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata S; Snoeck, Marc; Quinlivan, Ros; Treves, Susan; Laforét, Pascal; Jungbluth, Heinz; Voermans, Nicol C

    2016-01-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis is characterised by muscle breakdown associated with strenuous exercise or normal exercise under extreme circumstances. Key features are severe muscle pain and sudden transient elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK) levels with or without associated myoglobinuria. Mild cases may remain unnoticed or undiagnosed. Exertional rhabdomyolysis is well described among athletes and military personnel, but may occur in anybody exposed to unaccustomed exercise. In contrast, exertional rhabdomyolysis may be the first manifestation of a genetic muscle disease that lowers the exercise threshold for developing muscle breakdown. Repeated episodes of exertional rhabdomyolysis should raise the suspicion of such an underlying disorder, in particular in individuals in whom the severity of the rhabdomyolysis episodes exceeds the expected response to the exercise performed. The present review aims to provide a practical guideline for the acute management and postepisode counselling of patients with exertional rhabdomyolysis, with a particular emphasis on when to suspect an underlying genetic disorder. The pathophysiology and its clinical features are reviewed, emphasising four main stepwise approaches: (1) the clinical significance of an acute episode, (2) risks of renal impairment, (3) clinical indicators of an underlying genetic disorders and (4) when and how to recommence sport activity following an acute episode of rhabdomyolysis. Genetic backgrounds that appear to be associated with both enhanced athletic performance and increased rhabdomyolysis risk are briefly reviewed. PMID:27900193

  6. Paraphenylenediamine Containing Hair Dye: An Emerging Household Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ambika Prasad; Shaha, Kusa Kumar; Rayamane, Anand P; Dash, Shreemanta Kumar; Mohanty, Manoj Kumar; Mohanty, Sachidananda

    2015-09-01

    Paraphenylenediamine poisoning is among one of the emerging causes of poisoning in Asian countries, because it is a constituent of hair dye formulations and is easily available in market at low cost. Hair dyes are rampantly used in Asian households compared with the western world. Locally, hair dye constituents may have allergic adverse effects, and acute systemic poisoning presents with characteristic angioedema, upper airway obstruction, rhabdomyolysis, methemoglobinemia, myoglobinuria, and acute renal failure. This study reports about the death of a 24-year-old Indian housewife who committed suicide by taking hair dye emulsion. She had an argument with her husband, and because of fit of rage, took a bowlful (80 mL) of hair dye emulsion kept prepared for the use by husband. She developed angioedema, cervical swelling, and rhabdomyolysis and died of acute renal failure within 24 hours. Toxicological analysis of viscera and blood revealed varying levels of paraphenylenediamine. Histopathological samples of kidney showed features of acute tubular necrosis and myoglobin casts in renal tubules. The aim of the study is to create awareness about the adverse effects of the hair dye, its poisoning outcome, and possible preventive measures.

  7. Metabolic neuropathies and myopathies.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Adele; Bertini, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism may impact on muscle and peripheral nerve. Abnormalities involve mitochondria and other subcellular organelles such as peroxisomes and lysosomes related to the turnover and recycling of cellular compartments. Treatable causes are β-oxidation defects producing progressive neuropathy; pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, porphyria, or vitamin B12 deficiency causing recurrent episodes of neuropathy or acute motor deficit mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. On the other hand, lysosomal (mucopolysaccharidosis, Gaucher and Fabry diseases), mitochondriopathic (mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or mDNA depletion), peroxisomal (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, sterol carrier protein-2 deficiency, cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis, α-methylacyl racemase deficiency) diseases are multisystemic disorders involving also the heart, liver, brain, retina, and kidney. Pathophysiology of most metabolic myopathies is related to the impairment of energy production or to abnormal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Main symptoms are exercise intolerance with myalgias, cramps and recurrent myoglobinuria or limb weakness associated with elevation of serum creatine kinase. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency, followed by acid maltase deficiency, and lipin deficiency, are the most common cause of isolated rhabdomyolysis. Metabolic myopathies are frequently associated to extra-neuromuscular disorders particularly involving the heart, liver, brain, retina, skin, and kidney.

  8. Hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic syndrome associated with rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ka, T; Takahashi, S; Tsutsumi, Z; Moriwaki, Y; Yamamoto, T; Fukuchi, M

    2003-01-01

    A 64-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of general fatigue and drowsiness. On admission, a physical examination disclosed dehydration and a laboratory investigation revealed the following values: plasma glucose, 1309 mg/dl; serum sodium, 160 mmol/l; potassium, 3.0 mmol/l; urea nitrogen, 65 mg/dl; creatinine, 2.73 mg/dl; and plasma osmolarity, 403 mOsm/kg. Urine ketone bodies were negative. A diagnosis of hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic syndrome was made, and hydration with an infusion of hypotonic saline (0.45%) and insulin therapy were immediately started. However, despite adequate rehydration and correction of blood glucose, his serum creatinine level increased to 3.1 mg/dl, while oliguria and myoglobinuria developed on the 4th hospital day, with serum creatine kinase increasing up to a maximum level of 16,749 IU/l, suggesting rhabdomyolysis. A final diagnosis of hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic syndrome associated with rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure was made. His renal function gradually improved without hemodialysis, though acute renal failure due to rhabdomyolysis with hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic syndrome can sometimes be fatal. This rare case is presented along with a review of literature.

  9. Clear correlation of genotype with disease phenotype in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, B S; Olpin, S; Poorthuis, B J; Scholte, H R; Vianey-Saban, C; Wanders, R; Ijlst, L; Morris, A; Pourfarzam, M; Bartlett, K; Baumgartner, E R; deKlerk, J B; Schroeder, L D; Corydon, T J; Lund, H; Winter, V; Bross, P; Bolund, L; Gregersen, N

    1999-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. VLCAD deficiency is clinically heterogenous, with three major phenotypes: a severe childhood form, with early onset, high mortality, and high incidence of cardiomyopathy; a milder childhood form, with later onset, usually with hypoketotic hypoglycemia as the main presenting feature, low mortality, and rare cardiomyopathy; and an adult form, with isolated skeletal muscle involvement, rhabdomyolysis, and myoglobinuria, usually triggered by exercise or fasting. To examine whether these different phenotypes are due to differences in the VLCAD genotype, we investigated 58 different mutations in 55 unrelated patients representing all known clinical phenotypes and correlated the mutation type with the clinical phenotype. Our results show a clear relationship between the nature of the mutation and the severity of disease. Patients with the severe childhood phenotype have mutations that result in no residual enzyme activity, whereas patients with the milder childhood and adult phenotypes have mutations that may result in residual enzyme activity. This clear genotype-phenotype relationship is in sharp contrast to what has been observed in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, in which no correlation between genotype and phenotype can be established. PMID:9973285

  10. [Suspected case of postoperative malignant hyperthermia treated with dantrolene one week after neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazushi; Nishibe, Shinichi; Usuda, Yutaka; Kitamura, Akira

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old man who presented with hyperthermia (>40°C), an elevated creatine kinase level (>64,000 IU · l-1), and myoglobinuria one week after undergoing two successive neurosurgeries for a brain hemorrhage under sevoflurane anesthesia. After having been diagnosed with suspicious atypical postoperative malignant hyperthermia, he was treated with dantrolene and his symptoms disappeared on the day of dantrolene administration. Central hyperthermia is defined as hyperthermia associated with thermoregulatory dysfunction after brainstem injury. Postoperative malignant hyperthermia can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from central hyperthermia, especially after neurosurgery. We could not eliminate the possibility of central hyperthermia as a cause of hyperthermia in the present patient If marked postoperative hyperthermia must be addressed immediately and managed appropriately in neurosurgical patients and dantrolene having few serious side effects, we were able to control his symptoms immediately after the infusion of dantrolene. Therefore, the administration of dantrolene should be considered when treating unidentified postoperative hyperthermia after a neurosurgical procedure.

  11. [Overactive muscles: it can be more serious than common myalgia or cramp].

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P F; Snoeck, Marc M J; Voermans, Nicol C; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2016-01-01

    Positive muscle phenomena are due to muscle overactivity. Examples are cramp, myalgia, and stiffness. These manifestations have mostly acquired causes, e.g. side-effects of medication, metabolic disorders, vitamin deficiency, excessive caffeine intake or neurogenic disorders. We report on three patients with various positive muscle phenomena, to illustrate the clinical signs that indicate an underlying myopathy. Patient A, a 56-year-old man, was diagnosed with muscle cramp in the context of excessive coffee use and previous lumbosacral radiculopathy. Patient B, a 71-year-old man, was shown to have RYR1-related myopathy. Patient C, a 42-year-old man, suffered from Brody myopathy. We propose for clinicians to look out for a number of 'red flags' that can point to an underlying myopathy, and call for referral to neurology if indicated. Red flags include second wind phenomenon, familial occurrence of similar complaints, marked muscle stiffness, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle hypertrophy, and myoglobinuria. Establishing a correct diagnosis is important for proper treatment. Certain myopathies call for cardiac or respiratory screening.

