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Sample records for myosin ii motor

  1. Dynamic instability of collective myosin II motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Fang; Wang, Zi-Qing; Li, Qi-Kun; Xing, Jian-Jun; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Some kinds of muscles can oscillate spontaneously, which is related to the dynamic instability of the collective motors. Based on the two-state ratchet model and with consideration of the motor stiffness, the dynamics of collective myosin II motors are studied. It is shown that when the motor stiffness is small, the velocity of the collective motors decreases monotonically with load increasing. When the motor stiffness becomes large, dynamic instability appears in the force-velocity relationship of the collective-motor transport. For a large enough motor stiffness, the zero-velocity point lies in the unstable range of the force-velocity curve, and the motor system becomes unstable before the motion is stopped, so spontaneous oscillations can be generated if the system is elastically coupled to its environment via a spring. The oscillation frequency is related to the motor stiffness, motor binding rate, spring stiffness, and the width of the ATP excitation interval. For a medium motor stiffness, the zero-velocity point lies outside the unstable range of the force-velocity curve, and the motion will be stopped before the instability occurs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11205123).

  2. Mechanical output of myosin II motors is regulated by myosin filament size and actin network mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Munro, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    The interactions of bipolar myosin II filaments with actin arrays are a predominate means of generating forces in numerous physiological processes including muscle contraction and cell migration. However, how the spatiotemporal regulation of these forces depends on motor mechanochemistry, bipolar filament size, and local actin mechanics is unknown. Here, we simulate myosin II motors with an agent-based model in which the motors have been benchmarked against experimental measurements. Force generation occurs in two distinct regimes characterized either by stable tension maintenance or by stochastic buildup and release; transitions between these regimes occur by changes to duty ratio and myosin filament size. The time required for building force to stall scales inversely with the stiffness of a network and the actin gliding speed of a motor. Finally, myosin motors are predicted to contract a network toward stiffer regions, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our representation of myosin motors can be used to understand how their mechanical and biochemical properties influence their observed behavior in a variety of in vitro and in vivo contexts.

  3. Drosophila non-muscle myosin II motor activity determines the rate of tissue folding.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Sellers, James R; Martin, Adam C

    2016-12-30

    Non-muscle cell contractility is critical for tissues to adopt shape changes. Although, the non-muscle myosin II holoenzyme (myosin) is a molecular motor that powers contraction of actin cytoskeleton networks, recent studies have questioned the importance of myosin motor activity cell and tissue shape changes. Here, combining the biochemical analysis of enzymatic and motile properties for purified myosin mutants with in vivo measurements of apical constriction for the same mutants, we show that in vivo constriction rate scales with myosin motor activity. We show that so-called phosphomimetic mutants of the Drosophila regulatory light chain (RLC) do not mimic the phosphorylated RLC state in vitro. The defect in the myosin motor activity in these mutants is evident in developing Drosophila embryos where tissue recoil following laser ablation is decreased compared to wild-type tissue. Overall, our data highlights that myosin activity is required for rapid cell contraction and tissue folding in developing Drosophila embryos.

  4. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  5. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients' life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life. PMID:25072053

  6. Measurements of Myosin-II Motor Activity During Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Pollard, Luther W; Lord, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) represents the critical actin-based motor protein that drives actomyosin ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis. We detail three different methods to measure Myo2p motor function. Actin-activated ATPases provide a readout of actomyosin ATPase motor activity in a bulk assay; actin filament motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin-driven actin filament gliding (when motors are anchored); myosin-bead motility assays reveal the speed and efficiency of myosin ensembles traveling along actin filaments (when actin is anchored). Collectively, these methods allow us to combine the standard in vivo approaches common to fission yeast with in vitro biochemical methods to learn more about the mechanistic action of myosin-II during cytokinesis.

  7. Drosophila non-muscle myosin II motor activity determines the rate of tissue folding

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Sellers, James R; Martin, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle cell contractility is critical for tissues to adopt shape changes. Although, the non-muscle myosin II holoenzyme (myosin) is a molecular motor that powers contraction of actin cytoskeleton networks, recent studies have questioned the importance of myosin motor activity cell and tissue shape changes. Here, combining the biochemical analysis of enzymatic and motile properties for purified myosin mutants with in vivo measurements of apical constriction for the same mutants, we show that in vivo constriction rate scales with myosin motor activity. We show that so-called phosphomimetic mutants of the Drosophila regulatory light chain (RLC) do not mimic the phosphorylated RLC state in vitro. The defect in the myosin motor activity in these mutants is evident in developing Drosophila embryos where tissue recoil following laser ablation is decreased compared to wild-type tissue. Overall, our data highlights that myosin activity is required for rapid cell contraction and tissue folding in developing Drosophila embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20828.001 PMID:28035903

  8. Regulation of synapse structure and function by distinct myosin II motors.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Maria D; Johnson, Richard; Miller, Courtney A; Huganir, Richard L; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2011-01-26

    Ongoing synaptic function and rapid, bidirectional plasticity are both controlled by regulatory mechanisms within dendritic spines. Spine actin dynamics maintain synapse structure and function, and cytoskeletal rearrangements in these structures trigger structural and functional plasticity. Therefore, proteins that interact with actin filaments are attractive candidates to regulate synaptic actin dynamics and, thus, synapse structure and function. Here, we have cloned the rat isoform of class II myosin heavy chain MyH7B in brain. Unexpectedly, this isoform resembles muscle-type myosin II rather than the ubiquitously expressed nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, suggesting that a rich functional diversity of myosin II motors may exist in neurons. Indeed, reducing the expression of MyH7B in mature neurons caused profound alterations to dendritic spine structure and excitatory synaptic strength. Structurally, dendritic spines had large, irregularly shaped heads that contained many filopodia-like protrusions. Neurons with reduced MyH7B expression also had impaired miniature EPSC amplitudes accompanied by a decrease in synaptic AMPA receptors, which was linked to alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. MyH7B-mediated control over spine morphology and synaptic strength was distinct from that of a nonmuscle myosin, myosin IIb. Interestingly, when myosin IIb expression and MyH7B expression were simultaneously knocked-down in neurons, a third, more pronounced phenotype emerged. Together, our data provide evidence that distinct myosin II isoforms work together to regulate synapse structure and function in cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, myosin II motor activity is emerging as a broad regulatory mechanism for control over complex actin networks within dendritic spines.

  9. Regulation of Synapse Structure and Function by Distinct Myosin II Motors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Maria D.; Johnson, Richard; Miller, Courtney A.; Huganir, Richard L.; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing synaptic function and rapid, bidirectional plasticity are both controlled by regulatory mechanisms within dendritic spines. Spine actin dynamics maintain synapse structure and function, and cytoskeletal rearrangements in these structures trigger structural and functional plasticity. Therefore, proteins that interact with actin filaments are attractive candidates to regulate synaptic actin dynamics, and thus, synapse structure and function. Here, we have cloned the rat isoform of class II myosin heavy chain MyH7B in brain. Unexpectedly, this isoform resembles muscle-type myosin II, rather than the ubiquitously expressed non-muscle myosin II isoforms, suggesting that a rich functional diversity of myosin II motors may exist in neurons. Indeed, reducing the expression of MyH7B in mature neurons caused profound alterations to dendritic spine structure and excitatory synaptic strength. Structurally, dendritic spines had large, irregular shaped heads that contained many filopodia-like protrusions. Neurons with reduced MyH7B expression also had impaired mEPSC amplitudes, accompanied by a decrease in synaptic AMPA receptors, which was linked to alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. MyH7B-mediated control over spine morphology and synaptic strength was distinct from that of a non-muscle myosin, myosin IIb. Interestingly, when myosin IIb and MyH7B expression were simultaneously knocked-down in neurons, a third, more pronounced phenotype emerged. Taken together, our data provide evidence that distinct myosin II isoforms work together to regulate synapse structure and function in cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, myosin II motor activity is emerging as a broad regulatory mechanism for control over complex actin networks within dendritic spines. PMID:21273429

  10. Myosin II motor activity in the lateral amygdala is required for fear memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Cristin F; Rubio, Maria D; Young, Erica; Miller, Courtney; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Learning induces dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton that are required to support memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics during learning and memory are poorly understood. Myosin II motors are highly expressed in actin-rich growth structures including dendritic spines, and we have recently shown that these molecular machines mobilize F-actin in response to synaptic stimulation and learning in the hippocampus. In this study, we report that Myosin II motors in the rat lateral amygdala (LA) are essential for fear memory formation. Pretraining infusions of the Myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin (blebb), disrupted long term memory, while short term memory was unaffected. Interestingly, both post-training and pretesting infusions had no effect on memory formation, indicating that Myosin II motors operate during or shortly after learning to promote memory consolidation. These data support the idea that Myosin II motor-force generation is a general mechanism that supports memory consolidation in the mammalian CNS.

  11. Myosin II Motor Activity in the Lateral Amygdala Is Required for Fear Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, Cristin F.; Rubio, Maria D.; Young, Erica; Miller, Courtney; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Learning induces dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton that are required to support memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics during learning and memory are poorly understood. Myosin II motors are highly expressed in actin-rich growth structures including dendritic spines, and we have…

  12. Myosin II Motor Activity in the Lateral Amygdala Is Required for Fear Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, Cristin F.; Rubio, Maria D.; Young, Erica; Miller, Courtney; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Learning induces dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton that are required to support memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics during learning and memory are poorly understood. Myosin II motors are highly expressed in actin-rich growth structures including dendritic spines, and we have…

  13. UCS protein Rng3p is essential for myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; James, Michael L; Pollard, Luther W; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors.

  14. UCS Protein Rng3p Is Essential for Myosin-II Motor Activity during Cytokinesis in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Benjamin C.; James, Michael L.; Pollard, Luther W.; Sirotkin, Vladimir; Lord, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p) motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function) showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant) led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors. PMID:24244528

  15. Cytokinesis Depends on the Motor Domains of Myosin-II in Fission Yeast but Not in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Matthew; Laves, Ellen; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Budding yeast possesses one myosin-II, Myo1p, whereas fission yeast has two, Myo2p and Myp2p, all of which contribute to cytokinesis. We find that chimeras consisting of Myo2p or Myp2p motor domains fused to the tail of Myo1p are fully functional in supporting budding yeast cytokinesis. Remarkably, the tail alone of budding yeast Myo1p localizes to the contractile ring, supporting both its constriction and cytokinesis. In contrast, fission yeast Myo2p and Myp2p require both the catalytic head domain as well as tail domains for function, with the tails providing distinct functions (Bezanilla and Pollard, 2000). Myo1p is the first example of a myosin whose cellular function does not require a catalytic motor domain revealing a novel mechanism of action for budding yeast myosin-II independent of actin binding and ATPase activity. PMID:16148042

  16. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-02

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins.

  17. The structural coupling between ATPase activation and recovery stroke in the myosin II motor

    SciTech Connect

    Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-07-01

    Before the myosin motor head can perform the next power stroke, it undergoes a large conformational transition in which the converter domain, bearing the lever arm, rotates {approx} 65{sup o}. Simultaneous with this 'recovery stroke', myosin activates its ATPase function by closing the Switch-2 loop over the bound ATP. This coupling between the motions of the converter domain and of the 40 {angstrom}-distant Switch-2 loop is essential to avoid unproductive ATP hydrolysis. The coupling mechanism is determined here by finding a series of optimized intermediates between crystallographic end structures of the recovery stroke (Dictyostelium discoideum), yielding movies of the transition at atomic detail. The successive formation of two hydrogen bonds by the Switch-2 loop is correlated with the successive see-saw motions of the relay and SH1 helices that hold the converter domain. SH1 helix and Switch-2 loop communicate via a highly conserved loop that wedges against the SH1-helix upon Switch-2 closing.

  18. Myosin II Dynamics during Embryo Morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasza, Karen

    2013-03-01

    During embryonic morphogenesis, the myosin II motor protein generates forces that help to shape tissues, organs, and the overall body form. In one dramatic example in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, the epithelial tissue that will give rise to the body of the adult animal elongates more than two-fold along the head-to-tail axis in less than an hour. This elongation is accomplished primarily through directional rearrangements of cells within the plane of the tissue. Just prior to elongation, polarized assemblies of myosin II accumulate perpendicular to the elongation axis. The contractile forces generated by myosin activity orient cell movements along a common axis, promoting local cell rearrangements that contribute to global tissue elongation. The molecular and mechanical mechanisms by which myosin drives this massive change in embryo shape are poorly understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we generated a collection of transgenic flies expressing variants of myosin II with altered motor function and regulation. We found that variants that are predicted to have increased myosin activity cause defects in tissue elongation. Using biophysical approaches, we found that these myosin variants also have decreased turnover dynamics within cells. To explore the mechanisms by which molecular-level myosin dynamics are translated into tissue-level elongation, we are using time-lapse confocal imaging to observe cell movements in embryos with altered myosin activity. We are utilizing computational approaches to quantify the dynamics and directionality of myosin localization and cell rearrangements. These studies will help elucidate how myosin-generated forces control cell movements within tissues. This work is in collaboration with J. Zallen at the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

  19. Regulation of the actin-activated MgATPase activity of Acanthamoeba myosin II by phosphorylation of serine 639 in motor domain loop 2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Cai, Shutao; Yu, Shuhua; Shu, Shi; Levine, Rodney L; Korn, Edward D

    2013-01-02

    It had been proposed previously that only filamentous forms of Acanthamoeba myosin II have actin-activated MgATPase activity and that this activity is inhibited by phosphorylation of up to four serine residues in a repeating sequence in the C-terminal nonhelical tailpiece of the two heavy chains. We have reinvestigated these issues using recombinant WT and mutant myosins. Contrary to the earlier proposal, we show that two nonfilamentous forms of Acanthamoeba myosin II, heavy meromyosin and myosin subfragment 1, have actin-activated MgATPase that is down-regulated by phosphorylation. By mass spectroscopy, we identified five serines in the heavy chains that can be phosphorylated by a partially purified kinase preparation in vitro and also are phosphorylated in endogenous myosin isolated from the amoebae: four serines in the nonhelical tailpiece and Ser639 in loop 2 of the motor domain. S639A mutants of both subfragment 1 and full-length myosin had actin-activated MgATPase that was not inhibited by phosphorylation of the serines in the nonhelical tailpiece or their mutation to glutamic acid or aspartic acid. Conversely, S639D mutants of both subfragment 1 and full-length myosin were inactive, irrespective of the phosphorylation state of the serines in the nonhelical tailpiece. To our knowledge, this is the first example of regulation of the actin-activated MgATPase activity of any myosin by modification of surface loop 2.

  20. Shaking the Myosin Family Tree Biochemical kinetics defines four types of myosin motor

    PubMed Central

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Geeves, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Although all myosin motors follow the same basic cross-bridge cycle, they display a large variety in the rates of transition between different states in the cycle, allowing each myosin to be finely tuned for a specific task. Traditionally, myosins have been classified by sequence analysis into a large number of sub-families (~35). Here we use a different method to classify the myosin family members which is based on biochemical and mechanical properties. The key properties that define the type of mechanical properties of the motor are duty ratio (defined as the fraction of the time myosin remains attached to actin during each cycle), thermodynamic coupling of actin and nucleotide binding to myosin and the degree of strain-sensitivity of the ADP release step. Based on these properties we propose to classify myosins into four different groups: (I) fast movers, (II) slow/efficient movers, (III) load-bearers and (IV) gates. PMID:22001381

  1. Traction force microscopy in Dictyostelium reveals distinct roles for myosin II motor and actin-crosslinking activity in polarized cell movement.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Maria L; Knecht, David A; Dembo, Micah; Lee, Juliet

    2007-05-01

    Continuous cell movement requires the coordination of protrusive forces at the leading edge with contractile forces at the rear of the cell. Myosin II is required to generate the necessary contractile force to facilitate retraction; however, Dictyostelium cells that lack myosin II (mhcA-) are still motile. To directly investigate the role of myosin II in contractility we used a gelatin traction force assay to measure the magnitude and dynamic redistribution of traction stresses generated by randomly moving wild-type, myosin II essential light chain null (mlcE-) and mhcA- cells. Our data show that for each cell type, periods of rapid, directed cell movement occur when an asymmetrical distribution of traction stress is present, in which traction stresses at the rear are significantly higher than those at the front. We found that the major determinants of cell speed are the rate and frequency at which traction stress asymmetry develops, not the absolute magnitude of traction stress. We conclude that traction stress asymmetry is important for rapid, polarized cell movement because high traction stresses at the rear promote retraction, whereas low traction at the front allows protrusion. We propose that myosin II motor activity increases the rate and frequency at which traction stress asymmetry develops, whereas actin crosslinking activity is important for stabilizing it.

  2. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  3. Regulation of myosin II activity by actin architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Stam, Samantha; McCall, Patrick; Munro, Edwin; Gardel, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Networks of actin filaments containing myosin II motors generate forces and motions that promote biological processes such as cell division, motility, and cargo transport. In cells, actin filaments are arranged in various structures from disordered meshworks to tight bundles. Clusters of myosin II motors, known as myosin filaments, crosslink and generate force on neighboring actin filaments. We hypothesized that the local actin architecture controls the magnitude and duration of force generated by myosin II motors. We used fluorescence imaging to directly measure the mobility of myosin II filaments on actin networks and bundles with varying actin filament polarity, orientation, spacing, and length. On unipolar bundles, myosin exhibits fast, unidirectional motion consistent with their unloaded gliding speed. On mixed polarity bundles, myosin speed is reduced by one order of magnitude and marked by direction switching and trapping. Increasing filament spacing and bundle flexibility reduces the duration of trapping and enhances the mobility of motors. Simulations indicate that stable trapping is a signature of large generated forces while increased mobility indicates force release. Our data underscore that the efficiency of force generation by myosin motors in an actin network depends sensitively on its architecture and suggests actin crosslinking proteins are tuned to optimize actomyosin contractility.

  4. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this regulation we examined the role of two mammalian tropomyosins (Tpm3.1cy/Tm5NM1 and Tpm4.2cy/Tm4) recently implicated in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Like Cdc8p, the Tpm3.1cy and Tpm4.2cy isoforms significantly enhance Myo2p and Myo52p motor activity, converting non-processive Myo52p molecules into processive motors that can walk along actin tracks as single molecules. In contrast to the positive regulation of Myo2p and Myo52p, Cdc8p and the mammalian tropomyosins potently inhibited skeletal muscle myosin-II, while having negligible effects on the highly processive mammalian myosin-Va. In support of a conserved role for certain tropomyosins in regulating non-muscle actomyosin structures, Tpm3.1cy supported normal contractile ring function in fission yeast. Our work reveals that actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin is dependent on the myosin isoform, highlighting a general role for specific isoforms of tropomyosin in sorting myosin motor outputs. PMID:25712463

  5. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-08-24

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads.

  6. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads. PMID:27554800

  7. Association of a Nonmuscle Myosin II with Axoplasmic Organelles

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgis, Joseph A.; Reese, Thomas S.; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2002-01-01

    Association of motor proteins with organelles is required for the motors to mediate transport. Because axoplasmic organelles move on actin filaments, they must have associated actin-based motors, most likely members of the myosin superfamily. To gain a better understanding of the roles of myosins in the axon we used the giant axon of the squid, a powerful model for studies of axonal physiology. First, a ∼220 kDa protein was purified from squid optic lobe, using a biochemical protocol designed to isolate myosins. Peptide sequence analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA, identified this ∼220 kDa protein as a nonmuscle myosin II. This myosin is also present in axoplasm, as determined by two independent criteria. First, RT-PCR using sequence-specific primers detected the transcript in the stellate ganglion, which contains the cell bodies that give rise to the giant axon. Second, Western blot analysis using nonmuscle myosin II isotype-specific antibodies detected a single ∼220 kDa band in axoplasm. Axoplasm was fractionated through a four-step sucrose gradient after 0.6 M KI treatment, which separates organelles from cytoskeletal components. Of the total nonmuscle myosin II in axoplasm, 43.2% copurified with organelles in the 15% sucrose fraction, while the remainder (56.8%) was soluble and found in the supernatant. This myosin decorates the cytoplasmic surface of 21% of the axoplasmic organelles, as demonstrated by immunogold electron-microscopy. Thus, nonmuscle myosin II is synthesized in the cell bodies of the giant axon, is present in the axon, and is associated with isolated axoplasmic organelles. Therefore, in addition to myosin V, this myosin is likely to be an axoplasmic organelle motor. PMID:11907281

  8. PRIMARY PEPTIDE SEQUENCES FROM SQUID MUSCLE AND OPTIC LOBE MYOSIN IIs: A STRATEGY TO IDENTIFY AN ORGANELLE MYOSIN

    PubMed Central

    MEDEIROS, NELSON A.; REESE, THOMAS S.; JAFFE, HOWARD; DEGIORGIS, JOSEPH A.; BEARER, ELAINE L.

    2013-01-01

    The squid giant axon provides an excellent model system for the study of actin-based organelle transport likely to be mediated by myosins, but the identification of these motors has proven to be difficult. Here the authors purified and obtained primary peptide sequence of squid muscle myosin as a first step in a strategy designed to identify myosins in the squid nervous system. Limited digestion yielded fourteen peptides derived from the muscle myosin which possess high amino acid sequence identities to myosin II from scallop (60–95%) and chick pectoralis muscle (31–83%). Antibodies generated to this purified muscle myosin were used to isolate a potential myosin from squid optic lobe which yielded 11 peptide fragments. Sequences from six of these fragments identified this protein as a myosin II. The other five sequences matched myosin II (50–60%, identities), and some also matched unconventional myosins (33–50%). A single band that has a molecular weight similar to the myosin purified from optic lobe copurifies with axoplasmic organelles, and, like the optic lobe myosin, this band is also recognized by the antibodies raised against squid muscle myosin II. Hence, this strategy provides an approach to the identification of a myosin associated with motile axoplasmic organelles. PMID:9878103

  9. A non-muscle myosin II motor links NR1 to retrograde trafficking and proteasomal degradation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Vazhappilly, Rema; Wee, Karen Siaw-Ling; Sucher, Nikolaus J; Low, Chian-Ming

    2010-03-01

    Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells have been shown to lack functional NMDA receptors; yet, these cells express NR1 subunits of the NMDA receptor. The reason for the lack of functional receptors has been attributed to the absence of significant levels of NR2 subunits to co-assemble with NR1. It is known that PC12 expresses very low levels of NR2C, with complete absence of other types of NR2 subunits. The purpose of the present study is to describe the molecular mechanism of trafficking and degradation of unassembled NR1 subunits in PC12 cells. The localization of NR1 subunits in PC12 cells were evaluated by immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation, which showed that NR1 was present in the endoplasmic reticulum and cis-middle compartments of the Golgi apparatus. Upon treatment with a proteasome inhibitor, MG132, the ubiquitinylated species of NR1 subunit were detected, suggesting that NR1 is being targeted for endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteasomal degradation. Our previous studies suggest that NR1 subunits from the Golgi do not proceed to trans-Golgi, hence they will require re-routing to the endoplasmic reticulum for degradation. Further investigations on the factors involved in the trafficking of NR1 from Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum were performed using co-immunoprecipitation and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These revealed the co-association of NR1 with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II isoforms A and B. We also demonstrate the functional significance of this interaction through the use of a myosin inhibitor, blebbistatin, to disrupt brefeldin A-induced Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum trafficking of NR1. In conclusion, our results suggest that non-muscle myosin II is involved in the retrograde trafficking of NR1 subunits from the cis/middle-Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum for proteasomal degradation in PC12.

  10. Dual role of myosin II during Drosophila imaginal disc metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Aldaz, Silvia; Escudero, Luis M.; Freeman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein non-muscle myosin II is a major driver of the movements that sculpt three dimensional organs from two dimensional epithelia. The machinery of morphogenesis is well established but the logic of its control remains unclear in complex organs. Here we use live imaging and ex vivo culture to report a dual role of myosin II in regulating the development of the Drosophila wing. First, myosin II drives the contraction of a ring of cells that surround the squamous peripodial epithelium, providing the force to fold the whole disc through about 90°. Second, myosin II is needed to allow the squamous cells to expand and then retract at the end of eversion. The combination of genetics and live imaging allows us to describe and understand the tissue dynamics, and the logic of force generation needed to transform a relatively simple imaginal disc into a more complex and three-dimensional adult wing. PMID:23612302

  11. An electromechanical model of myosin molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2003-12-21

    There is a long-running debate on the working mechanism of myosin molecular motors, which, by interacting with actin filaments, convert the chemical energy of ATP into a variety of mechanical work. After the development of technologies for observing and manipulating individual working molecules, experimental results negating the widely accepted 'lever-arm hypothesis' have been reported. In this paper, based on the experimental results so far accumulated, an alternative hypothesis is proposed, in which motor molecules are modelled as electromechanical components that interact with each other through electrostatic force. Electrostatic attractive force between myosin and actin is assumed to cause a conformational change in the myosin head during the attachment process. An elastic energy resulting from the conformational change then produces the power stroke. The energy released at the ATP hydrolysis is mainly used to detach the myosin head from actin filaments. The mechanism presented in this paper is compatible with the experimental results contradictory to the previous theories. It also explains the behavior of myosins V and VI, which are engaged in cellular transport and move processively along actin filaments.

