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Sample records for myosin heavy chains

  1. Identification of the gene for fly non-muscle myosin heavy chain: Drosophila myosin heavy chains are encoded by a gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehart, D P; Lutz, M S; Chan, D; Ketchum, A S; Laymon, R A; Nguyen, B; Goldstein, L S

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate species Drosophila has a single myosin heavy chain gene that apparently encodes all sarcomeric heavy chain polypeptides. Flies also contain a cytoplasmic myosin heavy chain polypeptide that by immunological and peptide mapping criteria is clearly different from the major thoracic muscle isoform. Here, we identify the gene that encodes this cytoplasmic isoform and demonstrate that it is distinct from the muscle myosin heavy chain gene. Thus, fly myosin heavy chains are the products of a gene family. Our data suggest that the contractile function required to power myosin based movement in non-muscle cells requires myosin diversity beyond that available in a single heavy chain gene. In addition, we show, that accumulation of cytoplasmic myosin transcripts is regulated in a developmental stage specific fashion, consistent with a key role for this protein in the movements of early embryogenesis. Images PMID:2498088

  2. Heavy chain of Acanthamoeba myosine IB is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Korn, E.D.; Hammer, J.A. III

    1987-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii myosins IA and IB demonstrate the catalytic properties of a myosin and can support analogues of contractile and motile activity in vitro, but their single, low molecular weight heavy chains, roughly globular shapes, and inabilities to self-assemble into filaments make them structurally atypical myosins. The authors present the complete amino acid sequence of the 128-kDa myosin IB heavy chain, which they deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene and which reveals that the polypeptide is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences. Specifically, the amino-terminal approx. 76 kDa of amino acid sequence is highly similar to the globular head sequences of conventional myosins. By contrast, the remaining approx. 51 kDa of sequence shows no similarity to any portion of conventional myosin sequences, contains regions that are rich in glycine, proline, and alanine residues, and lacks the distinctive sequence characteristics of an ..cap alpha..-helical, coiled-coil structure. They conclude, therefore, that the protein is composed of a myosin globular head fused not to the typical coiled-coil rod-like myosin tail structure but rather to an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain. These results support the conclusion that filamentous myosin is not required for force generation and provide a further perspective on the structural requirements for myosin function. Finally, they find a striking conservation of intron/exon structure between this gene and a vertebrate muscle myosin gene. They discuss this observation in relation to the evolutionary origin of the myosin IB gene and the antiquity of myosin gene intron/exon structure.

  3. An unconventional myosin heavy chain gene from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, K A; Miller, K G

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study of cytoskeletal proteins involved in Drosophila embryonic development, we have undertaken the molecular analysis of a 140-kD ATP-sensitive actin-binding protein (Miller, K. G., C. M. Field, and B. M. Alberts. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2963-2975). Analysis of cDNA clones encoding this protein revealed that it represents a new class of unconventional myosin heavy chains. The amino-terminal two thirds of the protein comprises a head domain that is 29-33% identical (60-65% similar) to other myosin heads, and contains ATP-binding, actin-binding and calmodulin/myosin light chain-binding motifs. The carboxy-terminal tail has no significant similarity to other known myosin tails, but does contain a approximately 100-amino acid region that is predicted to form an alpha-helical coiled-coil. Since the unique gene that encodes this protein maps to the polytene map position 95F, we have named the new gene Drosophila 95F myosin heavy chain (95F MHC). The expression profile of the 95F MHC gene is complex. Examination of multiple cDNAs reveals that transcripts are alternatively spliced and encode at least three protein isoforms; in addition, a fourth isoform is detected on Western blots. Developmental Northern and Western blots show that transcripts and protein are present throughout the life cycle, with peak expression occurring during mid-embryogenesis and adulthood. Immunolocalization in early embryos demonstrates that the protein is primarily located in a punctate pattern throughout the peripheral cytoplasm. Most cells maintain a low level of protein expression throughout embryogenesis, but specific tissues appear to contain more protein. We speculate that the 95F MHC protein isoforms are involved in multiple dynamic processes during Drosophila development.

  4. The genes and mRNA coding for the heavy chains of chick embryonic skeletal myosin.

    PubMed

    Patrinou-Georgoulas, M; John, H A

    1977-10-01

    A size class of polysomes was isolated from chick embryonic leg skeletal muscle which synthesized almost exclusively a polypeptide chain with a molecular weight identical to the myosin heavy chain. The mRNA purified from these polysomes was shown to synthesize the 200,000 dalton polypeptide in the wheat germ cell-free translation system. At least 90% of the polypeptide had properties similar to the myosin heavy chain. Isoelectric focusing indicated that the myosin heavy chain synthesized in vitro contained two chains in equal amounts, as did purified embryonic leg skeletal muscle myosin. The kinetics of hybridization of the complementary DNA with an excess of the myosin heavy chain mRNA (MHC mRNA) indicated the presence of two different mRNA sequences. Reassociation of the cDNA to an excess of the DNA of the genome suggest that there is little, if any, reiteration of the myosin heavy chain genes.

  5. Masticatory (;superfast') myosin heavy chain and embryonic/atrial myosin light chain 1 in rodent jaw-closing muscles.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Peter J; Bicer, Sabahattin; Chen, Qun; Zhu, Ling; Quan, Ning

    2009-08-01

    Masticatory myosin is widely expressed among several vertebrate classes. Generally, the expression of masticatory myosin has been associated with high bite force for a carnivorous feeding style (including capturing/restraining live prey), breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting in different species. Masticatory myosin expression in the largest mammalian order, Rodentia, has not been reported. Several members of Rodentia consume large numbers of tree nuts that are encased in very hard shells, presumably requiring large forces to access the nutmeat. We, therefore, tested whether some rodent species express masticatory myosin in jaw-closing muscles. Myosin isoform expression in six Sciuridae species was examined, using protein gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and RNA analysis. The results indicate that masticatory myosin is expressed in some Sciuridae species but not in other closely related species with similar diets but having different nut-opening strategies. We also discovered that the myosin light chain 1 isoform associated with masticatory myosin heavy chain, in the same four Sciuridae species, is the embryonic/atrial isoform. We conclude that rodent speciation did not completely eliminate masticatory myosin and that its persistent expression in some rodent species might be related to not only diet but also to feeding style.

  6. Continued Expression of Neonatal Myosin Heavy Chain in Adult Dystrophic Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandman, Everett

    1985-02-01

    The expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms was examined in normal and dystrophic chicken muscle with a monoclonal antibody specific for neonatal myosin. Adult dystrophic muscle continued to contain neonatal myosin long after it disappeared from adult normal muscle. A new technique involving western blotting and peptide mapping demonstrated that the immunoreactive myosin in adult dystrophic muscle was identical to that found in neonatal normal muscle. Immunocytochemistry revealed that all fibers in the dystrophic muscle failed to repress neonatal myosin heavy chain. These studies suggest that muscular dystrophy inhibits the myosin gene switching that normally occurs during muscle maturation.

  7. Adaptations in myosin heavy chain profile in chronically unloaded muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmadge, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    In this review, myosin heavy chain (MHC) adaptations in response to several models of decreased neuromuscular activity (i.e. electrical activation and loading of a muscle) are evaluated. In each of these "reduced-activity" models it is important to: a) quantify the changes in electrical activation of the muscle as a result of the intervention; b) quantify the forces generated by the muscle; and c) determine whether the neuromuscular junction remains normal. Most of the models, including spaceflight, hindlimb suspension, spinal cord isolation, spinal cord transection, denervation, and limb immobilization in a shortened position, result in increases in the percentage of fast MHCs (or fast MHC mRNA) in normally slow rat muscles. It also can be inferred from histochemical data that increases in fast MHCs occur with TTX application and bed rest. The only "reduced-activity" model to consistently increase slow muscle myosin mRNA, and slow fibers is limb immobilization in a stretched position; however, this model results in at least a temporary increase in tension. It appears that the most common feature of these models that might induce MHC adaptations is the modification in loading rather than a change in the neuromuscular activity.

  8. Adaptations in myosin heavy chain profile in chronically unloaded muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmadge, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Bodine-Fowler, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    In this review, myosin heavy chain (MHC) adaptations in response to several models of decreased neuromuscular activity (i.e. electrical activation and loading of a muscle) are evaluated. In each of these "reduced-activity" models it is important to: a) quantify the changes in electrical activation of the muscle as a result of the intervention; b) quantify the forces generated by the muscle; and c) determine whether the neuromuscular junction remains normal. Most of the models, including spaceflight, hindlimb suspension, spinal cord isolation, spinal cord transection, denervation, and limb immobilization in a shortened position, result in increases in the percentage of fast MHCs (or fast MHC mRNA) in normally slow rat muscles. It also can be inferred from histochemical data that increases in fast MHCs occur with TTX application and bed rest. The only "reduced-activity" model to consistently increase slow muscle myosin mRNA, and slow fibers is limb immobilization in a stretched position; however, this model results in at least a temporary increase in tension. It appears that the most common feature of these models that might induce MHC adaptations is the modification in loading rather than a change in the neuromuscular activity.

  9. Myosin heavy chain expression in respiratory muscles of the rat.

    PubMed

    LaFramboise, W A; Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; Daood, M J; Guthrie, R D

    1992-03-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms of hind limb adult rat muscles and muscles with a range of respiratory activities were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique that allowed electrophoretic separation of the three fast and one slow MHC isoform found in typical rat muscle. Costal and crural diaphragm muscle samples expressed a mixture of MHC beta/slow, MHC2A, and MHC2X but little MHC2B. In contrast, MHC2B was the dominant MHC isoform in the genioglossus, intercostal, and three abdominal muscles, all of which exhibited minimal expression of MHC beta/slow. The amount of MHC2X (relative to total MHC composition) was similar in the diaphragm, genioglossus, and transversus abdominis muscles, while considerably less was detected in the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. These results indicate that MHC2X is broadly and variably distributed among respiratory muscles. Furthermore, these data suggest that a large portion of 2X fibers (containing MHC2X), which cannot be detected by standard histochemical analysis, may be present in the genioglossus and transversus abdominis muscles as has been demonstrated for the diaphragm muscle. We speculate that an association exists between the level of MHC2X expression and frequency of respiratory recruitment.

  10. Primary structure of chicken cardiac myosin S-1 heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, S; Tanaka, H; Yajima, E; Maita, T

    1994-05-01

    The sequence of the NH2-terminal 830 amino acid residues of chicken cardiac ventricular muscle myosin subfragment-1 (S-1) was determined. S-1 was obtained by limited chymotryptic digestion, and cleaved into three characteristics fragments (23, 41, and 22 kDa fragments) by limited tryptic digestion. These fragments were isolated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column, followed by cation-exchange chromatography on a CM-52 column and reverse-phase HPLC. The isolated fragments were sequenced completely. Peptides overlapping the 23 and 41 kDa fragments and also overlapping the 41 and 22 kDa fragments were obtained by cleaving S-1 with cyanogen bromide, and sequenced completely. We also obtained a minor fragment, the 20 kDa fragment, in addition to the three characteristic fragments. Amino acid compositions of the cyanogen bromide peptides of the 20 kDa fragment indicated that a portion of S-1 heavy chains had lost their COOH-terminal 21 residues during limited tryptic digestion. Methylated amino acid residues were found at four positions: epsilon-N-monomethyllysine at position 32, epsilon-N-trimethyllysine residues at 127 and 549, and 3-N-methylhistidine at 754.

  11. Conserved protein domains in a myosin heavy chain gene from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Warrick, H M; De Lozanne, A; Leinwand, L A; Spudich, J A

    1986-01-01

    The 2116-amino acid myosin heavy chain sequence from Dictyostelium discoideum was determined from DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene. The gene product can be divided into two distinct regions, a globular head region and a long alpha-helical, rod-like tail. In comparisons with nematode and mammalian muscle myosins, specific areas of the head region are highly conserved. These areas presumably reflect conserved functional and structural domains. Certain features that are present in the head region of nematode and mammalian muscle myosins, and that have been assumed to be important for myosin function, are missing in the Dictyostelium myosin sequence. The protein sequence of the Dictyostelium tail region is very poorly conserved with respect to the other myosins but displays the periodicities similar to those of muscle myosins. These periodicities are believed to play a role in filament formation. The 196-residue repeating unit that determines the 14.3-nm repeat seen in muscle thick filaments, the 28-residue charge repeating unit, and the 1,4 hydrophobic repeat previously described for the nematode myosin are all present in the Dictyostelium myosin rod sequence, suggesting that the filament structures of muscle and Dictyostelium myosins must be similar. PMID:3540939

  12. Thyroid hormone stimulates synthesis of a cardiac myosin isozyme. Comparison of the two-two-dimensional electrophoretic patterns of the cyanogen bromide peptides of cardiac myosin heavy chains from euthyroid and thyrotoxic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Flink, I L; Rader, J H; Morkin, E

    1979-04-25

    The CNBr peptides of [14C]carboxymethylated cardiac myosin heavy chains from euthyroid and thyrotoxic rabbits have been compared using a two-dimensional electrophoretic system. The results indicated that there were extensive differences in the peptide "maps" of these heavy chains, which included differences in the distribution of radiolabeled thiol peptides. Also, the patterns of heavy chain peptides from the cardiac myosins have been compared with those produced by the heavy chain myosin isozymes from skeletal muscles. Peptide maps of heavy chains from red skeletal muscle myosin closely resembled the pattern of peptides found with cardiac myosin heavy chains from euthyroid rabbits. However, peptide maps of heavy chains from white skeletal muscle myosin were dissimilar to those of the cardiac myosin isozymes. We conclude that thyroxine administration stimulates the synthesis of a cardiac myosin isozyme with a heavy chain primary structure which is different from either of the skeletal muscle myosin isozymes.

  13. Non-muscle myosin II heavy chain has a cryptic cell-adhesion domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, F; Ho, C H

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered a cryptic cell-adhesion domain in non-muscle myosin II heavy chain. A 205 kDa cell-adhesion-promoting polypeptide (p205) was extracted from BHK cells by Nonidet P-40 or Dounce homogenization. Adhesion to p205 was specifically inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro, indicating a role for the Arg-Gly-Asp cell-adhesion motif. Purified p205 was identified as non-muscle myosin II heavy chain, based on sequence analysis and on the cross-reactivity of p205 with anti-(bovine trachea myosin) antibodies. Further experiments showed that the heavy chain of purified myosin II has cell-adhesion-promoting activity in a cell-blotting assay, and cross-reacted with anti-p205 antibodies. Finally, the adhesion domain was located in the tail portion of myosin II heavy chain, where an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing sequence can be found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626021

  14. Generation and characterization of Dictyostelium cells deficient in a myosin I heavy chain isoform

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Motile activities such as chemotaxis and phagocytosis, which occur in Dictyostelium cells lacking myosin II, may be dependent upon myosin I. To begin to explore this possibility, we have engineered a disruption of the Dictyostelium myosin I heavy chain (DMIHC) gene described recently (Jung, G., C. L. Saxe III, A. R. Kimmel, and J. A. Hammer III. 1989. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 86:6186-6190). The double-crossover, gene disruption event that occurred resulted in replacement of the middle approximate one-third of the gene with the neomycin resistance marker. The resulting cells are devoid of both the 3.6-kb DMIHC gene transcript and the 124-kD DMIHC polypeptide. DMIHC- cells are capable of chemotactic streaming and aggregation, but these processes are delayed. Furthermore, the rate of phagocytosis by DMIHC- cells is reduced, as assessed by growth rate on lawns of heat-killed bacteria and on the initial rate of uptake of FITC-labeled bacteria. Therefore, this Dictyostelium myosin I isoform appears to play a role in supporting chemotaxis and phagocytosis, but it is clearly not required for these processes to occur. Using a portion of the DMIHC gene as a probe, we have cloned three additional Dictyostelium small myosin heavy chain genes. Comparison of these four genes with three genes described recently by Titus et al. (Titus, M. A., H. M. Warrick, and J. A. Spudich. 1989. Cell Reg. 1:55-63) indicates that there are at least five small myosin heavy chain genes in Dictyostelium. The probability that there is considerable overlap of function between these small myosin isoforms indicates that multiple gene disruptions within a single cell may be necessary to generate a more striking myosin I- phenotype. PMID:2141028

  15. Primary structure of myosin heavy chain from fast skeletal muscle of Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Yuki; Ojima, Takao; Inoue, Akira; Nishita, Kiyoyoshi

    2002-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA encoding myosin heavy chain of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta fast skeletal muscle was determined. The sequence consists of 5,994 bp, including 5,814 bp of translated region deducing an amino acid sequence of 1,937 residues. The deduced sequence showed 79% homology to that of rabbit fast skeletal myosin and 84-87% homology to those of fast skeletal myosins from walleye pollack, white croaker and carp. The putative binding-sites for ATP, actin and regulatory light-chains in the subfragment-1 region of the salmon myosin showed high homology with the fish myosins (78-100% homology). However, the Loop-1 and Loop-2 showed considerably low homology (31-60%). On the other hand, the deduced sequences of subfragment-2 (533 residues) and light meromyosin (564 residues) showed 88-93% homology to the corresponding regions of the fish myosins. It becomes obvious that several specific residues of the rabbit LMM are substituted to Gly in the salmon LMM as well as the other fish LMMs. This may be involved in the structural instability of the fish myosin tail region.

  16. The carboxyl-terminal isoforms of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain determine thick filament assembly properties

    PubMed Central

    Rovner, Arthur S.; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Lowey, Susan; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2002-01-01

    The alternatively spliced SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chains differ at their respective carboxyl termini by 43 versus 9 unique amino acids. To determine whether these tailpieces affect filament assembly, SM1 and SM2 myosins, the rod region of these myosin isoforms, and a rod with no tailpiece (tailless), were expressed in Sf 9 cells. Paracrystals formed from SM1 and SM2 rod fragments showed different modes of molecular packing, indicating that the tailpieces can influence filament structure. The SM2 rod was less able to assemble into stable filaments than either SM1 or the tailless rods. Expressed full-length SM1 and SM2 myosins showed solubility differences comparable to the rods, establishing the validity of the latter as a model for filament assembly. Formation of homodimers of SM1 and SM2 rods was favored over the heterodimer in cells coinfected with both viruses, compared with mixtures of the two heavy chains renatured in vitro. These results demonstrate for the first time that the smooth muscle myosin tailpieces differentially affect filament assembly, and suggest that homogeneous thick filaments containing SM1 or SM2 myosin could serve distinct functions within smooth muscle cells. PMID:11781338

  17. Calcium-mediated regulation of recombinant hybrids of full-length Physarum myosin heavy chain with Physarum/scallop myosin light chains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Kawamichi, Hozumi; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Physarum myosin is a Ca2+-binding protein and its activity is inhibited by Ca2+. In the present study, to clarify the light chains (LCs) from the different species (Physarum and scallop) and to determine the specific Ca2+-regulated effects, we constructed hybrid myosins with a Physarum myosin heavy chain (Ph·HC) and Physarum and/or scallop myosin LCs, and examined Ca2+-mediated regulation of ATPases and motor activities. In these experiments, it was found that Ca2+ inhibited motilities and ATPase activities of Physarum hybrid myosin with scallop regulatory light chain (ScRLC) and Physarum essential light chain (PhELC) but could not inhibit those of the Physarum hybrid myosin mutant Ph·HC/ScRLC/PhELC-3A which lacks Ca2+-binding ability, indicating that PhELC plays a critical role in Ca2+-mediated regulation of Physarum myosin. Furthermore, the effects of Ca2+ on ATPase activities of Physarum myosin constructs are in the following order: Ph·HC/PhRLC/PhELC > Ph·HC/ScRLC/PhELC > Ph·HC/PhRLC/ScELC > Ph·HC/ScRLC/ScELC, suggesting that the presence of PhRLC and PhELC leads to the greatest Ca2+ sensitivity of Physarum myosin. Although we did not observe the motilities of Physarum hybrid myosin Ph·HC/PhRLC/ScELC and Ph·HC/ScRLC/ScELC, our results suggest that Ca2+-binding to the PhELC may alter the flexibility of the regulatory domain and induce a ’closed’ state, which may consequently prevent full activity and force generation. PMID:27125976

  18. Prediction of the secondary structure of myosin light chains from comparison of homologous sequences. Implications for the interaction between myosin heavy and light chains.

    PubMed

    Béchet, J J; Houadjeto, M

    1989-07-06

    The primary sequences of seventeen essential and seventeen regulatory myosin light chains were analyzed and compared, using algorithms based on the different structural properties of their amino acid residues. This process allowed estimation of the structural homology between the proteins studied, and improved the prediction of their mean secondary structure and functionally important segments or residues. On the basis of the crystal structure of troponin C, a model of the myosin essential light chain with a fairly compact form is proposed. The possible sites of interaction between myosin light and heavy chains from rabbit skeletal muscle were also investigated by a complementarity method adapted to helix-rich proteins. Segments 139-149 and 65-75 in the essential light chain and segments 27-37, 67-77 and 97-107 in the regulatory light chain are suggested to constitute some of these sites, as most of them were found to have the features of surface-seeking helices.

  19. Expression of muscle-specific myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain 1 in the electric tissue of Electrophorus electricus (L.) in comparison with other vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Ayres Sá, L; Menezes, M A; dos Santos Mermelstein, C

    2001-08-01

    Myosin light and heavy chains from skeletal and cardiac muscles and from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.) were characterised using biochemical and immunological methods, and compared with myosin extracted from avian, reptilian, and mammalian skeletal and cardiac muscles. The results indicate that the electric tissue has a myosin light chain 1 (LC1) and a muscle-specific myosin heavy chain. We also show that monoclonal antibody F109-12A8 (against LC1 and LC2) recognizes LC1 of myosin from human skeletal and cardiac muscles as well as those of rabbit, lizard, chick, and electric eel. However, only cardiac muscles from humans and rabbits have LC2, which is recognized by antibody F109-16F4. The data presented confirm the muscle origin of the electric tissue of E. electricus. This electric tissue has a profile of LC1 protein expression that resembles the myosin from cardiac muscle of the eel more than that from eel skeletal muscle. This work raises an interesting question about the ontogenesis and differentiation of the electric tissue of E. electricus. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  1. Myosin light chains: Teaching old dogs new tricks

    PubMed Central

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2014-01-01

    The myosin holoenzyme is a multimeric protein complex consisting of heavy chains and light chains. Myosin light chains are calmodulin family members which are crucially involved in the mechanoenzymatic function of the myosin holoenzyme. This review examines the diversity of light chains within the myosin superfamily, discusses interactions between the light chain and the myosin heavy chain as well as regulatory and structural functions of the light chain as a subunit of the myosin holoenzyme. It covers aspects of the myosin light chain in the localization of the myosin holoenzyme, protein-protein interactions and light chain binding to non-myosin binding partners. Finally, this review challenges the dogma that myosin regulatory and essential light chain exclusively associate with conventional myosin heavy chains while unconventional myosin heavy chains usually associate with calmodulin. PMID:26155737

  2. Structural differences in the motor domain of temperature-associated myosin heavy chain isoforms from grass carp fast skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan; Wang, Sun-Yong; Liang, Chun-Shi; Fukushima, Hideto; Watabe, Shugo

    2009-10-01

    We determined coding sequences for three types of grass carp myosin subfragment-1 (S1) heavy chain by extending 5'-regions of the three known genes encoding light meromyosin isoforms (10 degrees C, intermediate and 30 degrees C types). The primary structures of these three S1 heavy chain isoforms showed 81.4%, 81.2%, and 97.8% identities between the 10 degrees C and intermediate types, between the 10 degrees C and 30 degrees C types, and between the intermediate and 30 degrees C types, respectively. Isoform-specific differences were clearly observed between the 10 degrees C type and the other two types in 97 amino acid residues. Furthermore, among these amino acid mutations, 51 mutations occurred at the conserved residue sites of S1 heavy chain from fish and homoiotherm. Additionally, the 10 degrees C type showed striking differences compared with the other two types in the two surface loops, loop 1 located near the ATP-binding pocket and loop 2, which is one of the actin-binding sites, suggesting that such structural differences possibly affect their motor functions. Interestingly, this 10 degrees C-type myosin heavy chain isolated from adult grass carp skeletal muscle was surprisingly similar to the embryonic fast-type myosin heavy chain from juvenile silver carp in the structure of S1 heavy chain, indicating that it may also function as embryonic fast-type myosin heavy chain in juvenile stage.

  3. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  4. The primary structure of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain: IV. Sequence of the rod, and the complete 1,938-residue sequence of the heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Maita, T; Yajima, E; Nagata, S; Miyanishi, T; Nakayama, S; Matsuda, G

    1991-07-01

    In the preceding paper [Maita, T., Miyanishi, T., Matsuzono, K., Tanioka, Y., & Matsuda, G. (1991) J. Biochem. 110, 68-74], we reported the amino-terminal 837-residue sequence of the heavy chain of adult chicken pectoralis muscle myosin. This paper describes the carboxyl terminal 1,097-residue sequence and the linkage of the two sequences. Rod obtained by digesting myosin filaments with alpha-chymotrypsin was redigested with the protease at high KCl concentration, and two fragments, subfragment-2 and light meromyosin, were isolated and sequenced by conventional methods. The linkage of the two fragments was deduced from the sequence of an overlapping peptide obtained by cleaving the rod with cyanogen bromide. The rod contained 1,039 amino acid residues, but lacked the carboxyl-terminal 58 residues of the heavy chain. A carboxyl-terminal 63-residue peptide obtained by cleaving the whole heavy chain with cyanogen bromide was sequenced. Thus, the carboxyl terminal 1,097-residue sequence of the heavy chain was completed. The linkage of subfragment-1 and the rod was deduced from the sequence of an overlapping peptide between the two which was obtained by cleaving heavy meromyosin with cyanogen bromide. Comparing the sequence of the adult myosin thus determined with that of chicken embryonic myosin reported by Molina et al. [Molina, M.I., Kropp, K.E., Gulick, J., & Robbins, J. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 6478-6488], we found that the sequence homology is 94%.

  5. Knockdown of embryonic myosin heavy chain reveals an essential role in the morphology and function of the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Rutland, Catrin Sian; Polo-Parada, Luis; Ehler, Elisabeth; Alibhai, Aziza; Thorpe, Aaran; Suren, Suganthi; Emes, Richard D.; Patel, Bhakti; Loughna, Siobhan

    2011-01-01

    The expression and function of embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMYH) has not been investigated within the early developing heart. This is despite the knowledge that other structural proteins, such as alpha and beta myosin heavy chains and cardiac alpha actin, play crucial roles in atrial septal development and cardiac function. Most cases of atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy are not associated with a known causative gene, suggesting that further analysis into candidate genes is required. Expression studies localised eMYH in the developing chick heart. eMYH knockdown was achieved using morpholinos in a temporal manner and functional studies were carried out using electrical and calcium signalling methodologies. Knockdown in the early embryo led to abnormal atrial septal development and heart enlargement. Intriguingly, action potentials of the eMYH knockdown hearts were abnormal in comparison with the alpha and beta myosin heavy chain knockdowns and controls. Although myofibrillogenesis appeared normal, in knockdown hearts the tissue integrity was affected owing to apparent focal points of myocyte loss and an increase in cell death. An expression profile of human skeletal myosin heavy chain genes suggests that human myosin heavy chain 3 is the functional homologue of the chick eMYH gene. These data provide compelling evidence that eMYH plays a crucial role in important processes in the early developing heart and, hence, is a candidate causative gene for atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy. PMID:21862559

  6. RNA-protein interactions of the 3' untranslated regions of myosin heavy chain transcripts.

    PubMed

    Kiri, Arpna; Goldspink, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    The RNA-protein interactions of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) were investigated using gel mobility shift assays. Marine skeletal myosin heavy chain mRNAs were amplified using reverse transcription coupled with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Four cloned MyHC sequences were identified as slow type 1, fast 2a, fast 2b and fast 2x. The 3'UTRs of the four MyHC mRNAs were shown to interact with muscle protein in a tissue-specific manner as illustrated by gel retardation assays with protein extracts from various tissues. Competition assays indicate that this interaction is specific to the MyHC 3'UTR sequence. UV cross-linking suggests that several small proteins bind to the 3'UTR's. Peptide sequencing identified aldolase A and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as MyHC 3'UTR RNA-binding proteins. The implications of these interactions and post-transcriptional regulation of the MyHC genes are discussed.

  7. Complete primary structure of a scallop striated muscle myosin heavy chain. Sequence comparison with other heavy chains reveals regions that might be critical for regulation.

    PubMed

    Nyitray, L; Goodwin, E B; Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1991-10-05

    We have determined the primary structure of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) of the striated adductor muscle of the scallop Aequipecten irradians by cloning and sequencing its cDNA. It is the first heavy chain sequence obtained in a directly Ca(2+)-regulated myosin. The 1938-amino acid sequence has an overall structure similar to other MHCs. The subfragment-1 region of the scallop MHC has a 59-62% sequence identity with sarcomeric and a 52-53% identity with nonsarcomeric (smooth and metazoan nonmuscle) MHCs. The heavy chain component of the regulatory domain (Kwon, H., Goodwin, E. B., Nyitray, L., Berliner, E., O'Neall-Hennessey, E., Melandri, F. D., and Szent-Györgyi, A. G. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 4771-4775) starts at either Leu-755 or Val-760. Ca(2+)-sensitive Trp residues (Wells, C., Warriner, K. E., and Bagshaw, C. R. (1985) Biochem. J. 231, 31-38) are located near the C-terminal end of this segment (residues 818-827). More detailed sequence comparison with other MHCs reveals that the 50-kDa domain and the N-terminal two-thirds of the 20-kDa domain differ substantially between sarcomeric and nonsarcomeric myosins. In contrast, in the light chain binding region of the regulatory domain (residues 784-844) the scallop sequence shows greater homology with regulated myosins (smooth muscle, nonmuscle, and invertebrate striated muscles) than with unregulated ones (vertebrate skeletal and heart muscles). The N-terminal 25-kDa domain also contains several residues which are preserved only in regulated myosins. These results indicate that certain heavy chain sites might be critical for regulation. The rod has features typical of sarcomeric myosins. It is 52-60% and 30-33% homologous with sarcomeric and nonsarcomeric MHCs, respectively. A Ser-rich tailpiece (residues 1918-1938) is apparently nonhelical.

  8. Characterization of isoform diversity among smooth muscle and nonmuscle myosin heavy chains.

    PubMed

    Kelley, C A

    1997-05-01

    In the last decade, as a result of molecular cloning and the reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, numerous isoforms of the contractile protein myosin have been discovered. What lags behind their discovery is knowledge of their functions. This review focuses on some of my recent work on the structure, function and regulation of isoforms of the heavy chain of vertebrate smooth muscle and nonmuscle myosin II. Reference to related work in the field is included where appropriate. The particular isoforms discussed are those that are generated by alternative splicing near the 5' end of the pre-mRNA, resulting in either an insertion or a deletion of a cassette of amino acids near the amino-terminus of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein. In both the smooth muscle and nonmuscle MHCs, this splicing occurs in the exact same region, which begins at amino acid 212 in the primary sequence. In the three-dimensional structure of the molecule, these inserts are located near the ATP-binding pocket in a region of the MHC that was not resolved in the crystal structure and therefore is believed to represent a flexible loop. In the smooth muscle MHC, the insertion of seven amino acids in this loop confers a higher enzymatic activity on the myosin. The potential mechanism by which this occurs and the significance to smooth muscle contractile diversity is discussed. In the nonmuscle MHC, the insert in this region is a different size and sequence of amino acids than that in the smooth muscle MHC. A serine residue (Ser-214) in the nonmuscle loop is phosphorylated by p34cdc2 kinase in Xenopus during meiotic maturation of oocytes to eggs and is dephosphorylated in interphase egg extracts that are equivalent to the interphase after fertilization of the egg. Thus, MHC-B phosphorylation by cdc2 kinase correlates with the cortical reorganization that occurs during meiosis, and dephosphorylation correlates with the cortical contraction that occurs at fertilization, which aids in

  9. Fiber-type distribution and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in newborn heterozygous myostatin-knockout pigs.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiao-Xu; Xuan, Mei-Fu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Bo; Wang, Jun-Xia; Luo, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Guang-Lei; Cui, Cheng-Du; Cui, Zheng-Yun; Kang, Jin-Dan; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2017-08-31

    To explore the effects of heterozygous myostatin-knockout (MSNT(+/-)) on muscle characteristics, specifically fiber-type distribution and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in pigs. The fiber cross-sectional area of the semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles were much larger in MSTN(+/-) pigs at birth than in wild-type (WT) pigs. MSTN(+/-) pigs had a higher proportion of fast-type fibers and lower succinate dehydrogenase activity in muscles than WT pigs. The myosin heavy chain IIB mRNA level in both two muscles was ~ threefold higher in MSTN(+/-) pigs compared with WT pigs. MSTN(+/-) pigs exhibit a disproportionate increase in muscle mass and can have a higher body weight due to fiber hypertrophy, a change in the fiber-type distribution, and alteration of myosin heavy chain isoforms levels, leading to more fast glycolytic fibers.

  10. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies with a common stereotypic rearrangement recognize nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA

    PubMed Central

    Catera, Rosa; Hatzi, Katerina; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Xiao Bo; Fales, Henry M.; Allen, Steven L.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Rai, Kanti R.; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Leukemic B lymphocytes of a large group of unrelated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients express an unmutated heavy chain immunoglobulin variable (V) region encoded by IGHV1-69, IGHD3-16, and IGHJ3 with nearly identical heavy and light chain complementarity-determining region 3 sequences. The likelihood that these patients developed CLL clones with identical antibody V regions randomly is highly improbable and suggests selection by a common antigen. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from this stereotypic subset strongly bind cytoplasmic structures in HEp-2 cells. Therefore, HEp-2 cell extracts were immunoprecipitated with recombinant stereotypic subset-specific CLL mAbs, revealing a major protein band at approximately 225 kDa that was identified by mass spectrometry as nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MYHIIA). Reactivity of the stereotypic mAbs with MYHIIA was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence colocalization with anti-MYHIIA antibody. Treatments that alter MYHIIA amounts and cytoplasmic localization resulted in a corresponding change in binding to these mAbs. The appearance of MYHIIA on the surface of cells undergoing stress or apoptosis suggests that CLL mAb may generally bind molecules exposed as a consequence of these events. Binding of CLL mAb to MYHIIA could promote the development, survival, and expansion of these leukemic cells. PMID:18812466

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence and deduced polypeptide sequence of a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain gene from Acanthamoeba: evidence of a hinge in the rodlike tail

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have completely sequenced a gene encoding the heavy chain of myosin II, a nonmuscle myosin from the soil ameba Acanthamoeba castellanii. The gene spans 6 kb, is split by three small introns, and encodes a 1,509-residue heavy chain polypeptide. The positions of the three introns are largely conserved relative to characterized vertebrate and invertebrate muscle myosin genes. The deduced myosin II globular head amino acid sequence shows a high degree of similarity with the globular head sequences of the rat embryonic skeletal muscle and nematode unc 54 muscle myosins. By contrast, there is no unique way to align the deduced myosin II rod amino acid sequence with the rod sequence of these muscle myosins. Nevertheless, the periodicities of hydrophobic and charged residues in the myosin II rod sequence, which dictate the coiled-coil structure of the rod and its associations within the myosin filament, are very similar to those of the muscle myosins. We conclude that this ameba nonmuscle myosin shares with the muscle myosins of vertebrates and invertebrates an ancestral heavy chain gene. The low level of direct sequence similarity between the rod sequences of myosin II and muscle myosins probably reflects a general tolerance for residue changes in the rod domain (as long as the periodicities of hydrophobic and charged residues are largely maintained), the relative evolutionary "ages" of these myosins, and specific differences between the filament properties of myosin II and muscle myosins. Finally, sequence analysis and electron microscopy reveal the presence within the myosin II rodlike tail of a well-defined hinge region where sharp bending can occur. We speculate that this hinge may play a key role in mediating the effect of heavy chain phosphorylation on enzymatic activity. PMID:3040773

  12. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  13. Lampreys Have a Single Gene Cluster for the Fast Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5′-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny. PMID:24376886

  14. Expression of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle Spindles After 19 Days of Hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Picquet, Florence; De-Doncker, Laurent; Falempin, Maurice

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a period of 19 days in hypergravity was long enough to induce changes in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in the muscle spindles. The soleus muscle of 10 male Wistar rats (control: CONT, n=5; hypergravity: HG, n=5) was frozen, cut into serial sections, and labeled with antibodies against MyHCs: I, IIA, IIA + IIX + IIB, slow-tonic, and α-cardiac. Forty CONT and 45 HG spindles were analyzed. The results from HG spindles compared to CONT showed that there was no change in the cross-sectional area of intrafusal fibers. However, along the entire length of B1 fibers, the expression of both MyHC I and α-cardiac was increased significantly, whereas the labeling against MyHC IIA and MyHC slow-tonic was decreased. In B2 fibers, the labeling against MyHC IIA (region A), slow-tonic (region A), and fast myosins (regions A-C) was statistically decreased. In chain fibers, the labeling against both MyHC IIA and fast MyHC was reduced significantly. We conclude that hypergravity has a real impact on the MyHC content in the muscle spindles and induces some inverse changes of those observed in hypogravity for MyHCs I, α-cardiac, and slow-tonic. PMID:14566020

  15. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  16. Mutations of the Drosophila myosin heavy-chain gene: effects on transcription, myosin accumulation, and muscle function.

    PubMed Central

    Mogami, K; O'Donnell, P T; Bernstein, S I; Wright, T R; Emerson, C P

    1986-01-01

    Mutations of the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene of Drosophila melanogaster were identified among a group of dominant flightless and recessive lethal mutants (map position 2-52, 36A8-B1,2). One mutation is a 0.1-kilobase deletion in the 5' region of the MHC gene and reduces MHC protein in the leg and thoracic muscles of heterozygotes to levels found in 36AC haploids. Three mutations are insertions of 8-to 10-kilobase DNA elements within the MHC gene and produce truncated MHC transcripts. Heterozygotes of these insertional mutations possess levels of MHC intermediate between those of haploids and diploids. An additional mutation has no gross alteration of the MHC gene or its RNA transcripts. Although leg and larval muscles function normally in each mutant heterozygote, indirect flight muscles are defective and possess disorganized myofibrils. Homozygous mutants die during embryonic or larval development and display abnormal muscle function prior to death. These findings provide direct genetic evidence that the MHC gene at 36B (2L) is essential for both larval and adult muscle development and function. The results are consistent with the previous molecular evidence that Drosophila, unlike other organisms, has only a single muscle MHC gene per haploid genome. Quantitative expression of both copies of the MHC gene is required for function of indirect flight muscle, whereas expression of a single MHC gene is sufficient for function of larval muscles and adult tubular muscles. Images PMID:3006049

  17. Tuning of shortening speed in coleoid cephalopod muscle: no evidence for tissue-specific muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Justin F.; Kier, William M.

    2015-01-01

    The contractile protein myosin II is ubiquitous in muscle. It is widely accepted that animals express tissue-specific myosin isoforms that differ in amino acid sequence and ATPase activity in order to tune muscle contractile velocities. Recent studies, however, suggested that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii might be an exception; members of this species do not express muscle-specific myosin isoforms, but instead alter sarcomeric ultrastructure to adjust contractile velocities. We investigated whether this alternative mechanism of tuning muscle contractile velocity is found in other coleoid cephalopods. We analyzed myosin heavy chain transcript sequences and expression profiles from muscular tissues of a cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, and an octopus, Octopus bimaculoides, in order to determine if these cephalopods express tissue-specific myosin heavy chain isoforms. We identified transcripts of four and six different myosin heavy chain isoforms in S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides muscular tissues, respectively. Transcripts of all isoforms were expressed in all muscular tissues studied, and thus S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides do not appear to express tissue-specific muscle myosin isoforms. We also examined the sarcomeric ultrastructure in the transverse muscle fibers of the arms of O. bimaculoides and the arms and tentacles of S. officinalis using transmission electron microscopy and found that the fast contracting fibers of the prey capture tentacles of S. officinalis have shorter thick filaments than those found in the slower transverse muscle fibers of the arms of both species. It thus appears that coleoid cephalopods, including the cuttlefish and octopus, may use ultrastructural modifications rather than tissue-specific myosin isoforms to adjust contractile velocities. PMID:26997860

  18. Tuning of shortening speed in coleoid cephalopod muscle: no evidence for tissue-specific muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2016-03-01

    The contractile protein myosin II is ubiquitous in muscle. It is widely accepted that animals express tissue-specific myosin isoforms that differ in amino acid sequence and ATPase activity in order to tune muscle contractile velocities. Recent studies, however, suggested that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii might be an exception; members of this species do not express muscle-specific myosin isoforms, but instead alter sarcomeric ultrastructure to adjust contractile velocities. We investigated whether this alternative mechanism of tuning muscle contractile velocity is found in other coleoid cephalopods. We analyzed myosin heavy chain transcript sequences and expression profiles from muscular tissues of a cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, and an octopus, Octopus bimaculoides, in order to determine if these cephalopods express tissue-specific myosin heavy chain isoforms. We identified transcripts of four and six different myosin heavy chain isoforms in S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides muscular tissues, respectively. Transcripts of all isoforms were expressed in all muscular tissues studied, and thus S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides do not appear to express tissue-specific muscle myosin isoforms. We also examined the sarcomeric ultrastructure in the transverse muscle fibers of the arms of O. bimaculoides and the arms and tentacles of S. officinalis using transmission electron microscopy and found that the fast contracting fibers of the prey capture tentacles of S. officinalis have shorter thick filaments than those found in the slower transverse muscle fibers of the arms of both species. It thus appears that coleoid cephalopods, including the cuttlefish and octopus, may use ultrastructural modifications rather than tissue-specific myosin isoforms to adjust contractile velocities.

  19. Developmental transitions in the myosin heavy chain phenotype of human respiratory muscle.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J S; Brozanski, B S; Daood, M; Watchko, J F

    1996-01-01

    We studied the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in the costal diaphragm (DIA) and the genioglossus (GG) muscles from 16 to 42 weeks gestation in the human using Western blotting techniques. Embryonic/neonatal MHC (MHCemb/neo) was the predominant isoform expressed in the DIA and GG at 16-24 weeks gestation. Subsequently, MHCemb/neo expression declined and the expression of MHCslow and MHC2A increased. At term, the DIA MHC phenotype was a composite of MHCemb/neo (15% of the total MHC complement), MHCslow (32%), MHC2A (47%), and MHC2B (6%); whereas, the GG was largely comprised of MHC2A (74%). We conclude that human DIA and GG demonstrate temporally dependent changes in MHC expression during gestation- and muscle-specific MHC phenotypes as they approach term.

  20. Mass spectrometry analyses of rat 2b myosin heavy chain isoform.

    PubMed

    Zurmanová, J; Malácová, D; Půta, F; Novák, P; Rícný, J; Soukup, T

    2007-01-01

    We have separated 2b myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform from the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle by SDS-PAGE and analyzed it by two subsequent mass spectrometry techniques. After tryptic digestion, the obtained peptides were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation reflectron Time of Flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and sequenced by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ESI LC/MS/MS). The analyzed peptides proportionally covered 30 % of the 2b MyHC isoform sequence. The results suggest that the primary structure is identical with the highest probability to a NCBI database record ref|NP_062198.1|, representing the last updated record of rat 2b isoform. Nonetheless, four peptides carrying amino acid substitution(s) in comparison with the NCBI database record were identified.

  1. Myosin heavy chain composition in the rat diaphragm - Effect of age and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, Luc E.; Betlach, Michael; Vailas, Arthur C.; Greaser, Marion L.; Thomas, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of aging and exercise training on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition were determined in both the costal and crural diaphragm regions of female Fischer 344 rats. Treadmill running at 75 percent maximal oxygen consumption resulted in similar increases in plantaris muscle citrate synthase activity in both young (5 mo) and old (23mo) trained animals (P less than 0.05). It was found that the ratio of fast to slow MHC was significantly higher (P less than 0.005) in the crural compared with costal diaphragm region in both age groups. A significant age-related increase in persentage of slow MHC was observed in both diaphragm regions. The relative proportion of slow MHC in either costal or crural region was not changed by exercise training.

  2. Enhanced protein electrophoresis technique for separating human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Talmadge, R. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Talmadge and Roy (J. Appl. Physiol. 1993, 75, 2337-2340) previously established a sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protocol for separating all four rat skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb); however, when applied to human muscle, the type II MHC isoforms (Ila, IIx) are not clearly distinguished. In this brief paper we describe a modification of the SDS-PAGE protocol which yields distinct and consistent separation of all three adult human MHC isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx) in a minigel system. MHC specificity of each band was confirmed by Western blot using three monoclonal IgG antibodies (mAbs) immunoreactive against MHCI (mAb MHCs, Novacastra Laboratories), MHCI+IIa (mAb BF-35), and MHCIIa+IIx (mAb SC-71). Results provide a valuable SDS-PAGE minigel technique for separating MHC isoforms in human muscle without the difficult task of casting gradient gels.

  3. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation (R134W) in Mouse Cardiac Troponin T Induces Greater Contractile Deficits against α-Myosin Heavy Chain than against β-Myosin Heavy Chain

    PubMed Central

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Chandra, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant—such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity—is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT), which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB) recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC)-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W) of the human DCM mutation (R131W), we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic mice (β-MHC). TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units) than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units). Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background. PMID:27757084

  4. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation (R134W) in Mouse Cardiac Troponin T Induces Greater Contractile Deficits against α-Myosin Heavy Chain than against β-Myosin Heavy Chain.

    PubMed

    Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant-such as myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity-is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT), which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB) recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC)-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W) of the human DCM mutation (R131W), we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic mice (β-MHC). TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units) than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units). Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background.

  5. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB) induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX)-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition. We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1) expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and calcineurin pathway) and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO) pathway and myostatin expression) in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB. Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth), and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  6. Non-Invasive Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Trained and Untrained Men.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel B; Weir, Joseph P; Beck, Travis W; Schilling, Brian K; Miller, Jonathan D; Nicoll, Justin X

    2016-09-20

    Numerous conditions and types of physical activity (e.g., exercise, aging, muscle-related diseases) can influence muscle fiber types and the proteins expressed. To date, muscle fibers can only be characterized by actually obtaining a tissue sample using the invasive muscle biopsy procedure. Mechanomyography (MMG) is the assessment of the vibration properties of contracting skeletal muscle, and has been proposed as a possible non-invasive method for muscle fiber analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of using MMG and muscle performance measures to non-invasively assess muscle fiber characteristics. Fifteen men (5 endurance-trained [End], 5 weight-trained [WT], and 5 sedentary [Sed]) provided muscle samples from their vastus lateralis muscle. These samples were analyzed for relative myosin heavy chain protein expression, which is highly correlated with % muscle fiber type areas. Additionally, each subject performed several muscle performance tests, and MMG of the quadriceps was assessed during a knee extension exercise. Multiple regression was used to develop prediction equations for determining relative muscle content of myosin heavy chain (MHC) types I, IIa, and IIx. A combination of MMG and knee extension performance variables estimated types I, IIa, and IIx MHC with approximately 80% accuracy. Although preliminary, these data suggest that muscle performance tests in addition to MMG assessments during a simple muscle performance task (knee extension) can be used to estimate muscle fiber type composition in a healthy male population. Such methods could ultimately be used to non-invasively monitor muscle health and fitness.

  7. Noninvasive Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Trained and Untrained Men.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel B; Weir, Joseph P; Beck, Travis W; Schilling, Brian K; Miller, Jonathan D; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-09-01

    Fry, AC, Housh, TJ, Cramer, JB, Weir, JP, Beck, TW, Schilling, BK, Miller, JD, and Nicoll, JX. Noninvasive assessment of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain expression in trained and untrained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2355-2362, 2017-Numerous conditions and types of physical activity (e.g., exercise, aging, and muscle-related diseases) can influence muscle fiber types and the proteins expressed. To date, muscle fibers can only be characterized by actually obtaining a tissue sample using the invasive muscle biopsy procedure. Mechanomyography (MMG) is the assessment of the vibration properties of contracting skeletal muscle and has been proposed as a possible noninvasive method for muscle fiber analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of using MMG and muscle performance measures to noninvasively assess muscle fiber characteristics. Fifteen men (5 endurance-trained, 5 weight-trained, and 5 sedentary) provided muscle samples from their vastus lateralis muscle. These samples were analyzed for relative myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein expression, which is highly correlated with % muscle fiber type areas. Additionally, each subject performed several muscle performance tests, and MMG of the quadriceps was assessed during a knee extension exercise. Multiple regression was used to develop prediction equations for determining relative muscle content of MHC types I, IIa, and IIx. A combination of MMG and knee extension performance variables estimated types I, IIa, and IIx MHCs with approximately 80% accuracy. Although preliminary, these data suggest that muscle performance tests in addition to MMG assessments during a simple muscle performance task (knee extension) can be used to estimate muscle fiber type composition in a healthy male population. Such methods could ultimately be used to noninvasively monitor muscle health and fitness.

  8. Relationships between maximal strength, muscle size, and myosin heavy chain isoform composition and postactivation potentiation.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Laurent B; Trajano, Gabriel S; Haff, G Gregory; Dumke, Charles C L S; Tufano, James J; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between maximal voluntary postactivation potentiation (PAP) and maximal knee extensor torque, quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) and volume, and type II myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform percentage in human skeletal muscle. Thirteen resistance-trained men completed a test protocol consisting of 2 isokinetic knee extensions at 180°·s(-)(1) performed before and 1, 4, 7, and 10 min after the completion of 4 maximal knee extensions at 60°·s(-)(1) (i.e., a conditioning activity (CA)). Magnetic resonance imaging and muscle microbiopsy procedures were completed on separate days to assess quadriceps CSA and volume and MHC isoform content. Maximal voluntary PAP response was assessed as the ratio of the highest knee extensor torques measured before and after the CA. There were large to very large correlations between maximal voluntary PAP response and maximal knee extensor torque (r = 0.62) and quadriceps CSA (r = 0.68) and volume (r = 0.63). Nonetheless, these correlations were not statistically significant after adjusting for the influence of type II MHC percentage using partial correlation analysis. By contrast, the strongest correlation was observed for type II MHC percentage (r = 0.77), and this correlation remained significant after adjusting for the other variables. Maximal voluntary PAP response is strongly correlated with maximal knee extensor torque and quadriceps CSA and volume, but is mostly clearly associated with the type II myosin isoform percentage in human skeletal muscle.

  9. Myosin IIA Heavy Chain Phosphorylation Mediates Adhesion Maturation and Protrusion in Three Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vandana; Thomas, Dustin G; Beach, Jordan R; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2017-02-24

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) is a conserved force-producing cytoskeletal enzyme with important but poorly understood roles in cell migration. To investigate myosin heavy chain (MHC) phosphorylation roles in 3D migration, we expressed GFP-tagged NMIIA wild-type or mutant constructs in cells depleted of endogenous NMIIA protein. We find that individual mutation or double mutation of Ser-1916 or Ser-1943 to alanine potently blocks recruitment of GFP-NM-IIA filaments to leading edge protrusions in 2D, and this in turn blocks maturation of anterior focal adhesions. When placed in 3D collagen gels, cells expressing wild-type GFP MHC-IIA behave like parental cells, displaying robust and active formation and retraction of protrusions. However, cells depleted of NMIIA or cells expressing the mutant GFP MHC-IIA display severe defects in invasion and in stabilizing protrusions in 3D. These studies reveal an NMIIA-specific role in 3D invasion that requires competence for NMIIA phosphorylation at Ser-1916 and Ser-1943. In sum, these results demonstrate a critical and previously unrecognized role for NMIIA phosphorylation in 3D invasion.

  10. Complete primary structure of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin heavy chain deduced from its complementary DNA sequence. Implications on topography and function of myosin.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Hamada, Y; Katsuragawa, Y; Imamura, M; Mikawa, T; Masaki, T

    1987-11-20

    The 1979 amino acid sequence of embryonic chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) have been determined by cloning and sequencing its cDNA. Genomic Southern analysis and Northern analysis with the cDNA sequence show that gizzard MHC is encoded by a single-copy gene, and this gene is expressed in the gizzard and aorta. The encoded protein has a calculated Mr of 229 X 10(3), and can be divided into a long alpha-helical rod and a globular head. Only 32 to 33% of the amino acid residues in the rod and 48 to 49% in the head are conserved when compared with nematode or vertebrate sarcomeric MHC sequences. However, the seven residue hydrophobic periodicity, together with the 28 and 196 residue repeat of charge distribution previously described in nematode myosin rod, are all present in the gizzard myosin rod. Two of the trypsin-sensitive sites in gizzard light meromyosin have been mapped by partial peptide sequencing to 99 nm and 60 nm from the tip of the myosin tail, where these sites coincide with the two "hinges" for the 6 S/10 S transition. In the head sequence, several polypeptide segments, including the regions around the putative ATP-binding site and the reactive thiol groups, are highly conserved. These areas presumably reflect conserved structural elements important for the function of myosin. A multi-domain folding model of myosin head is proposed on the basis of the conserved sequences, information on the topography of myosin in the literature, and the predicted secondary structures. In this model, Mg2+ ATP is bound to a pocket between two opposing alpha/beta domains, while actin undergoes electrostatic interactions with lysine-rich surface loops on two other domains. The actin-myosin interactions are thought to be modulated through relative movements of the domains induced by the binding of ATP.

  11. Analysis of sense and naturally occurring antisense transcripts of myosin heavy chain in the human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Podlowski, S; Hetzer, R; Baumann, G

    2001-01-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has the potential to form a duplex with its complementary sense mRNA, thereby regulating protein expression. Previously, we demonstrated considerable amounts of endogenous antisense RNA for both alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) in rat heart suggesting a role in posttranscriptional MHC-regulation (Luther et al. [1997] J Mol Cell Cardiol 29(1):27-35). To evaluate whether antisense RNA is also involved in MHC regulation in human heart we analyzed ventricular myocardium transcripts in nonfailing hearts (n=3) and hearts from patients undergoing heart transplantation (n=5). Investigation of RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detected an antisense RNA transcript for beta-MHC but none for alpha-MHC. Northern blot analysis of normal and failing hearts detected sense mRNA for beta-MHC, but not alpha-MHC suggesting no functionally relevant levels of alpha-MHC mRNA exist in the human ventricle. The results describe-for the first time-the existence of endogenous polyadenylated MHC antisense transcripts in the human heart. The potential effect of attenuating translation was shown in an in vitro translation assay using a synthetic antisense-oligonucleotide derived from the sequence of the naturally occurring antisense RNA. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Myosin heavy chain mRNA isoforms in masseter muscle before and after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Harzer, Winfried; Worm, Margret; Gedrange, Tomasz; Schneider, Matthias; Wolf, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Orthognathic surgery leads to changed jaw position and force vector of mastication to which the muscles must adapt. The aim of the present study was to determine the relative expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) messenger RNA (mRNA) isoforms in different types of human masseter muscle fiber under consideration of change in the number of occlusal contacts before and 6 months after surgery. Muscle biopsies were taken from the anterior and posterior parts of both sides in 30 patients with prognathic and retrognathic mandibles. Specific mRNA MyHC analysis was made by real-time polymerase chain reaction to quantify the isoforms I, IIa, and IId/x. There was a shift in the relative content from type I (46% before, 37% after) to type IIa (29% before, 42% after). This shift correlates with number of teeth in occlusion. Correlation between isoform shift and number of teeth in occlusion indicates higher mastication force which stabilizes the treatment result.

  13. Chronic sleep deprivation alters the myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruihua; Huang, Fei; Wang, Peihuan; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Lei; Wu, Gaoyi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms of rat masseter muscle fibres caused by chronic sleep deprivation and a possible link with the pathogenesis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 180 male rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=60 in each): cage controls, large platform controls, and chronic sleep deprivation group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups with different observation periods (7, 14, and 21 days). We investigated he expression of MyHC isoforms in masseter muscle fibres by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. In rats with chronic sleep deprivation there was increased MyHC-I expression in layers of both shallow and deep muscles at 7 and 21 days compared with the control groups, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with significantly decreased MyHC-II expression. At 21 days, there were no differences in MyHC-I or MyHC-II expression between the groups and there were no differences between the two control groups at any time point. These findings suggest that chronic sleep deprivation alters the expression of MyHC isoforms, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders of the TMJ.

  14. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  16. Effects of inactivity on myosin heavy chain composition and size of rat soleus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, E. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Zhong, H.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) and fiber size properties of the adult rat soleus were determined after 4-60 days of complete inactivity, i.e., lumbar spinal cord isolation. Soleus atrophy was rapid and progressive, i.e., 25% and 64% decrease in weight and 33% and 75% decrease in fiber size after 4 and 60 days of inactivity, respectively. Changes in MHC occurred at a slower rate than the atrophic response. After 15 days there was de novo expression of type IIx MHC (approximately 10%). By 60 days, type IIx MHC accounted for 33% of the total MHC content, and 7% of the fibers contained only type IIx MHC. The relative amount of type I MHC was reduced from 93% in control to 49% after 60 days of inactivity. Therefore, the effects of 60 days of inactivity suggest that during this time period at least 75% of fiber size and approximately 40% of type I MHC composition of the adult rat soleus can be attributed to activation-related events.