  12. Accidental oral poisoning caused by RDX (cyclonite): a report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Küçükardali, Yaşar; Acar, H Volkan; Ozkan, Sezai; Nalbant, Selim; Yazgan, Yusuf; Atasoyu, E Murat; Keskin, Ozcan; Naz, Alişan; Akyatan, Nevzat; Gökben, Merih; Danaci, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    The explosive RDX (hexogen, cyclonite) is usually used for the production of C-4 explosive. The rare occurrence of accidental and intentional RDX intoxications has been reported during manufacturing process or in wartime. In this article, the authors report 5 cases of accidental oral RDX poisoning. On admission, observed signs and symptoms included repetitive generalized tonic-clonic convulsions, postictal coma, lethargy, confusion, hyperreflexia, postictal amnesia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal tenderness, sinusal tachycardia, dysrhythmia with frequent ventricular premature beats, generalized muscle spasms, and myoclonus. Leukocytosis, mild anemia, methemoglobinemia, elevated levels of blood glucose, serum aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, lactic dehydrogenase, creatine phosphokinase, amilase, hypokalemia, metabolic acidosis, proteinuria, glucosuria, and myoglobinuria were also noted. Plasma RDX concentrations were 268 to 969 ng/mL at 3 hours of ingestion. For management, supportive and symptomatic measures were taken. Whole-bowel irrigation might have been an effective therapeutic procedure due to probable slow gastrointestinal absorption of RDX. Three patients who developed severe metabolic acidosis underwent urgent hemodialysis. All patients were discharged 7 to 21 days after admission without any sequelae. Plasma RDX levels were strongly correlated with the clinical and laboratory manifestations. The available toxicological data on this rare accidental poisoning are reviewed in light of the literature.

  13. Enhydrina schistosa (Elapidae: Hydrophiinae) the most dangerous sea snake in Sri Lanka: three case studies of severe envenoming.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, S A M; Hettiarachchi, R; Dalpathadu, J; Mendis, A S V; Appuhamy, P D S A N; Zoysa, H D J; Maduwage, K; Weerasinghe, V S; de Silva, A

    2014-01-01

    Sea snakes are highly venomous and inhabit tropical waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Enhydrina schistosa is a common species of sea snake that lives in the coastal waters, lagoons, river mouths and estuaries from the Persian Gulf through Sri Lanka and to Southeast Asia. It is considered one of the most aggressive sea snakes in Sri Lanka where fishermen and people wading are at high risk. However, sea snake bites are rarely reported. In this report, we describe three cases where E. schistosa was the offending species. These three patients presented to two hospitals on the west coast of Sri Lanka within the course of 14 months from November 2011 with different degrees of severity of envenoming. The first patient was a 26-year-old fisherman who developed severe myalgia with very high creatine kinase (CK) levels lasting longer than 7 days. The second patient was a 32-year-old fisherman who developed gross myoglobinuria, high CK levels and hyperkalaemia. Both patients recovered and their electromyographic recordings showed myopathic features. The nerve conduction and neuromuscular transmission studies were normal in both patients suggesting primary myotoxic envenoming. The third patient was a 41-year-old man who trod on a sea snake in a river mouth and developed severe myalgia seven hours later. He had severe rhabdomyolysis and died three days later due to cardiovascular collapse. In conclusion, we confirm that E. schistosa is a deadly sea snake and its bite causes severe rhabdomyolysis.

  14. [Hepatectomy combined with cryoablation and ethanol injection for unresectable multiple liver metastases from colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei-qun; Yu, Nan-rong; Liu, Hai-ying

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of hepatectomy combined with cryoablation and ethanol injection in patients with unresectable multiple liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Clinical data of 23 patients with multiple liver metastases form colorectal cancer in the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College between January 2005 and December 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. There were 15 males and 8 females with average age of 52.2 years. All the patients underwent hepatectomy combined with ultrasound-guided cryoablation and ethanol injection intraoperatively. Among 98 lesions in 23 patients, 45 were removed intraoperatively and 53 were treated by cryoablation and ethanol injection. Operative time for liver lesions ranged from 27 to 96 minutes and intraoperative blood loss 50 to 450 ml. One patient developed pleural effusion and 1 myoglobinuria after operation. All the patients were followed up with a median follow-up time of 34 months(8 to 70 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 83.2%, 45.5% and 37.6% respectively. Hepatectomy combined with cryoablation and ethanol injection is an effective and safe treatment option for patients with unresectable multiple liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

  15. A phase 1/pilot study of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of recurrent pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Fredric A; Daw, Najat C; Xiong, Xiaoping; Anghelescu, Doralina; Krasin, Matthew; Yan, Xiaowei; Davidoff, Andrew M; Furman, Wayne L; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Spunt, Sheri L

    2009-03-15

    This prospective study was designed to be the first to evaluate the toxicity of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with recurrent pediatric solid tumors. From 2003 through 2008, a phase 1/pilot study of RFA for recurrent pediatric solid tumors was conducted. A multidisciplinary cancer management team selected appropriate candidates for the study. Imaging-guided RFA was performed percutaneously. Repeat RFA was performed for recurrences when appropriate. Toxicity and imaging response was assessed at 1 month and 3 months prospectively. Accrual stopped in 2006, and data collection stopped in 2008. Sixteen patients (ages 4 years-33 years; median age, 15 years) and 56 tumor sites were treated in 37 RFA sessions including 38 pulmonary, 11 musculoskeletal, and 7 hepatic lesions (82 lesion-treatments). Postprocedural pain was moderate (median 5 on a scale from 1 to 10) and lasted a median of 9 days. Prolonged hospitalization (beyond 1 day) occurred 17 times (range, 2 days-25 days; median, 3 days). Hypoxia supported by supplemental oxygen occurred in 8 of 16 patients and resolved within 1 month after each RFA. No patient had tumor lysis syndrome but myoglobinuria/hemoglobinuria occurred in 6 of 16 patients, all without renal damage. Serious complications from pulmonary RFA included 2 diaphragmatic hernias. Of 82 lesions imaged, 24 (29%) remained ablated at the end of the study. The toxicity from RFA of recurrent pediatric solid tumors was real but limited, and RFA may offer a local tumor control alternative in carefully selected cases. Copyright (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  16. [Non-infective neurologic complications associated to heroin use].

    PubMed

    Pascual Calvet, J; Pou, A; Pedro-Botet, J; Gutiérrez Cebollada, J

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with heroin addiction has changed in the past six years because of the progressive knowledge of the neurological complications related to HIV infection. We reviewed 48 heroin addicts with neurological complications and 452 heroin overdose who were seen in the Emergency Unit of our hospital during 1988 and the publications since 1967. Regarding the overdose we present the results of a prospective study leading to determine the causes. We emphasize the relationship with the level of total morphine in serum, instead of conjugate morphine, and with the presence of high levels of benzodiazepines found in the plasma rather than an hypothetic hypersensitivity phenomenon. We resume the neurological complications related with heroin addiction: spongiform leukoencephalopathy, epileptic seizures, stroke, transverse myelopathy and neuromuscular complications such mononeuropathy, plexopathy, acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, rhabdomyolysis, fibrosing myopathy, musculoskeletal syndrome and acute bacterial myopathy. Some of such complications (i.e. transverse myelitis, polyradiculoneuropathy, leucoencephalopathy) must rise the suspicion of an HIV infection. Likewise, in patients assisted for overdosage we believe it's necessary rule out myoglobinuria by means of CPK serum levels and detection of urine hematic pigments without red blood cels in the urine sediment, in order to prevent and treat the renal failure. We report the results of muscular biopsy found in the musculoskeletal syndrome, which are similar to those found in alcoholic myopathy. Finally, we describe the clinical and diagnostic aspects in an unusually neuromuscular complication: the acute bacterial myopathy.