  12. Myosin V from Drosophila reveals diversity of motor mechanisms within the myosin V family.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Judit; Kovács, Mihály; Wang, Fei; Nyitray, László; Sellers, James R

    2005-08-26

    Myosin V is the best characterized vesicle transporter in vertebrates, but it has been unknown as to whether all members of the myosin V family share a common, evolutionarily conserved mechanism of action. Here we show that myosin V from Drosophila has a strikingly different motor mechanism from that of vertebrate myosin Va, and it is a nonprocessive, ensemble motor. Our steady-state and transient kinetic measurements on single-headed constructs reveal that a single Drosophila myosin V molecule spends most of its mechanochemical cycle time detached from actin, therefore it has to function in processive units that comprise several molecules. Accordingly, in in vitro motility assays, double-headed Drosophila myosin V requires high surface concentrations to exhibit a continuous translocation of actin filaments. Our comparison between vertebrate and fly myosin V demonstrates that the well preserved function of myosin V motors in cytoplasmic transport can be accomplished by markedly different underlying mechanisms.

  13. The myosin motor in muscle generates a smaller and slower working stroke at higher load.

    PubMed

    Reconditi, Massimo; Linari, Marco; Lucii, Leonardo; Stewart, Alex; Sun, Yin-Biao; Boesecke, Peter; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Fischetti, Robert F; Irving, Tom; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Irving, Malcom; Lombardi, Vincenzo

    2004-04-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by the motor protein myosin II, which binds transiently to an actin filament, generates a unitary filament displacement or 'working stroke', then detaches and repeats the cycle. The stroke size has been measured previously using isolated myosin II molecules at low load, with rather variable results, but not at the higher loads that the motor works against during muscle contraction. Here we used a novel X-ray-interference technique to measure the working stroke of myosin II at constant load in an intact muscle cell, preserving the native structure and function of the motor. We show that the stroke is smaller and slower at higher load. The stroke size at low load is likely to be set by a structural limit; at higher loads, the motor detaches from actin before reaching this limit. The load dependence of the myosin II stroke is the primary molecular determinant of the mechanical performance and efficiency of skeletal muscle.

  14. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Jonathan E.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R.; Friedman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin–specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end–directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼430 nm·s−1 at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (kcat ∼6 s−1) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (kdet = 6.2 s−1) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  15. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  16. Myosin light chain kinase steady-state kinetics: comparison of smooth muscle myosin II and nonmuscle myosin IIB as substrates.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Diego B; Haldeman, Brian D; Brizendine, Richard K; Krenc, Agata K; Baker, Josh E; Rock, Ronald S; Cremo, Christine R

    2016-10-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates S19 of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), which is required to activate myosin's ATPase activity and contraction. Smooth muscles are known to display plasticity in response to factors such as inflammation, developmental stage, or stress, which lead to differential expression of nonmuscle and smooth muscle isoforms. Here, we compare steady-state kinetics parameters for phosphorylation of different MLCK substrates: (1) nonmuscle RLC, (2) smooth muscle RLC, and heavy meromyosin subfragments of (3) nonmuscle myosin IIB, and (4) smooth muscle myosin II. We show that MLCK has a ~2-fold higher kcat for both smooth muscle myosin II substrates compared with nonmuscle myosin IIB substrates, whereas Km values were very similar. Myosin light chain kinase has a 1.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher specificity (kcat /Km ) for smooth versus nonmuscle-free RLC and heavy meromyosin, respectively, suggesting that differences in specificity are dictated by RLC sequences. Of the 10 non-identical RLC residues, we ruled out 7 as possible underlying causes of different MLCK kinetics. The remaining 3 residues were found to be surface exposed in the N-terminal half of the RLC, consistent with their importance in substrate recognition. These data are consistent with prior deletion/chimera studies and significantly add to understanding of MLCK myosin interactions. Phosphorylation of nonmuscle and smooth muscle myosin by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is required for activation of myosin's ATPase activity. In smooth muscles, nonmuscle myosin coexists with smooth muscle myosin, but the two myosins have very different chemo-mechanical properties relating to their ability to maintain force. Differences in specificity of MLCK for different myosin isoforms had not been previously investigated. We show that the MLCK prefers smooth muscle myosin by a significant factor. These data suggest that nonmuscle myosin is phosphorylated more slowly than smooth

  17. Multiple mechanisms for accumulation of myosin II filaments at the equator during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Yumura, Shigehiko; Ueda, Masahiro; Sako, Yasushi; Kitanishi-Yumura, Toshiko; Yanagida, Toshio

    2008-12-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed how individual bipolar myosin II filaments accumulate at the equatorial region in dividing Dictyostelium cells. Direct observation of individual filaments in live cells provided us with much convincing information. Myosin II filaments accumulated at the equatorial region by at least two independent mechanisms: (i) cortical flow, which is driven by myosin II motor activities and (ii) de novo association to the equatorial cortex. These two mechanisms were mutually redundant. At the same time, myosin II filaments underwent rapid turnover, repeating their association and dissociation with the actin cortex. Examination of the lifetime of mutant myosin filaments in the cortex revealed that the turnover mainly depended on heavy chain phosphorylation and that myosin motor activity accelerated the turnover. Double mutant myosin II deficient in both motor and phosphorylation still accumulated at the equatorial region, although they displayed no cortical flow and considerably slow turnover. Under this condition, the filaments stayed for a significantly longer time at the equatorial region than at the polar regions, indicating that there are still other mechanisms for myosin II accumulation such as binding partners or stabilizing activity of filaments in the equatorial cortex.

  18. Magnesium Modulates Actin Binding and ADP Release in Myosin Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Anja M.; Trivedi, Darshan V.; Rauscher, Anna A.; Wang, Yuan; Takagi, Yasuharu; Palmer, Bradley M.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Debold, Edward P.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the magnesium dependence of five class II myosins, including fast skeletal muscle myosin, smooth muscle myosin, β-cardiac myosin (CMIIB), Dictyostelium myosin II (DdMII), and nonmuscle myosin IIA, as well as myosin V. We found that the myosins examined are inhibited in a Mg2+-dependent manner (0.3–9.0 mm free Mg2+) in both ATPase and motility assays, under conditions in which the ionic strength was held constant. We found that the ADP release rate constant is reduced by Mg2+ in myosin V, smooth muscle myosin, nonmuscle myosin IIA, CMIIB, and DdMII, although the ADP affinity is fairly insensitive to Mg2+ in fast skeletal muscle myosin, CMIIB, and DdMII. Single tryptophan probes in the switch I (Trp-239) and switch II (Trp-501) region of DdMII demonstrate these conserved regions of the active site are sensitive to Mg2+ coordination. Cardiac muscle fiber mechanic studies demonstrate cross-bridge attachment time is increased at higher Mg2+ concentrations, demonstrating that the ADP release rate constant is slowed by Mg2+ in the context of an activated muscle fiber. Direct measurements of phosphate release in myosin V demonstrate that Mg2+ reduces actin affinity in the M·ADP·Pi state, although it does not change the rate of phosphate release. Therefore, the Mg2+ inhibition of the actin-activated ATPase activity observed in class II myosins is likely the result of Mg2+-dependent alterations in actin binding. Overall, our results suggest that Mg2+ reduces the ADP release rate constant and rate of attachment to actin in both high and low duty ratio myosins. PMID:25006251

  19. Sensitivity of small myosin II ensembles from different isoforms to mechanical load and ATP concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on a detailed crossbridge model for individual myosin II motors, we systematically study the influence of mechanical load and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on small myosin II ensembles made from different isoforms. For skeletal and smooth muscle myosin II, which are often used in actomyosin gels that reconstitute cell contractility, fast forward movement is restricted to a small region of phase space with low mechanical load and high ATP concentration, which is also characterized by frequent ensemble detachment. At high load, these ensembles are stalled or move backwards, but forward motion can be restored by decreasing ATP concentration. In contrast, small ensembles of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which are found in the cytoskeleton of nonmuscle cells, are hardly affected by ATP concentration due to the slow kinetics of the bound states. For all isoforms, the thermodynamic efficiency of ensemble movement increases with decreasing ATP concentration, but this effect is weaker for the nonmuscle myosin II isoforms.

  20. Collective Dynamics of Elastically Coupled Myosin V Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hailong; Efremov, Artem K.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Krementsova, Elena B.; Driver, Jonathan W.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Diehl, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the collective behaviors of different classes of processive motor proteins has become increasingly important to understand various intracellular trafficking and transport processes. This work examines the dynamics of structurally-defined motor complexes containing two myosin Va (myoVa) motors that are linked together via a molecular scaffold formed from a single duplex of DNA. Dynamic changes in the filament-bound configuration of these complexes due to motor binding, stepping, and detachment were monitored by tracking the positions of different color quantum dots that report the position of one head of each myoVa motor on actin. As in studies of multiple kinesins, the run lengths produced by two myosins are only slightly larger than those of single motor molecules. This suggests that internal strain within the complexes, due to asynchronous motor stepping and the resultant stretching of motor linkages, yields net negative cooperative behaviors. In contrast to multiple kinesins, multiple myosin complexes move with appreciably lower velocities than a single-myosin molecule. Although similar trends are predicted by a discrete state stochastic model of collective motor dynamics, these analyses also suggest that multiple myosin velocities and run lengths depend on both the compliance and the effective size of their cargo. Moreover, it is proposed that this unique collective behavior occurs because the large step size and relatively small stalling force of myoVa leads to a high sensitivity of motor stepping rates to strain. PMID:22718762

  1. Collective dynamics of elastically coupled myosin V motors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hailong; Efremov, Artem K; Bookwalter, Carol S; Krementsova, Elena B; Driver, Jonathan W; Trybus, Kathleen M; Diehl, Michael R

    2012-08-10

    Characterization of the collective behaviors of different classes of processive motor proteins has become increasingly important to understand various intracellular trafficking and transport processes. This work examines the dynamics of structurally-defined motor complexes containing two myosin Va (myoVa) motors that are linked together via a molecular scaffold formed from a single duplex of DNA. Dynamic changes in the filament-bound configuration of these complexes due to motor binding, stepping, and detachment were monitored by tracking the positions of different color quantum dots that report the position of one head of each myoVa motor on actin. As in studies of multiple kinesins, the run lengths produced by two myosins are only slightly larger than those of single motor molecules. This suggests that internal strain within the complexes, due to asynchronous motor stepping and the resultant stretching of motor linkages, yields net negative cooperative behaviors. In contrast to multiple kinesins, multiple myosin complexes move with appreciably lower velocities than a single-myosin molecule. Although similar trends are predicted by a discrete state stochastic model of collective motor dynamics, these analyses also suggest that multiple myosin velocities and run lengths depend on both the compliance and the effective size of their cargo. Moreover, it is proposed that this unique collective behavior occurs because the large step size and relatively small stalling force of myoVa leads to a high sensitivity of motor stepping rates to strain.

  2. Unique charge distribution in surface loops confers high velocity on the fast motor protein Chara myosin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohji; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Yanase, Kenji; Ichikawa, Yousuke; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2009-12-22

    Most myosins have a positively charged loop 2 with a cluster of lysine residues that bind to the negatively charged N-terminal segment of actin. However, the net charge of loop 2 of very fast Chara myosin is zero and there is no lysine cluster in it. In contrast, Chara myosin has a highly positively charged loop 3. To elucidate the role of these unique surface loops of Chara myosin in its high velocity and high actin-activated ATPase activity, we have undertaken mutational analysis using recombinant Chara myosin motor domain. It was found that net positive charge in loop 3 affected V(max) and K(app) of actin activated ATPase activity, while it affected the velocity only slightly. The net positive charge in loop 2 affected K(app) and the velocity, although it did not affect V(max). Our results suggested that Chara myosin has evolved to have highly positively charged loop 3 for its high ATPase activity and have less positively charged loop 2 for its high velocity. Since high positive charge in loop 3 and low positive charge in loop 2 seem to be one of the reasons for Chara myosin's high velocity, we manipulated charge contents in loops 2 and 3 of Dictyostelium myosin (class II). Removing positive charge from loop 2 and adding positive charge to loop 3 of Dictyostelium myosin made its velocity higher than that of the wild type, suggesting that the charge strategy in loops 2 and 3 is widely applicable.

  3. Myosin-V: a class of unconventional molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Larson, R E

    1996-03-01

    In this review we focus on the biochemical and structural properties of the myosin-V class of unconventional myosins as an example of the diversity of molecular motors within the myosin superfamily. A member of this class was first identified as a novel calmodulin-binding protein in mammalian brain (Larson RE, Pitta DE and Ferro JA (1988). Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, 21: 213-217). To date, the myosin-V class is represented by two molecules from yeast, one from nematodes, several from vertebrates (chickens, rats, mice and humans) and possibly one from plants. The domain structure of these myosins features a highly conserved head containing the ATP-hydrolysis and actin-binding sites, an extended neck composed of six tandem IQ-motifs which are sites for calmodulin binding and a large tail which has coiled-coil segments intercalated with globular regions of as yet unknown function. Biochemical studies on purified myosin-V from vertebrate brains and the description of myosin-V mutants in yeast and mice have made myosin-V one of the best characterized, unconventional myosin classes at the present time, surpassed only by the well-studied myosin-I class.

  4. Localization of myosin II regulatory light chain in the cerebral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ishmael, Jane E; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2008-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of cerebral microvascular endothelial cells is a critical determinant of blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Barrier integrity appears to be particularly sensitive to the phosphorylation state of specific residues within myosin regulatory light chain (RLC), one of two accessory light chains of the myosin II motor complex. Phosphorylation of myosin RLC by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been implicated in BBB dysfunction associated with alcohol abuse and hypoxia, whereas dephosphorylation may enhance BBB integrity following exposure to lipid-lowering statin drugs. Using immunohistochemistry we provide evidence of widespread myosin II RLC distribution throughout the cerebral vasculature of the mouse. Light microscopy revealed immunolocalization of myosin II RLC protein in the endothelium of brain capillaries, the endothelial cell layer of arterioles and in association with venules. Immunolabeling of myosin RLC in non-muscle endothelial cells could be distinguished from myosin RLC immunoreactivity associated with the smooth muscle layer of the tunica media in larger muscular arterioles. These findings support an emerging role for myosin II RLC as a component of the actomyosin cytoskeleton of cerebral endothelial cells with the potential to contribute to the selective vulnerability of the brain in vivo.

  5. How Actin Initiates the Motor Activity of Myosin

    PubMed Central

    Llinas, Paola; Isabet, Tatiana; Song, Lin; Ropars, Virginie; Zong, Bin; Benisty, Hannah; Sirigu, Serena; Morris, Carl; Kikuti, Carlos; Safer, Dan; Sweeney, H. Lee; Houdusse, Anne

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fundamental to cellular processes are directional movements driven by molecular motors. A common theme for these and other molecular machines driven by ATP is that controlled release of hydrolysis products is essential to use the chemical energy efficiently. Mechanochemical transduction by myosin motors on actin is coupled to unknown structural changes that result in the sequential release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and MgADP. We present here a myosin structure possessing an actin-binding interface and a tunnel (back door) that creates an escape route for Pi with a minimal rotation of the myosin lever arm that drives movements. We propose that this state represents the beginning of the powerstroke on actin, and that Pi translocation from the nucleotide pocket triggered by actin binding initiates myosin force generation. This elucidates how actin initiates force generation and movement, and may represent a strategy common to many molecular machines. PMID:25936506

  6. How actin initiates the motor activity of Myosin.

    PubMed

    Llinas, Paola; Isabet, Tatiana; Song, Lin; Ropars, Virginie; Zong, Bin; Benisty, Hannah; Sirigu, Serena; Morris, Carl; Kikuti, Carlos; Safer, Dan; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne

    2015-05-26

    Fundamental to cellular processes are directional movements driven by molecular motors. A common theme for these and other molecular machines driven by ATP is that controlled release of hydrolysis products is essential for using the chemical energy efficiently. Mechanochemical transduction by myosin motors on actin is coupled to unknown structural changes that result in the sequential release of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and MgADP. We present here a myosin structure possessing an actin-binding interface and a tunnel (back door) that creates an escape route for Pi with a minimal rotation of the myosin lever arm that drives movements. We propose that this state represents the beginning of the powerstroke on actin and that Pi translocation from the nucleotide pocket triggered by actin binding initiates myosin force generation. This elucidates how actin initiates force generation and movement and may represent a strategy common to many molecular machines.

  7. Force generation by kinesin and myosin cytoskeletal motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kull, F. Jon; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kinesins and myosins hydrolyze ATP, producing force that drives spindle assembly, vesicle transport and muscle contraction. How do motors do this? Here we discuss mechanisms of motor force transduction, based on their mechanochemical cycles and conformational changes observed in crystal structures. Distortion or twisting of the central β-sheet – proposed to trigger actin-induced Pi and ADP release by myosin, and microtubule-induced ADP release by kinesins – is shown in a movie depicting the transition between myosin ATP-like and nucleotide-free states. Structural changes in the switch I region form a tube that governs ATP hydrolysis and Pi release by the motors, explaining the essential role of switch I in hydrolysis. Comparison of the motor power strokes reveals that each stroke begins with the force-amplifying structure oriented opposite to the direction of rotation or swing. Motors undergo changes in their mechanochemical cycles in response to small-molecule inhibitors, several of which bind to kinesins by induced fit, trapping the motors in a state that resembles a force-producing conformation. An unusual motor activator specifically increases mechanical output by cardiac myosin, potentially providing valuable information about its mechanism of function. Further study is essential to understand motor mechanochemical coupling and energy transduction, and could lead to new therapies to treat human disease. PMID:23487037

  8. The non-linear elasticity of the muscle sarcomere and the compliance of myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Luca; Brunello, Elisabetta; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Lombardi, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    Force in striated muscle is due to attachment of the heads of the myosin, the molecular motors extending from the myosin filament, to the actin filament in each half-sarcomere, the functional unit where myosin motors act in parallel. Mechanical and X-ray structural evidence indicates that at the plateau of isometric contraction (force T0), less than half of the elastic strain of the half-sarcomere is due to the strain in the array of myosin motors (s), with the remainder being accounted for by the compliance of filaments acting as linear elastic elements in series with the motor array. Early during the development of isometric force, however, the half-sarcomere compliance has been found to be less than that expected from the linear elastic model assumed above, and this non-linearity may affect the estimate of s. This question is investigated here by applying nanometre-microsecond-resolution mechanics to single intact fibres from frog skeletal muscle at 4 °C, to record the mechanical properties of the half-sarcomere throughout the development of force in isometric contraction. The results are interpreted with mechanical models to estimate the compliance of the myosin motors. Our conclusions are as follows: (i) early during the development of an isometric tetanus, an elastic element is present in parallel with the myosin motors, with a compliance of ∼200 nm MPa(-1) (∼20 times larger than the compliance of the motor array at T0); and (ii) during isometric contraction, s is 1.66 ± 0.05 nm, which is not significantly different from the value estimated with the linear elastic model.

  9. Molecular engineering of a backwards-moving myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2004-02-05

    All members of the diverse myosin superfamily have a highly conserved globular motor domain that contains the actin- and nucleotide-binding sites and produces force and movement. The light-chain-binding domain connects the motor domain to a variety of functionally specialized tail domains and amplifies small structural changes in the motor domain through rotation of a lever arm. Myosins move on polarized actin filaments either forwards to the barbed (+) or backwards to the pointed (-) end. Here, we describe the engineering of an artificial backwards-moving myosin from three pre-existing molecular building blocks. These blocks are: a forward-moving class I myosin motor domain, a directional inverter formed by a four-helix bundle segment of human guanylate-binding protein-1 and an artificial lever arm formed by two alpha-actinin repeats. Our results prove that reverse-direction movement of myosins can be achieved simply by rotating the direction of the lever arm 180 degrees.

  10. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  11. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-02-19

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  12. Rab GTPases and myosin motors in organelle motility.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Miguel C; Coudrier, Evelyne

    2004-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential to ensure the proper location of, and communication between, intracellular organelles. Some actin-based myosin motors have been implicated in this process, particularly members of the class V myosins. We discuss here the emerging role of the Ras-like GTPases of the Rab family as regulators of myosin function in organelle transport. Evidence from yeast secretory vesicles and mitochondria, and mammalian melanosomes and endosomes suggests that Rab GTPases are crucial components of the myosin organelle receptor machinery. Better understood is the case of the melanosome where Rab27a recruits a specific effector called melanophilin, which in turn binds myosin Va. The presence of a linker protein between a Rab and a myosin may represent a general mechanism. We argue that Rabs are ideally suited to perform this role as they are exquisite organelle markers. Furthermore, the molecular switch property of Rabs may enable them to regulate the timing of the myosin association with the target organelle.

  13. A Global, Myosin Light Chain Kinase-dependent Increase in Myosin II Contractility Accompanies the Metaphase–Anaphase Transition in Sea Urchin Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R.

    2006-01-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase–anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase–anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus. PMID:16837551

  14. Isoforms Confer Characteristic Force Generation and Mechanosensation by Myosin II Filaments.

    PubMed

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jon; Gardel, Margaret L; Munro, Edwin

    2015-04-21

    Myosin II isoforms with varying mechanochemistry and filament size interact with filamentous actin (F-actin) arrays to generate contractile forces in muscle and nonmuscle cells. How myosin II force production is shaped by isoform-specific motor properties and environmental stiffness remains poorly understood. Here, we used computer simulations to analyze force production by an ensemble of myosin motors against an elastically tethered actin filament. We found that force output depends on two timescales: the duration of F-actin attachment, which varies sharply with the ensemble size, motor duty ratio, and external load; and the time to build force, which scales with the ensemble stall force, gliding speed, and environmental stiffness. Although force-dependent kinetics were not required to sense changes in stiffness, the myosin catch bond produced positive feedback between the attachment time and force to trigger switch-like transitions from transient attachments, generating small forces, to high-force-generating runs. Using parameters representative of skeletal muscle myosin, nonmuscle myosin IIB, and nonmuscle myosin IIA revealed three distinct regimes of behavior, respectively: 1) large assemblies of fast, low-duty ratio motors rapidly build stable forces over a large range of environmental stiffness; 2) ensembles of slow, high-duty ratio motors serve as high-affinity cross-links with force buildup times that exceed physiological timescales; and 3) small assemblies of low-duty ratio motors operating at intermediate speeds are poised to respond sharply to changes in mechanical context-at low force or stiffness, they serve as low-affinity cross-links, but they can transition to force production via the positive-feedback mechanism described above. Together, these results reveal how myosin isoform properties may be tuned to produce force and respond to mechanical cues in their environment. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Isoforms Confer Characteristic Force Generation and Mechanosensation by Myosin II Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jon; Gardel, Margaret L.; Munro, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Myosin II isoforms with varying mechanochemistry and filament size interact with filamentous actin (F-actin) arrays to generate contractile forces in muscle and nonmuscle cells. How myosin II force production is shaped by isoform-specific motor properties and environmental stiffness remains poorly understood. Here, we used computer simulations to analyze force production by an ensemble of myosin motors against an elastically tethered actin filament. We found that force output depends on two timescales: the duration of F-actin attachment, which varies sharply with the ensemble size, motor duty ratio, and external load; and the time to build force, which scales with the ensemble stall force, gliding speed, and environmental stiffness. Although force-dependent kinetics were not required to sense changes in stiffness, the myosin catch bond produced positive feedback between the attachment time and force to trigger switch-like transitions from transient attachments, generating small forces, to high-force-generating runs. Using parameters representative of skeletal muscle myosin, nonmuscle myosin IIB, and nonmuscle myosin IIA revealed three distinct regimes of behavior, respectively: 1) large assemblies of fast, low-duty ratio motors rapidly build stable forces over a large range of environmental stiffness; 2) ensembles of slow, high-duty ratio motors serve as high-affinity cross-links with force buildup times that exceed physiological timescales; and 3) small assemblies of low-duty ratio motors operating at intermediate speeds are poised to respond sharply to changes in mechanical context—at low force or stiffness, they serve as low-affinity cross-links, but they can transition to force production via the positive-feedback mechanism described above. Together, these results reveal how myosin isoform properties may be tuned to produce force and respond to mechanical cues in their environment. PMID:25902439

  16. Arabidopsis myosin XI: a motor rules the tracks.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chao; Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L; Szymanski, Daniel B; Staiger, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Plant cell expansion relies on intracellular trafficking of vesicles and macromolecules, which requires myosin motors and a dynamic actin network. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myosin XI powers the motility of diverse cellular organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, endomembrane vesicles, peroxisomes, and mitochondria. Several recent studies show that there are changes in actin organization and dynamics in myosin xi mutants, indicating that motors influence the molecular tracks they use for transport. However, the mechanism by which actin organization and dynamics are regulated by myosin XI awaits further detailed investigation. Here, using high spatiotemporal imaging of living cells, we quantitatively assessed the architecture and dynamic behavior of cortical actin arrays in a mutant with three Myosin XI (XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K) genes knocked out (xi3KO). In addition to apparent reduction of organ and cell size, the mutant showed less dense and more bundled actin filament arrays in epidermal cells. Furthermore, the overall actin dynamicity was significantly inhibited in the xi3KO mutant. Because cytoskeletal remodeling is contributed mainly by filament assembly/disassembly and translocation/buckling, we also examined the dynamic behavior of individual actin filaments. We found that the xi3KO mutant had significantly decreased actin turnover, with a 2-fold reduction in filament severing frequency. Moreover, quantitative analysis of filament shape change over time revealed that myosin XI generates the force for buckling and straightening of both single actin filaments and actin bundles. Thus, our data provide genetic evidence that three Arabidopsis class XI myosins contribute to actin remodeling by stimulating turnover and generating the force for filament shape change. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Electrostatic origin of the unidirectionality of walking myosin V motors.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Warshel, Arieh

    2013-10-22

    Understanding the basis for the action of myosin motors and related molecular machines requires a quantitative energy-based description of the overall functional cycle. Previous theoretical attempts to do so have provided interesting insights on parts of the cycle but could not generate a structure-based free energy landscape for the complete cycle of myosin. In particular, a nonphenomenological structure/energy-based understanding of the unidirectional motion is still missing. Here we use a coarse-grained model of myosin V and generate a structure-based free energy surface of the largest conformational change, namely the transition from the post- to prepowerstroke movement. We also couple the observed energetics of ligand binding/hydrolysis and product release to that of the conformational surface and reproduce the energetics of the complete mechanochemical cycle. It is found that the release in electrostatic free energy upon changing the conformation of the lever arm and the convertor domain from its post- to prepowerstroke state provides the necessary energy to bias the system towards the unidirectional movement of myosin V on the actin filament. The free energy change of 11 kcal is also in the range of ∼2-3 pN, which is consistent with the experimentally observed stalling force required to stop the motor completely on its track. The conformational-chemical coupling generating a successful powerstroke cycle is believed to be conserved among most members of the myosin family, thus highlighting the importance of the previously unknown role of electrostatics free energy in guiding the functional cycle in other actin-based myosin motors.