  17. Identification of myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle of four Southern African wild ruminants.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Tertius A; Hoffman, Louw C; Myburgh, Kathryn H

    2007-10-01

    The aim was to separate and characterize the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms of four southern African wild ruminants, namely Blesbuck (Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi), Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros), Black Wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou) and Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus). Longissimus dorsi muscle samples were subjected to SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses using antibodies raised against MHC isoforms. The specificity of these antibodies was assessed using immunohistochemistry combined with ATPase histochemistry, Three MHC isoforms were separated and the bands were identified from fastest to slowest migrating as MHC I, MHC IIx and MHC IIa. The mobility of the MHC isoforms was similar for all four species, including that of bovine, but differed from human muscle. Kudu muscle exhibited the lowest proportion of MHC I and the highest proportion of MHC IIx, whereas Blesbuck muscle had the least MHC IIx. The two Wildebeest species were intermediate in isoform content. In conclusion, when new species are studied, existing electrophoretic protocols may need to be modified to achieve quantifiable separation and isoform migration pattern must be verified in order to reach correct interpretations. Furthermore, antibody specificity may differ between techniques as well as species and needs confirmation.

  18. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  19. Developmental Modulation of a beta myosin heavy chain promoter-driven transgene.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Sánchez, A; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1996-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying heart and skeletal muscle-specific gene expression during development and in response to physioloic stimuli are largely unknown. Using a novel immunohistochemical procedure to detect chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), we have investigated, in vivo at high resolution, the ability of cis-acting DNA sequences within the 5' flanking region of the mouse beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene (beta-MyHC) to direct appropriate gene expression throughout development. A 5.6-kb fragment 5' to the beta-MyHC's transcriptional start site was linked to the reporter gene encoding CAT (cat) and used to generate transgenic mice. The anti-CAT in situ assay described in this report allowed us to define the ability of the promoter fragment to direct appropriate temporal, tissue- and muscle fiber type-specific gene expression throughout early development. In skeletal muscles, the transgene expression profile mimics the endogenous beta-myHC's at all developmental stages and is appropriately restricted to slow (type I) skeletal fibers in the adult. Surprisingly, transgene expression was detected in both the atria and ventricles during embryonic and fetal development, indicating that ventricular specification involves elements outside the 5.6-kb fragment. In contrast, in the adult, hypothyroid conditions led to transgene induction specifically in the ventricles, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms control fetal versus adult beta-MyHC expression in the cardiac compartment.

  20. In vivo regulation of the mouse beta myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Neumann, J; Robbins, J

    1994-12-09

    The interactions of trans-acting factors with their respective cis-acting elements in the 5' upstream region of the beta myosin heavy chain gene (MyHC) regulate its tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression. The role of three conserved elements, an MCAT or TEF-1 binding site, a C-rich region, and a beta e3 region, in muscle-specific gene expression was analyzed in vivo. Each cis-acting site was ablated in the context of the beta MyHC promoter, fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene, and used to generate transgenic mice. In contrast to results obtained in vitro, the data demonstrate that mutating any one of these cis-acting elements does not affect the level or tissue specificity of transgene expression. Sequences upstream of -600 can functionally substitute for any one of these regulatory cassettes and are important both for high levels of expression as well as for controlled muscle specificity. Mutation of any two of the cis-acting elements also does not affect transgene expression. However, simultaneous mutation of the three sites significantly reduces expression, indicating that these conserved sequences do play an important role and that combinatorial interactions underlie the beta MyHC's regulation.

  1. In vivo analysis of the murine beta-myosin heavy chain gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Rindt, H; Gulick, J; Knotts, S; Neumann, J; Robbins, J

    1993-03-05

    The 5' upstream region of the murine beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene has been isolated and tested for its ability to drive gene expression in transgenic mice. Three classes of transgenic mice were generated. The constructs contained approximately 5000, 2500, and 600 base pairs of beta-MHC upstream sequence fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and were termed beta 5, beta 2.5, and beta .6, respectively. Muscle-specific expression was observed with all three constructs. However, only the beta 5 lines directed high levels of muscle-specific transgene expression in both pre- and postbirth mice. Expression driven by the two shorter constructs was two to three orders of magnitude lower when the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase specific activities were compared. These data suggest that a distal-positive element directs high levels of gene expression in the ventricle and in slow skeletal muscles. Analyses of transgene expression during heart maturation revealed that some of the beta 5 lines were not able to respond in an appropriate manner to developmental transcriptional cues. Unlike the endogenous beta-MHC gene, which is down regulated in the ventricles around the time of birth, reporter gene expression in the majority of the lines generated was not shut off in the ventricles of the adult animals. These data indicate that high levels of muscle-specific beta-MHC gene expression are dependent upon the combinatorial interactions of a number of sequence elements that are distributed over a large region of the gene's upstream sequence.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila melanogaster muscle myosin heavy-chain gene

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Norbert K.; Singer, Phillip A.; Trinh, Kien; Nikkhoy, Massoud; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2007-01-01

    We show that a 2.6 kb fragment of the muscle myosin heavy-chain gene (Mhc) of Drosophila melanogaster (containing 458 base pairs of upstream sequence, the first exon, the first intron and the beginning of the second exon) drives expression in all muscles. Comparison of the minimal promoter to Mhc genes of ten Drosophila species identified putative regulatory elements in the upstream region and in the first intron. The first intron is required for expression in four small cells of the tergal depressor of the trochanter (jump) muscle and in the indirect flight muscle. The 3′ end of this intron is important for Mhc transcription in embryonic body wall muscle and contains AT–rich elements that are protected from DNase I digestion by nuclear proteins of Drosophila embryos. Sequences responsible for expression in embryonic, adult body wall and adult head muscles are present both within and outside the intron. Elements important for expression in leg muscles and in the large cells of the jump muscle flank the intron. We conclude that multiple transcriptional regulatory elements are responsible for Mhc expression in specific sets of Drosophila muscles. PMID:17194628

  3. Myosin heavy chain and fibre diameter of extrinsic tongue muscles in rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Chadwick; Goldberg, Stephen J; Shall, Mary S

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify the myosin heavy chain (MHC) phenotype and fibre diameters of hypoglossal innervated extrinsic tongue muscles in rhesus monkey. Genioglossus, styloglossus and hyoglossus muscle samples obtained from three female rhesus monkeys were analysed for MHC isoforms via gel electrophoresis and stained with MHC antibodies to measure least mean diameters. MHC phenotypes were consistent for all three muscles. Each muscle was predominantly composed of MHC type IIa and I. All three isoforms were significantly different from each other in fibre diameter for styloglossus and genioglossus (IIb>IIa and IIx>I; P<0.001). For hyoglossus, the MHC type II isoforms had larger diameters than the MHC type I isoform (P<0.001). While the extrinsic tongue muscle MHC and/or muscle fibre type composition may be different between mammalian species, there are consistent similarities between the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles. We suggest this is necessary for the highly coordinated activities performed by the tongue such as mastication, respiration and swallowing. The differences in fibre diameters among MHC isoforms suggest a large force gradation, which would be consistent with the coordination of these activities. The similarities among primates in MHC and/or muscle fibre composition as well as similar cortical inputs to the hypoglossal nucleus, suggest that we could expect to see similar MHC phenotype for extrinsic tongue muscles in human.

  4. Independent origin of identical [beta] cardiac myosin heavy-chain mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, H. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA St. George's Hospital Medical School, London ); Thierfelder, L.; Anan, R.; Jarcho, J.; Seidman, C.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Matsumori, Akira ); McKenna, W. ); Seidman, J.G. Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    The origins of the [beta] cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene missense mutations that cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) in 14 families have been evaluated. Of eight different mutations, four were present in single families, while four occurred in two or more families. To investigate the origins of the four shared mutations, the authors defined the [beta] cardiac MHC haplotypes of each of the mutation-bearing chromosomes by determining the alleles present at three intragenic polymorphic loci. Two of the mutations (Arg453Cys and Val606Met) have arisen independently in each of three families, being found on different chromosomal backgrounds. A third mutation (Gly584Arg) is associated with identical haplotypes in two families with Portuguese ancestors, suggesting a founder effect. Haplotype analysis was uninformative for the fourth mutation (Arg403Gln). Thus, FHC-causing mutations have arisen independently in at least 12 of the 14 families studied, suggesting that the majority have arisen relatively recently as new mutations. This finding predicts the prevalence of disease-causing [beta] cardiac MHC mutations to be comparable in all population groups. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  6. Single-fiber myosin heavy chain polymorphism during postnatal development: modulation by hypothyroidism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    di Maso, N. A.; Caiozzo, V. J.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to follow the developmental time course of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transitions in single fibers of the rodent plantaris muscle. Hypothyroidism was used in conjunction with single-fiber analyses to better describe a possible linkage between the neonatal and fast type IIB MHC isoforms during development. In contrast to the general concept that developmental MHC isoform transitions give rise to muscle fibers that express only a single MHC isoform, the single-fiber analyses revealed a very high degree of MHC polymorphism throughout postnatal development. In the adult state, MHC polymorphism was so pervasive that the rodent plantaris muscles contained approximately 12-15 different pools of fibers (i.e., fiber types). The degree of polymorphism observed at the single-fiber level made it difficult to determine specific developmental schemes analogous to those observed previously for the rodent soleus muscle. However, hypothyroidism was useful in that it confirmed a possible link between the developmental regulation of the neonatal and fast type IIB MHC isoforms.

  7. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  9. Single-fiber myosin heavy chain polymorphism during postnatal development: modulation by hypothyroidism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    di Maso, N. A.; Caiozzo, V. J.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to follow the developmental time course of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transitions in single fibers of the rodent plantaris muscle. Hypothyroidism was used in conjunction with single-fiber analyses to better describe a possible linkage between the neonatal and fast type IIB MHC isoforms during development. In contrast to the general concept that developmental MHC isoform transitions give rise to muscle fibers that express only a single MHC isoform, the single-fiber analyses revealed a very high degree of MHC polymorphism throughout postnatal development. In the adult state, MHC polymorphism was so pervasive that the rodent plantaris muscles contained approximately 12-15 different pools of fibers (i.e., fiber types). The degree of polymorphism observed at the single-fiber level made it difficult to determine specific developmental schemes analogous to those observed previously for the rodent soleus muscle. However, hypothyroidism was useful in that it confirmed a possible link between the developmental regulation of the neonatal and fast type IIB MHC isoforms.

  10. Segmental distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms within single muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Gould, Maree

    2017-02-18

    Despite many studies looking at the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms across a transverse section of muscle, knowledge of MHC distribution along the longitudinal axis of a single skeletal muscle fiber has been relatively overlooked. Immunocytochemistry was performed on serial sections of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle to identify MHC types I, IIA, IIX, IIY and IIB. Sixteen fascicles which contained a total of 362 fibers were randomly and systematically sampled from the 3 EDL muscles. All MHC type I and type II isoforms were expressed. Segmental expression occurred within a very limited segment. MHC isoform expression followed the accepted traditional order from I&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIA&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIX&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIB, however in some samples expression of an isoform was circumvented from IIB to I or from I to IIB directly. Segmental distribution of MHC isoforms along a single muscle fiber may be due to the myonuclear domain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  12. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  13. Effects of inactivity on myosin heavy chain composition and size of rat soleus fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, E. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Zhong, H.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) and fiber size properties of the adult rat soleus were determined after 4-60 days of complete inactivity, i.e., lumbar spinal cord isolation. Soleus atrophy was rapid and progressive, i.e., 25% and 64% decrease in weight and 33% and 75% decrease in fiber size after 4 and 60 days of inactivity, respectively. Changes in MHC occurred at a slower rate than the atrophic response. After 15 days there was de novo expression of type IIx MHC (approximately 10%). By 60 days, type IIx MHC accounted for 33% of the total MHC content, and 7% of the fibers contained only type IIx MHC. The relative amount of type I MHC was reduced from 93% in control to 49% after 60 days of inactivity. Therefore, the effects of 60 days of inactivity suggest that during this time period at least 75% of fiber size and approximately 40% of type I MHC composition of the adult rat soleus can be attributed to activation-related events.

  14. Myosin heavy chain is stabilized by BCL-2 interacting cell death suppressor (BIS) in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin; Park, Jun-Sub; Lee, Hyun; Jeong, Jaemin; Hyeon Yun, Hye; Yun Kim, Hye; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jeong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    BCL-2 interacting cell death suppressor (BIS), which is ubiquitously expressed, has important roles in various cellular processes, such as apoptosis, the cellular stress response, migration and invasion and protein quality control. In particular, BIS is highly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles, and BIS gene mutations result in human myopathy. In this study, we show that mRNA and protein levels of BIS were markedly increased during skeletal myogenesis in C2C12 cells and mouse satellite cells. BIS knockdown did not prevent the early stage of skeletal myogenesis, but did induce muscle atrophy and a decrease in the diameter of myotubes. BIS knockdown significantly suppressed the expression level of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) without changing the expression levels of myogenic marker proteins, such as Mgn, Cav-3 and MG53. In addition, BIS endogenously interacted with MyHC, and BIS knockdown induced MyHC ubiquitination and degradation. From these data, we conclude that molecular association of MyHC and BIS is necessary for MyHC stabilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:27034027

  15. Differential susceptibility on myosin heavy chain isoform following eccentric-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-12-01

    Based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, human skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into three fiber types, type I, IIa, IIx fibers, and each fiber type has different characteristics. Typical characteristics are difference in force production, shortening velocity, and fatigue resistance. When the muscle is contract and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle, contraction-induced muscle damage frequently occurs. Several experimental models involving both human and animal have considered the susceptibility of different muscle fiber type and part of muscles to eccentric induced muscle damage. General consensus is a greater susceptibility of fast-twitch fiber or type II fiber to damage following eccentric contractions. However, the results from these previous efforts were not enough to conclude the susceptibility between each individual fiber types after eccentric contraction. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to explore detail limitation and interpretation of previous studies, and review the recent study that eliminated the prior limitations, such as strain magnitude, lengthening velocity, fiber type heterogeneity, and muscle architecture issue.

  16. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  17. Electrophoretic separation of reptilian skeletal and cardiac muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms: dependence on gel format.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Peter J; Bicer, Sabahattin

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a comparison of multiple gel formats to study myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms that are expressed in reptilian skeletal and cardiac muscles of five turtle species, water monitor, and prehensile tailed skink. Three gel formats were tested. The results identify one format that is superior, for the overall extent of electrophoretic separation and for the assessment of the number of MHC isoforms in reptilian striated muscles. The same format was shown previously to separate MHC isoforms that are expressed in American alligator. The results also show that another gel format reveals the distinct electrophoretic mobility of MHC isoforms in atrial, ventricular, and jaw adductor samples, compared to those expressed in skeletal muscles in the limbs and elsewhere in the body. In addition, the results reveal that the electrophoretic mobility of specific MHC isoforms, relative to other isoforms, depends on the gel format, as shown previously for mammalian and avian species. The discovery of the expression of masticatory MHC, which is abundantly expressed in jaw adductors of members of Carnivora and several other vertebrate orders, in the homologous muscles of prehensile tailed skink, an herbivore, and the carnivorous water monitor, was made during the course of this study. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Limited Expression of Slow Tonic Myosin Heavy Chain in Human Cranial Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sokoloff, Alan J.; Li, Haiyan; Burkholder, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of slow tonic myosin heavy chain (MHCst) in human masticatory and laryngeal muscles suggest that MHCst may have a wider distribution in humans than previously thought. Because of the novelty of this finding, we sought to confirm the presence of MHCst in human masticatory and laryngeal muscles by reacting tissue from these muscles and controls from extraocular, intrafusal, cardiac, appendicular and developmental muscle with antibodies (Abs) ALD-58 and S46 considered highly specific for MHCst. At Ab dilutions producing minimal reaction to muscle fibers positive for MHCI, only extraocular, intrafusal and fetal tongue tissue reacted with Ab S46 had strong immunoreaction in an appreciable number of muscle fibers. In immunoblots Ab S46, but not Ab ALD-58, labeled adult extraocular muscles; no other muscles were labeled with either Ab. We conclude that, in humans, Ab S46 has greater specificity for MHCst than does Ab ALD-58. We suggest that reports of MHCst in human masticatory and laryngeal muscles reflect false-positive identification of MHCst due to cross-reactivity of Ab ALD-58 with another MHC isoform. PMID:17486578

  19. Interferon-γ causes cardiac myocyte atrophy via selective degradation of myosin heavy chain in a model of chronic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Cosper, Pippa F; Harvey, Pamela A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-12-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of forms of heart disease including myocarditis and congestive heart failure. In fact, overexpression of IFN-γ in mice causes dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the direct effects of IFN-γ on cardiac myocytes and the mechanism by which it causes cardiac dysfunction have not been described. Here, we present the molecular pathology of IFN-γ exposure and its effect on myofibrillar proteins in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Treatment with IFN-γ caused cardiac myocyte atrophy attributable to a specific decrease in myosin heavy chain protein. This selective degradation of myosin heavy chain was not accompanied by a decrease in total protein synthesis or by an increase in total protein degradation. IFN-γ increased both proteasome and immunoproteasome activity in cardiac myocytes and their inhibition blocked myosin heavy chain loss and myocyte atrophy, whereas inhibition of the lysosome or autophagosome did not. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism by which IFN-γ causes cardiac pathology in the setting of chronic inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Interferon-γ Causes Cardiac Myocyte Atrophy via Selective Degradation of Myosin Heavy Chain in a Model of Chronic Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Cosper, Pippa F.; Harvey, Pamela A.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of forms of heart disease including myocarditis and congestive heart failure. In fact, overexpression of IFN-γ in mice causes dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the direct effects of IFN-γ on cardiac myocytes and the mechanism by which it causes cardiac dysfunction have not been described. Here, we present the molecular pathology of IFN-γ exposure and its effect on myofibrillar proteins in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Treatment with IFN-γ caused cardiac myocyte atrophy attributable to a specific decrease in myosin heavy chain protein. This selective degradation of myosin heavy chain was not accompanied by a decrease in total protein synthesis or by an increase in total protein degradation. IFN-γ increased both proteasome and immunoproteasome activity in cardiac myocytes and their inhibition blocked myosin heavy chain loss and myocyte atrophy, whereas inhibition of the lysosome or autophagosome did not. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism by which IFN-γ causes cardiac pathology in the setting of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23058369

  1. Sequence of the 20-kilodalton heavy chain peptide from the carboxyl-terminus of bovine cardiac myosin subfragment-1.

    PubMed Central

    Flink, I L; Morkin, E

    1984-01-01

    An almost complete amino acid sequence of the carboxyl-terminal 20-kD tryptic heavy chain peptide from bovine cardiac myosin Subfragment-1 (S-1) has been determined by automated sequential degradation of the undigested peptide and subfragments derived by chemical and enzymatic digestion. The fragment contains 169 residues, including two reactive cysteinyl residues which are located nine residues apart. At six positions in the sequence, two amino acid residues were present and two different versions of a chymotryptic peptide were isolated in approximately 53 and 24% yields, suggesting that there are two cardiac myosin beta-type heavy chains in this species. Analysis of the secondary structure of the 20-kD peptide predicts that there are two distinct regions within the fragment. The first region (residues 1-121) contains 12% alpha-helix, 25% beta-sheet, 40% beta-bends, and 19% coil; the second region (residues 122-169) may form an extended alpha-helix. Comparison of the bovine sequence with the deduced amino acid sequence of a recombinant plasmid containing DNA sequences coding for the beta-heavy chain of rabbit cardiac myosin (pMHC beta 174) reveals approximately 86% homology. Images PMID:6746911

  2. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  3. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  4. Myosin heavy chain and physiological adaptation of the rat diaphragm in elastase-induced emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Kwan; Zhu, Jianliang; Kozyak, Benjamin W; Burkman, James M; Rubinstein, Neal A; Lankford, Edward B; Stedman, Hansell H; Nguyen, Taitan; Levine, Sanford; Shrager, Joseph B

    2003-01-01

    Background Several physiological adaptations occur in the respiratory muscles in rodent models of elastase-induced emphysema. Although the contractile properties of the diaphragm are altered in a way that suggests expression of slower isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC), it has been difficult to demonstrate a shift in MHCs in an animal model that corresponds to the shift toward slower MHCs seen in human emphysema. Methods We sought to identify MHC and corresponding physiological changes in the diaphragms of rats with elastase-induced emphysema. Nine rats with emphysema and 11 control rats were studied 10 months after instillation with elastase. MHC isoform composition was determined by both reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry by using specific probes able to identify all known adult isoforms. Physiological adaptation was studied on diaphragm strips stimulated in vitro. Results In addition to confirming that emphysematous diaphragm has a decreased fatigability, we identified a significantly longer time-to-peak-tension (63.9 ± 2.7 ms versus 53.9 ± 2.4 ms). At both the RNA (RT-PCR) and protein (immunocytochemistry) levels, we found a significant decrease in the fastest, MHC isoform (IIb) in emphysema. Conclusion This is the first demonstration of MHC shifts and corresponding physiological changes in the diaphragm in an animal model of emphysema. It is established that rodent emphysema, like human emphysema, does result in a physiologically significant shift toward slower diaphragmatic MHC isoforms. In the rat, this occurs at the faster end of the MHC spectrum than in humans. PMID:12617755

  5. Differential expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masticatory muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Spassov, Alexander; Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Lucke, Silke; Morgenstern, Sven; Pavlovic, Dragan; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2011-12-01

    The dystrophin-deficient mouse (mdx) is a homologue animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness accompanied by changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. It is likely that the masticatory muscles undergo similar changes. The aim of this study was to examine the masticatory muscles (masseter, temporal, tongue, and soleus) of 100-day-old mdx and control mice (n = 8-10), and the fibre type distribution (by immunohistochemistry) as well as the expression of the corresponding MyHC messenger RNA (mRNA) (protein and mRNA expression, using Western blot or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that the masticatory muscles in the control and mdx mice consisted mainly of type 2 fibres, whereas soleus muscle consisted of both type 1 and 2 fibres. In the masseter muscle, the mRNA in mdx mice was not different from that found in the controls. However, the mRNA content of the MyHC-2b isoform in mdx mice was lower in comparison with the controls in the temporal muscle [11.9 versus 36.9 per cent; P < 0.01; mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM), Student's unpaired t-test], as well as in the tongue muscle (65.7 versus 73.8 per cent; P < 0.05). Similarly, the content of MyHC-2x isoforms in mdx tongue muscle was lower than in the controls (25.9 versus 30.8 per cent; P < 0.05). The observed down-regulation of the MyHC-2x and MyHC-2b mRNA in the masticatory muscles of mdx mice may lead to changed fibre type composition. The different MyHC gene expression in mdx mice masticatory muscles may be seen as an adaptive mechanism to muscular dystrophy.

  6. Determining structure/function relationships for sarcomeric myosin heavy chain by genetic and transgenic manipulation of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Swank, D M; Wells, L; Kronert, W A; Morrill, G E; Bernstein, S I

    2000-09-15

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent system for examining the structure/function relationships of myosin. It yields insights into the roles of myosin in assembly and stability of myofibrils, in defining the mechanical properties of muscle fibers, and in dictating locomotory abilities. Drosophila has a single gene encoding muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC), with alternative RNA splicing resulting in stage- and tissue-specific isoform production. Localization of the alternative domains of Drosophila MHC on a three-dimensional molecular model suggests how they may determine functional differences between isoforms. We are testing these predictions directly by using biophysical and biochemical techniques to characterize myosin isolated from transgenic organisms. Null and missense mutations help define specific amino acid residues important in actin binding and ATP hydrolysis and the function of MHC in thick filament and myofibril assembly. Insights into the interaction of thick and thin filaments result from studying mutations in MHC that suppress ultrastructural defects induced by a troponin I mutation. Analysis of transgenic organisms expressing engineered versions of MHC shows that the native isoform of myosin is not critical for myofibril assembly but is essential for muscle function and maintenance of muscle integrity. We show that the C-terminus of MHC plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of muscle integrity. Transgenic studies using headless myosin reveal that the head is important for some, but not all, aspects of myofibril assembly. The integrative approach described here provides a multi-level understanding of the function of the myosin molecular motor. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Myosin heavy chain 15 is associated with bovine pulmonary arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Neary, Joseph M.; Lund, Gretchen K.; Holt, Timothy N.; Garry, Franklyn B.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Breckenridge, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bovine pulmonary hypertension, brisket disease, causes significant morbidity and mortality at elevations above 2,000 m. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) is moderately heritable, with inheritance estimated to lie within a few major genes. Invasive mPAP measurement is currently the only tool available to identify cattle at risk of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. A genetic test could allow selection of cattle suitable for high altitude without the need for invasive testing. In this study we evaluated three candidate genes (myosin heavy chain 15 [MYH15], NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 2, and FK binding protein 1A) for association with mPAP in 166 yearling Angus bulls grazing at 2,182 m. The T allele (rs29016420) of MYH15 was linked to lower mPAP in a dominant manner (CC 47.2 ± 1.6 mmHg [mean ± standard error of the mean]; CT/TT 42.8 ± 0.7 mmHg; P = 0.02). The proportions of cattle with MYH15 CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 55%, 41%, and 4%, respectively. Given the high frequency of the deleterious allele, it is likely that the relative contribution of MYH15 polymorphisms to pulmonary hypertension is small, supporting previous predictions that the disease is polygenic. We evaluated allelic frequency of MYH15 in the Himalayan yak (Bos grunniens), a closely related species adapted to high altitude, and found 100% prevalence of T allele homozygosity. In summary, we identified a polymorphism in MYH15 significantly associated with mPAP. This finding may aid selection of cattle suitable for high altitude and contribute to understanding human hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25621163

  8. Force-velocity properties of human skeletal muscle fibres: myosin heavy chain isoform and temperature dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Bottinelli, R; Canepari, M; Pellegrino, M A; Reggiani, C

    1996-01-01

    1. A large population (n = 151) of human skinned skeletal muscle fibres has been studied. Force-velocity curves of sixty-seven fibres were obtained by load-clamp manoeuvres at 12 degrees C. In each fibre maximum shortening velocity (Vmax), maximum power output (Wmax), optimal velocity (velocity at which Wmax is developed, Vopt), optimal force (force at which Wmax is developed, Popt), specific tension (Po/CSA, isometric tension/cross-sectional area) were assessed. Unloaded shortening velocity (Vo) was also determined at 12 degrees C in a different group (n = 57) of fibres by slack-test procedure. 2. All fibres used for mechanical experiments were characterized on the basis of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and divided into five types: type I (or slow), types IIA and IIB (or fast), and types I-IIA and IIA-IIB (or mixed types). 3. Vmax, Wmax, Vopt, Popt, Vopt/Vmax ratio, Po/CSA and Vo were found to depend on MHC isoform composition. All parameters were significantly lower in type I than in the fast (type IIA and IIB) fibres. Among fast fibres, Vmax, Wmax, Vopt and Vo were significantly lower in type IIA and than in IIB fibres, whereas Popt, Po/CSA and Vopt/Vmax were similar. 4. The temperature dependence of Vo and Po/CSA was assessed in a group of twenty-one fibres in the range 12-22 degrees C. In a set of six fibres temperature dependence of Vmax was also studied. The Q10 (5.88) and activation energy E (125 kJ mol-1) values for maximum shortening velocity calculated from Arrhenius plots pointed to a very high temperature sensitivity. Po/CSA was very temperature dependent in the 12-17 degrees C range, but less dependent between 17 and 22 degrees C. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8887767

  9. Regulation of naturally occurring antisense RNA of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Luther, H P; Bartsch, H; Morano, I; Podlowski, S; Baumann, G

    2005-03-01

    Naturally occurring antisense RNA has been detected for a range of eukaryotic genes. Its abundance compared to levels of its complementary sense mRNA appears to be a factor indicating its possible regulatory function. In previous studies, we detected appreciable levels of antisense RNA against the two isoforms (alpha and beta) of the heavy myosin-chain (MyHC) in the myocardium of rats. If this is to play a significant role in gene expression antisense levels should vary in response to external and internal cellular influences. Recently, a bidirectional promoter located in the alpha/beta MyHC intergenic region was described, which was proposed to regulate coordinated transcription of alpha-MyHC sense and beta-MyHC antisense. To study MyHC antisense regulation in neonatal heart, we investigated cultivated myocytes stimulated with either trijodthyronin (T3) as an inductor of alpha-MyHC or phenylephrine with stimulation of beta-MyHC. RNA-quantification of sense and antisense transcripts of both isoforms was performed by real-time RT-PCR. Stimulation by T3 led to an induction of both sense and antisense of alpha-MyHC and to a decrease of beta-MyHC sense and antisense. Phenylephrine increased sense and antisense beta-MyHC but reduced antisense alpha-MyHC. The sense/antisense of alpha- and beta-MyHC ratio was unchanged compared to control. Results indicate a coregulation of sense and antisense MyHC RNA under stimulation of T3 and phenylephrine in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  10. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  11. Myosin heavy chain expression in rodent skeletal muscle: effects of exposure to zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, F.; Herrick, R. E.; Adams, G. R.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study ascertained the effects of 9 days of zero gravity on the relative (percentage of total) and calculated absolute (mg/muscle) content of isomyosin expressed in both antigravity and locomotor skeletal muscle of ground control (CON) and flight-exposed (FL) rats. Results showed that although there were no differences in body weight between FL and CON animals, a significant reduction in muscle mass occurred in the vastus intermedius (VI) (P < 0.05) but not in the vastus lateralis (VL) or the tibialis anterior. Both total muscle protein and myofibril protein content were not different between the muscle regions examined in the FL and CON groups. In the VI, there were trends for reductions in the relative content of type I and IIa myosin heavy chains (MHCs) that were offset by increases in the relative content of both type IIb and possibly type IIx MHC protein (P > 0.05). mRNA levels were consistent with this pattern (P < 0.05). The same pattern held true for the red region of the VL as examined at both the protein and mRNA level (P < 0.05). When the atrophy process was examined, there were net reductions in the absolute content of both type I and IIa MHCs that were offset by calculated increases in type IIb MHC in both VI and red VL. Collectively, these findings suggest that there are both absolute and relative changes occurring in MHC expression in the "red" regions of antigravity skeletal muscle during exposure to zero gravity that could affect muscle function.

  12. Capillary supply in relation to myosin heavy chain fibre composition of human intrinsic tongue muscles.

    PubMed

    Granberg, I; Lindell, B; Eriksson, P-O; Pedrosa-Domellöf, F; Stål, P

    2010-01-01

    The capillary supply and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition of three different intrinsic tongue muscles was analysed in the anterior and posterior regions of the human tongue with biochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Mean capillary density for the whole tongue was 796 ± 82 cap/mm², without regional differences. The overall number of capillaries around each fibre (CAF) was higher in the posterior than in the anterior region (2.5 vs. 2.1, p = 0.009). However, correcting for regional differences in fibre size, CAF per fibre area was higher in the anterior region (4.3 vs. 3.0, p < 0.001). Muscle fibres containing fast MyHCs predominated in the anterior region (78.7%), consisting of MyHCIIa (58.5%), MyHCIIx (1.0%), MyHCIIa+MyHCIIx (11.3%) and MyHCI+MyHCIIa (7.9%). Fibres containing slow MyHC predominated in the posterior region (65.2%), consisting of MyHCI (45.5%) and MyHCI+MyHCIIa (19.7%). A minor fibre population (<2%) contained unusual MyHC isoforms, namely MyHC foetal, MyHC slow-tonic, MyHC α-cardiac or MyHC embryonic. The microvascularization of the human tongue was twice as high as in human limb muscles. Regional similarities in capillary supply, but differences in fibre phenotype composition, suggest that human tongue muscle fibres are fatigue resistant independently of MyHC content. High frequency of hybrid fibres, that is fibres co-expressing two or more MyHC isoforms, indicates a wider spectrum of fibre contractile properties than in limb muscles. In conclusion, human intrinsic tongue muscles showed internal specialization in distribution of MyHC isoforms and capillary supply, but not in the expression of unusual MyHCs. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25–60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. PMID:24671242

  14. Myosin heavy chain isoform transitions in canine skeletal muscles during postnatal growth

    PubMed Central

    Štrbenc, Malan; Smerdu, Vika; Pogačnik, Azra; Fazarinc, Gregor

    2006-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the normal characteristics of developing canine muscles, myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression was analysed in the axial and limb skeletal muscles of 18 young dogs whose ages ranged from the late prenatal stage to 6 months. We compared the results of immunohistochemistry using ten monoclonal antibodies, specific to different MHC isoforms, and enzyme-histochemical reactions, which demonstrate the activity of myofibrillar ATPase, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPDH). In the skeletal muscles of fetuses and neonatal dogs the developmental isoforms MHC-emb and MHC-neo were prevalent. In all muscles the primary fibres, located centrally in each muscle fascicle, strongly expressed the slow isoform MHC-I. The adult fast isoform MHC-IIa was first noted in some of the secondary fibres on fetal day 55. During the first 10 days after birth, the expression of MHC-emb declined, as did that of MHC-neo during the second and third weeks. Correspondingly, the expression of MHC-IIa, and later, of MHC-I increased in the secondary fibres. Between the sixth week and second month the expression of MHC-IIx became prominent. The slow rhomboideus muscle exhibited an early expression of the slow isoform in the secondary fibres. Our results indicate that the timing of muscle maturation depends on its activity immediately following birth. The fastest developing muscle was the diaphragm, followed by the fast muscles. A pronounced changeover from developmental to adult isoforms was noted at 4–6 weeks of age, which coincides with the increased physical activity of puppies. PMID:16879596

  15. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yousefzadeh, Nasibeh; Jeddi, Sajad; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH) in rats has not been elucidated thus far. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and β-MHC isoforms. Methods: Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Results: Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p < 0.05) and heart rate (217 ± 11 vs. 273 ± 6 beat/min, p < 0.05) were lower in the FH rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201%) and α- MHC expression was lower (47%) than control. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart. PMID:27411095

  17. Myosin Heavy Chain Expression Can Vary over the Length of Jaw and Leg Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Korfage, J.A.M.; Kwee, K.E.; Everts, V.; Langenbach, G.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber type classification can be determined by its myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition based on a few consecutive sections. It is generally assumed that the MyHC expression of a muscle fiber is the same over its length since neural stimulation and systemic influences are supposed to be the same over its length. We analyzed this in detail in three muscle types: the temporalis (closer) and digastricus (opener; both first brachial arch), and the medial gastrocnemius (somite). Sections of the muscles were incubated with monoclonal antibodies against various MyHC isoforms, and the distribution of these isoforms within individual fibers was followed over a distance of approximately 1 mm. The staining intensity of a fiber was measured and compared with the other fibers in the section. In the temporalis, digastricus, and gastrocnemius, 46, 11, and 15%, respectively, of their MyHC-I fibers showed a variation in the staining intensity over the length of their fibers, as well as 47, 87, and 22%, respectively, of their MyHC-IIA fibers. Most variable fibers were found amongst those with an overall relative intermediate staining intensity, which are presumably hybrid fibers. We conclude that different parts of a muscle fiber can have different fiber type compositions and, thus, contractile properties. Some muscle parts might reach their maximum contraction peak sooner or later than a muscle part a few microns further away. Next to stimulation by the nerve and systemic influences, local influences might also have an impact on the MyHC expression of the fiber. PMID:26950765

  18. Myosin heavy chain expression in rodent skeletal muscle: effects of exposure to zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, F.; Herrick, R. E.; Adams, G. R.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study ascertained the effects of 9 days of zero gravity on the relative (percentage of total) and calculated absolute (mg/muscle) content of isomyosin expressed in both antigravity and locomotor skeletal muscle of ground control (CON) and flight-exposed (FL) rats. Results showed that although there were no differences in body weight between FL and CON animals, a significant reduction in muscle mass occurred in the vastus intermedius (VI) (P < 0.05) but not in the vastus lateralis (VL) or the tibialis anterior. Both total muscle protein and myofibril protein content were not different between the muscle regions examined in the FL and CON groups. In the VI, there were trends for reductions in the relative content of type I and IIa myosin heavy chains (MHCs) that were offset by increases in the relative content of both type IIb and possibly type IIx MHC protein (P > 0.05). mRNA levels were consistent with this pattern (P < 0.05). The same pattern held true for the red region of the VL as examined at both the protein and mRNA level (P < 0.05). When the atrophy process was examined, there were net reductions in the absolute content of both type I and IIa MHCs that were offset by calculated increases in type IIb MHC in both VI and red VL. Collectively, these findings suggest that there are both absolute and relative changes occurring in MHC expression in the "red" regions of antigravity skeletal muscle during exposure to zero gravity that could affect muscle function.

  19. HDAC3-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of cardiac myosin heavy chain isoforms modulates their enzymatic and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Courson, David S; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Rock, Ronald S; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2011-02-18

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, associate with cardiac sarcomeres, and a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study, we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to the A band of sarcomeres and was capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the K(m) for the actin-activated ATPase activity of both α- and β-MHC isoforms. By an in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36%, compared to their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli, independent of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  20. HDAC3-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Sadhana A.; Courson, David S.; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Rock, Ronald S.; Gupta, Mahesh P.

    2011-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, associate with cardiac sarcomeres, and a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study, we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to the A band of sarcomeres and was capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of both α- and β-MHC isoforms. By an in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36%, compared to their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli, independent of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms. PMID:21177250

  1. Variable N-terminal regions of muscle myosin heavy chain modulate ATPase rate and actin sliding velocity.

    PubMed

    Swank, Douglas M; Knowles, Aileen F; Kronert, William A; Suggs, Jennifer A; Morrill, George E; Nikkhoy, Massoud; Manipon, Gracielle G; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2003-05-09

    We integratively assessed the function of alternative versions of a region near the N terminus of Drosophila muscle myosin heavy chain (encoded by exon 3a or 3b). We exchanged the alternative exon 3 regions between an embryonic isoform and the indirect flight muscle isoform. Each chimeric myosin was expressed in Drosophila indirect flight muscle, in the absence of other myosin isoforms, allowing for purified protein analysis and whole organism locomotory studies. The flight muscle isoform generates higher in vitro actin sliding velocity and solution ATPase rates than the embryonic isoform. Exchanging the embryonic exon 3 region into the flight muscle isoform decreased ATPase rates to embryonic levels but did not affect actin sliding velocity or flight muscle ultrastructure. Interestingly, this swap only slightly impaired flight ability. Exchanging the flight muscle-specific exon 3 region into the embryonic isoform increased actin sliding velocity 3-fold and improved indirect flight muscle ultrastructure integrity but failed to rescue the flightless phenotype of flies expressing embryonic myosin. These results suggest that the two structural versions of the exon 3 domain independently influence the kinetics of at least two steps of the actomyosin cross-bridge cycle.

  2. Functional analysis of slow myosin heavy chain 1 and myomesin-3 in sarcomere organization in zebrafish embryonic slow muscles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Gao, Jie; Li, Junling; Xue, Liangyi; Clark, Karl J.; Ekker, Stephen C.; Du, Shao Jun

    2014-01-01

    Myofibrillogenesis, the process of sarcomere formation, requires close interactions of sarcomeric proteins and various components of sarcomere structures. The myosin thick filaments and M-lines are two key components of the sarcomere. It has been suggested that myomesin proteins of M-lines interact with myosin and titin proteins and keep the thick and titin filaments in order. However, the function of myomesin in myofibrillogenesis and sarcomere organization remained largely enigmatic. No knockout or knockdown animal models have been reported to elucidate the role of myomesin in sarcomere organization in vivo. In this study, by using the gene-specific knockdown approach in zebrafish embryos, we carried out a loss-of-function analysis of myomesin-3 and slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1) expressed specifically in slow muscles. We demonstrated that knockdown of smyhc1 abolished the sarcomeric localization of myomesin-3 in slow muscles. In contrast, loss of myomesin-3 had no effect on the sarcomeric organization of thick and thin filaments as well as M- and Z-line structures. Together, these studies indicate that myosin thick filaments are required for M-line organization and M-line localization of myomesin-3. In contrast, myomesin-3 is dispensable for sarcomere organization in slow muscles. PMID:22361506

  3. Functional analysis of slow myosin heavy chain 1 and myomesin-3 in sarcomere organization in zebrafish embryonic slow muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Gao, Jie; Li, Junling; Xue, Liangyi; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C; Du, Shao Jun

    2012-02-01

    Myofibrillogenesis, the process of sarcomere formation, requires close interactions of sarcomeric proteins and various components of sarcomere structures. The myosin thick filaments and M-lines are two key components of the sarcomere. It has been suggested that myomesin proteins of M-lines interact with myosin and titin proteins and keep the thick and titin filaments in order. However, the function of myomesin in myofibrillogenesis and sarcomere organization remained largely enigmatic. No knockout or knockdown animal models have been reported to elucidate the role of myomesin in sarcomere organization in vivo. In this study, by using the gene-specific knockdown approach in zebrafish embryos, we carried out a loss-of-function analysis of myomesin-3 and slow myosin heavy chain 1 (smyhc1) expressed specifically in slow muscles. We demonstrated that knockdown of smyhc1 abolished the sarcomeric localization of myomesin-3 in slow muscles. In contrast, loss of myomesin-3 had no effect on the sarcomeric organization of thick and thin filaments as well as M- and Z-line structures. Together, these studies indicate that myosin thick filaments are required for M-line organization and M-line localization of myomesin-3. In contrast, myomesin-3 is dispensable for sarcomere organization in slow muscles.

  4. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  5. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  6. Sarcomere length dependence of rat skinned cardiac myocyte mechanical properties: dependence on myosin heavy chain

    PubMed Central

    Korte, F Steven; McDonald, Kerry S

    2007-01-01

    The effects of sarcomere length (SL) on sarcomeric loaded shortening velocity, power output and rates of force development were examined in rat skinned cardiac myocytes that contained either α-myosin heavy chain (α-MyHC) or β-MyHC at 12 ± 1°C. When SL was decreased from 2.3 μm to 2.0 μm submaximal isometric force decreased ∼40% in both α-MyHC and β-MyHC myocytes while peak absolute power output decreased 55% in α-MyHC myocytes and 70% in β-MyHC myocytes. After normalization for the fall in force, peak power output decreased about twice as much in β-MyHC as in α-MyHC myocytes (41%versus 20%). To determine whether the fall in normalized power was due to the lower force levels, [Ca2+] was increased at short SL to match force at long SL. Surprisingly, this led to a 32% greater peak normalized power output at short SL compared to long SL in α-MyHC myocytes, whereas in β-MyHC myocytes peak normalized power output remained depressed at short SL. The role that interfilament spacing plays in determining SL dependence of power was tested by myocyte compression at short SL. Addition of 2% dextran at short SL decreased myocyte width and increased force to levels obtained at long SL, and increased peak normalized power output to values greater than at long SL in both α-MyHC and β-MyHC myocytes. The rate constant of force development (ktr) was also measured and was not different between long and short SL at the same [Ca2+] in α-MyHC myocytes but was greater at short SL in β-MyHC myocytes. At short SL with matched force by either dextran or [Ca2+], ktr was greater than at long SL in both α-MyHC and β-MyHC myocytes. Overall, these results are consistent with the idea that an intrinsic length component increases loaded crossbridge cycling rates at short SL and β-MyHC myocytes exhibit a greater sarcomere length dependence of power output. PMID:17347271

  7. Neuregulin induces the expression of transcription factors and myosin heavy chains typical of muscle spindles in cultured human muscle.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Christian; Duggan, David; Fischbach, Gerald

    2004-08-17

    Neuregulin (NRG) (also known as ARIA, GGF, and other names) is a heparin sulfate proteoglycan secreted into the neuromuscular junction by innervating motor and sensory neurons. An integral part of synapse formation, we have analyzed NRG-induced changes in gene expression over 48 h in primary human myotubes. We show that in addition to increasing the expression of acetylcholine receptors on the myotube surface, NRG treatment results in a transient increase of several members of the early growth response (Egr) family of transcription factors. Three Egrs, Egr1, -2, and -3, are induced within the first hour of NRG treatment, with Egr1 and -3 RNA levels showing the most significant increases of approximately 9- and 16-fold, respectively. Also noted was a corresponding increase in protein levels for both of these transcription factors. Previous literature indicates that Egr3 expression is required for the formation of muscle spindle fibers, sensory organs that are distinct from skeletal muscle contractile fibers. At the molecular level, muscle spindle fibers express a unique subset of myosin heavy chains. Two isoforms of the myosin heavy chain, the slow development and neonatal, were found to be increased in our myotube cultures after 48 h of treatment with NRG. Taken together, these results indicate that not only can NRG induce the expression of a transcription factor key to spindle fiber development (Egr3), but that a portion of this developmental process can be replicated in vitro.

  8. Shared Gene Structures and Clusters of Mutually Exclusive Spliced Exons within the Metazoan Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kollmar, Martin; Hatje, Klas

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc) protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs). The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes) and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis). Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both) have independently been developed several times

  9. Myosin light chain kinase steady-state kinetics: comparison of smooth muscle myosin II and nonmuscle myosin IIB as substrates.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Diego B; Haldeman, Brian D; Brizendine, Richard K; Krenc, Agata K; Baker, Josh E; Rock, Ronald S; Cremo, Christine R

    2016-10-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates S19 of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), which is required to activate myosin's ATPase activity and contraction. Smooth muscles are known to display plasticity in response to factors such as inflammation, developmental stage, or stress, which lead to differential expression of nonmuscle and smooth muscle isoforms. Here, we compare steady-state kinetics parameters for phosphorylation of different MLCK substrates: (1) nonmuscle RLC, (2) smooth muscle RLC, and heavy meromyosin subfragments of (3) nonmuscle myosin IIB, and (4) smooth muscle myosin II. We show that MLCK has a ~2-fold higher kcat for both smooth muscle myosin II substrates compared with nonmuscle myosin IIB substrates, whereas Km values were very similar. Myosin light chain kinase has a 1.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher specificity (kcat /Km ) for smooth versus nonmuscle-free RLC and heavy meromyosin, respectively, suggesting that differences in specificity are dictated by RLC sequences. Of the 10 non-identical RLC residues, we ruled out 7 as possible underlying causes of different MLCK kinetics. The remaining 3 residues were found to be surface exposed in the N-terminal half of the RLC, consistent with their importance in substrate recognition. These data are consistent with prior deletion/chimera studies and significantly add to understanding of MLCK myosin interactions. Phosphorylation of nonmuscle and smooth muscle myosin by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is required for activation of myosin's ATPase activity. In smooth muscles, nonmuscle myosin coexists with smooth muscle myosin, but the two myosins have very different chemo-mechanical properties relating to their ability to maintain force. Differences in specificity of MLCK for different myosin isoforms had not been previously investigated. We show that the MLCK prefers smooth muscle myosin by a significant factor. These data suggest that nonmuscle myosin is phosphorylated more slowly than smooth

  10. [Changes in titin and myosin heavy chain isoform composition in skeletal muscles of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) after 12-day spaceflight].

    PubMed

    Okuneva, A D; Vikhliantsev, I M; Shpagina, M D; Rogachevskiĭ, V V; Khutsian, S S; Poddubnaia, Z A; Grigor'ev, A I

    2012-01-01

    Changes of titin and myosin heavy chain isoform composition in skeletal muscles (m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, m. psoas major) in Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus ) were investigated after 12-day spaceflight on board of Russian space vehicle "Foton-M3". In m. psoas and m. soleus in the gerbils from "Flight" group the expected increase in the content of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (IIxd and IIa, respectively) were observed. No significant differences were found in the content of IIxd and IIa isoforms of myosin heavy chain in m. tibialis anterior in the gerbils from control group as compared to that in "Flight" group. An unexpected increase in the content of slow myosin heavy chain I isoform and a decrease in the content of fast IIx/d isoform in m. gastrocnemius of the gerbils from "Flight" group were observed. In skeletal muscles of the gerbils from "Flight" group the relative content of titin N2A-isoform was reduced (by 1,2-1,7 times), although the content of its NT-isoform, which was revealed in striated muscles of mammals in our experiments earlier, remained the same. When the content of titin N2A-isoform was decreased, no predictable abnormalities in sarcomeric structure and contractile ability of skeletal muscles in the gerbils from "Flight" group were found. An assumption on the leading role of titin NT-isoform in maintenance of structural and functional properties of striated muscles of mammals was made.

  11. High fat/low carbohydrate diet attenuates left ventricular hypertrophy and prevents myosin heavy chain isoform switching induced by chronic hypertenstion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A switch in the expression of myosin heavy chain isoform (MHC) alpha to beta is observed with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and heart failure. This switch is associated with a defect in myocardial energy production and contractile dysfunction. Similar MHC isoform profile is observed in the fe...

  12. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Microsatellite haplotyping and identification of a hot spot for mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Dausse, E; Komajda, M; Fetler, L; Dubourg, O; Dufour, C; Carrier, L; Wisnewsky, C; Bercovici, J; Hengstenberg, C; al-Mahdawi, S

    1993-12-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease. The first identified disease gene, located on chromosome 14q11-q12, encodes the beta-myosin heavy chain. We have performed linkage analysis of two French FHC pedigrees, 720 and 730, with two microsatellite markers located in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYO I and MYO II) and with four highly informative markers, recently mapped to chromosome 14q11-q12. Significant linkage was found with MYO I and MYO II in pedigree 720, but results were not conclusive for pedigree 730. Haplotype analysis of the six markers allowed identification of affected individuals and of some unaffected subjects carrying the disease gene. Two novel missense mutations were identified in exon 13 by direct sequencing, 403Arg-->Leu and 403Arg-->Trp in families 720 and 730, respectively. The 403Arg-->Leu mutation was associated with incomplete penetrance, a high incidence of sudden deaths and severe cardiac events, whereas the consequences of the 403Arg-->Trp mutation appeared less severe. Haplotyping of polymorphic markers in close linkage to the beta-myosin heavy chain gene can, thus, provide rapid analysis of non informative pedigrees and rapid detection of carrier status. Our results also indicate that codon 403 of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene is a hot spot for mutations causing FHC.

  13. Alternative RNA splicing generates transcripts encoding a thorax-specific isoform of Drosophila melanogaster myosin heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, S I; Hansen, C J; Becker, K D; Wassenberg, D R; Roche, E S; Donady, J J; Emerson, C P

    1986-07-01

    Genomic and cDNA sequencing studies show that transcripts from the muscle myosin heavy-chain (MHC) gene of Drosophila melanogaster are alternatively spliced, producing RNAs that encode at least two MHC isoforms with different C termini. Transcripts encoding an MHC isoform with 27 unique C-terminal amino acids accumulate during both larval and adult muscle differentiation. Transcripts for the second isoform encode one unique C-terminal amino acid and accumulate almost exclusively in pupal and adult thoracic segments, the location of the indirect flight muscles. The 3' splice acceptor site preceding the thorax-specific exon is unusually purine rich and thus may serve as a thorax-specific splicing signal. We suggest that the alternative C termini of these two MHC isoforms control myofilament assembly and may play a role in generating the distinctive myofilament organizations of flight muscle and other muscle types.

  14. Myosin heavy chain isoform expression in human extraocular muscles: longitudinal variation and patterns of expression in global and orbital layers.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Ah; Lim, Jeonghee; Sohn, Seongsoo; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms along the length of the global and orbital layers of human extraocular muscles (EOMs). Whole muscle tissue extracts of human EOMs were cross-sectioned consecutively and separated into orbital and global layers. The extracts from these layers were subjected to electrophoretic analysis, followed by quantification with scanning densitometry. MyHC isoforms displayed different distributions along the lengths of EOMs. In the orbital and global layers of all EOMs except for the superior oblique muscle, MyHCeom was enriched in the central regions. MyHCIIa and MyHCI were most abundant in the proximal and distal ends. A variation in MyHC isoform expression was apparent along the lengths of human EOMs. These results provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional diversity of EOMs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  16. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  17. Effects of prolonged strenuous endurance exercise on plasma myosin heavy chain fragments and other muscular proteins. Cycling vs running.

    PubMed

    Koller, A; Mair, J; Schobersberger, W; Wohlfarter, T; Haid, C; Mayr, M; Villiger, B; Frey, W; Puschendorf, B

    1998-03-01

    This study evaluates creatine kinase, myosin heavy chain, and cardiac troponin blood levels following three types of exercise: 1) short-distance uphill or downhill running; 2) alpine ultramarathon; and 3) alpine long-distance cycling. Comparative field study; follow-up up to 10 days. Department of Sports Medicine. All biochemical markers were analysed at the Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry. Subjects included healthy, trained males (N = 53). All subjects were nonsmokers and free from medication prior to and during the study. Each volunteer was an experienced runner or cyclist, who had at least once successfully finished the Swiss Alpine Marathon of Davos or the Otztal-Radmarathon before. Running or cycling. Plasma concentrations of creatine kinase, myosin heavy chain fragments and cardiac troponins were measured to diagnose skeletal and cardiac muscle damage, respectively. Skeletal muscle protein release is markedly different between uphill and downhill running, with very little evidence for muscle damage in the uphill runners. There is considerable muscle protein leakage in the ultramarathoners (67 km distance; 30 km downhill running). In contrast, only modest amounts of skeletal muscle damage are found after alpine long-distance cycling (230 km distance). This study proves that there is slow-twitch skeletal muscle fiber damage after prolonged strenuous endurance exercise and short-distance downhill running. Exhaustive endurance exercise involving downhill running and short-distance downhill running lead to more pronounced injury than strenuous endurance exercise involving concentric actions. From our results there is no reason for suggesting that prolonged intense exercise may induce myocardial injury in symptom-less athletes without cardiac deseases.

  18. Effect of glucocorticoïd receptor ligands on myosin heavy chains expression in rat skeletal muscles during controllable stress.

    PubMed

    Martrette, J M; Hartmann, N; Westphal, A; Favot, L

    2004-01-01

    The influence of agonist (dexamethasone) and antagonist (mifepristone) of glucocorticoïd receptor during controllable painless stress was evaluated on myosin heavy chains expression in three masticatory and two nape rat muscles: anterior digastric (AD), anterior temporalis (AT), masseter superficialis (MS), longissimus capitis (L) and rectus capitis dorsalis major (R). The relative amounts of myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein isoform contained were significantly affected in four muscles studied by dexamethasone and in three muscles studied under mifepristone, versus control during the stress procedure, after only 1 week of treatment. The control group AT muscles contained respectively 18.2% of MHC 2A, 34.5% of MHC 2X and 47.4% of MHC 2B. The effects of dexamethasone and mifepristone were opposite in this muscle: under dexamethasone, the relative proportions of the three isoforms were 14.2, 31.0 and 54.8%: consequently, MHC 2A and 2X decreased with the profit of 2B. Under mifepristone, the relative proportions were 21.1, 36.6 and 42.3% (MHC 2A and 2X increased to the detriment of 2B). The L muscle was not affected by the two treatments and MS muscle was only affected by dexamethasone. Dexamethasone increased MHC 2B to the detriment of MHC 2A in MS, AD and R. Mifepristone and dexamethasone induced the same changes in AD. The mifepristone treatment decreased the MHC 2X profile in R. Under dexamethasone, four muscles exhibited a significantly higher proportion of the more rapid isoforms than under mifepristone. A previous work showed that controllable stress induced a marked increase in the relative expression of MHC 2B in the same skeletal muscles (Martrette et al. , 1998). Our results confirm then a significant participation of glucocorticoïd in MHC isoform expression during controllable stress.