  17. Coexistence of VHL Disease and CPT2 Deficiency: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Sciacco, Monica; Zovato, Stefania; Rizzati, Silvia; Colombo, Irene; Boaretto, Francesca; Moggio, Maurizio; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an inherited syndrome manifesting with benign and malignant tumors. Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT2) is a disorder of lipid metabolism that, in the muscle form, manifests with recurrent attacks of myalgias often associated with myoglobinuria. Rhabdomyolytic episodes may be complicated by life-threatening events, including acute renal failure (ARF). We report on a male patient who was tested, at 10 years of age, for VHL disease because of family history of VHL. He was diagnosed with VHL but without VHL-related manifestation at the time of diagnosis. During childhood, the patient was hospitalized several times for diffuse muscular pain, muscle weakness, and dark urine. These recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis were never accompanied by ARF. The patient was found to be homozygous for the mutation p.S113L of the CPT2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the coexistence of VHL disease and CPT2 deficiency in the same individual. Based on findings from animal models, the case illustrates that mutations in the VHL gene might protect against renal damage caused by CPT2 gene mutations. PMID:27034144

  18. Coexistence of VHL Disease and CPT2 Deficiency: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Sciacco, Monica; Zovato, Stefania; Rizzati, Silvia; Colombo, Irene; Boaretto, Francesca; Moggio, Maurizio; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an inherited syndrome manifesting with benign and malignant tumors. Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT2) is a disorder of lipid metabolism that, in the muscle form, manifests with recurrent attacks of myalgias often associated with myoglobinuria. Rhabdomyolytic episodes may be complicated by life-threatening events, including acute renal failure (ARF). We report on a male patient who was tested, at 10 years of age, for VHL disease because of family history of VHL. He was diagnosed with VHL but without VHL-related manifestation at the time of diagnosis. During childhood, the patient was hospitalized several times for diffuse muscular pain, muscle weakness, and dark urine. These recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis were never accompanied by ARF. The patient was found to be homozygous for the mutation p.S113L of the CPT2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the coexistence of VHL disease and CPT2 deficiency in the same individual. Based on findings from animal models, the case illustrates that mutations in the VHL gene might protect against renal damage caused by CPT2 gene mutations.

  19. Propofol infusion syndrome in a super morbidly obese patient (BMI = 75).

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Lollo, Loreto; Brannan, Douglas; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2011-01-01

    Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is a rare but often fatal complication as a result of large doses of propofol infusion (4-5 mg/kg/hr) for a prolonged period (>48 h). It has been reported in both children and adults. Besides large doses of propofol infusion, the risk factors include young age, acute neurological injury, low carbohydrate and high fat intake, exogenous administration of corticosteroid and catecholamine, critical illness, and inborn errors of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. PRIS manifestation include presence of metabolic acidosis with a base deficit of more than 10 mmol/l at least on one occasion, rhabdomyolysis or myoglobinuria, acute renal failure, sudden onset of bradycardia resistant to treatment, myocardial failure, and lipemic plasma. The pathophysiology of PRIS may be either direct mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibition or impaired mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism mediated by propofol. We report a case of supermorbidly obese patient who received propofol infusion by total body weight instead of actual body weight and developed PRIS.

  20. [Rhabdomyolysis in morbidly obese patient submitted to gastric bypass and during upper limb revascularization of pediatric patient: case reports.].

    PubMed

    Abrão, Maria Angélica; Ferreira, Renata Gomes; Germano Filho, Paulo Alípio; Lerner, Luiz Cláudio

    2006-02-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome caused by skeletal muscle injury. Its etiology is broad with special interest when it is manifested as intra or post-anesthetic complication. This report aimed at describing two cases of rhabdomyolysis in the postoperative period of long procedures in morbidly obese and trauma injury patients, emphasizing its correlation with anesthesia. The first case is a 39-year old, morbidly obese patient, BMI 62, submitted to laparoscopic gastric bypass under general anesthesia. In the postoperative period patient presented upper and lower limbs muscle weakness and changes in sensitivity evolving with muscle pain and reddish urine. Increased creatinokinase (CK) plasma levels confirmed the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Patient was treated with forced and diuretic hydration, has not evolved with renal failure, but was discharged with muscular and neurological sequelae. The second case is a 7-year old child victim of accident with a glass door, who was submitted to emergency procedure for left upper limb revascularization. During anesthesia urine color has changed becoming reddish. Intravenous sodium bicarbonate and mannitol were administered to alkalinize the urine and increase urinary output. Patient was referred to the ICU where rhabdomyolysis was confirmed by increased CK enzyme and myoglobinuria. Patient was discharged 10 days later without sequelae. Cases have shown risk factors for rhabdomyolysis and their relationship with anesthesia and surgery. Early diagnosis is critical for a fast and aggressive treatment to prevent more severe complications.

  1. [Epidemic rhabdomyolysis due to the eating of quail. A clinical, epidemiological and experimental study].

    PubMed

    Aparicio, R; Oñate, J M; Arizcun, A; Alvarez, T; Alba, A; Cuende, J I; Miró, M

    1999-02-06

    Few toxic outbreaks by quails ingestion have been described, none in Spain, and the toxic hasn't been identified. A toxic outbreak, by quails ingestion that ate Galeopsis ladanum seeds, is described and an animal model is developed. A rhabdomyolysis outbreak by quails ingestion is studied clinical and epidemiologically. Quails crops were analyzed and 20 patients were studied. A murine model was developed. Alcaloid content in Galeopsis ladanum seeds and quail meat was measured. Twenty patients suffered from rhabdomyolysis (myalgia, increase of muscular enzymes and myoglobinuria) by ingestion of quails that ate Galeopsis ladanum seeds as it could be seen at their crops. Six patients needed hospital care but evolution was benign. Rats fed with quails that ate Galeopsis ladanum seeds had higher creatinkinase (CK) levels than controls rats (near significance, p = 0.0588). Several alcaloids, stachydrine included, was detected in seeds. Another alcaloid no identified was detected in quails meat. Quails that eat Galeopsis ladanum seeds are toxic for human beings, causing rhabdomyolysis. A plant alcaloid could be the toxic involved in the outbreak.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure: rare presentation of carnitine palmityl-transferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gentili, A; Iannella, E; Masciopinto, F; Latrofa, M E; Giuntoli, L; Baroncini, S

    2008-05-01

    Carnitine palmityl-transferase (CPT) II deficiency is a rare disorder of the fatty acid beta-oxidation cycle. CPT II deficiency can be associated with rhabdomyolysis in particular conditions that increase the requirement for fatty acid oxidation, such as low-carbohydrate and high-fat diet, fasting, exposure to excessive cold, lack of sleep and prolonged exercise. The best known CPT II deficiency is the muscular form with episodic muscle necrosis and paroxysmal myoglobinuria after prolonged exercise. We report a case of a four-year-old male child, who, after one day of hyperthermia and fasting, developed a massive rhabdomyolysis beginning with acute respiratory failure and later complicated by acute renal failure. Appropriate management in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) (mechanical ventilatory support, fluid supply combined with mannitol and bicarbonate infusions, administration of acetaminophen and antibiotics, and continuous venovenous haemofiltration) brought about complete resolution with an excellent outcome. Biochemical investigation of muscle biopsy and genetic analysis showed a deficiency of CPT II. The onset of CPT II deficiency with respiratory failure is extremely rare, but a correct and early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is the key to successful treatment. A metabolic myopathy such as CPT II deficiency should be suspected in children affected by rhabdomyolysis if trauma, crash, infections, drugs or extreme exertion can be excluded.

  3. Carbohydrate oxidation disorders of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Vorgerd, Matthias; Zange, Jochen

    2002-11-01

    The major energy sources for muscle contraction are glycogen, glucose and fatty acids, and defects in their oxidative pathways cause metabolic myopathies. Eleven specific enzyme deficiencies of carbohydrate oxidation affect skeletal muscle alone or in combination with other tissues, such as liver, heart or red blood cells. These hereditary glycogen storage diseases cause two major clinical presentations: one characterized by fixed, often progressive muscle weakness, and the other by acute, intermittent, and reversible muscle dysfunction manifesting as exercise intolerance (myalgia on exertion, muscle contractures, myoglobinuria). The focus of this review is on recent developments in: clinical features, including a brief description of the newest identified glycogen storage disease type XIII; molecular genetic studies discussing genotype-phenotype correlations in some carbohydrate oxidation disorders; pathophysiological mechanisms, especially those assessed by non-invasive P magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and therapeutic approaches such as nutritional supplementation and gene therapy, including recombinant enzyme replacement. Although major progress has been made in an understanding of the molecular genetic bases of carbohydrate oxidation defects, the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance and muscle weakness remains to be further clarified. Gene therapy and dietary therapeutic regimes appear promising, but need to be actively investigated in the future.