  18. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications.

  19. Optical trapping studies of acto-myosin motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, Rachel E.; Rosenthal, Peter B.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Holder, Anthony A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2007-09-01

    Optical tweezers have been used extensively to measure the mechanical properties of individual biological molecules. Over the past 10-15 years optical trapping studies have revealed important information about the way in which motor proteins convert chemical energy to mechanical work. This paper focuses on studies of the acto-myosin motor system that is responsible for muscle contraction and a host of other cellular motilities. Myosin works by binding to filamentous actin, pulling and then releasing. Each cycle of interaction produces a few nanometres movement and a few piconewtons force. Individual interactions can be observed directly by holding an individual actin filament between two optically trapped microspheres and positioning it in the immediate vicinity of a single myosin motor. When the chemical fuel (adenosine triphosphate or ATP) is present the myosin undergoes repeated cycles of interaction with the actin filament producing square-wave like displacements and forces. Analysis of optical trapping data sets enables the size and timing of the molecular motions to be deduced.

  20. Actin network architecture can determine myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Reymann, Anne-Cécile; Boujemaa-Paterski, Rajaa; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Guérin, Christophe; Cao, Wenxiang; Chin, Harvey F; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2012-06-08

    The organization of actin filaments into higher-ordered structures governs eukaryotic cell shape and movement. Global actin network size and architecture are maintained in a dynamic steady state through regulated assembly and disassembly. Here, we used experimentally defined actin structures in vitro to investigate how the activity of myosin motors depends on network architecture. Direct visualization of filaments revealed myosin-induced actin network deformation. During this reorganization, myosins selectively contracted and disassembled antiparallel actin structures, while parallel actin bundles remained unaffected. The local distribution of nucleation sites and the resulting orientation of actin filaments appeared to regulate the scalability of the contraction process. This "orientation selection" mechanism for selective contraction and disassembly suggests how the dynamics of the cellular actin cytoskeleton can be spatially controlled by actomyosin contractility.

  1. Conformational changes in actin-myosin isoforms probed by Ni(II).Gly-Gly-His reactivity.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Juliette; Lafont, Chrystel; Knetsch, Menno L W; Derancourt, Jean; Manstein, Dietmar J; Long, Eric C; Chaussepied, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Crucial information concerning conformational changes that occur during the mechanochemical cycle of actin-myosin complexes is lacking due to the difficulties encountered in obtaining their three-dimensional structures. To obtain such information, we employed a solution-based approach through the reaction of Ni(II).tripeptide chelates which are able to induce protein cleavage and cross-linking reactions. Three different myosin motor domain isoforms in the presence of actin and nucleotides were treated with a library of Ni(II).tripeptide chelates and two reactivities were observed: (1) muscle motor domains were cross-linked to actin, as also observed for the skeletal muscle isoform, while (2) the Dictyostelium discoideum motor domain was cleaved at a single locus. All Ni(II).tripeptide chelates tested generated identical reaction products, with Ni(II).Gly-Gly-His, containing a C-terminal carboxylate, exhibiting the highest reactivity. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that protein cleavage occurred within segment 242-265 of the Dictyostelium discoideum myosin heavy chain sequence, while the skeletal myosin cross-linking site was as localized previously within segment 506-561. Using a fusion protein consisting of the yellow and cyan variants of green fluorescent protein linked by Dictyostelium discoideum myosin segment 242-265, we demonstrated that the primary sequence of this segment alone is not a sufficient substrate for Ni(II).Gly-Gly-His-induced cleavage. Importantly, the cross-linking and cleavage reactions both exhibited specific structural sensitivities to the nature of the nucleotide bound to the active site, validating the conformational changes suggested from crystallographic data of the actin-free myosin motor domain.

  2. A millennial myosin census.

    PubMed

    Berg, J S; Powell, B C; Cheney, R E

    2001-04-01

    The past decade has seen a remarkable explosion in our knowledge of the size and diversity of the myosin superfamily. Since these actin-based motors are candidates to provide the molecular basis for many cellular movements, it is essential that motility researchers be aware of the complete set of myosins in a given organism. The availability of cDNA and/or draft genomic sequences from humans, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis thaliana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Dictyostelium discoideum has allowed us to tentatively define and compare the sets of myosin genes in these organisms. This analysis has also led to the identification of several putative myosin genes that may be of general interest. In humans, for example, we find a total of 40 known or predicted myosin genes including two new myosins-I, three new class II (conventional) myosins, a second member of the class III/ninaC myosins, a gene similar to the class XV deafness myosin, and a novel myosin sharing at most 33% identity with other members of the superfamily. These myosins are in addition to the recently discovered class XVI myosin with N-terminal ankyrin repeats and two human genes with similarity to the class XVIII PDZ-myosin from mouse. We briefly describe these newly recognized myosins and extend our previous phylogenetic analysis of the myosin superfamily to include a comparison of the complete or nearly complete inventories of myosin genes from several experimentally important organisms.

  3. Melanophilin Stimulates Myosin-5a Motor Function by Allosterically Inhibiting the Interaction between the Head and Tail of Myosin-5a

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lin-Lin; Cao, Qing-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Yang; Li, Xiang-dong

    2015-01-01

    The tail-inhibition model is generally accepted for the regulation of myosin-5a motor function. Inhibited myosin-5a is in a folded conformation in which its globular tail domain (GTD) interacts with its head and inhibits its motor function, and high Ca2+ or cargo binding may reduce the interaction between the GTD and the head of myosin-5a, thus activating motor activity. Although it is well established that myosin-5a motor function is regulated by Ca2+, little is known about the effects of cargo binding. We previously reported that melanophilin (Mlph), a myosin-5a cargo-binding protein, is capable of activating myosin-5a motor function. Here, we report that Mlph-GTBDP, a 26 amino-acid-long peptide of Mlph, is sufficient for activating myosin-5a motor function. We demonstrate that Mlph-GTBDP abolishes the interaction between the head and GTD of myosin-5a, thereby inducing a folded-to-extended conformation transition for myosin-5a and activating its motor function. Mutagenesis of the GTD shows that the GTD uses two distinct, non-overlapping regions to interact with Mlph-GTBDP and the head of myosin-5a. We propose that the GTD is an allosteric protein and that Mlph allosterically inhibits the interaction between the GTD and head of myosin-5a, thereby activating myosin-5a motor function. PMID:26039755

  4. A role for myosin II in mammalian mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Korobova, Farida; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-02-17

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, undergoing both fission and fusion regularly in interphase cells. Mitochondrial fission is thought to be part of a quality-control mechanism whereby damaged mitochondrial components are segregated from healthy components in an individual mitochondrion, followed by mitochondrial fission and degradation of the damaged daughter mitochondrion. Fission also plays a role in apoptosis. Defects in mitochondrial dynamics can lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondrial fission requires the dynamin GTPase Drp1, which assembles in a ring around the mitochondrion and appears to constrict both outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. However, mechanisms controlling Drp1 assembly on mammalian mitochondria are unclear. Recent results show that actin polymerization, driven by the endoplasmic reticulum-bound formin protein INF2, stimulates Drp1 assembly at fission sites. Here, we show that myosin II also plays a role in fission. Chemical inhibition by blebbistatin or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated suppression of myosin IIA or myosin IIB causes an increase in mitochondrial length in both control cells and cells expressing constitutively active INF2. Active myosin II accumulates in puncta on mitochondria in an actin- and INF2-dependent manner. In addition, myosin II inhibition decreases Drp1 association with mitochondria. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic model in which INF2-mediated actin polymerization leads to myosin II recruitment and constriction at the fission site, enhancing subsequent Drp1 accumulation and fission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin-actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to determine the relation between shortening velocity and the number and strain of myosin motors and the effect of orthophosphate concentration. A model simulation of the myosin-actin reaction explains the results assuming that orthophosphate and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The ADP release rate further increases by one order of magnitude with the rise of negative strain in the final motor conformation. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and shortening velocity during muscle contraction. The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II--actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca(2+)-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi ), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s(-1) per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0 ), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mM, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40-50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin-actin reaction in which

  6. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2006-12-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by {approx}60 degrees. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin's ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a see-saw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston/seesaw motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery stroke by using Principal Component Analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions.

  7. Dictyostelium myosin-IE is a fast molecular motor involved in phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dürrwang, Ulrike; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Erent, Muriel; Kull, F Jon; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Geeves, Michael A; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2006-02-01

    Class I myosins are single-headed motor proteins, implicated in various motile processes including organelle translocation, ion-channel gating, and cytoskeleton reorganization. Here we describe the cellular localization of myosin-IE and its role in the phagocytic uptake of solid particles and cells. A complete analysis of the kinetic and motor properties of Dictyostelium discoideum myosin-IE was achieved by the use of motor domain constructs with artificial lever arms. Class I myosins belonging to subclass IC like myosin-IE are thought to be tuned for tension maintenance or stress sensing. In contrast to this prediction, our results show myosin-IE to be a fast motor. Myosin-IE motor activity is regulated by myosin heavy chain phosphorylation, which increases the coupling efficiency between the actin and nucleotide binding sites tenfold and the motile activity more than fivefold. Changes in the level of free Mg(2+) ions, which are within the physiological range, are shown to modulate the motor activity of myosin-IE by inhibiting the release of adenosine diphosphate.

  8. Purification and partial characterization of myosin II from rat testis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Decivaldo dos Santos; Coelho, Milton Vieira

    2007-10-01

    The intent, in this work, was to isolate rat testis myosin II. Testis 40,000 x g x 40' supernatant was frozen at -20 degrees C for 48 h and, after it was thawed and centrifuged. The precipitate, after washed twice, was enriched in three polypeptides bands: p205, p43 and one that migrated together with the front of the gel. These polypeptides were solubilized in pH 10.8 at 27 degrees C and separated in Sephacryl S-400 column. Three low weight polypeptides co-eluted together with p205. The p205 was marked with anti-myosin II, possess actin-stimulated Mg-ATPase activity and co-sedimented with F-actin in the absence, but not in the presence, of ATP. In the present study, we have been developing a method for purification of myosin II from rat testis.

  9. Biochemical and bioinformatic analysis of the myosin-XIX motor domain.

    PubMed

    Adikes, Rebecca C; Unrath, William C; Yengo, Christopher M; Quintero, Omar A

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics are dependent on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletal systems. Evidence for the involvement of myosin motors has been described in many systems, and until recently a candidate mitochondrial myosin transport motor had not been described in vertebrates. Myosin-XIX (MYO19) was predicted to represent a novel class of myosin and had previously been shown to bind to mitochondria and increase mitochondrial network dynamics when ectopically expressed. Our analyses comparing ∼40 MYO19 orthologs to ∼2000 other myosin motor domain sequences identified instances of homology well-conserved within class XIX myosins that were not found in other myosin classes, suggesting MYO19-specific mechanochemistry. Steady-state biochemical analyses of the MYO19 motor domain indicate that Homo sapiens MYO19 is a functional motor. Insect cell-expressed constructs bound calmodulin as a light chain at the predicted stoichiometry and displayed actin-activated ATPase activity. MYO19 constructs demonstrated high actin affinity in the presence of ATP in actin-co-sedimentation assays, and translocated actin filaments in gliding assays. Expression of GFP-MYO19 containing a mutation impairing ATPase activity did not enhance mitochondrial network dynamics, as occurs with wild-type MYO19, indicating that myosin motor activity is required for mitochondrial motility. The measured biochemical properties of MYO19 suggest it is a high-duty ratio motor that could serve to transport mitochondria or anchor mitochondria, depending upon the cellular microenvironment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Myosin-II sets the optimal response time scale of chemotactic amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    The response dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton to external chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in numerous cellular functions. One of the key players that governs the dynamics of the actin network is the motor protein myosin-II. Here we investigate the role of myosin-II in the response of the actin system to external stimuli. We used a microfluidic device in combination with a photoactivatable chemoattractant to apply stimuli to individual cells with high temporal resolution. We directly compare the actin dynamics in Dictyostelium discodelium wild type (WT) cells to a knockout mutant that is deficient in myosin-II (MNL). Similar to the WT a small population of MNL cells showed self-sustained oscillations even in absence of external stimuli. The actin response of MNL cells to a short pulse of chemoattractant resembles WT during the first 15 sec but is significantly delayed afterward. The amplitude of the dominant peak in the power spectrum from the response time series of MNL cells to periodic stimuli with varying period showed a clear resonance peak at a forcing period of 36 sec, which is significantly delayed as compared to the resonance at 20 sec found for the WT. This shift indicates an important role of myosin-II in setting the response time scale of motile amoeba. Institute of Physics und Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.

  11. Distinct and redundant roles of the non-muscle myosin II isoforms and functional domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aibing; Ma, Xuefei; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    We propose that the in vivo functions of NM II (non-muscle myosin II) can be divided between those that depend on the N-terminal globular motor domain and those less dependent on motor activity but more dependent on the C-terminal domain. The former, being more dependent on the kinetic properties of NM II to translocate actin filaments, are less amenable to substitution by different NM II isoforms, whereas the in vivo functions of the latter, which involve the structural properties of NM II to cross-link actin filaments, are more amenable to substitution. In light of this hypothesis, we examine the ability of NM II-A, as well as a motor-compromised form of NM II-B, to replace NM II-B and rescue neuroepithelial cell-cell adhesion defects and hydrocephalus in the brain of NM II-B-depleted mice. We also examine the ability of NM II-B as well as chimaeric forms of NM II (II-A head and II-B tail and vice versa) to substitute for NM II-A in cell-cell adhesions in II-A-ablated mice. However, we also show that certain functions, such as neuronal cell migration in the developing brain and vascularization of the mouse embryo and placenta, specifically require NM II-B and II-A respectively.

  12. The myosin X motor is optimized for movement on actin bundles

    PubMed Central

    Ropars, Virginie; Yang, Zhaohui; Isabet, Tatiana; Blanc, Florian; Zhou, Kaifeng; Lin, Tianming; Liu, Xiaoyan; Hissier, Pascale; Samazan, Frédéric; Amigues, Béatrice; Yang, Eric D.; Park, Hyokeun; Pylypenko, Olena; Cecchini, Marco; Sindelar, Charles V.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Houdusse, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Myosin X has features not found in other myosins. Its structure must underlie its unique ability to generate filopodia, which are essential for neuritogenesis, wound healing, cancer metastasis and some pathogenic infections. By determining high-resolution structures of key components of this motor, and characterizing the in vitro behaviour of the native dimer, we identify the features that explain the myosin X dimer behaviour. Single-molecule studies demonstrate that a native myosin X dimer moves on actin bundles with higher velocities and takes larger steps than on single actin filaments. The largest steps on actin bundles are larger than previously reported for artificially dimerized myosin X constructs or any other myosin. Our model and kinetic data explain why these large steps and high velocities can only occur on bundled filaments. Thus, myosin X functions as an antiparallel dimer in cells with a unique geometry optimized for movement on actin bundles. PMID:27580874

  13. Blebbistatin, a myosin II inhibitor, is photoinactivated by blue light.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takeshi; Limouze, John; Combs, Christian A; Straight, Aaron F; Sellers, James R

    2005-01-18

    Blebbistatin is a small molecule inhibitor discovered in a screen for inhibitors of nonmuscle myosin IIA. Blebbistatin inhibits the actin-activated MgATPase activity and in vitro motility of class II myosins. In cells, it has been shown to inhibit contraction of the cytokinetic ring. Blebbistatin has some photochemical properties that may affect its behavior in cells. In particular, we have found that exposure to light at wavelengths below 488 nm rapidly inactivates the inhibitory action of blebbistatin using the in vitro motility of myosin as an assay. In addition, the inhibition of cytokinetic ring contraction can be reversed by exposure of the cells to blue light. This property may be useful in locally reversing the action of blebbistatin treatment in a cell. However, caution should be exercised as free radicals may be produced upon irradiation of blebbistatin that could result in cell damage.

  14. The Myosin IXb Motor Activity Targets the Myosin IXb RhoGAP Domain as Cargo to Sites of Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    van den Boom, Frank; Düssmann, Heiko; Uhlenbrock, Katharina; Abouhamed, Marouan

    2007-01-01

    Myosin IXb (Myo9b) is a single-headed processive myosin that exhibits Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) activity in its tail region. Using live cell imaging, we determined that Myo9b is recruited to extending lamellipodia, ruffles, and filopodia, the regions of active actin polymerization. A functional motor domain was both necessary and sufficient for targeting Myo9b to these regions. The head domains of class IX myosins comprise a large insertion in loop2. Deletion of the large Myo9b head loop 2 insertion abrogated the enrichment in extending lamellipodia and ruffles, but enhanced significantly the enrichment at the tips of filopodia and retraction fibers. The enrichment in the tips of filopodia and retraction fibers depended on four lysine residues C-terminal to the loop 2 insertion and the tail region. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and photoactivation experiments in lamellipodia revealed that the dynamics of Myo9b was comparable to that of actin. The exchange rates depended on the Myo9b motor region and motor activity, and they were also dependent on the turnover of F-actin. These results demonstrate that Myo9b functions as a motorized RhoGAP molecule in regions of actin polymerization and identify Myo9b head sequences important for in vivo motor properties. PMID:17314409

  15. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, R. F.; Sommese, R. F.; Adhikari, A. S.; Taylor, R. E.; Sutton, S.; Spudich, J. A.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes.

  16. Harmonic force spectroscopy reveals a force-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian; Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James

    2014-03-01

    A muscle contracts rapidly under low load, but slowly under high load. Its molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, however. During contraction, myosins in thick filaments interact with actin in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound (force producing) state and a weakly bound (relaxed) state. Huxley et al. have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by a load. We use a new method we call ``harmonic force spectroscopy'' to extract a load-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor. With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a myosin molecule anchored to the microscope stage that oscillates sinusoidally. Upon binding, the motor experiences an oscillatory load with a mean that is directed forward or backward, depending on binding location We find that the bound time at saturating [ATP] is exponentially correlated with the mean load, which is explained by Arrhenius transition theory. With a stroke size measurement, we obtained a load-velocity curve from a single myosin. We compare the curves for wild-type motors with mutants that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, to understand the effects on the contractile cycle

  17. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, Stefan

    2007-03-23

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by 60 degrees . This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a seesaw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston-like motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery-stroke by using principal component analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large-amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the seesaw motion of the relay helix dominates in the dynamics of the pre-recovery stroke structure, but not in the dynamics of the post-recovery stroke structure, and vice versa for the piston motion of the SH1 helix. This is consistent with the order of the proposed two-phase model for the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke. Molecular movies of these principal motions are available at http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/groups/biocomp/fischer.

  18. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-03-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by 60{sup o}. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a seesaw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston-like motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery-stroke by using principal component analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large-amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the seesaw motion of the relay helix dominates in the dynamics of the pre-recovery stroke structure, but not in the dynamics of the post-recovery stroke structure, and vice versa for the piston motion of the SH1 helix. This is consistent with the order of the proposed two-phase model for the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke. Molecular movies of these principal motions are available at http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/groups/biocomp/fischer.

  19. HDAC3-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of cardiac myosin heavy chain isoforms modulates their enzymatic and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Courson, David S; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Rock, Ronald S; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2011-02-18

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, associate with cardiac sarcomeres, and a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study, we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to the A band of sarcomeres and was capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the K(m) for the actin-activated ATPase activity of both α- and β-MHC isoforms. By an in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36%, compared to their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli, independent of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  20. HDAC3-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Sadhana A.; Courson, David S.; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Rock, Ronald S.; Gupta, Mahesh P.

    2011-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, associate with cardiac sarcomeres, and a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study, we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to the A band of sarcomeres and was capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of both α- and β-MHC isoforms. By an in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36%, compared to their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli, independent of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms. PMID:21177250

  1. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle.

  2. Effects of filament rigidity in myosin II-induced actin network contractility and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Gardel, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Cells change shape, deforming to move and divide. The dynamic protein scaffold that shapes the cell is the cortex, a disordered, thin network of actin filaments. Random, local stresses generated by myosin II in the network create cellular-scale deformations. Myosin induced buckling and severing of actin filaments has been shown to underlie the contractility of two-dimensional disordered actin networks. This non-linear elastic response of actin filaments is thought to be an essential symmetry breaking mechanism to produce robust contractility in disordered actomyosin networks. To test this idea, we explore the effects of an actin bundling protein fascin, a crosslinker which induces polarity specific bundling of actin filaments, to create a network of F-actin bundles. We investigate myosin-induced stresses in a network of randomly oriented actin filaments, confined to a thin sheet at a supported lipid bilayer surface through a crowding agent. We find fascin-bundled filaments are less prone to filament buckling and show increased filament sliding, causing the myosin activity to induce network reorganization rather than contraction. Thus, changes in the filament bending rigidity in motor-filament systems can drive the system between distinct states with unique dynamic and mechanical signatures.

  3. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biman; Onuchic, José N

    2016-08-01

    A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI). Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities.

  4. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Biman; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-01-01

    A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI). Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities. PMID:27494025

  5. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems—the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32–125 motors per μm2), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track. PMID:25201964

  6. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shane R; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M

    2014-09-23

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems--the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32-125 motors per μm(2)), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track.

  7. Increased association of dynamin II with myosin II in ras transformed NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yoo, Jiyun; Han, Mi-Young; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Heung-Joong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Choi, Baik-Dong; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2006-08-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin II has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin II and myosin II. The dynamin II expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin II in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells. Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins. The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin II interacted with myosin II. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway, was found to be associated with dynamin II and myosin II gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin II acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  8. Crystal structure of the rigor-like human non-muscle myosin-2 motor domain.

    PubMed

    Münnich, Stefan; Pathan-Chhatbar, Salma; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2014-12-20

    We determined the crystal structure of the motor domain of human non-muscle myosin 2B (NM-2B) in a nucleotide-free state and at a resolution of 2.8 Å. The structure shows the motor domain with an open active site and the large cleft that divides the 50 kDa domain in a closed state. Compared to other rigor-like myosin motor domain structures, our structure shows subtle but significant conformational changes in regions important for actin binding and mechanochemical coupling. Moreover, our crystal structure helps to rationalize the impact of myosin, heavy chain 9 (MYH9)-related disease mutations Arg709Cys and Arg709His on the kinetic and functional properties of NM-2B and of the closely related non-muscle myosin 2A (NM-2A). Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phospholipid-dependent regulation of the motor activity of myosin X.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Nobuhisa; Jung, Hyun Suk; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Osamu; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-06-12

    Myosin X is involved in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and protrusion of filopodia. Here we studied the molecular mechanism by which bovine myosin X is regulated. The globular tail domain inhibited the motor activity of myosin X in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. Structural analysis revealed that myosin X is monomeric and that the band 4.1-ezrin-radixin-moesin (FERM) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains bind to the head intramolecularly, forming an inhibited conformation. Binding of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)) to the PH domain reversed the tail-induced inhibition and induced the formation of myosin X dimers. Consistently, disruption of the binding of PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) attenuated the translocation of myosin X to filopodial tips in cells. We propose the following mechanism: first, the tail inhibits the motor activity of myosin X by intramolecular head-tail interactions to form the folded conformation; second, phospholipid binding reverses the inhibition and disrupts the folded conformation, which induces dimer formation, thereby activating the mechanical and cargo transporter activity of myosin X.

  10. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Progress report, [July 1, 1992--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have evidence for at least nine myosin-like genes in Arbidopsis, six of which have been cloned by a PCR-based method from genomic DNA, two have been isolated by genomic DNA cloning, and four have been identified by cDNA cloning. Most of our attention has been focused on the four myosin genes for which we have cDNA clones, and these cDNAs have now been sequenced to completion. Each of these myosins is similar in overall structure, with each containing the characteristic myosin head (motor) domain, which possesses ATP- and actin-binding motifs, a series of IQ repeats, which may be involved in calmodulin binding, a domain with a high probability of forming an alpha-helical coiled-coil secondary structure, which may allow the polypeptides to form dimers, and a variable tail domain, which may serve to define the specific cellular component that each myosin interacts with. One of these myosin genes, called MYA1, displays structural similarity to class of myosins that includes the yeast MYO2, mouse Dilute, and chicken p190 proteins, and this group of myosins is thought to play a role in intracellular trafficking of organelles. Because MYA1 is similar to this interesting class of myosins, we have chosen to conduct detailed studies of MYA1.