  19. Comparison of Characteristics of Myosin Heavy Chain-based Fiber and Meat Quality among Four Bovine Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gap-Don; Yang, Han-Sul; Jeong, Jin-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber characteristics account for meat quality and muscle fibers are mainly classified into three or more types according to their contractile and metabolic properties. However, the majority of previous studies on bovine skeletal muscle are based on myosin ATPase activity. In the present study, the differences in the characteristics of muscle fibers classified by the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) among four bovine skeletal muscles such as longissimus thoracis (LT), psoas major (PM), semimembranosus (SM) and semitendinosus (ST) and their relationships to beef quality were investigated. MHCs 2x, 2a and slow were identified by LC-MS/MS and IIX, IIA and I fiber types were classified. PM, which had the smallest size and highest density of fibers regardless of type, showed the highest myoglobin content, CIE L*, a*, b* and sarcomere length (p<0.05), whereas ST with the highest composition of IIX, showed high shear force and low sarcomere length (p<0.05). The correlation coefficients between muscle fiber characteristics and meat quality showed that type IIX is closely related to poor beef quality and that a high density of small-sized fibers is related to redness and tenderness. Therefore, the differences in meat quality between muscles can be explained by the differences in muscle fiber characteristics, and especially, the muscles with good quality are composed of more small-sized fibers regardless of fiber type. PMID:28115894

  20. Sexually Dimorphic Expression of a Laryngeal-Specific, Androgen-Regulated Myosin Heavy Chain Gene during Xenopus laevis Development

    PubMed Central

    Catz, Diana S.; Fischer, Leslie M.; Moschella, Maria C.; Tobias, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Masculinization of the larynx in Xenopus laevis frogs is essential for the performance of male courtship song. During postmetamorphic (PM) development, the initially female-like phenotype of laryngeal muscle (slow and fast twitch fibers) is converted to the masculine form (entirely fast twitch) under the influence of androgenic steroids. To explore the molecular basis of androgen-directed masculinization, we have isolated cDNA clones encoding portions of a new Xenopus myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene. We have detected expression of this gene only in laryngeal muscle and specifically in males. All adult male laryngeal muscle fibers express the laryngeal myosin (LM). Adult female laryngeal muscle expresses LM only in some fibers. Expression of LM during PM development was examined using Northern blots and in situ hybridization. Males express higher levels of LM than females throughout PM development and attain adult levels by PM3. In females, LM expression peaks transiently at PM2. Treatment of juvenile female frogs with the androgen dihydrotestosterone masculinizes LM expression. Thus, LM appears to be a male-specific, testosterone-regulated MHC isoform in Xenopus laevis. The LM gene will permit analysis of androgen-directed sexual differentiation in this highly sexually dimorphic tissue. PMID:1426643

  1. Increased myocardial short-range forces in a rodent model of diabetes reflect elevated content of β myosin heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Chung, Charles S; Mitov, Mihail I; Callahan, Leigh Ann; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2014-06-15

    Diastolic dysfunction is a clinically significant problem for patients with diabetes and often reflects increased ventricular stiffness. Attached cross-bridges contribute to myocardial stiffness and produce short-range forces, but it is not yet known whether these forces are altered in diabetes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that cross-bridge-based short-range forces are increased in the streptozotocin (STZ) induced rat model of type 1 diabetes. Chemically permeabilized myocardial preparations were obtained from 12week old rats that had been injected with STZ or vehicle 4weeks earlier, and activated in solutions with pCa (=-log10[Ca(2+)]) values ranging from 9.0 to 4.5. The short-range forces elicited by controlled length changes were ∼67% greater in the samples from the diabetic rats than in the control preparations. This change was mostly due to an increased elastic limit (the length change at the peak short-range force) as opposed to increased passive muscle stiffness. The STZ-induced increase in short-ranges forces is thus unlikely to reflect changes to titin and/or collagen filaments. Gel electrophoresis showed that STZ increased the relative expression of β myosin heavy chain. This molecular mechanism can explain the increased short-ranges forces observed in the diabetic tissue if β myosin molecules remain bound between the filaments for longer durations than α molecules during imposed movements. These results suggest that interventions that decrease myosin attachment times may be useful treatments for diastolic dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  2. Correlation between histochemically assessed fiber type distribution and isomyosin and myosin heavy chain content in porcine skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Bee, G; Solomon, M B; Czerwinski, S M; Long, C; Pursel, V G

    1999-08-01

    Highly sensitive enzyme assays developed to differentiate skeletal muscle fibers allow the recognition of three main fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative (SO), fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and fast-twitch glycolytic (FG). Myosin, the predominant contractile protein in mammalian skeletal muscle, can be separated based on the electrophoretic mobility under nondissociating conditions into SM2, SM1, IM, FM3, and FM2 isoforms, or under dissociating conditions into myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, IIb, IIx/d, and IIa. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the histochemical method of differentiation of fiber types is consistent with the electrophoretically identified isomyosin and MHC isoforms. These comparisons were made using serratus ventralis (SV), gluteus medius (GM), and longissimus muscles (LM) from 13 pigs. Two calculation methods for the histochemical assessed fiber type distribution were adopted. The first method incorporated the number of fibers counted for each fiber type and calculated a percentage of the total fiber number (fiber number percentage: FNP). The second method expressed the cross-sectional area of each fiber type as a percentage of the total fiber area measured per muscle (fiber area percentage: FAP). Independent of the calculation methods, correlation analyses revealed in all muscles a strong relation between SO fibers, the slow isomyosin (SM1 and SM2), and MHCI, as well as between the FG fibers, the fast isomyosin (FM3 and FM2), and MHCIIx/b content (P<.05). There were no correlations between FOG fiber population assessed by histochemical analysis and intermediate isoform (IM) or MHCIIa content. The present results did not provide conclusive evidence as to which of the calculation methods (FNP or FAP) was more closely related to myosin composition of skeletal muscles. Despite some incompatibility between the methods, the present study shows that histochemical as well as electrophoretic analyses yielded important

  3. Mechanism of the Ca2+-Dependent Interaction between S100A4 and Tail Fragments of Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIA

    PubMed Central

    Badyal, Sandip K.; Basran, Jaswir; Bhanji, Nina; Kim, Ju Hwan; Chavda, Alap P.; Jung, Hyun Suk; Craig, Roger; Elliott, Paul R.; Irvine, Andrew F.; Barsukov, Igor L.; Kriajevska, Marina; Bagshaw, Clive R.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between the calcium-binding protein S100A4 and the C-terminal fragments of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA has been studied by equilibrium and kinetic methods. Using site-directed mutants, we conclude that Ca2+ binds to the EF2 domain of S100A4 with micromolar affinity and that the Kd value for Ca2+ is reduced by several orders of magnitude in the presence of myosin target fragments. The reduction in Kd results from a reduced dissociation rate constant (from 16 s− 1 to 0.3 s− 1 in the presence of coiled-coil fragments) and an increased association rate constant. Using peptide competition assays and NMR spectroscopy, we conclude that the minimal binding site on myosin heavy chain IIA corresponds to A1907-G1938; therefore, the site extends beyond the end of the coiled-coil region of myosin. Electron microscopy and turbidity assays were used to assess myosin fragment filament disassembly by S100A4. The latter assay demonstrated that S100A4 binds to the filaments and actively promotes disassembly rather than just binding to the myosin monomer and displacing the equilibrium. Quantitative modelling of these in vitro data suggests that S100A4 concentrations in the micromolar region could disassemble myosin filaments even at resting levels of cytoplasmic [Ca2+]. However, for Ca2+ transients to be effective in further promoting dissociation, the elevated Ca2+ signal must persist for tens of seconds. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of A431/SIP1 cells expressing green fluorescent protein–myosin IIA, immobilised on fibronectin micropatterns to control stress fibre location, yielded a recovery time constant of around 20 s, consistent with in vitro data. PMID:21110983

  4. Temperature and ionic strength dependence of the subunit interactions in vertebrate skeletal myosin. A comparison of the interaction between the alkali light and heavy chains of mammalian and avian myosin.

    PubMed

    Zaager, S; Burke, M

    1988-09-25

    The stability of the interaction of A1 in myosin and subfragment 1 isolated from fast-twitch mammalian and avian muscles with respect to temperature and ionic strength has been examined. This was done by determining the extent of exchange of the endogenous free A1 light chain into these proteins from the two species. Whereas the extent of exchange at 37 degrees C into mammalian S1, occurring after 60 min, is about 80% of the theoretically expected amount at physiological ionic conditions, the level of exchange observed with the avian S1 is significantly lower. However, close to the theoretical limit is observed for the avian S1 when exchange is done at 43 degrees C which is close to average avian body temperature. A similar dependence with temperature is observed in the case of exchanges into avian myosin. In the case of mammalian myosin, 50% of the theoretical exchange is observed at 37 degrees C under physiological ionic strength, whereas the level of exchange observed under these conditions with the avian protein is much lower in agreement with recent observations (Waller, G. S., and Lowey, S. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 14368-14373; Pastra-Landis, S. C., and Lowey, S. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 14811-14816). If, however, the exchanges are done at 43 degrees C in physiological ionic strength, significant extents of exchange can be observed in avian myosin. These results suggest that at physiological ionic and temperature conditions relevant for the source of myosin and S1 being investigated, the alkali light chains are in dynamic equilibrium between free and heavy chain associated states. Therefore, the failure to observe alkali light chain exchange in avian myosin at 37 degrees C appears to be related to the higher temperature stability of its interaction with the heavy chain.

  5. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    SciTech Connect

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  6. Effects of low-level α-myosin heavy chain expression on contractile kinetics in porcine myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Razumova, Maria V.; Stelzer, Julian E.; Norman, Holly S.; Moss, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are principal determinants of work capacity in mammalian ventricular myocardium. The ventricles of large mammals including humans normally express ∼10% α-MHC on a predominantly β-MHC background, while in failing human ventricles α-MHC is virtually eliminated, suggesting that low-level α-MHC expression in normal myocardium can accelerate the kinetics of contraction and augment systolic function. To test this hypothesis in a model similar to human myocardium we determined composite rate constants of cross-bridge attachment (fapp) and detachment (gapp) in porcine myocardium expressing either 100% α-MHC or 100% β-MHC in order to predict the MHC isoform-specific effect on twitch kinetics. Right atrial (∼100% α-MHC) and left ventricular (∼100% β-MHC) tissue was used to measure myosin ATPase activity, isometric force, and the rate constant of force redevelopment (ktr) in solutions of varying Ca2+ concentration. The rate of ATP utilization and ktr were approximately ninefold higher in atrial compared with ventricular myocardium, while tension cost was approximately eightfold greater in atrial myocardium. From these values, we calculated fapp to be ∼10-fold higher in α- compared with β-MHC, while gapp was 8-fold higher in α-MHC. Mathematical modeling of an isometric twitch using these rate constants predicts that the expression of 10% α-MHC increases the maximal rate of rise of force (dF/dtmax) by 92% compared with 0% α-MHC. These results suggest that low-level expression of α-MHC significantly accelerates myocardial twitch kinetics, thereby enhancing systolic function in large mammalian myocardium. PMID:21217059

  7. Cardiac and skeletal muscle expression of mutant β-myosin heavy chains, degree of functional impairment and phenotypic heterogeneity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Marina; Casadonte, Rita; Ricci, Pietroantonio; Santini, Mario; Frati, Giacomo; Rizzo, Antonietta; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Lamberti, Monica; Parrotta, Elvira; Quaresima, Barbara; Faniello, Concetta M; Costanzo, Francesco; Cuda, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Several mutations in distinct genes, all coding for sarcomeric proteins, have been reported in unrelated kindreds with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We have identified nine individuals from three families harboring two distinct mutations in one copy of the β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) gene. In this study, the expression of the mutant β-myosin protein isoform, isolated from slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle, was demonstrated by Northern and Western blot analysis; this myosin showed a decreased in vitro motility activity and produced a lower actin-activated ATPase activity. Isometric tension, measured in single slow-twitch fibers isolated from the affected individuals, also showed a significant decrease. The degree of impairment of β-myosin function, as well as the loss in isometric tension development, were strictly dependent on the amount of the isoform transcribed from the mutated allele. Interestingly, a strong correlation was also demonstrated between mutant β-myosin content and clinical features of FHC. On the other hand, we were unable to detect any correlation between mutant β-myosin expression and degree of cardiac hypertrophy, thereby strengthening the hypothesis that hypertrophy, one of the hallmarks of FHC, might not necessarily be related to the clinical evolution of this disease. These findings lend support to the notion that additional factors rather than the mutated gene may play a pathogenetic role in cardiac wall thickening, whereas the prognosis appears to be strongly related to the amount of mutant protein. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Direct photoaffinity labeling of gizzard myosin with ( sup 3 H)uridine diphosphate places Glu185 of the heavy chain at the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, T.E.; Yount, R.G. )

    1990-12-25

    The active site of chicken gizzard myosin was labeled by direct photoaffinity labeling with ({sup 3}H)UDP. ({sup 3}H) UDP was stably trapped at the active site by addition of vanadate (Vi) and Co{sup 2+}. The extraordinary stability of the myosin.Co2+.(3H)UDP.Vi complex (t1/2 greater than 5 days at 0{degrees}C) allowed it to be purified free of extraneous ({sup 3}H)UDP before irradiation began. Upon UV irradiation, greater than 60% of the trapped ({sup 3}H)UDP was photoincorporated into the active site. Only the 200-kDa heavy chain was labeled, confirming earlier results using ({sup 3}H)UTP. Extensive tryptic digestion of photolabeled myosin subfragment 1 followed by high performance liquid chromatography separations and removal of nucleotide phosphates by treatment with alkaline phosphatase allowed two labeled peptides to be isolated. Sequencing of the labeled peptides and radioactive counting showed that Glu185 was the residue labeled. Since UDP is a zero-length cross-linker, Glu185 is located at the purine-binding pocket of the active site of smooth myosin and adjacent to the glycine-rich loop which binds the polyphosphate portion of ATP. This Glu residue is conserved in smooth and nonmuscle myosins and is the same residue identified previously by ({sup 3}H)UTP photolabeling in Acanthamoeba myosin II.

  9. Myosin heavy chain expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; De Assis, Jeane Marlene Fogaça; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Pai-Silva, Maeli Dal

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle are observed during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by aortic stenosis (AS). AS and control animals were studied 12 and 18 weeks after surgery and when overt CHF had developed in AS animals, 28 weeks after the surgery. The following parameters were studied in the soleus muscle: muscle atrophy index (soleus weight/body weight), muscle fibre diameter and frequency and MHC expression. AS animals presented decreases in both MHC1 and type I fibres and increases in both MHC2a and type IIa fibres during late cardiac hypertrophy and CHF. Type IIa fibre atrophy occurred during CHF. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur in both late cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure; this suggests that attention should be given to the fact that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur prior to overt heart failure symptoms.

  10. Recombinant growth hormone enhances muscle myosin heavy-chain mRNA accumulation and amino acid accrual in humans.

    PubMed

    Fong, Y; Rosenbaum, M; Tracey, K J; Raman, G; Hesse, D G; Matthews, D E; Leibel, R L; Gertner, J M; Fischman, D A; Lowry, S F

    1989-05-01

    A potentially lethal complication of trauma, malignancy, and infection is a progressive erosion of muscle protein mass that is not readily reversed by nutritional support. Growth hormone is capable of improving total body nitrogen balance, but its role in myofibrillar protein synthesis in humans is unknown. The acute, in situ muscle protein response to an infusion of methionyl human growth hormone was investigated in the limbs of nutritionally depleted subjects during a period of intravenous refeeding. A 6-hr methionyl growth hormone infusion achieved steady-state serum levels comparable to normal physiologic peaks and was associated with a significant increase in limb amino acid uptake, without a change in body amino acid oxidation. Myosin heavy-chain mRNA levels, measured by quantitative dot blot hybridization, were also significantly elevated after growth hormone administration. The data indicate that methionyl growth hormone can induce intracellular amino acid accrual and increased levels of myofibrillar protein mRNA during hospitalized nutritional support and suggest growth hormone to be a potential therapy of lean body wasting.

  11. Synergistic ablation does not affect atrophy or altered myosin heavy chain expression in the non-weight bearing soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, J. K.; Talmadge, R. J.; Gosselink, K. L.; Tri, P. N.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the soleus muscle undergoes atrophy and alterations in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition during non-weight bearing in the absence of synergists. Thirty-two female rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), synergistic ablation (ABL) of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles to overload the soleus muscle, hindlimb suspension (HLS), or a combination of synergistic ablation and hindlimb suspension (HLS-ABL). After 28 days of hindlimb suspension, soleus atrophy was more pronounced in HLS (58%) than in HLS-ABL (43%) rats. Compared to C rats, non-weight bearing decreased mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC 49%, 45%, and 7%, respectively, in HLS animals. In addition, de novo expression of fast Type IIx and Type IIb MHC (5% and 2%, respectively) was observed in HLS animals. Similarly, when compared to C rats, mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC decreased 43%, 46%, and 4%, respectively, in HLS-ABL animals. Also, de novo expression of Type IIx (4%) and IIb (1%) MHC was observed. Collectively, these data indicate that the loss of muscle protein and Type I MHC, and the de novo expression of Type IIx and Type IIb MHC in the rat soleus occur independently of the presence of synergists during non-weight bearing. Furthermore, these results confirm the contention that soleus mass and MHC expression are highly sensitive to alterations in mechanical load.

  12. The inv(16) Fusion Protein Associates with Corepressors via a Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy-Chain Domain

    PubMed Central

    Durst, Kristie L.; Lutterbach, Bart; Kummalue, Tanawan; Friedman, Alan D.; Hiebert, Scott W.

    2003-01-01

    Inversion(16) is one of the most frequent chromosomal translocations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), occurring in over 8% of AML cases. This translocation results in a protein product that fuses the first 165 amino acids of core binding factor β to the coiled-coil region of a smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (CBFβ/SMMHC). CBFβ interacts with AML1 to form a heterodimer that binds DNA; this interaction increases the affinity of AML1 for DNA. The CBFβ/SMMHC fusion protein cooperates with AML1 to repress the transcription of AML1-regulated genes. We show that CBFβ/SMMHC contains a repression domain in the C-terminal 163 amino acids of the SMMHC region that is required for inv(16)-mediated transcriptional repression. This minimal repression domain is sufficient for the association of CBFβ/SMMHC with the mSin3A corepressor. In addition, the inv(16) fusion protein specifically associates with histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). inv(16)-mediated repression is sensitive to HDAC inhibitors. We propose a model whereby the inv(16) fusion protein associates with AML1 to convert AML1 into a constitutive transcriptional repressor. PMID:12509458

  13. Fiber size, type, and myosin heavy chain content in rhesus hindlimb muscles after 2 weeks at 2 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavakol, Morteza; Roy, Roland R.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Hodgson, John A.; Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.; Fuller, Charles A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fiber atrophy and an increase in the percentage of fast fibers have been observed in Rhesus leg muscles after spaceflight. Hypothesis: Hypergravity will result in muscle fiber hypertrophy and an increase in the percentage of slow fibers. METHODS: Open muscle biopsies were obtained from Rhesus soleus, medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles before and after 14 d of centrifugation (2 G) and in time-matched controls. Cage activity levels were measured by telemetry. RESULTS: Based on monoclonal antibody binding for myosin heavy chains (MHC), the fastest region of soleus contained a higher proportion of type I+II (27 vs. 13%) and had a tendency for a lower proportion of type I (38 vs. 61%, p = 0.10) fibers after than before centrifugation. There was a higher proportion of type I+II fibers in post- vs. pre-2 G (10 vs. 0.6%) MG biopsies. Fiber type distribution and MHC composition were unaffected in the TA. Overall, mean fiber sizes were unaffected by centrifugation. Average cage activity levels were 36% lower during than before 2 G. CONCLUSIONS: Our hypothesis was rejected. The changes in the proportion of fibers expressing type I MHC are the reverse of that expected with chronic loading of extensors and, paradoxically, are similar to changes observed with chronic unloading, such as occurs during spaceflight, in this primate model. The data are consistent with the observed decrease in total daily activity levels.

  14. Structural abnormalities develop in the brain after ablation of the gene encoding nonmuscle myosin II-B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Tullio, A N; Bridgman, P C; Tresser, N J; Chan, C C; Conti, M A; Adelstein, R S; Hara, Y

    2001-04-23

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II-B (NMHC-B) in mice results in severe hydrocephalus with enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. All B(-)/B(-) mice died either during embryonic development or on the day of birth (PO). Neurons cultured from superior cervical ganglia of B(-)/B(-) mice between embryonic day (E) 18 and P0 showed decreased rates of neurite outgrowth, and their growth cones had a distinctive narrow morphology compared with those from normal mice. Serial sections of E12.5, E13.5, and E15 mouse brains identified developmental defects in the ventricular neuroepithelium. On E12.5, disruption of the coherent ventricular surface and disordered cell migration of neuroepithelial and differentiated cells were seen at various points in the ventricular walls. These abnormalities resulted in the formation of rosettes in various regions of the brain and spinal cord. On E13.5 and E15, disruption of the ventricular surface and aberrant protrusions of neural cells into the ventricles became more prominent. By E18.5 and P0, the defects in cells lining the ventricular wall resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus due to stenosis or occlusion of the third ventricle and cerebral aqueduct. These defects may be caused by abnormalities in the cell adhesive properties of neuroepithelial cells and suggest that NMHC-B is essential for both early and late developmental processes in the mammalian brain.

  15. Src-dependent Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Non-muscle Myosin Heavy Chain-IIA Restricts Listeria monocytogenes Cellular Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria Teresa; Mesquita, Francisco S.; Cruz, Rui; Osório, Hugo; Custódio, Rafael; Brito, Cláudia; Vingadassalom, Didier; Martins, Mariana; Leong, John M.; Holden, David W.; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens often interfere with host tyrosine phosphorylation cascades to control host responses and cause infection. Given the role of tyrosine phosphorylation events in different human infections and our previous results showing the activation of the tyrosine kinase Src upon incubation of cells with Listeria monocytogenes, we searched for novel host proteins undergoing tyrosine phosphorylation upon L. monocytogenes infection. We identify the heavy chain of the non-muscle myosin IIA (NMHC-IIA) as being phosphorylated in a specific tyrosine residue in response to L. monocytogenes infection. We characterize this novel post-translational modification event and show that, upon L. monocytogenes infection, Src phosphorylates NMHC-IIA in a previously uncharacterized tyrosine residue (Tyr-158) located in its motor domain near the ATP-binding site. In addition, we found that other intracellular and extracellular bacterial pathogens trigger NMHC-IIA tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrate that NMHC-IIA limits intracellular levels of L. monocytogenes, and this is dependent on the phosphorylation of Tyr-158. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of regulation of NMHC-IIA activity relying on the phosphorylation of Tyr-158 by Src. PMID:25635050

  16. Segregation of cardiac and skeletal muscle-specific regulatory elements of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rindt, H; Knotts, S; Robbins, J

    1995-01-01

    The beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MyHC) gene is expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscles. To examine the regulatory sequences that are required for the gene's expression in the two compartments in vivo, we analyzed the expression pattern of a transgene consisting of the beta-MyHC gene 5' upstream region linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. By using 5600 bp of 5' upstream region, the transgene was expressed at high levels in the slow skeletal muscles. Decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to the up-regulation of the transgene in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, mimicking the behavior of the endogenous beta-MyHC gene. After deleting the distal 5000 bp, the level of reporter gene expression was strongly reduced. However, decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to an 80-fold skeletal muscle-specific increase in transgene expression, even upon the ablation of a conserved cis-regulatory element termed MCAT, which under normal (euthyroid) conditions abolishes muscle-specific expression. In contrast, cardiac-specific induction was not detected with the deletion construct. These observations indicate that the cardiac and skeletal muscle regulatory elements can be functionally segregated on the beta-MyHC gene promoter. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7878016

  17. Segregation of cardiac and skeletal muscle-specific regulatory elements of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Rindt, H; Knotts, S; Robbins, J

    1995-02-28

    The beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MyHC) gene is expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscles. To examine the regulatory sequences that are required for the gene's expression in the two compartments in vivo, we analyzed the expression pattern of a transgene consisting of the beta-MyHC gene 5' upstream region linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. By using 5600 bp of 5' upstream region, the transgene was expressed at high levels in the slow skeletal muscles. Decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to the up-regulation of the transgene in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, mimicking the behavior of the endogenous beta-MyHC gene. After deleting the distal 5000 bp, the level of reporter gene expression was strongly reduced. However, decreased levels of thyroid hormone led to an 80-fold skeletal muscle-specific increase in transgene expression, even upon the ablation of a conserved cis-regulatory element termed MCAT, which under normal (euthyroid) conditions abolishes muscle-specific expression. In contrast, cardiac-specific induction was not detected with the deletion construct. These observations indicate that the cardiac and skeletal muscle regulatory elements can be functionally segregated on the beta-MyHC gene promoter.

  18. Transgenic analysis of the thyroid-responsive elements in the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, A; Gulick, J; Neumann, J; Knotts, S; Robbins, J

    1993-02-25

    The role of two putative, cis-acting thyroid hormone-responsive elements, TRE1 and TRE2, located at -129 to -149 and -102 to -120, respectively, on the murine alpha-myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, has been investigated in transgenic mice. These motifs are present in a 4.5-kilobase fragment lying upstream of the transcriptional start site of the mouse alpha-MHC gene: this fragment directs appropriate expression of a reporter gene in transgenic mice (Subramaniam, A., Jones, W. K., Gulick, J., Wert, S., Neumann, J., and Robbins, J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 24613-24620). Here, we independently mutate the TRE1 and TRE2 elements by base substitution. The mice were analyzed for transgene expression in different muscle and non-muscle tissues including the atria and ventricles. Normal levels of transgene expression were observed in euthyroid mice carrying a mutation in TRE1. In contrast to these results, mice in which TRE2 was mutated showed reduced levels of CAT activity in both the atria and ventricles, suggesting a previously undefined role for this element in the constitutive up-regulation of the alpha-MHC gene. In hypothyroid mice carrying either of these mutations, the complete cessation of ventricular expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase transcripts that takes place in the alpha-5.5 (wild type) animals did not occur.

  19. Fiber size, type, and myosin heavy chain content in rhesus hindlimb muscles after 2 weeks at 2 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavakol, Morteza; Roy, Roland R.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Hodgson, John A.; Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.; Fuller, Charles A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fiber atrophy and an increase in the percentage of fast fibers have been observed in Rhesus leg muscles after spaceflight. Hypothesis: Hypergravity will result in muscle fiber hypertrophy and an increase in the percentage of slow fibers. METHODS: Open muscle biopsies were obtained from Rhesus soleus, medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles before and after 14 d of centrifugation (2 G) and in time-matched controls. Cage activity levels were measured by telemetry. RESULTS: Based on monoclonal antibody binding for myosin heavy chains (MHC), the fastest region of soleus contained a higher proportion of type I+II (27 vs. 13%) and had a tendency for a lower proportion of type I (38 vs. 61%, p = 0.10) fibers after than before centrifugation. There was a higher proportion of type I+II fibers in post- vs. pre-2 G (10 vs. 0.6%) MG biopsies. Fiber type distribution and MHC composition were unaffected in the TA. Overall, mean fiber sizes were unaffected by centrifugation. Average cage activity levels were 36% lower during than before 2 G. CONCLUSIONS: Our hypothesis was rejected. The changes in the proportion of fibers expressing type I MHC are the reverse of that expected with chronic loading of extensors and, paradoxically, are similar to changes observed with chronic unloading, such as occurs during spaceflight, in this primate model. The data are consistent with the observed decrease in total daily activity levels.

  20. Differential expression of equine myosin heavy-chain mRNA and protein isoforms in a limb muscle.

    PubMed

    Eizema, Karin; van den Burg, Maarten; Kiri, Arpna; Dingboom, Elizabeth G; van Oudheusden, Hans; Goldspink, Geoffrey; Weijs, Wim A

    2003-09-01

    The horse is one of the few animals kept and bred for its athletic performance and is therefore an interesting model for human sports performance. The regulation of the development of equine locomotion in the first year of life, and the influence of early training on later performance, are largely unknown. The major structural protein in skeletal muscle, myosin heavy-chain (MyHC), is believed to be primarily transcriptionally controlled. To investigate the expression of the MyHC genes at the transcriptional level, we isolated cDNAs encoding the equine MyHC isoforms type 1 (slow), type 2a (fast oxidative), and type 2d/x (fast glycolytic). cDNAs encoding the 2b gene were not identified. The mRNA expression was compared to the protein expression on a fiber-to-fiber basis using in situ hybridization (non-radioactive) and immunohistochemistry. Marked differences were detected between the expression of MyHC transcripts and MyHC protein isoforms in adult equine gluteus medius muscle. Mismatches were primarily due to the presence of hybrid fibers expressing two fast (2ad) MyHC protein isoforms, but only one fast (mainly 2a) MyHC RNA isoform. This discrepancy was most likely not due to differential mRNA expression of myonuclei.

  1. Ubiquitin Ligase, MuRF-1 regulates myosin heavy chain type IIa transcripts during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Sachiko

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity conditions. We previously reported that gastrocnemius muscle atrophy by spaceflight was specifically sensitive to the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. We also screened more over 26,000 skeletal muscle genes in rats exposed to real weightlessness and found that the expression of Ubiquitin Ligase, Muscle specific Ring Finger-1 (MuRF-1) upregulated under microgravity. In the present study, we examined the role of MuRF-1 in microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. The amounts of MuRF-1 transcripts significantly increased in skeletal muscle after denervation, an in vivo model of microgravity-induced unloading. MuRF-1 deficient (MuRF-1-/-) mice significantly inhibited reduction of muscle weight for muscle atrophy, compared with wild type mice. Interestingly, MuRF-1-/- mice significantly inhibited upregulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIa transcrips, while wild type mice significantly increased expression of MyHC type IIa transcripts in denervated skeletal muscle. Our present results suggest that MuRF-1 may play an important role in regulation of MyHC type IIa during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions.

  2. Mutations in myosin heavy chain 11 cause a syndrome associating thoracic aortic aneurysm/aortic dissection and patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Limin; Vranckx, Roger; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Lalande, Alain; Boisset, Nicolas; Mathieu, Flavie; Wegman, Mark; Glancy, Luke; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Brunotte, François; Bruneval, Patrick; Wolf, Jean-Eric; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Jeunemaitre, Xavier

    2006-03-01

    We have recently described two kindreds presenting thoracic aortic aneurysm and/or aortic dissection (TAAD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and mapped the disease locus to 16p12.2-p13.13 (ref. 3). We now demonstrate that the disease is caused by mutations in the MYH11 gene affecting the C-terminal coiled-coil region of the smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, a specific contractile protein of smooth muscle cells (SMC). All individuals bearing the heterozygous mutations, even if asymptomatic, showed marked aortic stiffness. Examination of pathological aortas showed large areas of medial degeneration with very low SMC content. Abnormal immunological recognition of SM-MHC and the colocalization of wild-type and mutant rod proteins in SMC, in conjunction with differences in their coimmunoprecipitation capacities, strongly suggest a dominant-negative effect. Human MYH11 gene mutations provide the first example of a direct change in a specific SMC protein leading to an inherited arterial disease.

  3. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9) and Rac1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbir, Mohammad G.; Dillon, Rachelle; Mowat, Michael R. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1) gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9), plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype. PMID:26977077

  4. Synergistic ablation does not affect atrophy or altered myosin heavy chain expression in the non-weight bearing soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, J. K.; Talmadge, R. J.; Gosselink, K. L.; Tri, P. N.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the soleus muscle undergoes atrophy and alterations in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition during non-weight bearing in the absence of synergists. Thirty-two female rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), synergistic ablation (ABL) of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles to overload the soleus muscle, hindlimb suspension (HLS), or a combination of synergistic ablation and hindlimb suspension (HLS-ABL). After 28 days of hindlimb suspension, soleus atrophy was more pronounced in HLS (58%) than in HLS-ABL (43%) rats. Compared to C rats, non-weight bearing decreased mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC 49%, 45%, and 7%, respectively, in HLS animals. In addition, de novo expression of fast Type IIx and Type IIb MHC (5% and 2%, respectively) was observed in HLS animals. Similarly, when compared to C rats, mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC decreased 43%, 46%, and 4%, respectively, in HLS-ABL animals. Also, de novo expression of Type IIx (4%) and IIb (1%) MHC was observed. Collectively, these data indicate that the loss of muscle protein and Type I MHC, and the de novo expression of Type IIx and Type IIb MHC in the rat soleus occur independently of the presence of synergists during non-weight bearing. Furthermore, these results confirm the contention that soleus mass and MHC expression are highly sensitive to alterations in mechanical load.

  5. bHLH transcription factor MyoD affects myosin heavy chain expression pattern in a muscle-specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Seward, D J; Haney, J C; Rudnicki, M A; Swoap, S J

    2001-02-01

    A strong correlative pattern between MyoD gene expression and myosin heavy chain IIB (MHC IIB) gene expression exists. To test whether this correlative relationship is causative, MHC gene expression in muscles from MyoD(-/-) mice was analyzed. The MHC IIB gene was not detectable in the MyoD(-/-) diaphragm, whereas the MHC IIB protein made up 10.0 +/- 1.7% of the MHC protein pool in the wild-type (WT) mouse diaphragm. Furthermore, the MHC IIA protein was not detectable in the MyoD(-/-) biceps brachii, and the MHC IIB protein was overexpressed in the masseter. To examine whether MyoD is required for the upregulation of the MHC IIB gene within slow muscle after disuse, MyoD(-/-) and WT hindlimb musculature was unweighted. MyoD(-/-) exhibited a diminished response in the upregulation of the MHC IIB mRNA within the soleus muscle as a result of the hindlimb unweighting. Collectively, these data suggest that MyoD plays a role in the MHC profile in a muscle-specific fashion.

  6. Automated muscle fiber type population analysis with ImageJ of whole rat muscles using rapid myosin heavy chain immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bergmeister, Konstantin D; Gröger, Marion; Aman, Martin; Willensdorfer, Anna; Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Salminger, Stefan; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle consists of different fiber types which adapt to exercise, aging, disease, or trauma. Here we present a protocol for fast staining, automatic acquisition, and quantification of fiber populations with ImageJ. Biceps and lumbrical muscles were harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats. Quadruple immunohistochemical staining was performed on single sections using antibodies against myosin heavy chains and secondary fluorescent antibodies. Slides were scanned automatically with a slide scanner. Manual and automatic analyses were performed and compared statistically. The protocol provided rapid and reliable staining for automated image acquisition. Analyses between manual and automatic data indicated Pearson correlation coefficients for biceps of 0.645-0.841 and 0.564-0.673 for lumbrical muscles. Relative fiber populations were accurate to a degree of ± 4%. This protocol provides a reliable tool for quantification of muscle fiber populations. Using freely available software, it decreases the required time to analyze whole muscle sections. Muscle Nerve 54: 292-299, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effects of myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity induced by HMGCoA-reductase inhibition on skeletal muscle functions.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Laura; Melli, Luca; Segatto, Marco; Trezza, Viviana; Campolongo, Patrizia; Jozwiak, Adam; Swiezewska, Ewa; Pucillo, Leopoldo Paolo; Moreno, Sandra; Fanelli, Francesca; Linari, Marco; Pallottini, Valentina

    2011-11-01

    The rate-limiting step of cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme reductase (HGMR), whose inhibitors, the statins, widely used in clinical practice to treat hypercholesterolemia, often cause myopathy, and rarely rhabdomyolysis. All studies to date are limited to the definition of statin-induced myotoxicity omitting to investigate whether and how HMGR inhibition influences muscle functions. To this end, 3-mo-old male rats (Rattus norvegicus) were treated for 3 wk with a daily intraperitoneal injection of simvastatin (1.5 mg/kg/d), and biochemical, morphological, mechanical, and functional analysis were performed on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Our results show that EDL muscles from simvastatin-treated rats exhibited reduced HMGR activity; a 15% shift from the fastest myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform IIb to the slower IIa/x; and reduced power output and unloaded shortening velocity, by 41 and 23%, respectively, without any change in isometric force and endurance. Moreover, simvastatin-treated rats showed a decrease of maximum speed reached and the latency to fall off the rotaroad (∼-30%). These results indicate that the molecular mechanism of the impaired muscle function following statin treatment could be related to the plasticity of fast MHC isoform expression.

  8. Heat-Stress effects on the myosin heavy chain phenotype of rat soleus fibers during the early stages of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yasuharu; Roy, Roland R; Ogata, Tomonori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-12-01

    We investigated heat-stress effects on the adult myosin heavy chain (MyHC) profile of soleus muscle fibers at an early stage of regeneration. Regenerating fibers in adult rats were analyzed 2, 4, or 6 days after bupivacaine injection. Rats were heat stressed by immersion in water (42 ± 1°C) for 30 minutes 24 hours after bupivacaine injection and every other day thereafter. No adult MyHC isoforms were observed after 2 days, whereas some fibers expressed only fast MyHC after 4 days. Heat stress increased fast and slow MyHC in regenerating fibers after 6 days. Regenerating fibers expressing only slow MyHC were observed only in heat-stressed muscles. Bupivacaine injection increased the number of Pax7(+) and MyoD(+) satellite cells in regenerating fibers, more so in heat-stressed rats. The results indicate that heat stress accelerates fast-to-slow MyHC phenotype conversion in regenerating fibers via activation of satellite cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The resident endoplasmic reticulum protein, BAP31, associates with gamma-actin and myosin B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Axel; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-01-01

    BAP31 is a 28-kDa integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum whose cytosolic domain contains two caspase recognition sites that are preferentially cleaved by initiator caspases, such as caspase-8. Recently, we reported that the caspase-resistant BAP31 inhibited Fas-mediated apoptotic membrane fragmentation and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in KB epithelial cells (Nguyen M., Breckenridge G., Ducret A & Shore G. (2000) Mol. Cell. Biol.20, 6731-6740). We describe here the characterization by capillary liquid chromatography microelectrospray tandem MS of a BAP31 immunocomplex isolated from a HepG2 cell lysate in the absence of a death signal. We show that BAP31 specifically associates with nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B and nonmuscle gamma-actin, two components of the cytoskeleton actomyosin complex. Collectively, these data confirm that BAP31, in addition to its potential role as a chaperone, may play a fundamental role in the structural organization of the cytoplasm. Here we also show that Fas stimulation of apoptosis releases BAP31 associations with these motor proteins, a step that may contribute to extranuclear events, such as membrane remodelling, during the execution phase of apoptosis.

  10. Myosin subunit interactions. Properties of the 19,000-dalton light chain-deficient myosin.

    PubMed

    Pastra-Landis, S C; Lowey, S

    1986-11-05

    The 19,000-dalton light chain (LC2) can be completely and reversibly removed from chicken pectoralis myosin in 1 mM EDTA and 5 mM ATP using immunoaffinity chromatography at 37 degrees C. Earlier methods have led to only partial removal of LC2 or have caused limited degradation of the heavy chain. Electron microscopy of LC2-deficient myosin showed it to have a marked tendency to aggregate into oligomers through the "neck" region of the myosin head. Myosin reverted to the monomeric form when it was reconstituted with light chains. LC2-deficient myosin retained full K+ (EDTA) or Ca2+-ATPase activity, and the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase was similar to that of the native molecule. Alkali light chain exchange at 37 degrees C, which has been demonstrated in subfragment 1 prepared with chymotrypsin, does not occur with intact myosin molecules or with papain subfragment 1, both of which contain LC2. However, a temperature-dependent exchange of alkali light chains was observed in myosin lacking LC2. The interaction of the alkali light chain with the heavy chain thus appears to be influenced by the presence of LC2, which may have an important stabilizing effect on the myosin molecule.

  11. The primary structure of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain: I. Sequence of the amino-terminal 23 kDa fragment.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, M; Maita, T; Matsuda, G

    1991-07-01

    Subfragment-1 was prepared from adult chicken pectoralis myosin by limited digestion with alpha-chymotrypsin, and an amino-terminal 23 kDa fragment of the heavy chain was obtained by digesting the subfragment-1 with trypsin. The 205-residue sequence of the fragment was determined by sequencing its cyanogen bromide, tryptic, and chymotryptic peptides. The amino-terminal alpha-amino group of the fragment was acetylated, and two methylated lysines; epsilon-N-monomethyllysine and epsilon-N-trimethyllysine were recognized at the 35th and 130th positions, respectively, as in rabbit skeletal myosin. Comparing the 205-residue sequence of the skeletal myosin with those of cardiac, and gizzard myosins from chicken, considerable differences are recognized, especially in the amino-terminal region, but strong homologies are observed around the reactive lysine residue, around the epsilon-N-trimethyllysine residue, and around the consensus sequence of GXXGXGKT for nucleotide-binding proteins. On the other hand, only 12 amino acid substitutions are recognized between adult and embryonic skeletal myosins, allowing for the post-translational methylation.

  12. Evolutionarily conserved sequences of striated muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms. Epitope mapping by cDNA expression.

    PubMed

    Miller, J B; Teal, S B; Stockdale, F E

    1989-08-05

    A cDNA expression strategy was used to localize amino acid sequences which were specific for fast, as opposed to slow, isoforms of the chicken skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) and which were conserved in vertebrate evolution. Five monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), termed F18, F27, F30, F47, and F59, were prepared that reacted with all of the known chicken fast MHC isoforms but did not react with any of the known chicken slow nor with smooth muscle MHC isoforms. The epitopes recognized by mAbs F18, F30, F47, and F59 were on the globular head fragment of the MHC, whereas the epitope recognized by mAb F27 was on the helical tail or rod fragment. Reactivity of all five mAbs also was confined to fast MHCs in the rat, with the exception of mAb F59, which also reacted with the beta-cardiac MHC, the single slow MHC isoform common to both the rat heart and skeletal muscle. None of the five epitopes was expressed on amphioxus, nematode, or Dictyostelium MHC. The F27 and F59 epitopes were found on shark, electric ray, goldfish, newt, frog, turtle, chicken, quail, rabbit, and rat MHCs. The epitopes recognized by these mAbs were conserved, therefore, to varying degrees through vertebrate evolution and differed in sequence from homologous regions of a number of invertebrate MHCs and myosin-like proteins. The sequence of those epitopes on the head were mapped using a two-part cDNA expression strategy. First, Bal31 exonuclease digestion was used to rapidly generate fragments of a chicken embryonic fast MHC cDNA that were progressively deleted from the 3' end. These cDNA fragments were expressed as beta-galactosidase/MHC fusion proteins using the pUR290 vector; the fusion proteins were tested by immunoblotting for reactivity with the mAbs; and the approximate locations of the epitopes were determined from the sizes of the cDNA fragments that encoded a particular epitope. The epitopes were then precisely mapped by expression of overlapping cDNA fragments of known sequence that

  13. Aberrant splicing and expression of the non muscle myosin heavy-chain gene MYH14 in DM1 muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, F; Terracciano, C; Pisani, V; Massa, R; Loro, E; Vergani, L; Di Girolamo, S; Angelini, C; Gourdon, G; Novelli, G; Botta, A

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a complex multisystemic disorder caused by an expansion of a CTG repeat located at the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of DMPK on chromosome 19q13.3. Aberrant messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing of several genes has been reported to explain some of the symptoms of DM1 including insulin resistance, muscle wasting and myotonia. In this paper we analyzed the expression of the MYH14 mRNA and protein in the muscle of DM1 patients (n=12) with different expansion lengths and normal subjects (n=7). The MYH14 gene is located on chromosome 19q13.3 and encodes for one of the heavy chains of the so called class II "nonmuscle" myosins (NMHCII). MYH14 has two alternative spliced isoforms: the inserted isoform (NMHCII-C1) which includes 8 amino acids located in the globular head of the protein, not encoded by the non inserted isoform (NMHCII-C0). Results showed a splicing unbalance of the MYH14 gene in DM1 muscle, with a prevalent expression of the NMHCII-C0 isoform more marked in DM1 patients harboring large CTG expansions. Minigene assay indicated that levels of the MBNL1 protein positively regulates the inclusion of the MYH14 exon 6. Quantitative analysis of the MYH14 expression revealed a significant reduction in the DM1 muscle samples, both at mRNA and protein level. No differences were found between DM1 and controls in the skeletal muscle localization of MYH14, obtained through immunofluorescence analysis. In line with the thesis of an "RNA gain of function" hypothesis described for the CTG mutation, we conclude that the alterations of the MYH14 gene may contribute to the DM1 molecular pathogenesis.

  14. Effects of spaceflight on myosin heavy-chain content, fibre morphology and succinate dehydrogenase activity in rat diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gregory; Martinuk, Karen J B; Bell, Gordon J; MacLean, Ian M; Martin, Thomas P; Putman, Charles T

    2004-05-01

    The present study examined the effect of 14 days of exposure to microgravity during the Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) space shuttle mission on the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) content, fibre size and type distributions and metabolic properties of rat diaphragm. Five adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 14 days of microgravity (SF, spaceflight) and compared to five ground-based controls (C). Immunohistochemical analyses using isoform-specific anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies revealed that 14 days of SF did not alter the proportions of type-I, -IIA, -IID/X or -IIB fibres within the crural, sternal or lateral costal regions of the diaphragm; the electrophoretically quantified MHC-isoform contents also remained unchanged. In contrast, the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles displayed slow-to-fast fibre type transitions: within the MG the proportion of type-IID/X fibres was reduced by 59% ( P<0.04) and corresponded to a 51% increase ( P<0.03) in type-IIB fibres. Within the TA, the sum of type-IID/X+IIB fibres was elevated by 24% ( P<0.02) at the expense of the slower type-IIA fibres, which decreased by 33% ( P<0.04). Electrophoretic analyses yielded qualitatively similar patterns of transformation. SF did not induce atrophic changes within the diaphragm, MG or TA. Succinate dehydrogenase activity remained unchanged in the crural diaphragm ( P>0.96) but was 34% lower ( P<0.0001) in the TA. We conclude that 14 days of SF did not alter structural or metabolic factors that are known to underlie functional properties of the diaphragm. The findings of the present study show that 14 days of SF does not induce deleterious adaptive changes in the rat diaphragm that occur in hindlimb muscles.

  15. Cold exposure increases slow-type myosin heavy chain 1 (MyHC1) composition of soleus muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Iwamoto, Yohei; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cold exposure on rat skeletal muscle fiber type, according to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform and metabolism-related factors. Male Wistar rats (7 weeks old) were housed individually at 4 ± 2°C as a cold-exposed group or at room temperature (22 ± 2°C) as a control group for 4 weeks. We found that cold exposure significantly increased the slow-type MyHC1 content in the soleus muscle (a typical slow-type fiber), while the intermediate-type MyHC2A content was significantly decreased. In contrast to soleus, MyHC composition of extensor digitorum longus (EDL, a typical fast-type fiber) and gastrocnemius (a mix of slow-type and fast-type fibers) muscle did not change from cold exposure. Cold exposure increased mRNA expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in both the soleus and EDL. Cold exposure also increased mRNA expression of myoglobin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in the soleus. Upregulation of UCP3 and PGC1α proteins were observed with Western blotting in the gastrocnemius. Thus, cold exposure increased metabolism-related factors in all muscle types that were tested, but MyHC isoforms changed only in the soleus. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Severe atrophy of slow myofibers in aging muscle is concealed by myosin heavy chain co-expression.

    PubMed

    Purves-Smith, Fennigje M; Solbak, Nathan M; Rowan, Sharon L; Hepple, Russell T

    2012-12-01

    Although slow myofibers are considered less susceptible to atrophy with aging, slow fiber atrophy may have been underestimated previously. First, the marked atrophy of the aging rat soleus (Sol) muscle cannot be explained by the atrophy of only the fast fibers, due to their low abundance. Second, the increase in small fibers co-expressing both fast and slow myosin heavy chains (MHC) in the aging rat Sol is proportional to a decline in pure MHC slow fibers (Snow et al., 2005), suggesting that these MHC co-expressing fibers represent formerly pure slow fibers. Thus, we examined the size and proportion of MHC slow, MHC fast, and MHC fast-slow co-expressing fibers in the Sol and mixed region of the gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle in young adult (YA) and senescent (SEN) rats. Our results suggest that formerly pure MHC slow fibers are the source of MHC co-expressing fibers with aging in both muscle regions. Accounting for the atrophy of these fibers in calculating MHC slow fiber atrophy with aging revealed that MHC slow fibers atrophy on average by 40% in the Sol and by 38% in the mixed Gas, values which are similar to the 60% and 31% atrophy of pure MHC fast fibers in the Sol and mixed Gas, respectively. Probing for the atrophy-dependent ubiquitin ligase, MAFbx (atrogin 1), it was suggested that former slow fibers acquire atrophy potential via the up-regulation of MAFbx coincident with the co-expression of fast MHC. These results redefine the impact of aging on slow fiber atrophy, and emphasize the necessity of addressing the atrophy of fast and slow fibers in seeking treatments for aging muscle atrophy.

  17. Developing cardiac and skeletal muscle share fast-skeletal myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin-I expression.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Tchao, Jason; Powell, Mary C; Liu, Li J; Huard, Johnny; Keller, Bradley B; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC) and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I) positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13) and 20 (ED20), neonatal day 0 (ND0) and 4 (ND4), postnatal day 10 (PND10), and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  18. Chronic hypoxia and VEGF differentially modulate abundance and organization of myosin heavy chain isoforms in fetal and adult ovine arteries.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, Margaret C; Semotiuk, Andrew J; Thorpe, Richard B; Adeoye, Olayemi O; Butler, Stacy M; Williams, James M; Khorram, Omid; Pearce, William J

    2012-11-15

    Chronic hypoxia increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thereby promotes angiogenesis. The present study explores the hypothesis that hypoxic increases in VEGF also remodel artery wall structure and contractility through phenotypic transformation of smooth muscle. Pregnant and nonpregnant ewes were maintained at sea level (normoxia) or 3,820 m (hypoxia) for the final 110 days of gestation. Common carotid arteries harvested from term fetal lambs and nonpregnant adults were denuded of endothelium and studied in vitro. Stretch-dependent contractile stresses were 32 and 77% of normoxic values in hypoxic fetal and adult arteries. Hypoxic hypocontractility was coupled with increased abundance of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NM-MHC) in fetal (+37%) and adult (+119%) arteries. Conversely, hypoxia decreased smooth muscle MHC (SM-MHC) abundance by 40% in fetal arteries but increased it 123% in adult arteries. Hypoxia decreased colocalization of NM-MHC with smooth muscle α-actin (SM-αA) in fetal arteries and decreased colocalization of SM-MHC with SM-αA in adult arteries. Organ culture with physiological concentrations (3 ng/ml) of VEGF-A(165) similarly depressed stretch-dependent stresses to 37 and 49% of control fetal and adult values. The VEGF receptor antagonist vatalanib ablated VEGF's effects in adult but not fetal arteries, suggesting age-dependent VEGF receptor signaling. VEGF replicated hypoxic decreases in colocalization of NM-MHC with SM-αA in fetal arteries and decreases in colocalization of SM-MHC with SM-αA in adult arteries. These results suggest that hypoxic increases in VEGF not only promote angiogenesis but may also help mediate hypoxic arterial remodeling through age-dependent changes in smooth muscle phenotype and contractility.

  19. Chronic hypoxia and VEGF differentially modulate abundance and organization of myosin heavy chain isoforms in fetal and adult ovine arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hubbell, Margaret C.; Semotiuk, Andrew J.; Thorpe, Richard B.; Adeoye, Olayemi O.; Butler, Stacy M.; Williams, James M.; Khorram, Omid

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thereby promotes angiogenesis. The present study explores the hypothesis that hypoxic increases in VEGF also remodel artery wall structure and contractility through phenotypic transformation of smooth muscle. Pregnant and nonpregnant ewes were maintained at sea level (normoxia) or 3,820 m (hypoxia) for the final 110 days of gestation. Common carotid arteries harvested from term fetal lambs and nonpregnant adults were denuded of endothelium and studied in vitro. Stretch-dependent contractile stresses were 32 and 77% of normoxic values in hypoxic fetal and adult arteries. Hypoxic hypocontractility was coupled with increased abundance of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NM-MHC) in fetal (+37%) and adult (+119%) arteries. Conversely, hypoxia decreased smooth muscle MHC (SM-MHC) abundance by 40% in fetal arteries but increased it 123% in adult arteries. Hypoxia decreased colocalization of NM-MHC with smooth muscle α-actin (SM-αA) in fetal arteries and decreased colocalization of SM-MHC with SM-αA in adult arteries. Organ culture with physiological concentrations (3 ng/ml) of VEGF-A165 similarly depressed stretch-dependent stresses to 37 and 49% of control fetal and adult values. The VEGF receptor antagonist vatalanib ablated VEGF's effects in adult but not fetal arteries, suggesting age-dependent VEGF receptor signaling. VEGF replicated hypoxic decreases in colocalization of NM-MHC with SM-αA in fetal arteries and decreases in colocalization of SM-MHC with SM-αA in adult arteries. These results suggest that hypoxic increases in VEGF not only promote angiogenesis but may also help mediate hypoxic arterial remodeling through age-dependent changes in smooth muscle phenotype and contractility. PMID:22992677

  20. Relationship between pork quality and characteristics of muscle fibers classified by the distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gap-Don; Ryu, Youn-Chul; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Yang, Han-Sul; Joo, Seon-Tea

    2013-11-01

    A total of six fiber types, including four pure types (type I, IIA, IIX, and IIB) and two hybrid types (type IIAX and IIXB), were classified according to the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms by immunohistochemistry with MHC specific monoclonal antibodies. The comparison of the muscle fiber characteristics and pork quality between pork quality groups (DFD: dark, firm, and dry; PSE: pale, soft, and exudative; RFN: reddish pink, firm, and nonexudative; and RSE: reddish pink, soft, and exudative) classified by muscle pH, drip loss, and lightness was conducted and the relationship of myofiber characteristics to pork quality was investigated. The DFD group had the highest value of IIAX fiber density (P<0.05). The DFD group also showed the greatest fiber relative area of type I, IIA, and IIAX (P<0.05) whereas there were no significant differences in area composition for types I, IIA, and IIAX among the other groups including PSE, RFN, and RSE (P>0.05). The DFD group had the highest cross-sectional area (CSA) in types I, IIA, and IIX among the groups. The increase in density of type IIAX was related with the higher pH and the lower hue and drip loss. An increase in the fiber number composition of hybrid type IIXB increased the lightness and cooking loss and decreased sarcoplasmic protein solubility (SPS). Regarding fiber relative area, pure type I and IIA and hybrid type IIAX were greater in the DFD group and had lower lightness and drip loss. Hybrid type IIAX influences the desirability of the pork due to its association with low lightness and high pH and water-holding capacity (WHC). In contrast, type IIXB was related to poor quality pork, including pale color, low WHC in cooked meat, and low SPS.

  1. Sexually differentiated, androgen-regulated, larynx-specific myosin heavy-chain isoforms in Xenopus tropicalis; comparison to Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Laura A.; Nasipak, Brian T.; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown that the sarcoplasmic myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform xtMyHC-101d is highly and specifically expressed in the larynx of the aquatic anuran, Xenopus tropicalis. In male larynges, the predominant MyHC isoform is xtMyHC-101d, while in females, another isoform, xtMyHC-270c, predominates. The X. tropicalis genome has been sequenced in its entirety, and xtMyHC-101d is part of a specific array of xtMyHC genes expressed otherwise in embryonic muscles. The administration of the androgen dihydrotestosterone increases the expression of xtMyHC-101d in juvenile larynges of both sexes. Using ATPase histochemistry, we found that in adults, X. tropicalis male laryngeal muscle contains only fast-twitch fibers, while the female laryngeal muscle contains a mix of fast- and slow-twitch fibers. Juvenile larynges are female-like in fiber type composition (44% slow twitch, 56% fast twitch); androgen treatment increases the percentage of fast-twitch fibers to 86%. xtMyHC-101d predominates in larynges of dihydrotestosterone-treated juveniles but not in larynges of untreated juveniles. We compared the larynx-specific expression of xtMyHC genes in X. tropicalis to the MyHC gene expressed in X. laevis larynx (xlMyHC-LM) by sequencing the entire xlMyHC-LM gene. The androgen-regulated xtMyHC that predominates in the male larynx of X. tropicalis is not the gene phylogenetically most similar to xlMyHC-LM at the nucleotide level but is instead a similar isoform found in the same MyHC array and expressed in the embryonic muscle. PMID:18551305

  2. A continuum of myofibers in adult rabbit extraocular muscle: force, shortening velocity, and patterns of myosin heavy chain colocalization.

    PubMed

    McLoon, Linda K; Park, Han Na; Kim, Jong-Hee; Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima; Thompson, Ladora V

    2011-10-01

    Extraocular muscle (EOM) myofibers do not fit the traditional fiber typing classifications normally used in noncranial skeletal muscle, in part, due to the complexity of their individual myofibers. With single skinned myofibers isolated from rectus muscles of normal adult rabbits, force and shortening velocity were determined for 220 fibers. Each fiber was examined for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition by densitometric analysis of electrophoresis gels. Rectus muscle serial sections were examined for coexpression of eight MyHC isoforms. A continuum was seen in single myofiber shortening velocities as well as force generation, both in absolute force (g) and specific tension (kN/m(2)). Shortening velocity correlated with MyHCIIB, IIA, and I content, the more abundant MyHC isoforms expressed within individual myofibers. Importantly, single fibers with similar or identical shortening velocities expressed significantly different ratios of MyHC isoforms. The vast majority of myofibers in both the orbital and global layers expressed more than one MyHC isoform, with up to six isoforms in single fiber segments. MyHC expression varied significantly and unpredictably along the length of single myofibers. Thus EOM myofibers represent a continuum in their histological and physiological characteristics. This continuum would facilitate fine motor control of eye position, speed, and direction of movement in all positions of gaze and with all types of eye movements-from slow vergence movements to fast saccades. To fully understand how the brain controls eye position and movements, it is critical that this significant EOM myofiber heterogeneity be integrated into hypotheses of oculomotor control.

  3. Functional effects of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy R403Q mutation are different in an alpha- or beta-myosin heavy chain backbone.

    PubMed

    Lowey, Susan; Lesko, Leanne M; Rovner, Arthur S; Hodges, Alex R; White, Sheryl L; Low, Robert B; Rincon, Mercedes; Gulick, James; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2008-07-18

    The R403Q mutation in the beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC) was the first mutation to be linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a primary disease of heart muscle. The initial studies with R403Q myosin, isolated from biopsies of patients, showed a large decrease in myosin motor function, leading to the hypothesis that hypertrophy was a compensatory response. The introduction of the mouse model for FHC (the mouse expresses predominantly alpha-MHC as opposed to the beta-isoform in larger mammals) created a new paradigm for FHC based on finding enhanced motor function for R403Q alpha-MHC. To help resolve these conflicting mechanisms, we used a transgenic mouse model in which the endogenous alpha-MHC was largely replaced with transgenically encoded beta-MHC. A His(6) tag was cloned at the N terminus of the alpha-and beta-MHC to facilitate protein isolation by Ni(2+)-chelating chromatography. Characterization of the R403Q alpha-MHC by the in vitro motility assay showed a 30-40% increase in actin filament velocity compared with wild type, consistent with published studies. In contrast, the R403Q mutation in a beta-MHC backbone showed no enhancement in velocity. Cleavage of the His-tagged myosin by chymotrypsin made it possible to isolate homogeneous myosin subfragment 1 (S1), uncontaminated by endogenous myosin. We find that the actin-activated MgATPase activity for R403Q alpha-S1 is approximately 30% higher than for wild type, whereas the enzymatic activity for R403Q beta-S1 is reduced by approximately 10%. Thus, the functional consequences of the mutation are fundamentally changed depending upon the context of the cardiac MHC isoform.

  4. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2015-06-19

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  5. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Sadhana A.; Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Gupta, Mahesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms. PMID:25911107

  6. Muscle-specific accumulation of Drosophila myosin heavy chains: a splicing mutation in an alternative exon results in an isoform substitution.