  4. [Exercise-induced muscular weakness, myalgia and contractures. I. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Mattle, H; Jerusalem, F

    1977-04-02

    In the differential diagnosis of intermittent claudication some rare myopathies have to be considered. The most frequent is phosphorylase deficiency (McArdle's disease). Exercise-induced muscular pain, weakness, contractures and occasionally myoglobinuria are the most prominent clinical signs. Serum creatine phosphokinase, aldolase and lactic dehydrogenase may be elevated after exertion. In the ischemic forearm test there is no rise of serum lactic acid. The enzyme deficiency can be demonstrated by histochemical and biochemical examination of a muscle specimen. Further, but more infrequent, enzymatic disturbances of glycolysis are phosphofructokinase deficiency and phosphohexoisomerase inhibitor, which also yield an abnormal ischemic forearm test and must be demonstrated histochemically and biochemically. Apart from muscular signs, myopathy with lactic acidosis is associated with palpitation, dyspnea and exhaustion, and a disproportionate rise in serum lactic acid level after exertion. Histochemically and electronmicroscopically demonstrable fat accumulation in the muscle can be a sign of a disturbance in lipid metabolism. This type of exercise-induced myopathy has been reported only in a few cases with carnitine-pylmityltransferase deficiency, which has to be demonstrated biochemically. Muscular contractures also exercise-induced but painless and reversible within seconds may be due to deficient uptake of sarcoplasmic calcium in the tubular system. Dyskalemic paralysis causes painless paresis within minutes of hours after exertion, which disappears within hours to a few days. Myopathy with tubular aggregates can be differentiated from other exercise-induced myopathies by morphology. Myotonia combined with painful contractures characterizes myopathia myotonica.

  5. The influence of hypothalamic cytokine PRP on protein synthesis in brain subcellular compartments in crush syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guevorkian, Artashes G; Kanayan, Alexander S; Chailian, Gor G; Danielyan, Kristine E; Hayrapetyan, Hripsime L; Barsegyan, Karine A; Khachatryan, Hranush F; Galoyan, Armen A; Kevorkian, Guevork A

    2011-09-01

    Crush-syndrom (CS) was characterized by Bywaters E.G.L. in 1941 after London blitz. The soft tissues is followed by acute hemodynamic shock, myoglobinuria, acute renal insufficiency, and lethal endotoxicity. Data of CS pathogenesis study has shown that the largest changes in Crush occur during decompression and are accompanied by acute alteration of brain protein synthesis and strong morphological changes of brain structures. The period of decompression might be characterized by the proteolytic breakdown of the myoglobine and formation of toxic peptides. In our current work we have identified four newly formed peptides in the brain of the animals subjected to the experimental muscle tissue injury. Our investigations related with the CS experimental model have demonstrated that during the 2-hours compression protein synthesis was decreased in cytosol (32,7%) and mitochondria (49%), after 5-h compression there were registered non-significant changes in the level of protein synthesis. Intraperitoneal administration of Proline-rich peptide, ((PRP), 1 mcg/100g weight of rats), originating from proteolysis of C-terminal glycoprotein a neurophysin II along with vasopressin and oxytocin and transferring from the hypothalamus to the neurohypophysis by axonal transport, initiates activation of the protein synthesis in all studied cellular subcomponents of brain cells. The positive effect of the peptide is conditioned, most probably, by activation of the immune system and adaptation mechanisms, including mobilization of endogen-protective mechanisms of the organism.

  6. PubMed Central

    Logerfo, Annalisa; Simoncini, Costanza; Papi, Riccardo; Franzoni, Ferdinando; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Servadio, Adele; Masoni, Maria Chiara

    2015-01-01

    McArdle's disease is the most common metabolic myopathy of muscle carbohydrate metabolism, due to deficiency of myophosphorylase and alteration of glycogen breakdown in muscle. The clinical manifestations usually begin in young adulthood, with exercise intolerance, exercise-induced muscle cramps, pain and recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria. Many patients experience the second wind phenomenon, characterized by an improved tolerance for aerobic exercise approximately after eight minutes of motor activity, secondary to the increased availability of blood glucose and free fatty acids associated to an enhanced glucose uptake by muscle cells. In this study, we aimed to test a multi-parametric protocol in order to detect the impairment of muscular metabolism and motor performance in patients with McArdle's disease. We enrolled 5 patients and 5 age-matched healthy subjects, that were evaluated by: (01) monitoring of physical activity with an electronic armband; (02) testing of cardiopulmonary, metabolic and respiratory responses to exercise with a cardiopulmonary exercise test and analyzing muscle fatigue during exercise test by surface electromyography (04) evaluating blood lactate and oxidative stress biomarkers at rest and during exercise. The patients were tested at baseline and after three days of carbohydrate-rich diet integrated with tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate and creatine. The multiparametric protocol proved to be useful to detect the oxidative capacity impairment and the second wind phenomenon of patients. We did not observe any significant differences of muscle metabolic response during the exercise test after three days of carbohydrate-rich diet. PMID:27199539

  7. Deleterious mutation in FDX1L gene is associated with a novel mitochondrial muscle myopathy.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Halvardson, Jonatan; Soiferman, Devorah; Shaag, Avraham; Edvardson, Simon; Horovitz, Yoseph; Khayat, Morad; Shalev, Stavit A; Feuk, Lars; Elpeleg, Orly

    2014-07-01

    Isolated metabolic myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of disorders, with mitochondrial myopathies being a subgroup, with depleted skeletal muscle energy production manifesting either by recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria or progressive muscle weakness. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with adolescent onset autosomal recessive mitochondrial myopathy. Analysis of enzyme activities of the five respiratory chain complexes in our patients' skeletal muscle showed severely impaired activities of iron sulfur (Fe-S)-dependent complexes I, II and III and mitochondrial aconitase. We employed exome sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping to identify a homozygous mutation, c.1A>T, in the FDX1L gene, which encodes the mitochondrial ferredoxin 2 (Fdx2) protein. The mutation disrupts the ATG initiation translation site resulting in severe reduction of Fdx2 content in the patient muscle and fibroblasts mitochondria. Fdx2 is the second component of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis machinery, the first being IscU that is associated with isolated mitochondrial myopathy. We suggest adding genetic analysis of FDX1L in cases of mitochondrial myopathy especially when associated with reduced activity of the respiratory chain complexes I, II and III.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infected gluteal compartment syndrome with rhabdomyolysis in a bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Woon, Colin Yl; Patel, Kushal R; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2016-05-18

    Gluteal compartment syndrome (GCS) is a rare condition. We present a case of gluteal muscle strain with hematoma formation, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) superinfection, leading to acute GCS, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. This combination of diagnoses has not been reported in the literature. A 36-year-old Caucasian male presented with buttock pain, swelling and fever after lifting weights. Gluteal compartment pressure was markedly elevated compared with the contralateral side. Investigations revealed elevated white blood cell, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactic acid. Urinalysis was consistent with myoglobinuria. Magnetic resonance imaging showed increased T2 signal in the gluteus maximus and a central hematoma. Cultures taken from the emergency debridement and fasciotomy revealed MRSA. He had repeat, debridement 2 d later, and delayed primary closure 3 d after. GCS is rare and must be suspected when patients present with pain and swelling after an inciting event. They are easily diagnosed with compartment pressure monitoring. The treatment of gluteal abscess and compartment syndrome is the same and involves rapid surgical debridement.

  9. Diagnosis of Snakebite and the Importance of Immunological Tests in Venom Research

    PubMed Central

    Theakston, R. David G.; Laing, Gavin D.

    2014-01-01

    In many cases of envenoming following snake bite, the snake responsible for the accident remains unidentified; this frequently results in difficulty deciding which antivenom to administer to the systemically-envenomed victim, especially when only monospecific antivenoms are available. Normally the specific diagnosis of snake bite can be conveniently made using clinical and laboratory methods. Where clinical diagnosis depends upon the recognition of specific signs of envenoming in the patient, laboratory diagnosis is based on the changes which occur in envenomed victims including the detection of abnormalities in blood parameters, presence/absence of myoglobinuria, changes in certain enzyme levels, presence/absence of neurotoxic signs and the detection in the blood of specific venom antigens using immunologically-based techniques, such as enzyme immunoassay. It is the latter which is the main subject of this review, together with the application of techniques currently used to objectively assess the effectiveness of new and existing antivenoms, to assess first aid measures, to investigate the possible use of such methods in epidemiological studies, and to detect individual venom components. With this in mind, we have discussed in some detail how such techniques were developed and how they have helped in the treatment of envenoming particularly and in venom research in general. PMID:24859244

  10. Severe and fatal mass attacks by 'killer' bees (Africanized honey bees--Apis mellifera scutellata) in Brazil: clinicopathological studies with measurement of serum venom concentrations.