  11. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of squid myosin-V: a vesicle motor in nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Molyneaux, B J; Mulcahey, M K; Stafford, P; Langford, G M

    2000-06-01

    We have shown that vesicles in the axoplasm of the squid giant axon move on actin filaments and that movement is inhibited by myosin V-specific antibodies [Tabb et al., 1998]. In the study reported in this article, experiments were performed to clone and sequence the cDNA for squid brain myosin V. Five proteolytic fragments of purified squid brain myosin V were analyzed by direct protein sequencing [Tabb et al., 1998]. Based on this sequence information, degenerate primers were constructed and used to isolate cDNA clones by PCR. Five clones, representing overlapping segments of the gene, were sequenced. The sequence data and the previous biochemical characterization of the molecule support the classification of this vesicle-associated myosin as a member of the class V myosins. Motif analysis of the head, neck, and tail domains revealed that squid MyoV has consensus sequences for all the motifs found in vertebrate members of the myosin V family of motor proteins. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from a sequence alignment by the neighbor-joining method, using Megalign (DNAStar, Madison, WI); the resulting phylogenetic tree showed that squid MyoV is more closely related to vertebrate MyoV (mouse dilute, chicken dilute, rat myr6, and human myo5a) than Drosophila and yeast (myo2, and myo4) myosins V. These new data on the phylogenetic relationships of squid myosin V to vertebrate myosin V strengthens the argument that myosin V functions as a vesicle motor in vertebrate neurons. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Drosophila melanogaster myosin-18 represents a highly divergent motor with actin tethering properties.

    PubMed

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Houdusse, Anne; Sellers, James R

    2011-06-17

    The gene encoding Drosophila myosin-18 is complex and can potentially yield six alternatively spliced mRNAs. One of the major features of this myosin is an N-terminal PDZ domain that is included in some of the predicted alternatively spliced products. To explore the biochemical properties of this protein, we engineered two minimal motor domain (MMD)-like constructs, one that contains the N-terminal PDZ (myosin-18 M-PDZ) domain and one that does not (myosin-18 M-ΔPDZ). These two constructs were expressed in the baculovirus/Sf9 system. The results suggest that Drosophila myosin-18 is highly divergent from most other myosins in the superfamily. Neither of the MMD constructs had an actin-activated MgATPase activity, nor did they even bind ATP. Both myosin-18 M-PDZ and M-ΔPDZ proteins bound to actin with K(d) values of 2.61 and 1.04 μM, respectively, but only about 50-75% of the protein bound to actin even at high actin concentrations. Unbound proteins from these actin binding assays reiterated the 60% saturation maximum, suggesting an equilibrium between actin-binding and non-actin-binding conformations of Drosophila myosin-18 in vitro. Neither the binding affinity nor the substoichiometric binding was significantly affected by ATP. Optical trapping of single molecules in three-bead assays showed short lived interactions of the myosin-18 motors with actin filaments. Combined, these data suggest that this highly divergent motor may function as an actin tethering protein.

  13. Drosophila melanogaster Myosin-18 Represents a Highly Divergent Motor with Actin Tethering Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Houdusse, Anne; Sellers, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The gene encoding Drosophila myosin-18 is complex and can potentially yield six alternatively spliced mRNAs. One of the major features of this myosin is an N-terminal PDZ domain that is included in some of the predicted alternatively spliced products. To explore the biochemical properties of this protein, we engineered two minimal motor domain (MMD)-like constructs, one that contains the N-terminal PDZ (myosin-18 M-PDZ) domain and one that does not (myosin-18 M-ΔPDZ). These two constructs were expressed in the baculovirus/Sf9 system. The results suggest that Drosophila myosin-18 is highly divergent from most other myosins in the superfamily. Neither of the MMD constructs had an actin-activated MgATPase activity, nor did they even bind ATP. Both myosin-18 M-PDZ and M-ΔPDZ proteins bound to actin with Kd values of 2.61 and 1.04 μm, respectively, but only about 50–75% of the protein bound to actin even at high actin concentrations. Unbound proteins from these actin binding assays reiterated the 60% saturation maximum, suggesting an equilibrium between actin-binding and non-actin-binding conformations of Drosophila myosin-18 in vitro. Neither the binding affinity nor the substoichiometric binding was significantly affected by ATP. Optical trapping of single molecules in three-bead assays showed short lived interactions of the myosin-18 motors with actin filaments. Combined, these data suggest that this highly divergent motor may function as an actin tethering protein. PMID:21498886

  14. Axon extension in the fast and slow lanes: substratum-dependent engagement of myosin II functions.

    PubMed

    Ketschek, Andrea R; Jones, Steven L; Gallo, Gianluca

    2007-09-01

    Axon extension involves the coordinated regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Actin filaments drive protrusion of filopodia and lamellipodia while microtubules invade the growth cone, thereby providing structural support for the nascent axon. Furthermore, in order for axons to extend the growth cone must attach to the substratum. Previous work indicates that myosin II activity inhibits the advance of microtubules into the periphery of growth cones, and myosin II has also been implicated in mediating integrin-dependent cell attachment. However, it is not clear how the functions of myosin II in regulating substratum attachment and microtubule advance are integrated during axon extension. We report that inhibition of myosin II function decreases the rate of axon extension on laminin, but surprisingly promotes extension rate on polylysine. The differential effects of myosin II inhibition on axon extension rate are attributable to myosin II having the primary function of mediating substratum attachment on laminin, but not on polylysine. Conversely, on polylysine the primary function of myosin II is to inhibit microtubule advance into growth cones. Thus, the substratum determines the role of myosin II in axon extension by controlling the functions of myosin II that contribute to extension.

  15. Axon Extension in the Fast and Slow Lanes: Substratum-Dependent Engagement of Myosin II Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ketschek, Andrea R.; Jones, Steven L.; Gallo, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Axon extension involves the coordinated regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Actin filaments drive protrusion of filopodia and lamellipodia while microtubules invade the growth cone, thereby providing structural support for the nascent axon. Furthermore, in order for axons to extend the growth cone must attach to the substratum. Previous work indicates that myosin II activity inhibits the advance of microtubules into the periphery of growth cones, and myosin II has also been implicated in mediating integrin-dependent cell attachment. However, it is not clear how the functions of myosin II in regulating substratum attachment and microtubule advance are integrated during axon extension. We report that inhibition of myosin II function decreases the rate of axon extension on laminin, but surprisingly promotes extension rate on polylysine. The differential effects of myosin II inhibition on axon extension rate are attributable to myosin II having the primary function of mediating substratum attachment on laminin, but not on polylysine. Conversely, on polylysine the primary function of myosin II is to inhibit microtubule advance into growth cones. Thus, the substratum determines the role of myosin II in axon extension by controlling the functions of myosin II that contribute to extension. PMID:17638383

  16. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  17. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  18. Human myosin VIIa is a very slow processive motor protein on various cellular actin structures.

    PubMed

    Sato, Osamu; Komatsu, Satoshi; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Mizutani, Takeomi; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2017-06-30

    Human myosin VIIa (MYO7A) is an actin-linked motor protein associated with human Usher syndrome (USH) type 1B, which causes human congenital hearing and visual loss. Although it has been thought that the role of human myosin VIIa is critical for USH1 protein tethering with actin and transportation along actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells, myosin VIIa's motor function remains unclear. Here, we studied the motor function of the tail-truncated human myosin VIIa dimer (HM7AΔTail/LZ) at the single-molecule level. We found that the HM7AΔTail/LZ moves processively on single actin filaments with a step size of 35 nm. Dwell-time distribution analysis indicated an average waiting time of 3.4 s, yielding ∼0.3 s(-1) for the mechanical turnover rate; hence, the velocity of HM7AΔTail/LZ was extremely slow, at 11 nm·s(-1) We also examined HM7AΔTail/LZ movement on various actin structures in demembranated cells. HM7AΔTail/LZ showed unidirectional movement on actin structures at cell edges, such as lamellipodia and filopodia. However, HM7AΔTail/LZ frequently missed steps on actin tracks and exhibited bidirectional movement at stress fibers, which was not observed with tail-truncated myosin Va. These results suggest that the movement of the human myosin VIIa motor protein is more efficient on lamellipodial and filopodial actin tracks than on stress fibers, which are composed of actin filaments with different polarity, and that the actin structures influence the characteristics of cargo transportation by human myosin VIIa. In conclusion, myosin VIIa movement appears to be suitable for translocating USH1 proteins on stereocilia actin bundles in inner-ear hair cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Structural changes in myosin motors and filaments during relaxation of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, E; Fusi, L; Reconditi, M; Linari, M; Bianco, P; Panine, P; Narayanan, T; Piazzesi, G; Lombardi, V; Irving, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural changes in myosin motors and filaments during relaxation from short tetanic contractions of intact single fibres of frog tibialis anterior muscles at sarcomere length 2.14 μm, 4°C were investigated by X-ray diffraction. Force declined at a steady rate for several hundred milliseconds after the last stimulus, while sarcomere lengths remained almost constant. During this isometric phase of relaxation the intensities of the equatorial and meridional M3 X-ray reflections associated with the radial and axial distributions of myosin motors also recovered at a steady rate towards their resting values, consistent with progressive net detachment of myosin motors from actin filaments. Stiffness measurements confirmed that the fraction of motors attached to actin declined at a constant rate, but also revealed a progressive increase in force per motor. The interference fine structure of the M3 reflection suggested that actin-attached myosin motors are displaced towards the start of their working stroke during isometric relaxation. There was negligible recovery of the intensities of the meridional and layer-line reflections associated with the quasi-helical distribution of myosin motors in resting muscle during isometric relaxation, and the 1.5% increase in the axial periodicity of the myosin filament associated with muscle activation was not reversed. When force had decreased to roughly half its tetanus plateau value, the isometric phase of relaxation abruptly ended, and the ensuing chaotic relaxation had an exponential half-time of ca 60 ms. Recovery of the equatorial X-ray intensities was largely complete during chaotic relaxation, but the other X-ray signals recovered more slowly than force. PMID:19651765

  20. A small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii motility induces the posttranslational modification of myosin light chain-1 and inhibits myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Aoife T; Leung, Jacqueline M; Carey, Kimberly L; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M; Westwood, Nicholas J; Ballif, Bryan A; Ward, Gary E

    2010-01-15

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains.

  1. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of T. gondii Motility Induces the Posttranslational Modification of Myosin Light Chain-1 and Inhibits Myosin Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Heaslip, Aoife T.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Carey, Kimberly L.; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains. PMID:20084115

  2. Mouse Myosin-19 Is a Plus-end-directed, High-duty Ratio Molecular Motor*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zekuan; Ma, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Ji, Huan-Hong; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Dan; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2014-01-01

    Class XIX myosin (Myo19) is a vertebrate-specific unconventional myosin, responsible for the transport of mitochondria. To characterize biochemical properties of Myo19, we prepared recombinant mouse Myo19-truncated constructs containing the motor domain and the IQ motifs using the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. We identified regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle/non-muscle myosin-2 as the light chain of Myo19. The actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding velocity of Myo19-truncated constructs were about one-third and one-sixth as those of myosin-5a, respectively. The apparent affinity of Myo19 to actin was about the same as that of myosin-5a. The RLCs bound to Myo19 could be phosphorylated by myosin light chain kinase, but this phosphorylation had little effect on the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Using dual fluorescence-labeled actin filaments, we determined that Myo19 is a plus-end-directed molecular motor. We found that, similar to that of the high-duty ratio myosin, such as myosin-5a, ADP release rate was comparable with the maximal actin-activated ATPase activity of Myo19, indicating that ADP release is a rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle of acto-Myo19. ADP strongly inhibited the actin-activated ATPase activity and actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Based on the above results, we concluded that Myo19 is a high-duty ratio molecular motor moving to the plus-end of the actin filament. PMID:24825904

  3. Coordinated recruitment of Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors to Rab11 vesicle membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pylypenko, Olena; Welz, Tobias; Tittel, Janine; Kollmar, Martin; Chardon, Florian; Malherbe, Gilles; Weiss, Sabine; Michel, Carina Ida Luise; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Grasskamp, Andreas Till; Hume, Alistair; Goud, Bruno; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Titus, Margaret A; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence for a coupling of actin assembly and myosin motor activity in cells. However, mechanisms for recruitment of actin nucleators and motors on specific membrane compartments remain unclear. Here we report how Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors coordinate their specific membrane recruitment. The myosin V globular tail domain (MyoV-GTD) interacts directly with an evolutionarily conserved Spir sequence motif. We determined crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD bound either to the Spir-2 motif or to Rab11 and show that a Spir-2:MyoVa:Rab11 complex can form. The ternary complex architecture explains how Rab11 vesicles support coordinated F-actin nucleation and myosin force generation for vesicle transport and tethering. New insights are also provided into how myosin activation can be coupled with the generation of actin tracks. Since MyoV binds several Rab GTPases, synchronized nucleator and motor targeting could provide a common mechanism to control force generation and motility in different cellular processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17523.001 PMID:27623148

  4. Coordinated recruitment of Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors to Rab11 vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Pylypenko, Olena; Welz, Tobias; Tittel, Janine; Kollmar, Martin; Chardon, Florian; Malherbe, Gilles; Weiss, Sabine; Michel, Carina Ida Luise; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Grasskamp, Andreas Till; Hume, Alistair; Goud, Bruno; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Titus, Margaret A; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas; Houdusse, Anne; Kerkhoff, Eugen

    2016-09-13

    There is growing evidence for a coupling of actin assembly and myosin motor activity in cells. However, mechanisms for recruitment of actin nucleators and motors on specific membrane compartments remain unclear. Here we report how Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors coordinate their specific membrane recruitment. The myosin V globular tail domain (MyoV-GTD) interacts directly with an evolutionarily conserved Spir sequence motif. We determined crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD bound either to the Spir-2 motif or to Rab11 and show that a Spir-2:MyoVa:Rab11 complex can form. The ternary complex architecture explains how Rab11 vesicles support coordinated F-actin nucleation and myosin force generation for vesicle transport and tethering. New insights are also provided into how myosin activation can be coupled with the generation of actin tracks. Since MyoV binds several Rab GTPases, synchronized nucleator and motor targeting could provide a common mechanism to control force generation and motility in different cellular processes.

  5. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  6. A new role for myosin II in vesicle fission.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan A; Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Cabeza, Jose M; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2014-01-01

    An endocytic vesicle is formed from a flat plasma membrane patch by a sequential process of invagination, bud formation and fission. The scission step requires the formation of a tubular membrane neck (the fission pore) that connects the endocytic vesicle with the plasma membrane. Progress in vesicle fission can be measured by the formation and closure of the fission pore. Live-cell imaging and sensitive biophysical measurements have provided various glimpses into the structure and behaviour of the fission pore. In the present study, the role of non-muscle myosin II (NM-2) in vesicle fission was tested by analyzing the kinetics of the fission pore with perforated-patch clamp capacitance measurements to detect single vesicle endocytosis with millisecond time resolution in peritoneal mast cells. Blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of NM-2, dramatically increased the duration of the fission pore and also prevented closure during large endocytic events. Using the fluorescent markers FM1-43 and pHrodo Green dextran, we found that NM-2 inhibition greatly arrested vesicle fission in a late phase of the scission event when the pore reached a final diameter of ∼ 5 nm. Our results indicate that loss of the ATPase activity of myosin II drastically reduces the efficiency of membrane scission by making vesicle closure incomplete and suggest that NM-2 might be especially relevant in vesicle fission during compound endocytosis.

  7. A New Role for Myosin II in Vesicle Fission

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Jose M.; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2014-01-01

    An endocytic vesicle is formed from a flat plasma membrane patch by a sequential process of invagination, bud formation and fission. The scission step requires the formation of a tubular membrane neck (the fission pore) that connects the endocytic vesicle with the plasma membrane. Progress in vesicle fission can be measured by the formation and closure of the fission pore. Live-cell imaging and sensitive biophysical measurements have provided various glimpses into the structure and behaviour of the fission pore. In the present study, the role of non-muscle myosin II (NM-2) in vesicle fission was tested by analyzing the kinetics of the fission pore with perforated-patch clamp capacitance measurements to detect single vesicle endocytosis with millisecond time resolution in peritoneal mast cells. Blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of NM-2, dramatically increased the duration of the fission pore and also prevented closure during large endocytic events. Using the fluorescent markers FM1-43 and pHrodo Green dextran, we found that NM-2 inhibition greatly arrested vesicle fission in a late phase of the scission event when the pore reached a final diameter of ∼ 5 nm. Our results indicate that loss of the ATPase activity of myosin II drastically reduces the efficiency of membrane scission by making vesicle closure incomplete and suggest that NM-2 might be especially relevant in vesicle fission during compound endocytosis. PMID:24959909

  8. Myosin transducer mutations differentially affect motor function, myofibril structure, and the performance of skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Cammarato, Anthony; Dambacher, Corey M; Knowles, Aileen F; Kronert, William A; Bodmer, Rolf; Ocorr, Karen; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2008-02-01

    Striated muscle myosin is a multidomain ATP-dependent molecular motor. Alterations to various domains affect the chemomechanical properties of the motor, and they are associated with skeletal and cardiac myopathies. The myosin transducer domain is located near the nucleotide-binding site. Here, we helped define the role of the transducer by using an integrative approach to study how Drosophila melanogaster transducer mutations D45 and Mhc(5) affect myosin function and skeletal and cardiac muscle structure and performance. We found D45 (A261T) myosin has depressed ATPase activity and in vitro actin motility, whereas Mhc(5) (G200D) myosin has these properties enhanced. Depressed D45 myosin activity protects against age-associated dysfunction in metabolically demanding skeletal muscles. In contrast, enhanced Mhc(5) myosin function allows normal skeletal myofibril assembly, but it induces degradation of the myofibrillar apparatus, probably as a result of contractile disinhibition. Analysis of beating hearts demonstrates depressed motor function evokes a dilatory response, similar to that seen with vertebrate dilated cardiomyopathy myosin mutations, and it disrupts contractile rhythmicity. Enhanced myosin performance generates a phenotype apparently analogous to that of human restrictive cardiomyopathy, possibly indicating myosin-based origins for the disease. The D45 and Mhc(5) mutations illustrate the transducer's role in influencing the chemomechanical properties of myosin and produce unique pathologies in distinct muscles. Our data suggest Drosophila is a valuable system for identifying and modeling mutations analogous to those associated with specific human muscle disorders.

  9. New insight into role of myosin motors for activation of RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sarshad, Aishe A; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, actin and myosin are emerging as essential regulators of nuclear function. At gene level, they regulate chromatin and modulate RNA polymerase transcription, and at the RNA level, they are involved in the metabolism of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Furthermore, actin and myosin are involved in maintaining the structure of cell nucleus by mediating chromatin movement and by interacting with components of the nuclear lamina. This plethora of functions is now supported by evidence that nuclear actin polymerizes just like the cytoplasmic actin fraction. Based on these considerations, we now hypothesize that the nuclear myosin forms function as actin-based motors. In this chapter, our goal is to start from the knowledge acquired in the cytoplasmic field to explore how nuclear myosin functions in gene transcription. One of the pressing issues discussed here is whether nuclear myosin produces local tension or functions as transporters. Based on two current models reported in the literature, we discuss the topology of the actin-based nuclear myosin 1 motor and how it is believed to facilitate propulsion of the RNA polymerase machinery while maintaining chromatin that is compatible with transcription. These mechanisms will be placed in the context of cell cycle progression. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Whole genome duplication events in plant evolution reconstructed and predicted using myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The evolution of land plants is characterized by whole genome duplications (WGD), which drove species diversification and evolutionary novelties. Detecting these events is especially difficult if they date back to the origin of the plant kingdom. Established methods for reconstructing WGDs include intra- and inter-genome comparisons, KS age distribution analyses, and phylogenetic tree constructions. Results By analysing 67 completely sequenced plant genomes 775 myosins were identified and manually assembled. Phylogenetic trees of the myosin motor domains revealed orthologous and paralogous relationships and were consistent with recent species trees. Based on the myosin inventories and the phylogenetic trees, we have identified duplications of the entire myosin motor protein family at timings consistent with 23 WGDs, that had been reported before. We also predict 6 WGDs based on further protein family duplications. Notably, the myosin data support the two recently reported WGDs in the common ancestor of all extant angiosperms. We predict single WGDs in the Manihot esculenta and Nicotiana benthamiana lineages, two WGDs for Linum usitatissimum and Phoenix dactylifera, and a triplication or two WGDs for Gossypium raimondii. Our data show another myosin duplication in the ancestor of the angiosperms that could be either the result of a single gene duplication or a remnant of a WGD. Conclusions We have shown that the myosin inventories in angiosperms retain evidence of numerous WGDs that happened throughout plant evolution. In contrast to other protein families, many myosins are still present in extant species. They are closely related and have similar domain architectures, and their phylogenetic grouping follows the genome duplications. Because of its broad taxonomic sampling the dataset provides the basis for reliable future identification of further whole genome duplications. PMID:24053117

  11. The myosin family: unconventional roles of actin-dependent molecular motors in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Maravillas-Montero, José L; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2012-01-01

    Myosins comprise a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins that are best known for their role in muscle contraction and their involvement in a wide range of other eukaryotic motility processes. Recent phylogenetic analysis places myosins into 35 highly diverse classes. Although these actin-based molecular motors have been characterized extensively, and much is known about their function in different cellular compartments, there is little information available about these molecules in hematopoietic cells. The available data establish that myosins expressed by immune cells are able to support general tasks, such as maintaining plasma membrane tension, moving and secreting vesicles, aiding in endo- and exocytotic processes, and promoting the adhesion and motility of cells. Additionally, however, myosins are involved in highly specialized functions, such as regulating cell activation, IS-induced signaling, and the severing of microfilaments via the control of GTPases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of myosins in leukocytes, with emphasis on the emerging roles of these molecular motors in immune functions.

  12. Live-cell single-molecule labeling and analysis of myosin motors with quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Nakahata, Yoshihito; Yarimizu, Hirokazu; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a powerful tool for quantitatively analyzing dynamic cellular processes by single-particle tracking. However, tracking of intracellular molecules with QDs is limited by their inability to penetrate the plasma membrane and bind to specific molecules of interest. Although several techniques for overcoming these problems have been proposed, they are either complicated or inconvenient. To address this issue, in this study, we developed a simple, convenient, and nontoxic method for labeling intracellular molecules in cells using HaloTag technology and electroporation. We labeled intracellular myosin motors with this approach and tracked their movement within cells. By simultaneously imaging myosin movement and F-actin architecture, we observed that F-actin serves not only as a rail but also as a barrier for myosin movement. We analyzed the effect of insulin on the movement of several myosin motors, which have been suggested to regulate intracellular trafficking of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4, but found no significant enhancement in myosin motor motility as a result of insulin treatment. Our approach expands the repertoire of proteins for which intracellular dynamics can be analyzed at the single-molecule level. PMID:28035048

  13. Deletion of Calponin 2 in Mouse Fibroblasts Increases Myosin II-Dependent Cell Traction Force.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Moazzem; Zhao, Guangyi; Woo, Moon-Sook; Wang, James H-C; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Cell traction force (CTF) plays a critical role in controlling cell shape, permitting cell motility, and maintaining cellular homeostasis in many biological processes such as angiogenesis, development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. Calponin is an actin filament-associated cytoskeletal protein in smooth muscles and multiple types of non-muscle cells. An established biochemical function of calponin is the inhibition of myosin ATPase in smooth muscle cells. Vertebrates have three calponin isoforms. Among them, calponin 2 is expressed in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, macrophages, myoblasts, and fibroblasts and plays a role in regulating cytoskeleton activities such as cell adhesion, migration, and cytokinesis. Knockout (KO) of the gene encoding calponin 2 (Cnn2) in mice increased cell motility, suggesting a function of calponin 2 in modulating CTF. In this study, we examined fibroblasts isolated from Cnn2 KO and wild-type (WT) mice using CTF microscopy. Primary mouse fibroblasts were cultured on polyacrylamide gel substrates embedded with fluorescent beads to measure root-mean-square traction, total strain energy, and net contractile movement. The results showed that calponin 2-null fibroblasts exhibit traction force greater than that of WT cells. Adherent calponin 2-null fibroblasts de-adhered faster than the WT control during mild trypsin treatment, consistent with an increased CTF. Blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase, is more effective upon an alteration in cell morphology when calponin 2 is present in WT fibroblasts than that on Cnn2 KO cells, indicating their additive effects in inhibiting myosin motor activity. The novel finding that calponin 2 regulates myosin-dependent CTF in non-muscle cells demonstrates a mechanism for controlling cell motility-based functions.

  14. Comparison of biochemical and immunochemical properties of myosin II in taeniid parasites.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Rivera, M; Reyes-Torres, A; Reynoso-Ducoing, O; Flisser, A; Ambrosio, J R

    2006-07-01

    Type II myosins are highly conserved proteins, though differences have been observed among organisms, mainly in the filamentous region. Myosin isoforms have been identified in Taenia solium, a helminth parasite of public health importance in many developing countries. These isoforms are probably associated with the physiological requirements of each developmental stage of the parasite. In this paper we extend the characterization of myosin to several other Taenia species. Type II myosins were purified from the larvae (cysticerci) of Taenia solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps and the adult stages of T. solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. saginata. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against some of these myosins were specific at high dilutions but cross-reacted at low dilutions. ATPase activity was evaluated and kinetic values were calculated for each myosin. Homologous actin-myosin interactions increased both the affinity of myosin for ATP and the hydrolysis rate. The results indicate immunological and biochemical differences among taeniid myosins. This variability suggests that different isoforms are found not only in different taeniid species but also at different developmental stages. Further characterization of myosin isoforms should include determination of their amino acid composition.