    PubMed

    Kronert, W A; Edwards, K A; Roche, E S; Wells, L; Bernstein, S I

    1991-09-01

    We show that the molecular lesions in two homozygousviable mutants of the Drosophila muscle myosin heavy chain gene affect an alternative exon (exon 9a) which encodes a portion of the myosin head that is highly conserved among both cytoplasmic and muscle myosins of all organisms. In situ hybridization and Northern blotting analysis in wild-type organisms indicates that exon 9a is used in indirect flight muscles whereas both exons 9a and 9b are utilized in jump muscles. Alternative exons 9b and 9c are used in other larval and adult muscles. One of the mutations in exon 9a is a nonsense allele that greatly reduces myosin RNA stability. It prevents thick filament accumulation in indirect flight muscles and severely reduces the number of thick filaments in a subset of cells of the jump muscles. The second mutation affects the 5' splice site of exon 9a. This results in production of an aberrantly spliced transcript in indirect flight muscles, which prevents thick filament accumulation. Jump muscles of this mutant substitute exon 9b for exon 9a and consequently have normal levels of thick filaments in this muscle type. This isoform substitution does not obviously affect the ultrastructure or function of the jump muscle. Analysis of this mutant illustrates that indirect flight muscles and jump muscles utilize different mechanisms for alternative RNA splicing.

  7. Lamellipodial localization of Dictyostelium myosin heavy chain kinase A is mediated via F-actin binding by the coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Paul A; Licate, Lucila; Côté, Graham P; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2002-04-10

    Myosin heavy chain kinase A (MHCK A) modulates myosin II filament assembly in the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. MHCK A localization in vivo is dynamically regulated during chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and other polarized cell motility events, with preferential recruitment into anterior filamentous actin (F-actin)-rich structures. The current work reveals that an amino-terminal segment of MHCK A, previously identified as forming a coiled-coil, mediates anterior localization. MHCK A co-sediments with F-actin, and deletion of the amino-terminal domain eliminated actin binding. These results indicate that the anterior localization of MHCK A is mediated via direct binding to F-actin, and reveal the presence of an actin-binding function not previously detected by primary sequence evaluation of the coiled-coil domain.

  8. Expression profiles of myostatin, myogenin, and Myosin heavy chain in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds differing in growth rate.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Liangde; Xie, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lei, Min; Li, Congyan; Ren, Yongjun; Zheng, Jie; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cuixia; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare mRNA levels of myostatin (MSTN), myogenin (MyoG), and fiber type compositions in terms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds with different body sizes and growth rates. Longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles of 16 Californian rabbits (CW) and 16 Germany great line of ZIKA rabbits (GZ) were collected at the ages of 35d and 84d (slaughter age). The results showed that the live weights of GZ rabbits of 35d and 84d old were approximately 36% and 26% greater than those of CW rabbits, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that at the age of 84d GZ rabbits contained significantly lower MSTN mRNA level and higher MyoG mRNA level in both longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles than CW rabbits, and mRNA levels of MSTN and MyoG exhibited opposite changes from the age of 35d to 84d, suggesting that GZ rabbits were subjected to less growth inhibition from MSTN at slaughter age, which occurred most possibly in skeletal muscles. Four types of fiber were identified by real-time PCR in rabbit muscles, with MyHC-1 and MyHC-2D, MyHC-2B were the major types in biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi muscles, respectively. At the age of 84d, GZ rabbits contained greater proportion of MyHC-1 and decreased proportion of MyHC-2D and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity in biceps femoris than CW rabbits, and the results were exactly opposite in longissimus dorsi, suggesting that GZ rabbits show higher oxidative capacity in biceps femoris muscle than CW rabbits. In conclusion, the trends of mRNA levels of MSTN and fiber types in GZ rabbits' skeletal muscles might be consistent with the putative fast growth characteristic of GZ rabbits compared to CW rabbits.

  9. Evidence for myoblast-extrinsic regulation of slow myosin heavy chain expression during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Cho, M; Webster, S G; Blau, H M

    1993-05-01

    Vertebrate muscles are composed of an array of diverse fast and slow fiber types with different contractile properties. Differences among fibers in fast and slow MyHC expression could be due to extrinsic factors that act on the differentiated myofibers. Alternatively, the mononucleate myoblasts that fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers could differ intrinsically due to lineage. To distinguish between these possibilities, we determined whether the changes in proportion of slow fibers were attributable to inherent differences in myoblasts. The proportion of fibers expressing slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) was found to change markedly with time during embryonic and fetal human limb development. During the first trimester, a maximum of 75% of fibers expressed slow MyHC. Thereafter, new fibers formed which did not express this MyHC, so that the proportion of fibers expressing slow MyHC dropped to approximately 3% of the total by midgestation. Several weeks later, a subset of the new fibers began to express slow MyHC and from week 30 of gestation through adulthood, approximately 50% of fibers were slow. However, each myoblast clone (n = 2,119) derived from muscle tissues at six stages of human development (weeks 7, 9, 16, and 22 of gestation, 2 mo after birth and adult) expressed slow MyHC upon differentiation. We conclude from these results that the control of slow MyHC expression in vivo during muscle fiber formation in embryonic development is largely extrinsic to the myoblast. By contrast, human myoblast clones from the same samples differed in their expression of embryonic and neonatal MyHCs, in agreement with studies in other species, and this difference was shown to be stably heritable. Even after 25 population doublings in tissue culture, embryonic stage myoblasts did not give rise to myoblasts capable of expressing MyHCs typical of neonatal stages, indicating that stage-specific differences are not under the control of a division dependent mechanism, or

  10. Divergent effects of α- and β-myosin heavy chain isoforms on the N terminus of rat cardiac troponin T

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath

    2013-01-01

    Divergent effects of α– and β–myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on contractile behavior arise mainly because of their impact on thin filament cooperativity. The N terminus of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) also modulates thin filament cooperativity. Our hypothesis is that the impact of the N terminus of cTnT on thin filament activation is modulated by a shift from α- to β-MHC isoform. We engineered two recombinant proteins by deleting residues 1–43 and 44–73 in rat cTnT (RcTnT): RcTnT1–43Δ and RcTnT44–73Δ, respectively. Dynamic and steady-state contractile parameters were measured at sarcomere length of 2.3 µm after reconstituting proteins into detergent-skinned muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and propylthiouracil-treated (β-MHC) rat hearts. α-MHC attenuated Ca2+-activated maximal tension (∼46%) in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. In contrast, β-MHC decreased tension only by 19% in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. Both α- and β-MHC did not affect tension in RcTnT44–73Δ fibers. The instantaneous muscle fiber stiffness measurements corroborated the divergent impact of α- and β-MHC on tension in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. pCa50 (-log of [Ca2+]free required for half-maximal activation) decreased significantly by 0.13 pCa units in α-MHC + RcTnT1–43Δ fibers but remained unaltered in β-MHC + RcTnT1–43Δ fibers, demonstrating that β-MHC counteracted the attenuating effect of RcTnT1–43Δ on myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. β-MHC did not alter the sudden stretch–mediated recruitment of new cross-bridges (ER) in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers, but α-MHC attenuated ER by 36% in RcTnT1–43Δ fibers. The divergent impact of α- and β-MHC on how the N terminus of cTnT modulates contractile dynamics has implications for heart disease; alterations in cTnT and MHC are known to occur via changes in isoform expression or mutations. PMID:24043862

  11. Association between myosin heavy chain protein isoforms and intramuscular anabolic signaling following resistance exercise in trained men

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Adam M.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Wells, Adam J.; Beyer, Kyle S.; Willoughby, Darryn S.; Oliveira, Leonardo P.; Fukuda, David H.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resistance exercise stimulates an increase in muscle protein synthesis regulated by intracellular anabolic signaling molecules in a mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)‐dependent pathway. The purpose of this study was to investigate acute anabolic signaling responses in experienced, resistance‐trained men, and to examine the association between myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition and the magnitude of anabolic signaling. Eight resistance‐trained men (24.9 ± 4.3 years; 91.2 ± 12.4 kg; 176.7 ± 8.0 cm; 13.3 ± 3.9 body fat %) performed a whole body, high‐volume resistance exercise protocol (REX) and a control protocol (CTL) in a balanced, randomized order. Participants were provided a standardized breakfast, recovery drink, and meal during each protocol. Fine needle muscle biopsies were completed at baseline (BL), 2 h (2H) and 6 h post‐exercise (6H). BL biopsies were analyzed for MHC isoform composition. Phosphorylation of proteins specific to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and MHC mRNA expression was quantified. Phosphorylation of p70S6k was significantly greater in REX compared to CTL at 2H (P = 0.04). MHC mRNA expression and other targets in the Akt/mTOR pathway were not significantly influenced by REX. The percentage of type IIX isoform was inversely correlated (P < 0.05) with type I and type IIA MHC mRNA expression (r = −0.69 to −0.93). Maximal strength was also observed to be inversely correlated (P < 0.05) with Type I and Type IIA MHC mRNA expression (r = −0.75 to −0.77) and p70S6k phosphorylation (r = −0.75). Results indicate that activation of p70S6k occurs within 2‐h following REX in experienced, resistance‐trained men. Further, results also suggest that highly trained, stronger individuals have an attenuated acute anabolic response. PMID:25626869

  12. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  13. 1A.02: MICRORNA-208A AND ITS HOST GENE CARDIAC MYOSIN HEAVY CHAIN MYH6 ARE INVOLVED IN HYPERTROPHIC HEART DYSFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Dóka, G; Radik, M; Krenek, P; Kyselovic, J; Klimas, J

    2015-06-01

    Circulating microRNAs may be markers of cardiac damage or dysfunction. miR-208a has heart-specific expression since its host gene - myosin heavy chain MYH6, dominant cardiac myosin motor is also heart-specific and its expression maintains proper cardiac output. Our aim was to evaluate miR-208a and MYH6 as key contributing factors involved in hypertrophic heart dysfunction. 18-20 weeks old male Wistar rats were treated for 8 days with isoproterenol (ISO; N=12; 5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle (CON; N=12). Relative expressions of cardiac myosin heavy chains (MYH6, MYH7, MYH7B), markers of cardiac damage (natriuretic peptides ANP, BNP) and heart-related microRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-208a, miR-499 were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR in samples from left ventricle, microRNAs also in venous blood. Cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction was quantified with heart gravimetry and left heart catheterization, respectively. Treatment with isoproterenol induced cardiac hypertrophy (heart mass increased by +36% vs. CON (P<0.01) and 53% mortality associated with cardiovascular dysfunction characterized by a deteriorated peak left ventricular pressure and rate of isovolumetric pressure change during contraction (+dP/dt) compared to CON (-8% and -27% resp., P < 0.01). Gene expression of cardiac myosin heavy chain MYH6 in left ventricles was decreased by -61% indicating myosin switching in contractile apparatus. Cardiac dysfunction was further confirmed by 10-fold increase of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; P<0.01). Cardiac levels of microRNAs miR-1, miR-133a, miR-208a, miR-499 were strongly decreased (-71%, -65%, -59%, -75% resp., P < 0.01). Plasma levels of the same microRNAs were unchanged except for the cardio-specific miR-208a that showed a significant, 56-fold increase (P<0.01). ROC curve for detection of cardiac hypertrophy based on plasma miR-208a had a corresponding AUC = 98.8% (95% confidence interval, 85.3% - 100%). Cardiac hypertrophy was

  14. MicroRNA-23a reduces slow myosin heavy chain isoforms composition through myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and potentially influences meat quality.

    PubMed

    Shen, Linyuan; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Shunhua; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Jingyong; Zhu, Li

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs that participate in the regulation of a variety of biological processes. Muscle fiber types were very important to meat quality traits, however, the molecular mechanism by which miRNAs regulate the muscle fiber type composition is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether miRNA-23a can affect muscle fiber type composition. Luciferase reporter assays proved that miRNA-23a directly targets the 3' untranslated region (UTRs) of MEF2c. Overexpression of miRNA-23a significantly suppressed the expression of MEF2c both in mRNA and protein levels, thus caused down-regulation of the expression of some key downstream genes of MEF2c (PGC1-α, NRF1 and mtTFA). More interestingly, overexpression of miRNA-23a significantly restrained the myogenic differentiation and decreased the ratio of slow myosin heavy chain in myoblasts (p<0.05). Our findings hinted a novel role of miRNA-23a in the epigenetic regulation of meat quality via decreasing the ratio of slow myosin heavy chain isoforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Absolute quantification of myosin heavy chain isoforms by selected reaction monitoring can underscore skeletal muscle changes in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peggion, Caterina; Massimino, Maria Lina; Biancotto, Giancarlo; Angeletti, Roberto; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro; Stella, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers contain different isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) that define distinctive contractile properties. In light of the muscle capacity to adapt MyHC expression to pathophysiological conditions, a rapid and quantitative assessment of MyHC isoforms in small muscle tissue quantities would represent a valuable diagnostic tool for (neuro)muscular diseases. As past protocols did not meet these requirements, in the present study we applied a targeted proteomic approach based on selected reaction monitoring that allowed the absolute quantification of slow and fast MyHC isoforms in different mouse skeletal muscles with high reproducibility. This mass-spectrometry-based method was validated also in a pathological specimen, by comparison of the MyHC expression profiles in different muscles from healthy mice and a genetic mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) expressing the SOD1(G93A) mutant. This analysis showed that terminally ill ALS mice have a fast-to-slow shift in the fiber type composition of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles, as previously reported. These results will likely open the way to accurate and rapid diagnoses of human (neuro)muscular diseases by the proposed method. Graphical Abstract Methods for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) quantification: a comparison of classical methods and selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based mass spectrometry approaches.

  16. Evaluation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in isolated pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, D.B.; Soeling, H.D.; Williams, J.A. Universitaet Goettingen )

    1988-01-01

    The role of contractile proteins in secretory granule exocytosis was evaluated by determining whether myosin light chain phosphorylation was altered during stimulation of secretion in mouse pancreatic acini. Acinar myosin was purified by extraction into isosmotic sucrose solution containing 40 mM pyrophosphate followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation and Sepharose 4B-CL chromatography. Myosin was eluted as a single peak of K{sup +}-EDTA ATPase activity and was purified over 2,000-fold to a final ATPase specific activity of 0.96 {mu}mol{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}mg protein {sup {minus}1}. Three major myosin subunits of apparent M{sub r} of 200,000, 20,000, and 17,000 were present in the purified myosin preparation. A fourth protein of M{sub r} 21,000 was also present. Purification of myosin from {sup 32}P-labeled acini revealed that M{sub r} 200,000, 21,000, and 20,000 proteins to be heavily labeled. The effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) on myosin phosphorylation was studied after isolation of myosin from {sup 32}P-labeled acinar lysates by immunoprecipitation. Treatment of acini for 1-10 min with a concentration of CCK-8 that gives a maximal secretory response caused a 25-40% increase in light chain labeling. Treatment with a supramaximal CCK-8 concentration produced a 50-80% increase in light chain labeling. Phosphorylation of myosin heavy chain was not significantly affected by secretagogue treatment. These results indicate that stimulation of pancreatic acinar secretion is accompanied by an increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation.

  17. Four things to know about myosin light chains as reporters for non-muscle myosin-2 dynamics in live cells.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2015-02-01

    The interplay between non-muscle myosins-2 and filamentous actin results in cytoplasmic contractility which is essential for eukaryotic life. Concomitantly, there is tremendous interest in elucidating the physiological function and temporal localization of non-muscle myosin-2 in cells. A commonly used method to study the function and localization of non-muscle myosin-2 is to overexpress a fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged version of the regulatory light chain (RLC) which binds to the myosin-2 heavy chain by mass action. Caveats about this approach include findings from recent studies indicating that the RLC does not bind exclusively to the non-muscle myosin-2 heavy chain. Rather, it can also associate with the myosin heavy chains of several other classes as well as other targets than myosin. In addition, the presence of the FP moiety may compromise myosin's enzymatic and mechanical performance. This and other factors to be discussed in this commentary raise questions about the possible complications in using FP-RLC as a marker for the dynamic localization and regulatory aspects of non-muscle myosin-2 motor functions in cell biological experiments. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Akirin2 promotes slow myosin heavy chain expression by CaN/NFATc1 signaling in porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoling; Luo, Yanliu; Huang, Zhiqing; Liu, Guangmang; Zhao, Hua

    2017-02-16

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Akirin2 on slow myosin heavy chain (slow MyHC, MyHC I) gene expression and its molecular mechanisms. In this study, we showed that the protein expression of Akirin2 in pig slow oxidative Psoas major muscle is higher than that in fast glycolytic tibialis anterior muscle, suggesting that Akirin2 may play a role in myofiber typing. Knockdown of Akirin2 decreased the MyHC I expression and the calcineurin (CaN) activity, and also decreased the expressions of NFATc1 and MCIP1.4. Conversely, overexpression of Akirin2 got the opposite results. Furthermore, inhibition of CaN or knockdown of NFATc1 attenuated Akirin2 overexpression-induced upregulation of MyHC I. Together, these results demonstrate that Akirin2 promotes MyHC I expression via CaN/NFATc1 signaling pathway in porcine skeletal muscle satellite cells.

  19. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-08-25

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Position independent expression and developmental regulation is directed by the beta myosin heavy chain gene's 5' upstream region in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, S; Rindt, H; Robbins, J

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice generated with constructs containing 5.6 kb of the beta myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene's 5' flanking region linked to the cat reporter gene express the transgene at high levels. In all 47 lines analyzed, tissue-specific accumulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was found at levels proportional to the number of integrated transgene copies. Deletion constructs containing only 0.6 kb of 5' upstream region showed position effects in transgenic mice and did not demonstrate copy number dependence although transgene expression remained muscle-specific. The 5.6 kb 5' upstream region conferred appropriate developmental control of the transgene to the cardiac compartment and directs copy number dependent and position independent expression. Lines generated with a construct in which three proximal cis-acting elements were mutated showed reduced levels of transgene expression, but all maintained their position independence and copy number dependence, suggesting the presence of distinct regulatory mechanisms. Images PMID:7667107

  1. Cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain defects in two families with non-compaction cardiomyopathy: linking non-compaction to hypertrophic, restrictive, and dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaekers, Yvonne M; Caliskan, Kadir; Majoor-Krakauer, Danielle; van de Laar, Ingrid; Michels, Michelle; Witsenburg, Maarten; ten Cate, Folkert J; Simoons, Maarten L; Dooijes, Dennis

    2007-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are classified according to distinct morphological characteristics. They occur relatively frequent and are an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Isolated ventricular non-compaction or non-compaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM) is characterized by an excessively thickened endocardial layer with deep intertrabecular recesses, reminiscent of the myocardium during early embryogenesis. Aims Autosomal-dominant as well as X-linked inheritance for NCCM has been described and several loci have been associated with the disease. Nevertheless, a major genetic cause for familial NCCM remains to be identified. Methods and Results We describe, in two separate autosomal-dominant NCCM families, the identification of mutations in the sarcomeric cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7), known to be associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), restricted cardiomyopathy (RCM), and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Conclusion These results confirm the genetic heterogeneity of NCCM and suggest that the molecular classification of cardiomyopathies includes an MYH7-associated spectrum of NCCM with HCM, RCM, and DCM.

  2. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

  3. Characteristics of light chains of Chara myosin revealed by immunological investigation

    PubMed Central

    KAKEI, Toshihito; SUMIYOSHI, Hiroki; HIGASHI-FUJIME, Sugie

    2012-01-01

    Chara myosin is plant myosin responsible for cytoplasmic streaming and moves actin filaments at 60 µm/s, which is the fastest of all myosins examined. The neck of the myosin molecule has usually mechanical and regulatory roles. The neck of Chara myosin is supposed to bind six light chains, but, at present, we have no knowledge about them. We found Ca++-calmodulin activated Chara myosin motility and its actin-activated ATPase, and actually bound with the Chara myosin heavy chain, indicating calmodulin might be one of candidates for Chara myosin light chains. Antibody against essential light chain from Physarum myosin, and antibodies against Chara calmodulin and chicken myosin light chain from lens membranes reacted with 20 kDa and 18 kDa polypeptides of Chara myosin preparation, respectively. Correspondingly, column purified Chara myosin had light chains of 20 kDa, and 18 kDa with the molar ratio of 0.7 and 2.5 to the heavy chain, respectively. PMID:22687741

  4. MicroRNA deep sequencing in two adult stem cell populations identifies miR-501 as a novel regulator of myosin heavy chain during muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mizbani, Amir; Luca, Edlira; Rushing, Elisabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of skeletal muscle regeneration, but the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Here, comparative miRNA sequencing analysis of myogenic progenitor cells (MPs) and non-myogenic fibroblast-adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) during cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury uncovered miR-501 as a novel muscle-specific miRNA. miR-501 is an intronic miRNA and its expression levels in MPs correlated with its host gene, chloride channel, voltage-sensitive 5 (Clcn5). Pharmacological inhibition of miR-501 dramatically blunted the induction of embryonic myosin heavy chain (MYH3) and, to a lesser extent, adult myosin isoforms during muscle regeneration, and promoted small-diameter neofibers. An unbiased target identification approach in primary myoblasts validated gigaxonin as a target of miR-501 that mimicked the effect of miR-501 inhibition on MYH3 expression. In the mdx mouse model, which models a pathological disease state, not only was miR-501 induced in regenerating skeletal muscle, but also its serum levels were increased, which correlated with the disease state of the animals. Our results suggest that miR-501 plays a key role in adult muscle regeneration and might serve as a novel serum biomarker for the activation of adult muscle stem cells. PMID:27707793

  5. Cloning, expression, and localization of two types of fast skeletal myosin heavy chain genes from black tiger and Pacific white shrimps.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hiroki; Akolkar, Dadasaheb B; Piyapattanakorn, Sanit; Watabe, Shugo

    2012-12-01

    The physiology and biochemistry of skeletal muscles in shrimps have been poorly understood compared with those from vertebrates. The present study was conducted focusing on myosin, the major protein in skeletal muscle, from adult specimens of black tiger Penaeus monodon and Pacific white Penaeus vannamei shrimps. Two genes encoding myosin heavy chain (MHC), a large subunit of the myosin molecule, were cloned from abdominal fast skeletal muscle and defined as MHCa and MHCb according to our previous study on kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus. Random cloning demonstrated that the MHCb gene (MHCb) was expressed more abundantly than MHCa. The full-length cDNA clones of MHCa and MHCb from black tiger shrimp consisted of 5,926 and 5,914 bp, respectively, which encoded 1,914 and 1,909 amino acids, respectively, whereas those from Pacific white shrimp consisted of 5,923 and 5,908 bp, respectively, which encoded 1,913 and 1,909 amino acids, respectively. Both MHCa and MHCb were considered to be fast muscle type due to their strict localization in fast muscle. The amino acid identities between MHCa and MHCb of black tiger shrimp were 77%, 60%, and 73% in the regions of subfragment-1 (S1), subfragment-2 (S2) and light meromyosin (LMM), respectively, with 71% in total, whereas those of Pacific white shrimp were 78%, 60%, and 73% in the regions of S1, S2, and LMM, respectively, with 72% in total. In situ hybridization and northern blot analysis using different regions from abdominal muscle demonstrated different localizations of MHCa and MHCb transcripts in this muscle, suggesting their distinct physiological functions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Analysis of the 5' end of the Drosophila muscle myosin heavy chain gene. Alternatively spliced transcripts initiate at a single site and intron locations are conserved compared to myosin genes of other organisms.

    PubMed

    Wassenberg, D R; Kronert, W A; O'Donnell, P T; Bernstein, S I

    1987-08-05

    We have localized the transcription start site of the Drosophila melanogaster muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene and find that all forms of the alternatively spliced MHC mRNA initiate at the same location. Therefore the alternative inclusion/exclusion of the 3' penultimate exon in transcripts from this gene (Bernstein, S.I., Hansen, C.J., Becker, K.D., Wassenberg, D.R., II, Roche, E.S., Donady, J.J., and Emerson, C. P., Jr. (1986) Mol. Cell. Biol. 6, 2511-2519; Rozek, C.E., and Davidson, N. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 2128-2134) does not result from the use of different 5' transcription initiation sites. This gene is the first invertebrate MHC gene shown to have TATA and CAAT box consensus sequences and a noncoding 5' exon, properties that are shared with some vertebrate and invertebrate contractile protein genes. The intron that splits the 5' noncoding region of the Drosophila MHC gene contains no major conserved elements relative to other Drosophila contractile protein genes. The introns within the coding region near the 5' end of the Drosophila MHC gene are located at the same sites as nematode and vertebrate MHC gene introns, indicating that these MHC genes are derived from a common ancestral sequence. The putative ATP binding domain encoded in the fourth exon of the Drosophila MHC gene is highly conserved relative to vertebrate, invertebrate, and non-muscle MHC genes suggesting that each of these myosins bind ATP by the same mechanism. Two divergent copies of the third exon are present within the 5' region of the Drosophila MHC gene, suggesting that alternative splicing produces MHC isoforms with different globular head regions.

  7. Temporal embryonic transcription of chicken fast skeletal myosin heavy chain isoforms in the single comb white leghorn.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J; St-Pierre, N; Lilburn, M S; Wick, M

    2016-05-01

    There are numerous factors that can significantly influence embryonic development in poultry and thus make simple days of incubation (chronological age) a less than perfect metric for studying embryonic physiology. The developmental fast skeletal muscle myosin (MyHC), the predominant protein in the Pectoralis major (PM), is temporally expressed as a cadre of highly specific developmental isoforms. In the study described herein, a novel molecular technology (NanoString) was used to characterize the myosin isoform transcriptional patterns in the PM of Single Comb White Leghorn (SCWL) embryos. NanoString technology is based on quantitative analysis of the transcriptome through digital detection and quantification of target mRNA transcripts. Total RNA was isolated and gene transcription quantified using NanoString in embryonic muscle samples collected daily from 6 through 19 days of incubation. Data were analyzed using the LOESS smoothing function at a 95% confidence level. The temporal transcription of MyHC isoforms obtained in this study was consistent with the literature at higher specificity and resolution, thus validating NanoString for use in gene transcription analyses. The results support a hypothesis that the transcription patterns of the embryonic MyHC isoforms may be used as molecular clocks to further investigate the developmental relationships underlying embryonic fast skeletal muscle growth and development.

  8. Analysis of tcRNA102 associated with myosin heavy chain-mRNPs in control and dystrophic chick pectoralis muscle.

    PubMed

    Zezza, D J; Heywood, S M

    1986-06-05

    Translational control RNA (tcRNA102) is closely associated with nonpolysomal myosin heavy chain-mRNA in mRNP particles. The nucleotide sequence of tcRNA102 has revealed a heterogeneity at the 3' end. This heterogeneity is mostly with regard to an ambiguity between adenine and guanine residues. tcRNA102 (obtained from pectoralis muscle) runs as a single band on denaturing acrylamide gels. When this band is extracted and rerun on a native gel at low voltage, two individual bands appear (A the slower moving and B the faster moving). From the partial RNase U2 sequence analysis and our previous sequence determinations (McCarthy, T. L., Siegel, E., Mrockowski, B., and Heywood, S. M. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 935-941), we may now assign tcRNA102 (A) the 3'-terminal sequence ... GGUUGGACGG-3' and tcRNA102(B) and 3' terminal sequence ... GAUUAAGCAA-3'. Analysis of the tcRNA102s indicates that dystrophic pectoralis muscle contains much less tcRNA102 than a similar preparation from control muscle. The tcRNA102 found in dystrophic pectoralis muscle is of the "A" type while normal pectoralis muscle contains predominantly the "B" type. In addition, control leg muscle from dystrophic chick contains predominantly "B" type. These results suggest that the differences observed at the DNA level (see accompanying paper, Zezza, D. J., and Heywood, S. M. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7455-7460) may be reflected in the RNA transcripts.

  9. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) from fast skeletal muscle of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wuying; Fu, Guihong; Bing, Shiyu; Meng, Tao; Zhou, Ruixue; Cheng, Jia; Zhao, Falan; Zhang, Hongfang; Zhang, Jianshe

    2010-03-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) is one of the major structural and contracting proteins of muscle. We have isolated the cDNA clone encoding MyHC of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. The sequence comprises 5 934 bp, including a 5 814 bp open reading frame encoding an amino acid sequence of 1 937 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69% homology to rabbit fast skeletal MyHC and 73%-76% homology to the MyHCs from the mandarin fish, walleye pollack, white croaker, chum salmon, and carp. The putative sequences of subfragment-1 and the light meromyosin region showed 61.4%-80% homology to the corresponding regions of other fish MyHCs. The tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific expressions of the MyHC gene were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The MyHC gene showed the highest expression in the muscles compared with the kidney, spleen and intestine. Developmentally, there was a gradual increase in MyHC mRNA expression from the neural formation stage to the tail bud stage. The highest expression was detected in hatching larva. Our work on the MyHC gene from the grass carp has provided useful information for fish molecular biology and fish genomics.

  10. Effects of chronic Akt/mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on mechanical overload-induced hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition in masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway on masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain (MHC) transition in response to mechanical overload, we analyzed the effects of bite-opening (BO) on the hypertrophy and MHC composition of masseter muscle of BO-rats treated or not treated with rapamycin (RAPA), a selective mTOR inhibitor. The masseter muscle weight in BO-rats was significantly greater than that in controls, and this increase was attenuated by RAPA treatment. Expression of slow-twitch MHC isoforms was significantly increased in BO-rats with/without RAPA treatment, compared with controls, but the magnitude of the increase was much smaller in RAPA-treated BO-rats. Phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2), which preserves fast-twitch MHC isoforms in skeletal muscle, was significantly decreased in BO-rats, but the decrease was abrogated by RAPA treatment. Calcineurin signaling is known to be important for masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition, but expression of known calcineurin activity modulators was unaffected by RAPA treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in both development of masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition in response to mechanical overload with inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway and operates independently of the calcineurin pathway.

  11. Muscle-Specific Myosin Heavy Chain Shifts in Response to a Long-Term High Fat/High Sugar Diet and Resveratrol Treatment in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K.; Nguyen, Lisa; Hall, Allison E.; Huber, Ashley M.; Kocan, Jessica C.; Mattison, Julie A.; de Cabo, Rafael; LaRocque, Jeannine R.; Talmadge, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Shifts in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression within skeletal muscle can be induced by a host of stimuli including, but not limited to, physical activity, alterations in neural activity, aging, and diet or obesity. Here, we hypothesized that both age and a long-term (2 year) high fat/high sugar diet (HFS) would induce a slow to fast MHC shift within the plantaris, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, we tested whether supplementation with resveratrol, a naturally occurring compound that has been attributed with augmenting aerobic potential through mitochondrial proliferation, would counteract any diet-induced MHC changes by promoting a fast to slow isoform switch. In general, we found that MHC isoforms were not altered by aging during mid-life. The HFS diet had the largest impact within the soleus muscle where the greatest slow to fast isoform shifts were observed in both mRNA and protein indicators. As expected, long-term resveratrol treatment counteracted, or blunted, these diet-induced shifts within the soleus muscle. The plantaris muscle also demonstrated a fast-to-slow phenotypic response to resveratrol treatment. In conclusion, diet or resveratrol treatment impacts skeletal muscle phenotype in a muscle-specific manner and resveratrol supplementation may be one approach for promoting the fatigue-resistant MHC (type I) isoform especially if its expression is blunted as a result of a long-term high fat/sugar diet. PMID:26973542

  12. Changes in muscle fiber size and in the composition of myosin heavy chain isoforms of rabbit extraocular rectus muscle following recession surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Chul; Kim, Yun Taek; Kim, Sun A; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2008-01-01

    To assess the changes in the size of muscle fibers and the composition of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in the global layer (GL) and the orbital layer (OL) of rabbit rectus extraocular muscle (EOM) after recession. The right superior rectus muscles of two rabbits were harvested at 3 days or 1, 2, or 4 weeks after recession (eight rabbits in total). At each time point, one muscle was used for measuring the cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers and the other for identifying the composition of MyHC. The right superior rectus muscles of three additional naïve rabbits were used as controls. The mean cross-sectional area of the OL fibers did not change significantly. However, that of the GL fibers significantly decreased at 3 days (P<0.001) and 1 week (P=0.024) postoperatively, and increased thereafter to reach the control levels at 2 and 4 weeks postoperatively. Three days after surgery, the total MyHC content and the proportion of type IIb MyHC (MyHCIIb) plus EOM-specific MyHC (MyHCeom) decreased and remained at its lower level for 4 weeks. Transient atrophy and regeneration were observed only in the GL, and the changes in the MyHCIIb plus MyHCeom appeared to be related to these changes.

  13. Immunolabelling, histochemistry and in situ hybridisation in human skeletal muscle fibres to detect myosin heavy chain expression at the protein and mRNA level

    PubMed Central

    SERRANO, A. L.; PÉREZ, MARGARITA; LUCÍA, A.; CHICHARRO, J. L.; QUIROZ-ROTHE, E.; RIVERO, J. L. L.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of muscle fibres classified on the basis of their content of different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms was analysed in vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of 15 young men (with an average age of 22 y) by correlating immunohistochemistry with specific anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies, myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) histochemistry and in situ hybridisation with probes specific for MHC β-slow, MHC-IIA and MHC-IIX. The characterisation of a large number of individual fibres was compared and correlated on a fibre-to-fibre basis. The panel of monoclonal antibodies used in the study allowed classification of human skeletal muscle fibres into 5 categories according to the MHC isoform they express at the protein level, types I, I+IIA, IIA, IIAX and IIX. Hybrid fibres coexpressing two isoforms represented a considerable proportion of the fibre composition (about 14%) and were clearly underestimated by mATPase histochemistry. For a very high percentage of fibres there was a precise correspondence between the MHC protein isoforms and mRNA transcripts. The integrated methods used demonstrate a high degree of precision of the immunohistochemical procedure used for the identification and quantification of human skeletal muscle fibre types. The monoclonal antibody S5-8H2 is particularly useful for identifying hybrid IIAX fibres. This protocol offers new prospects for muscle fibre classification in human experimental studies. PMID:11554510

  14. Characterisation of isoform-specific tryptic peptides of rat cardiac myosin heavy chains using automated liquid chromatography-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation (LC-MALDI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burniston, Jatin G; Connolly, Joanne B

    2010-04-30

    Proteomics investigations using 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) cannot resolve the entire cardiac proteome because some proteins, including myosin heavy chains (MyHC), are insoluble in the buffers required for isoelectric focusing. Here, we report an automated mass spectrometry (MS) method complementary to 2-DE and capable of yielding important additional information. Rat myocardium was homogenised in standard lysis solution and centrifuged to produce a supernatant fraction, suitable for 2-DE. The pelleted fraction, which is normally discarded, was used for the current analysis. Proteins were digested with trypsin and the peptides fractionated by HPLC. Automated spotting of eluent fractions onto 384-well target plates and matrix-assisted laser desorption tandem time of flight (MALDI-ToF/ToF) MS were directed by dedicated software. Peptide ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation and the MS/MS spectra searched against the NCBI database using Mascot. This approach confidently identified 13 tryptic peptides specific to cardiac alpha-MyHC and 4 specific to beta-MyHC, which can be used to differentiate these highly homologous protein isoforms in future quantitative MS analyses.

  15. Ginger extract mitigates ethanol-induced changes of alpha and beta - myosin heavy chain isoforms gene expression and oxidative stress in the heart of male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Zerehpoosh, Mitra; Ansari, Mohammad Hasan Khadem; Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Rasmi, Yousef

    2017-09-01

    The association between ethanol consumption and heart abnormalities, such as chamber dilation, myocyte damage, ventricular hypertrophy, and hypertension is well known. However, underlying molecular mediators involved in ethanol-induced heart abnormalities remain elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on alpha and beta - myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms gene expression transition and oxidative stress in rats' heart. It was also planned to find out whether ginger extract mitigated the abnormalities induced by ethanol in rats' heart. Male wistar rats were divided into three groups of eight animals as follows: Control, ethanol, and ginger extract treated ethanolic (GETE) groups. After six weeks of treatment, the results revealed a significant increase in the β-MHC gene expression, 8- OHdG amount, and NADPH oxidase level. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the ratio of α-MHC/β-MHC gene expression to the amount of paraoxonase enzyme in the ethanol group compared to the control group was found. The consumption of Ginger extract along with ethanol ameliorated the changes in MHC isoforms gene expression and reduced the elevated amount of 8-OHdG and NADPH oxidase. Moreover, compared to the consumption of ethanol alone, it increased the paraoxonase level significantly. These findings indicate that ethanol-induced heart abnormalities may in part be associated with MHC isoforms changes mediated by oxidative stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using ginger extract as an antioxidant molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Association of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the 5' upstream region of the porcine myosin heavy chain 4 gene with meat quality traits in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun‐Seok; Lee, Kyung‐Tai; Kim, Jun‐Mo; Lee, Si‐Woo; Jeon, Hyeon‐Jeong; Lee, Seung‐Hwan; Hong, Ki‐Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We identified a potential molecular marker associated with meat quality traits in the myosin heavy chain 4, MYH4 gene of Landrace pigs. Sequencing revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; g.‐1398G>T) in the 5' upstream region of MYH4. It was significantly associated with the number of type IIa muscle fibers and water‐holding capacity based on filter‐paper fluid uptake. The GG genotype groups had a greater number of type IIa fibers and a larger area composed of type IIa fibers than the other genotype group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.061, respectively). Expression level of MYH4 gene in the genotype TT or GT was higher than in genotype of GG (P < 0.0001). The T allele may enhance expression level of MYH4 gene and then the portion of IIb type fiber in the muscle be increased by the T allelle. Therefore, we suggest that the g.‐1398G>T in the 5' upstream region of the porcine MYH4 may be used as a molecular marker for meat quality traits, although its functional effect is not defined yet. PMID:26271027

  17. Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two isopods (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Kreissl, S; Uber, A; Harzsch, S

    2008-05-01

    In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two isopods, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects.

  18. Multiple muscle-specific regulatory elements are associated with a DNase I hypersensitive site of the cardiac beta-myosin heavy-chain gene.

    PubMed

    Huang, W Y; Chen, J J; Shih, N; Liew, C C

    1997-10-15

    Using nuclei isolated from neonatal cardiomyocytes, we have mapped the DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) residing within the 5'-upstream regions of the hamster cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) gene. Two cardiac-specific DHSs within the 5 kb upstream region of the cardiac MyHC gene were identified. One of the DHSs was mapped to the -2.3 kb (beta-2.3 kb) region and the other to the proximal promoter region. We further localized the beta-2.3 kb site to a range of 250 bp. Multiple, conserved, muscle regulatory motifs were found within the beta-2.3 kb site, consisting of three E-boxes, one AP-2 site, one CArG motif, one CT/ACCC box and one myocyte-specific enhancer factor-2 site. This cluster of regulatory elements is strikingly similar to a cluster found in the enhancer of the mouse muscle creatine kinase gene (-1256 to -1050). The specific interaction of the motifs within the beta-2.3 kb site and the cardiac nuclear proteins was demonstrated using gel mobility-shift assays and footprinting analysis. In addition, transfection analysis revealed a significant increase in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity when the beta-2.3 kb site was linked to a heterologous promoter. These results suggest that previously undefined regulatory elements of the beta-MyHC gene may be associated with the beta-2.3 kb site.

  19. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  20. Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two isopods (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain

    PubMed Central

    Kreissl, S.; Uber, A.

    2008-01-01

    In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two isopods, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00427-008-0216-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18443823

  1. Altered expression of pectoral myosin heavy chain isoforms corresponds to migration status in the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii)

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Kenneth C.; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Birds undergo numerous changes as they progress through life-history stages, yet relatively few studies have examined how birds adapt to both the dynamic energetic and mechanical demands associated with such transitions. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, often linked with muscle fibre type, is strongly correlated with a muscle's mechanical power-generating capability, thus we examined several morphological properties, including MyHC expression of the pectoralis, in a long-distance migrant, the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) throughout the progression from winter, spring departure and arrival on breeding grounds. White-crowned sparrows demonstrated significant phenotypic flexibility throughout the seasonal transition, including changes in prealternate moult status, lipid fuelling, body condition and flight muscle morphology. Pectoral MyHC expression also varied significantly over the course of the study. Wintering birds expressed a single, newly classified adult fast 2 isoform. At spring departure, pectoral isoform expression included two MyHC isoforms: the adult fast 2 isoform along with a smaller proportion of a newly present adult fast 1 isoform. By spring arrival, both adult fast isoforms present at departure remained, yet expression had shifted to a greater relative proportion of the adult fast 1 isoform. Altering pectoral MyHC isoform expression in preparation for and during spring migration may represent an adaptation to modulate muscle mechanical output to support long-distance flight. PMID:28018664

  2. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  3. Removal of the cardiac myosin regulatory light chain increases isometric force production

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Kiran; Watt, James; Greenberg, Michael; Jones, Michelle; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    The myosin neck, which is supported by the interactions between light chains and the underlying α-helical heavy chain, is thought to act as a lever arm to amplify movements originating in the globular motor domain. Here, we studied the role of the cardiac myosin regulatory light chains (RLCs) in the capacity of myosin to produce force using a novel optical-trap-based isometric force in vitro motility assay. We measured the isometric force and actin filament velocity for native porcine cardiac (PC) myosin, RLC-depleted PC (PCdepl) myosin, and PC myosin reconstituted with recombinant bacterially expressed human cardiac RLC (PCrecon). RLC depletion reduced unloaded actin filament velocity by 58% and enhanced the myosin-based isometric force ∼2-fold. No significant change between PC and PCdepl preparations was observed in the maximal rate of actin-activated myosin ATPase activity. Reconstitution of PCdepl myosin with human RLC partially restored the velocity and force levels to near untreated values. The reduction in unloaded velocity after RLC extraction is consistent with the myosin neck acting as a lever, while the enhancement in isometric force can be directly related to enhancement of unitary force. The force data are consistent with a model in which the neck region behaves as a cantilevered beam.—Pant, K., Watt, J., Greenberg, M., Jones, M., Szczesna-Cordary, D., Moore, J. R. Removal of the cardiac myosin regulatory light chain increases isometric force production. PMID:19470801

  4. Myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin T damage is associated with impaired myofibrillar ATPase activity contributing to sarcomeric dysfunction in Ca(2+)-paradox rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Árpád; Kalász, Judit; Pásztor, Enikő T; Tóth, Attila; Papp, Zoltán; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Barta, Judit

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential contribution of myofibrils to contractile dysfunction in Ca(2+)-paradox hearts. Isolated rat hearts were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (Control), followed by Ca(2+)-depletion, and then Ca(2+)-repletion after Ca(2+)-depletion (Ca(2+)-paradox) by Langendorff method. During heart perfusion left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of pressure development (+ dP/dt), and pressure decay (-dP/dt) were registered. Control LVDP (127.4 ± 6.1 mmHg) was reduced during Ca(2+)-depletion (9.8 ± 1.3 mmHg) and Ca(2+)-paradox (12.9 ± 1.3 mmHg) with similar decline in +dP/dt and -dP/dt. LVEDP was increased in both Ca(2+)-depletion and Ca(2+)-paradox. Compared to Control, myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity was decreased in the Ca(2+)-depletion group (12.08 ± 0.57 vs. 8.13 ± 0.19 µmol Pi/mg protein/h), besides unvarying Mg(2+) ATPase activity, while upon Ca(2+)-paradox myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity was decreased (12.08 ± 0.57 vs. 8.40 ± 0.22 µmol Pi/mg protein/h), but Mg(2+) ATPase activity was increased (3.20 ± 0.25 vs. 7.21 ± 0.36 µmol Pi/mg protein/h). In force measurements of isolated cardiomyocytes at saturating [Ca(2+)], Ca(2+)-depleted cells had lower rate constant of force redevelopment (k tr,max, 3.85 ± 0.21) and unchanged active tension, while those in Ca(2+)-paradox produced lower active tension (12.12 ± 3.19 kN/m(2)) and k tr,max (3.21 ± 23) than cells of Control group (25.07 ± 3.51 and 4.61 ± 22 kN/m(2), respectively). In biochemical assays, α-myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin T presented progressive degradation during Ca(2+)-depletion and Ca(2+)-paradox. Our results suggest that contractile impairment in Ca(2+)-paradox partially resides in deranged sarcomeric function and compromised myofibrillar ATPase activity as a result of myofilament protein degradation, such

  5. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling and Neurotrophins Control Transformation of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Aerobic Treadmill Training

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenfeng; Chen, Gan; Li, Fanling; Tang, Changfa; Yin, Dazhong

    2014-01-01

    This study elucidated the role of CaN-NFAT signaling and neurotrophins on the transformation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber following aerobic exercise training. To do so, we examined the content and distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber, the activity of CaN and expression of NFATc1 in these fibers, and changes in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neutrophin-3 (NT-3) in the soleus and striatum following high-and medium-intensity aerobic treadmill training. Specific pathogen-free 2 month old male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control group (Con, n = 8), moderate-intensity aerobic exercise group (M-Ex, n = 8) and high-intensity aerobic exercise group (H-Ex, n = 8). We used ATPase staining to identify the muscle fiber type I and II, SDS-PAGE to separate and analyze the isoforms MyHCI, MyHCIIA, MyHCIIB and MyHCIIx, and performed western blots to determine the expression of NFATc1, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. CaN activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. In the soleus muscle, 8 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise can induce transformation of MyHC IIA and MyHC IIB to MyHC IIX and MyHC I (p < 0.01), while high-intensity treadmill exercise can induce transform MyHC IIx to MyHC IIB, MyHC IIA and MyHC I (p < 0.01). In comparison to the control group, CaN activity and NFATcl protein level were significantly increased in both the M-Ex and H-Ex groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01), with a more pronounced upregulation in the M-Ex group (p < 0.05). Eight weeks of moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise induced the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in the soleus muscle and the striatum (p < 0.01), with the most significant increase in the H-Ex group (p < 0.01). In the rat soleus muscle, (1) CaN–NFATcl signaling contributes to the conversion of MyHC I isoform in response to moderate-intensity exercise; (2) Neurotrophins

  6. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  7. N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Subunits Are Non-myosin Targets of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Gaurav; Zhang, Yong; Schimerlik, Michael I.; Hau, Andrew M.; Yang, Jing; Filtz, Theresa M.; Kioussi, Chrissa; Ishmael, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    Excitatory synapses contain multiple members of the myosin superfamily of molecular motors for which functions have not been assigned. In this study we characterized the molecular determinants of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding to two major subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NR). Myosin RLC bound to NR subunits in a manner that could be distinguished from the interaction of RLC with the neck region of non-muscle myosin II-B (NMII-B) heavy chain; NR-RLC interactions did not require the addition of magnesium, were maintained in the absence of the fourth EF-hand domain of the light chain, and were sensitive to RLC phosphorylation. Equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy experiments indicate that the affinity of myosin RLC for NR1 is high (30 nm) in the context of the isolated light chain. Binding was not favored in the context of a recombinant NMII-B subfragment one, indicating that if the RLC is already bound to NMII-B it is unlikely to form a bridge between two binding partners. We report that sequence similarity in the “GXXXR” portion of the incomplete IQ2 motif found in NMII heavy chain isoforms likely contributes to recognition of NR2A as a non-myosin target of the RLC. Using site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt NR2A-RLC binding in intact cells, we find that RLC interactions facilitate trafficking of NR1/NR2A receptors to the cell membrane. We suggest that myosin RLC can adopt target-dependent conformations and that a role for this light chain in protein trafficking may be independent of the myosin II complex. PMID:18945678

  8. Effect of 48-h food deprivation on the expressions of myosin heavy-chain isoforms and fiber type-related factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Sawano, Shoko; Iwamoto, Yohei; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 48-h food deprivation on rat skeletal muscle fiber type, according to myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform composition and some metabolism-related factors in both slow-type dominant and fast-type dominant muscle tissues. Male Wistar rats (7 wk old) were treated with 48-h food deprivation or ad libitum feeding as control. After the treatment, the soleus muscle (slow-type dominant) and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-type dominant) were excised. We found that 48-h food deprivation did not affect MyHC composition in either the soleus or EDL, compared with fed rats by electrophoretic separation of MyHC isoforms. However, 48-h food deprivation significantly increased the mRNA expression of fast-type MyHC2B in the EDL muscle. Moreover, food deprivation increased fatty acid metabolism, as shown by elevated levels of related serum energy substrates and mRNA expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP) 3 and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in both the soleus and EDL. UCP3 and LPL are generally expressed at higher levels in slow-type fibers. Furthermore, we found that food deprivation significantly decreased the protein amounts of PGC1α and phosphorylated FOXO1, which are known as skeletal muscle fiber type regulators. In conclusion, 48-h food deprivation increased mRNA expression of fast-type MyHC isoform and oxidative metabolism-related factors in EDL, whereas MyHC composition at the protein level did not change in either the soleus or EDL.

  9. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. Differential muscular myosin heavy chain expression of the pectoral and pelvic girdles during early growth in the king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) chick.

    PubMed

    Erbrech, Aude; Robin, Jean-Patrice; Guérin, Nathalie; Groscolas, René; Gilbert, Caroline; Martrette, Jean-Marc

    2011-06-01

    Continuous growth, associated with a steady parental food supply, is a general pattern in offspring development. So that young chicks can acquire their locomotor independence, this period is usually marked by a fast maturation of muscles, during which different myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms are expressed. However, parental food provisioning may fluctuate seasonally, and offspring therefore face a challenge to ensure the necessary maturation of their tissues when energy is limited. To address this trade-off we investigated muscle maturation in both the pectoral and pelvic girdles of king penguin chicks. This species has an exceptionally long rearing period (1 year), which is prolonged when parental food provisioning is drastically reduced during the sub-Antarctic winter. Approximately 1 month post hatching, chicks acquire a functional pedestrian locomotion, which uses pelvic muscles, whereas swimming, which uses the pectoral muscles, only occurs 1 year later. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the MyHC content of the leg muscles reaches a mature state before those of the pectoral muscles. We found that leg muscle MyHC composition changed with the progressive acquisition of pedestrian locomotion, whereas pectoral muscle fibres reached their mature MyHC profile as early as hatching. Contrary to our predictions, the acquisition of the adult profile in pectoral muscles could be related to an early maturation of the contractile muscular proteins, presumably associated with early thermoregulatory capacities of chicks, necessary for survival in their cold environment. This differential maturation appears to reconcile both the locomotor and environmental constraints of king penguin chicks during growth.

  11. Exogenous apelin changes alpha and beta myosin heavy chain mRNA expression and improves cardiac function in PTU-induced hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Faraji Shahrivar, Farzaneh; Badavi, Mohammad; Dianat, Mahin; Mard, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Samarbaf-Zadeh, Alireza

    2016-12-20

    The most important conditions associated with hypothyroidism is the cardiac dysfunction. Apelin is an endogenous ligand, involved in energy storage and metabolism which improves cardiac contractility. This study was done to evaluate the effects of apelin, l-Thyroxin (T4) or a combination of both, on cardiac function and mRNA expression of two contractile proteins, α and β myosin heavy chain (α-MHC and β-MHC), in 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroid rats. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into five groups: Ctrl (Control), and 4 hypothyroid groups (H, HA, HT, and HAT). The Hypothyroid (H) group received 0.05% PTU in the drinking water for six weeks; the next 3 groups, along with PTU, received apelin (HA, 200μg/kg/day, ip), T4 (HT, 20μg/kg/day, gavage), or a combination of both drugs (HAT) for the last 2weeks (weeks 5 and 6). TSH and T4 were measured using ELISA kit. Isolated hearts of animals were perfused in Langendorff apparatus and left ventricular developed pressure, cardiac contractility, heart rate, rate pressure product and perfusion pressure were assessed using PowerLab ADInstruments. In addition α-MHC and β-MHC mRNA expression were evaluated by RT-PCR method in heart tissue. Apelin alone or accompanied by T4 significantly increased cardiac contractility and performance as compared to hypothyroid group. Apelin also significantly increased the alpha-MHC mRNA expression and in the presence of T4 significantly decreased beta-MHC mRNA expression. It seems that apelin alone may improve cardiac function in hypothyroid rats via genomic pathways.

  12. MicroRNA-27a Regulates Beta Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression by Targeting Thyroid Hormone Receptor β1 in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Myocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hitoo; Ono, Koh; Horie, Takahiro; Nagao, Kazuya; Kinoshita, Minako; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Watanabe, Shin; Takaya, Tomohide; Tamaki, Yodo; Takanabe-Mori, Rieko; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, are negative regulators of gene expression and play important roles in gene regulation in the heart. To examine the role of miRNAs in the expression of the two isoforms of the cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, α- and β-MHC, which regulate cardiac contractility, endogenous miRNAs were downregulated in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) using lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Dicer, an essential enzyme for miRNA biosynthesis, and MHC expression levels were examined. As a result, Dicer siRNA could downregulate endogenous miRNAs simultaneously and the β-MHC gene but not α-MHC, which implied that specific miRNAs could upregulate the β-MHC gene. Among 19 selected miRNAs, miR-27a was found to most strongly upregulate the β-MHC gene but not α-MHC. Moreover, β-MHC protein was downregulated by silencing of endogenous miR-27a. Through a bioinformatics screening using TargetScan, we identified thyroid hormone receptor β1 (TRβ1), which negatively regulates β-MHC transcription, as a target of miR-27a. Moreover, miR-27a was demonstrated to modulate β-MHC gene regulation via thyroid hormone signaling and to be upregulated during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells or in hypertrophic hearts in association with β-MHC gene upregulation. These findings suggested that miR-27a regulates β-MHC gene expression by targeting TRβ1 in cardiomyocytes. PMID:21149577

  13. Identification of a 94-bp GC-rich element in the smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain promoter controlling vascular smooth muscle cell-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Deindl, Elisabeth; Middeler, Guido; Müller, Oliver J; Selbert, Stefan; Schlenke, Peter; Marienfeld, Uta; Thirion, Christian; Katus, Hugo A; Franz, Wolfgang M

    2006-01-01

    The previously described rabbit 2.3-kilobase smooth muscle myosin heavy-chain (SMHCwt) promoter targets gene expression in transgenic animals to vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), including coronary arteries. Therefore, SMHCwt is thought to provide a promising tool for human gene therapy. In the present study, we examined tissue specificity and expression levels of wild-type and mutated SMHC promoters within the system of high-capacity adenoviral (hcAd) vectors. SMHCwt and a series of SMHC promoter deletion mutants, a triple promoter as well as a cytomegalovirus-SMHC hybrid promoter driving the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter gene were transiently transfected into aortic SMCs. Fluorescence intensity was measured by flow cytometric analysis. Consecutively, hcAd vectors were constructed with the SMHCwt and the mutant promoter with the highest fluorescence activity. Levels of EGFP expression were determined after transduction of SMCs derived from human coronary arteries. For analysis of tissue specificity, embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived SMCs (ESdSMHCs) and cardiomyocytes (ESdCMs) were used. In comparison with SMHCwt, only the SMHCdel94 mutant lacking a 94-bp GC-rich element revealed a 1.5-fold increased fluorescence activity. Transduction of primary SMCs of human coronary arteries with hcAd vectors confirmed an increased EGFP expression driven by the SMHCdel94 promoter. In ES-cell-derived embryoid bodies, SMHCwt was exclusively active in transduced ESdSMCs. In contrast, expression of SMHCdel94 was also found in ESdCMs and other nontarget cells of the embryoid body. The tissue-specific rabbit SMHCwt promoter seems to be suitable for adenoviral gene transfer in SMCs of human coronary arteries and deletion of a 94-bp negative cis-acting GC-rich element results in loss of specificity.

  14. Transcription enhancer factor 1 interacts with a basic helix-loop-helix zipper protein, Max, for positive regulation of cardiac alpha-myosin heavy-chain gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, M P; Amin, C S; Gupta, M; Hay, N; Zak, R

    1997-01-01

    The M-CAT binding factor transcription enhancer factor 1 (TEF-1) has been implicated in the regulation of several cardiac and skeletal muscle genes. Previously, we identified an E-box-M-CAT hybrid (EM) motif that is responsible for the basal and cyclic AMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MHC) gene in cardiac myocytes. In this study, we report that two factors, TEF-1 and a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper protein, Max, bind to the alpha-MHC EM motif. We also found that Max was a part of the cardiac troponin T M-CAT-TEF-1 complex even when the DNA template did not contain an apparent E-box binding site. In the protein-protein interaction assay, a stable association of Max with TEF-1 was observed when glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TEF-1 or GST-Max was used to pull down in vitro-translated Max or TEF-1, respectively. In addition, Max was coimmunoprecipitated with TEF-1, thus documenting an in vivo TEF-1-Max interaction. In the transient transcription assay, overexpression of either Max or TEF-1 resulted a mild activation of the alpha-MHC-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene at lower concentrations and repression of this gene at higher concentrations. However, when Max and TEF-1 expression plasmids were transfected together, the repression mediated by a single expression plasmid was alleviated and a three- to fourfold transactivation of the alpha-MHC-CAT reporter gene was observed. This effect was abolished once the EM motif in the promoter-reporter construct was mutated, thus suggesting that the synergistic transactivation function of the TEF-1-Max heterotypic complex is mediated through binding of the complex to the EM motif. These results demonstrate a novel association between Max and TEF-1 and indicate a positive cooperation between these two factors in alpha-MHC gene regulation. PMID:9199327

  15. Beta-myosin heavy-chain mutations R403QLW, V606M, K615N and R663H in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Atay, Sevcan; Tetik, Aslı; Bozok Çetintaş, Vildan; Yakar Tülüce, Selcen; Tülüce, Kamil; Kayıkçıoğlu, Meral; Eroğlu, Zuhal

    2014-05-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the myocardium with an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance mainly caused by single heterozygous mutations in sarcomere genes. In this study we aimed to detect the presence of R403QLW, V606M, K615N, and R663H mutations in beta-myosin heavy-chain gene (MYH7) and figure out the genotype-phenotype correlations in Turkish patients with HCM. This case-control study based on genotype-phenotype correlation included 69 patients (mean age, years: 50±13.16) diagnosed with HCM constituting the study group and 50 healthy individuals (mean age, years: 52±1.4) constituting the control group. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and the genotyping of mutations was performed by real-time PCR technique and high resolution melting analysis. Associations between categoric variables were determined using chi-square tests. Differences between two groups were compared with unpaired Student's t-test for continuous variables. None of the patients in the HCM group were carrying the index mutations. One healthy individual was found to be heterozygous for the R663H mutation with mildly abnormal IVS and LVPW thickness. The allele frequency for R663H (G>A) mutation was found to be 0.01% in control group. We performed a mutational screening of 6 HCM-associated mutations in 69 Turkish HCM patients (not previously studied except R403Q). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of the mutations between the patients with HCM and the healthy controls (p>0.05).