    PubMed

    França, F O; Benvenuti, L A; Fan, H W; Dos Santos, D R; Hain, S H; Picchi-Martins, F R; Cardoso, J L; Kamiguti, A S; Theakston, R D; Warrell, D A

    1994-05-01

    In São Paulo State, Brazil, five males, aged between 8 and 64 years, were attacked by 'Africanized' honey bees (Apis mellifera scutellata). The estimated number of stings received by each patient ranged from > 200 to > 1000. All five were transferred to intensive care units in São Paulo City. Clinical features included intravascular haemolysis, respiratory distress with ARDS, hepatic dysfunction, rhabdomyolysis (with myoglobinaemia and myoglobinuria), hypertension and myocardial damage (perhaps explained by release of endogenous catecholamines by venom phospholipase A2 and mellitin), shock, coma, acute renal failure and bleeding. Laboratory findings included gross neutrophil leucocytosis, elevated serum enzymes [AST, ALT, LDH, CPK (predominantly CPK-MM)] and creatinine. Clotting times were slightly prolonged. Despite treatment with antihistamines, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, vasodilators, bicarbonate, mannitol and mechanical ventilation, three of the patients died between 22 and 71 h after the attacks, with histopathological features of ARDS, hepatocellular necrosis, acute tubular necrosis, focal subendocardial necrosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Whole bee venom and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) antigen concentrations were measured in serum and urine for the first time, using enzyme immunoassay. High venom and PLA2 concentrations were detected in serum and urine for more than 50 h after the stings in two fatal cases, in one of which the total circulating unbound whole venom was estimated at 27 mg, one hour after the attack. An antivenom should be developed to treat the increasing numbers of victims of mass attacks by Africanized 'killer' bees in USA, Middle and South America.

  11. Accuracy of urine dipstick in the detection of patients at risk for crush-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Moghaddam, Mostafa; Safari, Saeed; Najafi, Iraj; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the utility of urine dipstick test (UDT) for detecting rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury (AKI) due to crush injury. All the rescued victims of the Bam earthquake who had a documented urine analysis and serum creatine phosphokinase and creatinine levels during their hospitalization period were eligible to enter the study. The sensitivity and the specificity, along with the positive and negative likelihood ratios, of UDT in detecting at-risk patients for rhabdomyolysis and crush-related AKI were calculated. Urine red blood cell count of 5 or less in blood-positive UDT, as a surrogate marker for myoglobinuria, was reported in 210 (31.7%) of the total 1821 urine analyses. Blood-positive UDTs (without considering the urine red blood cell count) had a 92.5% (95% confidence interval: 79.6-98.4) sensitivity in creatine phosphokinase, with a cut-off of 15,000 (IU/l). Comparing the results of the serum creatinine level and the urine blood, analysis showed that UDT had a sensitivity and a specificity of as high as 83.3 and 56.6% in detecting high-risk patients for AKI, respectively. UDT can be considered as an early screening tool for the detection and triage of patients at risk of developing AKI because of traumatic rhabdomyolysis after mass disasters.

  12. [Isotretinoin and exercise: can the two walk together?].

    PubMed

    Dalal, Adam; Ben-Barak, Shira; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Constantini, Naama

    2014-02-01

    Since its introduction in 1982, isotretinoin has revolutionized acne treatment, targeting the underlying mechanism of the disease, with effective and long-lasting results. During the first decade of its marketing, several cases of hyperCKemia and rhabdomyolysis were linked to isotretinon therapy. A special concern was given to the possible triggering of muscle toxicity by vigorous exercise. These potential effects discouraged the prescription of isotretinoin to physically active patients or required them to abstain from exercise during treatment. Common musculoskeletal adverse effects of isotretinoin include muscle or joint pains. HyperCKemia is frequently found in patients receiving treatment for rare cases of rhabdomyolysis. Isotretinoin-associated muscle toxicity is usually detected in asymptomatic patients, even though symptoms can appear without hyperCKemia. A possible synergistic effect of isotretinoin and exercise is plausible, although supported by weak evidence and mediated by an unknown mechanism. There are only two reports of myoglobinuria and no reports of decreased renal function in exercising patient under treatment. In conclusion, we believe that current data should not deter physicians from offering isotretinoin to physically active patients nor require them to abstain from exercise. Physicians must explain to patients the possible side effects of treatment, ask them to refrain from an unusual change in their exercise regimen and advise them to avoid other triggers of rhabdomyolysis. Patients should be aware of possible signs of muscle toxicity and inform their doctors about any relevant symptoms.

  13. Pharmacological and nutritional treatment for McArdle disease (Glycogen Storage Disease type V).

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Rosaline; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Schoser, Benedikt

    2014-11-12

    Background McArdle disease (Glycogen Storage Disease type V) is caused by an absence of muscle phosphorylase leading to exercise intolerance,myoglobinuria rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. This is an update of a review first published in 2004.Objectives To review systematically the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of pharmacological or nutritional treatments for improving exercise performance and quality of life in McArdle disease.Search methods We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE on 11 August 2014.Selection criteria We included RCTs (including cross-over studies) and quasi-RCTs. We included unblinded open trials and individual patient studies in the discussion. Interventions included any pharmacological agent or nutritional supplement. Primary outcome measures included any objective assessment of exercise endurance (for example aerobic capacity (VO2) max, walking speed, muscle force or power and fatigability). Secondary outcome measures included metabolic changes (such as reduced plasma creatine kinase and a reduction in the frequency of myoglobinuria), subjective measures (including quality of life scores and indices of disability) and serious adverse events.Data collection and analysis Three review authors checked the titles and abstracts identified by the search and reviewed the manuscripts. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of relevant studies, with comments from a third author. Two authors extracted data onto a specially designed form.Main results We identified 31 studies, and 13 fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. We described trials that were not eligible for the review in the Discussion. The included studies involved a total of 85 participants, but the number in each individual trial was small; the largest treatment trial included 19 participants and the smallest study included only one participant. There was no benefit with: D

  14. Renal uptake of myoglobin is mediated by the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin.

    PubMed

    Gburek, Jakub; Birn, Henrik; Verroust, Pierre J; Goj, Bogusława; Jacobsen, Christian; Moestrup, Søren K; Willnow, Thomas E; Christensen, Erik I

    2003-09-01

    Nephrotoxicity of myoglobin is well recognized as playing a part in the development of acute renal failure in settings of myoglobinuria. However, the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake in renal proximal tubules has not been clarified. Here, we report that the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin are involved in renal reabsorption of myoglobin. Both receptors were captured from solubilized renal brush-border membranes by affinity chromatography using myoglobin-Sepharose. Myoglobin bound to purified megalin and cubilin with Kd values of 2.0 and 3 microM, respectively, as evaluated by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Apomyoglobin bound to megalin with the same affinity, and the affinity of apomyoglobin to cubilin was reduced (Kd = 5 microM). Radioiodinated myoglobin could be displaced by apomyoglobin in inhibition studies using isolated renal brush-border membranes (Ki approximately 2 microM). Receptor-associated protein as well as antibodies directed against megalin and cubilin markedly inhibited the uptake of fluorescent-labeled myoglobin by cultured yolk sac BN-16 cells. The significance of megalin- and cubilin-mediated endocytosis for myoglobin uptake in vivo was demonstrated by use of kidney-specific megalin knockout mice. Injected myoglobin was extensively reabsorbed by megalin-expressing proximal tubular cells, whereas there was very little uptake in the megalin-deficient cells. In conclusion, this study establishes the molecular mechanism of myoglobin uptake in the renal proximal tubule involving the endocytic receptors megalin and cubilin. Identification of the receptors for tubular uptake of myoglobin may be essential for development of new therapeutic strategies for myoglobinuric acute renal failure.

  15. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle of pigs with acute monensin myotoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1984-01-01

    Large doses of monensin, a Na+-selective carboxylic ionophore, produce polyfocal, monophasic necrosis of skeletal muscle, with Type I fiber selectivity, in swine. For a study of the sequential ultrastructural alterations in affected skeletal muscles, 14 weanling pigs were given 40 mg monensin/kg body weight and were euthanatized 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 days later. Myotoxicosis and myoglobinuria were apparent clinically. At necropsy, white, dry areas of necrosis were present in the muscle masses of the anterior and posterior thigh, shoulder, and loin. Two patterns of skeletal muscle necrosis were observed on Day 1, especially in Type I fibers. In fibers exhibiting the first of these patterns, the contractile material was disrupted, forming dense amorphous and filamentous clumps scattered within the persistent sheaths of external lamina (sarcolemmal tubes); the mitochondria were swollen and contained flocculent matrix densities, and the nuclei were pyknotic. Fibers showing the second pattern were uniformly dense, but their sarcoplasm was not disrupted. Sublethally injured fibers were also observed and showed focal myofibrillar lysis. On Days 2 and 4, the necrotic muscle had marked infiltration of macrophages in the interstitium and within sarcolemmal tubes. Rapid resolution of the fiber necrosis occurred by phagocytosis of the sarcoplasmic debris. Regeneration of affected muscles developed early following injury and progressed rapidly to complete restoration of the necrotic muscles without residual fibrosis. Regeneration was initiated on Day 1 by activation of satellite cells to form presumptive myoblasts; on Days 4 and 8 these cells showed evidence of fusion, forming myotubes to restore the necrotic fibers. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6696050