  15. Highly selective inhibition of myosin motors provides the basis of potential therapeutic application

    PubMed Central

    Sirigu, Serena; Hartman, James J.; Ropars, Virginie; Clancy, Sheila; Wang, Xi; Chuang, Grace; Qian, Xiangping; Lu, Pu-Ping; Barrett, Edward; Rudolph, Karin; Royer, Christopher; Morgan, Bradley P.; Stura, Enrico A.; Malik, Fady I.; Houdusse, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct inhibition of smooth muscle myosin (SMM) is a potential means to treat hypercontractile smooth muscle diseases. The selective inhibitor CK-2018571 prevents strong binding to actin and promotes muscle relaxation in vitro and in vivo. The crystal structure of the SMM/drug complex reveals that CK-2018571 binds to a novel allosteric pocket that opens up during the “recovery stroke” transition necessary to reprime the motor. Trapped in an intermediate of this fast transition, SMM is inhibited with high selectivity compared with skeletal muscle myosin (IC50 = 9 nM and 11,300 nM, respectively), although all of the binding site residues are identical in these motors. This structure provides a starting point from which to design highly specific myosin modulators to treat several human diseases. It further illustrates the potential of targeting transition intermediates of molecular machines to develop exquisitely selective pharmacological agents. PMID:27815532

  16. Rap1 controls cell adhesion and cell motility through the regulation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Taeck J.; Lee, Dai-Jen; Merlot, Sylvain; Weeks, Gerald; Firtel, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the role of Rap1 in controlling chemotaxis and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum. Rap1 is activated rapidly in response to chemoattractant stimulation, and activated Rap1 is preferentially found at the leading edge of chemotaxing cells. Cells expressing constitutively active Rap1 are highly adhesive and exhibit strong chemotaxis defects, which are partially caused by an inability to spatially and temporally regulate myosin assembly and disassembly. We demonstrate that the kinase Phg2, a putative Rap1 effector, colocalizes with Rap1–guanosine triphosphate at the leading edge and is required in an in vitro assay for myosin II phosphorylation, which disassembles myosin II and facilitates filamentous actin–mediated leading edge protrusion. We suggest that Rap1/Phg2 plays a role in controlling leading edge myosin II disassembly while passively allowing myosin II assembly along the lateral sides and posterior of the cell. PMID:17371831

  17. Small teams of myosin Vc motors coordinate their stepping for efficient cargo transport on actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Krementsova, Elena B; Furuta, Ken'ya; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Trybus, Kathleen M; Ali, M Yusuf

    2017-06-30

    Myosin Vc (myoVc) is unique among vertebrate class V myosin isoforms in that it requires teams of motors to move continuously on single actin filaments. Single molecules of myoVc cannot take multiple hand-over-hand steps from one actin-binding site to the next without dissociating, in stark contrast to the well studied myosin Va (myoVa) isoform. At low salt, single myoVc motors can, however, move processively on actin bundles, and at physiologic ionic strength, even teams of myoVc motors require actin bundles to sustain continuous motion. Here, we linked defined numbers of myoVc or myoVa molecules to DNA nanostructures as synthetic cargos. Using total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy, we compared the stepping behavior of myoVc versus myoVa ensembles and myoVc stepping patterns on single actin filaments versus actin bundles. Run lengths of both myoVc and myoVa teams increased with motor number, but only multiple myoVc motors showed a run-length enhancement on actin bundles compared with actin filaments. By resolving the stepping behavior of individual myoVc motors with a quantum dot bound to the motor domain, we found that coupling of two myoVc motors significantly decreased the futile back and side steps that were frequently observed for single myoVc motors. Changes in the inter-motor distance between two coupled myoVc motors affected stepping dynamics, suggesting that mechanical tension coordinates the stepping behavior of two myoVc motors for efficient directional motion. Our study provides a molecular basis to explain how teams of myoVc motors are suited to transport cargos such as zymogen granules on actin bundles. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Structural insights into functional overlapping and differentiation among myosin V motors.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Andrey F Z; Trindade, Daniel M; Tonoli, Celisa C C; de Giuseppe, Priscila O; Assis, Leandro H P; Honorato, Rodrigo V; de Oliveira, Paulo S L; Mahajan, Pravin; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; von Delft, Frank; Larson, Roy E; Murakami, Mario T

    2013-11-22

    Myosin V (MyoV) motors have been implicated in the intracellular transport of diverse cargoes including vesicles, organelles, RNA-protein complexes, and regulatory proteins. Here, we have solved the cargo-binding domain (CBD) structures of the three human MyoV paralogs (Va, Vb, and Vc), revealing subtle structural changes that drive functional differentiation and a novel redox mechanism controlling the CBD dimerization process, which is unique for the MyoVc subclass. Moreover, the cargo- and motor-binding sites were structurally assigned, indicating the conservation of residues involved in the recognition of adaptors for peroxisome transport and providing high resolution insights into motor domain inhibition by CBD. These results contribute to understanding the structural requirements for cargo transport, autoinhibition, and regulatory mechanisms in myosin V motors.

  19. Structural Insights into Functional Overlapping and Differentiation among Myosin V Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Andrey F. Z.; Trindade, Daniel M.; Tonoli, Celisa C. C.; de Giuseppe, Priscila O.; Assis, Leandro H. P.; Honorato, Rodrigo V.; de Oliveira, Paulo S. L.; Mahajan, Pravin; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A.; von Delft, Frank; Larson, Roy E.; Murakami, Mario T.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin V (MyoV) motors have been implicated in the intracellular transport of diverse cargoes including vesicles, organelles, RNA-protein complexes, and regulatory proteins. Here, we have solved the cargo-binding domain (CBD) structures of the three human MyoV paralogs (Va, Vb, and Vc), revealing subtle structural changes that drive functional differentiation and a novel redox mechanism controlling the CBD dimerization process, which is unique for the MyoVc subclass. Moreover, the cargo- and motor-binding sites were structurally assigned, indicating the conservation of residues involved in the recognition of adaptors for peroxisome transport and providing high resolution insights into motor domain inhibition by CBD. These results contribute to understanding the structural requirements for cargo transport, autoinhibition, and regulatory mechanisms in myosin V motors. PMID:24097982

  20. Understanding cardiomyopathy phenotypes based on the functional impact of mutations in the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeffrey R; Leinwand, Leslie; Warshaw, David M

    2012-07-20

    Hypertrophic (HCM) and dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathies are inherited diseases with a high incidence of death due to electric abnormalities or outflow tract obstruction. In many of the families afflicted with either disease, causative mutations have been identified in various sarcomeric proteins. In this review, we focus on mutations in the cardiac muscle molecular motor, myosin, and its associated light chains. Despite the >300 identified mutations, there is still no clear understanding of how these mutations within the same myosin molecule can lead to the dramatically different clinical phenotypes associated with HCM and DCM. Localizing mutations within myosin's molecular structure provides insight into the potential consequence of these perturbations to key functional domains of the motor. Review of biochemical and biophysical data that characterize the functional capacities of these mutant myosins suggests that mutant myosins with enhanced contractility lead to HCM, whereas those displaying reduced contractility lead to DCM. With gain and loss of function potentially being the primary consequence of a specific mutation, how these functional changes trigger the hypertrophic response and lead to the distinct HCM and DCM phenotypes will be the future investigative challenge.

  1. Temperature effect on the chemomechanical regulation of substeps within the power stroke of a single Myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenling; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Myosin IIs in the skeletal muscle are highly efficient nanoscale machines evolved in nature. Understanding how they function can not only bring insights into various biological processes but also provide guidelines to engineer synthetic nanoscale motors working in the vicinity of thermal noise. Though it was clearly demonstrated that the behavior of a skeletal muscle fiber, or that of a single myosin was strongly affected by the temperature, how exactly the temperature affects the kinetics of a single myosin is not fully understood. By adapting the newly developed transitional state model, which successfully explained the intriguing motor force regulation during skeletal muscle contraction, here we systematically explain how exactly the power stroke of a single myosin proceeds, with the consideration of the chemomechanical regulation of sub-steps within the stroke. The adapted theory is then utilized to investigate the temperature effect on various aspects of the power stroke. Our analysis suggests that, though swing rates, the isometric force, and the maximal stroke size all strongly vary with the temperature, the temperature can have a very small effect on the releasable elastic energy within the power stroke. PMID:26786569

  2. Myosin motor domain lever arm rotation is coupled to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Highsmith, S; Polosukhina, K; Eden, D

    2000-10-10

    We have investigated coupling of lever arm rotation to the ATP binding and hydrolysis steps for the myosin motor domain. In several current hypotheses of the mechanism of force production by muscle, the primary mechanical feature is the rotation of a lever arm that is a subdomain of the myosin motor domain. In these models, the lever arm rotates while the myosin motor domain is free, and then reverses the rotation to produce force while it is bound to actin. These mechanical steps are coupled to steps in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. Our hypothesis is that ATP hydrolysis induces lever arm rotation to produce a more compact motor domain that has stored mechanical energy. Our approach is to use transient electric birefringence techniques to measure changes in hydrodynamic size that result from lever arm rotation when various ligands are bound to isolated skeletal muscle myosin motor domain in solution. Results for ATP and CTP, which do support force production by muscle fibers, are compared to those of ATPgammaS and GTP, which do not. Measurements are also made of conformational changes when the motor domain is bound to NDP's and PP(i) in the absence and presence of the phosphate analogue orthovanadate, to determine the roles the nucleoside moieties of the nucleotides have on lever arm rotation. The results indicate that for the substrates investigated, rotation does not occur upon substrate binding, but is coupled to the NTP hydrolysis step. The data are consistent with a model in which only substrates that produce a motor domain-NDP-P(i) complex as the steady-state intermediate make the motor domain more compact, and only those substrates support force production.

  3. Myosin II Is Involved in the Production of Constitutive Transport Vesicles from the TGN

    PubMed Central

    Müsch, Anne; Cohen, David; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    1997-01-01

    The participation of nonmuscle myosins in the transport of organelles and vesicular carriers along actin filaments has been documented. In contrast, there is no evidence for the involvement of myosins in the production of vesicles involved in membrane traffic. Here we show that the putative TGN coat protein p200 (Narula, N., I. McMorrow, G. Plopper, J. Doherty, K.S. Matlin, B. Burke, and J.L. Stow. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 114: 1113–1124) is myosin II. The recruitment of myosin II to Golgi membranes is dependent on actin and is regulated by G proteins. Using an assay that studies the release of transport vesicles from the TGN in vitro, we provide functional evidence that p200/myosin is involved in the assembly of basolateral transport vesicles carrying vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSVG) from the TGN of polarized MDCK cells. The 50% reduced efficiency in VSVG vesicle release from the TGN in vitro after depletion of p200/myosin II could be reestablished to control levels by the addition of purified nonmuscle myosin II. Several inhibitors of the actin-stimulated ATPase activity of myosin specifically inhibited the release of VSVG-containing vesicles from the TGN. PMID:9230072

  4. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP3R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP3R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP3R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  5. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment.

  6. Aberrant post-translational modifications compromise human myosin motor function in old age.

    PubMed

    Li, Meishan; Ogilvie, Hannah; Ochala, Julien; Artemenko, Konstantin; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Bergquist, Jonas; Larsson, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Novel experimental methods, including a modified single fiber in vitro motility assay, X-ray diffraction experiments, and mass spectrometry analyses, have been performed to unravel the molecular events underlying the aging-related impairment in human skeletal muscle function at the motor protein level. The effects of old age on the function of specific myosin isoforms extracted from single human muscle fiber segments, demonstrated a significant slowing of motility speed (P < 0.001) in old age in both type I and IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The force-generating capacity of the type I and IIa MyHC isoforms was, on the other hand, not affected by old age. Similar effects were also observed when the myosin molecules extracted from muscle fibers were exposed to oxidative stress. X-ray diffraction experiments did not show any myofilament lattice spacing changes, but unraveled a more disordered filament organization in old age as shown by the greater widths of the 1, 0 equatorial reflections. Mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed eight age-specific myosin post-translational modifications (PTMs), in which two were located in the motor domain (carbonylation of Pro79 and Asn81) and six in the tail region (carbonylation of Asp900, Asp904, and Arg908; methylation of Glu1166; deamidation of Gln1164 and Asn1168). However, PTMs in the motor domain were only observed in the IIx MyHC isoform, suggesting PTMs in the rod region contributed to the observed disordering of myosin filaments and the slowing of motility speed. Hence, interventions that would specifically target these PTMs are warranted to reverse myosin dysfunction in old age.

  7. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  8. Alignment of actin filament streams driven by myosin motors in crowded environments.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takahiro; Sasaki, Yasuhiko; Hatori, Kuniyuki

    2017-07-25

    Cellular dynamics depend on cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins. Collective movements of filaments driven by motor proteins are observed in the presence of dense filaments in in vitro systems. As multiple macromolecules exist within cells and the physiological ionic conditions affect their interactions, crowding might contribute to ordered cytoskeletal architecture because of collective behavior. Using an in vitro reconstituted system, we observed the emergence of stripe patterns resulting from collective actin filament streaming driven by myosin motors in the presence of the crowding agent, methylcellulose (MC). Although at high KCl concentrations (150mM), actin filaments tended to dissociate from a myosin-coated surface, 1% MC prevented this dissociation and enabled filament movement on myosin molecules. At concentrations of actin filaments above 0.2mg/mL, the moving filaments accumulated and progressively formed long, dense bands. The bands were spaced at about 10-μm intervals. Increasing the KCl concentration up to 300mM resulted in narrowing of the spacing between the aligned bands. On the other hand, low KCl concentrations (≤25mM) induced broad streams, where actin filaments exhibited bidirectional movement. These results suggest that crowded environments can promote spatial patterning of the actin cytoskeleton, depending on the intensity of the myosin driving force and filament velocity, both modulated by the ionic strength. The mutual contribution of packing and driving forces provides insight into cytoskeleton organization in living cells, in which various macromolecules mingle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural change and nucleotide dissociation of Myosin motor domain: dual go model simulation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Fumiko; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the structural relaxation of myosin motor domain from the pre-power stroke state to the near-rigor state using molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained protein model. To describe the spontaneous structural change, we propose a dual Gō-model-a variant of the Gō-like model that has two reference structures. The nucleotide dissociation process is also studied by introducing a coarse-grained nucleotide in the simulation. We found that the myosin structural relaxation toward the near-rigor conformation cannot be completed before the nucleotide dissociation. Moreover, the relaxation and the dissociation occurred cooperatively when the nucleotide was tightly bound to the myosin head. The result suggested that the primary role of the nucleotide is to suppress the structural relaxation.

  10. The movement of actin-myosin biomolecular linear motor under AC electric fields: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongkuk; Famouri, Parviz

    2013-03-15

    The role of actin-myosin as a biomolecular linear motor is considered a transport system at nanoscale because of their size, efficiency and functionality. To utilize the ability to transport, it is essential to control the random movement of actin filaments (F-actin) on myosin coated substrate. In the presence of an alternating current (AC) electric field, the direction of F-actin movement is regulated by electro-orientation torque and, as a result, its movement is perpendicularly toward the electrode edges. Our data confirm such aligned movement is proportional to the strength of applied electric field. Interestingly, the aligned movement is found frequency-dependent and the electrothermal effect is observed by means of the velocity measurement of aligned F-actin movement. The findings in this study may provide constructive information for manipulating actin-myosin nanotransport system to build functional nanodevices in future work.

  11. Thermodynamic evidence of non-muscle myosin II-lipid-membrane interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schewkunow, Vitali; Sharma, Karan P.; Diez, Gerold; Klemm, Anna H.; Sharma, Pal C.; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.

    2008-02-08

    A unique feature of protein networks in living cells is that they can generate their own force. Proteins such as non-muscle myosin II are an integral part of the cytoskeleton and have the capacity to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directional movement. Non-muscle myosin II can move actin filaments against each other, and depending on the orientation of the filaments and the way in which they are linked together, it can produce contraction, bending, extension, and stiffening. Our measurements with differential scanning calorimetry showed that non-muscle myosin II inserts into negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Using lipid vesicles made of DMPG/DMPC at a molar ratio of 1:1 at 10 mg/ml in the presence of different non-muscle myosin II concentrations showed a variation of the main phase transition of the lipid vesicle at around 23 deg. C. With increasing concentrations of non-muscle myosin II the thermotropic properties of the lipid vesicle changed, which is indicative of protein-lipid interaction/insertion. We hypothesize that myosin tail binds to acidic phospholipids through an electrostatic interaction using the basic side groups of positive residues; the flexible, amphipathic helix then may partially penetrate into the bilayer to form an anchor. Using the stopped-flow method, we determined the binding affinity of non-muscle myosin II when anchored to lipid vesicles with actin, which was similar to a pure actin-non-muscle myosin II system. Insertion of myosin tail into the hydrophobic region of lipid membranes, a model known as the lever arm mechanism, might explain how its interaction with actin generates cellular movement.

  12. Long-range self-organization of cytoskeletal myosin II filament stacks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiqiong; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Guo, Zhenhuan; Tee, Yee-Han; Thiagarajan, Visalatchi; Hersen, Pascal; Chew, Teng-Leong; Safran, Samuel A; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Bershadsky, Alexander D

    2017-02-01

    Although myosin II filaments are known to exist in non-muscle cells, their dynamics and organization are incompletely understood. Here, we combined structured illumination microscopy with pharmacological and genetic perturbations, to study the process of actomyosin cytoskeleton self-organization into arcs and stress fibres. A striking feature of the myosin II filament organization was their 'registered' alignment into stacks, spanning up to several micrometres in the direction orthogonal to the parallel actin bundles. While turnover of individual myosin II filaments was fast (characteristic half-life time 60 s) and independent of actin filament turnover, the process of stack formation lasted a longer time (in the range of several minutes) and required myosin II contractility, as well as actin filament assembly/disassembly and crosslinking (dependent on formin Fmnl3, cofilin1 and α-actinin-4). Furthermore, myosin filament stack formation involved long-range movements of individual myosin filaments towards each other suggesting the existence of attractive forces between myosin II filaments. These forces, possibly transmitted via mechanical deformations of the intervening actin filament network, may in turn remodel the actomyosin cytoskeleton and drive its self-organization.

  13. Mechanism and Specificity of Pentachloropseudilin-mediated Inhibition of Myosin Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Taft, Manuel H.; Martin, René; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K.; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Gutzeit, Herwig O.; Fedorov, Roman; Buss, Folma; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Coluccio, Lynne M.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report that the natural compound pentachloropseudilin (PClP) acts as a reversible and allosteric inhibitor of myosin ATPase and motor activity. IC50 values are in the range from 1 to 5 μm for mammalian class-1 myosins and greater than 90 μm for class-2 and class-5 myosins, and no inhibition was observed with class-6 and class-7 myosins. We show that in mammalian cells, PClP selectively inhibits myosin-1c function. To elucidate the structural basis for PClP-induced allosteric coupling and isoform-specific differences in the inhibitory potency of the compound, we used a multifaceted approach combining direct functional, crystallographic, and in silico modeling studies. Our results indicate that allosteric inhibition by PClP is mediated by the combined effects of global changes in protein dynamics and direct communication between the catalytic and allosteric sites via a cascade of small conformational changes along a conserved communication pathway. PMID:21680745

  14. Mechanism and specificity of pentachloropseudilin-mediated inhibition of myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Taft, Manuel H; Martin, René; Heissler, Sarah M; Preller, Matthias; Hartmann, Falk K; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Gutzeit, Herwig O; Fedorov, Roman; Buss, Folma; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Coluccio, Lynne M; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2011-08-26

    Here, we report that the natural compound pentachloropseudilin (PClP) acts as a reversible and allosteric inhibitor of myosin ATPase and motor activity. IC(50) values are in the range from 1 to 5 μm for mammalian class-1 myosins and greater than 90 μm for class-2 and class-5 myosins, and no inhibition was observed with class-6 and class-7 myosins. We show that in mammalian cells, PClP selectively inhibits myosin-1c function. To elucidate the structural basis for PClP-induced allosteric coupling and isoform-specific differences in the inhibitory potency of the compound, we used a multifaceted approach combining direct functional, crystallographic, and in silico modeling studies. Our results indicate that allosteric inhibition by PClP is mediated by the combined effects of global changes in protein dynamics and direct communication between the catalytic and allosteric sites via a cascade of small conformational changes along a conserved communication pathway.

  15. F-actin and myosin II accelerate catecholamine release from chromaffin granules

    PubMed Central

    Berberian, Khajak; Torres, Alexis J; Fang, Qinghua; Kisler, Kassandra

    2009-01-01

    The roles of non-muscle myosin II and cortical actin filaments in chromaffin granule exocytosis were studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy, amperometry, and cell-attached capacitance measurements. Fluorescence imaging indicated decreased mobility of granules near the plasma membrane following inhibition of myosin II function with Blebbistatin. Slower fusion pore expansion rates and longer fusion pore lifetimes were observed after inhibition of actin polymerization using Cytochalasin-D. Amperometric recordings revealed increased amperometric spike half-widths without change in quantal size after either myosin II inhibition or actin disruption. These results suggest that actin and myosin II facilitate release from individual chromaffin granules by accelerating dissociation of catecholamines from the intragranular matrix possibly through generation of mechanical forces. PMID:19158310

  16. Immobile myosin-II plays a scaffolding role during cytokinesis in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wloka, Carsten; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Thé, Lydia; Fang, Xiaodong; Oh, Younghoon

    2013-01-01

    Core components of cytokinesis are conserved from yeast to human, but how these components are assembled into a robust machine that drives cytokinesis remains poorly understood. In this paper, we show by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis that Myo1, the sole myosin-II in budding yeast, was mobile at the division site before anaphase and became immobilized shortly before cytokinesis. This immobility was independent of actin filaments or the motor domain of Myo1 but required a small region in the Myo1 tail that is thought to be involved in higher-order assembly. As expected, proteins involved in actin ring assembly (tropomyosin and formin) and membrane trafficking (myosin-V and exocyst) were dynamic during cytokinesis. Strikingly, proteins involved in septum formation (the chitin synthase Chs2) and/or its coordination with the actomyosin ring (essential light chain, IQGAP, F-BAR, etc.) displayed Myo1-dependent immobility during cytokinesis, suggesting that Myo1 plays a scaffolding role in the assembly of a cytokinesis machine. PMID:23358243

  17. Computing with the Actin-Myosin Molecular Motor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolau, Dan V., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    We propose a new, biologically-inspired model of computation, based on the motion of actin filaments on a myosin substrate, as used in motility assays, noting that this represents a marriage of the fields of natural computing and computing with agents. A highly simplified model of actin motility is presented and used to simulate the simultaneous motion of identical filaments. We show that using some simple formal definitions, we can regard this motion as a continuous computation. We demonstrate using a computer simulation, how actin filaments can be used to solve a traditional maze in a highly parallel fashion, with obvious implications for attacking computationally difficult graph problems. Briefly, we mention the limitations of our model and possibilities for the physical implementation of such a system.

  18. ATP-dependent interplay between local and global conformational changes in the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    The ATPase active site of myosin is located at the core of the motor head. During the Lymn-Taylor actomyosin contractile cycle, small conformational changes in the active site upon ATP binding, ATP hydrolysis and ADP/Pi release are accompanied by large conformational transitions of the motor domains, such as opening and closing of the actin binding cleft and the movement of lever arm. Here, our previous computational studies of myosin are summarized in a comprehensive model at the level of atomic detail. Molecular movies show how the successive domain motions during the ATP induced actin dissociation and the recovery stroke are coupled with the precise positioning of the key catalytic groups in the active site. This leads to a precise timing of the activation of the ATPase function: it allows ATP hydrolysis only after unbinding from actin and the priming of the lever arm, both pre-requisites for an efficient functioning of the motor during the subsequent power stroke. These coupling mechanisms constitute essential principles of every myosin motor, of which the ATP-site can be seen as the central allosteric control unit. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The motor domain and the regulatory domain of myosin solely dictate enzymatic activity and phosphorylation-dependent regulation, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Sata, Masataka; Stafford, Walter F.; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    1997-01-01

    While the structures of skeletal and smooth muscle myosins are homologous, they differ functionally from each other in several respects, i.e., motor activities and regulation. To investigate the molecular basis for these differences, we have produced a skeletal/smooth chimeric myosin molecule and analyzed the motor activities and regulation of this myosin. The produced chimeric myosin is composed of the globular motor domain of skeletal muscle myosin (Met1–Gly773) and the C-terminal long α-helix domain of myosin subfragment 1 as well as myosin subfragment 2 (Gly773–Ser1104) and light chains of smooth muscle myosin. Both the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-translocating activity of the chimeric myosin were completely regulated by light chain phosphorylation. On the other hand, the maximum actin-activated ATPase activity of the chimeric myosin was the same as skeletal myosin and thus much higher than smooth myosin. These results show that the C-terminal light chain-associated domain of myosin head solely confers regulation by light chain phosphorylation, whereas the motor domain determines the rate of ATP hydrolysis. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that directly determines the function of the two structurally separated domains in myosin head. PMID:8990166

  20. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2015-06-19

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  1. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Sadhana A.; Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Gupta, Mahesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms. PMID:25911107

  2. Analysis of Myosin II Minifilament Orientation at Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Magdalene; Liang, Xuan; Gomez, Guillermo A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II (NMII) form bipolar filaments, which bind F-actin to exert cellular contractility during physiological processes (Vicente-Manzanares et al., 2009). Using a combinatorial approach to fluorescently label both N- and C-termini of the NMII heavy chain, recent works have demonstrated the ability to visualize NMII bipolar filaments at various subcellular localizations (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). At the zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelia, NMII minifilaments bind the circumferential actin bundles in a pseudo-sarcomeric manner (Ebrahim et al., 2013), a conformation required to maintain junctional tension and tissue integrity (Ratheesh et al., 2012). By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NMIIA heavy chain and immunolabel it using a NMIIA C-terminus specific antibody, we were able to visualize the NMII minifilaments bound to F-actin bundles in Caco-2 cells (Michael et al., 2016), as previously reported (Ebrahim et al., 2013; Beach et al., 2014). In addition, we designed an FIJI/MATLAB analysis module to quantify the size, distance and alignment of these minifilaments with respect to junctional F-actin at the ZA. Measurements of the dispersion of minifilaments angles were proven to be a useful parameter that closely correlated to the extent of contractility at junctions (Michael et al., 2016). PMID:28251171

  3. Cargo Transport by Two Coupled Myosin Va Motors on Actin Filaments and Bundles.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Yusuf; Vilfan, Andrej; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M

    2016-11-15

    Myosin Va (myoVa) is a processive, actin-based molecular motor essential for intracellular cargo transport. When a cargo is transported by an ensemble of myoVa motors, each motor faces significant physical barriers and directional challenges created by the complex actin cytoskeleton, a network of actin filaments and actin bundles. The principles that govern the interaction of multiple motors attached to the same cargo are still poorly understood. To understand the mechanical interactions between multiple motors, we developed a simple in vitro model in which two individual myoVa motors labeled with different-colored Qdots are linked via a third Qdot that acts as a cargo. The velocity of this two-motor complex was reduced by 27% as compared to a single motor, whereas run length was increased by only 37%, much less than expected from multimotor transport models. Therefore, at low ATP, which allowed us to identify individual motor steps, we investigated the intermotor dynamics within the two-motor complex. The randomness of stepping leads to a buildup of tension in the linkage between motors-which in turn slows down the leading motor-and increases the frequency of backward steps and the detachment rate. We establish a direct relationship between the velocity reduction and the distribution of intermotor distances. The analysis of run lengths and dwell times for the two-motor complex, which has only one motor engaged with the actin track, reveals that half of the runs are terminated by almost simultaneous detachment of both motors. This finding challenges the assumptions of conventional multimotor models based on consecutive motor detachment. Similar, but even more drastic, results were observed with two-motor complexes on actin bundles, which showed a run length that was even shorter than that of a single motor.