  16. Differential epigenetic modifications of histones at the myosin heavy chain genes in fast and slow skeletal muscle fibers and in response to muscle unloading.

    PubMed

    Pandorf, Clay E; Haddad, Fadia; Wright, Carola; Bodell, Paul W; Baldwin, Kenneth M

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in chromatin biology have enhanced our understanding of gene regulation. It is now widely appreciated that gene regulation is dependent upon post-translational modifications to the histones which package genes in the nucleus of cells. Active genes are known to be associated with acetylation of histones (H3ac) and trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined histone modifications at the myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes expressed in fast vs. slow fiber-type skeletal muscle, and in a model of muscle unloading, which results in a shift to fast MHC gene expression in slow muscles. Both H3ac and H3K4me3 varied directly with the transcriptional activity of the MHC genes in fast fiber-type plantaris and slow fiber-type soleus. During MHC transitions with muscle unloading, histone H3 at the type I MHC becomes de-acetylated in correspondence with down-regulation of that gene, while upregulation of the fast type IIx and IIb MHCs occurs in conjunction with enhanced H3ac in those MHCs. Enrichment of H3K4me3 is also increased at the type IIx and IIb MHCs when these genes are induced with muscle unloading. Downregulation of IIa MHC, however, was not associated with corresponding loss of H3ac or H3K4me3. These observations demonstrate the feasibility of using the ChIP assay to understand the native chromatin environment in adult skeletal muscle, and also suggest that the transcriptional state of types I, IIx and IIb MHC genes are sensitive to histone modifications both in different muscle fiber-types and in response to altered loading states.

  17. Contractile properties of motor units and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in rat fast-type muscle after volitional weight-lifting training.

    PubMed

    Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Mrówczyński, Włodzimierz; Warchoł, Wojciech; Majerczak, Joanna; Karasiński, Janusz; Korostyński, Michał; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic resistance training increases the force and speed of muscle contraction, but little is known about modifications to the contractile properties of the main physiological types of motor units (MUs) that contribute to these muscle adaptations. Although the contractile profile of MU muscle fibers is tightly coupled to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression, it is not well understood if MyHC transition is a prerequisite for modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs. In this study, we examined MU contractile properties, the mRNA expression of MyHC, parvalbumin, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump isoforms, as well as the MyHC protein content after 5 wk of volitional progressive weight-lifting training in the medial gastrocnemius muscle in rats. The training had no effect on MyHC profiling or Ca(2+)-handling protein gene expression. Maximum force increased in slow (by 49%) and fast (by 21%) MUs. Within fast MUs, the maximum force increased in most fatigue-resistant and intermediate but not most fatigable MUs. Twitch contraction time was shortened in slow and fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Twitch half-relaxation was shortened in fast most fatigue-resistant and intermediate MUs. The force-frequency curve shifted rightward in fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Fast fatigable MUs fatigued less within the initial 15 s while fast fatigue-resistant units increased the ability to potentiate the force within the first minute of the standard fatigue test. In conclusion, at the early stage of resistance training, modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs appear in the absence of MyHC transition and the upregulation of Ca(2+)-handling genes.

  18. Expression of the Myosin Heavy Chain IIB Gene in Porcine Skeletal Muscle: The Role of the CArG-Box Promoter Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David M.; Brameld, John M.; Parr, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Due to its similarity to humans, the pig is increasingly being considered as a good animal model for studying a range of human diseases. Despite their physiological similarities, differential expression of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) IIB gene (MYH4) exists in the skeletal muscles of these species, which is associated with a different muscle phenotype. The expression of different MyHC isoforms is a critical determinant of the contractile and metabolic characteristics of the muscle fibre. We aimed to elucidate whether a genomic mechanism was responsible for the drastically different expression of MYH4 between pigs and humans, thus improving our understanding of the pig as a model for human skeletal muscle research. We utilized approximately 1 kb of the MYH4 promoter from a domestic pig and a human (which do and do not express MYH4, respectively) to elucidate the role of the promoter sequence in regulating the high expression of MYH4 in porcine skeletal muscle. We identified a 3 bp genomic difference within the proximal CArG and E-box region of the MYH4 promoter of pigs and humans that dictates the differential activity of these promoters during myogenesis. Subtle species-specific genomic differences within the CArG-box region caused differential protein-DNA interactions at this site and is likely accountable for the differential MYH4 promoter activity between pigs and humans. We propose that the genomic differences identified herein explain the differential activity of the MYH4 promoter of pigs and humans, which may contribute to the differential expression patterns displayed in these otherwise physiologically similar mammals. Further, we report that both the pig and human MYH4 promoters can be induced by MyoD over-expression, but the capacity to activate the MYH4 promoter is largely influenced by the 3 bp difference located within the CArG-box region of the proximal MYH4 promoter. PMID:25469802

  19. Multiple positive and negative 5' regulatory elements control the cell-type-specific expression of the embryonic skeletal myosin heavy-chain gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvagnet, P F; Strehler, E E; White, G E; Strehler-Page, M A; Nadal-Ginard, B; Mahdavi, V

    1987-01-01

    To identify the DNA sequences that regulate the expression of the sarcomeric myosin heavy-chain (MHC) genes in muscle cells, a series of deletion constructs of the rat embryonic MHC gene was assayed for transient expression after introduction into myogenic and nonmyogenic cells. The sequences in 1.4 kilobases of 5'-flanking DNA were found to be sufficient to direct expression of the MHC gene constructs in a tissue-specific manner (i.e., in differentiated muscle cells but not in undifferentiated muscle and nonmuscle cells). Three main distinct regulatory domains have been identified: (i) the upstream sequences from positions -1413 to -174, which determine the level of expression of the MHC gene and are constituted of three positive regulatory elements and two negative ones; (ii) a muscle-specific regulatory element from positions -173 to -142, which restricts the expression of the MHC gene to muscle cells; and (iii) the promoter region, downstream from position -102, which directs transcription initiation. Introduction of the simian virus 40 enhancer into constructs where subportions of or all of the upstream sequences are deleted (up to position -173) strongly increases the level of expression of such truncated constructs but without changing their muscle specificity. These upstream sequences, which can be substituted for by the simian virus 40 enhancer, function in an orientation-, position-, and promoter-dependent fashion. The muscle-specific element is also promoter specific but does not support efficient expression of the MHC gene. The MHC promoter in itself is not muscle specific. These results underline the importance of the concerted action of multiple regulatory elements that are likely to represent targets for DNA-binding-regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2830491

  20. Comparisons of different myosin heavy chain types, AMPK, and PGC-1α gene expression in the longissimus dorsi muscles in Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y N; Ao, Q W; Jiang, Q Y; Guo, Y F; Lan, G Q; Jiang, H S

    2016-07-14

    Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs are the local fatty and lean breeds, respectively, in China. We compared differences in carcass traits, meat quality traits, and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) types in the longissimus dorsi muscles between Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs. This was done in pigs of the same age, using real-time PCR, to investigate the relationship between MyHC fiber types and carcass characteristics, meat quality traits, and the key factors regulating muscle fiber type. Bama Xiang pigs exhibited smaller size and slower growth than Landrace pigs (P < 0.01). We found that the superior meat quality, especially the high intramuscular fat (IMF) content in Bama Xiang pig, was related to elevated type I oxidative muscle fiber content (P < 0.01). In contrast, Landrace pig muscle had a higher glycolytic type IIb muscle fiber content (P < 0.01). MyHC I gene expression was significantly positively correlated with backfat thickness and IMF content (P < 0.01). MyHC IIb was significantly negatively correlated with IMF content (P < 0.05), and positively correlated with carcass yield (P < 0.05). AMP-activated protein kinase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-g coactivator-1a are suggested to be the two key factors regulating muscle fiber type in pigs. Our results indicate that muscle fiber composition is one of the key differences leading to the differences of meat quality between Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs. These results may provide a theoretical basis for further studies of the molecular mechanism underlying the excellent meat quality of the Bama Xiang pig.

  1. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  2. Localization of CD8 T cell epitope within cardiac myosin heavy chain-α334-352 that induces autoimmune myocarditis in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Basavalingappa, Rakesh H; Rajasekaran, Rajkumar A; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Han, Zhongji; Othman, Shadi; Steffen, David; Reddy, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myosin heavy chain-α (Myhc), an intracellular protein expressed in the cardiomyocytes, has been identified as a major autoantigen in cardiac autoimmunity. In our studies with Myhc334-352-induced experimental autoimmune myocarditis in A/J mice (H-2a), we discovered that Myhc334-352, supposedly a CD4 T cell epitope, also induced antigen-specific CD8 T cells that transfer disease to naive animals. In our efforts to identify the CD8 T cell determinants, we localized Myhc338-348 within the full length-Myhc334-352, leading to four key findings. (1) By acting as a dual epitope, Myhc338-348 induces both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. (2) In a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-stabilization assay, Myhc338-348 was found to bind H-2Dd-but not H-2Kk or H-2Ld-alleles. (3) The CD8 T cell response induced by Myhc338-348 was antigen-specific, as evaluated by MHC class I/H-2Dd dextramer staining. The antigen-sensitized T cells predominantly produced interferon-γ, the critical cytokine of effector cytotoxic T lymphocytes. (4) Myhc338-348 was found to induce myocarditis in immunized animals as determined by histology and magnetic resonance microscopy imaging. Our data provide new insights as to how different immune cells can recognize the same antigen and inflict damage through different mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA is a critical factor contributing to the efficiency of early infection of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinyan; Qi, Yonghe; Liu, Chenxuan; Gao, Wenqing; Chen, Pan; Fu, Liran; Peng, Bo; Wang, Haimin; Jing, Zhiyi; Zhong, Guocai; Li, Wenhui

    2014-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a novel phlebovirus in the Bunyaviridae family. Most patients infected by SFTSV present with fever and thrombocytopenia, and up to 30% die due to multiple-organ dysfunction. The mechanisms by which SFTSV enters multiple cell types are unknown. SFTSV contains two species of envelope glycoproteins, Gn (44.2 kDa) and Gc (56 kDa), both of which are encoded by the M segment and are cleaved from a precursor polypeptide (about 116 kDa) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Gn fused with an immunoglobulin Fc tag at its C terminus (Gn-Fc) bound to multiple cells susceptible to the infection of SFTSV and blocked viral infection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Immunoprecipitation assays following mass spectrometry analysis showed that Gn binds to nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA), a cellular protein with surface expression in multiple cell types. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of NMMHC-IIA, but not the closely related NMMHC-IIB or NMMHC-IIC, reduced SFTSV infection, and NMMHC-IIA specific antibody blocked infection by SFTSV but not other control viruses. Overexpression of NMMHC-IIA in HeLa cells, which show limited susceptivity to SFTSV, markedly enhanced SFTSV infection of the cells. These results show that NMMHC-IIA is critical for the cellular entry of SFTSV. As NMMHC-IIA is essential for the normal functions of platelets and human vascular endothelial cells, it is conceivable that NMMHC-IIA directly contributes to the pathogenesis of SFTSV and may be a useful target for antiviral interventions against the viral infection.

  4. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min−1, respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2′/3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μm, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg2+ ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3–6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  5. Acute Myosin Heavy Chain Isoform mRNA Expression in Response to Two Resistance Exercise Intensities With Equal Volume Load in Resistance-Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Neil A; Spillane, Mike B; McKinley, Sarah K; Andre, Thomas L; Gann, Joshua J; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if resistance exercise intensity, in the context of equal volume load, differentially affected myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in resistance-trained men. In a crossover, uniform-balanced design, 10 male participants (23.7 ± 2.8 years, 178.8 ± 5.9 cm, 85.9 ± 9.2 kg) completed 2 lower-body resistance exercise sessions of different intensities with equal volume load. For the higher-intensity exercise session, participants performed 5 sets of 6 repetitions at 80% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). For the lower-intensity exercise session, participants performed 3 sets of 16 repetitions at 50% of 1RM. Muscle samples from the vastus lateralis were acquired before exercise (PRE), 45 minutes postexercise (45MINPE), 3 hours postexercise (3HRPE), 24 hours postexercise (24HRPE), and 48 hours postexercise (48HRPE). Statistical analyses of mRNA expression were performed using separate 2 × 5 two-way repeated-measures analyses of variance for each criterion variable (p ≤ 0.05). There were no statistically significant interactions between intensity and time. Likewise, there were no significant differences between exercise intensity in MHC expression. Expression of mRNA for all MHC isoforms decreased at all postexercise time points, except 3HRPE (p = 0.051), compared with PRE following both exercise bouts (p ≤ 0.05). The results of this study found no difference in mRNA expression of MHC isoforms as a function of resistance exercise intensity. In addition, in contrast to results found in previous studies of untrained men, MHC mRNA expression seems to decrease in response to acute resistance exercise in previously resistance-trained men.

  6. Myosin‑II heavy chain and formin mediate the targeting of myosin essential light chain to the division site before and during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhonghui; Okada, Satoshi; Cai, Guoping; Zhou, Bing; Bi, Erfei

    2015-01-01

    MLC1 is a haploinsufficient gene encoding the essential light chain for Myo1, the sole myosin‑II heavy chain in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mlc1 defines an essential hub that coordinates actomyosin ring function, membrane trafficking, and septum formation during cytokinesis by binding to IQGAP, myosin‑II, and myosin‑V. However, the mechanism of how Mlc1 is targeted to the division site during the cell cycle remains unsolved. By constructing a GFP‑tagged MLC1 under its own promoter control and using quantitative live‑cell imaging coupled with yeast mutants, we found that septin ring and actin filaments mediate the targeting of Mlc1 to the division site before and during cytokinesis, respectively. Both mechanisms contribute to and are collectively required for the accumulation of Mlc1 at the division site during cytokinesis. We also found that Myo1 plays a major role in the septin‑dependent Mlc1 localization before cytokinesis, whereas the formin Bni1 plays a major role in the actin filament–dependent Mlc1 localization during cytokinesis. Such a two‑tiered mechanism for Mlc1 localization is presumably required for the ordered assembly and robustness of cytokinesis machinery and is likely conserved across species. PMID:25631819

  7. The heavy chain has its day

    PubMed Central

    Dulyaninova, Natalya G; Bresnick, Anne R

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin-II is an actin-based motor that converts chemical energy into force and movement, and thus functions as a key regulator of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Although it is established that phosphorylation on the regulatory light chain increases the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the motor and promotes myosin-II filament assembly, studies have begun to characterize alternative mechanisms that regulate filament assembly and disassembly. These investigations have revealed that all three nonmuscle myosin-II isoforms are subject to additional regulatory controls, which impact diverse cellular processes. In this review, we discuss current knowledge on mechanisms that regulate the oligomerization state of nonmuscle myosin-II filaments by targeting the myosin heavy chain. PMID:24002531

  8. Cardiomyopathy-related mutation (A30V) in mouse cardiac troponin T divergently alters the magnitude of stretch activation in α- and β-myosin heavy chain fibers.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Alexis V; Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the functional consequences of the human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutation A28V in cardiac troponin T (TnT). The A28V mutation is located within the NH2 terminus of TnT, a region known to be important for full activation of cardiac thin filaments. The functional consequences of the A28V mutation in TnT remain unknown. Given how α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms differently alter the functional effect of the NH2 terminus of TnT, we hypothesized that the A28V-induced effects would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC isoforms. Recombinant wild-type mouse TnT (TnTWT) and the mouse equivalent of the human A28V mutation (TnTA30V) were reconstituted into detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fibers extracted from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mice. Dynamic and steady-state contractile parameters were measured in reconstituted muscle fibers. Step-like length perturbation experiments demonstrated that TnTA30V decreased the magnitude of the muscle length-mediated recruitment of new force-bearing cross bridges (ER) by 30% in α-MHC fibers. In sharp contrast, TnTA30V increased ER by 55% in β-MHC fibers. Inferences drawn from other dynamic contractile parameters suggest that directional changes in ER in TnTA30V + α-MHC and TnTA30V + β-MHC fibers result from a divergent impact on cross bridge-regulatory unit (troponin-tropomyosin complex) cooperativity. TnTA30V-mediated effects on Ca(2+)-activated maximal tension and instantaneous muscle fiber stiffness (ED) were also divergently affected by α- and β-MHC. Our study demonstrates that TnTA30V + α-MHC and TnTA30V + β-MHC fibers show contrasting contractile phenotypes; however, only the observations from β-MHC fibers are consistent with the clinical data for A28V in humans.

  9. Rat cardiac troponin T mutation (F72L)-mediated impact on thin filament cooperativity is divergently modulated by α- and β-myosin heavy chain isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Chandra, Murali

    2015-01-01

    The primary causal link between disparate effects of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM)-related mutations in troponin T (TnT) and α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on cardiac contractile phenotype remains poorly understood. Given the divergent impact of α- and β-MHC on the NH2-terminal extension (44–73 residues) of TnT, we tested if the effects of the HCM-linked mutation (TnTF70L) were differentially altered by α- and β-MHC. We hypothesized that the emergence of divergent thin filament cooperativity would lead to contrasting effects of TnTF70L on contractile function in the presence of α- and β-MHC. The rat TnT analog of the human F70L mutation (TnTF72L) or the wild-type rat TnT (TnTWT) was reconstituted into demembranated muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and propylthiouracil-treated (β-MHC) rat hearts to measure steady-state and dynamic contractile function. TnTF72L-mediated effects on tension, myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, myofilament cooperativity, rate constants of cross-bridge (XB) recruitment dynamics, and force redevelopment were divergently modulated by α- and β-MHC. TnTF72L increased the rate of XB distortion dynamics by 49% in α-MHC fibers but had no effect in β-MHC fibers; these observations suggest that TnTF72L augmented XB detachment kinetics in α-MHC, but not β-MHC, fibers. TnTF72L increased the negative impact of strained XBs on the force-bearing XBs by 39% in α-MHC fibers but had no effect in β-MHC fibers. Therefore, TnTF72L leads to contractile changes that are linked to dilated cardiomyopathy in the presence of α-MHC. On the other hand, TnTF72L leads to contractile changes that are linked to HCM in the presence of β-MHC. PMID:26342069

  10. Activation of the beta myosin heavy chain promoter by MEF-2D, MyoD, p300, and the calcineurin/NFATc1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Joachim D; Umeda, Patrick K; Chang, Kin-Chow; Gros, Gerolf; Scheibe, Renate J

    2007-04-01

    Calcium is a key element in intracellular signaling in skeletal muscle. Changes in intracellular calcium levels are thought to mediate the fast-to-slow transformation of muscle fiber type. One factor implicated in gene regulation in adult muscle is the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) isoform c1, whose dephosphorylation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin facilitates its nuclear translocation. Here, we report that differentiated C2C12 myotubes predominantly expressing fast-type MyHCII protein undergo fast-to-slow transformation following calcium-ionophore treatment, with several transcription factors and a transcriptional coactivator acting in concert to upregulate the slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) beta promoter. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the calcineurin/NFATc1 signaling pathway is essential for MyHCbeta promoter activation during transformation of C2C12 myotubes but is not sufficient for complete fast MyHCIId/x promoter inhibition. Along with NFATc1, myocyte enhancer factor-2D (MEF-2D) and the myogenic transcription factor MyoD transactivated the MyHCbeta promoter in calcium-ionophore-treated myotubes in a calcineurin-dependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism involved in regulating MyHCbeta gene expression, we analyzed the -2.4-kb MyHCbeta promoter construct for cis-regulatory elements. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP), and nuclear complex coimmunoprecipitation (NCcoIP) assays, we demonstrated calcium-ionophore-induced binding of NFATc1 to a NFAT consensus site adjacent to a MyoD-binding E-box. At their respective binding sites, both NFATc1 and MyoD recruited the transcriptional coactivator p300, and in turn, MEF-2D bound to the MyoD complex. The calcium-ionophore-induced effects on the MyHCbeta promoter were shown to be calcineurin-dependent. Together, our findings demonstrate calcium-ionophore-induced activation of the beta MyHC promoter by

  11. Dynamics of myosin heavy chain isoform transition in the longissimus muscle of domestic and wild pigs during growth: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Fazarinc, G; Vrecl, M; Škorjanc, D; Čehovin, T; Čandek-Potokar, M

    2017-01-01

    Dynamics of myofiber differentiation/maturation in porcine skeletal muscle is associated with domestication, breeding and rearing conditions. This study was aimed to comparatively elucidate the age-dependent myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform expression and transition pattern in domestic and wild pig (WP) skeletal muscle from birth until adulthood. Domestic pigs (DPs) of Large White breed raised in conventional production system were compared with WPs reared in a large hunting enclosure. Muscle samples for immuno/enzyme histochemistry were taken from the longissimus dorsi muscle within 24 h postmortem at 24 to 48 h, 21 to 23 days, 7 months and ~2 years postpartum. Based on the antibody reactivity to MyHCs (NCL-MHCs, A4.74, BF-F3) and succinate dehydrogenase activity, myofibers were classified into I, I/IIa, IIa, IIx and IIb types. In addition, foetal MyHC expression was determined with the use of F158.4C10 antibody. Maturation of the longissimus dorsi muscle in the WP was characterized by an accelerated transformation of the fast to slow MyHC during the first hours postpartum, followed by differentiation towards oxidative myofibers in which type I, IIa and IIx MyHCs predominated. In the DP, the transformation shifted towards glycolytic myofibers that expressed MyHC-IIb. The expression of foetal MyHC was higher in the DP than in the WP at 1 day of age, and the decline in the foetal MyHC during the first 3 weeks was more rapid in the WP than in the DP denoting an accelerated early postnatal muscle maturation in WP than DP piglets. All foetal MyHC-positive myofibers co-expressed IIa isoform, but not vice versa. The intense myofiber hypertrophy was evident from 3 weeks until 7 months of age. In this period, the myofiber cross-sectional area increased up to 10- and 20-fold in the WP and the DP, respectively. In the DP, the hypertrophy of all myofiber types was more pronounced than in the WP, particularly the hypertrophy of IIx and IIb myofibers. To summarize, the

  12. Increase in cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) alpha protein isoform in hibernating ground squirrels, with echocardiographic visualization of ventricular wall hypertrophy and prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Nelson, O Lynne; Rourke, Bryan C

    2013-12-15

    heavy-chain (MyHC) isoforms in a separate cohort of squirrels over 5 months, including time points before hibernation, during hibernation and just prior to emergence. Hibernating individuals were maintained in both a 4°C cold room and a 20°C warm room. Measured by SDS-PAGE, relative percentages of cardiac MyHC alpha were increased during hibernation, at both hibernacula temperatures. A potential increase in contractile speed, and power, from more abundant MyHC alpha may aid force generation at low temperature and at low heart rates. Unlike many models of cardiomyopathies where the alpha isoform is replaced by the beta isoform in order to reduce oxygen consumption, ground squirrels demonstrate a potential cardioprotective mechanism to maintain cardiac output during torpor.

  13. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  14. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Platelet Contractile Forces Through Rho Kinase and Myosin Light-Chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Shirin; Tooley, Wes W; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-10-01

    Platelet contractile forces play a major role in clot retraction and help to hold hemostatic clots against the vessel wall. Platelet forces are produced by its cytoskeleton, which is composed of actin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. In this work, we studied the role of Rho kinase, myosin light-chain kinase, and myosin in the generation of contractile forces by using pharmacological inhibitors and arrays of flexible microposts to measure platelet forces. When platelets were seeded onto microposts, they formed aggregates on the tips of the microposts. Forces produced by the platelets in the aggregates were measured by quantifying the deflection of the microposts, which bent in proportion to the force of the platelets. Platelets were treated with small molecule inhibitors of myosin activity: Y-27632 to inhibit the Rho kinase (ROCK), ML-7 to inhibit myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and blebbistatin to inhibit myosin ATPase activity. ROCK inhibition reduced platelet forces, demonstrating the importance of the assembly of actin and myosin phosphorylation in generating contractile forces. Similarly, MLCK inhibition caused weaker platelet forces, which verifies that myosin phosphorylation is needed for force generation in platelets. Platelets treated with blebbistatin also had weaker forces, which indicates that myosin's ATPase activity is necessary for platelet forces. Our studies demonstrate that myosin ATPase activity and the regulation of actin-myosin assembly by ROCK and MLCK are needed for the generation of platelet forces. Our findings illustrate and explain the importance of myosin for clot compaction in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  15. The light chains of muscle myosin: its structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, G

    1983-01-01

    In this review I described the primary structures of myosin light chains contained in fast skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and gizzard muscle of chicken. In a comparison of these proteins many more amino acid substitutions than expected were recognized among the primary structures in the muscle from various organs. A fairly high homology was however shown between their primary structure, and this homology is also recognized among the light chains, parvalbumins, troponins C, and calmodulins. On the other hand, the relation between the primary structures and physiological function of these myosin light chains or the interaction between light chains and heavy chains still seems unclear. These problems are important subjects for future study.

  16. Abolition of ATPase activities of skeletal myosin subfragment 1 by a new selective proteolytic cleavage within the 50-kilodalton heavy chain segment.

    PubMed

    Chaussepied, P; Mornet, D; Audemard, E; Derancourt, J; Kassab, R

    1986-03-11

    We have isolated and chemically characterized several 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoate-subfragment 1 derivatives (TNB-S-1) generated by the reaction of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DNTB, up to 10-fold molar excess) with native S-1, N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-S-1 (AEDANS-S-1), and N,N'-p-phenylenedimaleimide-S-1 (pPDM-S-1) at 4 degrees C, pH 8.0. The reaction of the reagent with AEDANS-S-1, which has a blocked -SH1 group, induced the formation of an intramolecular cystine disulfide between two vicinal -SH groups in S-1; in contrast, the treatment of pPDM-S-1 with DTNB resulted in the formation of TNB mixed disulfides only. The incorporation of the TNB groups (up to 3 mol/mol of S-1) into the native or premodified S-1 led to a local conformational change in the 50K heavy chain region that was fully reversed upon disulfide reduction. Exploiting this peculiarity of the DTNB-modified S-1's, we have realized a highly selective proteolysis of the S-1 heavy chain by thrombin and chymotrypsin, which do not act at all on the normal S-1. The 95K heavy chain was cut by thrombin into two fragments with apparent masses of 68K and 30K, whereas the "connector segments" and the light chains were unaffected. The two new fragments were issued from a primary peptide-bound cleavage between Lys-560 and Ser-561 within the amino acid sequence of the 50K region (M. Elzinga, personal communication).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Overexpression of Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response and Autophagic Turnover of Thick Filament-associated Proteins in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kwartler, Callie S.; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V.; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A.; Epstein, Henry F.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. PMID:24711452

  18. Overexpression of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and autophagic turnover of thick filament-associated proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kwartler, Callie S; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A; Epstein, Henry F; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-05-16

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Point mutations in human beta cardiac myosin heavy chain have differential effects on sarcomeric structure and assembly: an ATP binding site change disrupts both thick and thin filaments, whereas hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutations display normal assembly.

    PubMed

    Becker, K D; Gottshall, K R; Hickey, R; Perriard, J C; Chien, K R

    1997-04-07

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a human heart disease characterized by increased ventricular mass, focal areas of fibrosis, myocyte, and myofibrillar disorganization. This genetically dominant disease can be caused by mutations in any one of several contractile proteins, including beta cardiac myosin heavy chain (beta MHC). To determine whether point mutations in human beta MHC have direct effects on interfering with filament assembly and sarcomeric structure, full-length wild-type and mutant human beta MHC cDNAs were cloned and expressed in primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRC) under conditions that promote myofibrillogenesis. A lysine to arginine change at amino acid 184 in the consensus ATP binding sequence of human beta MHC resulted in abnormal subcellular localization and disrupted both thick and thin filament structure in transfected NRC. Diffuse beta MHC K184R protein appeared to colocalize with actin throughout the myocyte, suggesting a tight interaction of these two proteins. Human beta MHC with S472V mutation assembled normally into thick filaments and did not affect sarcomeric structure. Two mutant myosins previously described as causing human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, R249Q and R403Q, were competent to assemble into thick filaments producing myofibrils with well defined I bands, A bands, and H zones. Coexpression and detection of wild-type beta MHC and either R249Q or R403Q proteins in the same myocyte showed these proteins are equally able to assemble into the sarcomere and provided no discernible differences in subcellular localization. Thus, human beta MHC R249Q and R403Q mutant proteins were readily incorporated into NRC sarcomeres and did not disrupt myofilament formation. This study indicates that the phenotype of myofibrillar disarray seen in HCM patients which harbor either of these two mutations may not be directly due to the failure of the mutant myosin heavy chain protein to assemble and form normal sarcomeres

  20. Primary structure and cellular localization of chicken brain myosin-V (p190), an unconventional myosin with calmodulin light chains

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Recent biochemical studies of p190, a calmodulin (CM)-binding protein purified from vertebrate brain, have demonstrated that this protein, purified as a complex with bound CM, shares a number of properties with myosins (Espindola, F. S., E. M. Espreafico, M. V. Coelho, A. R. Martins, F. R. C. Costa, M. S. Mooseker, and R. E. Larson. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 118:359-368). To determine whether or not p190 was a member of the myosin family of proteins, a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding the full-length protein sequence of chicken brain p190 was isolated and sequenced. Verification that the deduced primary structure was that of p190 was demonstrated through microsequence analysis of a cyanogen bromide peptide generated from chick brain p190. The deduced primary structure of chicken brain p190 revealed that this 1,830-amino acid (aa) 212,509-D) protein is a member of a novel structural class of unconventional myosins that includes the gene products encoded by the dilute locus of mouse and the MYO2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have named the p190-CM complex "myosin-V" based on the results of a detailed sequence comparison of the head domains of 29 myosin heavy chains (hc), which has revealed that this myosin, based on head structure, is the fifth of six distinct structural classes of myosin to be described thus far. Like the presumed products of the mouse dilute and yeast MYO2 genes, the head domain of chicken myosin-V hc (aa 1-764) is linked to a "neck" domain (aa 765-909) consisting of six tandem repeats of an approximately 23-aa "IQ-motif." All known myosins contain at least one such motif at their head-tail junctions; these IQ-motifs may function as calmodulin or light chain binding sites. The tail domain of chicken myosin-V consists of an initial 511 aa predicted to form several segments of coiled-coil alpha helix followed by a terminal 410-aa globular domain (aa, 1,421-1,830). Interestingly, a portion of the tail domain (aa, 1,094-1,830) shares 58% amino acid

  1. Primary structure and cellular localization of chicken brain myosin-V (p190), an unconventional myosin with calmodulin light chains.

    PubMed

    Espreafico, E M; Cheney, R E; Matteoli, M; Nascimento, A A; De Camilli, P V; Larson, R E; Mooseker, M S

    1992-12-01

    Recent biochemical studies of p190, a calmodulin (CM)-binding protein purified from vertebrate brain, have demonstrated that this protein, purified as a complex with bound CM, shares a number of properties with myosins (Espindola, F. S., E. M. Espreafico, M. V. Coelho, A. R. Martins, F. R. C. Costa, M. S. Mooseker, and R. E. Larson. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 118:359-368). To determine whether or not p190 was a member of the myosin family of proteins, a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding the full-length protein sequence of chicken brain p190 was isolated and sequenced. Verification that the deduced primary structure was that of p190 was demonstrated through microsequence analysis of a cyanogen bromide peptide generated from chick brain p190. The deduced primary structure of chicken brain p190 revealed that this 1,830-amino acid (aa) 212,509-D) protein is a member of a novel structural class of unconventional myosins that includes the gene products encoded by the dilute locus of mouse and the MYO2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have named the p190-CM complex "myosin-V" based on the results of a detailed sequence comparison of the head domains of 29 myosin heavy chains (hc), which has revealed that this myosin, based on head structure, is the fifth of six distinct structural classes of myosin to be described thus far. Like the presumed products of the mouse dilute and yeast MYO2 genes, the head domain of chicken myosin-V hc (aa 1-764) is linked to a "neck" domain (aa 765-909) consisting of six tandem repeats of an approximately 23-aa "IQ-motif." All known myosins contain at least one such motif at their head-tail junctions; these IQ-motifs may function as calmodulin or light chain binding sites. The tail domain of chicken myosin-V consists of an initial 511 aa predicted to form several segments of coiled-coil alpha helix followed by a terminal 410-aa globular domain (aa, 1,421-1,830). Interestingly, a portion of the tail domain (aa, 1,094-1,830) shares 58% amino acid

  2. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    PubMed

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  3. Mutations in Myosin Light Chain Kinase Cause Familial Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Guo, Dong-chuan; Cao, Jiumei; Gong, Limin; Kamm, Kristine E.; Regalado, Ellen; Li, Li; Shete, Sanjay; He, Wei-Qi; Zhu, Min-Sheng; Offermanns, Stephan; Gilchrist, Dawna; Elefteriades, John; Stull, James T.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoforms of α-actin and β-myosin heavy chain, two major components of the SMC contractile unit, cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (FTAAD). To investigate whether mutations in the kinase that controls SMC contractile function (myosin light chain kinase [MYLK]) cause FTAAD, we sequenced MYLK by using DNA from 193 affected probands from unrelated FTAAD families. One nonsense and four missense variants were identified in MYLK and were not present in matched controls. Two variants, p.R1480X (c.4438C>T) and p.S1759P (c.5275T>C), segregated with aortic dissections in two families with a maximum LOD score of 2.1, providing evidence of linkage of these rare variants to the disease (p = 0.0009). Both families demonstrated a similar phenotype characterized by presentation with an acute aortic dissection with little to no enlargement of the aorta. The p.R1480X mutation leads to a truncated protein lacking the kinase and calmodulin binding domains, and p.S1759P alters amino acids in the α-helix of the calmodulin binding sequence, which disrupts kinase binding to calmodulin and reduces kinase activity in vitro. Furthermore, mice with SMC-specific knockdown of Mylk demonstrate altered gene expression and pathology consistent with medial degeneration of the aorta. Thus, genetic and functional studies support the conclusion that heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in MYLK are associated with aortic dissections. PMID:21055718

  4. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation enhances cardiac β-myosin in vitro motility under load.

    PubMed

    Karabina, Anastasia; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2015-08-15

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and myofibrillar disarray, and often results in sudden cardiac death. Two HCM mutations, N47K and R58Q, are located in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The RLC mechanically stabilizes the myosin lever arm, which is crucial to myosin's ability to transmit contractile force. The N47K and R58Q mutations have previously been shown to reduce actin filament velocity under load, stemming from a more compliant lever arm (Greenberg, 2010). In contrast, RLC phosphorylation was shown to impart stiffness to the myosin lever arm (Greenberg, 2009). We hypothesized that phosphorylation of the mutant HCM-RLC may mitigate distinct mutation-induced structural and functional abnormalities. In vitro motility assays were utilized to investigate the effects of RLC phosphorylation on the HCM-RLC mutant phenotype in the presence of an α-actinin frictional load. Porcine cardiac β-myosin was depleted of its native RLC and reconstituted with mutant or wild-type human RLC in phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated form. Consistent with previous findings, in the presence of load, myosin bearing the HCM mutations reduced actin sliding velocity compared to WT resulting in 31-41% reductions in force production. Myosin containing phosphorylated RLC (WT or mutant) increased sliding velocity and also restored mutant myosin force production to near WT unphosphorylated values. These results point to RLC phosphorylation as a general mechanism to increase force production of the individual myosin motor and as a potential target to ameliorate the HCM-induced phenotype at the molecular level.

  5. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1) Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects

    PubMed Central

    Augière, Céline; Mégy, Simon; El Malti, Rajae; Boland, Anne; El Zein, Loubna; Verrier, Bernard; Mégarbané, André; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects), conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5. Methods and Results A set of 399 poly(AC) markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1) among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr)) in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys) and p.(Met125Val)) which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser),p.(Asp313His) and p.(Arg314His)) which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface. Conclusions Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin. PMID:26061005

  6. Nerve-dependent changes in skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain after experimental denervation, cross-reinnervation and in a demyelinating mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Maggs, Alison M.; Huxley, Clare; Hughes, Simon M.

    2010-01-01

    Innervation regulates the contractile properties of vertebrate muscle fibers, in part through the effect of electrical activity on expression of distinct myosins. Here we analyse the role of innervation in regulating the accumulation of the general, maturational and adult forms of rodent slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) that are defined by the presence of distinct antigenic epitopes. Denervation increases the number of fibers that express general slow MyHC, but it decreases the adult slow MyHC epitope. Cross-reinnervation of slow muscle by a fast nerve leads to an increase in the number of fibers that express fast MyHC. In both cases, there is an increase in fibers that express slow and fast IIA MyHCs but without the adult slow MyHC epitope. The data suggest that innervation is required for maturation and maintenance of diversity of both slow and fast fibers. The sequence of slow MyHC epitope transitions is a useful biomarker, and it may play a significant role during nerve-dependent changes in muscle fiber function. We applied this detailed muscle analysis to a transgenic mouse model of Human Motor and Sensory Neuropathy IA, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A), in which electrical conduction in some motor neurons is poor due to demyelination. The mice display atrophy of some muscle fibers and changes in slow and fast MyHC epitope expression suggestive of a progressive increase in innervation of muscle fibers by fast motor neurons, even at early stages. The potential role of these early changes in disease pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:19016545

  7. Fast-to-Slow Transition of Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function and Corresponding Changes in Myosin Heavy and Light Chain Formation in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Tanja; Braubach, Peter; Landwehrmeyer, G. Bernhard; Lindenberg, Katrin S.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington´s disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease resulting from an expanded polyglutamine sequence (poly-Q) in the protein huntingtin (HTT). Various studies report atrophy and metabolic pathology of skeletal muscle in HD and suggest as part of the process a fast-to-slow fiber type transition that may be caused by the pathological changes in central motor control or/and by mutant HTT in the muscle tissue itself. To investigate muscle pathology in HD, we used R6/2 mice, a common animal model for a rapidly progressing variant of the disease expressing exon 1 of the mutant human gene. We investigated alterations in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), a typical fast-twitch muscle, and the soleus (SOL), a slow-twitch muscle. We focussed on mechanographic measurements of excised muscles using single and repetitive electrical stimulation and on the expression of the various myosin isoforms (heavy and light chains) using dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of whole muscle and single fiber preparations. In EDL of R6/2, the functional tests showed a left shift of the force-frequency relation and decrease in specific force. Moreover, the estimated relative contribution of the fastest myosin isoform MyHC IIb decreased, whereas the contribution of the slower MyHC IIx isoform increased. An additional change occurred in the alkali MyLC forms showing a decrease in 3f and an increase in 1f level. In SOL, a shift from fast MyHC IIa to the slow isoform I was detectable in male R6/2 mice only, and there was no evidence of isoform interconversion in the MyLC pattern. These alterations point to a partial remodeling of the contractile apparatus of R6/2 mice towards a slower contractile phenotype, predominantly in fast glycolytic fibers. PMID:27820862

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of myosin II essential light chains of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites regulates their motility.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Moreno, Raúl; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy-Andrés; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Morales, Fernando O; Meza, Isaura

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites dwell in the human intestine as comensals although under still unclear circumstances become invasive and destroy the host tissues. For these activities, trophozoites relay on remarkable motility provided by the cytoskeleton organization. Amebic actin and some of its actin-associated proteins are well known, while components of the myosin II molecule, although predicted from the E. histolytica genome, need biochemical and functional characterization. Recently, an amebic essential light myosin II chain, named EhMLCI, was identified and reported to be phosphorylated in tyrosines. The phosphorylated form of the protein was associated with the soluble assembly incompetent conformation of the heavy myosin chains, while the non-phosphorylated protein was identified with filamentous heavy chains, organized in an assembly competent conformation. It was postulated that EhMLCI tyrosine phosphorylation could act as a negative regulator of myosin II activity by its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an expression vector containing an EhMLCI DNA sequence where two tyrosine residues, with strong probability of phosphorylation and fall within the single EF-hand domain that interacts with the N-terminus of myosin II heavy chains, were replaced by phenylalanines. Transfected trophozoites, expressing the mutant MutEhMLCI protein cannot process it, thereby not incorporated into the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles required for myosin II activity, results in motility defective trophozoites.

  9. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: a maturation model promoting long-term survival of myotubes, structural development of the excitation-contraction coupling apparatus and neonatal myosin heavy chain expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Mainak; Rumsey, John W; Bhargava, Neelima; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J

    2009-10-01

    The use of defined in vitro systems to study the developmental and physiological characteristics of a variety of cell types is increasing, due in large part to their ease of integration with tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and high-throughput screening applications. In this study, myotubes derived from fetal rat hind limbs were induced to develop several aspects of mature muscle including: sarcomere assembly, development of the excitation-contraction coupling apparatus and myosin heavy chain (MHC) class switching. Utilizing immunocytochemical analysis, anisotropic and isotropic band formation (striations) within the myotubes was established, indicative of sarcomere formation. In addition, clusters of ryanodine receptors were colocalized with dihydropyridine complex proteins which signaled development of the excitation-contraction coupling apparatus and transverse tubule biogenesis. The myotubes also exhibited MHC class switching from embryonic to neonatal MHC. Lastly, the myotubes survived significantly longer in culture (70-90 days) than myotubes from our previously developed system (20-25 days). These results were achieved by modifying the culture timeline as well as the development of a new medium formulation. This defined model system for skeletal muscle maturation supports the goal of developing physiologically relevant muscle constructs for use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as well as for high-throughput screening applications.

  10. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH(M86-2) promoter in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, Md; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM86-2, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYHM86-2 promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614bp 5'-flanking sequences of MYHM86-2 contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYHM86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYHM86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYHM86-2 expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYHM86-2 expression.

  11. Clathrin heavy chain, light chain interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, F K; Stanley, K K

    1983-01-01

    Purified pig brain clathrin can be reversibly dissociated and separated into heavy chain trimers and light chains in the presence of non-denaturing concentrations of the chaotrope thiocyanate. The isolated heavy chain trimers reassemble into regular polygonal cage structures in the absence of light chains. The light chain fraction can be further resolved into its two components L alpha and L beta which give different one-dimensional peptide maps. Radiolabelled light chains bind with high affinity (KD < 10(-10) M) to heavy chain trimers, to heavy chain cages and to a 110,000 mol. wt. tryptic fragment of the heavy chain. Both light chains compete with each other and with light chains from other sources for the same binding sites on heavy chains and c.d. spectroscopy shows that the two pig brain light chains possess very similar structures. We conclude that light chains from different sources, despite some heterogeneity, have a highly conserved, high affinity binding site on the heavy chain but are not essential for the formation of regular cage structures. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 8. PMID:10872336

  12. Mammalian Nonmuscle Myosin II Binds to Anionic Phospholipids with Concomitant Dissociation of the Regulatory Light Chain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Shu, Shi; Billington, Neil; Williamson, Chad D; Yu, Shuhua; Brzeska, Hanna; Donaldson, Julie G; Sellers, James R; Korn, Edward D

    2016-11-25

    Mammalian cells express three Class II nonmuscle myosins (NM): NM2A, NM2B, and NM2C. The three NM2s have well established essential roles in cell motility, adhesion, and cytokinesis and less well defined roles in vesicle transport and other processes that would require association of NM2s with cell membranes. Previous evidence for the mechanism of NM2-membrane association includes direct interaction of NM2s with membrane lipids and indirect interaction by association of NM2s with membrane-bound F-actin or peripheral membrane proteins. Direct binding of NM2s to phosphatidylserine-liposomes, but not to phosphatidylcholine-liposomes, has been reported, but the molecular basis of the interaction between NM2s and acidic phospholipids has not been previously investigated. We now show that filamentous, full-length NM2A, NM2B, and NM2C and monomeric, non-filamentous heavy meromyosin bind to liposomes containing one or more acidic phospholipids (phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate) but do not bind to 100% phosphatidylcholine-liposomes. Binding of NM2s to acidic liposomes occurs predominantly through interaction of the liposomes with the regulatory light chain (RLC) binding site in the myosin heavy chain with concomitant dissociation of the RLC. Phosphorylation of myosin-bound RLC by myosin light chain kinase substantially inhibits binding to liposomes of both filamentous NM2 and non-filamentous heavy meromyosin; the addition of excess unbound RLC, but not excess unbound essential light chain, competes with liposome binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, we show that endogenous and expressed NM2A associates with the plasma membrane of HeLa cells and fibrosarcoma cells independently of F-actin. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Cytoplasmic myosin from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Myosin is identified and purified from three different established Drosophila melanogaster cell lines (Schneider's lines 2 and 3 and Kc). Purification entails lysis in a low salt, sucrose buffer that contains ATP, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, precipitation with actin in the absence of ATP, gel filtration in a discontinuous KI-KCl buffer system, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Yield of pure cytoplasmic myosin is 5-10%. This protein is identified as myosin by its cross-reactivity with two monoclonal antibodies against human platelet myosin, the molecular weight of its heavy chain, its two light chains, its behavior on gel filtration, its ATP-dependent affinity for actin, its characteristic ATPase activity, its molecular morphology as demonstrated by platinum shadowing, and its ability to form bipolar filaments. The molecular weight of the cytoplasmic myosin's light chains and peptide mapping and immunochemical analysis of its heavy chains demonstrate that this myosin, purified from Drosophila cell lines, is distinct from Drosophila muscle myosin. Two-dimensional thin layer maps of complete proteolytic digests of iodinated muscle and cytoplasmic myosin heavy chains demonstrate that, while the two myosins have some tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic peptides in common, most peptides migrate with unique mobility. One-dimensional peptide maps of SDS PAGE purified myosin heavy chain confirm these structural data. Polyclonal antiserum raised and reacted against Drosophila myosin isolated from cell lines cross-reacts only weakly with Drosophila muscle myosin isolated from the thoraces of adult Drosophila. Polyclonal antiserum raised against Drosophila muscle myosin behaves in a reciprocal fashion. Taken together our data suggest that the myosin purified from Drosophila cell lines is a bona fide cytoplasmic myosin and is very likely the product of a different myosin gene than the muscle myosin heavy chain gene that has been previously identified and characterized. PMID

  14. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    PubMed

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  15. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats.

    PubMed

    Soukup, T; Diallo, M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have established that slow soleus (SOL) and fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of euthyroid (EU) Lewis rats posses the same proportions between their four myosin heavy chain (MyHC) mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types as determined by real time RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and 2-D stereological fiber type analysis, respectively. In the present paper we investigated if these proportions are maintained in adult Lewis rats with hyperthyroid (HT) and hypothyroid (HY) status. Although HT and HY states change MyHC isoform expression, results from all three methods showed that proportion between MyHC mRNA-1, 2a, -2x/d, -2b, protein isoforms MyHC-1, -2a, -2x/d, -2b and to lesser extent also fiber types 1, 2A, 2X/D, 2B were preserved in both SOL and EDL muscles. Furthermore, in the SOL muscle mRNA expression of slow MyHC-1 remained up to three orders higher compared to fast MyHC transcripts, which explains the predominance of MyHC-1 isoform and fiber type 1 even in HT rats. Although HT status led in the SOL to increased expression of MyHC-2a mRNA, MyHC-2a isoform and 2A fibers, it preserved extremely low expression of MyHC-2x and -2b mRNA and protein isoforms, which explains the absence of pure 2X/D and 2B fibers. HY status, on the other hand, almost completely abolished expression of all three fast MyHC mRNAs, MyHC protein isoforms and fast fiber types in the SOL muscle. Our data present evidence that a correlation between mRNA, protein content and fiber type composition found in EU status is also preserved in HT and HY rats.

  16. An M-CAT binding factor and an RSRF-related A-rich binding factor positively regulate expression of the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Molkentin, J D; Markham, B E

    1994-01-01

    Cardiac muscle-restricted expression of the alpha-myosin heavy-chain (alpha-MHC) gene is regulated by multiple elements in the proximal enhancer/promoter. Within this region, an M-CAT site and an A-rich site were identified as potential regulatory elements. Site-specific mutations in each site, individually, reduced activity from the wild-type promoter by approximately 85% in the adult rat heart, demonstrating that these sites were positive regulatory elements. alpha-MHC, beta-MHC, and chicken cardiac troponin T (cTnT) M-CAT sites interacted with an M-CAT-binding factor (MCBF) from rat heart nuclear extracts that was immunologically related to transcriptional enhancer factor 1, a factor that binds within the simian virus 40 enhancer. The factor that bound the A-rich region (ARF) was antigenically related to the RSRF family of proteins, ARF was distinct from myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 (MEF-2) on the basis of DNA-binding specificity and developmental expression. Like MEF-2, ARF DNA-binding activity was present in the heart and brain; however, no ARF activity was detected in extracts from skeletal muscle or C2C12 myotubes. MCBF and ARF DNA-binding activities were developmentally regulated with peak levels in the 1- to 2-day neonatal heart. The activity of both factors increased nearly fivefold in adult rat hearts subjected to a pressure overload. By comparison, the levels of alpha-MHC binding factor 2 did not change during hypertrophy. Binding sites for MCBF and ARF are present in several genes that are upregulated during cardiac hypertrophy. Our results suggest that these factors participate in the alterations in gene expression that occur during cardiac development and hypertrophy. Images PMID:8035789

  17. Ramipril restores PPARβ/δ and PPARγ expressions and reduces cardiac NADPH oxidase but fails to restore cardiac function and accompanied myosin heavy chain ratio shift in severe anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rat.

    PubMed

    Cernecka, Hana; Doka, Gabriel; Srankova, Jasna; Pivackova, Lenka; Malikova, Eva; Galkova, Kristina; Kyselovic, Jan; Krenek, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2016-11-15

    We hypothesized that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) might be involved in a complex protective action of ACE inhibitors (ACEi) in anthracyclines-induced cardiomyopathy. For purpose of study, we compared effects of ramipril on cardiac dysfunction, cardiac failure markers and PPAR isoforms in moderate and severe chronic daunorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Male Wistar rats were administered with a single intravenous injection of daunorubicin: 5mg/kg (moderate cardiomyopathy), or 15mg/kg (severe cardiomyopathy) or co-administered with daunorubicin and ramipril (1mg/kg/d, orally) or vehicle for 8 weeks. Left ventricular function was measured invasively under anesthesia. Cardiac mRNA levels of heart failure markers (ANP, Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b) and PPARs (alpha, beta/delta and gama) were measured by qRT-PCR. Protein expression of NADPH subunit (gp91phox) was measured by Western blot. Moderate cardiomyopathy exhibited only minor cardiac dysfunction what was corrected by ramipril. In severe cardiomyopathy, hemodynamic dysfunction remained unaltered upon ramipril although it decreased the significantly up-regulated cardiac ANP mRNA expression. Simultaneously, while high-dose daunorubicin significantly decreased PPARbeta/delta and PPARgama mRNA, ramipril normalized these abnormalities. Similarly, ramipril reduced altered levels of oxidative stress-related gp91phox. On the other hand, ramipril was unable to correct both the significantly decreased relative abundance of Myh6 and increased Myh7 mRNA levels, respectively. In conclusion, ramipril had a protective effect on cardiac function exclusively in moderate chronic daunorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Although it normalized abnormal PPARs expression and exerted also additional protective effects also in severe cardiomyopathy, it was insufficient to influence impaired cardiac function probably because of a shift in myosin heavy chain isoform content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The essential light chain is required for full force production by skeletal muscle myosin.

    PubMed Central

    VanBuren, P; Waller, G S; Harris, D E; Trybus, K M; Warshaw, D M; Lowey, S

    1994-01-01

    Myosin, a molecular motor that is responsible for muscle contraction, is composed of two heavy chains each with two light chains. The crystal structure of subfragment 1 indicates that both the regulatory light chains (RLCs) and the essential light chains (ELCs) stabilize an extended alpha-helical segment of the heavy chain. It has recently been shown in a motility assay that removal of either light chain markedly reduces actin filament sliding velocity without a significant loss in actin-activated ATPase activity. Here we demonstrate by single actin filament force measurements that RLC removal has little effect on isometric force, whereas ELC removal reduces isometric force by over 50%. These data are interpreted with a simple mechanical model where subfragment 1 behaves as a torque motor whose leyer arm length is sensitive to light-chain removal. Although the effect of removing RLCs fits within the confines of this model, altered crossbridge kinetics, as reflected in a reduced unloaded duty cycle, probably contributes to the reduced velocity and force production of ELC-deficient myosins. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7809049

  19. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Battiprolu, Pavan K; Cowley, Patrick M; Chen, Guohua; Gerard, Robert D; Pinto, Jose R; Hill, Joseph A; Baker, Anthony J; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2015-04-24

    In beating hearts, phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) at a single site to 0.45 mol of phosphate/mol by cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) increases Ca(2+) sensitivity of myofilament contraction necessary for normal cardiac performance. Reduction of RLC phosphorylation in conditional cMLCK knock-out mice caused cardiac dilation and loss of cardiac performance by 1 week, as shown by increased left ventricular internal diameter at end-diastole and decreased fractional shortening. Decreased RLC phosphorylation by conventional or conditional cMLCK gene ablation did not affect troponin-I or myosin-binding protein-C phosphorylation in vivo. The extent of RLC phosphorylation was not changed by prolonged infusion of dobutamine or treatment with a β-adrenergic antagonist, suggesting that RLC is constitutively phosphorylated to maintain cardiac performance. Biochemical studies with myofilaments showed that RLC phosphorylation up to 90% was a random process. RLC is slowly dephosphorylated in both noncontracting hearts and isolated cardiac myocytes from adult mice. Electrically paced ventricular trabeculae restored RLC phosphorylation, which was increased to 0.91 mol of phosphate/mol of RLC with inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). The two RLCs in each myosin appear to be readily available for phosphorylation by a soluble cMLCK, but MLCP activity limits the amount of constitutive RLC phosphorylation. MLCP with its regulatory subunit MYPT2 bound tightly to myofilaments was constitutively phosphorylated in beating hearts at a site that inhibits MLCP activity. Thus, the constitutive RLC phosphorylation is limited physiologically by low cMLCK activity in balance with low MLCP activity.

  20. [Functional properties and intracellular localization of high molecular weight isoforms of ligh chain myosin kinase].

    PubMed

    Chibalina, M V; Kudriashov, D S; Shekhonin, B V; Shirinskiĭ, V P

    2000-01-01

    The vertebrate genetic locus, coding for a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), the key regulator of smooth muscle contraction and cell motility, reveals a complex organization. Two MLCK isoforms are encoded by the MLCK genetic locus. Recently identified M(r) 210 kDa MLCK contains a sequence of smooth muscle/non-muscle M(r) 108 kDa MLCK and has an additional N-terminal sequence (Watterson et al., 1995. FEBS Lett. 373 : 217). A gene for an independently expressed non-kinase product KRP (telokin) is located within the MLCK gene (Collinge et al., 1992. Mol. Cell. Biol. 12 : 2359). KRP binds to and regulates the structure of myosin filaments (Shirinsky et al., 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268 : 16578). Here we compared biochemical properties of MLCK-210 and MLCK-108 and studied intracellular localization of MLCK-210. MLCK-210 was isolated from extract of chicken aorta by immunoprecipitation using specific antibody and biochemically analysed in vitro. MLCK-210 phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain and heavy meromyosin. The Ca(2+)-dependence and specific activity of MLCK-210 were similar to that of MLCK-108 from turkey gizzard. Using sedimentation assay we demonstrated that MLCK-210 as well as MLCK-108 binds to both actin and myosin filaments. MLCK-210 was localized in smooth muscle cell layers of aortic wall and was found to co-localize with microfilaments in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells.

  1. Structures of smooth muscle myosin and heavy meromyosin in the folded, shutdown state.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stan A; Yu, Shuizi; Walker, Matt L; Hawkins, Rhoda J; Chalovich, Joseph M; Knight, Peter J

    2007-10-05

    Remodelling the contractile apparatus within smooth muscle cells allows effective contractile activity over a wide range of cell lengths. Thick filaments may be redistributed via depolymerisation into inactive myosin monomers that have been detected in vitro, in which the long tail has a folded conformation. Using negative stain electron microscopy of individual folded myosin molecules from turkey gizzard smooth muscle, we show that they are more compact than previously described, with heads and the three segments of the folded tail closely packed. Heavy meromyosin (HMM), which lacks two-thirds of the tail, closely resembles the equivalent parts of whole myosin. Image processing reveals a characteristic head region morphology for both HMM and myosin, with features identifiable by comparison with less compact molecules. The two heads associate asymmetrically: the tip of one motor domain touches the base of the other, resembling the blocked and free heads of this HMM when it forms 2D crystals on lipid monolayers. The tail of HMM lies between the heads, contacting the blocked motor domain, unlike in the 2D crystal. The tail of whole myosin is bent sharply and consistently close to residues 1175 and 1535. The first bend position correlates with a skip in the coiled coil sequence, the second does not. Tail segments 2 and 3 associate only with the blocked head, such that the second bend is near the C-lobe of the blocked head regulatory light chain. Quantitative analysis of tail flexibility shows that the single coiled coil of HMM has an apparent Young's modulus of about 0.5 GPa. The folded tail of the whole myosin is less flexible, indicating interactions between the segments. The folded tail does not modify the compact head arrangement but stabilises it, indicating a structural mechanism for the very low ATPase activity of the folded molecule.