  16. Post-mortem urinary myoglobin levels with reference to the causes of death.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B L; Ishida, K; Quan, L; Taniguchi, M; Oritani, S; Kamikodai, Y; Fujita, M Q; Maeda, H

    2001-01-15

    To evaluate pathophysiological significance of post-mortem urinary myoglobin levels in determining the cause of death, we investigated 210 forensic autopsy cases, partially in comparison with serum levels. Post-mortem serum myoglobin levels were extraordinary high in most cases possibly due to post-mortem change. Urinary myoglobin levels did not correlate with the serum levels, showing possible post-mortem elevation in cases of a prolonged post-mortem period over 48h. A high (>1000 ng/ml), moderate (100-1000 ng/ml), slight (50-100 ng/ml) and not significant (<50 ng/ml) elevation of urinary myoglobin were observed in 26, 43, 31 and 110 cases, respectively. Half the highly elevated cases were those with a survival time over 24h. In cases of minor muscle injury such as head trauma, elevation of urinary myoglobin level was closely related to longer survival. In acute/subacute deaths with a post-mortem interval within 48h, a significant difference was observed in relation to the blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels of fire victims: myoglobinuria over 100 ng/ml was more frequently and markedly observed in cases with COHb below 60% than over 60%, suggesting muscle damage in fatal burns. Similar elevation was observed in heat stroke victims, and also in some cases of acute and subacute death from polytrauma, asphyxiation, drowning, electricity and spontaneous cerebral bleeding, but not in myocardial infarction. Thus, it was suggested that high post-mortem urinary myoglobin levels in acute and subacute death cases may be a possible indicator of antemortem massive skeletal muscle damage as well as exertional muscle hyperactivity or convulsive disorders associated with hypoxia.

  17. Lethal carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency in newborns: A molecular-genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Taroni, F.; Gellera, C.; Cavadini, P.

    1994-09-01

    Classically, CPT II deficiency presents in young adults with recurrent episodes of paroxysmal myoglobinuria triggered by prolonged exercise, cold, or fever. More severe forms of CPT II deficiency have recently been observed in children and newborns. Here, were present biochemical and molecular studies of lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency in a premature Haitian infant of nonconsanguineous parents. He presented at birth with severe respiratory distress, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. His condition worsened and he died on the 4th day of life. Postmortem examination showed hypertrophied, dilated heart, and lipid storage in liver, heart and kidney. An older sibling had died unexpectantly at 4 days of age with postmortem evidence of fatty infiltration of liver, kidney, heart and muscle. Biochemical study of cultured fibroblasts demonstrated dramatic reduction of palmitate oxidation (to < 3%) and very low residual CPT II activity ({le}15%). No CPT II protein was detected by Western blot analysis of fibroblasts. However, immunoprecitation of cells pulse-labeled with L-[{sup 35}S] methionine demonstrated normal amounts of newly synthesized CPT II, thus suggesting altered stability of the enzyme. To identify the molecular defect in his patient, individual CPT II exons were amplified by genomic PCR and directly sequenced. A missense mutation was found in exon 4, resulting in the nonconservative amino acid substitution at codon 227 (Pro227Leu). SSCP analysis of a genomic PCR fragment encompassing the mutation demonstrated that the patient was homozygous and the parents were heterozygous for this mutation. The mutation was detected neither in a large number of controls nor in other CPT II deficient patients. Finally, CPT II activity in COS-1 cells transfected with mutated CPT II cDNA was <8% than that in cells transfected with wild-type cDNA, thus demonstrating the pathogenic role of this mutation.

  18. Renal Involvement in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies.

    PubMed

    Cucchiari, David; Angelini, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Renal involvement in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies is not as uncommon as was previously thought, as it develops in about one fifth of patients. Clinical presentation includes either acute kidney injury or chronic glomerulonephritis. The former usually develops abruptly during acute phases of rhabdomyolysis: in this case, kidney injury is caused by the toxic effects that myoglobinuria has on the kidney tubules, including cast formation and iron-induced oxidative stress and the development of a third space into the injured muscles. The latter instead has an autoimmune nature, a pleomorphic histological picture, and a more indolent course, with the exception of crescentic glomerulonephritis. Accurate diagnosis and management is crucial for these patients, as timely evaluation and treatment can prevent most of the complications. In the setting of rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury, the necessity of dialysis can be avoided through aggressive hydration and alkalinization, in order to force diuresis and avoid acidosis and hyperkalemia. In immune-mediated glomerulonephritis, renal biopsy is of undoubtedly value in the diagnostic process and can add prognostic and therapeutic information. In these forms, the development of chronic kidney disease can be prevented or at least delayed by the institution or modification of immunosuppressive treatment. Moreover, the use of drugs that inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and some lifestyle modifications, such as smoking cessation, weight loss, and salt restriction have also value in reducing proteinuria and the progression of kidney damage. In this review, we have summarized the currently available evidence and the different case series in an attempt to provide the readers with the most complete and practical notions that are needed to handle these delicate patients.

  19. Long-term follow-up in patients with CCFDN syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walter, Maggie C; Bernert, Günther; Zimmermann, Uta; Müllner-Eidenböck, Andrea; Moser, Elisabeth; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Lochmüller, Hanns; Müller-Felber, Wolfgang

    2014-10-07

    We describe the 10-year follow-up in a cohort of 16 patients with genetically confirmed congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, and neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome, providing new insights in the clinical course of the disease. We performed a detailed clinical and paraclinical characterization and 10-year follow-up study in 16 patients with molecularly defined CCFDN syndrome, illustrating that CCFDN is a severe disabling disorder. All patients initially presented with congenital cataracts along with strabismus, facial dysmorphism, short stature, and demyelinating neuropathy. In all patients, paresis of small hand muscles and foot extensors worsened with disease progression, while ataxia scores remained stable or improved. Nerve conduction velocity was normal in early infancy up to 18 months, decreased to approximately 20 m/s around age 10 years, and then remained stable; distal motor latency was prolonged. Sensory nerve conduction velocities were slowed, and initially of normal amplitude. With disease progression, both sensory and motor nerves showed reduction of amplitudes indicating axonal loss. In 6 patients, acute severe proximal weakness and myalgia after febrile infections, along with rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, and hyperCKemia, led to a less favorable outcome and permanent loss of ambulation in 3 patients. CCFDN should be classified as a recessive demyelinating sensory-motor neuropathy, and axonal loss is a major determinant of long-term outcomes and disability. Patients benefit from early and ongoing physiotherapy, and should be thoroughly counseled regarding virus-triggered rhabdomyolysis and the risk of malignant hyperthermia. Whether supplementation with liposoluble vitamins results in a therapeutic benefit should be evaluated in further studies. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Muscle glycogenosis with low phosphorylase kinase activity: mutations in PHKA1, PHKG1 or six other candidate genes explain only a minority of cases.

    PubMed

    Burwinkel, Barbara; Hu, Bin; Schroers, Anja; Clemens, Paula R; Moses, Shimon W; Shin, Yoon S; Pongratz, Dieter; Vorgerd, Matthias; Kilimann, Manfred W

    2003-07-01

    Muscle-specific deficiency of phosphorylase kinase (Phk) causes glycogen storage disease, clinically manifesting in exercise intolerance with early fatiguability, pain, cramps and occasionally myoglobinuria. In two patients and in a mouse mutant with muscle Phk deficiency, mutations were previously found in the muscle isoform of the Phk alpha subunit, encoded by the X-chromosomal PHKA1 gene (MIM # 311870). No mutations have been identified in the muscle isoform of the Phk gamma subunit (PHKG1). In the present study, we determined Q1the structure of the PHKG1 gene and characterized its relationship to several pseudogenes. In six patients with adult- or juvenile-onset muscle glycogenosis and low Phk activity, we then searched for mutations in eight candidate genes. The coding sequences of all six genes that contribute to Phk in muscle were analysed: PHKA1, PHKB, PHKG1, CALM1, CALM2 and CALM3. We also analysed the genes of the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM), of a muscle-specific regulatory subunit of the AMP-dependent protein kinase (PRKAG3), and the promoter regions of PHKA1, PHKB and PHKG1. Only in one male patient did we find a PHKA1 missense mutation (D299V) that explains the enzyme deficiency. Two patients were heterozygous for single amino-acid replacements in PHKB that are of unclear significance (Q657K and Y770C). No sequence abnormalities were found in the other three patients. If these results can be generalized, only a fraction of cases with muscle glycogenosis and a biochemical diagnosis of low Phk activity are caused by coding, splice-site or promoter mutations in PHKA1, PHKG1 or other Phk subunit genes. Most patients with this diagnosis probably are affected either by elusive mutations of Phk subunit genes or by defects in other, unidentified genes.