  4. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the

  5. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective.

    PubMed

    Dayraud, Cyrielle; Alié, Alexandre; Jager, Muriel; Chang, Patrick; Le Guyader, Hervé; Manuel, Michaël; Quéinnec, Eric

    2012-07-02

    Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the other paralogue, PpiMHCIIb1, was

  6. A Novel Positive Selection for Identifying Cold-Sensitive Myosin II Mutants in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, B.; Spudich, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    We developed a positive selection for myosin heavy chain mutants in Dictyostelium. This selection is based on the fact that brief exposure to azide causes wild-type cells to release from the substrate, whereas myosin null cells remain adherent. This procedure assays myosin function on a time scale of minutes and has therefore allowed us to select rapid-onset cold-sensitive mutants after random chemical mutagenesis of Dictyostelium cells. We developed a rapid technique for determining which mutations lie in sequences of the myosin gene that encode the head (motor) domain and localized 27 of 34 mutants to this domain. We recovered the appropriate sequences from five of the mutants and demonstrated that they retain their cold-sensitive properties when expressed from extrachromosomal plasmids. PMID:7498732

  7. Myosin II-dependent exclusion of CD45 from the site of Fcγ receptor activation during phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Shota; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2012-09-21

    Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytosis requires myosin II activity. Here we show that myosin II contributes to FcγR activation and subsequent F-actin assembly at the nascent phagocytic cup. Inhibition of myosin II attenuates phosphorylation of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) of FcγR and binding of Syk to the ITAM. Furthermore, FcγR clusters independently of myosin II activity at the phagocytic cup, from which the receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is excluded depending on myosin II activity. These findings suggest that myosin II-dependent segregation of CD45 from FcγR facilitates phosphorylation of the ITAM and triggers phagocytosis.

  8. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  9. Supervillin binding to myosin II and synergism with anillin are required for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara C.; Fridy, Peter C.; Li, Yinyin; Basil, Shruti; Arjun, Sneha; Friesen, Ryan M.; Leszyk, John; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the process by which cytoplasm is apportioned between dividing daughter cells, requires coordination of myosin II function, membrane trafficking, and central spindle organization. Most known regulators act during late cytokinesis; a few, including the myosin II–binding proteins anillin and supervillin, act earlier. Anillin's role in scaffolding the membrane cortex with the central spindle is well established, but the mechanism of supervillin action is relatively uncharacterized. We show here that two regions within supervillin affect cell division: residues 831–1281, which bind central spindle proteins, and residues 1–170, which bind the myosin II heavy chain (MHC) and the long form of myosin light-chain kinase. MHC binding is required to rescue supervillin deficiency, and mutagenesis of this site creates a dominant-negative phenotype. Supervillin concentrates activated and total myosin II at the furrow, and simultaneous knockdown of supervillin and anillin additively increases cell division failure. Knockdown of either protein causes mislocalization of the other, and endogenous anillin increases upon supervillin knockdown. Proteomic identification of interaction partners recovered using a high-affinity green fluorescent protein nanobody suggests that supervillin and anillin regulate the myosin II and actin cortical cytoskeletons through separate pathways. We conclude that supervillin and anillin play complementary roles during vertebrate cytokinesis. PMID:24088567

  10. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the motor domain of nonmuscle myosin which is specifically expressed in the mantle pallial cell layer of scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y

    2000-12-01

    It has been reported that catch and striated muscle myosin heavy chains of scallop are generated through alternative splicing from a single gene [Nyitray et al. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 12686-12690]. They suggested that the catch muscle type myosin was expressed in various tissues of scallop, including the gonad, heart, foot, and mantle. However, there have been no reports of the primary structure of myosin from tissues other than the adductor muscles. In this study, we isolated a cDNA encoding the motor domain of myosin from the mantle tissue of scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis), and determined its nucleotide sequence. Sequence analysis revealed that mantle myosin exhibited 65% identity with Drosophila non muscle myosin, 60% with chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin, and 44% with scallop striated muscle myosin. The mantle myosin has inserted sequences in the 27 kDa domain of the head region, and has a longer loop 1 structure than those of scallop striated and catch muscle myosins. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mantle myosin is classified as a smooth/nonmuscle type myosin. Western blot analysis with antibodies produced against the N-terminal region of the mantle myosin revealed that this myosin was specifically expressed in the mantle pallial cell layer consisting of nonmuscle cells. Our results show that mantle myosin is classified as a nonmuscle type myosin in scallop.

  11. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  12. On the Role of Myosin-II in Cytokinesis: Division of Dictyostelium Cells under Adhesive and Nonadhesive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Ji-Hong; Cavet, Guy; Sabry, James H.; Wagner, Peter; Moores, Sheri L.; Spudich, James A.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the role of myosin in cytokinesis in Dictyostelium cells by examining cells under both adhesive and nonadhesive conditions. On an adhesive surface, both wild-type and myosin-null cells undergo the normal processes of mitotic rounding, cell elongation, polar ruffling, furrow ingression, and separation of daughter cells. When cells are denied adhesion through culturing in suspension or on a hydrophobic surface, wild-type cells undergo these same processes. However, cells lacking myosin round up and polar ruffle, but fail to elongate, furrow, or divide. These differences show that cell division can be driven by two mechanisms that we term Cytokinesis A, which requires myosin, and Cytokinesis B, which is cell adhesion dependent. We have used these approaches to examine cells expressing a myosin whose two light chain-binding sites were deleted (ΔBLCBS-myosin). Although this myosin is a slower motor than wild-type myosin and has constitutively high activity due to the abolition of regulation by light-chain phosphorylation, cells expressing ΔBLCBS-myosin were previously shown to divide in suspension (Uyeda et al., 1996). However, we suspected their behavior during cytokinesis to be different from wild-type cells given the large alteration in their myosin. Surprisingly, ΔBLCBS-myosin undergoes relatively normal spatial and temporal changes in localization during mitosis. Furthermore, the rate of furrow progression in cells expressing a ΔBLCBS-myosin is similar to that in wild-type cells. PMID:9398680

  13. Structure meets function: actin filaments and myosin motors in the axon.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Don B; Gallo, Gianluca

    2014-04-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the organization and roles of actin filaments, and associated myosin motor proteins, in regulating the structure and function of the axon shaft. 'Patches' of actin filaments have emerged as a major type of actin filament organization in axons. In the distal axon, patches function as precursors to the formation of filopodia and branches. At the axon initial segment, patches locally capture membranous organelles and contribute to polarized trafficking. The trapping function of patches at the initial segment can be ascribed to interactions with myosin motors, and likely also applies to patches in the more distal axon. Finally, submembranous rings of actin filaments were recently described in axons, which form an actin-spectrin cytoskeleton, likely contributing to the maintenance of axon integrity. Continued investigation into the roles of axonal actin filaments and myosins will shed light on fundamental aspects of the development, adult function and the repair of axons in the nervous system. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Dictyostelium myosin II G680V suppressors exhibit overlapping spectra of biochemical phenotypes including facilitated phosphate release.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Nejad, M; Patterson, B

    1999-01-01

    We have biochemically characterized 13 intragenic suppressors of the G680V mutation of Dictyostelium myosin II. In the absence of the G680V mutation, the suppressors result in a number of deviant behaviors, most commonly an increase in the basal (actin-independent) ATPase of the motor. This phenotype is complementary to that of the G680V mutant and supports our proposal that the latter impairs phosphate release. Different subsets of the mutants also suffer from poor ATPase enhancement by 1 mg/ml actin, failure to release from actin in the presence of ATPgammaS (or ADP and salt), and excessive release from actin in the presence of ADP. The patterns of suppressor behaviors suggest that, in general, they are facilitating P(i)-releasing state(s) of the motor, but that different individual suppressors may secondarily perturb other states or actions of the motor. PMID:10471704

  15. Does Interaction between the Motor and Regulatory Domains of the Myosin Head Occur during ATPase Cycle? Evidence from Thermal Unfolding Studies on Myosin Subfragment 1

    PubMed Central

    Logvinova, Daria S.; Markov, Denis I.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Sluchanko, Nikolai N.; Ushakov, Dmitry S.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.

    2015-01-01

    Myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) consists of two major structural domains, the motor (or catalytic) domain and the regulatory domain. Functioning of the myosin head as a molecular motor is believed to involve a rotation of the regulatory domain (lever arm) relative to the motor domain during the ATPase cycle. According to predictions, this rotation can be accompanied by an interaction between the motor domain and the C-terminus of the essential light chain (ELC) associated with the regulatory domain. To check this assumption, we applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) combined with temperature dependences of fluorescence to study changes in thermal unfolding and the domain structure of S1, which occur upon formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx that mimic S1 ATPase intermediate states S1**-ADP-Pi and S1*-ATP, respectively. To identify the thermal transitions on the DSC profiles (i.e. to assign them to the structural domains of S1), we compared the DSC data with temperature-induced changes in fluorescence of either tryptophan residues, located only in the motor domain, or recombinant ELC mutants (light chain 1 isoform), which were first fluorescently labeled at different positions in their C-terminal half and then introduced into the S1 regulatory domain. We show that formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx significantly stabilizes not only the motor domain, but also the regulatory domain of the S1 molecule implying interdomain interaction via ELC. This is consistent with the previously proposed concepts and also adds some new interesting details to the molecular mechanism of the myosin ATPase cycle. PMID:26356744

  16. Minimum number of myosin motors accounting for shortening velocity under zero load in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Luca; Percario, Valentina; Brunello, Elisabetta; Caremani, Marco; Bianco, Pasquale; Powers, Joseph D; Reconditi, Massimo; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Gabriella

    2017-02-15

    Myosin filament mechanosensing determines the efficiency of the contraction by adapting the number of switched ON motors to the load. Accordingly, the unloaded shortening velocity (V0 ) is already set at the end of latency relaxation (LR), ∼10 ms after the start of stimulation, when the myosin filament is still in the OFF state. Here the number of actin-attached motors per half-myosin filament (n) during V0 shortening imposed either at the end of LR or at the plateau of the isometric contraction is estimated from the relation between half-sarcomere compliance and force during the force redevelopment after shortening. The value of n decreases progressively with shortening and, during V0 shortening starting at the end of LR, is 1-4. Reduction of n is accounted for by a constant duty ratio of 0.05 and a parallel switching OFF of motors, explaining the very low rate of ATP utilization found during unloaded shortening. The maximum velocity at which a skeletal muscle can shorten (i.e. the velocity of sliding between the myosin filament and the actin filament under zero load, V0 ) is already set at the end of the latency relaxation (LR) preceding isometric force generation, ∼10 ms after the start of electrical stimulation in frog muscle fibres at 4°C. At this time, Ca(2+) -induced activation of the actin filament is maximal, while the myosin filament is in the OFF state characterized by most of the myosin motors lying on helical tracks on the filament surface, making them unavailable for actin binding and ATP hydrolysis. Here, the number of actin-attached motors per half-thick filament during V0 shortening (n) is estimated by imposing, on tetanized single fibres from Rana esculenta (at 4°C and sarcomere length 2.15 μm), small 4 kHz oscillations and determining the relation between half-sarcomere (hs) compliance and force during the force development following V0 shortening. When V0 shortening is superimposed on the maximum isometric force T0 , n decreases

  17. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    PubMed

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  18. Matrix-driven Myosin II Mediates the Pro-fibrotic Fibroblast Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Southern, Brian D; Grove, Lisa M; Rahaman, Shaik O; Abraham, Susamma; Scheraga, Rachel G; Niese, Kathryn A; Sun, Huanxing; Herzog, Erica L; Liu, Fei; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Egelhoff, Thomas T; Rosenfeld, Steven S; Olman, Mitchell A

    2016-03-18

    Pro-fibrotic mesenchymal cells are known to be the key effector cells of fibroproliferative disease, but the specific matrix signals and the induced cellular responses that drive the fibrogenic phenotype remain to be elucidated. The key mediators of the fibroblast fibrogenic phenotype were characterized using a novel assay system that measures fibroblast behavior in response to actual normal and fibrotic lung tissue. Using this system, we demonstrate that normal lung promotes fibroblast motility and polarization, while fibrotic lung immobilizes the fibroblast and promotes myofibroblast differentiation. These context-specific phenotypes are surprisingly both mediated by myosin II. The role of myosin II is supported by the observation of an increase in myosin phosphorylation and a change in intracellular distribution in fibroblasts on fibrotic lung, as compared with normal lung. Moreover, loss of myosin II activity has opposing effects on protrusive activity in fibroblasts on normal and fibrotic lung. Loss of myosin II also selectively inhibits myofibroblast differentiation in fibroblasts on fibrotic lung. Importantly, these findings are recapitulated by varying the matrix stiffness of polyacrylamide gels in the range of normal and fibrotic lung tissue. Comparison of the effects of myosin inhibition on lung tissue with that of polyacrylamide gels suggests that matrix fiber organization drives the fibroblast phenotype under conditions of normal/soft lung, while matrix stiffness drives the phenotype under conditions of fibrotic/stiff lung. This work defines novel roles for myosin II as a key regulatory effector molecule of the pro-fibrotic phenotype, in response to biophysical properties of the matrix. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. A novel role for myosin II in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle, Paul A.; Kent Fulcher, F.; Patel, Yashomati M. . E-mail: ympatel@uncg.edu

    2005-06-17

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake requires the activation of several signaling pathways to mediate the translocation and fusion of GLUT4 vesicles from an intracellular pool to the plasma membrane. The studies presented here show that inhibition of myosin II activity impairs GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake but not GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. We also show that adipocytes express both myosin IIA and IIB isoforms, and that myosin IIA is recruited to the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation. Taken together, the data presented here represent the first demonstration that GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake is a myosin II-dependent process in adipocytes. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that myosin II is activated upon insulin stimulation and recruited to the cell cortex to facilitate GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane. The identification of myosin II as a key component of GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake represents an important advance in our understanding of the mechanisms regulating glucose homeostasis.

  20. Non-muscle myosin II heavy chain has a cryptic cell-adhesion domain.

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, F; Ho, C H

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered a cryptic cell-adhesion domain in non-muscle myosin II heavy chain. A 205 kDa cell-adhesion-promoting polypeptide (p205) was extracted from BHK cells by Nonidet P-40 or Dounce homogenization. Adhesion to p205 was specifically inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro, indicating a role for the Arg-Gly-Asp cell-adhesion motif. Purified p205 was identified as non-muscle myosin II heavy chain, based on sequence analysis and on the cross-reactivity of p205 with anti-(bovine trachea myosin) antibodies. Further experiments showed that the heavy chain of purified myosin II has cell-adhesion-promoting activity in a cell-blotting assay, and cross-reacted with anti-p205 antibodies. Finally, the adhesion domain was located in the tail portion of myosin II heavy chain, where an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing sequence can be found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7626021

  1. Purification of a protein phosphatase from Acanthamoeba that dephosphorylates and activates myosin II.

    PubMed

    McClure, J A; Korn, E D

    1983-12-10

    The actin-activated ATPase activity of myosin II from Acanthamoeba castellanii is inhibited by phosphorylation of 3 serine residues near the carboxyl end of the heavy chain of the molecule. We have purified a protein phosphatase from Acanthamoeba using myosin II as a substrate. This phosphatase has a molecular weight of 39,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an isoelectric point in urea of 5.2. The enzyme also is active against other phosphoserine protein substrates such as turkey gizzard smooth muscle myosin light chain, but not against a synthetic phosphotyrosine protein substrate. It does not hydrolyze ATP or p-nitrophenol phosphate. No effector has been found to increase substantially the activity of the enzyme as isolated, but it is inhibited by ATP, pyrophosphate, and NaF. This inhibition is reduced in the presence of MnCl2. The Mg2+-dependent actin-activated ATPase of myosin II is activated by dephosphorylation of phosphorylated myosin II by the phosphatase. Its broad substrate specificity, molecular weight, and response to protein phosphatase inhibitors suggest that the Acanthamoeba protein phosphatase is a type 2A phosphatase (Cohen, P. (1982) Nature (Lond.) 206, 613-620).

  2. A genomic toolkit to investigate kinesin and myosin motor function in cells.

    PubMed

    Maliga, Zoltan; Junqueira, Magno; Toyoda, Yusuke; Ettinger, Andreas; Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Klemm, Robin W; Vasilj, Andrej; Guhr, Elaine; Ibarlucea-Benitez, Itziar; Poser, Ina; Bonifacio, Ezio; Huttner, Wieland B; Shevchenko, Andrej; Hyman, Anthony A

    2013-03-01

    Coordination of multiple kinesin and myosin motors is required for intracellular transport, cell motility and mitosis. However, comprehensive resources that allow systems analysis of the localization and interplay between motors in living cells do not exist. Here, we generated a library of 243 amino- and carboxy-terminally tagged mouse and human bacterial artificial chromosome transgenes to establish 227 stably transfected HeLa cell lines, 15 mouse embryonic stem cell lines and 1 transgenic mouse line. The cells were characterized by expression and localization analyses and further investigated by affinity-purification mass spectrometry, identifying 191 candidate protein-protein interactions. We illustrate the power of this resource in two ways. First, by characterizing a network of interactions that targets CEP170 to centrosomes, and second, by showing that kinesin light-chain heterodimers bind conventional kinesin in cells. Our work provides a set of validated resources and candidate molecular pathways to investigate motor protein function across cell lineages.

  3. Biphasic targeting and cleavage furrow ingression directed by the tail of a myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaodong; Luo, Jianying; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Wloka, Carsten; Dravis, Christopher; Travaglia, Mirko; Iwase, Masayuki; Vallen, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animal and fungal cells utilizes a contractile actomyosin ring (AMR). However, how myosin II is targeted to the division site and promotes AMR assembly, and how the AMR coordinates with membrane trafficking during cytokinesis, remains poorly understood. Here we show that Myo1 is a two-headed myosin II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and that Myo1 localizes to the division site via two distinct targeting signals in its tail that act sequentially during the cell cycle. Before cytokinesis, Myo1 localization depends on the septin-binding protein Bni5. During cytokinesis, Myo1 localization depends on the IQGAP Iqg1. We also show that the Myo1 tail is sufficient for promoting the assembly of a “headless” AMR, which guides membrane deposition and extracellular matrix remodeling at the division site. Our study establishes a biphasic targeting mechanism for myosin II and highlights an underappreciated role of the AMR in cytokinesis beyond force generation. PMID:21173112

  4. A Mec17-Myosin II Effector Axis Coordinates Microtubule Acetylation and Actin Dynamics to Control Primary Cilium Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Yanhua; Hao, Rui; Wang, Bin; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are specialized, acetylated microtubule-based signaling processes. Cilium assembly is activated by cellular quiescence and requires reconfiguration of microtubules, the actin cytoskeleton, and vesicular trafficking machinery. How these components are coordinated to activate ciliogenesis remains unknown. Here we identify the microtubule acetyltransferase Mec-17 and myosin II motors as the key effectors in primary cilium biogenesis. We found that myosin IIB (Myh10) is required for cilium formation; however, myosin IIA (Myh9) suppresses it. Myh10 binds and antagonizes Myh9 to increase actin dynamics, which facilitates the assembly of the pericentrosomal preciliary complex (PPC) that supplies materials for cilium growth. Importantly, Myh10 expression is upregulated by serum-starvation and this induction requires Mec-17, which is itself accumulated upon cellular quiescence. Pharmacological stimulation of microtubule acetylation also induces Myh10 expression and cilium formation. Thus cellular quiescence induces Mec17 to couple the production of acetylated microtubules and Myh10, whose accumulation overcomes the inhibitory role of Myh9 and initiates ciliogenesis. PMID:25494100

  5. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  6. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Donald A; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T; Stock, Ann M

    2015-08-06

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  7. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin. PMID:26246073

  8. Myosin chaperones.

    PubMed

    Hellerschmied, Doris; Clausen, Tim

    2014-04-01

    The folding and assembly of myosin motor proteins is essential for most movement processes at the cellular, but also at the organism level. Importantly, myosins, which represent a very diverse family of proteins, require the activity of general and specialized folding factors to develop their full motor function. The activities of the myosin-specific UCS (UNC-45/Cro1/She4) chaperones range from assisting acto-myosin dependent transport processes to scaffolding multi-subunit chaperone complexes, which are required to assemble myofilaments. Recent structure-function studies revealed the structural organization of TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat)-containing and TPR-less UCS chaperones. The observed structural differences seem to reflect the specialized and remarkably versatile working mechanisms of myosin-directed chaperones, as will be discussed in this review. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Myosin chaperones☆

    PubMed Central

    Hellerschmied, Doris; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The folding and assembly of myosin motor proteins is essential for most movement processes at the cellular, but also at the organism level. Importantly, myosins, which represent a very diverse family of proteins, require the activity of general and specialized folding factors to develop their full motor function. The activities of the myosin-specific UCS (UNC-45/Cro1/She4) chaperones range from assisting acto-myosin dependent transport processes to scaffolding multi-subunit chaperone complexes, which are required to assemble myofilaments. Recent structure–function studies revealed the structural organization of TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat)-containing and TPR-less UCS chaperones. The observed structural differences seem to reflect the specialized and remarkably versatile working mechanisms of myosin-directed chaperones, as will be discussed in this review. PMID:24440450

  10. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  11. Myosin II transport, organization, and phosphorylation: evidence for cortical flow/solation-contraction coupling during cytokinesis and cell locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    DeBiasio, R L; LaRocca, G M; Post, P L; Taylor, D L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of cytokinesis has been difficult to define because of the short duration and the temporal-spatial dynamics involved in the formation, activation, force production, and disappearance of the cleavage furrow. We have investigated the structural and chemical dynamics of myosin II in living Swiss 3T3 cells from prometaphase through the separation and migration of daughter cells. The structural and chemical dynamics of myosin II have been defined using the semiautomated, multimode light microscope, together with a fluorescent analogue of myosin II and a fluorescent biosensor of myosin II regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation at serine 19. The correlation of image data from live cells using different modes of light microscopy allowed interpretations not possible from single-mode investigations. Myosin II transported toward the equatorial plane from adjacent regions, forming three-dimensional fibers that spanned the volume of the equator during anaphase and telophase. A global phosphorylation of myosin II at serine 19 of the RLC was initiated at anaphase when cortical myosin II transport started. The phosphorylation of myosin II remained high near the equatorial plane through telophase and into cytokinesis, whereas the phosphorylation of myosin II at serine 19 of the RLC decreased at the poles. The timing and pattern of phosphorylation was the same as the shortening of myosin II-based fibers in the cleavage furrow. Myosin II-based fibers shortened and transported out of the cleavage furrow into the tails of the two daughter cells late in cytokinesis. The patterns of myosin II transport, phosphorylation, and shortening of fibers in the migrating daughter cells were similar to that previously defined for cells migrating in a wound in vitro. The temporal-spatial patterns and dynamics of myosin II transport, phosphorylation at serine 19 of the RLC, and the shortening and disappearance of myosin II-based fibers support the proposal that a combination of

  12. The molecular motor Myosin Va interacts with the cilia-centrosomal protein RPGRIP1L

    PubMed Central

    Assis, L. H. P.; Silva-Junior, R. M. P.; Dolce, L. G.; Alborghetti, M. R.; Honorato, R. V.; Nascimento, A. F. Z.; Melo-Hanchuk, T. D.; Trindade, D. M.; Tonoli, C. C. C.; Santos, C. T.; Oliveira, P. S. L.; Larson, R. E.; Kobarg, J.; Espreafico, E. M.; Giuseppe, P. O.; Murakami, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Myosin Va (MyoVa) is an actin-based molecular motor abundantly found at the centrosome. However, the role of MyoVa at this organelle has been elusive due to the lack of evidence on interacting partners or functional data. Herein, we combined yeast two-hybrid screen, biochemical studies and cellular assays to demonstrate that MyoVa interacts with RPGRIP1L, a cilia-centrosomal protein that controls ciliary signaling and positioning. MyoVa binds to the C2 domains of RPGRIP1L via residues located near or in the Rab11a-binding site, a conserved site in the globular tail domain (GTD) from class V myosins. According to proximity ligation assays, MyoVa and RPGRIP1L can interact near the cilium base in ciliated RPE cells. Furthermore, we showed that RPE cells expressing dominant-negative constructs of MyoVa are mostly unciliated, providing the first experimental evidence about a possible link between this molecular motor and cilia-related processes. PMID:28266547

  13. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Newell-Litwa, Karen A; Horwitz, Rick; Lamers, Marcelo L

    2015-12-01

    The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII) acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  14. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Newell-Litwa, Karen A.; Horwitz, Rick; Lamers, Marcelo L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII) acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies. PMID:26542704

  15. Phosphorylation of myosin II regulatory light chain is necessary for migration of HeLa cells but not for localization of myosin II at the leading edge.