  2. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-11-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but one that my AP® students found difficult to analyze given their current math background. As the year progressed, we began to explore the importance of work and its utility in making predictions on systems that did not lend themselves to easy analysis using Newtonian mechanics. The effort made it apparent that the heavy rope Atwood's machine would make a perfect system for investigation using the lessons gained from work and energy.

  3. N-terminus of Cardiac Myosin Essential Light Chain Modulates Myosin Step-Size

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle myosin cyclically hydrolyzes ATP to translate actin. Ventricular cardiac myosin (βmys) moves actin with three distinct unitary step-sizes resulting from its lever-arm rotation and with step-frequencies that are modulated in a myosin regulation mechanism. The lever-arm associated essential light chain (vELC) binds actin by its 43 residue N-terminal extension. Unitary steps were proposed to involve the vELC N-terminal extension with the 8 nm step engaging the vELC/actin bond facilitating an extra ~19 degrees of lever-arm rotation while the predominant 5 nm step forgoes vELC/actin binding. A minor 3 nm step is the unlikely conversion of the completed 5 to the 8 nm step. This hypothesis was tested using a 17 residue N-terminal truncated vELC in porcine βmys (Δ17βmys) and a 43 residue N-terminal truncated human vELC expressed in transgenic mouse heart (Δ43αmys). Step-size and step-frequency were measured using the Qdot motility assay. Both Δ17βmys and Δ43αmys had significantly increased 5 nm step-frequency and coincident loss in the 8 nm step-frequency compared to native proteins suggesting the vELC/actin interaction drives step-size preference. Step-size and step-frequency probability densities depend on the relative fraction of truncated vELC and relate linearly to pure myosin species concentrations in a mixture containing native vELC homodimer, two truncated vELCs in the modified homodimer, and one native and one truncated vELC in the heterodimer. Step-size and step-frequency, measured for native homodimer and at two or more known relative fractions of truncated vELC, are surmised for each pure species by using a new analytical method. PMID:26671638

  4. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: Transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Asaduzzaman, Md.; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYH{sub M86-2}, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614 bp 5′-flanking sequences of MYH{sub M86-2} contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. - Highlights: ► MYH{sub M86-2} is highly expressed in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae. ► MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity depends on the hedgehog signaling. ► Sox6 binding elements inhibits MYH{sub M86-2} expression in fast muscle fibers. ► Sox6 elements function as transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity. ► NFAT and MEF2 binding elements play a key role for directing MYH{sub M86-2} expression.

  5. An E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif and cognate binding protein(s) regulate the basal muscle-specific and cAMP-inducible expression of the rat cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain gene.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M P; Gupta, M; Zak, R

    1994-11-25

    Expression of the cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) genes is regulated developmentally and by numerous epigenetic factors. Here we report the identification of a cis-regulatory element and cognate nuclear binding protein(s) responsible for cAMP-induced expression of the rat cardiac alpha-MHC gene. By Northern blot analysis, we found that, in primary cultures of fetal rat heart myocytes, the elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP results in up-regulation of alpha-MHC and down-regulation of beta-MHC mRNA expression. This effect of cAMP was dependent upon the basal level of expression of both MHC transcripts and was sensitive to cycloheximide. In transient expression analysis employing a series of alpha-MHC/CAT constructs, we identified a 31-base pair fragment located in the immediate upstream region (-71 to -40), which confers both muscle-specific and cAMP-inducible expression of the gene. Within this 31-base pair fragment there are two regions, an AT-rich portion and a hybrid motif which contains overlapping sequences of E-box and M-CAT binding sites (GGCACGTGGAATG). By substitution mutation analysis, both elements were found important for the basal muscle-specific expression; however, the cAMP-inducible expression of the gene is conferred only by the E-box/M-CAT hybrid motif (EM element). Using mobility gel shift competition assay, immunoblotting, and UV-cross-linking analyses, we found that a protein binding to the EM element is indistinguishable from the transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF-1) in terms of sequence recognition, molecular mass, and immunoreactivity. Methylation interference and point mutation analyses indicate that, besides M-CAT sequences, center CG dinucleotides of the E-box motif CACGTG are essential for protein binding to the EM element and for its functional activity. Furthermore, our data also show that, in addition to TEF-1, another HF-1a-related factor may be recognized by the alpha-MHC gene EM element. These results are first to

  6. A Cardiomyopathy Mutation in the Myosin Essential Light Chain Alters Actomyosin Structure.

    PubMed

    Guhathakurta, Piyali; Prochniewicz, Ewa; Roopnarine, Osha; Rohde, John A; Thomas, David D

    2017-07-11

    We have used site-directed time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine the effect of a pathological mutation in the human ventricular essential light chain (hVELC) of myosin, on the structural dynamics of the actin-myosin complex. The hVELC modulates the function of actomyosin, through the interaction of its N-terminal extension with actin and its C-terminal lobe with the myosin heavy chain. Several mutations in hVELC are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Some biochemical effects of these mutations are known, but further insight is needed about their effects on the structural dynamics of functioning actomyosin. Therefore, we introduced the HCM mutation E56G into a single-cysteine (C16) hVELC construct and substituted it for the VELC of bovine cardiac myosin subfragment 1. Using a donor fluorescent probe on actin (at C374) and an acceptor probe on C16 of hVELC, we performed time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer, directly detecting structural changes within the bound actomyosin complex during function. The E56G mutation has no significant effect on actin-activated ATPase activity or actomyosin affinity in the presence of ATP, or on the structure of the strong-binding S complex in the absence of ATP. However, in the presence of saturating ATP, where both W (prepowerstroke) and S (postpowerstroke) structural states are observed, the mutant increases the mole fraction of the S complex (increasing the duty ratio), while shifting the structure of the remaining W complex toward that of S, indicating a structural redistribution toward the strongly bound (force-generating) complex. We propose that this effect is responsible for the hypercontractile phenotype induced by this HCM mutation in myosin. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Myosin light chain kinase-regulated endothelial cell contraction: the relationship between isometric tension, actin polymerization, and myosin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chains by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been shown to be essential and sufficient for initiation of endothelial cell retraction in saponin permeabilized monolayers (Wysolmerski, R. B. and D. Lagunoff. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:16-20). We now report the effects of thrombin stimulation on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVE) actin, myosin II and the functional correlate of the activated actomyosin based contractile system, isometric tension development. Using a newly designed isometric tension apparatus, we recorded quantitative changes in isometric tension from paired monolayers. Thrombin stimulation results in a rapid sustained isometric contraction that increases 2- to 2.5-fold within 5 min and remains elevated for at least 60 min. The phosphorylatable myosin light chains from HUVE were found to exist as two isoforms, differing in their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Resting isometric tension is associated with a basal phosphorylation of 0.54 mol PO4/mol myosin light chain. After thrombin treatment, phosphorylation rapidly increases to 1.61 mol PO4/mol myosin light chain within 60 s and remains elevated for the duration of the experiment. Myosin light chain phosphorylation precedes the development of isometric tension and maximal phosphorylation is maintained during the sustained phase of isometric contraction. Tryptic phosphopeptide maps from both control and thrombin-stimulated cultures resolve both monophosphorylated Ser-19 and diphosphorylated Ser-19/Thr-18 peptides indicative of MLCK activation. Changes in the polymerization of actin and association of myosin II correlate temporally with the phosphorylation of myosin II and development of isometric tension. Activation results in a 57% increase in F-actin content within 90 s and 90% of the soluble myosin II associates with the reorganizing F-actin. Furthermore, the disposition of actin and

  8. Biochemistry of Smooth Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Haldeman, Brian D.; Jackson, Del; Carter, Mike; Baker, Jonathan E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2011-01-01

    The smooth muscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is a Ca2+-calmodulin-activated kinase that is found in many tissues. It is particularly important for regulating smooth muscle contraction by phosphorylation of myosin. This review summarizes selected aspects of recent biochemical work on MLCK that pertains to its function in smooth muscle. In general, the focus of the review is on new findings, unresolved issues, and areas with the potential for high physiological significance that need further study. The review includes a concise summary of the structure, substrates, and enzyme activity, followed by a discussion of the factors that may limit the effective activity of MLCK in the muscle. The interactions of each of the many domains of MLCK with the proteins of the contractile apparatus, and the multi-domain interactions of MLCK that may control its behaviors in the cell are summarized. Finally, new in vitro approaches to studying the mechanism of phosphorylation of myosin are introduced. PMID:21565153

  9. Novel familial dilated cardiomyopathy mutation in MYL2 affects the structure and function of myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Morales, Ana; McBride, Kim L; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M; Hershberger, Ray E; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-06-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the myocardium characterized by left ventricular dilatation and diminished contractile function. Here we describe a novel DCM mutation in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), in which aspartic acid at position 94 is replaced by alanine (D94A). The mutation was identified by exome sequencing of three adult first-degree relatives who met formal criteria for idiopathic DCM. To obtain insight into the functional significance of this pathogenic MYL2 variant, we cloned and purified the human ventricular RLC wild-type (WT) and D94A mutant proteins, and performed in vitro experiments using RLC-mutant or WT-reconstituted porcine cardiac preparations. The mutation induced a reduction in the α-helical content of the RLC, and imposed intra-molecular rearrangements. The phosphorylation of RLC by Ca²⁺/calmodulin-activated myosin light chain kinase was not affected by D94A. The mutation was seen to impair binding of RLC to the myosin heavy chain, and its incorporation into RLC-depleted porcine myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of mutant-reconstituted porcine cardiac myosin was significantly higher compared with ATPase of wild-type. No changes in the myofibrillar ATPase-pCa relationship were observed in wild-type- or D94A-reconstituted preparations. Measurements of contractile force showed a slightly reduced maximal tension per cross-section of muscle, with no change in the calcium sensitivity of force in D94A-reconstituted skinned porcine papillary muscle strips compared with wild-type. Our data indicate that subtle structural rearrangements in the RLC molecule, followed by its impaired interaction with the myosin heavy chain, may trigger functional abnormalities contributing to the DCM phenotype. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Structural requirement of the regulatory light chain of smooth muscle myosin as a substrate for myosin light chain kinase.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, M; Reardon, S; Schwonek, J P; Sanders, C R; Ikebe, R

    1994-11-11

    The substrate structure required for skeletal and smooth muscle myosin light chain kinases (MLC kinase) was studied by using various mutant regulatory light chains of smooth muscle myosin. The deletion of the NH2-terminal 10 residues did not greatly affect the kinetic parameters of smooth MLC kinase; however, deletion of an additional 3 residues, Lys11-Arg13, prevented phosphorylation. In contrast, deletion of Lys11-Arg13 did not completely abolish the phosphorylation for skeletal MLC kinase, and deletion of three additional residues was required for complete inhibition. Substitution of Arg16 with Glu markedly decreased Vmax for both smooth and skeletal MLC kinases. Substitution of Lys11-Arg13 with acidic or noncharged residues decreased Vmax, but these changes were much lower than that occurring on substitution of Arg16. Replacement of Lys11-Arg13 with acidic residues reduced the affinity of the free LC20 but had little effect on the myosin-incorporated LC20. These results were different from those previously obtained with synthetic peptide analogs (Kemp, B. E., Pearson, R. B., and House, C. (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 80, 7471-7475) and suggest that a cluster of the basic amino acid residues are not fundamentally important for substrate recognition. The structural simulation revealed that the guanidyl group of Arg16 but not the corresponding Glu13 of skeletal light chain resides in close proximity to Ser19, suggesting that the guanidyl group of Arg16 stabilizes the phosphate transfer and that the introduction of Glu at the 16th position would significantly destabilized this reaction.

  11. Regulatory myosin light-chain genes of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, C; Anderson, P

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and analyzed the Caenorhabditis elegans regulatory myosin light-chain genes. C. elegans contains two such genes, which we have designated mlc-1 and mlc-2. The two genes are separated by 2.6 kilobases and are divergently transcribed. We determined the complete nucleotide sequences of both mlc-1 and mlc-2. A single, conservative amino acid substitution distinguishes the sequences of the two proteins. The C. elegans proteins are strongly homologous to regulatory myosin light chains of Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrates and weakly homologous to a superfamily of eucaryotic calcium-binding proteins. Both mlc-1 and mlc-2 encode abundant mRNAs. We mapped the 5' termini of these transcripts by using primer extension sequencing of mRNA templates. mlc-1 mRNAs initiate within conserved hexanucleotides at two different positions, located at -28 and -38 relative to the start of translation. The 5' terminus of mlc-2 mRNA is not encoded in the 4.8-kilobase genomic region upstream of mlc-2. Rather, mlc-2 mRNA contains at its 5' end a short, untranslated leader sequence that is identical to the trans-spliced leader sequence of three C. elegans actin genes. Images PMID:3244358

  12. Thirteen is enough: the myosins of Dictyostelium discoideum and their light chains

    PubMed Central

    Kollmar, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Dictyostelium discoideum is one of the most famous model organisms for studying motile processes like cell movement, organelle transport, cytokinesis, and endocytosis. Members of the myosin superfamily, that move on actin filaments and power many of these tasks, are tripartite proteins consisting of a conserved catalytic domain followed by the neck region consisting of a different number of so-called IQ motifs for binding of light chains. The tails contain functional motifs that are responsible for the accomplishment of the different tasks in the cell. Unicellular organisms like yeasts contain three to five myosins while vertebrates express over 40 different myosin genes. Recently, the question has been raised how many myosins a simple multicellular organism like Dictyostelium would need to accomplish all the different motility-related tasks. Results The analysis of the Dictyostelium genome revealed thirteen myosins of which three have not been described before. The phylogenetic analysis of the motor domains of the new myosins placed Myo1F to the class-I myosins and Myo5A to the class-V myosins. The third new myosin, an orphan myosin, has been named MyoG. It contains an N-terminal extension of over 400 residues, and a tail consisting of four IQ motifs and two MyTH4/FERM (myosin tail homology 4/band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin) tandem domains that are separated by a long region containing an SH3 (src homology 3) domain. In contrast to previous analyses, an extensive comparison with 126 class-VII, class-X, class-XV, and class-XXII myosins now showed that MyoI does not group into any of these classes and should not be used as a model for class-VII myosins. The search for calmodulin related proteins revealed two further potential myosin light chains. One is a close homolog of the two EF-hand motifs containing MlcB, and the other, CBP14, phylogenetically groups to the ELC/RLC/calmodulin (essential light chain/regulatory light chain) branch of the tree

  13. Distinct interactions between actin and essential myosin light chain isoforms.

    PubMed

    Petzhold, Daria; Simsek, Burcu; Meißner, Ralf; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Morano, Ingo

    2014-07-04

    Binding of the utmost N-terminus of essential myosin light chains (ELC) to actin slows down myosin motor function. In this study, we investigated the binding constants of two different human cardiac ELC isoforms with actin. We employed circular dichroism (CD) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy to determine structural properties and protein-protein interaction of recombinant human atrial and ventricular ELC (hALC-1 and hVLC-1, respectively) with α-actin as well as α-actin with alanin-mutated ELC binding site (α-actin(ala3)) as control. CD spectroscopy showed similar secondary structure of both hALC-1 and hVLC-1 with high degree of α-helicity. SPR spectroscopy revealed that the affinity of hALC-1 to α-actin (KD=575 nM) was significantly (p<0.01) lower compared with the affinity of hVLC-1 to α-actin (KD=186 nM). The reduced affinity of hALC-1 to α-actin was mainly due to a significantly (p<0.01) lower association rate (kon: 1,018 M(-1)s(-1)) compared with kon of the hVLC-1/α-actin complex interaction (2,908 M(-1)s(-1)). Hence, differential expression of ELC isoforms could modulate muscle contractile activity via distinct α-actin interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of a myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation site mutant complements the cytokinesis and developmental defects of Dictyostelium RMLC null cells.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, B D; Chen, P; Chisholm, R L

    1994-12-01

    In a number of systems phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RMLC) of myosin regulates the activity of myosin. In smooth muscle and vertebrate nonmuscle systems RMLC phosphorylation is required for contractile activity. In Dictyostelium discoideum phosphorylation of the RMLC regulates both ATPase activity and motor function. We have determined the site of phosphorylation on the Dictyostelium RMLC and used site-directed mutagenesis to replace the phosphorylated serine with an alanine. The mutant light chain was then expressed in RMLC null Dictyostelium cells (mLCR-) from an actin promoter on an integrating vector. The mutant RMLC was expressed at high levels and associated with the myosin heavy chain. RMLC bearing a ser13ala substitution was not phosphorylated in vitro by purified myosin light chain kinase, nor could phosphate be detected on the mutant RMLC in vivo. The mutant myosin had reduced actin-activated ATPase activity, comparable to fully dephosphorylated myosin. Unexpectedly, expression of the mutant RMLC rescued the primary phenotypic defects of the mlcR- cells to the same extent as did expression of wild-type RMLC. These results suggest that while phosphorylation of the Dictyostelium RMLC appears to be tightly regulated in vivo, it is not essential for myosin-dependent cellular functions.

  15. Cooperative regulation of myosin-S1 binding to actin filaments by a continuous flexible Tm-Tn chain.

    PubMed

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Li, Xiaochuan; Griffiths, Hugh; Geeves, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    The regulation of striated muscle contraction involves cooperative interactions between actin filaments, myosin-S1 (S1), tropomyosin (Tm), troponin (Tn), and calcium. These interactions are modeled by treating overlapping tropomyosins as a continuous flexible chain (CFC), weakly confined by electrostatic interactions with actin. The CFC is displaced locally in opposite directions on the actin surface by the binding of either S1 or Troponin I (TnI) to actin. The apparent rate constants for myosin and TnI binding to and detachment from actin are then intrinsically coupled via the CFC model to the presence of neighboring bound S1s and TnIs. Monte Carlo simulations at prescribed values of the CFC stiffness, the CFC's degree of azimuthal confinement, and the angular displacements caused by the bound proteins were able to predict the stopped-flow transients of S1 binding to regulated F-actin. The transients collected over a large range of calcium concentrations could be well described by adjusting a single calcium-dependent parameter, the rate constant of TnI detachment from actin, k(-I). The resulting equilibrium constant K(B) ≡ 1/K(I) varied sigmoidally with the free calcium, increasing from 0.12 at low calcium (pCa >7) to 12 at high calcium (pCa <5.5) with a Hill coefficient of ~2.15. The similarity of the curves for excess-actin and excess-myosin data confirms their allosteric relationship. The spatially explicit calculations confirmed variable sizes for the cooperative units and clustering of bound myosins at low calcium concentrations. Moreover, inclusion of negative cooperativity between myosin units predicted the observed slowing of myosin binding at excess-myosin concentrations.

  16. Phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain is necessary for migration of HeLa cells but not for localization of myosin II at the leading edge.

    PubMed Central

    Fumoto, Katsumi; Uchimura, Takashi; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Ueda, Kozue; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the role of phosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC) in living cell migration, these mutant MRLCs were engineered and introduced into HeLa cells. The mutant MRLCs include an unphosphorylatable form, in which both Thr-18 and Ser-19 were substituted with Ala (AA-MRLC), and pseudophosphorylated forms, in which Thr-18 and Ser-19 were replaced with Ala and Asp, respectively (AD-MRLC), and both Thr-18 and Ser-19 were replaced with Asp (DD-MRLC). Mutant MRLC-expressing cell monolayers were mechanically stimulated by scratching, and the cells were forced to migrate in a given direction. In this wound-healing assay, the AA-MRLC-expressing cells migrated much more slowly than the wild-type MRLC-expressing cells. In the case of DD-MRLC- and AD-MRLC-expressing cells, no significant differences compared with wild-type MRLC-expressing cells were observed in their migration speed. Indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that the accumulation of endogenous diphosphorylated MRLC at the leading edge was not observed in AA-MRLC-expressing cells, although AA-MRLC was incorporated into myosin heavy chain and localized at the leading edge. In conclusion, we propose that the phosphorylation of MRLC is required to generate the driving force in the migration of the cells but not necessary for localization of myosin II at the leading edge. PMID:12429016

  17. Localization of myosin II regulatory light chain in the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ishmael, Jane E; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2008-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells is a critical determinant of blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Barrier integrity appears to be particularly sensitive to the phosphorylation state of specific residues within myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), one of two accessory light chains of the myosin II motor complex. Phosphorylation of myosin RLC by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been implicated in BBB dysfunction associated with alcohol abuse and hypoxia, whereas dephosphorylation may enhance BBB integrity following exposure to lipid-lowering statin drugs. Using immunohistochemistry we provide evidence of widespread myosin II RLC distribution throughout the cerebral vasculature of the mouse. Light microscopy revealed immunolocalization of myosin II RLC protein in the endothelium of brain capillaries, the endothelial cell layer of arterioles and in association with venules. Immunolabeling of myosin RLC in non-muscle endothelial cells could be distinguished from myosin RLC immunoreactivity associated with the smooth muscle layer of the tunica media in larger muscular arterioles. These findings support an emerging role for myosin II RLC as a component of the actomyosin cytoskeleton of cerebral endothelial cells with the potential to contribute to the selective vulnerability of the brain in vivo.

  18. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but…

  19. Atwood's Heavy Chain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2011-01-01

    While perusing various websites in search of a more challenging lab for my students, I came across a number of ideas where replacing the string in an Atwood's machine with a simple ball chain like the kind found in lamp pulls created an interesting system to investigate. The replacement of the string produced a nice nonuniform acceleration, but…

  20. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    PubMed

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors.

  1. Novel Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation in MYL2 Affects the Structure and Function of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Liang, Jingsheng; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Morales, Ana; McBride, Kim L.; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara M.; Hershberger, Ray E.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease of the myocardium characterized by left ventricular dilatation and diminished contractile function. In this report we describe a novel DCM mutation identified for the first time in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), replacing Aspartic Acid at position 94 with Alanine (D94A). The mutation was identified by exome sequencing of three adult first-degree relatives who met formal criteria for idiopathic DCM. To gain insight into the functional significance of this pathogenic MYL2 variant, we have cloned and purified the human ventricular RLC wild-type (WT) and D94A-mutant proteins and performed in vitro experiments using RLC-exchanged porcine cardiac preparations. The mutation was observed to induce a reduction in the α-helical content of the RLC and imposed intra-molecular rearrangements. The Ca2+-calmodulin-activated myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation of RLC was not affected by D94A. The mutation was seen to impair the binding of RLC to the MHC (myosin heavy chain), and its incorporation into the RLC-depleted porcine myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of mutant-reconstituted porcine cardiac myosin was significantly higher compared to ATPase of WT. No changes in myofibrillar ATPase-pCa relationship were observed in WT- or D94A-reconstituted preparations. Measurements of contractile force showed a slightly reduced maximal tension per cross-section of muscle with no change in calcium sensitivity of force in D94A-reconstituted skinned porcine papillary muscle strips compared with WT. Our data indicate that subtle structural rearrangements in the RLC molecule followed by its impaired interaction with the MHC may trigger functional abnormalities contributing to the DCM phenotype. PMID:25825243

  2. Diffusion of myosin light chain kinase on actin: A mechanism to enhance myosin phosphorylation rates in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Brizendine, Richard K; Carter, Michael S; Alcala, Diego B; Brown, Avery E; Chattin, Amy M; Haldeman, Brian D; Walsh, Michael P; Facemyer, Kevin C; Baker, Josh E; Cremo, Christine R

    2015-10-01

    Smooth muscle myosin (SMM) light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates SMM, thereby activating the ATPase activity required for muscle contraction. The abundance of active MLCK, which is tightly associated with the contractile apparatus, is low relative to that of SMM. SMM phosphorylation is rapid despite the low ratio of MLCK to SMM, raising the question of how one MLCK rapidly phosphorylates many SMM molecules. We used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor single molecules of streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK interacting with purified actin, actin bundles, and stress fibers of smooth muscle cells. Surprisingly, MLCK and the N-terminal 75 residues of MLCK (N75) moved on actin bundles and stress fibers of smooth muscle cell cytoskeletons by a random one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion mechanism. Although diffusion of proteins along microtubules and oligonucleotides has been observed previously, this is the first characterization to our knowledge of a protein diffusing in a sustained manner along actin. By measuring the frequency of motion, we found that MLCK motion is permitted only if acto-myosin and MLCK-myosin interactions are weak. From these data, diffusion coefficients, and other kinetic and geometric considerations relating to the contractile apparatus, we suggest that 1-D diffusion of MLCK along actin (a) ensures that diffusion is not rate limiting for phosphorylation, (b) allows MLCK to locate to areas in which myosin is not yet phosphorylated, and (c) allows MLCK to avoid getting "stuck" on myosins that have already been phosphorylated. Diffusion of MLCK along actin filaments may be an important mechanism for enhancing the rate of SMM phosphorylation in smooth muscle.

  3. Myosin light chain phosphorylation is correlated with cold-induced changes in platelet shape.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, H; Higashihara, M; Ohsaka, M; Miyazaki, K; Ikebe, M; Hirano, H

    2001-12-01

    Chilling induces shape changes in platelets from disks to spheres with abundant filopodia. Such changes were time-dependent and correlated well with the phosphorylation of 20-kDa myosin light chain (LC20). Both the shape changes and the phosphorylation were reversible. After the platelets had been chilled, myosin became incorporated into the Triton X-insoluble fraction. When the chilled platelets were immunocytochemically stained, anti-myosin antibody was localized with filamentous structures inside the filopodia. These results suggest that LC20 phosphorylation and subsequent interactions with actin filaments play a crucial role in the cold-induced changes in platelet shape and in the formation of filopodia.

  4. K-252a, a novel microbial product, inhibits smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, S.; Yamada, K.; Kase, H.; Nakamura, S.; Nonomura, Y.

    1988-05-05

    Effects of K-252a, purified from the culture broth of Nocardiopsis sp., on the activity of myosin (light chain kinase were investigated. 1) K-252a affected three characteristic properties of chicken gizzard myosin-B, natural actomyosin, to a similar degree: the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent activity of ATPase, superprecipitation, and the phosphorylation of the myosin light chain. 2) K-252a inhibited the activities of the purified myosin light chain kinase and a Ca/sup 2 +/-independent form of the enzyme which was constructed by cross-linking of myosin light chain kinase and calmodulin using glutaraldehyde. The degrees of inhibition by 3 x 10/sup -6/ M K-252a were 69 and 48% of the control activities with the purified enzyme and the cross-linked complex, respectively. Chlorpromazine (3 x 10/sup -4/ M), a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited the native enzyme, but not the cross-linked one. These results suggested that K-252a inhibited myosin light chain kinase by direct interaction with the enzyme, whereas chlorpromazine suppressed the enzyme activation by interacting with calmodulin. 3) The inhibition by K-252a of the cross-linked kinase was affected by the concentration of ATP, a phosphate donor. The concentration causing 50% inhibition was two orders magnitude lowere in the presence of 100 ..mu..M ATP than in the presence of 2 mM ATP. 4) Kinetic analyses using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP indicated that the inhibitory mode of K-252a was competitive with respect to ATP. These results suggest that K-252a interacts at the ATP-binding domain of myosin light chain kinase.

  5. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-02-18

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  6. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  7. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Sellers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds. PMID:26827725

  8. Minimum requirements for inhibition of smooth-muscle myosin light-chain kinase by synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J T; Floyd, D M; Lee, V G; Little, D K; Moreland, S

    1989-01-01

    Although the amino acid residues that are important for peptide substrates of myosin light-chain kinase have been reported, those that are important for peptide inhibitors of this enzyme have not previously been investigated. Synthetic peptides based on the sequence Lys11-Lys12-Arg13-Ala-Ala-Arg16-Ala-Thr-Ser19 -Asn-Val21-Phe22-Ala of the chicken gizzard myosin light chain were tested as inhibitors of pig carotid-artery myosin light-chain kinase. The basic amino acid residues of the known myosin light-chain kinase inhibitor Lys-Lys-Arg-Ala-Ala-Arg-Ala-Thr-Ser-NH2 (IC50 = 14 microM) [Pearson, Misconi & Kemp (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 25-27] were shown to be the important residues that contribute to inhibitor potency, as evidence by the finding that the hexapeptide Lys-Lys-Arg-Ala-Ala-Arg-NH2 had an IC50 value of 22 microM. This indicates that binding of the phosphorylatable serine residue to myosin light-chain kinase, which is of obvious importance for a substrate, does not enhance the potency of an inhibitor. With the aim of preparing more potent inhibitors, peptides Lys-Lys-Arg-Ala-Ala-Arg-Ala-Ala-Xaa-NH2 were prepared with a variety of amino acids substituted for the phosphorylatable serine residue. None of these peptides was a more potent inhibitor than the serine peptide. PMID:2920029

  9. New insights into the regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Loredo, Ariadna Yolanda; López-Colomé, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role in the function of the neural retina and the maintenance of vision. Most of the functions displayed by RPE require a dynamic organization of the acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Myosin II, a main cytoskeletal component in muscle and non-muscle cells, is directly involved in force generation required for organelle movement, selective molecule transport within cell compartments, exocytosis, endocytosis, phagocytosis, and cell division, among others. Contractile processes are triggered by the phosphorylation of myosin II light chains (MLCs), which promotes actin-myosin interaction and the assembly of contractile fibers. Considerable evidence indicates that non-muscle myosin II activation is critically involved in various pathological states, increasing the interest in studying the signaling pathways controlling MLC phosphorylation. Particularly, recent findings suggest a role for non-muscle myosin II-induced contraction in RPE cell transformation involved in the establishment of numerous retinal diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding myosin function in RPE cells, as well as the signaling networks leading to MLC phosphorylation under pathological conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying RPE dysfunction would improve the development of new therapies for the treatment or prevention of different ocular disorders leading to blindness.

  10. Sequence analysis of the myosin regulatory light chain gene of the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila.

    PubMed

    Ravaux, J; Hassanin, A; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F; Markmann-Mulisch, U

    2001-01-24

    We have isolated and characterized a cDNA (DNA complementary to RNA) clone (Rf69) from the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila. The cDNA insert consists of 1169 base pairs. The aminoacid sequence deduced from the longest reading frame is 193 residues in length, and clearly characterized it as a myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The RLC primary structure is described in relation to its function in muscle contraction. The comparison with other RLCs suggested that Riftia myosin is probably regulated through its RLC either by phosphorylation like the vertebrate smooth muscle myosins, and/or by Ca2+-binding like the mollusk myosins. Riftia RLC possesses a N-terminal extension lacking in all other species besides the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. Aminoacid sequence comparisons with a number of RLCs from vertebrates and invertebrates revealed a relatively high identity score (64%) between Riftia RLC and the homologous gene from Lumbricus. The relationships between the members of the myosin RLCs were examined by two phylogenetic methods, i.e. distance matrix and maximum parsimony. The resulting trees depict the grouping of the RLCs according to their role in myosin activity regulation. In all trees, Riftia RLC groups with RLCs that depend on Ca2+-binding for myosin activity regulation.

  11. A Global, Myosin Light Chain Kinase-dependent Increase in Myosin II Contractility Accompanies the Metaphase–Anaphase Transition in Sea Urchin Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R.

    2006-01-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase–anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase–anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus. PMID:16837551

  12. Two Cases of Heavy Chain MGUS

    PubMed Central

    Meijers, Björn; Delforge, Michel; Verhoef, Gregor; Poesen, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Heavy chain diseases are rare variants of B-cell lymphomas that produce one of three classes of immunoglobulin heavy chains, without corresponding light chains. We describe two patients with asymptomatic heavy chain monoclonal gammopathy. The first patient is a 51-year-old woman with alpha paraprotein on serum immunofixation. The second case is a 46-year-old woman with gamma paraprotein on urine immunofixation. Neither patient had corresponding monoclonal light chains. Workup for multiple myeloma and lymphoma was negative in both patients. These two cases illustrate that heavy chain monoclonal gammopathy can exist in the absence of clinically apparent malignancy. Only a few reports of “heavy chain MGUS” have been described before. In the absence of specialized guidelines, we suggest a similar follow-up as for MGUS, while taking into account the higher probability of progression to lymphoma than to myeloma. PMID:27213064

  13. Cell Adhesion, Signaling and Myosin in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    calmodulin-binding myosins. Trends Cell Bio 5:310- 316. 4. de Lanerolle, P. and Paul, R.J. (1991) Myosin phosphorylation/ dephosphorylation and...muscle myosin heavy chain is phosphorylated in intact cells by casein kinase II on a serine near the carboxyl terminus. J. Bio. Chem., 265:17876-17882 10

  14. Regulation of myosin accumulation by muscle activity in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Strohman, R C; Bandman, E; Walker, C R

    1981-09-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX), at concentrations that do not interfere with normal myogenesis or with myosin synthesis, causes of cultured muscle fibres to accumulate myosin heavy chain peptides. This effect is now shown to be reversible. On removal of TTX, muscle fibres begin to reaccumulate myosin heavy chains and it appears that the myosin heavy chains display a 230% increase in stability when cells are shifted from TTX to a normal medium without TTX. Total protein stability or turnover is not affected by TTX. The ability of TTX to induce failure of accumulation of myosin heavy-chain in cultured muscle fibres does not extend to cultured chick fibroblasts. TTX also does not perturb normal uptake of [3H] leucine during a 1 h pulse and the leucine-specific activity within TTX-treated cells is essentially equivalent to that within normal cells. Finally, limited proteolysis of myosin heavy chain isolated from TTX-treated and normal muscle fibres and display of cleavage products on SDS-polyacrylamide gels does not reveal any significant difference between the two myosins. We conclude that failure of TTX muscle to accumulate myosin heavy chain is not related to impaired synthesis, to changes in myosin heavy-chain primary structure, or to overall changes in muscle fibre proteolytic activity. We speculate that the increase in degradation and resulting failure to accumulate myosin heavy chain in TTX cells is related to an inability of TTX-related muscle fibres to assemble newly synthesized fibrillar proteins into structures such as filaments or fibrils. Failure of assembly would lead to increased exposure to base-line levels of muscle proteolysis and to the observed lack of accumulation of myosin heavy chain.

  15. Myosin polymorphism in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Libera, L D; Margreth, A; Mussini, I; Cerri, C; Scarlato, G

    1978-01-01

    Myosins isolated from individual human muscles (primarily normal muscles) were investigated with respect to their structural and catalytic properties. The results indicate unexpected elements of uniformity shared by the several myosins, such as a three-banded, electrophoretic pattern of light chains in sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) gels and a low degree of alkaline lability. The pH activity profile and the effect of KCl on myosin ATPase activities were also found to be the same for the myosins from predominantly fast (e.g., vastus lateralis and rectus abdominis) and slow (e.g,, soleus and pectoralis minor) muscles. Coelectrophoretic experiments lend further credence to the interrelationship between human myosin light chains and the light chains of rabbit fast-muscle myosin. However, several kinds of circumstantial evidence, such as that derived from the study of myosin in nemaline myopathy, suggest that one shoould exercise caution in interpreting these results. On the other hand, human muscle myosins, like those of other mammalian species, can be divided into two main categories according to the peptide composition of tryptic heavy meromyosin (HMM) and the banding pattern of light meromyosin (LMM) paracrystals. These results, which are indicative of differences in the primary structure of the heavy chains, allow us to identify these heavy chains as the main site of heterogeneity among myosins in human mucles.

  16. Rare, Non-Synonymous Variant in the Smooth Muscle-Specific Isoform of Myosin Heavy Chain, MYH11, R247C, Alters Force Generation in the Aorta and Phenotype of Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Kwartler, Callie S.; Byanova, Katerina L.; Pham, John; Gong, Limin; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Huang, Jian; Kamm, Kristine E.; Stull, James T.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Mutations in MYH11 cause autosomal dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. At the same time, rare, non-synonymous variants in MYH11 that are predicted to disrupt protein function but do not cause inherited aortic disease are common in the general population and the vascular disease risk associated with these variants is unknown. Objective To determine the consequences of the recurrent MYH11 rare variant, R247C, through functional studies in vitro and analysis of a knock-in mouse model with this specific variant, including assessment of aortic contraction, response to vascular injury, and phenotype of primary aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods and Results The steady state ATPase activity (actin-activated) and the rates of phosphate and ADP release were lower for the R247C mutant myosin than for the wild-type, as was the rate of actin filament sliding in an in vitro motility assay. Myh11R247C/R247C mice exhibited normal growth, reproduction, and aortic histology but decreased aortic contraction. In response to vascular injury, Myh11R247C/R247C mice showed significantly increased neointimal formation due to increased SMC proliferation when compared with the wild-type mice. Primary aortic SMCs explanted from the Myh11R247C/R247C mice were de-differentiated compared with wild-type SMCs based on increased proliferation and reduced expression of SMC contractile proteins. The mutant SMCs also displayed altered focal adhesions and decreased Rho activation, associated with decreased nuclear localization of myocardin-related transcription factor-A. Exposure of the Myh11R247C/R247C SMCs to a Rho activator rescued the de-differentiated phenotype of the SMCs. Conclusions These results indicate that a rare variant in MYH11, R247C, alters myosin contractile function and SMC phenotype, leading to increased proliferation in vitro and in response to vascular injury. PMID:22511748

  17. The primary structure of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain: III. Sequence of the 22 kDa fragment and the alignment of the 23 kDa, 50 kDa, and 22 kDa fragments.

    PubMed

    Maita, T; Miyanishi, T; Matsuzono, K; Tanioka, Y; Matsuda, G

    1991-07-01

    The amino acid sequence of the 197-residue 22 kDa fragment from chicken pectoralis muscle was determined to be as follows: K-K-G-S-S-F-Q-T-V-S-A-L-F-R-E-N-L-N-K-L- M-A-N-L-R-S-T-H-P-H-F-V-R-C-I-I-P-N-E-T-K-T-P-G-A-M-E-H-E-L-V-L-H-Q-L-R- C-N-G-V- L-E-G-I-R-I-C-R-K-G-F-P-S-R-V-L-Y-A-D-F-K-Q-R-Y-R-V-L-N-A-S-A-I-P-E-G-Q- F-M-D-S- K-K-A-S-E-K-L-L-G-S-I-D-V-D-h-T-Q-Y-R-F-G-H-T-K-V-F-F-K-A-G-L-L-G-L-L-E- E-M-R-D- D-K-L-A-E-I-I-T-R-T-Q-A-R-C-R-G-F-L-M-R-V-E-Y-R-R-M-V-E-R-R-E-S-I-F-C-I- Q-Y-N-V-R-S-F-M-N-V-K-H-W-P-W-M-K-L-F-F-K, where h stands for 3-N-methylhistidine. The amino acid sequences of the 22 kDa fragment and its equivalent fragment from chicken ventricle and gizzard muscle myosins were also determined by our group. Predicted secondary structures of these 22 kDa fragment regions and of the reported chicken embryo myosin revealed some possible structural differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylated Light Chain Domain of Scallop Smooth-Muscle Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.S.; Robinson, H.; O-Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Brown, J. H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-11-02

    We have determined the crystal structure of a phosphorylated smooth-muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This reconstituted LCD is of a sea scallop catch muscle myosin with its phosphorylatable regulatory light chain (RLC SmoA). In the crystal structure, Arg{sup 16}, an arginine residue that is present in this isoform but not in vertebrate smooth-muscle RLC, stabilizes the phosphorylation site. This arginine interacts with the carbonyl group of the phosphorylation-site serine in the unphosphorylated LCD (determined previously), and with the phosphate group when the serine is phosphorylated. However, the overall conformation of the LCD is essentially unchanged upon phosphorylation. This result provides additional evidence that phosphorylation of the RLC is unlikely to act as an on-switch in regulation of scallop catch muscle myosin.

  19. Purification, Characterization and Analysis of the Allergenic Properties of Myosin Light Chain in Procambarus clarkia.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Myosin light chain (MLC) plays a vital role in cell and muscle functions and has been identified as an allergen in close species. In this study, MLC with the molecular mass of 18kDa was purified from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle fibrils. Its physicochemical characterization showed that the...

  20. Transchromosomally derived Ig heavy chains

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Kingzette, M.; Crane, M.A.

    1995-07-15

    During an immune response, activated B cells undergo isotype switching and begin to express isotypes other than IgM and IgD. Isotype switching occurs when downstream C{gamma}, C{alpha}, or C{epsilon} genes are rearranged into the S{mu} chromosomal region, resulting in the deletion of the region in between. These rearrangements usually occur in cis, i.e., intrachromosomally. In previous studies, we analyzed allotypic specificities of rabbit secretory IgA and identified a substantial number of IgA heavy chains with V{sub h} and C{alpha} allotypes that were encoded by V{sub h} and C{alpha} genes in trans. In those studies, however, we could not determine whether the trans association of V{sub H} and C{alpha} occurred during VDJ gene rearrangement or during isotype switching. Here, we cloned rabbit cDNA which encodes these trans IgA heavy chains and determined the chromosomal origin of the V{sub H}, J{sub H}, and C{alpha} regions. To determine whether the trans association occurred during VDJ gene rearrangement, we analyzed the nucleotide polymorphism of the J{sub H} region and the V{sub H} allotype encoded by the cDNA. We found that the V{sub H} and J{sub H} genes used in the VDJ gene rearrangements were from the same chromosome, indicating that the V{sub H}, D, and J{sub H} gene rearrangements occurred in cis. Furthermore, we analyzed the DNA polymorphisms of J{sub H} and C{alpha} and showed that the VDJ and C{alpha} genes encoding the trans IgA molecules were derived from different parental chromosomes. We suggest that the trans association occurred during isotype switching. This study shows that V{sub H} and C{sub H} can associate transchromosomally as part of a normal immune response. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  1. A small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii motility induces the posttranslational modification of myosin light chain-1 and inhibits myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Aoife T; Leung, Jacqueline M; Carey, Kimberly L; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M; Westwood, Nicholas J; Ballif, Bryan A; Ward, Gary E

    2010-01-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains.

  2. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of T. gondii Motility Induces the Posttranslational Modification of Myosin Light Chain-1 and Inhibits Myosin Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Heaslip, Aoife T.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Carey, Kimberly L.; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains. PMID:20084115

  3. Mammalian myosin-18A, a highly divergent myosin.

    PubMed

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Yang, Yi; Knight, Peter J; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R

    2013-03-29

    The Mus musculus myosin-18A gene is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, α and β, with reported roles in Golgi localization, in maintenance of cytoskeleton, and as receptors for immunological surfactant proteins. Both myosin-18A isoforms feature a myosin motor domain, a single predicted IQ motif, and a long coiled-coil reminiscent of myosin-2. The myosin-18Aα isoform, additionally, has an N-terminal PDZ domain. Recombinant heavy meromyosin- and subfragment-1 (S1)-like constructs for both myosin-18Aα and -18β species were purified from the baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system. These constructs bound both essential and regulatory light chains, indicating an additional noncanonical light chain binding site in the neck. Myosin-18Aα-S1 and -18Aβ-S1 molecules bound actin weakly with Kd values of 4.9 and 54 μm, respectively. The actin binding data could be modeled by assuming an equilibrium between two myosin conformations, a competent and an incompetent form to bind actin. Actin binding was unchanged by presence of nucleotide. Both myosin-18A isoforms bound N-methylanthraniloyl-nucleotides, but the rate of ATP hydrolysis was very slow (<0.002 s(-1)) and not significantly enhanced by actin. Phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain had no effect on ATP hydrolysis, and neither did the addition of tropomyosin or of GOLPH3, a myosin-18A binding partner. Electron microscopy of myosin-18A-S1 showed that the lever is strongly angled with respect to the long axis of the motor domain, suggesting a pre-power stroke conformation regardless of the presence of ATP. These data lead us to conclude that myosin-18A does not operate as a traditional molecular motor in cells.

  4. Mammalian Myosin-18A, a Highly Divergent Myosin

    PubMed Central

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Heissler, Sarah M.; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Yang, Yi; Knight, Peter J.; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The Mus musculus myosin-18A gene is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, α and β, with reported roles in Golgi localization, in maintenance of cytoskeleton, and as receptors for immunological surfactant proteins. Both myosin-18A isoforms feature a myosin motor domain, a single predicted IQ motif, and a long coiled-coil reminiscent of myosin-2. The myosin-18Aα isoform, additionally, has an N-terminal PDZ domain. Recombinant heavy meromyosin- and subfragment-1 (S1)-like constructs for both myosin-18Aα and -18β species were purified from the baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system. These constructs bound both essential and regulatory light chains, indicating an additional noncanonical light chain binding site in the neck. Myosin-18Aα-S1 and -18Aβ-S1 molecules bound actin weakly with Kd values of 4.9 and 54 μm, respectively. The actin binding data could be modeled by assuming an equilibrium between two myosin conformations, a competent and an incompetent form to bind actin. Actin binding was unchanged by presence of nucleotide. Both myosin-18A isoforms bound N-methylanthraniloyl-nucleotides, but the rate of ATP hydrolysis was very slow (<0.002 s−1) and not significantly enhanced by actin. Phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain had no effect on ATP hydrolysis, and neither did the addition of tropomyosin or of GOLPH3, a myosin-18A binding partner. Electron microscopy of myosin-18A-S1 showed that the lever is strongly angled with respect to the long axis of the motor domain, suggesting a pre-power stroke conformation regardless of the presence of ATP. These data lead us to conclude that myosin-18A does not operate as a traditional molecular motor in cells. PMID:23382379

  5. Porcine myosin-VI: characterization of a new mammalian unconventional myosin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned a new mammalian unconventional myosin, porcine myosin-VI from the proximal tubule cell line, LLC-PK1 (CL4). Porcine myosin-VI is highly homologous to Drosophila 95F myosin heavy chain, and together these two myosins comprise a sixth class of myosin motors. Myosin-VI exhibits ATP-sensitive actin-binding activities characteristic of myosins, and it is associated with a calmodulin light chain. Within LLC- PK1 cells, myosin-VI is soluble and does not associate with the major actin-containing domains. Within the kidney, however, myosin-VI is associated with sedimentable structures and specifically locates to the actin- and membrane-rich apical brush border domain of the proximal tubule cells. This motor was not enriched within the glomerulus, capillaries, or distal tubules. Myosin-VI associates with the proximal tubule cytoskeleton in an ATP-sensitive fashion, suggesting that this motor is associated with the actin cytoskeleton within the proximal tubule cells. Given the difference in association of myosin-VI with the apical cytoskeleton between LLC-PK1 cells and adult kidney, it is likely that this cell line does not fully differentiate to form functional proximal tubule cells. Myosin-VI may require the presence of additional elements, only found in vivo in proximal tubule cells, to properly locate to the apical domain. PMID:7929586

  6. Berberine Depresses Contraction of Smooth Muscle via Inhibiting Myosin Light-chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhili; Zhang, Mingbo; Dou, Deqiang; Tao, Xiaojun; Kang, Tingguo

    2017-01-01

    Berberine is a natural isoquinoline alkaloid possessing various pharmacological effects, particularly apparent in the treatment of diarrhea, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) plays a crucial role in the smooth muscle relaxation-contraction events, and it is well known that berberine can effectively depress the contraction of smooth muscle. Hence, whether berberine could inhibit MLCK and then depress the smooth muscle contractility might be researched. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of berberine on MLCK. Based on this, the contractility of gastro-intestine, catalysis activity of MLCK, and molecular docking are going to be evaluated. The experiment of smooth muscle contraction was directly monitored the contractions of the isolated gastrointestine by frequency and amplitude at different concentration of berberine. The effects of berberine on MLCK were measured in the presence of Ca(2+)-calmodulin, using the activities of 20 kDa myosin light chain (MLC20) phosphorylation, and myosin Mg(2+)-ATPase induced by MLCK. The docking study was conducted with expert software in the meantime. The phosphorylation of myosin and the Mg(2+)-ATPase activity is reduced in the presence of berberine. Moreover, berberine could inhibit the contractibility of isolated gastric intestine smooth muscle. Berberine could bind to the ATP binding site of MLCK through hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding according to the docking study. The present work gives a deep insight into the molecular mechanism for the treatment of diarrhea with berberine, i.e., berberine could suppress the contractility of smooth muscle through binding to MLCK and depressing the catalysis activity of MLCK. Berberine significantly reduced the amplitude of contraction in isolated duodenum and gastric strips in ratsBerberine inhibited the phosphorylated extents of MLC20 and Mg2+-ATPase activity of phosphorylated myosin induced by

  7. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase, supramolecular organization, modulation of activity, and related conformational changes.

    PubMed Central

    Filenko, A M; Danilova, V M; Sobieszek, A

    1997-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that activation of smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) can be modulated by formation of supramolecular structures (Sobieszek, A. 1991. Regulation of smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase. Allosteric effects and co-operative activation by CaM. J. Mol. Biol. 220:947-957). The present light scattering data demonstrate that the inactive (calmodulin-free) MLCK apoenzyme exists in solution as a mixture of oligomeric (2% by weight), dimeric (53%), and monomeric (45%) species at physiological ionic strength (160 mM salt). These long-living assemblies, the lifetime of which was measured by minutes, were in equilibrium with each other. The most likely form of the oligomer was a spiral-like hexamer, the dimensions of which fit very well the helical structure of self-assembled myosin filaments (Sobieszek, A. 1972. Cross-bridges on self-assembled smooth muscle myosin filaments. J. Mol. Biol. 70:741-744). After activation of the kinase by calmodulin (CaM) we could not detect any appreciable changes in the distribution of the kinase species either when the kinase was saturated with CaM or when its molar concentration exceeded that of CaM. Our fluorescent measurements suggest that the earlier observed inhibition of kinase at substoichiometric amounts of CaM (Sobieszek, A., A. Strobl, B. Ortner, and E. Babiychuk. 1993. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent modification of smooth-muscle myosin light chain kinase leading to its co-operative activation by calmodulin. Biochem. J. 295:405-411) is associated with slow conformational change(s) of the activated (CaM-bound) kinase molecules. Such conformational rearrangements also took place with equimolar kinase to CaM; however, in this case there was no decrease in MLCK activity. The nature of these conformational changes, which are accompanied by reduction of the kinase for CaM affinity, is discussed. PMID:9284326

  8. Kinetics of myosin light chain kinase activation of smooth muscle myosin in an in vitro model system.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; Facemyer, Kevin C; Carter, Michael S; Jackson, Del R; Haldeman, Brian D; Ruana, Nick; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P; Cremo, Christine R; Baker, Josh E

    2013-11-26

    During activation of smooth muscle contraction, one myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) molecule rapidly phosphorylates many smooth muscle myosin (SMM) molecules, suggesting that muscle activation rates are influenced by the kinetics of MLCK-SMM interactions. To determine the rate-limiting step underlying activation of SMM by MLCK, we measured the kinetics of calcium-calmodulin (Ca²⁺CaM)-MLCK-mediated SMM phosphorylation and the corresponding initiation of SMM-based F-actin motility in an in vitro system with SMM attached to a coverslip surface. Fitting the time course of SMM phosphorylation to a kinetic model gave an initial phosphorylation rate, kp(o), of ~1.17 heads s⁻¹ MLCK⁻¹. Also, we measured the dwell time of single streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK molecules interacting with surface-attached SMM and phosphorylated SMM using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. From these data, the dissociation rate constant from phosphorylated SMM was 0.80 s⁻¹, which was similar to the kp(o) mentioned above and with rates measured in solution. This dissociation rate was essentially independent of the phosphorylation state of SMM. From calculations using our measured dissociation rates and Kd values, and estimates of SMM and MLCK concentrations in muscle, we predict that the dissociation of MLCK from phosphorylated SMM is rate-limiting and that the rate of the phosphorylation step is faster than this dissociation rate. Also, association with SMM (11-46 s⁻¹) would be much faster than with pSMM (<0.1-0.2 s⁻¹). This suggests that the probability of MLCK interacting with unphosphorylated versus phosphorylated SMM is 55-460 times greater. This would avoid sequestering MLCK to unproductive interactions with previously phosphorylated SMM, potentially leading to faster rates of phosphorylation in muscle.

  9. The Kinetics of Myosin Light Chain Kinase Activation of Smooth Muscle Myosin in an In Vitro Model System

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Carter, Michael S.; Jackson, Del R.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Ruana, Nick; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P.; Cremo, Christine R.; Baker, Josh E.

    2013-01-01

    During activation of smooth muscle contraction, one myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) molecule rapidly phosphorylates many smooth muscle myosin (SMM) molecules, suggesting that muscle activation rates are influenced by the kinetics of MLCK-SMM interactions. To determine the rate-limiting step underlying activation of SMM by MLCK, we measured the kinetics of calcium-calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM)-MLCK-mediated SMM phosphorylation and the corresponding initiation of SMM-based F-actin motility in an in vitro system with SMM attached to a coverslip surface. Fitting the time course of SMM phosphorylation to a kinetic model gave an initial phosphorylation rate, kpo, of ~1.17 heads s−1·MLCK−1. Also we measured the dwell time of single QD-labeled MLCK molecules interacting with surface-attached SMM and phosphorylated SMM using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. From these data, the dissociation rate constant from phosphorylated SMM was 0.80 s−1, which was similar to kpo mentioned above and with rates measured in solution. This dissociation rate was essentially independent of the phosphorylation state of SMM. From calculations using our measured dissociation rates and Kds, and estimates of [SMM] and [MLCK] in muscle, we predict that the dissociation of MLCK from phosphorylated SMM is rate-limiting and that the rate of the phosphorylation step is faster than this dissociation rate. Also, association to SMM (11-46 s−1) would be much faster than to pSMM (<0.1-0.2 s−1). This suggests that the probability of MLCK interacting with unphosphorylated versus pSMM is 55-460 times greater. This would avoid sequestering MLCK to unproductive interactions with previously phosphorylated SMM, potentially leading to faster rates of phosphorylation in muscle. PMID:24144337

  10. Insulin-induced myosin light-chain phosphorylation during receptor capping in IM-9 human B-lymphoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Majercik, M H; Bourguignon, L Y

    1988-01-01

    We have examined further the interaction between insulin surface receptors and the cytoskeleton of IM-9 human lymphoblasts. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we determined that actin, myosin, calmodulin and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) are all accumulated directly underneath insulin-receptor caps. In addition, we have now established that the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ (as measured by fura-2 fluorescence) increases just before insulin-induced receptor capping. Most importantly, we found that the binding of insulin to its receptor induces phosphorylation of myosin light chain in vivo. Furthermore, a number of drugs known to abolish the activation properties of calmodulin, such as trifluoperazine (TFP) or W-7, strongly inhibit insulin-receptor capping and myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These data imply that an actomyosin cytoskeletal contraction, regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and MLCK, is involved in insulin-receptor capping. Biochemical analysis in vitro has revealed that IM-9 insulin receptors are physically associated with actin and myosin; and most interestingly, the binding of insulin-receptor/cytoskeletal complex significantly enhances the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain. This insulin-induced phosphorylation is inhibited by calmodulin antagonists (e.g. TFP and W-7), suggesting that the phosphorylation is catalysed by MLCK. Together, these results strongly suggest that MLCK-mediated myosin light-chain phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the membrane-associated actomyosin contraction required for the collection of insulin receptors into caps. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:3048249

  11. Identification of calmodulin and MlcC as light chains for Dictyostelium myosin-I isozymes.

    PubMed

    Crawley, Scott W; Liburd, Janine; Shaw, Kristopher; Jung, Yoojin; Smith, Steven P; Côté, Graham P

    2011-08-02

    Dictyostelium discoideum express seven single-headed myosin-I isozymes (MyoA-MyoE and MyoK) that drive motile processes at the cell membrane. The light chains for MyoA and MyoE were identified by expressing Flag-tagged constructs consisting of the motor domain and the two IQ motifs in the neck region in Dictyostelium. The MyoA and MyoE constructs both copurified with calmodulin. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) showed that apo-calmodulin bound to peptides corresponding to the MyoA and MyoE IQ motifs with micromolar affinity. In the presence of calcium, calmodulin cross-linked two IQ motif peptides, with one domain binding with nanomolar affinity and the other with micromolar affinity. The IQ motifs were required for the actin-activated MgATPase activity of MyoA but not MyoE; however, neither myosin exhibited calcium-dependent activity. A Flag-tagged construct consisting of the MyoC motor domain and the three IQ motifs in the adjacent neck region bound a novel 8.6 kDa two EF-hand protein named MlcC, for myosin light chain for MyoC. MlcC is most similar to the C-terminal domain of calmodulin but does not bind calcium. ITC studies showed that MlcC binds IQ1 and IQ2 but not IQ3 of MyoC. IQ3 contains a proline residue that may render it nonfunctional. Each long-tailed Dictyostelium myosin-I has now been shown to have a unique light chain (MyoB-MlcB, MyoC-MlcC, and MyoD-MlcD), whereas the short-tailed myosins-I, MyoA and MyoE, have the multifunctional calmodulin as a light chain. The diversity in light chain composition is likely to contribute to the distinct cellular functions of each myosin-I isozyme.