  1. [Early diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndrome caused by landslides:a report of 20 cases].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Peng, Zi-Lai; Liu, Xu-Bang; Chen, Lian

    2012-01-01

    To summarize early diagnosis and treatment methods of 20 patients with compartment syndrome caused by landslides during coal mine accidents in order to improve the level of diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndrome and reduce disability. From September 2006 to April 2010,20 patients with compartment syndrome were treated with the methods of early decompression, systemic support. All the patients were male with an average age of 42 years (ranged, 23 to 54). All the patients with high tension limb swelling, pain, referred pain passive positive; 5 extremities feeling diminish or disappear and the distal blood vessel beat were normal or weakened or disappeared; myoglobinuria, hyperkalemia, serum urea nitrogen and creatinine increased in 5 cases and oliguria in occurred 1 case. The function of affected limbs was observed according to disability ratings. Three cases complicated with infection of affected limb and 6 cases occurred with renal function insufficiency. Total recovery was in 16 cases, basically recovery in 3, amputation in 1 case. All patients were followed up for 6-15 months with an average of 12 months. The ability to work according to national standard identification--Employee work-related injuries and occupational disability rating classification (GB/T16180-2006) to assess, grade 5 was in 1 case, grade 8 in 2 cases, grade 10 in 1 case, no grade in 16 cases. Arteriopalmus of dorsalis pedis weaken and vanished can not be regard as an evidence in early diagnosis of compartment syndrome. Early diagnosis and decompression, systemic support and treatment is the key in reducing disability.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Cvetkovska, Emilija; Kuzmanovski, Igor; Jankulovski, Nikola; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Spirovska, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome of injury of skeletal muscles associated with myoglobinuria, muscle weakness, electrolyte imbalance and often, acute kidney injury as severe complication. The aim: of this study is to detect the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill patients in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU), and to raise awareness of this medical condition and its treatment among the clinicians. Material and methods: A retrospective review of all surgical and trauma patients admitted to surgical ICU of the University Surgical Clinic “Mother Teresa” in Skopje, Macedonia, from January 1st till December 31st 2015 was performed. Patients medical records were screened for available serum creatine kinase (CK) with levels > 200 U/l, presence of myoglobin in the serum in levels > 80 ng/ml, or if they had a clinical diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis by an attending doctor. Descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze the collected data. Results: Out of totally 1084 patients hospitalized in the ICU, 93 were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis during the course of one year. 82(88%) patients were trauma patients, while 11(12%) were surgical non trauma patients. 7(7.5%) patients diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis developed acute kidney injury (AKI) that required dialysis. Average values of serum myoglobin levels were 230 ng/ml, with highest values of > 5000 ng/ml. Patients who developed AKI had serum myoglobin levels above 2000 ng/ml. Average values of serum CK levels were 400 U/l, with highest value of 21600 U/l. Patients who developed AKI had serum CK levels above 3000 U/l. Conclusion: Regular monitoring and early detection of elevated serum CK and myoglobin levels in critically ill surgical and trauma patients is recommended in order to recognize and treat rhabdomyolysis in timely manner and thus prevent development of AKI. PMID:27703296

  3. The Spectrum of Renal Involvement in Patients With Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Namara, Evelyne Mac; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; Broucker, Thomas De; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM. PMID:24378741

  4. The spectrum of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Masseau, Agathe; Benveniste, Olivier; Bruel, Alexandra; Hervier, Baptiste; Mussini, Jean-Marie; Buob, David; Hachulla, Eric; Rémy, Philippe; Azar, Raymond; Mac Namara, Evelyne; MacGregor, Brigitte; Daniel, Laurent; Lacraz, Adeline; De Broucker, Thomas; Rouvier, Philippe; Carli, Philippe; Laville, Maurice; Dantan, Etienne; Hamidou, Mohamed; Moreau, Anne; Fakhouri, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Data regarding the incidence and outcome of renal involvement in patients with inflammatory myopathies (IM) remain scarce. We assessed the incidence and causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in 150 patients with dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and antisynthetase syndrome followed in 3 French referral centers. Renal involvement occurred in 35 (23.3%) patients: AKI in 16 (10.7%), and CKD in 31 (20.7%) patients. The main cause of AKI was drug or myoglobinuria-induced acute tubular necrosis. Male sex, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac involvement, and initial proteinuria >0.3 g/d were associated with the occurrence of AKI. The outcome of patients with AKI was poor: 13 (81%) progressed to CKD and 2 (12.5%) reached end-stage renal disease. In multivariate survival analysis, age at IM onset, male sex, a history of cardiovascular events, and a previous episode of AKI were associated with the risk of CKD. We also identified 14 IM patients who underwent a kidney biopsy in 10 nephrology centers. Renal pathology disclosed a wide range of renal disorders, mainly immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We identified in 5 patients a peculiar pattern of severe acute renal vascular damage consisting mainly of edematous thickening of the intima of arterioles. We found that AKI and CKD are frequent in patients with IM. Prevention of AKI is crucial in these patients, as AKI is a major contributor to their relatively high risk of CKD. A peculiar pattern of acute vascular damage is part of the spectrum of renal diseases associated with IM.

  5. Renal function abnormalities after marathon run and 16-kilometre long-distance run.

    PubMed

    Mydlík, Miroslav; Derzsiová, Katarína; Bohus, Branislav

    2012-01-01

    Renal functions were investigated in 29 marathon runners and in 20 runners in connection with 16-kilometre long-distance run. Body weight in runners decreased after marathon run in average of 1.3 +/- 0.5 kg and after 16-kilometre long-distance run in average of 1.4 +/- 0.4 kg. Blood pressure decreased after both runs. Total proteinuria and albuminuria significantly increased after both runs. The significant non-glomerular erythrocyturia was found in 9 runners after marathon run and in 3 runners after 16-km long-distance run. Total catalytic activity of serum creatine kinase, and its isoenzyme MB significantly increased after both runs. Increase of isoenzyme MB creatine kinase after runs was lower than 6% of total catalytic activity of creatine kinase. These increases were caused by rhabdomyolysis and were connected with myoglobinuria. Serum myoglobin significantly increased after marathon run and after 16-km run. Serum urea, creatinine, phosphorus and osmolality significantly increased after both runs. Calculated GFR significantly decreased after both runs. FE(Na), FE(Ca), FE(P), FE(OSM) and FE(H2O) significantly decreased after both runs. FE significantly increased after marathon run, but after 16-km run non-significantly decreased. Renal function abnormalities were caused by dehydration, microtraumas in extrarenal urinary tract, protein catabolism, decreased urinary excretion of osmotically active substances, rhabdomyolysis, activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and other factors. Renal function abnormalities in runners were already not present 2-6 days after marathon run and after 16-kilometre long-distance run and investigated parameters were in normal range or they did not significantly differ from the initial values.

  6. What Caused the UK's Largest Common Dolphin (Delphinus delphis) Mass Stranding Event?

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Paul D.; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell Jr., Robert L.; Clare, Frances C.; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J.; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K.; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W.; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L.; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06∶30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a “two-stage process” where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3–4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE. PMID

  7. The greater black krait (Bungarus niger), a newly recognized cause of neuro-myotoxic snake bite envenoming in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Abul; Ghose, Aniruddha; Ahsan, Farid; Rahman, Ridwanur; Amin, Robed; Hassan, Mahtab Uddin; Chowdhury, A Wahed; Kuch, Ulrich; Rocha, Thalita; Harris, John B; Theakston, R David G; Warrell, David A

    2010-11-01

    Prospective studies of snake bite patients in Chittagong, Bangladesh, included five cases of bites by greater black kraits (Bungarus niger), proven by examination of the snakes that had been responsible. This species was previously known only from India, Nepal, Bhutan and Burma. The index case presented with descending flaccid paralysis typical of neurotoxic envenoming by all Bungarus species, but later developed generalized rhabdomyolysis (peak serum creatine kinase concentration 29,960 units/l) with myoglobinuria and acute renal failure from which he succumbed. Among the other four patients, one died of respiratory paralysis in a peripheral hospital and three recovered after developing paralysis, requiring mechanical ventilation in one patient. One patient suffered severe generalized myalgia and odynophagia associated with a modest increase in serum creatine kinase concentration. These are the first cases of Bungarus niger envenoming to be reported from any country. Generalized rhabdomyolysis has not been previously recognized as a feature of envenoming by any terrestrial Asian elapid snake, but a review of the literature suggests that venoms of some populations of Bungarus candidus and Bungarus multicinctus in Thailand and Vietnam may also have this effect in human victims. To investigate this unexpected property of Bungarus niger venom, venom from the snake responsible for one of the human cases of neuro-myotoxic envenoming was injected into one hind limb of rats and saline into the other under buprenorphine analgesia. All animals developed paralysis of the venom-injected limb within two hours. Twenty-four hours later, the soleus muscles were compared histopathologically and cytochemically. Results indicated a predominantly pre-synaptic action (β-bungarotoxins) of Bungarus niger venom at neuromuscular junctions, causing loss of synaptophysin and the degeneration of the terminal components of the motor innervation of rat skeletal muscle. There was oedema and