    PubMed Central

    Fumoto, Katsumi; Uchimura, Takashi; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Ueda, Kozue; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the role of phosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC) in living cell migration, these mutant MRLCs were engineered and introduced into HeLa cells. The mutant MRLCs include an unphosphorylatable form, in which both Thr-18 and Ser-19 were substituted with Ala (AA-MRLC), and pseudophosphorylated forms, in which Thr-18 and Ser-19 were replaced with Ala and Asp, respectively (AD-MRLC), and both Thr-18 and Ser-19 were replaced with Asp (DD-MRLC). Mutant MRLC-expressing cell monolayers were mechanically stimulated by scratching, and the cells were forced to migrate in a given direction. In this wound-healing assay, the AA-MRLC-expressing cells migrated much more slowly than the wild-type MRLC-expressing cells. In the case of DD-MRLC- and AD-MRLC-expressing cells, no significant differences compared with wild-type MRLC-expressing cells were observed in their migration speed. Indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that the accumulation of endogenous diphosphorylated MRLC at the leading edge was not observed in AA-MRLC-expressing cells, although AA-MRLC was incorporated into myosin heavy chain and localized at the leading edge. In conclusion, we propose that the phosphorylation of MRLC is required to generate the driving force in the migration of the cells but not necessary for localization of myosin II at the leading edge. PMID:12429016

  16. Mechanism of IFN-γ-induced Endocytosis of Tight Junction Proteins: Myosin II-dependent Vacuolarization of the Apical Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Utech, Markus; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Samarin, Stanislav N.; Bruewer, Matthias; Turner, Jerrold R.; Mrsny, Randall J.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2005-01-01

    Disruption of epithelial barrier by proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ represents a major pathophysiological consequence of intestinal inflammation. We have previously shown that IFN-γ increases paracellular permeability in model T84 epithelial cells by inducing endocytosis of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin, JAM-A, and claudin-1. The present study was designed to dissect mechanisms of IFN-γ-induced endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins. IFN-γ treatment of T84 cells resulted in internalization of TJ proteins into large actin-coated vacuoles that originated from the apical plasma membrane and resembled the vacuolar apical compartment (VAC) previously observed in epithelial cells that lose cell polarity. The IFN-γ dependent formation of VACs required ATPase activity of a myosin II motor but was not dependent on rapid turnover of F-actin. In addition, activated myosin II was observed to colocalize with VACs after IFN-γ exposure. Pharmacological analyses revealed that formation of VACs and endocytosis of TJ proteins was mediated by Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) but not myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Furthermore, IFN-γ treatment resulted in activation of Rho GTPase and induced expressional up-regulation of ROCK. These results, for the first time, suggest that IFN-γ induces endocytosis of epithelial TJ proteins via RhoA/ROCK-mediated, myosin II-dependent formation of VACs. PMID:16055505

  17. Dual role for myosin II in GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fulcher, F. Kent; Smith, Bethany T.; Russ, Misty; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2008-10-15

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake requires the activation of several signaling pathways to mediate the translocation and fusion of GLUT4 vesicles to the plasma membrane. Our previous studies demonstrated that GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake is a myosin II-dependent process in adipocytes. The experiments described in this report are the first to show a dual role for the myosin IIA isoform specifically in regulating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. We demonstrate that inhibition of MLCK but not RhoK results in impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Furthermore, our studies show that insulin specifically stimulates the phosphorylation of the RLC associated with the myosin IIA isoform via MLCK. In time course experiments, we determined that GLUT4 translocates to the plasma membrane prior to myosin IIA recruitment. We further show that recruitment of myosin IIA to the plasma membrane requires that myosin IIA be activated via phosphorylation of the RLC by MLCK. Our findings also reveal that myosin II is required for proper GLUT4-vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane. We show that once at the plasma membrane, myosin II is involved in regulating the intrinsic activity of GLUT4 after insulin stimulation. Collectively, our results are the first to reveal that myosin IIA plays a critical role in mediating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-LI adipocytes, via both GLUT4 vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane and GLUT4 activity.

  18. Phosphorylation by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, N V; Vorotnikov, A V; Birukov, K G; Shirinsky, V P; Gusev, N B

    1993-01-01

    Smooth muscle caldesmon was phosphorylated by casein kinase II, and the effects of phosphorylation on the interaction of caldesmon and its chymotryptic peptides with myosin and tropomyosin were investigated. The N-terminal chymotryptic peptide of caldesmon of molecular mass 27 kDa interacted with myosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II resulted in a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the native caldesmon (or its 27 kDa N-terminal peptide) for smooth muscle myosin. At low ionic strength, caldesmon and its N-terminal peptides of molecular masses 25 and 27 kDa were retarded on a column of immobilized tropomyosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 led to a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of caldesmon (or its N-terminal peptides) for tropomyosin. Thus phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with both smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8452532

  19. Probing muscle myosin motor action: x-ray (m3 and m6) interference measurements report motor domain not lever arm movement.

    PubMed

    Knupp, Carlo; Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W; Squire, John M

    2009-07-10

    The key question in understanding how force and movement are produced in muscle concerns the nature of the cyclic interaction of myosin molecules with actin filaments. The lever arm of the globular head of each myosin molecule is thought in some way to swing axially on the actin-attached motor domain, thus propelling the actin filament past the myosin filament. Recent X-ray diffraction studies of vertebrate muscle, especially those involving the analysis of interference effects between myosin head arrays in the two halves of the thick filaments, have been claimed to prove that the lever arm moves at the same time as the sliding of actin and myosin filaments in response to muscle length or force steps. It was suggested that the sliding of myosin and actin filaments, the level of force produced and the lever arm angle are all directly coupled and that other models of lever arm movement will not fit the X-ray data. Here, we show that, in addition to interference across the A-band, which must be occurring, the observed meridional M3 and M6 X-ray intensity changes can all be explained very well by the changing diffraction effects during filament sliding caused by heads stereospecifically attached to actin moving axially relative to a population of detached or non-stereospecifically attached heads that remain fixed in position relative to the myosin filament backbone. Crucially, and contrary to previous interpretations, the X-ray interference results provide little direct information about the position of the myosin head lever arm; they are, in fact, reporting relative motor domain movements. The implications of the new interpretation are briefly assessed.

  20. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  1. Advances in quantum simulations of ATPase catalysis in the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    During its contraction cycle, the myosin motor catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP. Several combined quantum/classical mechanics (QM/MM) studies of this step have been published, which substantially contributed to our thinking about the catalytic mechanism. The methodological difficulties encountered over the years in the simulation of this complex reaction are now understood: (a) Polarization of the protein peptide groups surrounding the highly charged ATP(4-) cannot be neglected. (b) Some unsuspected protein groups need to be treated QM. (c) Interactions with the γ-phosphate versus the β-phosphate favor a concurrent versus a sequential mechanism, respectively. Thus, these practical aspects strongly influence the computed mechanism, and should be considered when studying other catalyzed phosphor-ester hydrolysis reactions, such as in ATPases or GTPases.

  2. [Origin of motion in the human ureter: mechanics, energetics and kinetics of the myosin molecular motors].

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; De Lisa, Antonello; Tintrup, Frank; Manca, Francesco; Mancinelli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    Ureteral peristalsis is the result of coordinated mechanical motor performance of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle layer of the ureter wall. The main aim of this study was to characterize in smooth muscle of proximal segments of human ureter, the mechanical properties at level of muscle tissue and at level of myosin molecular motors. Ureteral samples were collected from 15 patients, who underwent nephrectomy for renal cancer. Smooth muscle strips longitudinally and circularly oriented from proximal segments of human ureter were used for the in vitro experiments. Mechanical indices including the maximum unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), and the maximum isometric tension (P0) normalized per cross-sectional area, were determined in vitro determined in electrically evoked contractions of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle strips. Myosin cross-bridge (CB) number per mm2 (Ψ) the elementary force per single CB (Ψ) and kinetic parameters were calculated in muscle strips, using Huxley's equations adapted to nonsarcomeric muscles. Longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited a significantly (p<0.05) faster Vmax (63%) and a higher P0 (40%), if compared to circular strips. Moreover, longitudinal muscle strips showed a significantly higher unitary force (Ψ) per CB. However, no significant differences were observed in CB number, the attachment (f1) and the detachment (g2) rate constants between longitudinal and circular muscle strips. The main result obtained in the present work documents that the mechanical, energetic and unitary forces per CB of longitudinal layer of proximal ureter are better compared to the circular one; these preliminary findings suggested, unlike intestinal smooth muscle, a major role of longitudinal smooth muscle layer in the ureter peristalsis.

  3. Myosin Va molecular motors manoeuvre liposome cargo through suspended actin filament intersections in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Andrew T.; Nelson, Shane R.; Ali, M. Yusuf; Kennedy, Guy G.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Walcott, Sam; Warshaw, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular cargo transport relies on myosin Va molecular motor ensembles to travel along the cell's three-dimensional (3D) highway of actin filaments. At actin filament intersections, the intersecting filament is a structural barrier to and an alternate track for directed cargo transport. Here we use 3D super-resolution fluorescence imaging to determine the directional outcome (that is, continues straight, turns or terminates) for an ∼10 motor ensemble transporting a 350 nm lipid-bound cargo that encounters a suspended 3D actin filament intersection in vitro. Motor–cargo complexes that interact with the intersecting filament go straight through the intersection 62% of the time, nearly twice that for turning. To explain this, we develop an in silico model, supported by optical trapping data, suggesting that the motors' diffusive movements on the vesicle surface and the extent of their engagement with the two intersecting actin tracks biases the motor–cargo complex on average to go straight through the intersection. PMID:28569841

  4. Unique sequences and predicted functions of myosins in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Maki; Iwataki, Yoshinori; Nakano, Kentaro; Numata, Osamu

    2011-07-01

    Myosins are eukaryotic actin-dependent molecular motors that play important roles in many cellular events. The function of each myosin is determined by a variety of functional domains in its tail region. In some major model organisms, the functions and properties of myosins have been investigated based on their amino acid sequences. However, in protists, myosins have been little studied beyond the level of genome sequences. We therefore investigated the mRNA expression levels and amino acid sequences of 13 myosin genes in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. This study is an overview of myosins in T. thermophila, which has no typical myosins, such as class I, II, or V myosins. We showed that all 13 myosins were expressed in vegetative cells. Furthermore, these myosins could be divided into 3 subclasses based on four functional domains in their tail regions. Subclass 1 comprised of 8 myosins has both MyTH4 and FERM domains, and has a potential to function in vesicle transport or anchoring between membrane and actin filaments. Subclass 2 comprised of 4 myosins has RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) domains, which are found only in some protists, and may have unconventional features. Subclass 3 is comprised of one myosin, which has a long coiled-coil domain like class II myosin. In addition, phylogenetic analysis on the basis of motor domains showed that T. thermophila myosins are separated into two clusters: one consists of subclasses 1 and 2, and the other consists of subclass 3. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MCAK-mediated regulation of endothelial cell microtubule dynamics is mechanosensitive to myosin-II contractility

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Lauren; Myer, Nicole M.; Myers, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Compliance and dimensionality mechanosensing, the processes by which cells sense the physical attributes of the extracellular matrix (ECM), are known to drive cell branching and shape change largely through a myosin-II–mediated reorganization of the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons. Subcellular regulation of MT dynamics is spatially controlled through a Rac1–Aurora-A kinase pathway that locally inhibits the MT depolymerizing activity of mitotic centromere–associated kinesin (MCAK), thereby promoting leading-edge MT growth and cell polarization. These results suggest that the regulation of MT growth dynamics is intimately linked to physical engagement of the cell with the ECM. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MCAK contributes to compliance and dimensionality mechanosensing-mediated regulation of MT growth dynamics through a myosin-II–dependent signaling pathway. We cultured endothelial cells (ECs) on collagen-coupled stiff or compliant polyacrylamide ECMs to examine the effects of MCAK expression on MT growth dynamics and EC branching morphology. Our results identify that MCAK promotes fast MT growth speeds in ECs cultured on compliant 2D ECMs but promotes slow MT growth speeds in ECs cultured on compliant 3D ECMs, and these effects are myosin-II dependent. Furthermore, we find that 3D ECM engagement uncouples MCAK-mediated regulation of MT growth persistence from myosin-II–mediated regulation of growth persistence specifically within EC branched protrusions. PMID:28298485

  6. The role of vertebrate nonmuscle Myosin II in development and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Three different genes each located on a different chromosome encode the heavy chains of nonmuscle myosin II in humans and mice. This review explores the functional consequences of the presence of three isoforms during embryonic development and beyond. The roles of the various isoforms in cell division, cell-cell adhesion, blood vessel formation and neuronal cell migration are addressed in animal models and at the cellular level. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of nonmuscle myosin II during cardiac and brain development, and during closure of the neural tube and body wall. Questions addressed include the consequences on organ development, of lowering or ablating a particular isoform as well as the effect of substituting one isoform for another, all in vivo. Finally the roles of the three isoforms in human diseases such as cancer as well as in syndromes affecting a variety of organs in humans are reviewed. PMID:25098841

  7. Calcium-dependent regulation of the motor activity of recombinant full-length Physarum myosin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Kawamichi, Hozumi; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Yoshiyama, Shinji; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Akio

    2012-08-01

    We successfully synthesized full-length and the mutant Physarum myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) constructs associated with Physarum regulatory light chain and essential light chain (PhELC) using Physarum myosin heavy chain in Sf-9 cells, and examined their Ca(2+)-mediated regulation. Ca(2+) inhibited the motility and ATPase activities of Physarum myosin and HMM. The Ca(2+) effect is also reversible at the in vitro motility of Physarum myosin. We demonstrated that full-length myosin increases the Ca(2+) inhibition more effectively than HMM. Furthermore, Ca(2+) did not affect the motility and ATPase activities of the mutant Physarum myosin with PhELC that lost Ca(2+)-binding ability. Therefore, we conclude that PhELC plays a critical role in Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Physarum myosin.

  8. Myosin II activity is required for structural plasticity at the axon initial segment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark D; Tufo, Candida; Dumitrescu, Adna S; Grubb, Matthew S

    2017-07-01

    In neurons, axons possess a molecularly defined and highly organised proximal region - the axon initial segment (AIS) - that is a key regulator of both electrical excitability and cellular polarity. Despite existing as a large, dense structure with specialised cytoskeletal architecture, the AIS is surprisingly plastic, with sustained alterations in neuronal activity bringing about significant alterations to its position, length or molecular composition. However, although the upstream activity-dependent signalling pathways that lead to such plasticity have begun to be elucidated, the downstream mechanisms that produce structural changes at the AIS are completely unknown. Here, we use dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus to show that two forms of AIS plasticity in dentate granule cells - long-term relocation, and more rapid shortening - are completely blocked by treatment with blebbistatin, a potent and selective myosin II ATPase inhibitor. These data establish a link between myosin II and AIS function, and suggest that myosin II's primary role at the structure may be to effect activity-dependent morphological alterations. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system.

  10. Magnesium impacts myosin V motor activity by altering key conformational changes in the mechanochemical cycle.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Darshan V; Muretta, Joseph M; Swenson, Anja M; Thomas, David D; Yengo, Christopher M

    2013-07-09

    We investigated how magnesium (Mg) impacts key conformational changes during the ADP binding/release steps in myosin V and how these alterations impact the actomyosin mechanochemical cycle. The conformation of the nucleotide binding pocket was examined with our established FRET system in which myosin V labeled with FlAsH in the upper 50 kDa domain participates in energy transfer with mant labeled nucleotides. We examined the maximum actin-activated ATPase activity of MV FlAsH at a range of free Mg concentrations (0.1-9 mM) and found that the highest activity occurs at low Mg (0.1-0.3 mM), while there is a 50-60% reduction in activity at high Mg (3-9 mM). The motor activity examined with the in vitro motility assay followed a similar Mg-dependence, and the trend was similar with dimeric myosin V. Transient kinetic FRET studies of mantdADP binding/release from actomyosin V FlAsH demonstrate that the transition between the weak and strong actomyosin.ADP states is coupled to movement of the upper 50 kDa domain and is dependent on Mg with the strong state stabilized by Mg. We find that the kinetics of the upper 50 kDa conformational change monitored by FRET correlates well with the ATPase and motility results over a wide range of Mg concentrations. Our results suggest the conformation of the upper 50 kDa domain is highly dynamic in the Mg free actomyosin.ADP state, which is in agreement with ADP binding being entropy driven in the absence of Mg. Overall, our results demonstrate that Mg is a key factor in coupling the nucleotide- and actin-binding regions. In addition, Mg concentrations in the physiological range can alter the structural transition that limits ADP dissociation from actomyosin V, which explains the impact of Mg on actin-activated ATPase activity and in vitro motility.

  11. Molecular consequences of the R453C hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation on human β-cardiac myosin motor function

    PubMed Central

    Sommese, Ruth F.; Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Sutton, Shirley; Deacon, John C.; Choe, Elizabeth; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Ruppel, Kathleen; Spudich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is among the most frequently occurring inherited cardiac disorders. HCM is caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating machinery of the cardiac muscle, including β-cardiac myosin. Here, we present a biomechanical analysis of the HCM-causing mutation, R453C, in the context of human β-cardiac myosin. We found that this mutation causes a ∼30% decrease in the maximum ATPase of the human β-cardiac subfragment 1, the motor domain of myosin, and a similar percent decrease in the in vitro velocity. The major change in the R453C human β-cardiac subfragment 1 is a 50% increase in the intrinsic force of the motor compared with wild type, with no appreciable change in the stroke size, as observed with a dual-beam optical trap. These results predict that the overall force of the ensemble of myosin molecules in the muscle should be higher in the R453C mutant compared with wild type. Loaded in vitro motility assay confirms that the net force in the ensemble is indeed increased. Overall, this study suggests that the R453C mutation should result in a hypercontractile state in the heart muscle. PMID:23798412

  12. Invited Review: The Myosins: Exploration of the Development of Our Current Understanding of These Mutations in the Motor

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Leinwand, Leslie; Warshaw, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic (HCM) and dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathies are inherited diseases with a high incidence of death due to electrical abnormalities or outflow tract obstruction. In many of the families afflicted with either disease, causative mutations have been identified in various sarcomeric proteins. In this review, we focus on mutations in the cardiac muscle molecular motor, myosin and its associated light chains. Despite the >300 identified mutations there is still no clear understanding of how these mutations within the same myosin molecule can lead to the dramatically different clinical phenotypes associated with HCM and DCM. Localizing mutations within myosin’s molecular structure provides insight into the potential consequence of these perturbations to key functional domains of the motor. Review of biochemical and biophysical data that characterize the functional capacities of these mutant myosins suggests that mutant myosins with enhanced contractility lead to HCM while those displaying reduced contractility lead to DCM. With gain and loss of function potentially being the primary consequence of a specific mutation, how these functional changes trigger the hypertrophic response and lead to the distinct HCM and DCM phenotypes will be the future investigative challenge. PMID:22821910

  13. Reassessing the Role and Dynamics of Nonmuscle Myosin II during Furrow Formation in Early Drosophila EmbryosD⃞V⃞

    PubMed Central

    Royou, Anne; Field, Christine; Sisson, John C.; Sullivan, William; Karess, Roger

    2004-01-01

    The early Drosophila embryo undergoes two distinct membrane invagination events believed to be mechanistically related to cytokinesis: metaphase furrow formation and cellularization. Both involve actin cytoskeleton rearrangements, and both have myosin II at or near the forming furrow. Actin and myosin are thought to provide the force driving membrane invagination; however, membrane addition is also important. We have examined the role of myosin during these events in living embryos, with a fully functional myosin regulatory light-chain-GFP chimera. We find that furrow invagination during metaphase and cellularization occurs even when myosin activity has been experimentally perturbed. In contrast, the basal closure of the cellularization furrows and the first cytokinesis after cellularization are highly dependent on myosin. Strikingly, when ingression of the cellularization furrow is experimentally inhibited by colchicine treatment, basal closure still occurs at the appropriate time, suggesting that it is regulated independently of earlier cellularization events. We have also identified a previously unrecognized reservoir of particulate myosin that is recruited basally into the invaginating furrow in a microfilament-independent and microtubule-dependent manner. We suggest that cellularization can be divided into two distinct processes: furrow ingression, driven by microtubule mediated vesicle delivery, and basal closure, which is mediated by actin/myosin based constriction. PMID:14657248

  14. Tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of myosin II essential light chains of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites regulates their motility.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Moreno, Raúl; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy-Andrés; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Morales, Fernando O; Meza, Isaura

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites dwell in the human intestine as comensals although under still unclear circumstances become invasive and destroy the host tissues. For these activities, trophozoites relay on remarkable motility provided by the cytoskeleton organization. Amebic actin and some of its actin-associated proteins are well known, while components of the myosin II molecule, although predicted from the E. histolytica genome, need biochemical and functional characterization. Recently, an amebic essential light myosin II chain, named EhMLCI, was identified and reported to be phosphorylated in tyrosines. The phosphorylated form of the protein was associated with the soluble assembly incompetent conformation of the heavy myosin chains, while the non-phosphorylated protein was identified with filamentous heavy chains, organized in an assembly competent conformation. It was postulated that EhMLCI tyrosine phosphorylation could act as a negative regulator of myosin II activity by its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an expression vector containing an EhMLCI DNA sequence where two tyrosine residues, with strong probability of phosphorylation and fall within the single EF-hand domain that interacts with the N-terminus of myosin II heavy chains, were replaced by phenylalanines. Transfected trophozoites, expressing the mutant MutEhMLCI protein cannot process it, thereby not incorporated into the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles required for myosin II activity, results in motility defective trophozoites.

  15. Distribution and evolution of stable single α-helices (SAH domains) in myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Dominic; Hatje, Klas

    2017-01-01

    Stable single-alpha helices (SAHs) are versatile structural elements in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins acting as semi-flexible linkers and constant force springs. This way SAH-domains function as part of the lever of many different myosins. Canonical myosin levers consist of one or several IQ-motifs to which light chains such as calmodulin bind. SAH-domains provide flexibility in length and stiffness to the myosin levers, and may be particularly suited for myosins working in crowded cellular environments. Although the function of the SAH-domains in human class-6 and class-10 myosins has well been characterised, the distribution of the SAH-domain in all myosin subfamilies and across the eukaryotic tree of life remained elusive. Here, we analysed the largest available myosin sequence dataset consisting of 7919 manually annotated myosin sequences from 938 species representing all major eukaryotic branches using the SAH-prediction algorithm of Waggawagga, a recently developed tool for the identification of SAH-domains. With this approach we identified SAH-domains in more than one third of the supposed 79 myosin subfamilies. Depending on the myosin class, the presence of SAH-domains can range from a few to almost all class members indicating complex patterns of independent and taxon-specific SAH-domain gain and loss. PMID:28369123

  16. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles

  17. The Globular Tail Domain of Myosin-5a Functions as a Dimer in Regulating the Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Yao, Lin-Lin; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-24

    Myosin-5a contains two heavy chains, which are dimerized via the coiled-coil regions. Thus, myosin-5a comprises two heads and two globular tail domains (GTDs). The GTD is the inhibitory domain that binds to the head and inhibits its motor function. Although the two-headed structure is essential for the processive movement of myosin-5a along actin filaments, little is known about the role of GTD dimerization. Here, we investigated the effect of GTD dimerization on its inhibitory activity. We found that the potent inhibitory activity of the GTD is dependent on its dimerization by the preceding coiled-coil regions, indicating synergistic interactions between the two GTDs and the two heads of myosin-5a. Moreover, we found that alanine mutations of the two conserved basic residues at N-terminal extension of the GTD not only weaken the inhibitory activity of the GTD but also enhance the activation of myosin-5a by its cargo-binding protein melanophilin (Mlph). These results are consistent with the GTD forming a head to head dimer, in which the N-terminal extension of the GTD interacts with the Mlph-binding site in the counterpart GTD. The Mlph-binding site at the GTD-GTD interface must be exposed prior to the binding of Mlph. We therefore propose that the inhibited Myo5a is equilibrated between the folded state, in which the Mlph-binding site is buried, and the preactivated state, in which the Mlph-binding site is exposed, and that Mlph is able to bind to the Myo5a in preactivated state and activates its motor function.