  12. Heterogeneity of myofibrillar proteins in lobster fast and slow muscles: variants of troponin, paramyosin, and myosin light chains comprise four distinct protein assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fast and slow muscles from the claws and abdomen of the American lobster Homarus americanus were examined for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity and for differences in myofibrillar proteins. Both myosin and actomyosin ATPase were correlated with fiber composition and contractile speed. Four distinct patterns of myofibrilla proteins observed in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels were distinguished by different assemblages of regulatory and contractile protein variants. A total of three species of troponin-T, five species of troponin-I, and three species of troponin-C were observed. Lobster myosins contained two groups of light chains (LC), termed alpha and beta. There were three ..cap alpha..-LC variants and two ..beta..-LC variants. There were no apparent differences in myosin heavy chain, actin, and tropomyosin. Only paramyosin showed a pattern completely consistent with muscle fiber type: slow fibers contained a species (105 kD) slightly smaller than the principle variant (110 kD) in fast fibers. It is proposed that the type of paramyosin present could provide a biochemical marker to identify the fiber composition of muscles that have not been fully characterized. The diversity of troponin and myosin LC variants suggests that subtle differences in physiological performance exist within the broader categories of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. 31 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Interaction of protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) with smooth muscle myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2003-06-01

    The interaction of a protein-bound polysaccharide (PSK) isolated from Basidiomycetes with smooth muscle myosin components was evaluated by limited digestion, urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis, affinity chromatography and overlay assay using a peptide array. PSK was bound to the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin, but not to the essential light chain. The binding to PSK was definitely observed for unphosphorylated RLC, compared to phosphorylated one. From the amino acid sequence of the RLC, 490 peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane. Overlay assays showed that the PSK-binding on the molecule of RLC were localized in the N- and C-terminal basic regions and these sites were conserved in RLC from the human smooth muscle and nonmuscle cells.

  14. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  15. Aurora B but not rho/MLCK signaling is required for localization of diphosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain to the midzone in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomo; Isoda, Rieko; Ookusa, Takayuki; Kamijo, Keiju; Hamao, Kozue; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II is stimulated by monophosphorylation of its regulatory light chain (MRLC) at Ser19 (1P-MRLC). MRLC diphosphorylation at Thr18/Ser19 (2P-MRLC) further enhances the ATPase activity of myosin II. Phosphorylated MRLCs localize to the contractile ring and regulate cytokinesis as subunits of activated myosin II. Recently, we reported that 2P-MRLC, but not 1P-MRLC, localizes to the midzone independently of myosin II heavy chain during cytokinesis in cultured mammalian cells. However, the mechanism underlying the distinct localization of 1P- and 2P-MRLC during cytokinesis is unknown. Here, we showed that depletion of the Rho signaling proteins MKLP1, MgcRacGAP, or ECT2 inhibited the localization of 1P-MRLC to the contractile ring but not the localization of 2P-MRLC to the midzone. In contrast, depleting or inhibiting a midzone-localizing kinase, Aurora B, perturbed the localization of 2P-MRLC to the midzone but not the localization of 1P-MRLC to the contractile ring. We did not observe any change in the localization of phosphorylated MRLC in myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK)-inhibited cells. Furrow regression was observed in Aurora B- and 2P-MRLC-inhibited cells but not in 1P-MRLC-perturbed dividing cells. Furthermore, Aurora B bound to 2P-MRLC in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Aurora B, but not Rho/MLCK signaling, is essential for the localization of 2P-MRLC to the midzone in dividing HeLa cells.

  16. Structure of the Single-lobe Myosin Light Chain C in Complex with the Light Chain-binding Domains of Myosin-1C Provides Insights into Divergent IQ Motif Recognition.

    PubMed

    Langelaan, David N; Liburd, Janine; Yang, Yidai; Miller, Emily; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W; Côté, Graham P; Smith, Steven P

    2016-09-09

    Myosin light chains are key regulators of class 1 myosins and typically comprise two domains, with calmodulin being the archetypal example. They bind IQ motifs within the myosin neck region and amplify conformational changes in the motor domain. A single lobe light chain, myosin light chain C (MlcC), was recently identified and shown to specifically bind to two sequentially divergent IQ motifs of the Dictyostelium myosin-1C. To provide a molecular basis of this interaction, the structures of apo-MlcC and a 2:1 MlcC·myosin-1C neck complex were determined. The two non-functional EF-hand motifs of MlcC pack together to form a globular four-helix bundle that opens up to expose a central hydrophobic groove, which interacts with the N-terminal portion of the divergent IQ1 and IQ2 motifs. The N- and C-terminal regions of MlcC make critical contacts that contribute to its specific interactions with the myosin-1C divergent IQ motifs, which are contacts that deviate from the traditional mode of calmodulin-IQ recognition.

  17. Structure of the Single-lobe Myosin Light Chain C in Complex with the Light Chain-binding Domains of Myosin-1C Provides Insights into Divergent IQ Motif Recognition *

    PubMed Central

    Langelaan, David N.; Liburd, Janine; Yang, Yidai; Miller, Emily; Chitayat, Seth; Crawley, Scott W.; Côté, Graham P.; Smith, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chains are key regulators of class 1 myosins and typically comprise two domains, with calmodulin being the archetypal example. They bind IQ motifs within the myosin neck region and amplify conformational changes in the motor domain. A single lobe light chain, myosin light chain C (MlcC), was recently identified and shown to specifically bind to two sequentially divergent IQ motifs of the Dictyostelium myosin-1C. To provide a molecular basis of this interaction, the structures of apo-MlcC and a 2:1 MlcC·myosin-1C neck complex were determined. The two non-functional EF-hand motifs of MlcC pack together to form a globular four-helix bundle that opens up to expose a central hydrophobic groove, which interacts with the N-terminal portion of the divergent IQ1 and IQ2 motifs. The N- and C-terminal regions of MlcC make critical contacts that contribute to its specific interactions with the myosin-1C divergent IQ motifs, which are contacts that deviate from the traditional mode of calmodulin-IQ recognition. PMID:27466369

  18. The effects of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of brain myosin on its actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase and contractile activities.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, S; Takashima, T; Ohmori, H; Kumon, A

    1988-02-01

    Purified bovine brain myosin contained approximately 1 and 3 mol of protein-bound phosphate/mol myosin in the light chains and heavy chains, respectively. Large portions of this light chain- and heavy chain-bound phosphate (about 0.8 and 2.4 mol, respectively) were removed by incubation with a brain phosphoprotein phosphatase and potato acid phosphatase, respectively. Upon phosphorylation of the dephosphorylated brain myosin with myosin light chain kinase and casein kinase II, about 1.6 and 3.0 mol of phosphate was incorporated into the light chains and heavy chains, respectively, while much lower levels of phosphate were incorporated into the non-dephosphorylated brain myosin under the same conditions. The actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity of brain myosin rephosphorylated with myosin light chain kinase was about twice as high as that of dephosphorylated brain myosin (about 30 and 15 nmol phosphate/mg/min, respectively). On the other hand, whereas the rephosphorylated brain myosin superprecipitated rapidly with F-actin, the rate of superprecipitation of the dephosphorylated brain myosin was extremely low. Under appropriate conditions, a loose network of tiny superprecipitates, which formed initially throughout the solution, contracted to form eventually a large and dense particle. These results indicate that phosphorylation of the light chains of brain myosin is a prerequisite for the contraction of brain actomyosin. The role of phosphorylation of the heavy chains by casein kinase II remains to be elucidated.

  19. Agonist-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the myosin- binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase and CPI17, two regulatory factors of myosin light chain phosphatase, in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Niiro, Naohisa; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    The inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) enhances smooth muscle contraction at a constant [Ca2+]. There are two components, myosin-binding subunit of MLCP (MBS) and CPI17, thought to be responsible for the inhibition of MLCP by external stimuli. The phosphorylation of MBS at Thr-641 and of CPI17 at Thr-38 inhibits the MLCP activity in vitro. Here we determined the changes in the phosphorylation of MBS and CPI17 after agonist stimulation in intact as well as permeabilized smooth muscle strips using phosphorylation-site-specific antibodies as probes. The CPI17 phosphorylation transiently increased after agonist stimulation in both alpha-toxin skinned and intact fibres. The time course of the increase in CPI17 phosphorylation after stimulation correlated with the increase in myosin regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. The increase in CPI17 phosphorylation was significantly diminished by Y27632, a Rho kinase inhibitor, and GF109203x, a protein kinase C inhibitor, suggesting that both the protein kinase C and Rho kinase pathways influence the change in CPI17 phosphorylation. On the other hand, a significant level of MBS phosphorylation at Thr-641, an inhibitory site, was observed in the resting state for both skinned and intact fibres and the agonist stimulation did not significantly alter the MBS phosphorylation level at Thr-641. While the removal of the agonist markedly decreased MLC phosphorylation and induced relaxation, the phosphorylation of MBS was unchanged, while CPI17 phosphorylation markedly diminished. These results strongly suggest that the phosphorylation of CPI17 plays a more significant role in the agonist-induced increase in myosin phosphorylation and contraction of smooth muscle than MBS phosphorylation in the Ca2+-independent activation mechanism of smooth muscle contraction. PMID:12296769

  20. Regulatory light chain mutants linked to heart disease modify the cardiac myosin lever arm.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Sikkink, Laura A

    2013-02-19

    Myosin is the chemomechanical energy transducer in striated heart muscle. The myosin cross-bridge applies impulsive force to actin while consuming ATP chemical energy to propel myosin thick filaments relative to actin thin filaments in the fiber. Transduction begins with ATP hydrolysis in the cross-bridge driving rotary movement of a lever arm converting torque into linear displacement. Myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binds to the lever arm and modifies its ability to translate actin. Gene sequencing implicated several RLC mutations in heart disease, and three of them are investigated here using photoactivatable GFP-tagged RLC (RLC-PAGFP) exchanged into permeabilized papillary muscle fibers. A single-lever arm probe orientation is detected in the crowded environment of the muscle fiber by using RLC-PAGFP with dipole orientation deduced from the three-spatial dimension fluorescence emission pattern of the single molecule. Symmetry and selection rules locate dipoles in their half-sarcomere, identify those at the minimal free energy, and specify active dipole contraction intermediates. Experiments were performed in a microfluidic chamber designed for isometric contraction, total internal reflection fluorescence detection, and two-photon excitation second harmonic generation to evaluate sarcomere length. The RLC-PAGFP reports apparently discretized lever arm orientation intermediates in active isometric fibers that on average produce the stall force. Disease-linked mutants introduced into RLC move intermediate occupancy further down the free energy gradient, implying lever arms rotate more to reach stall force because mutant RLC increases lever arm shear strain. A lower free energy intermediate occupancy involves a lower energy conversion efficiency in the fiber relating a specific myosin function modification to the disease-implicated mutant.

  1. PKC-mediated cerebral vasoconstriction: Role of myosin light chain phosphorylation versus actin cytoskeleton reorganization.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Abd-Elrahman, Khaled S; Moreno-Dominguez, Alejandro

    2015-06-15

    Defective protein kinase C (PKC) signaling has been suggested to contribute to abnormal vascular contraction in disease conditions including hypertension and diabetes. Our previous work on agonist and pressure-induced cerebral vasoconstriction implicated PKC as a major contributor to force production in a myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation-independent manner. Here, we used phorbol dibutyrate to selectively induce a PKC-dependent constriction in rat middle cerebral arteries and delineate the relative contribution of different contractile mechanisms involved. Specifically, we employed an ultra-sensitive 3-step western blotting approach to detect changes in the content of phosphoproteins that regulate myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, thin filament activation, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Data indicate that PKC activation evoked a greater constriction at a similar level of LC20 phosphorylation achieved by 5-HT. PDBu-evoked constriction persisted in the presence of Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC, and in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Biochemical evidence indicates that either + or - extracellular Ca(2+), PDBu (i) inhibits MLCP activity via the phosphorylation of myosin targeting subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT1) and C-kinase potentiated protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor (CPI-17), (ii) increases the phosphorylation of paxillin and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), and reduces G-actin content, and (iii) does not change the phospho-content of the thin filament proteins, calponin and caldesmon. PDBu-induced constriction was more sensitive to disruption of actin cytoskeleton compared to inhibition of cross-bridge cycling. In conclusion, this study provided evidence for the pivotal contribution of cytoskeletal actin polymerization in force generation following PKC activation in cerebral resistance arteries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  3. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  4. Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Myosin Subfragment 1 Isoforms with Different Essential Light Chains

    PubMed Central

    Markov, Denis I.; Zubov, Eugene O.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Kurganov, Boris I.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared thermally induced denaturation and aggregation of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) containing different “essential” (or “alkali”) light chains, A1 or A2. We applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the domain structure of these two S1 isoforms. For this purpose, a special calorimetric approach was developed to analyze the DSC profiles of irreversibly denaturing multidomain proteins. Using this approach, we revealed two calorimetric domains in the S1 molecule, the more thermostable domain denaturing in two steps. Comparing the DSC data with temperature dependences of intrinsic fluorescence parameters and S1 ATPase inactivation, we have identified these two calorimetric domains as motor domain and regulatory domain of the myosin head, the motor domain being more thermostable. Some difference between the two S1 isoforms was only revealed by DSC in thermal denaturation of the regulatory domain. We also applied dynamic light scattering (DLS) to analyze the aggregation of S1 isoforms induced by their thermal denaturation. We have found no appreciable difference between these S1 isoforms in their aggregation properties under ionic strength conditions close to those in the muscle fiber (in the presence of 100 mM KCl). Under these conditions kinetics of this process was independent of protein concentration, and the aggregation rate was limited by irreversible denaturation of the S1 motor domain. PMID:21151434

  5. Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Diphosphorylation Slows Relaxation of Arterial Smooth Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    The principal signal to activate smooth muscle contraction is phosphorylation of the regulatory light chains of myosin (LC20) at Ser19 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase. Inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase leads to Ca2+-independent phosphorylation at both Ser19 and Thr18 by integrin-linked kinase and/or zipper-interacting protein kinase. The functional effects of phosphorylation at Thr18 on steady-state isometric force and relaxation rate were investigated in Triton-skinned rat caudal arterial smooth muscle strips. Sequential phosphorylation at Ser19 and Thr18 was achieved by treatment with adenosine 5′-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) in the presence of Ca2+, which induced stoichiometric thiophosphorylation at Ser19, followed by microcystin (phosphatase inhibitor) in the absence of Ca2+, which induced phosphorylation at Thr18. Phosphorylation at Thr18 had no effect on steady-state force induced by Ser19 thiophosphorylation. However, phosphorylation of Ser19 or both Ser19 and Thr18 to comparable stoichiometries (0.5 mol of Pi/mol of LC20) and similar levels of isometric force revealed differences in the rates of dephosphorylation and relaxation following removal of the stimulus: t½ values for dephosphorylation were 83.3 and 560 s, and for relaxation were 560 and 1293 s, for monophosphorylated (Ser19) and diphosphorylated LC20, respectively. We conclude that phosphorylation at Thr18 decreases the rates of LC20 dephosphorylation and smooth muscle relaxation compared with LC20 phosphorylated exclusively at Ser19. These effects of LC20 diphosphorylation, combined with increased Ser19 phosphorylation (Ca2+-independent), may underlie the hypercontractility that is observed in response to certain physiological contractile stimuli, and under pathological conditions such as cerebral and coronary arterial vasospasm, intimal hyperplasia, and hypertension. PMID:22661704

  6. Autoregulatory Control of Smooth Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase Promoter by Notch Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanchita; Proweller, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (SM-MLCK) is the key enzyme responsible for phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chain (MLC20), resulting in actin-myosin cross-bridging and force generation in vascular smooth muscle required for physiological vasoreactivity and blood pressure control. In this study, we investigated the combinatorial role of myocardin/serum response factor (SRF) and Notch signaling in the transcriptional regulation of MLCK gene expression. Promoter reporter analyses in rat A10 smooth muscle cells revealed a bimodal pattern of MLCK promoter activity and gene expression upon stimulation with constitutively active Notch1 in presence of myocardin or by Jagged1 ligand stimulation. An initial Notch1-induced increase in MLCK transcription was followed by loss in promoter sensitivity, which could be restored with further Notch1 dose escalation. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that endogenous levels of Hairy Related Transcription (HRT) factor 2 (HRT2) peaked concurrently with inhibitory concentrations of Notch1. Forced expression of HRT2 demonstrated simultaneous repression of both myocardin- and Notch1-induced MLCK promoter activity. HRT2-mediated repression was further confirmed by HRT2 truncations and siHRT2 treatments that rescued MLCK promoter activity and gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed both Jagged1 ligand- and Notch1-enhanced myocardin/SRF complex formation at the promoter CArG element. In contrast, heightened levels of HRT2 concomitantly disrupted myocardin/SRF and Notch transcription complex formation at respective CArG and CSL binding elements. Taken together, SM-MLCK promoter activity appears highly sensitive to the relative levels of Notch1 signaling, HRT2, and myocardin. These findings identify a novel Notch-dependent HRT2 autoregulatory circuit coordinating transcriptional regulation of SM-MLCK. PMID:26703474

  7. Calcium-dependent regulation of the motor activity of recombinant full-length Physarum myosin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kawamichi, Hozumi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yoshiyama, Shinji; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2012-08-01

    We successfully synthesized full-length and the mutant Physarum myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) constructs associated with Physarum regulatory light chain and essential light chain (PhELC) using Physarum myosin heavy chain in Sf-9 cells, and examined their Ca(2+)-mediated regulation. Ca(2+) inhibited the motility and ATPase activities of Physarum myosin and HMM. The Ca(2+) effect is also reversible at the in vitro motility of Physarum myosin. We demonstrated that full-length myosin increases the Ca(2+) inhibition more effectively than HMM. Furthermore, Ca(2+) did not affect the motility and ATPase activities of the mutant Physarum myosin with PhELC that lost Ca(2+)-binding ability. Therefore, we conclude that PhELC plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Physarum myosin.

  8. The molecular structure of the fastest myosin from green algae, Chara.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, M; Nakamura, A; Sumiyoshi, H; Sakaba, N; Taniguchi, H; Kohama, K; Higashi-Fujime, S

    2000-04-02

    Chara myosin in green algae, Chara corallina, is the fastest myosin of all those observed so far. To shed light on the molecular mechanism of this fast sliding, we determined the primary structure of Chara myosin heavy chain (hc). It has a motor domain, six IQ motifs for calmodulin binding, a coiled-coil structure to dimerize, and a globular tail. Chara myosin hc is very similar to some plant myosins and has been predicted to belong to the class XI. Short loop 1 and loop 2 may account for the characteristics of mechanochemical properties of Chara myosin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Planarian myosin essential light chain is involved in the formation of brain lateral branches during regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuying; Chen, Xuhui; Yuan, Zuoqing; Zhou, Luming; Pang, Qiuxiang; Mao, Bingyu; Zhao, Bosheng

    2015-08-01

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structure component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, however, the functions in the central nervous system (CNS) development and regeneration remain poorly understood. Planarian Dugesia japonica has revealed fundamental mechanisms and unique aspects of neuroscience and neuroregeneration. In this study, the cDNA DjElc, encoding a planarian essential light chain of myosin, was identified from the planarian Dugesia japonica cDNA library. It encodes a deduced protein with highly conserved functionally domains EF-Hand and Ca(2+) binding sites that shares significant similarity with other members of ELC. Whole mount in situ hybridization studies show that DjElc expressed in CNS during embryonic development and regeneration of adult planarians. Loss of function of DjElc by RNA interference during planarian regeneration inhibits brain lateral branches regeneration completely. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that DjElc is required for maintenance of neurons and neurite outgrowth, particularly for involving the brain later branch regeneration.

  10. Rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase and phosphatase activities decrease with age.

    PubMed

    Belik, J; Kerc, Ewa; Pato, Mary D

    2006-03-01

    We and others have shown that the fetal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle potential for contraction and relaxation is significantly reduced compared with the adult. Whether these developmental changes relate to age differences in the expression and/or activity of key enzymes regulating the smooth muscle mechanical properties has not been previously evaluated. Therefore, we studied the catalytic activities and expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) catalytic (PP1cdelta) and regulatory (MYPT) subunits in late fetal, early newborn, and adult rat intrapulmonary arterial tissues. In keeping with the greater force development and relaxation of adult pulmonary artery, Western blot analysis showed that the MLCK, MYPT, and PP1cdelta contents increased significantly with age and were highest in the adult rat. In contrast, their specific activities (activity/enzyme content) were significantly higher in the fetal compared with the adult tissue. The fetal and newborn pulmonary arterial muscle relaxant response to the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was greater than the adult tissue. In addition to the 130-kDa isoform of MLCK, we documented the presence of minor higher-molecular-weight embryonic isoforms in the fetus and newborn. During fetal life, the lung pulmonary arterial MLCK- and MLCP-specific activities are highest and appear to be related to Rho-kinase activation during lung morphogenesis.

  11. [Ontogenetic and phylogenetic analysis of myosin light chain proteins from skeletal muscles of loach Misgurnus fossilis].

    PubMed

    Miuge, N S; Tikhonov, A V; Ozerniuk, N D

    2005-01-01

    mRNAs of all three types of myosin light chain proteins are expressed in skeletal muscles of both larval and adult stages of loach Misgurnus fossilis (Cobitidae) and these proteins are encoded by different genes (mlc1, mlc2, and mlc3). No difference was revealed between transcripts from larval stage and adult fish for all three mlc proteins. Our approach (RT-PCR with fish-specific mlc1, mlc2, and mlc3 primers) failed to reveal the larval form of myosin light chain protein found previously by protein electrophoresis of loach fry muscle extract. Comparative analysis of the protein structure shows high homology of MLC1 and MLC3 proteins sharing a large EF-hand calcium-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis of MLC1 from skeletal muscles of fish and other vertebrate species is concordant with the traditional phylogeny of the group. Within the Teleostei, loach MLC1 had the highest homology with other Cyprinidae, and least with Salmonidae fishes.

  12. Myosin Regulatory Light Chain (RLC) Phosphorylation Change as a Modulator of Cardiac Muscle Contraction in Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Toepfer, Christopher; Caorsi, Valentina; Kampourakis, Thomas; Sikkel, Markus B.; West, Timothy G.; Leung, Man-Ching; Al-Saud, Sara A.; MacLeod, Kenneth T.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Marston, Steven B.; Sellers, James R.; Ferenczi, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation alters cardiac muscle mechanics is important because it is often altered in cardiac disease. The effect this protein phosphorylation has on muscle mechanics during a physiological range of shortening velocities, during which the heart generates power and performs work, has not been addressed. We have expressed and phosphorylated recombinant Rattus norvegicus left ventricular RLC. In vitro we have phosphorylated these recombinant species with cardiac myosin light chain kinase and zipper-interacting protein kinase. We compare rat permeabilized cardiac trabeculae, which have undergone exchange with differently phosphorylated RLC species. We were able to enrich trabecular RLC phosphorylation by 40% compared with controls and, in a separate series, lower RLC phosphorylation to 60% of control values. Compared with the trabeculae with a low level of RLC phosphorylation, RLC phosphorylation enrichment increased isometric force by more than 3-fold and peak power output by more than 7-fold and approximately doubled both maximum shortening speed and the shortening velocity that generated peak power. We augmented these measurements by observing increased RLC phosphorylation of human and rat HF samples from endocardial left ventricular homogenate. These results demonstrate the importance of increased RLC phosphorylation in the up-regulation of myocardial performance and suggest that reduced RLC phosphorylation is a key aspect of impaired contractile function in the diseased myocardium. PMID:23530050

  13. Definite differences between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction as revealed using antibodies to myosin head.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Chaen, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Abe, Takahiro; Kimura, Kazushige; Saeki, Yasutake; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2014-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from attachment-detachment cycles between myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and actin filaments. It is generally believed that a myosin head first attaches to actin, undergoes conformational changes to produce force and motion in muscle, and then detaches from actin. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanism of myosin head conformational changes still remains to be a matter for debate and speculation. The myosin head consists of catalytic (CAD), converter (CVD) and lever arm (LD) domains. To give information about the role of these domains in the myosin head performance, we have examined the effect of three site-directed antibodies to the myosin head on in vitro ATP-dependent actin-myosin sliding and Ca2+-activated contraction of muscle fibers. Antibody 1, attaching to junctional peptide between 50K and 20K heavy chain segments in the CAD, exhibited appreciable effects neither on in vitro actin-myosin sliding nor muscle fiber contraction. Since antibody 1 covers actin-binding sites of the CAD, one interpretation of this result is that rigor actin-myosin linkage is absent or at most a transient intermediate in physiological actin-myosin cycling. Antibody 2, attaching to reactive lysine residue in the CVD, showed a marked inhibitory effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding without changing actin-activated myosin head (S1) ATPase activity, while it showed no appreciable effect on muscle contraction. Antibody 3, attaching to two peptides of regulatory light chains in the LD, had no significant effect on in vitro actin-myosin sliding, while it reduced force development in muscle fibers without changing MgATPase activity. The above definite differences in the effect of antibodies 2 and 3 between in vitro actin-myosin sliding and muscle contraction can be explained by difference in experimental conditions; in the former, myosin heads are randomly oriented on a glass surface, while in the latter myosin heads are regularly

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory light-chain Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site and its role in hybrid myosins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinach, Fernando C.; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Kendrick-Jones, John

    1986-07-01

    The regulatory light chains, small polypeptides located on the myosin head, regulate the interaction of myosin with actin in response to either Ca2+ or phosphorylation. The demonstration that the regulatory light chains on scallop myosin can be replaced by light chains from other myosins has allowed us to compare the functional capabilities of different light chains1, but has not enabled us to probe the role of features, such as the Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site, that are common to all of them. Here, we describe the use of site-directed mutagenesis to study the function of that site. We synthesized the chicken skeletal myosin light chain in Escherichia coli and constructed mutants with substitutions within the Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site. When the aspartate residues at the first and sixth Ca2+ coordination positions are replaced by uncharged alanines, the light chains have a reduced Ca2+ binding capacity but still bind to scallop myosin with high affinity. Unlike the wild-type skeletal light chain which inhibits myosin interaction with actin, the mutants activate it. Thus, an intact Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site in the N-terminal region of the light chain is essential for regulating the interaction of myosin with actin.

  15. Irreversible heavy chain transfer to chondroitin.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mark E; Hascall, Vincent C; Green, Dixy E; DeAngelis, Paul L; Calabro, Anthony

    2014-10-17

    We have recently demonstrated that the transfer of heavy chains (HCs) from inter-α-inhibitor, via the enzyme TSG-6 (tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6), to hyaluronan (HA) oligosaccharides is an irreversible event in which subsequent swapping of HCs between HA molecules does not occur. We now describe our results of HC transfer experiments to chondroitin sulfate A, chemically desulfated chondroitin, chemoenzymatically synthesized chondroitin, unsulfated heparosan, heparan sulfate, and alginate. Of these potential HC acceptors, only chemically desulfated chondroitin and chemoenzymatically synthesized chondroitin were HC acceptors. The kinetics of HC transfer to chondroitin was similar to HA. At earlier time points, HCs were more widely distributed among the different sizes of chondroitin chains. As time progressed, the HCs migrated to lower molecular weight chains of chondroitin. Our interpretation is that TSG-6 swaps the HCs from the larger, reversible sites on chondroitin chains, which function as HC acceptors, onto smaller chondroitin chains, which function as irreversible HC acceptors. HCs transferred to smaller chondroitin chains were unable to be swapped off the smaller chondroitin chains and transferred to HA. HCs transferred to high molecular weight HA were unable to be swapped onto chondroitin. We also present data that although chondroitin was a HC acceptor, HA was the preferred acceptor when chondroitin and HA were in the same reaction mixture.

  16. The role of the N-terminus of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jones, Michelle; Guzman, Georgianna; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kerrick, W. Glenn L.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Summary To study the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction by the myosin essential light chain (ELC) and the physiological significance of its N-terminal extension, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice partially replacing the endogenous mouse ventricular ELC with either the human ventricular ELC wild type (Tg-WT) or its 43 amino acid N-terminal truncation mutant (Tg-Δ43) in the murine hearts. The mutant protein is similar in sequence to the short ELC variant present in skeletal muscle and the ELC protein distribution in Tg-Δ43 ventricles resembles that of fast skeletal muscle. Cardiac muscle preparations from Tg-Δ43 mice demonstrate reduced force per cross-sectional area of muscle, which is likely caused by a reduced number of force generating myosin cross-bridges and/or by decreased force per cross-bridge. As the mice grow older, the contractile force per cross-sectional area further decreases in Tg-Δ43 mice and the mutant hearts develop a phenotype of non-pathologic hypertrophy while still maintaining normal cardiac performance. The myocardium of older Tg-Δ43 mice also exhibits reduced myosin content. Our results suggest that the role of the N-terminal ELC extension is to maintain the integrity of myosin and to modulate force generation by decreasing myosin neck region compliance and promoting strong cross-bridge formation and/or by enhancing myosin attachment to actin. PMID:19361417

  17. Myosin light chain kinase accelerates vesicle endocytosis at the calyx of Held synapse.

    PubMed

    Yue, Hai-Yuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activity triggers endocytosis at synaptic terminals to retrieve efficiently the exocytosed vesicle membrane, ensuring the membrane homeostasis of active zones and the continuous supply of releasable vesicles. The kinetics of endocytosis depends on Ca(2+) and calmodulin which, as a versatile signal pathway, can activate a broad spectrum of downstream targets, including myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). MLCK is known to regulate vesicle trafficking and synaptic transmission, but whether this kinase regulates vesicle endocytosis at synapses remains elusive. We investigated this issue at the rat calyx of Held synapse, where previous studies using whole-cell membrane capacitance measurement have characterized two common forms of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent endocytosis, i.e., slow clathrin-dependent endocytosis and rapid endocytosis. Acute inhibition of MLCK with pharmacological agents was found to slow down the kinetics of both slow and rapid forms of endocytosis at calyces. Similar impairment of endocytosis occurred when blocking myosin II, a motor protein that can be phosphorylated upon MLCK activation. The inhibition of endocytosis was not accompanied by a change in Ca(2+) channel current. Combined inhibition of MLCK and calmodulin did not induce synergistic inhibition of endocytosis. Together, our results suggest that activation of MLCK accelerates both slow and rapid forms of vesicle endocytosis at nerve terminals, likely by functioning downstream of Ca(2+)/calmodulin.

  18. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Thomson, James A

    2010-08-06

    Human ESCs are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ESCs exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ESCs are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here, we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ESC dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ESCs. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ESCs.

  19. Monomeric Acanthamoeba myosins I support movement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albanesi, J P; Fujisaki, H; Hammer, J A; Korn, E D; Jones, R; Sheetz, M P

    1985-07-25

    Acanthamoeba myosins IA and IB were found to have molecular weights of 159,000 and 150,000 and Stokes radii of 6.2 and 5.9 nm, respectively. Both enzymes have frictional ratios of 1.7. Myosin IA consists of 22% alpha-helix, 32% beta-structure, and 46% unordered structure, while myosin IB is 16% alpha-helix, 46% beta-structure, and 38% unordered. Both myosins remain monomolecular under conditions in which other myosins form filaments. Beads coated with myosin IA or IB move unidirectionally on actin cables of Nitella. Movement requires ATP and phosphorylation of the myosin I heavy chain which is also required for actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity. Movement is inhibited by myosin I antiserum that inhibits actin-activated ATPase activity. These studies establish that these nonfilamentous, monomolecular myosins with single heavy chains of 130,000 and 125,000 daltons (IA and IB, respectively) can support actin-dependent movement analogous to that supported by filamentous myosins.

  20. Characterization and bacterial expression of the Dictyostelium myosin light chain kinase cDNA. Identification of an autoinhibitory domain.

    PubMed

    Tan, J L; Spudich, J A

    1991-08-25

    A full-length cDNA corresponding to the Dictyostelium myosin light chain kinase gene has been isolated and characterized. Sequence analysis of the cDNA confirms conserved protein kinase subdomains and reveals that the Dictyostelium sequence is highly homologous to those of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including myosin light chain kinases from higher eukaryotes. Despite the high homologies to calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, there is no recognizable calmodulin-binding domain within the Dictyostelium sequence. However, the Dictyostelium myosin light chain kinase possesses a putative auto-inhibitory domain near its carboxyl terminus. To further characterize this domain, the full-length enzyme as well as a truncated form lacking this domain were expressed in bacterial cells and purified. The full-length enzyme expressed in bacteria exhibits essentially the same biochemical characteristics as the enzyme isolated from Dictyostelium. The truncated form however exhibits a Vmax that is approximately ten times greater than that of the native enzyme. In addition, unlike the native kinase and the full-length kinase expressed in bacteria, the truncated enzyme does not undergo autophosphorylation. These results suggest that the Dictyostelium enzyme, like myosin light chain kinases from higher eukaryotes, is regulated by an autoinhibitory domain but that the specific molecular signals necessary for activation of the Dictyostelium enzyme are entirely distinct.

  1. Purification, Characterization, and Analysis of the Allergenic Properties of Myosin Light Chain in Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Xia; Chen, Heng-Li; Maleki, Soheila J; Cao, Min-Jie; Zhang, Ling-Jing; Su, Wen-Jin; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2015-07-15

    Myosin light chain (MLC) plays a vital role in cell and muscle functions and has been identified as an allergen in shrimp. In this study, MLC with a molecular mass of 18 kDa was purified from crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle. Its physicochemical characterization showed that the purified MLC is a glycoprotein with 4.3% carbohydrate, highly stable to heat, acid-alkali, and digestion, and weakly retains IgE-binding activity when its secondary structure was altered. Serological assays suggested that conformational epitopes predominate over linear epitopes in the purified MLC. Two isoforms of the MLC gene (MLC1 and MLC2) were cloned, and the purified MLC was identified as MLC1. Analysis of the secondary and tertiary structures of the MLCs indicated that MLC1 has four conformational epitopes and three linear epitopes, whereas MLC2 had a major conformational epitope and three linear epitopes. These results are significant for understanding hypersensitization of humans to crayfish.

  2. Cytoplasmic free calcium, myosin light chain phosphorylation, and force in phasic and tonic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The time course of [Ca2+]i, tension, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were determined during prolonged depolarization with high K+ in intact tonic (rabbit pulmonary artery) and phasic (longitudinal layer of guinea pig ileum) smooth muscles. [Ca2+]i was monitored with the 340 nm/380 nm signal ratio of the fluorescent indicator fura-2. The fluorescence ratio had a similar time course in both muscle types during depolarization with 109 mM [K+]o; after a transient peak, there was a decline to 70% of its peak value in tonic smooth muscle, and to 60% in phasic smooth muscle. Tension, however, continued to increase in the pulmonary artery, while in the ileum it declined in parallel with the [Ca2+]i. On changing [K+]o from 109 to 20 mM, tension and [Ca2+]i either remained unchanged or declined in parallel in the pulmonary artery. Phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain, measured during stimulation of muscle strips with 109 mM [K+]o in another set of experiments, increased from 3% to a peak of 50% in the intact pulmonary artery, and then declined to a steady state value of 23%. In the intact ileum, a very rapid, early transient phosphorylation (up to 50%) at 2-3 s was seen. This transient declined by 30 s to a value that was close to the resting level (7%), while tension remained at 55% of its peak force. A quick release during maintained stimulation induced no detectable change in the [Ca2+]i in either type of smooth muscle. We discuss the possibility that the slowly rising tonic tension in pulmonary artery could be due to cooperativity between phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated crossbridges. PMID:3216188

  3. Novel Polymorphisms in the Myosin Light Chain Kinase Gene Confer Risk for Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Grant, Audrey; Halder, Indrani; Brower, Roy; Sevransky, Jonathan; Maloney, James P.; Moss, Marc; Shanholtz, Carl; Yates, Charles R.; Meduri, Gianfranco Umberto; Shriver, Mark D.; Ingersoll, Roxann; Scott, Alan F.; Beaty, Terri H.; Moitra, Jaideep; Ma, Shwu Fan; Ye, Shui Q.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic basis of acute lung injury (ALI) is poorly understood. The myosin light chain kinase (MYLK) gene encodes the nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase isoform, a multifunctional protein involved in the inflammatory response (apoptosis, vascular permeability, leukocyte diapedesis). To examine MYLK as a novel candidate gene in sepsis-associated ALI, we sequenced exons, exon–intron boundaries, and 2 kb of 5′ UTR of the MYLK, which revealed 51 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Potential association of 28 MYLK SNPs with sepsis-associated ALI were evaluated in a case-control sample of 288 European American subjects (EAs) with sepsis alone, subjects with sepsis-associated ALI, or healthy control subjects, and a sample population of 158 African American subjects (AAs) with sepsis and ALI. Significant single locus associations in EAs were observed between four MYLK SNPs and the sepsis phenotype (P < 0.001), with an additional SNP associated with the ALI phenotype (P = 0.03). A significant association of a single SNP (identical to the SNP identified in EAs) was observed in AAs with sepsis (P = 0.002) and with ALI (P = 0.01). Three sepsis risk-conferring haplotypes in EAs were defined downstream of start codon of smooth muscle MYLK isoform, a region containing putative regulatory elements (P < 0.001). In contrast, multiple haplotypic analyses revealed an ALI-specific, risk-conferring haplotype at 5′ of the MYLK gene in both European and African Americans and an additional 3′ region haplotype only in African Americans. These data strongly implicate MYLK genetic variants to confer increased risk of sepsis and sepsis-associated ALI. PMID:16399953

  4. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H. Lee; Kamm, Kristine E.; Stull, James T.

    2016-01-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal “pseudoregulatory helix” that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca2+/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca2+/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca2+/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  5. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) gene disruption in Dictyostelium: a role for MLCK-A in cytokinesis and evidence for multiple MLCKs.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J L; Silveira, L A; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    We have created a strain of Dictyostelium that is deficient for the Ca2+/calmodulin-independent MLCK-A. This strain undergoes cytokinesis less efficiently than wild type, which results in an increased frequency of multinucleate cells when grown in suspension. The MLCK-A-cells are able, however, to undergo development and to cap crosslinked surface receptors, processes that require myosin heavy chain. Phosphorylated regulatory light chain (RLC) is still present in MLCK-A-cells, indicating that Dictyostelium has one or more additional protein kinases capable of phosphorylating RLC. Concanavalin A treatment was found to induce phosphorylation of essentially all of the RLC in wild-type cells, but RLC phosphorylation levels in MLCK-A-cells are unaffected by concanavalin A. Thus MLCK-A is regulated separately from the other MLCK(s) in the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8901579

  6. Immunoglobulin heavy chains in medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bony fish present an immunological system, which evolved independently from those of animals that migrated to land 400 million years ago. The publication of whole genome sequences and the availability of several cDNA libraries for medaka (Oryzias latipes) permitted us to perform a thorough analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chains present in this teleost. Results We identified IgM and IgD coding ESTs, mainly in spleen, kidney and gills using published cDNA libraries but we did not find any sequence that coded for IgT or other heavy chain isotypes described in fish. The IgM - ESTs corresponded with the secreted and membrane forms and surprisingly, the latter form only presented two constant heavy chain domains. This is the first time that this short form of membrane IgM is described in a teleost. It is different from that identified in Notothenioid teleost because it does not present the typical splicing pattern of membrane IgM. The identified IgD-ESTs only present membrane transcripts, with Cμ1 and five Cδ exons. Furthermore, there are ESTs with sequences that do not have any VH which disrupt open reading frames. A scan of the medaka genome using transcripts and genomic short reads resulted in five zones within a region on chromosome 8 with Cμ and Cδ exons. Some of these exons do not form part of antibodies and were at times interspersed, suggesting a recombination process between zones. An analysis of the ESTs confirmed that no antibodies are expressed from zone 3. Conclusions Our results suggest that the IGH locus duplication is very common among teleosts, wherein the existence of a recombination process explains the sequence homology between them. PMID:21676244

  7. Phosphorylation of Nonmuscle myosin II-A regulatory light chain resists Sendai virus fusion with host cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Provas; Saha, Shekhar; Chandra, Sunandini; Das, Alakesh; Dey, Sumit K.; Das, Mahua R.; Sen, Shamik; Sarkar, Debi P.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter host cells through membrane fusion and the cells in turn alter their shape to accommodate components of the virus. However, the role of nonmuscle myosin II of the actomyosin complex of host cells in membrane fusion is yet to be understood. Herein, we show that both (−) blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) and small interfering RNA markedly augment fusion of Sendai virus (SeV), with chinese hamster ovary cells and human hepatocarcinoma cells. Inhibition of RLC phosphorylation using inhibitors against ROCK, but not PKC and MRCK, or overexpression of phospho-dead mutant of RLC enhances membrane fusion. SeV infection increases cellular stiffness and myosin light chain phosphorylation at two hour post infection. Taken together, the present investigation strongly indicates that Rho-ROCK-NMII contractility signaling pathway may provide a physical barrier to host cells against viral fusion. PMID:25993465

  8. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Wise, Eric S.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Objective Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Approach and Results HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. Conclusions These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm. PMID:27136356

  9. Adiabatic compressibility of myosin subfragment-1 and heavy meromyosin with or without nucleotide.

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Y; Suzuki, N; Mihashi, K

    1993-01-01

    The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) and heavy meromyosin (HMM) of skeletal muscle in solution were determined by measuring the density and the sound velocity of the solution. The partial specific volumes of S1 and HMM were 0.713 and 0.711 cm3/g, respectively. The partial specific adiabatic compressibilities of S1 and HMM were 4.2 x 10(-12) and 2.9 x 10(-12) cm2/dyn, respectively. These values are in the same range as the most of globular proteins so far studied. The result indicates that the flexibility of S1 region almost equals to that of HMM. After binding to ADP.orthovanadate, S1 and HMM became softer than their complexes with ADP. The bulk moduli of S1 and HMM were of the order of (4-6) x 10(10) dyn/cm2, which are very comparable with the bulk modulus of muscle fiber. PMID:8298019

  10. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Stone, William L.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Brannon, Marianne F.; Hall, H. Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L.; Stone, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. PMID:26676053

  11. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Charles A; Stone, William L; Howell, Mary E A; Brannon, Marianne F; Hall, H Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Two distinct myosin light chain structures are induced by specific variations within the bound IQ motifs—functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Terrak, Mohammed; Wu, Guanming; Stafford, Walter F.; Lu, Renne C.; Dominguez, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    IQ motifs are widespread in nature. Mlc1p is a calmodulin-like myosin light chain that binds to IQ motifs of a class V myosin, Myo2p, and an IQGAP-related protein, Iqg1p, playing a role in polarized growth and cytokinesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The crystal structures of Mlc1p bound to IQ2 and IQ4 of Myo2p differ dramatically. When bound to IQ2, Mlc1p adopts a compact conformation in which both the N- and C-lobes interact with the IQ motif. However, in the complex with IQ4, the N-lobe no longer interacts with the IQ motif, resulting in an extended conformation of Mlc1p. The two light chain structures relate to two distinct subfamilies of IQ motifs, one of which does not interact with the N-lobes of calmodulin-like light chains. The correlation between light chain structure and IQ sequence is demonstrated further by sedimentation velocity analysis of complexes of Mlc1p with IQ motifs from Myo2p and Iqg1p. The resulting ‘free’ N-lobes of myosin light chains in the extended conformation could mediate the formation of ternary complexes during protein localization and/or partner recruitment. PMID:12554638

  13. Increasing evidence of mechanical force as a functional regulator in smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Fabian; Bauer, Magnus Sebastian; Rees, Martin; Alexandrovich, Alexander; Gautel, Mathias; Pippig, Diana Angela; Gaub, Hermann Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Mechanosensitive proteins are key players in cytoskeletal remodeling, muscle contraction, cell migration and differentiation processes. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a member of a diverse group of serine/threonine kinases that feature cytoskeletal association. Its catalytic activity is triggered by a conformational change upon Ca2+/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) binding. Due to its significant homology with the force-activated titin kinase, smMLCK is suspected to be also regulatable by mechanical stress. In this study, a CaM-independent activation mechanism for smMLCK by mechanical release of the inhibitory elements is investigated via high throughput AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy. The characteristic pattern of transitions between different smMLCK states and their variations in the presence of different substrates and ligands are presented. Interaction between kinase domain and regulatory light chain (RLC) substrate is identified in the absence of CaM, indicating restored substrate-binding capability due to mechanically induced removal of the auto-inhibitory regulatory region. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26473.001 PMID:28696205

  14. Kinetic properties and small-molecule inhibition of human myosin-6

    PubMed Central

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Selvadurai, Jayashankar; Bond, Lisa M.; Fedorov, Roman; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin-6 is an actin-based motor protein that moves its cargo towards the minus-end of actin filaments. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin-6 heavy chain and changes in the cellular abundance of the protein have been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Here, we present a detailed kinetic characterization of the human myosin-6 motor domain, describe the effect of 2,4,6-triiodophenol on the interaction of myosin-6 with F-actin and nucleotides, and show how addition of the drug reduces the number of myosin-6-dependent vesicle fusion events at the plasma membrane during constitutive secretion. PMID:22884421

  15. Characterization and ontogenetic expression analysis of the myosin light chains from the fast white muscle of mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi.

    PubMed

    Chu, W Y; Chen, J; Zhou, R X; Zhao, F L; Meng, T; Chen, D X; Nong, X X; Liu, Z; Lu, S Q; Zhang, J S

    2011-04-01

    Three full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones were isolated encoding the skeletal myosin light chain 1 (MLC1; 1237 bp), myosin light chain 2 (MLC2; 1206 bp) and myosin light chain 3 (MLC3; 1079 bp) from the fast white muscle cDNA library of mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi. The sequence analysis indicated that MLC1 and MLC3 were not produced from differentially spliced messenger RNAs (mRNA) as reported in birds and rodents but were encoded by different genes. The MLC2 encodes 170 amino acids, which include four EF-hand (helix-loop-helix) structures. The primary structures of the Ca(2+)-binding domain were well conserved among the MLC2s of seven other fish species. The ontogenetic expression analysis by real-time PCR showed that the three light-chain mRNAs were first detected in the gastrula stage, and their expression increased from the tail bud stage to the larval stage. All three MLC mRNAs showed longitudinal expression variation in the fast white muscle of S. chuatsi, especially MLC1 which was highly expressed at the posterior area. Taken together, the study provides a better understanding about the MLC gene structure and their expression pattern in muscle development of S. chuatsi.

  16. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Hare, Joshua M.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. We hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype. PMID:26124132

  17. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Hare, Joshua M.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-06-29

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. In this paper, we hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Finally, our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype.

  18. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts. PMID:27483374

  19. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; ...

    2015-06-29

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. In this paper, we hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In supportmore » of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Finally, our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype.« less

  20. Cytokinesis is not controlled by calmodulin or myosin light chain kinase in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Ellen L.; Thomas–Virnig, Christina L.; Hardin, Jeffery D.; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Furrow ingression in animal cell cytokinesis is controlled by phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (mRLC). In C. elegans embryos, Rho-dependent Kinase (RhoK) is involved in, but not absolutely required for, this phosphorylation. The calmodulin effector Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) can also phosphorylate mRLC and is widely regarded as a candidate for redundant function with RhoK. However, our results show that RNAi against C. elegans calmodulin and candidate MLCKs had no effect on cytokinesis in wild type or RhoK mutant embryos, ruling out the calmodulin/MLCK pathway as the missing regulator of cytokinesis in the C. elegans early embryo. PMID:17716666

  1. Cytokinesis is not controlled by calmodulin or myosin light chain kinase in the Caenorhabditis elegans early embryo.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, Ellen L; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L; Hardin, Jeffery D; White, John G

    2007-09-04

    Furrow ingression in animal cell cytokinesis is controlled by phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain (mRLC). In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, Rho-dependent Kinase (RhoK) is involved in, but not absolutely required for, this phosphorylation. The calmodulin effector myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) can also phosphorylate mRLC and is widely regarded as a candidate for redundant function with RhoK. However, our results show that RNA mediated interference against C. elegans calmodulin and candidate MLCKs had no effect on cytokinesis in wild-type or RhoK mutant embryos, ruling out the calmodulin/MLCK pathway as the missing regulator of cytokinesis in the C. elegans early embryo.

  2. Canine cardiac myosin with special referrence to pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy. I. Subunit composition.

    PubMed

    Siemankowski, R F; Dreizen, P

    1978-12-10

    In studies of myosin from left and right ventricles of normal hearts and hypertrophic hearts at 5 weeks and 13 weeks after aortic banding, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows intermediate molecular weight components which derive from heavy chains fragmented in the presence of dodecyl sulfate. The proportion of degraded heavy chains is greater in myosin from hypertrophic hearts than normal hearts, with comparable degradation in left and right ventricle myosin. The observed fragmentation of myosin results from proteolysis due to contaminant proteases or a thermally activated, heat-stable nonenzymatic process, or both. The susceptibility of heavy chains to crude myofibrillar proteases differs in normal and hypertrophic cardiac myosin; however, the kinetics of tryptic digestion are identical for both myosins. With precautions to minimize proteolytic artifacts on dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, preparations of myosin from left and right ventricles of normal and hypertrophic hearts exhibit comparable subunit composition, with approximately molar ratios of heavy chains, light chain L1, and light chain L2. Comparable stoichiometry for the light chain fraction is determined by high speed sedimentation equilibrium at pH 11 and direct fractionation of the different cardiac myosins. We do not confirm reports (e.g. Wikman-Coffelt, J., Fenner, C., Smith, A., and Mason, D. T. (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 1257-1262) of different proportions of light chains in left and right ventricle myosin of normal and hypertrophic canine hearts. The light chains display microheterogeneity, with L1 generating two isoelectric variants and L2 generating two major and two minor variants, but identical mobilities and isoelectric values are obtained in the different myosin preparations.

  3. A comparison between mammalian and avian fast skeletal muscle alkali myosin light chain genes: regulatory implications.

    PubMed Central

    Daubas, P; Robert, B; Garner, I; Buckingham, M

    1985-01-01

    A single locus in the mouse, rat and chicken encodes both alkali myosin light chains, MLC1F and MLC3F. This gene has two distinct promoters and gives rise to two different primary transcripts, which are processed by alternative and different modes of splicing to form MLC1F and MLC3F mRNAs. The MLC1F/MLC3F gene is very similar between mouse, rat and chicken, in terms of its overall structure, the length and location of the introns, and the splice site consensus sequences. Nucleotide sequences of coding regions are very conserved but 3' and 5' non coding regions of the mRNAs have diverged. In the MLC1F promoter regions, several blocks of nucleotides are highly conserved (more than 70% homology), especially a sequence of about 70 nucleotides, located between positions -80 and -150 relative to the Cap site. Conserved blocks of homology are also found in the MLC3F promoter regions, although the common sequences are shorter. The presence of such highly conserved nucleotide sequences in the 5' flanking regions suggests that these sequences are functionally important in initiation of transcription and regulation of expression of this complex gene. Primer extension experiments indicate multiple cap sites for MLC3F mRNA. Images PMID:4022770

  4. The long myosin light chain kinase is differentially phosphorylated during interphase and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Dulyaninova, Natalya G; Bresnick, Anne R

    2004-10-01

    We have shown previously that the activity of the long myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is cell cycle regulated with a decrease in specific activity during mitosis that can be restored following treatment with alkaline phosphatase. To better understand the role and significance of phosphorylation in regulating MLCK function during mitosis, we examined the phosphorylation state of in vivo derived MLCK. Phosphoamino acid analysis and phosphopeptide mapping demonstrate that the long MLCK is differentially phosphorylated on serine residues during interphase and mitosis with the majority of the phosphorylation sites located within the N-terminal IgG domain. Biochemical assays show that Aurora B binds and phosphorylates the IgG domain of the long MLCK. In addition, phosphopeptide maps of the endogenous full-length MLCK from mitotic cells and in vitro phosphorylated IgG domain demonstrate that Aurora B phosphorylates the same sites as those observed in vivo. Altogether, these studies suggest that the long MLCK may be a cellular target for Aurora B during mitosis.

  5. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, L M; Hidalgo, M J; Palmero, M; Ballesta, J J; Reig, J A; Garcia, A G; Viniegra, S

    1989-01-01

    The myosin-light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation accompanying catecholamine release in chromaffin cells was investigated with the objective of assessing the possible role of this contractile protein in catecholamine secretion. The electrophoretic characteristics of adrenomedullary MLC were determined by immunochemical techniques using two different specific antibodies. The identified 22 kDa phosphoprotein was mainly present in the cytosol, as demonstrated by ultracentrifugation and immunocytochemical analysis. A part of this protein was located on, or close to, the plasma membrane. Cell stimulation by secretagogues resulted in a Ca2(+)-dependent 32P incorporation into MLC, the time course of this process being related to catecholamine release. These findings were supported by a two-dimensional gel-electrophoretic analysis by which means this protein was resolved into two acidic forms. A role for Ca2(+)-calmodulin and Ca2(+)-phospholipid kinases in adrenomedullary MLC phosphorylation is reported. The results obtained suggest a regulatory role for such a protein in the underlying exocytotic event. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:2481449

  6. [Functional regulation of endothelial Myosin light chain kinase in extravascular migration of fibrosarcoma cells].

    PubMed

    Xin, Hua; Han, Zhen-guo

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the functional regulation of endothelial Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in extravascular migration of fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. An in vitro model of fibrosarcoma cell transmigration across a monolayer of HUVEC cultured on collagen gel was applied to observe extravascular migration of HT1080 cells,and were the electrical resistance of HUVEC monolayer and endothelial MLC phosphorylation in extravascular migration of HT1080 cells. HT1080 cells migrated through endothelial cells into collagen gel, the electrical resistance of a HUVEC monolayer was reduced and endothelial MLC phosphorylation was enhanced in extravascular migration of fibrosarcoma cells. Endothelial MLCK inhibitor (ML-7) blocked extravascular migration of HT1080 cells and inhibited reduction of electrical resistance of a HUVEC monolayer and enhancement of endothelial MLC phosphorylation in extravascular migration of HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Endothelial MLCK regulates fibrosarcoma cell transendothelial migration through MLC phosphorylation, leading to cytoskeletal reorganization and endothelial cell constriction, then fibrosarcoma cells migrate into extravascular tissue through the gaps between endothelial cells.

  7. Olanzapine May Inhibit Colonic Motility Associated with the 5-HT Receptor and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiarui; Qiao, Ying; Le, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study whether the effects of olanzapine on gastrointestinal motility is related to the serotonin antagonism and myosin light chain kinase. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Olanzapine gavage was performed for each treatment group during the course of 30 continuous days, while the same volume of saline was given to the rats in the control group. Defecation of the rats was observed on days 7 and 30 after olanzapine gavage. The effects of olanzapine on contraction of colonic smooth muscles were observed in ex vivo experiments. A Western blot was used to evaluate expression levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and MLCK in colon segments of the rats. Results ResultsaaCompared to the control group, 5-160 µ M of olanzapine could inhibit dose-dependently the contraction of colonic smooth muscle ex vivo experiments. The maximum smooth muscle contraction effects of 5-HT and acetylcholine significantly decreased after treatment with 40-160 µ M of olanzapine. Constipation was found in the olanzapine-treated rats on day 7 and have sustained day 30 after gavage. Expression of MLCK in olanzapine-treated rats was significantly decreased, whereas the expression of SERT significantly increased on the day 7, then significantly decreased on the day 30 after olanzapine gavage. Conclusion SERT and MLCK may involve in the inhibition of colonic contraction induced by olanzapine. PMID:27081386

  8. Peptide modulators of myosin light chain kinase affect smooth muscle cell contraction.

    PubMed

    Kargacin, G J; Ikebe, M; Fay, F S

    1990-08-01

    To examine the importance of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in the initiation of contraction in smooth muscle, we used a constitutively active form of MLCK (IMLCK) and two specific peptide inhibitors of MLCK to study the activation of skinned single smooth muscle cells. Although unregulated by Ca-calmodulin, IMLCK, in vitro, was found to have biochemical properties like those of MLCK. Upon photolysis of caged ATP, IMLCK caused Ca-free shortening of skinned cells similar in time course and extent to that induced by Ca2+. Two peptide probes, RS-20 and SM-1, patterned after the Ca-calmodulin binding site and a pseudosubstrate inhibitory site, respectively, of the native MLCK molecule, were shown to specifically inhibit MLCK in in vitro experiments. Both peptides dose dependently inhibited Ca-induced shortening of skinned single cells. These results indicate that MLCK plays an essential role in the activation process in the smooth muscle cell in that activation of this enzyme is both necessary and sufficient for the initiation of contraction.

  9. AMPK Regulates Mitotic Spindle Orientation through Phosphorylation of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Thaiparambil, Jose T.; Eggers, Carrie M.