  8. Spasmodic muscle cramps and weakness as presenting symptoms in Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Rosen, John M; Kuntz, Nancy; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Bass, Lee M

    2013-10-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of hepatic copper metabolism that has tremendous variability in its presentation. Phenotypic diversity of the disease can lead to delayed diagnosis. We describe a case of WD in a 10-year-old boy presenting with 3 months of increasingly intense, spasmodic lower extremity muscle cramps. Physical examination revealed tenderness on calf palpation and dark flat lesions over his ankles, knees, and elbows. Initial testing revealed creatine kinase of 302 IU/L (normal 24-248 IU/L), hemoglobin of 8.9 g/dL (11.5-15.5 g/dL), aspartate aminotransferase of 114 IU/L (16-52 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase of 54 IU/L (2-30 IU/L), and myoglobinuria. Extensive evaluation of his myopathy, including MRI and muscle biopsy, was negative. Additional laboratory tests revealed a prothrombin time of 21.3 seconds (11.8-15.5 seconds), total bilirubin of 1.4 mg/dL (<1 mg/dL), direct bilirubin of 0.5 mg/dL (<0.3 mg/dL), albumin of 2.1 g/dL (3.1-4.6 g/dL), a reticulocyte percentage of 4.5% (0.5%-2.5%), a negative Coombs direct antibody test, ceruloplasmin of 3 mg/dL (21-51 mg/dL), and 24-h urine copper of 393 μg/24 h (15-60 μg/24 h). Liver biopsy showed patchy advanced fibrosis, mild inflammation, positive staining for copper, and a tissue copper concentration of 768 µg/g (10-35 μg/g). Brain MRI revealed symmetric intrinsic T1 shortening within bilateral basal ganglia. Trientene therapy was initiated for WD. Symptoms and laboratory abnormalities resolved and remain normal at 21 months' follow-up. Musculoskeletal involvement in WD is uncommon and typically defined as bone demineralization, arthropathy, or hypokalemic muscle weakness. In patients with unexplained musculoskeletal symptoms and hepatic abnormalities, a diagnosis of WD should be considered and appropriate evaluation initiated.

  9. Frequency of Acute Hepatitis Following Acute Paraphenylene Diamine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ishtiaq, Rizwan; Shafiq, Sadaf; Imran, Ali; Masroor Ali, Qazi; Khan, Raheel; Tariq, Hassan; Ishtiaq, Daniyal

    2017-04-21

    Paraphenylene diamine (PPD) ingestion is manifesting as one of the more common ways of committing suicide in Southern Punjab, Pakistan, especially Bahawalpur. PPD is an ingredient of a compound commonly known "Kala Pathar" which means "Black Stone" in Urdu. It is readily available in the market at low cost and is used to dye hair and fur. Its intoxication inhibits cellular oxidation and affects the muscles causing rhabdomyolysis. This leads to myoglobinuria followed by renal failure and edema of face and throat resulting in respiratory difficulty. Very little is known about the impact of PPD intoxication on liver tissue. The purpose of the study was to find out the frequency of acute hepatitis following PPD intoxication. We reviewed the medical records of 109 patients with PPD intoxication admitted to Medical Unit-2, Bahawalpur Victoria Hospital from January 1, 2015, to June 30, 2015, in a descriptive, cross-sectional study. We noted the frequency of acute hepatitis and other complications, and we recorded the demographic features, clinical features, and outcomes of these patients. Our study included 32 men (29%) and 77 women (71%). The mean age was 22 ± 3.4 years, and most patients were young women aged 15 to 24 years. Suicidal ingestion was the leading cause of admission for 101 patients (93%). The most common clinical presentation was cervicofacial edema (95%), throat pain (88%), dysphonia (95%), cola-colored urine (100%), and oliguria (95%). Rhabdomyolysis (86%), acute hepatitis (51%), and acute renal failure (63%) were the most common clinical conditions following poisoning. Overall mortality was noted in 39 patients (36%) while all other patients achieved complete clinical recovery (64%). In patients with mortality, 20 of 39 (51%) developed acute hepatitis. Most patients (95%) in our study underwent tracheostomy. The frequency of acute hepatitis in PPD intoxication is high in this population, especially in young women. Measures need to be instituted

  10. What caused the UK's largest common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) mass stranding event?

    PubMed

    Jepson, Paul D; Deaville, Robert; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina; Barnett, James; Brownlow, Andrew; Brownell, Robert L; Clare, Frances C; Davison, Nick; Law, Robin J; Loveridge, Jan; Macgregor, Shaheed K; Morris, Steven; Murphy, Sinéad; Penrose, Rod; Perkins, Matthew W; Pinn, Eunice; Seibel, Henrike; Siebert, Ursula; Sierra, Eva; Simpson, Victor; Tasker, Mark L; Tregenza, Nick; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On 9 June 2008, the UK's largest mass stranding event (MSE) of short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) occurred in Falmouth Bay, Cornwall. At least 26 dolphins died, and a similar number was refloated/herded back to sea. On necropsy, all dolphins were in good nutritive status with empty stomachs and no evidence of known infectious disease or acute physical injury. Auditory tissues were grossly normal (26/26) but had microscopic haemorrhages (5/5) and mild otitis media (1/5) in the freshest cases. Five lactating adult dolphins, one immature male, and one immature female tested were free of harmful algal toxins and had low chemical pollutant levels. Pathological evidence of mud/seawater inhalation (11/26), local tide cycle, and the relative lack of renal myoglobinuria (26/26) suggested MSE onset on a rising tide between 06:30 and 08∶21 hrs (9 June). Potential causes excluded or considered highly unlikely included infectious disease, gas/fat embolism, boat strike, by-catch, predator attack, foraging unusually close to shore, chemical or algal toxin exposure, abnormal weather/climatic conditions, and high-intensity acoustic inputs from seismic airgun arrays or natural sources (e.g., earthquakes). International naval exercises did occur in close proximity to the MSE with the most intense part of the exercises (including mid-frequency sonars) occurring four days before the MSE and resuming with helicopter exercises on the morning of the MSE. The MSE may therefore have been a "two-stage process" where a group of normally pelagic dolphins entered Falmouth Bay and, after 3-4 days in/around the Bay, a second acoustic/disturbance event occurred causing them to strand en masse. This spatial and temporal association with the MSE, previous associations between naval activities and cetacean MSEs, and an absence of other identifiable factors known to cause cetacean MSEs, indicates naval activity to be the most probable cause of the Falmouth Bay MSE.

  11. Calcitriol Directly Sensitizes Renal Tubular Cells to ATP-Depletion- and Iron-Mediated Attack

    PubMed Central

    Zager, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    Vitamin Ds have been reported to have diverse effects on cell homeostasis, leading to suggestions that they have therapeutic applications extending beyond their traditional actions on the Ca2+/parathyroid/bone axis. As some of these potential indications carry an inherent risk of acute renal failure (ARF; eg, cancer chemotherapy and organ transplantation), the goal of this study was to assess whether vitamin Ds directly affect renal tubule injury responses. Cultured human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells were exposed to physiological or pharmacological doses of either calcitriol (D3) or a synthetic vitamin D2 analogue (19-nor) for 3 to 48 hours. Their impact on cell integrity (percent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and tetrazolium dye MTT uptake) under basal conditions and during superimposed injuries (ATP depletion/Ca2+ ionophore or iron-mediated oxidant stress) were determined. As vitamin Ds can be anti-proliferative, cell outgrowth ([3H]thymidine uptake and crystal violet staining) was also tested. Finally, the action of D3 on in vivo ARF (glycerol-induced myoglobinuria) and isolated proximal tubule injury responses were assessed. D3 induced a rapid, dose-dependent increase in HK-2 susceptibility to both ATP-depletion/Ca2+-ionophore- and Fe-mediated attack without independently affecting cell integrity or proliferative responses. In contrast, D2 negatively affected only Fe toxicity and only after relatively prolonged exposure (48 hours). D3 dramatically potentiated in vivo ARF (two- to threefold increase in azotemia), suggesting potential in vivo relevance of the above HK-2 cell results. Proximal tubules, isolated from these glycerol-exposed mice, suggested that D3 can worsen tubule injury despite a parodoxic suppression of H2O2 production. In contrast, D3 had a mild negative impact on cellular energetics (depressed ATP/ADP ratios), and it accentuated plasma membrane phospholipid breakdown. The latter was observed in both glycerol-treated and control tubules