    2012-01-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine172 phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine19 phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLCser19) and spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLCser19 spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments. PMID:22688514

  10. Effects of a Fluorescent Myosin Light Chain Phosphatase Inhibitor on Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grindrod, Scott; Suy, Simeng; Fallen, Shannon; Eto, Masumi; Toretsky, Jeffrey; Brown, Milton L.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) is an enzyme important to regulation of cell cycle and motility that is shown to be upregulated in aggressive prostate cancer cells and tissue. We developed a fluorescent small molecule inhibitor of MLCP using structure based design in recombinant protein phosphatase 1C. Several best fit compounds were synthesized and evaluated by their inhibition of MLCP/32P-MLC dephosphorylation, which resulted in the identification of novel MLCP inhibitors. Androgen dependent (AD) and castration resistant prostate cancer cell (CRPC) lines were treated with the lead inhibitor resulting in decreased growth rate, reduced DNA synthesis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Moreover, CRPC cell lines showed an increased sensitivity to drug treatment having GI50 values four times lower than the AD prostate cancer cell line. This was reinforced by reduced BrdU DNA incorporation into CRPC cells compared to AD cells. β-actin disruption was also seen at much lower drug concentrations in CR cells which caused a dose dependent reduction in cellular chemotaxis of PC-3 cells. Since there are currently few clinical therapeutics targeting CR prostate cancer, MLCP represents a new target for preclinical and clinical development of new potential therapeutics which inhibit this disease phenotype. PMID:22655237

  11. Mechanism of action of endothelin in rat cardiac muscle: cross-bridge kinetics and myosin light chain phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Rossmanith, G H; Hoh, J F; Turnbull, L; Ludowyke, R I

    1997-01-01

    1. The molecular mechanism of inotropic action of endothelin was investigated in rat ventricular muscle by studying its effects on characteristics of isometric twitch, barium-induced steady contracture and the level of incorporation of 32Pi into myosin light chain 2. 2. Exposure of rat papillary muscle to endothelin caused an increase in isometric twitch force but did not alter the twitch-time parameters. 3. Endothelin did not significantly change the maximum contracture tension but did cause an increase in contracture tension at submaximal levels of activation, without changes in the tension-to-stiffness ratio and kinetics of attached cross-bridges. Kinetics of attached cross-bridges were deduced during steady contracture from complex-stiffness values, and in particular from the frequency at which muscle stiffness assumes a minimum value, fmin. Endothelin did not alter fmin. 4. Endothelin caused an increase in the level of incorporation of 32Pi into myosin light chain 2 without a concurrent change in the level of incorporation of 32Pi into troponin I. 5. We conclude that the inotropic action of endothelin is not due to an increase in the kinetics of attached cross-bridges, nor due to a change in the force per unit cross-bridge, but may result from an increased divalent cation sensitivity caused by elevated myosin light chain 2 phosphorylation, resembling post-tetanic potentiation in fast skeletal muscle fibres. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9409484

  12. Age- and Activity-Related Differences in the Abundance of Myosin Essential and Regulatory Light Chains in Human Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Ab. Malik, Zulezwan; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Edwards, Ben J.; Burniston, Jatin G.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods for phenotyping skeletal muscle (e.g., immunohistochemistry) are labor-intensive and ill-suited to multixplex analysis, i.e., assays must be performed in a series. Addressing these concerns represents a largely unmet research need but more comprehensive parallel analysis of myofibrillar proteins could advance knowledge regarding age- and activity-dependent changes in human muscle. We report a label-free, semi-automated and time efficient LC-MS proteomic workflow for phenotyping the myofibrillar proteome. Application of this workflow in old and young as well as trained and untrained human skeletal muscle yielded several novel observations that were subsequently verified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). We report novel data demonstrating that human ageing is associated with lesser myosin light chain 1 content and greater myosin light chain 3 content, consistent with an age-related reduction in type II muscle fibers. We also disambiguate conflicting data regarding myosin regulatory light chain, revealing that age-related changes in this protein more closely reflect physical activity status than ageing per se. This finding reinforces the need to control for physical activity levels when investigating the natural process of ageing. Taken together, our data confirm and extend knowledge regarding age- and activity-related phenotypes. In addition, the MRM transitions described here provide a methodological platform that can be fine-tuned to suite multiple research needs and thus advance myofibrillar phenotyping. PMID:28248225

  13. Toxoplasma gondii myosin A and its light chain: a fast, single-headed, plus-end-directed motor

    PubMed Central

    Herm-Götz, Angelika; Weiss, Stefan; Stratmann, Rolf; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Ruff, Christine; Meyhöfer, Edgar; Soldati, Thierry; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Soldati, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Successful host cell invasion is a prerequisite for survival of the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasites and establishment of infection. Toxoplasma gondii penetrates host cells by an active process involving its own actomyosin system and which is distinct from induced phagocytosis. Toxoplasma gondii myosin A (TgMyoA) is presumed to achieve power gliding motion and host cell penetration by the capping of apically released adhesins towards the rear of the parasite. We report here an extensive biochemical characterization of the functional TgMyoA motor complex. TgMyoA is anchored at the plasma membrane and binds a novel type of myosin light chain (TgMLC1). Despite some unusual features, the kinetic and mechanical properties of TgMyoA are unexpectedly similar to those of fast skeletal muscle myosins. Microneedle–laser trap and sliding velocity assays established that TgMyoA moves in unitary steps of 5.3 nm with a velocity of 5.2 µm/s towards the plus end of actin filaments. TgMyoA is the first fast, single-headed myosin and fulfils all the requirements for power parasite gliding. PMID:11980712

  14. Lens fiber cell elongation and differentiation is associated with a robust increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation in the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Skiba, Nikolai; Vasantha Rao, Ponugoti

    2007-10-01

    Myosin II, a molecular motor, plays a critical role in cell migration, cell shape changes, cell adhesion, and cytokinesis. To understand the role of myosin II in lens fiber cell elongation and differentiation, we determined the distribution pattern of nonmuscle myosin IIA, IIB, and phosphorylated regulatory myosin light chain-2 (phospho-MLC) in frozen sections of the developing mouse lens by immunofluorescence analysis. While myosin IIA was distributed uniformly throughout the differentiating lens, including the epithelium and fibers, myosin IIB was localized predominantly to the epithelium and the posterior tips of the lens fibers. In contrast, immunostaining with a di-phospho-MLC antibody localized intensely and precisely to the elongating and differentiating primary and secondary lens fibers, co-localizing with actin filaments. An in situ analysis of Rho GTPase activation revealed that Rho-GTP was distributed uniformly throughout the embryonic lens, including epithelium and fibers. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity by ML-7 in organ cultured mouse lenses led to development of nuclear lens opacity in association with abnormal fiber cell organization. Taken together, these data reveal a distinct spatial distribution pattern of myosin II isoforms in the developing lens and a robust activation of MLC phosphorylation in the differentiating lens fibers. Moreover, the regulation of MLC phosphorylation by MLCK appears to be critical for crystallin organization and for maintenance of lens transparency and lens membrane function.

  15. Isolation of cardiac myosin light-chain isotypes by chromatofocusing. Comparison of human cardiac atrial light-chain 1 and foetal ventricular light-chain 1.

    PubMed

    Vincent, N D; Cummins, P

    1985-04-01

    Cardiac myosin light chain isotypes have been resolved using chromatofocusing, a new preparative column chromatographic technique. The method relies on production of narrow-range, shallow and stable pH gradients using ion-exchange resins and buffers with even buffering capacity over the required pH range. Light chains were resolved in order of decreasing isoelectric point in the pH range 5.2-4.5. Gradients of delta pH = 0.004-0.006/ml elution volume were achieved which were capable of resolving light chains with isoelectric point differences of only 0.03. Analytical isoelectric focusing of light chains in polyacrylamide gels could be used to predict the results of preparative chromatofocusing for method development. Chromatofocusing was capable of resolving human and bovine cardiac light chain 1 and 2 subunits, atrial (ALC) and ventricular (VLC) light chain isotypes and homologous VLC-2 and VLC-2* light chains. The technique was used to purify and resolve the human foetal ventricular light chain 1 (FLC-1) from adult ventricular light chain 1 (VLC-1) present in foetal ventricles and the atrial light chain 1 (ALC-1) in adult atria. Comparative peptide mapping studies and amino acid analyses were carried out on FLC-1 and ALC-1. No differences were detected between FLC-1 and ALC-1 using three different proteases and amino acid compositions were similar with the exception of glycine content. The studies indicate that FLC-1 and ALC-1 are homologous, and possibly identical, light chains. Comparison of human FLC-1/ALC-1 with VLC-1 suggested marked structural and chemical differences in these light chain isotypes, in particular in the contents of methionine, proline, lysine and alanine residues. Differences in the contents of these residues were also apparent in the corresponding bovine atrial and ventricular light chains [Wikman-Coffelt, J. & Srivastava, S. (1979) FEBS Lett. 106, 207-212]. The latter three residues are known to be rich in the N-termini of cardiac and

  16. Cardiac V1 and V3 myosins differ in their hydrolytic and mechanical activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, P; Harris, D E; Alpert, N R; Warshaw, D M

    1995-08-01

    The two mammalian cardiac myosin heavy chain isoforms, alpha and beta, have 93% amino acid homology, but hearts expressing these myosins exhibit marked differences in their mechanical activities. To further understand the function of these cardiac myosins as molecular motors, we compared the ability of these myosins to hydrolyze ATP and to both translocate actin filaments and generate force in an in vitro motility assay. V1 myosin has twice the actin-activated ATPase activity and three times the actin filament sliding velocity when compared with V3 myosin. In contrast, the force-generating ability of these myosins is quite different when the total force produced by a small population of myosin molecules (> 50) is examined. V1 myosin produces only one half the average cross-bridge force of V3 myosin. With discrete areas of primary structural heterogeneity known to exist between alpha and beta heavy chains, the differences we report in the hydrolytic and mechanical activities of the motors are explored in the context of potential structural and kinetic differences between the V1 and V3 myosins.

  17. Myosin light chain phosphorylation enhances contraction of heart muscle via structural changes in both thick and thin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Contraction of heart muscle is triggered by calcium binding to the actin-containing thin filaments but modulated by structural changes in the myosin-containing thick filaments. We used phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (cRLC) by the cardiac isoform of its specific kinase to elucidate mechanisms of thick filament-mediated contractile regulation in demembranated trabeculae from the rat right ventricle. cRLC phosphorylation enhanced active force and its calcium sensitivity and altered thick filament structure as reported by bifunctional rhodamine probes on the cRLC: the myosin head domains became more perpendicular to the filament axis. The effects of cRLC phosphorylation on thick filament structure and its calcium sensitivity were mimicked by increasing sarcomere length or by deleting the N terminus of the cRLC. Changes in thick filament structure were highly cooperative with respect to either calcium concentration or extent of cRLC phosphorylation. Probes on unphosphorylated myosin heads reported similar structural changes when neighboring heads were phosphorylated, directly demonstrating signaling between myosin heads. Moreover probes on troponin showed that calcium sensitization by cRLC phosphorylation is mediated by the thin filament, revealing a signaling pathway between thick and thin filaments that is still present when active force is blocked by Blebbistatin. These results show that coordinated and cooperative structural changes in the thick and thin filaments are fundamental to the physiological regulation of contractility in the heart. This integrated dual-filament concept of contractile regulation may aid understanding of functional effects of mutations in the protein components of both filaments associated with heart disease. PMID:27162358

  18. Segregated assembly of muscle myosin expressed in nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Moncman, C L; Rindt, H; Robbins, J; Winkelmann, D A

    1993-10-01

    Skeletal muscle myosin cDNAs were expressed in a simian kidney cell line (COS) and a mouse myogenic cell line to investigate the mechanisms controlling early stages of myosin filament assembly. An embryonic chicken muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) cDNA was linked to constitutive promoters from adenovirus or SV40 and transiently expressed in COS cells. These cells accumulate hybrid myosin molecules composed of muscle MHCs and endogenous, nonmuscle, myosin light chains. The muscle myosin is found associated with a Triton insoluble fraction from extracts of the COS cells by immunoprecipitation and is detected in 2.4 +/- 0.8-micron-long filamentous structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm by immunofluorescence microscopy. These structures are shown by immunoelectron microscopy to correspond to loosely organized bundles of 12-16-nm-diameter myosin filaments. The muscle and nonmuscle MHCs are segregated in the transfected cells; the endogenous nonmuscle myosin displays a normal distribution pattern along stress fibers and does not colocalize with the muscle myosin filament bundles. A similar assembly pattern and distribution are observed for expression of the muscle MHC in a myogenic cell line. The myosin assembles into filament bundles, 1.5 +/- 0.6 micron in length, that are distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the undifferentiated myoblasts and segregated from the endogenous nonmuscle myosin. In both cell lines, formation of the myosin filament bundles is dependent on the accumulation of the protein. In contrast to these results, the expression of a truncated MHC that lacks much of the rod domain produces an assembly deficient molecule. The truncated MHC is diffusely distributed throughout the cytoplasm and not associated with cellular stress fibers. These results establish that the information necessary for the segregation of myosin isotypes into distinct cellular structures is contained within the primary structure of the MHC and that other factors are not

  19. X-ray diffraction analysis of the effects of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and butanedione monoxime on skinned skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Masako; Li, Zhao-bo; Ohno, Tetsuo; Takemori, Shigeru; Hoh, Joseph F. Y.; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is an important modulator of skeletal muscle performance and plays a key role in posttetanic potentiation and staircase potentiation of twitch contractions. The structural basis for these phenomena within the filament lattice has not been thoroughly investigated. Using a synchrotron radiation source at SPring8, we obtained X-ray diffraction patterns from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers before and after phosphorylation of myosin RLC in the presence of myosin light chain kinase, calmodulin, and calcium at a concentration below the threshold for tension development ([Ca2+] = 10−6.8 M). After phosphorylation, the first myosin layer line slightly decreased in intensity at ∼0.05 nm−1 along the equatorial axis, indicating a partial loss of the helical order of myosin heads along the thick filament. Concomitantly, the (1,1/1,0) intensity ratio of the equatorial reflections increased. These results provide a firm structural basis for the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin RLC caused the myosin heads to move away from the thick filaments towards the thin filaments, thereby enhancing the probability of interaction with actin. In contrast, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), known to inhibit contraction by impeding phosphate release from myosin, had exactly the opposite effects on meridional and equatorial reflections to those of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that these antagonistic effects are due to the acceleration of phosphate release from myosin by phosphorylation and its inhibition by BDM, the consequent shifts in crossbridge equilibria leading to opposite changes in abundance of the myosin-ADP-inorganic phosphate complex state associated with helical order of thick filaments. PMID:26911280

  20. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  1. Regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in the trabecular meshwork: role in aqueous humour outflow facility.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Vasantha; Deng, Peifeng; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Epstein, David L

    2005-02-01

    Cellular contraction and relaxation and integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue have been thought to influence aqueous humour outflow. However, the cellular pathways that regulate these events in TM cells are not well understood. In this study, we investigated physiological agonist-mediated regulation of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in the TM, and correlated such effects with alterations in aqueous outflow facility, since MLC phosphorylation is a critical biochemical determinant of cellular contraction in TM cells. Treatment of serum starved human TM cells with endothelin-1 (0.1 microM), thromboxane A2 mimetic U-46619 (1.0 microM), or angiotensin II (1 microM), all of which are agonists of G-protein coupled receptors, triggered activation of MLC phosphorylation, as determined by urea/glycerol-based Western blot analysis. Agonist-stimulated increase in MLC phosphorylation was associated with activation of Rho GTPase in TM cells, as determined in pull-down assays. In contrast, treatment of human TM cells with a novel Rho-kinase inhibitor H-1152 (0.1-2 microM), in the presence of serum reduced basal MLC phosphorylation. H-1152 also increased aqueous outflow facility significantly in a dose-dependent fashion, in perfusion studies with cadaver porcine eyes. This effect of H-1152 on outflow facility was associated with decreased MLC phosphorylation in TM tissue of drug-perfused eyes. Collectively, this study identifies potential physiological regulators of MLC phosphorylation in human TM cells and demonstrates the significance of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway-mediated MLC phosphorylation in modulation of aqueous outflow facility through TM.

  2. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. Constraints on intron evolution in the gene encoding the myosin alkali light chain in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Leicht, B.G.; Muse, S.V.; Hanczyc, M.

    1995-01-01

    Interspecific comparisons of intron sequences reveal conserved blocks of invariant nucleotides and several other departures from the strictly neutral model of molecular evolution. To distinguish the past action of evolutionary forces in introns known to have regulatory information, we examined nucleotide sequence variation at 991 sites in a random sample of 16 Drosophila melanogaster alleles of the gene encoding the myosin alkali light chain (Mlc1). The Mlc1 gene of D. melanogaster encodes two Mlc1 isoforms via developmentally regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Analyses of these data reveal that introns 4 and 5, which flank the alternatively spliced exon 5, have reduced levels of both intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific divergence relative to intron 3. No polymorphism was observed in any of the exons examined in D. melanogaster. A genealogical analysis clearly demonstrates the occurrence of intragenic recombination in the ancestral history of Mlc1. Recombination events are estimated to be 13 times more likely than mutation events over the span of the sequenced region. Although there is little evidence for pairwise linkage disequilibrium in the Mlc1 region, higher order disequilibrium. does seem to be present in the 5{prime} half of the portion of the gene that was examined. Predictions of the folding free energy of the pre-mRNA reveal that sampled alleles have a significantly higher (less stable) free energy than do randomly permuted sequences. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that introns surrounding an alternatively spliced exon are subjected to additional constraints, perhaps due to specific aspects of secondary structure required for appropriate splicing of the pre-mRNA molecule. 48 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Myosin Light Chain Kinase Mediates Intestinal Barrier Disruption following Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuanli; Wang, Pei; Su, Qin; Wang, Shiliang; Wang, Fengjun

    2012-01-01

    Background Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK) is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. Methodology/Principal Findings Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control) or 30% total body surface area (TBSA) full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg), an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. Conclusions/Significance The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury. PMID:22529961

  5. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang-Fan; Wang, Hao; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. PMID:22348072

  6. The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in the reptile Anolis carolinensis.

    PubMed

    Gambón Deza, Francisco; Sánchez Espinel, Christian; Magadán Mompó, Susana

    2009-05-01

    We describe the entire immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus from the reptile Anolis carolinensis. The heavy chain constant (C(H)) region includes C mu, C delta and C upsilon genes. This is the first description of a C upsilon gene in the reptilian class. Variable (V(H)), diversity (D(H)) and joining (J(H)) genes are located 5' from the constant (C(H)) chain complex locus. The C mu and C upsilon genes encode antibodies with four immunoglobulin domains. The C delta gene encoded an 11 domain delta heavy chain as in Eublepharis macularius. Seventy V(H) genes, belonging to 28 families, were identified, and they can be sorted into five broader groups. The similarity of the organization of the reptilian genes with those of amphibians and mammals suggests the existence of a process of heavy chain genomic reorganization before the radiation of tetrapod vertebrates.

  7. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  8. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the motor domain of nonmuscle myosin which is specifically expressed in the mantle pallial cell layer of scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y

    2000-12-01

    It has been reported that catch and striated muscle myosin heavy chains of scallop are generated through alternative splicing from a single gene [Nyitray et al. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 12686-12690]. They suggested that the catch muscle type myosin was expressed in various tissues of scallop, including the gonad, heart, foot, and mantle. However, there have been no reports of the primary structure of myosin from tissues other than the adductor muscles. In this study, we isolated a cDNA encoding the motor domain of myosin from the mantle tissue of scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis), and determined its nucleotide sequence. Sequence analysis revealed that mantle myosin exhibited 65% identity with Drosophila non muscle myosin, 60% with chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin, and 44% with scallop striated muscle myosin. The mantle myosin has inserted sequences in the 27 kDa domain of the head region, and has a longer loop 1 structure than those of scallop striated and catch muscle myosins. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mantle myosin is classified as a smooth/nonmuscle type myosin. Western blot analysis with antibodies produced against the N-terminal region of the mantle myosin revealed that this myosin was specifically expressed in the mantle pallial cell layer consisting of nonmuscle cells. Our results show that mantle myosin is classified as a nonmuscle type myosin in scallop.

  9. Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and myosin heavy polypeptide gene products in degenerating rotator cuff muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Bruno; Zumstein, Matthias; Regenfelder, Felix; Steinmann, Patrick; Fuchs, Thomas; Husmann, Knut; Hellermann, Jens; Jost, Bernhard; Hodler, Jürg; Born, Walter; Gerber, C

    2008-07-01

    Impaired function of shoulder muscles, resulting from rotator cuff tears, is associated with abnormal deposition of fat in muscle tissue, but corresponding cellular and molecular mechanisms, likely reflected by altered gene expression profiles, are largely unknown. Here, an analysis of muscle gene expression was carried out by semiquantitative RT-PCR in total RNA extracts of supraspinatus biopsies collected from 60 patients prior to shoulder surgery. A significant increase of alpha-skeletal muscle actin (p = 0.0115) and of myosin heavy polypeptide 1 (p = 0.0147) gene transcripts was observed in parallel with progressive fat deposition in the muscle, assessed on parasagittal T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo magnetic resonance images according to Goutallier. Upregulation of alpha-skeletal muscle actin and of myosin heavy polypeptide-1 has been reported to be associated with increased muscle tissue metabolism and oxidative stress. The findings of the present study, therefore, challenge the hypothesis that increased fat deposition in rotator cuff muscle after injury reflects muscle degeneration.

  10. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    PubMed Central

    Lima, V.V.; Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P.; Webb, R.C.; Tostes, R.C.; Giachini, F.R.

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca2+/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction. PMID:25140811

  11. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain.

    PubMed

    Lima, V V; Lobato, N S; Filgueira, F P; Webb, R C; Tostes, R C; Giachini, F R

    2014-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2 ± 2 vs 7.9 ± 1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4 ± 2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3 ± 2 vs 7.5 ± 2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1 ± 2 vs 7.4 ± 2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca(2+)/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction.

  12. Differential roles of Rho-kinase and myosin light chain kinase in regulating shape, adhesion, and migration of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Verena; Schmid, Manuela; Nievergelt, Alexandra

    2006-05-05

    We present evidence for differential roles of Rho-kinase and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in regulating shape, adhesion, migration, and chemotaxis of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells on laminin-coated surfaces. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho-kinase by Y-27632 or inhibition of MLCK by W-7 or ML-7 resulted in significant attenuation of constitutive myosin light chain phosphorylation. Rho-kinase inhibition resulted in sickle-shaped cells featuring long, thin F-actin-rich protrusions. These cells adhered more strongly to laminin and migrated faster. Inhibition of MLCK in contrast resulted in spherical cells and marked impairment of adhesion and migration. Inhibition of myosin II activation with blebbistatin resulted in a morphology similar to that induced by Y-27632 and enhanced migration and adhesion. Cells treated first with blebbistatin and then with ML-7 also rounded up, suggesting that effects of MLCK inhibition on HT1080 cell shape and motility are independent of inhibition of myosin activity.

  13. The Plasmodium Class XIV Myosin, MyoB, Has a Distinct Subcellular Location in Invasive and Motile Stages of the Malaria Parasite and an Unusual Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Noor A.; Green, Judith L.; Wall, Richard J.; Knuepfer, Ellen; Moon, Robert W.; Schulte-Huxel, Christina; Stanway, Rebecca R.; Martin, Stephen R.; Howell, Steven A.; Douse, Christopher H.; Cota, Ernesto; Tate, Edward W.; Tewari, Rita; Holder, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Myosin B (MyoB) is one of the two short class XIV myosins encoded in the Plasmodium genome. Class XIV myosins are characterized by a catalytic “head,” a modified “neck,” and the absence of a “tail” region. Myosin A (MyoA), the other class XIV myosin in Plasmodium, has been established as a component of the glideosome complex important in motility and cell invasion, but MyoB is not well characterized. We analyzed the properties of MyoB using three parasite species as follows: Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium berghei, and Plasmodium knowlesi. MyoB is expressed in all invasive stages (merozoites, ookinetes, and sporozoites) of the life cycle, and the protein is found in a discrete apical location in these polarized cells. In P. falciparum, MyoB is synthesized very late in schizogony/merogony, and its location in merozoites is distinct from, and anterior to, that of a range of known proteins present in the rhoptries, rhoptry neck or micronemes. Unlike MyoA, MyoB is not associated with glideosome complex proteins, including the MyoA light chain, myosin A tail domain-interacting protein (MTIP). A unique MyoB light chain (MLC-B) was identified that contains a calmodulin-like domain at the C terminus and an extended N-terminal region. MLC-B localizes to the same extreme apical pole in the cell as MyoB, and the two proteins form a complex. We propose that MLC-B is a MyoB-specific light chain, and for the short class XIV myosins that lack a tail region, the atypical myosin light chains may fulfill that role. PMID:25802338

  14. Tarantula myosin free head regulatory light chain phosphorylation stiffens N-terminal extension, releasing it and blocking its docking back.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Lehman, William; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of smooth and striated muscle myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) showed that diphosphorylation induces a disorder-to-order transition. Our goal here was to further explore the effects of mono- and diphosphorylation on the straightening and rigidification of the tarantula myosin RLC NTE. For that we used MD simulations followed by persistence length analysis to explore the consequences of secondary and tertiary structure changes occurring on RLC NTE following phosphorylation. Static and dynamic persistence length analysis of tarantula RLC NTE peptides suggest that diphosphorylation produces an important 24-fold straightening and a 16-fold rigidification of the RLC NTE, while monophosphorylation has a less profound effect. This new information on myosin structural mechanics, not fully revealed by previous EM and MD studies, add support to a cooperative phosphorylation-dependent activation mechanism as proposed for the tarantula thick filament. Our results suggest that the RLC NTE straightening and rigidification after Ser45 phosphorylation leads to a release of the constitutively Ser35 monophosphorylated free head swaying away from the thick filament shaft. This is so because the stiffened diphosphorylated RLC NTE would hinder the docking back of the free head after swaying away, becoming released and mobile and unable to recover its original interacting position on activation.

  15. Tarantula Myosin Free Head Regulatory Light Chain Phosphorylation Stiffens N-terminal Extension Releasing it and Blocking its Docking Back

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Li, Xiaochuan (Edward); Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D.; Lehman, William; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of smooth and striated muscle myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) showed that diphosphorylation induces a disorder-to-order transition. Our goal here was to further explore the effects of mono- and diphosphorylation on the straightening and rigidification of the tarantula myosin RLC NTE. For that we used MD simulations followed by persistence length analysis to explore the consequences of secondary and tertiary structure changes occurring on RLC NTE following phosphorylation. Static and dynamic persistence lengths analysis of tarantula RLC NTE peptides suggest that diphosphorylation produces an important 24-fold straightening and a 16-fold rigidification of the RLC NTE, while monophosphorylation has a less profound effect. This new information on myosin structural mechanics, not fully revealed by previous EM and MD studies, add support to a cooperative phosphorylation-dependent activation mechanism as proposed for the tarantula thick filament. Our results suggest that the RLC NTE straightening and rigidification after Ser45 phosphorylation leads to a release of the constitutively Ser35 monophosphorylated free head swaying away from the thick filament shaft in the relaxed state. This is so because the stiffened diphosphorylated RLC NTE would hinder the docking back of the free head after swaying away, becoming released and mobile and unable to recover its original interacting position on activation. PMID:26038302

  16. Probing myosin head structure with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, D A; Lowey, S

    1986-04-20

    Monoclonal antibodies that react with defined regions of the heavy and light chains of chicken skeletal muscle myosin have been used to provide a correlation between the primary and the tertiary structures of the head. Electron microscopy of rotary shadowed antibody-myosin complexes shows that the sites for three epitopes in the 25,000 Mr tryptic fragment (25k) of subfragment-1, including one within 4000 Mr of the amino terminus of the myosin heavy chain, are clustered 145(+/- 20) A from the head-rod junction. An epitope in the 50,000 Mr fragment maps even further out on the head. These antibodies bind to the head in several orientations, suggesting that each of the heads can rotate can rotate 180 degrees about the head-rod junction. The epitopes are accessible on subfragment-1 bound to actin when they were probed with Fab fragments; therefore, none of these heavy chain sites is is on the contact surface between the head and actin. Two of the anti-25k antibodies affect the K+-EDTA-and Ca2+-ATPase activities of myosin in a manner that mimics the effect on activity of the modification of the reactive thiol, SH-1. These two antibodies also inhibit the actin-activated ATPase non-competitively with respect to actin. None of the other eight antibodies tested had any marked effect on activity. A monoclonal antibody that reacts with an epitope in the amino-terminal third of myosin light chain 2 maps close to the head-rod junction. A polyclonal antibody specific for the amino terminus of light chain 3 binds further up in the "neck region" of the head, indicating that these portions of the two classes of light chains are located at different sites.

  17. Actin and Myosin in Pea Tendrils 1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Ze; Yen, Lung-Fei

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate here the presence of actin and myosin in pea (Pisum sativum L.) tendrils. The molecular weight of tendril actin is 43,000, the same as rabbit skeletal muscle actin. The native molecular weight of tendril myosin is about 440,000. Tendril myosin is composed of two heavy chains of molecular weight approximately 165,000 and four (two pairs) light chains of 17,000 and 15,000. At high ionic strength, the ATPase activity of pea tendril myosin is activated by K+-EDTA and Ca2+ and is inhibited by Mg2+. At low ionic strength, the Mg2+-ATPase activity of pea tendril myosin is activated by rabbit skeletal muscle F-actin. Superprecipitation occurred after incubation at room temperature when ATP was added to the crude actomyosin extract. It is suggested that the interaction of actin and myosin may play a role in the coiling movement of pea tendril. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16666586

  18. Heart Failure Induced by Perinatal Ablation of Cardiac Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Islam, Yasmin F K; Joseph, Ryan; Chowdhury, Rajib R; Anderson, Robert H; Kasahara, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Germline knockout mice are invaluable in understanding the function of the targeted genes. Sometimes, however, unexpected phenotypes are encountered, due in part to the activation of compensatory mechanisms. Germline ablation of cardiac myosin light chain kinase (cMLCK) causes mild cardiac dysfunction with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas ablation in adult hearts results in acute heart failure with cardiomyocyte atrophy. We hypothesized that compensation after ablation of cMLCK is dependent on developmental staging and perinatal-onset of cMLCK ablation will result in more evident heart failure than germline ablation, but less profound when compared to adult-onset ablation. Methods and Results: The floxed-Mylk3 gene was ablated at the beginning of the perinatal stage using a single intra-peritoneal tamoxifen injection of 50 mg/kg into pregnant mice on the 19th day of gestation, this being the final day of gestation. The level of cMLCK protein level could no longer be detected 3 days after the injection, with these mice hereafter denoted as the perinatal Mylk3-KO. At postnatal day 19, shortly before weaning age, these mice showed reduced cardiac contractility with a fractional shortening 22.8 ± 1.0% (n = 7) as opposed to 31.4 ± 1.0% (n = 11) in controls. The ratio of the heart weight relative to body weight was significantly increased at 6.68 ± 0.28 mg/g (n = 12) relative to the two control groups, 5.90 ± 0.16 (flox/flox, n = 11) and 5.81 ± 0.33 (wild/wild/Cre, n = 5), accompanied by reduced body weight. Furthermore, their cardiomyocytes were elongated without thickening, with a long-axis of 101.8 ± 2.4 μm (n = 320) as opposed to 87.1 ± 1.6 μm (n = 360) in the controls. Conclusion: Perinatal ablation of cMLCK produces an increase of heart weight/body weight ratio, a reduction of contractility, and an increase in the expression of fetal genes. The perinatal Mylk3-KO cardiomyocytes were elongated in the absence of thickening, differing from the

  19. Myosin Storage Myopathy in C. elegans and Human Cultured Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahl-Halvarsson, Martin; Pokrzywa, Malgorzata; Rauthan, Manish; Pilon, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Myosin storage myopathy is a protein aggregate myopathy associated with the characteristic subsarcolemmal accumulation of myosin heavy chain in muscle fibers. Despite similar histological findings, the clinical severity and age of onset are highly variable, ranging from no weakness to severe impairment of ambulation, and usually childhood-onset to onset later in life. Mutations located in the distal end of the tail of slow/ß-cardiac myosin heavy chain are associated with myosin storage myopathy. Four missense mutations (L1793P, R1845W, E1883K and H1901L), two of which have been reported in several unrelated families, are located within or closed to the assembly competence domain. This location is critical for the proper assembly of sarcomeric myosin rod filaments. To assess the mechanisms leading to protein aggregation in myosin storage myopathy and to evaluate the impact of these mutations on myosin assembly and muscle function, we expressed mutated myosin proteins in cultured human muscle cells and in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. While L1793P mutant myosin protein efficiently incorporated into the sarcomeric thick filaments, R1845W and H1901L mutants were prone to formation of myosin aggregates without assembly into striated sarcomeric thick filaments in cultured muscle cells. In C. elegans, mutant alleles of the myosin heavy chain gene unc-54 corresponding to R1845W, E1883K and H1901L, were as effective as the wild-type myosin gene in rescuing the null mutant worms, indicating that they retain functionality. Taken together, our results suggest that the basis for the pathogenic effect of the R1845W and H1901L mutations are primarily structural rather than functional. Further analyses are needed to identify the primary trigger for the histological changes seen in muscle biopsies of patients with L1793P and E1883K mutations. PMID:28125727

  20. Biochemical and Immunocytochemical Characterization of Two Types of Myosins in Cultured Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Etsuo; Yukawa, Chiharu; Muto, Shoshi; Sonobe, Seiji; Shimmen, Teruo

    1999-01-01

    We have isolated a myosin (referred to as 170-kD myosin) from lily pollen tubes, which consists of 170-kD heavy chain and calmodulin (CaM) light chain and is responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. A 170-kD polypeptide that has similar antigenicity to the 170-kD myosin heavy chain of lily pollen tubes was also present in cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells, and possessed the ability to interact with F-actin in an ATP-dependent manner. In addition to this myosin, we identified biochemically another kind of myosin in BY-2 cells. This myosin consisted of a CaM light chain and a 175-kD heavy chain with antigenicity different from the 170-kD myosin heavy chain. In the present study, we referred to this myosin as 175-kD myosin. This myosin was able to translocate rhodamine-phalloidin (RP)-labeled F-actin at an average velocity of about 9 μm/s in the motility assay in vitro. In contrast, the sliding velocity of RP-labeled F-actin translocated by fractions containing the 170-kD myosin was 3 to 4 μm/s. The velocity of cytoplasmic streaming in living BY-2 cells ranged from 2 to 9 μm/s. The motile activity of 175-kD myosin in vitro was inhibited by Ca2+ at concentrations higher than 10−6 m. Immunoblot analyses using an antiserum against the heavy chain of 170- or 175-kD myosin revealed that in tobacco plants, the 175-kD myosin was expressed in leaf, stem, and root, but not in germinating pollen, while 170-kD myosin was present in all of these plant parts and in germinating pollen. These results suggest that the two types of myosins, 170 and 175 kD, presumably participate in cytoplasmic streaming in BY-2 cells and other somatic cells of tobacco plants. PMID:10517844

  1. [Protective effect of tiacalix[4]arene-tetrasulphonate on heavy metal inhibition of myometrium myosin subfragment-1 ATP-hydrolase activity].

    PubMed

    Labyntseva, R D; Bevza, O V; Bevza, A A; Liul'ko, A O; Kharchenko, S H; Kal'chenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals have a negative effect on the contractility of uterine smooth muscles (myometrium), these effects can lead to various pathologies of a women reproductive system. To overcome these effects the methods for correcting the myometrium contractile activity are to be developed. Catalyzed by myosin ATPase ATP hydrolysis is the most important reaction in the molecular mechanism of myometrium contraction. We have found an inhibitory effect of 0.03-0.3 mM Ni2+, Pb2+ and Cd2+ on enzymatic hydrolysis of ATP by myosin subfragment-1 obtained from swine uterine smooth muscles. We have demonstrated that 100 μM thiacalix[4]arene-tetrasulphonate (C-798) recovered to the control level of ATPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 in the presence of heavy metal cations. One of the most probable mechanisms of C-798 corrective activity is based on its ability to chelate heavy metals, thus cations Pb, Cd and Ni can be removed from the incubation medium. Computer simulation has demonstrated that the protective effect of C-798 may also be the result of weakening the interaction of heavy metal ions with amino acid residues of the myosin molecule near the active site of ATP hydrolase. The obtained results can be used for further research aimed at assessing the prospects of thiacalix[4]arene-tetrasulfonate as pharmacological compounds.

  2. Phospholipase C and myosin light chain kinase inhibition define a common step in actin regulation during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raymond; Fabian, Lacramioara; Forer, Arthur; Brill, Julie A

    2007-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is required for successful completion of cytokinesis. In addition, both PIP2 and phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) have been localized to the cleavage furrow of dividing mammalian cells. PLC hydrolyzes PIP2 to yield diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3), which in turn induces calcium (Ca2+) release from the ER. Several studies suggest PIP2 must be hydrolyzed continuously for continued cleavage furrow ingression. The majority of these studies employ the N-substituted maleimide U73122 as an inhibitor of PLC. However, the specificity of U73122 is unclear, as its active group closely resembles the non-specific alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). In addition, the pathway by which PIP2 regulates cytokinesis remains to be elucidated. Results Here we compared the effects of U73122 and the structurally unrelated PLC inhibitor ET-18-OCH3 (edelfosine) on cytokinesis in crane-fly and Drosophila spermatocytes. Our data show that the effects of U73122 are indeed via PLC because U73122 and ET-18-OCH3 produced similar effects on cell morphology and actin cytoskeleton organization that were distinct from those caused by NEM. Furthermore, treatment with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 caused cleavage furrow regression and loss of both F-actin and phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain from the contractile ring in a manner similar to treatment with U73122 and ET-18-OCH3. Conclusion We have used multiple inhibitors to examine the roles of PLC and MLCK, a predicted downstream target of PLC regulation, in cytokinesis. Our results are consistent with a model in which PIP2 hydrolysis acts via Ca2+ to activate myosin via MLCK and thereby control actin dynamics during constriction of the contractile ring. PMID:17509155

  3. Phospholipase C and myosin light chain kinase inhibition define a common step in actin regulation during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond; Fabian, Lacramioara; Forer, Arthur; Brill, Julie A

    2007-05-17

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is required for successful completion of cytokinesis. In addition, both PIP2 and phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) have been localized to the cleavage furrow of dividing mammalian cells. PLC hydrolyzes PIP2 to yield diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3), which in turn induces calcium (Ca2+) release from the ER. Several studies suggest PIP2 must be hydrolyzed continuously for continued cleavage furrow ingression. The majority of these studies employ the N-substituted maleimide U73122 as an inhibitor of PLC. However, the specificity of U73122 is unclear, as its active group closely resembles the non-specific alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM). In addition, the pathway by which PIP2 regulates cytokinesis remains to be elucidated. Here we compared the effects of U73122 and the structurally unrelated PLC inhibitor ET-18-OCH3 (edelfosine) on cytokinesis in crane-fly and Drosophila spermatocytes. Our data show that the effects of U73122 are indeed via PLC because U73122 and ET-18-OCH3 produced similar effects on cell morphology and actin cytoskeleton organization that were distinct from those caused by NEM. Furthermore, treatment with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 caused cleavage furrow regression and loss of both F-actin and phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain from the contractile ring in a manner similar to treatment with U73122 and ET-18-OCH3. We have used multiple inhibitors to examine the roles of PLC and MLCK, a predicted downstream target of PLC regulation, in cytokinesis. Our results are consistent with a model in which PIP2 hydrolysis acts via Ca2+ to activate myosin via MLCK and thereby control actin dynamics during constriction of the contractile ring.

  4. Primary structure of myosin from the striated adductor muscle of the Atlantic scallop, Pecten maximus, and expression of the regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Janes, D P; Patel, H; Chantler, P D

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the complete cDNA and deduced amino acid sequences of the heavy chain, regulatory light chain and essential light chain which constitute the molecular structure of myosin from the striated adductor muscle of the scallop, Pecten maximus. The deduced amino acid sequences of P. maximus regulatory light chain, essential light chain and heavy chain comprise 156, 156 and 1940 amino acids, respectively. These myosin peptide sequences, obtained from the most common of the eastern Atlantic scallops, are compared with those from three other molluscan myosins: the striated adductor muscles of Argopecten irradians and Placopecten magellanicus, and myosin from the siphon retractor muscle of the squid, Loligo pealei. The Pecten heavy chain sequence resembles those of the other two scallop sequences to a much greater extent as compared with the squid sequence, amino acid identities being 97.5% (A. irradians), 95.6% (P. magellanicus) and 73.6% (L. pealei), respectively. Myosin heavy chain residues that are known to be important for regulation are conserved in Pecten maximus. Using these Pecten sequences, we have overexpressed the regulatory light chain, and a combination of essential light chain and myosin heavy chain fragment, separately, in E. coli BL21 (DE3) prior to recombination, thereby producing Pecten regulatory domains without recourse to proteolytic digestion. The expressed regulatory domain was shown to undergo a calcium-dependent increase (approximately 7%) in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence with a mid-point at a pCa of 6.6.

  5. The pepsin digestibility of thermal gel products made from white croaker (Pennahia argentata) muscle in associating with myosin polymerization levels.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Nobuhiko; Wan, Jianrong; Watabe, Shugo

    2014-12-01

    Thermal gels were made from white croaker (Pennahia argentata) surimi at various polymerization levels of myosin heavy chains induced by suwari treatment at 38 °C for various time periods and subsequently heated at 85 °C for 20 min. Myosin heavy chain polymerization levels were also achieved in the presence of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) added at various concentrations in the surimi. The breaking strength and breaking strain rate were markedly increased during suwari treatment up to 60 min in accordance with the increased levels of myosin heavy chain polymerization. MTG enhanced myosin heavy chain polymerization during suwari treatment for 15 and 30 min, resulting in the increase of breaking strength. The solubilization in 8 M urea and pepsin digestibility of these gels as well as angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of their pepsin digests were decreased with the increased levels of myosin heavy chain polymerization. These results suggest that myosin heavy chain polymerization affects not only rheological properties of thermal gels but also their functional properties for human health.

  6. Myosin proteins identified from masseter muscle using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction--a pilot study of the relevance to orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Suchak, Archna; Hunt, Nigel P; Shah, Rishma; Sinanan, Andrea C M; Lloyd, Tim; Lewis, Mark P

    2009-04-01

    There is a clearly established relationship between masticatory muscle structure and facial form. Human studies in this area, however, have been limited, especially in consideration of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) family of contractile proteins. The aim of this pilot study was to assess if differences were detectable between genotype with respect to MyHC isoforms and the vertical facial phenotype in a sample of nine Caucasian female patients, age range 18-49 years, using a novel rapid technique. Masseter muscle biopsies were taken from patients with a range of vertical facial form. The levels of expression of the MyHC isoform genes MYH 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 were compared with the expression in a female calibrator patient aged 23 years with normal vertical facial form, using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Statistical analysis was undertaken using Pearson correlation coefficient. The results showed that there were distinct differences in gene expression between patients with a wide range of variation although changes in MYH1 were consistent with one cephalometric variable, the maxillo-mandibular angle. The full procedure, from start to finish, can be completed within half a day. Rapid genotyping of patients in this way could reveal important information of relevance to treatment. This technology has potential as a diagnostic and prognostic aid when considering correction of certain malocclusions.

  7. Mechanisms of cGMP-dependent mesangial-cell relaxation: a role for myosin light-chain phosphatase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Torrecillas, G; Díez-Marqués, M L; García-Escribano, C; Bosch, R J; Rodríguez-Puyol, D; Rodríguez-Puyol, M

    2000-01-01

    Although the cGMP-dependent relaxation of contractile cells seems to depend on the ability of the cyclic nucleotide to interfere with intracellular calcium, this does not appear to be the only mechanism involved. The present experiments were designed to analyse alternative mechanisms, trying to test the hypothesis that cGMP could relax rat mesangial cells by activating myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLC-PP), with the subsequent dephosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC). The effect of a cGMP analogue, dibutyryl cGMP (dbcGMP), on angiotensin II-(AII) and PMA-induced MLC phosphorylation (MLCP) was tested, in the presence of calyculin A (CA), an inhibitor of MLC-PP. MLCP was measured, after cell labelling with (32)P, by immunoprecipitation. dbcGMP prevented the increased MLCP induced by AII or PMA, and this inhibition was blocked by CA. dbcGMP also increased the MLC dephosphorylation observed in cells incubated with AII and in which MLC kinase and protein kinase C activities were blocked. The AII-elicited increased intracellular calcium concentration was only partially inhibited by dbcGMP. These results suggest that the cGMP-induced mesangial-cell relaxation could be due, at least partially, to the stimulation of MLC-PP. PMID:10657260

  8. Spatial and temporal control of nonmuscle myosin localization: identification of a domain that is necessary for myosin filament disassembly in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Myosin null mutants of Dictyostelium are defective for cytokinesis, multicellular development, and capping of surface proteins. We have used these cells as transformation recipients for an altered myosin heavy chain gene that encodes a protein bearing a carboxy-terminal 34- kD truncation. This truncation eliminates threonine phosphorylation sites previously shown to control filament assembly in vitro. Despite restoration of growth in suspension, development, and ability to cap cell surface proteins, these delta C34-truncated myosin transformants display severe cytoskeletal abnormalities, including excessive localization of the truncated myosin to the cortical cytoskeleton, impaired cell shaped dynamics, and a temporal defect in myosin dissociation from beneath capped surface proteins. These data demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of myosin plays a critical role in regulating the disassembly of the protein from contractile structures in vivo. PMID:1899668

  9. Differential roles of regulatory light chain and myosin binding protein-C phosphorylations in the modulation of cardiac force development

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Brett A.; Locher, Matthew R.; Bekyarova, Tanya; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-05-25

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by protein kinase A (PKA) independently accelerate the kinetics of force development in ventricular myocardium. However, while MLCK treatment has been shown to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}), PKA treatment has been shown to decrease pCa{sub 50}, presumably due to cardiac troponin I phosphorylation. Further, MLCK treatment increases Ca{sup 2+}-independent force and maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated force, whereas PKA treatment has no effect on either force. To investigate the structural basis underlying the kinase-specific differential effects on steady-state force, we used synchrotron low-angle X-ray diffraction to compare equatorial intensity ratios (I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}) to assess the proximity of myosin cross-bridge mass relative to actin and to compare lattice spacings (d{sub 1,0}) to assess the inter-thick filament spacing in skinned myocardium following treatment with either MLCK or PKA. As we showed previously, PKA phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} and, as hypothesized, treatment with MLCK also increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, which can explain the accelerated rates of force development during activation. Importantly, interfilament spacing was reduced by {approx}2 nm ({Delta} 3.5%) with MLCK treatment, but did not change with PKA treatment. Thus, RLC or cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases the proximity of cross-bridges to actin, but only RLC phosphorylation affects lattice spacing, which suggests that RLC and cMyBP-C modulate the kinetics of force development by similar structural mechanisms; however, the effect of RLC phosphorylation to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force is mediated by a distinct mechanism, most probably involving changes in interfilament spacing.

  10. Erythrocyte Protein 4.1 Binds and Regulates Myosin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternack, Gary R.; Racusen, Richard H.

    1989-12-01

    Myosin was recently identified in erythrocytes and was shown to partition both with membrane and cytosolic fractions, suggesting that it may be loosely bound to membranes [Fowler, V. M., Davis, J. Q. & Bennett, V. (1985) J. Cell Biol. 100, 47-55, and Wong, A. J., Kiehart, D. P. & Pollard, T. D. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 46-49]; however, the molecular basis for this binding was unclear. The present studies employed immobilized monomeric myosin to examine the interaction of myosin with erythrocyte protein 4.1. In human erythrocytes, protein 4.1 binds to integral membrane proteins and mediates spectrin-actin assembly. Protein 4.1 binds to rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with a Kd = 140 nM and a stoichiometry consistent with 1:1 binding. Heavy meromyosin competes for protein 4.1 binding with Ki = 36-54 nM; however, the S1 fragment (the myosin head) competes less efficiently. Affinity chromatography of partial chymotryptic digests of protein 4.1 on immobilized myosin identified a 10-kDa domain of protein 4.1 as the myosin-binding site. In functional studies, protein 4.1 partially inhibited the actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity of rabbit skeletal muscle myosin with Ki = 51 nM. Liver cytosolic and erythrocyte myosins preactivated with myosin light-chain kinase were similarly inhibited by protein 4.1. These studies show that protein 4.1 binds, modulates, and thus may regulate myosin. This interaction might serve to generate the contractile forces involved in Mg2+-ATP-dependent shape changes in erythrocytes and may additionally serve as a model for myosin organization and regulation in non-muscle cells.

  11. Calcium inhibition as an intracellular signal for actin–myosin interaction

    PubMed Central

    KOHAMA, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways include both the activation and the inhibition of biological processes. The activation of Ca2+ regulation of actin-myosin interactions was examined first, whereas it took 20 years for the author to clarify the inhibitory mode by using Physarum polycephalum, a lower eukaryote. This review describes the investigation of the inhibitory mode since 1980. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ on myosin was detected chemically by ATPase assays and mechanically by in vitro motility assays. The Ca2+-binding ability of Physarum myosin is as high as that of scallop myosin. Ca2+ inhibits Physarum myosin, whereas it activates scallop myosin. We cloned cDNA of the myosin heavy chain and light chains to express a hybrid of Physarum and scallop myosin, and found that the Ca-binding light chain (CaLc), which belongs to an alkali light chain class, plays a major role in Ca inhibition. The role of CaLc was confirmed by mutating its EF-hand, Ca-binding structure and expressing Physarum myosin as a recombinant protein. Thus, the data obtained by classical protein purification were confirmed by the results obtained with the modern recombinant techniques. However, there are some discrepancies that remain to be solved as described in Section XII. PMID:27941307

  12. Calcium inhibition as an intracellular signal for actin-myosin interaction.

    PubMed

    Kohama, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways include both the activation and the inhibition of biological processes. The activation of Ca(2+) regulation of actin-myosin interactions was examined first, whereas it took 20 years for the author to clarify the inhibitory mode by using Physarum polycephalum, a lower eukaryote. This review describes the investigation of the inhibitory mode since 1980. The inhibitory effect of Ca(2+) on myosin was detected chemically by ATPase assays and mechanically by in vitro motility assays. The Ca(2+)-binding ability of Physarum myosin is as high as that of scallop myosin. Ca(2+) inhibits Physarum myosin, whereas it activates scallop myosin. We cloned cDNA of the myosin heavy chain and light chains to express a hybrid of Physarum and scallop myosin, and found that the Ca-binding light chain (CaLc), which belongs to an alkali light chain class, plays a major role in Ca inhibition. The role of CaLc was confirmed by mutating its EF-hand, Ca-binding structure and expressing Physarum myosin as a recombinant protein. Thus, the data obtained by classical protein purification were confirmed by the results obtained with the modern recombinant techniques. However, there are some discrepancies that remain to be solved as described in Section XII.

  13. Comparison of Orientation and Rotational Motion of Skeletal Muscle Cross-bridges Containing Phosphorylated and Dephosphorylated Myosin Regulatory Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna; Rich, Ryan; Marandos, Peter; Fudala, Rafal; Li, Amy; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Borejdo, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Calcium binding to thin filaments is a major element controlling active force generation in striated muscles. Recent evidence suggests that processes other than Ca2+ binding, such as phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) also controls contraction of vertebrate striated muscle (Cooke, R. (2011) Biophys. Rev. 3, 33–45). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies using nucleotide analog spin label probes showed that dephosphorylated myosin heads are highly ordered in the relaxed fibers and have very low ATPase activity. This ordered structure of myosin cross-bridges disappears with the phosphorylation of RLC (Stewart, M. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 430–435). The slower ATPase activity in the dephosporylated moiety has been defined as a new super-relaxed state (SRX). It can be observed in both skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers (Hooijman, P., Stewart, M. A., and Cooke, R. (2011) Biophys. J. 100, 1969–1976). Given the importance of the finding that suggests a novel pathway of regulation of skeletal muscle, we aim to examine the effects of phosphorylation on cross-bridge orientation and rotational motion. We find that: (i) relaxed cross-bridges, but not active ones, are statistically better ordered in muscle where the RLC is dephosporylated compared with phosphorylated RLC; (ii) relaxed phosphorylated and dephosphorylated cross-bridges rotate equally slowly; and (iii) active phosphorylated cross-bridges rotate considerably faster than dephosphorylated ones during isometric contraction but the duty cycle remained the same, suggesting that both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated muscles develop the same isometric tension at full Ca2+ saturation. A simple theory was developed to account for this fact. PMID:23319584

  14. In vivo definition of cardiac myosin-binding protein C's critical interactions with myosin.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; McLendon, Patrick; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Gulick, James; Bhandary, Bidur; Lorenz, John N; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an integral part of the sarcomeric machinery in cardiac muscle that enables normal function. cMyBP-C regulates normal cardiac contraction by functioning as a brake through interactions with the sarcomere's thick, thin, and titin filaments. cMyBP-C's precise effects as it binds to the different filament systems remain obscure, particularly as it impacts on the myosin heavy chain's head domain, contained within the subfragment 2 (S2) region. This portion of the myosin heavy chain also contains the ATPase activity critical for myosin's function. Mutations in myosin's head, as well as in cMyBP-C, are a frequent cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We generated transgenic lines in which endogenous cMyBP-C was replaced by protein lacking the residues necessary for binding to S2 (cMyBP-C(S2-)). We found, surprisingly, that cMyBP-C lacking the S2 binding site is incorporated normally into the sarcomere, although systolic function is compromised. We show for the first time the acute and chronic in vivo consequences of ablating a filament-specific interaction of cMyBP-C. This work probes the functional consequences, in the whole animal, of modifying a critical structure-function relationship, the protein's ability to bind to a region of the critical enzyme responsible for muscle contraction, the subfragment 2 domain of the myosin heavy chain. We show that the binding is not critical for the protein's correct insertion into the sarcomere's architecture, but is essential for long-term, normal function in the physiological context of the heart.

  15. The molecular phenotype of human cardiac myosin associated with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Adam M.; Briceno, Natalia; Messer, Andrew E.; Gallon, Clare E.; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; Garcia, Edwin; Kikonda-Kanda, Gaelle; Goddard, Jennifer; Harding, Sian E.; Watkins, Hugh; Esteban, M. Tomé; Tsang, Victor T.; McKenna, William J.; Marston, Steven B.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of the study was to compare the functional and structural properties of the motor protein, myosin, and isolated myocyte contractility in heart muscle excised from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients by surgical myectomy with explanted failing heart and non-failing donor heart muscle. Methods Myosin was isolated and studied using an in vitro motility assay. The distribution of myosin light chain-1 isoforms was measured by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation was measured by sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein stain. Results The fraction of actin filaments moving when powered by myectomy myosin was 21% less than with donor myosin (P = 0.006), whereas the sliding speed was not different (0.310 ± 0.034 for myectomy myosin vs. 0.305 ± 0.019 µm/s for donor myosin in six paired experiments). Failing heart myosin showed 18% reduced motility. One myectomy myosin sample produced a consistently higher sliding speed than donor heart myosin and was identified with a disease-causing heavy chain mutation (V606M). In myectomy myosin, the level of atrial light chain-1 relative to ventricular light chain-1 was 20 ± 5% compared with 11 ± 5% in donor heart myosin and the level of myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation was decreased by 30–45%. Isolated cardiomyocytes showed reduced contraction amplitude (1.61 ± 0.25 vs. 3.58 ± 0.40%) and reduced relaxation rates compared with donor myocytes (TT50% = 0.32 ± 0.09 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 s). Conclusion Contractility in myectomy samples resembles the hypocontractile phenotype found in end-stage failing heart muscle irrespective of the primary stimulus, and this phenotype is not a direct effect of the hypertrophy-inducing mutation. The presence of a myosin heavy chain mutation causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be predicted from a simple functional assay. PMID:18411228

  16. Human myosin-IXb, an unconventional myosin with a chimerin-like rho/rac GTPase-activating protein domain in its tail.

    PubMed

    Wirth, J A; Jensen, K A; Post, P L; Bement, W M; Mooseker, M S

    1996-03-01

    The full-length primary structure and expression profile of a novel unconventional myosin heavy chain, human myosin-IXb, is described. The primary structure of this myosin predicts a 229 kDa protein that together with its recently described rat homolog, myr 5, is the ninth class of myosins to be identified. In comparison to skeletal muscle myosin-II, the myosin-IXb 'head' has two unusual features: a novel N-terminal domain of 140 amino acids, which includes a 60 amino acid extension, and a large insertion of 126 amino acids in the putative actin-binding site. The 'neck' contains four tandemly repeated IQ motifs, suggesting that this myosin may have four associated light chains. The 'tail' contains a region similar to regions found in the chimerins, with a putative zinc and diacylglycerol binding domain, homologous to the regulatory domain of protein kinase C and a putative GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain of the rho/rac family of ras-like G-proteins. Northern blot analysis of 16 different human tissues revealed an approximately 8 kb transcript that is most highly expressed in peripheral blood leukocytes, with somewhat lower levels of expression in thymus and spleen, suggesting that myosin-IXb is most abundant in cells of myeloid origin. Myosin-IXb was also expressed in a number of other tissues at significantly lower levels. Analysis of myosin-IXb protein expression, using a tail-domain directed antibody, was performed in HL-60 cells, a human leukocyte cell. Myosin-IXb expression increases by 4- to 5-fold upon induced differentiation of these cells into macrophage-like cells. The localization of myosin-IXb is also altered upon differentiation. In undifferentiated HL-60 cells, myosin-IXb colocalizes with F-actin in the cell periphery, while in differentiated cells its localization becomes more cytoplasmic, with the highest levels in the perinuclear region.

  17. Enucleation of human erythroblasts involves non-muscle myosin IIB

    PubMed Central

    Ubukawa, Kumi; Guo, Yong-Mei; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hirokawa, Makoto; Michishita, Yoshihiro; Nara, Miho; Tagawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Naoto; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Nunomura, Wataru; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian erythroblasts undergo enucleation, a process thought to be similar to cytokinesis. Although an assemblage of actin, non-muscle myosin II, and several other proteins is crucial for proper cytokinesis, the role of non-muscle myosin II in enucleation remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of various cell-division inhibitors on cytokinesis and enucleation. For this purpo