  18. Structural differences in the motor domain of temperature-associated myosin heavy chain isoforms from grass carp fast skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan; Wang, Sun-Yong; Liang, Chun-Shi; Fukushima, Hideto; Watabe, Shugo

    2009-10-01

    We determined coding sequences for three types of grass carp myosin subfragment-1 (S1) heavy chain by extending 5'-regions of the three known genes encoding light meromyosin isoforms (10 degrees C, intermediate and 30 degrees C types). The primary structures of these three S1 heavy chain isoforms showed 81.4%, 81.2%, and 97.8% identities between the 10 degrees C and intermediate types, between the 10 degrees C and 30 degrees C types, and between the intermediate and 30 degrees C types, respectively. Isoform-specific differences were clearly observed between the 10 degrees C type and the other two types in 97 amino acid residues. Furthermore, among these amino acid mutations, 51 mutations occurred at the conserved residue sites of S1 heavy chain from fish and homoiotherm. Additionally, the 10 degrees C type showed striking differences compared with the other two types in the two surface loops, loop 1 located near the ATP-binding pocket and loop 2, which is one of the actin-binding sites, suggesting that such structural differences possibly affect their motor functions. Interestingly, this 10 degrees C-type myosin heavy chain isolated from adult grass carp skeletal muscle was surprisingly similar to the embryonic fast-type myosin heavy chain from juvenile silver carp in the structure of S1 heavy chain, indicating that it may also function as embryonic fast-type myosin heavy chain in juvenile stage.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii myosin A and its light chain: a fast, single-headed, plus-end-directed motor

    PubMed Central

    Herm-Götz, Angelika; Weiss, Stefan; Stratmann, Rolf; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Ruff, Christine; Meyhöfer, Edgar; Soldati, Thierry; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Soldati, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Successful host cell invasion is a prerequisite for survival of the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasites and establishment of infection. Toxoplasma gondii penetrates host cells by an active process involving its own actomyosin system and which is distinct from induced phagocytosis. Toxoplasma gondii myosin A (TgMyoA) is presumed to achieve power gliding motion and host cell penetration by the capping of apically released adhesins towards the rear of the parasite. We report here an extensive biochemical characterization of the functional TgMyoA motor complex. TgMyoA is anchored at the plasma membrane and binds a novel type of myosin light chain (TgMLC1). Despite some unusual features, the kinetic and mechanical properties of TgMyoA are unexpectedly similar to those of fast skeletal muscle myosins. Microneedle–laser trap and sliding velocity assays established that TgMyoA moves in unitary steps of 5.3 nm with a velocity of 5.2 µm/s towards the plus end of actin filaments. TgMyoA is the first fast, single-headed myosin and fulfils all the requirements for power parasite gliding. PMID:11980712

  20. An increase or a decrease in myosin II phosphorylation inhibits macrophage motility

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Myosin II purified from mammalian non-muscle cells is phosphorylated on the 20-kD light chain subunit (MLC20) by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). The importance of MLC20 phosphorylation in regulating cell motility was investigated by introducing either antibodies to MLCK (MK-Ab) or a Ca2+/calmodulin- independent, constitutively active form of MLCK (MK-) into macrophages. The effects of these proteins on cell motility were then determined using a quantitative chemotaxis assay. Chemotaxis is significantly diminished in macrophages containing MK-Ab compared to macrophages containing control antibodies. Moreover, there is an inverse relationship between the number of cells that migrate and the amount of MK-Ab introduced into cells. Interestingly, there is also an inverse relationship between the number of cells that migrate and the amount of MK- introduced into cells. Other experiments demonstrated that MK-Ab decreased intracellular MLC20 phosphorylation while MK- increased MLC20 phosphorylation. MK- also increased the amount of myosin associated with the cytoskeleton. These data demonstrate that the regulation of MLCK is an important aspect of cell motility and suggest that MLC20 phosphorylation must be maintained within narrow limits during translational motility by mammalian cells. PMID:2071674

  1. Non-muscle Myosin II Isoforms Co-assemble in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Jordan R.; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique, as well as redundant, cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear if NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments, or if filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently-tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms co-assemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly-spread cells, arguing for the existence of sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while co-assembled with other NM II isoforms. PMID:24814144

  2. Two single-headed myosin V motors bound to a tetrameric adapter protein form a processive complex

    PubMed Central

    Krementsova, Elena B.; Hodges, Alex R.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Sladewski, Thomas E.; Travaglia, Mirko; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Myo4p, one of two class V myosins in budding yeast, continuously transports messenger RNA (mRNA) cargo in the cell but is nonprocessive when characterized in vitro. The adapter protein She3p tightly binds to the Myo4p rod, forming a single-headed motor complex. In this paper, we show that two Myo4p–She3p motors are recruited by the tetrameric mRNA-binding protein She2p to form a processive double-headed complex. The binding site for She3p was mapped to a single α helix that protrudes at right angles from She2p. Processive runs of several micrometers on yeast actin–tropomyosin filaments were observed only in the presence of She2p, and, thus, motor activity is regulated by cargo binding. While moving processively, each head steps ∼72 nm in a hand-over-hand motion. Coupling two high-duty cycle monomeric motors via a common cargo-binding adapter protein creates a complex with transport properties comparable with a single dimeric processive motor such as vertebrate myosin Va. PMID:22084309

  3. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  4. Mammalian Nonmuscle Myosin II Binds to Anionic Phospholipids with Concomitant Dissociation of the Regulatory Light Chain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Shu, Shi; Billington, Neil; Williamson, Chad D; Yu, Shuhua; Brzeska, Hanna; Donaldson, Julie G; Sellers, James R; Korn, Edward D

    2016-11-25

    Mammalian cells express three Class II nonmuscle myosins (NM): NM2A, NM2B, and NM2C. The three NM2s have well established essential roles in cell motility, adhesion, and cytokinesis and less well defined roles in vesicle transport and other processes that would require association of NM2s with cell membranes. Previous evidence for the mechanism of NM2-membrane association includes direct interaction of NM2s with membrane lipids and indirect interaction by association of NM2s with membrane-bound F-actin or peripheral membrane proteins. Direct binding of NM2s to phosphatidylserine-liposomes, but not to phosphatidylcholine-liposomes, has been reported, but the molecular basis of the interaction between NM2s and acidic phospholipids has not been previously investigated. We now show that filamentous, full-length NM2A, NM2B, and NM2C and monomeric, non-filamentous heavy meromyosin bind to liposomes containing one or more acidic phospholipids (phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate, and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate) but do not bind to 100% phosphatidylcholine-liposomes. Binding of NM2s to acidic liposomes occurs predominantly through interaction of the liposomes with the regulatory light chain (RLC) binding site in the myosin heavy chain with concomitant dissociation of the RLC. Phosphorylation of myosin-bound RLC by myosin light chain kinase substantially inhibits binding to liposomes of both filamentous NM2 and non-filamentous heavy meromyosin; the addition of excess unbound RLC, but not excess unbound essential light chain, competes with liposome binding. Consistent with the in vitro data, we show that endogenous and expressed NM2A associates with the plasma membrane of HeLa cells and fibrosarcoma cells independently of F-actin. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Unipolar distributions of junctional Myosin II identify cell stripe boundaries that drive cell intercalation throughout Drosophila axis extension

    PubMed Central

    Tetley, Robert J; Blanchard, Guy B; Fletcher, Alexander G; Adams, Richard J; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Convergence and extension movements elongate tissues during development. Drosophila germ-band extension (GBE) is one example, which requires active cell rearrangements driven by Myosin II planar polarisation. Here, we develop novel computational methods to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of Myosin II during GBE, at the scale of the tissue. We show that initial Myosin II bipolar cell polarization gives way to unipolar enrichment at parasegmental boundaries and two further boundaries within each parasegment, concomitant with a doubling of cell number as the tissue elongates. These boundaries are the primary sites of cell intercalation, behaving as mechanical barriers and providing a mechanism for how cells remain ordered during GBE. Enrichment at parasegment boundaries during GBE is independent of Wingless signaling, suggesting pair-rule gene control. Our results are consistent with recent work showing that a combinatorial code of Toll-like receptors downstream of pair-rule genes contributes to Myosin II polarization via local cell-cell interactions. We propose an updated cell-cell interaction model for Myosin II polarization that we tested in a vertex-based simulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12094.001 PMID:27183005

  6. Myosin-II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in 3D by minimizing cell surface curvature

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert A.; Myers, Kenneth A.; Desai, Ravi A.; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S.; Adelstein, Robert; Waterman, Clare M.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We utilized endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin-II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin-II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell surface curvature. Utilizing micro-fabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin-II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between myosin-II regulation by and control of curvature drives cycles of localized cortical myosin-II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration. PMID:25621949

  7. Stereocilia-staircase spacing is influenced by myosin III motors and their cargos espin-1 and espin-like

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Seham; Avenarius, Matthew R.; Grati, M’hamed; Krey, Jocelyn F.; Windsor, Alanna M.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Ballesteros, Angela; Cui, Runjia; Millis, Bryan A.; Salles, Felipe T.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Jones, Sherri M.; Choi, Dongseok; Dong, Lijin; Raval, Manmeet H.; Yengo, Christopher M.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells tightly control the dimensions of their stereocilia, which are actin-rich protrusions with graded heights that mediate mechanotransduction in the inner ear. Two members of the myosin-III family, MYO3A and MYO3B, are thought to regulate stereocilia length by transporting cargos that control actin polymerization at stereocilia tips. We show that eliminating espin-1 (ESPN-1), an isoform of ESPN and a myosin-III cargo, dramatically alters the slope of the stereocilia staircase in a subset of hair cells. Furthermore, we show that espin-like (ESPNL), primarily present in developing stereocilia, is also a myosin-III cargo and is essential for normal hearing. ESPN-1 and ESPNL each bind MYO3A and MYO3B, but differentially influence how the two motors function. Consequently, functional properties of different motor-cargo combinations differentially affect molecular transport and the length of actin protrusions. This mechanism is used by hair cells to establish the required range of stereocilia lengths within a single cell. PMID:26926603

  8. Stereocilia-staircase spacing is influenced by myosin III motors and their cargos espin-1 and espin-like.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Seham; Avenarius, Matthew R; Grati, M'hamed; Krey, Jocelyn F; Windsor, Alanna M; Sousa, Aurea D; Ballesteros, Angela; Cui, Runjia; Millis, Bryan A; Salles, Felipe T; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Jones, Sherri M; Choi, Dongseok; Dong, Lijin; Raval, Manmeet H; Yengo, Christopher M; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-03-01

    Hair cells tightly control the dimensions of their stereocilia, which are actin-rich protrusions with graded heights that mediate mechanotransduction in the inner ear. Two members of the myosin-III family, MYO3A and MYO3B, are thought to regulate stereocilia length by transporting cargos that control actin polymerization at stereocilia tips. We show that eliminating espin-1 (ESPN-1), an isoform of ESPN and a myosin-III cargo, dramatically alters the slope of the stereocilia staircase in a subset of hair cells. Furthermore, we show that espin-like (ESPNL), primarily present in developing stereocilia, is also a myosin-III cargo and is essential for normal hearing. ESPN-1 and ESPNL each bind MYO3A and MYO3B, but differentially influence how the two motors function. Consequently, functional properties of different motor-cargo combinations differentially affect molecular transport and the length of actin protrusions. This mechanism is used by hair cells to establish the required range of stereocilia lengths within a single cell.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Printable PDF Open All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder ...

  10. The neck region of the myosin motor domain acts as a lever arm to generate movement.

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, T Q; Abramson, P D; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    The myosin head consists of a globular catalytic domain that binds actin and hydrolyzes ATP and a neck domain that consists of essential and regulatory light chains bound to a long alpha-helical portion of the heavy chain. The swinging neck-level model assumes that a swinging motion of the neck relative to the catalytic domain is the origin of movement. This model predicts that the step size, and consequently the sliding velocity, are linearly related to the length of the neck. We have tested this point by characterizing a series of mutant Dictyostelium myosins that have different neck lengths. The 2xELCBS mutant has an extra binding site for essential light chain. The delta RLCBS mutant myosin has an internal deletion that removes the regulatory light chain binding site. The delta BLCBS mutant lacks both light chain binding sites. Wild-type myosin and these mutant myosins were subjected to the sliding filament in vitro motility assay. As expected, mutants with shorter necks move slower than wild-type myosin in vitro. Most significantly, a mutant with a longer neck moves faster than the wild type, and the sliding velocities of these myosins are linearly related to the neck length, as predicted by the swinging neck-lever model. A simple extrapolation to zero speed predicts that the fulcrum point is in the vicinity of the SH1-SH2 region in the catalytic domain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8633089

  11. Motor-motor interactions in ensembles of muscle myosin: using theory to connect single molecule to ensemble measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcott, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Interactions between the proteins actin and myosin drive muscle contraction. Properties of a single myosin interacting with an actin filament are largely known, but a trillion myosins work together in muscle. We are interested in how single-molecule properties relate to ensemble function. Myosin's reaction rates depend on force, so ensemble models keep track of both molecular state and force on each molecule. These models make subtle predictions, e.g. that myosin, when part of an ensemble, moves actin faster than when isolated. This acceleration arises because forces between molecules speed reaction kinetics. Experiments support this prediction and allow parameter estimates. A model based on this analysis describes experiments from single molecule to ensemble. In vivo, actin is regulated by proteins that, when present, cause the binding of one myosin to speed the binding of its neighbors; binding becomes cooperative. Although such interactions preclude the mean field approximation, a set of linear ODEs describes these ensembles under simplified experimental conditions. In these experiments cooperativity is strong, with the binding of one molecule affecting ten neighbors on either side. We progress toward a description of myosin ensembles under physiological conditions.

  12. Actin depolymerisation and crosslinking join forces with myosin II to contract actin coats on fused secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Miklavc, Pika; Ehinger, Konstantin; Sultan, Ayesha; Felder, Tatiana; Paul, Patrick; Gottschalk, Kay-Eberhard; Frick, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In many secretory cells actin and myosin are specifically recruited to the surface of secretory granules following their fusion with the plasma membrane. Actomyosin-dependent compression of fused granules is essential to promote active extrusion of cargo. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms regulating actin coat formation and contraction. Here, we provide a detailed kinetic analysis of the molecules regulating actin coat contraction on fused lamellar bodies in primary alveolar type II cells. We demonstrate that ROCK1 and myosin light chain kinase 1 (MLCK1, also known as MYLK) translocate to fused lamellar bodies and activate myosin II on actin coats. However, myosin II activity is not sufficient for efficient actin coat contraction. In addition, cofilin-1 and α-actinin translocate to actin coats. ROCK1-dependent regulated actin depolymerisation by cofilin-1 in cooperation with actin crosslinking by α-actinin is essential for complete coat contraction. In summary, our data suggest a complementary role for regulated actin depolymerisation and crosslinking, and myosin II activity, to contract actin coats and drive secretion. PMID:25637593

  13. The microcephaly protein Asp regulates neuroepithelium morphogenesis by controlling the spatial distribution of myosin II.

    PubMed

    Rujano, Maria A; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Pennetier, Carole; le Dez, Gaelle; Basto, Renata

    2013-11-01

    Mutations in ASPM are the most frequent cause of microcephaly, a disorder characterized by reduced brain size at birth. ASPM is recognized as a major regulator of brain size, yet its role during neural development remains poorly understood. Moreover, the role of ASPM proteins in invertebrate brain morphogenesis has never been investigated. Here, we characterized the function of the Drosophila ASPM orthologue, Asp, and found that asp mutants present severe defects in brain size and neuroepithelium morphogenesis. We show that size reduction depends on the mitotic function of Asp, whereas regulation of tissue shape depends on an uncharacterized function. Asp interacts with myosin II regulating its polarized distribution along the apico-basal axis. In the absence of Asp, mislocalization of myosin II results in interkinetic nuclear migration and tissue architecture defects. We propose that Asp regulates neuroepithelium morphogenesis through myosin-II-mediated structural and mechanical processes to maintain force balance and tissue cohesiveness.

  14. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion.

  15. Regulation of myosin 5a and myosin 7a.

    PubMed

    Siththanandan, Verl B; Sellers, James R

    2011-10-01

    The myosin superfamily is diverse in its structure, kinetic mechanisms and cellular function. The enzymatic activities of most myosins are regulated by some means such as Ca2+ ion binding, phosphorylation or binding of other proteins. In the present review, we discuss the structural basis for the regulation of mammalian myosin 5a and Drosophila myosin 7a. We show that, although both myosins have a folded inactive state in which domains in the myosin tail interact with the motor domain, the details of the regulation of these two myosins differ greatly.

  16. Increased expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs is associated with 3MC-induced mouse tumor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shekhar; Dey, Sumit K; Das, Provas; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2011-11-01

    Administration of the chemical carcinogen, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), in the hind leg induces the progressive formation of tumors in mice within 110 days. Previous reports suggest that transformation of muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes of tumor formation. Molecular events that lead to transformation of normal cells to atypical cells are not well understood. Here, we investigate the effect of 3MC on the expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs (NM IIs) which are known to be involved in cell migration, division and adhesion. Mass spectroscopy analysis reveals that tumor tissue contains 64.5% NM II-A, 34% II-B and only 1.5% II-C of total NM IIs, whereas these three isoforms of NM IIs are undetectable by mass spectroscopy in normal tissue associated with the tumor (NTAT) from the hind leg. Quantification of heavy chain mRNAs of NM II suggests that tumor tissue contains 25.7-fold and 19.03-fold more of NM II-A and II-B, respectively, compared with NTAT. Unlike NM II-B, which is detected only after tumor formation, II-A is detectable as early as day 7 after a second dose of 3MC. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy reveals that fibroblast cells which are sparsely distributed in normal tissue are densely populated but of atypical shape in the tumor. These findings suggest that transformation of fibroblasts or non-fibroblast cells to atypical, cancerous cells is associated with increased levels of NM II-A and NM II-B expression in the 3MC-induced tumor mouse model. 3MC-induced transformation is further demonstrated in C2C12 myotubes.

  17. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  18. The Effect of Including the C2 Insert of Nonmuscle Myosin II-C on Neuritogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shekhar; Dey, Sumit K.; Biswas, Arunima; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2013-01-01

    The functional role of the C2 insert of nonmuscle myosin II-C (NM II-C) is poorly understood. Here, we report for the first time that the expression of the C2 insert-containing isoform, NM II-C1C2, is inducible in Neuro-2a cells during differentiation both at mRNA and protein levels. Immunoblot and RT-PCR analysis reveal that expression of NM II-C1C2 peaks between days 3 and 6 of differentiation. Localization of NM II-C1C2 in Neuro-2a cells suggests that the C2 insert-containing isoform is localized in the cytosol and along the neurites, specifically at the adherence point to substratum. Inhibition of endogenous NM II-C1C2 using siRNA decreases the neurite length by 43% compared with control cells treated with nonspecific siRNA. Time lapse image analysis reveals that neurites of C2-siRNA-treated cells have a net negative change in neurite length per minute, leading to a reduction of overall neurite length. During neuritogenesis, NM II-C1C2 can interact and colocalize with β1-integrin in neurites. Altogether, these studies indicate that NM II-C1C2 may be involved in stabilizing neurites by maintaining their structure at adhesion sites. PMID:23355468

  19. Substrate stiffness regulates cadherin-dependent collective migration through myosin-II contractility

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Mei Rosa; Besser, Achim

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment is known to influence single-cell migration; however, the extent to which mechanical cues affect collective migration of adherent cells is not well understood. We measured the effects of varying substrate compliance on individual cell migratory properties in an epithelial wound-healing assay. Increasing substrate stiffness increased collective cell migration speed, persistence, and directionality as well as the coordination of cell movements. Dynamic analysis revealed that wounding initiated a wave of motion coordination from the wound edge into the sheet. This was accompanied by a front-to-back gradient of myosin-II activation and establishment of cell polarity. The propagation was faster and farther reaching on stiff substrates, indicating that substrate stiffness affects the transmission of directional cues. Manipulation of myosin-II activity and cadherin–catenin complexes revealed that this transmission is mediated by coupling of contractile forces between neighboring cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the mechanical environment integrates in a feedback with cell contractility and cell–cell adhesion to regulate collective migration. PMID:23091067

  20. The role of myosin II in glioma invasion: A mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wanho; Lim, Sookkyung; Kim, Yangjin

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are malignant tumors that are commonly observed in primary brain cancer. Glioma cells migrate through a dense network of normal cells in microenvironment and spread long distances within brain. In this paper we present a two-dimensional multiscale model in which a glioma cell is surrounded by normal cells and its migration is controlled by cell-mechanical components in the microenvironment via the regulation of myosin II in response to chemoattractants. Our simulation results show that the myosin II plays a key role in the deformation of the cell nucleus as the glioma cell passes through the narrow intercellular space smaller than its nuclear diameter. We also demonstrate that the coordination of biochemical and mechanical components within the cell enables a glioma cell to take the mode of amoeboid migration. This study sheds lights on the understanding of glioma infiltration through the narrow intercellular spaces and may provide a potential approach for the development of anti-invasion strategies via the injection of chemoattractants for localization. PMID:28166231

  1. Rho1 regulates adherens junction remodeling by promoting recycling endosome formation through activation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hanako; Loza, Andrew J.; Skeath, James B.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Once adherens junctions (AJs) are formed between polarized epithelial cells they must be maintained because AJs are constantly remodeled in dynamic epithelia. AJ maintenance involves endocytosis and subsequent recycling of E-cadherin to a precise location along the basolateral membrane. In the Drosophila pupal eye epithelium, Rho1 GTPase regulates AJ remodeling through Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) endocytosis by limiting Cdc42/Par6/aPKC complex activity. We demonstrate that Rho1 also influences AJ remodeling by regulating the formation of DE-cadherin–containing, Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in Drosophila postmitotic pupal eye epithelia. This effect of Rho1 is mediated through Rok-dependent, but not MLCK-dependent, stimulation of myosin II activity yet independent of its effects upon actin remodeling. Both Rho1 and pMLC localize on endosomal vesicles, suggesting that Rho1 might regulate the formation of recycling endosomes through localized myosin II activation. This work identifies spatially distinct functions for Rho1 in the regulation of DE-cadherin–containing vesicular trafficking during AJ remodeling in live epithelia. PMID:25079692

  2. Nonmuscle Myosin II Regulates the Morphogenesis of Metanephric Mesenchyme-Derived Immature Nephrons.

    PubMed

    Recuenco, Mariam C; Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Taguchi, Atsuhiro; Fujimura, Sayoko; Conti, Mary Anne; Wei, Qize; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Adelstein, Robert S; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2015-05-01

    The kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. The mesenchyme transforms into epithelia and forms complicated nephron structures, whereas the ureteric bud extends its pre-existing epithelial ducts. Although the roles are well established for extracellular stimuli, such as Wnt and Notch, it is unclear how the intracellular cytoskeleton regulates these morphogenetic processes. Myh9 and Myh10 encode nonmuscle myosin II heavy chains, and Myh9 mutations in humans are implicated in congenital kidney diseases and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults. Here, we analyzed the roles of Myh9 and Myh10 in the developing kidney. Ureteric bud-specific depletion of Myh9 resulted in no apparent phenotypes, whereas mesenchyme-specific Myh9 deletion caused proximal tubule dilations and renal failure. Mesenchyme-specific Myh9/Myh10 mutant mice died shortly after birth and showed a severe defect in nephron formation. The nascent mutant nephrons failed to form a continuous lumen, which likely resulted from impaired apical constriction of the elongating tubules. In addition, nephron progenitors lacking Myh9/Myh10 or the possible interactor Kif26b were less condensed at midgestation and reduced at birth. Taken together, nonmuscle myosin II regulates the morphogenesis of immature nephrons derived from the metanephric mesenchyme and the maintenance of nephron progenitors. Our data also suggest that Myh9 deletion in mice results in failure to maintain renal tubules but not in glomerulosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  3. Nonmuscle Myosin II Regulates the Morphogenesis of Metanephric Mesenchyme–Derived Immature Nephrons

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Mariam C.; Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Taguchi, Atsuhiro; Fujimura, Sayoko; Conti, Mary Anne; Wei, Qize; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. The mesenchyme transforms into epithelia and forms complicated nephron structures, whereas the ureteric bud extends its pre-existing epithelial ducts. Although the roles are well established for extracellular stimuli, such as Wnt and Notch, it is unclear how the intracellular cytoskeleton regulates these morphogenetic processes. Myh9 and Myh10 encode nonmuscle myosin II heavy chains, and Myh9 mutations in humans are implicated in congenital kidney diseases and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults. Here, we analyzed the roles of Myh9 and Myh10 in the developing kidney. Ureteric bud-specific depletion of Myh9 resulted in no apparent phenotypes, whereas mesenchyme-specific Myh9 deletion caused proximal tubule dilations and renal failure. Mesenchyme-specific Myh9/Myh10 mutant mice died shortly after birth and showed a severe defect in nephron formation. The nascent mutant nephrons failed to form a continuous lumen, which likely resulted from impaired apical constriction of the elongating tubules. In addition, nephron progenitors lacking Myh9/Myh10 or the possible interactor Kif26b were less condensed at midgestation and reduced at birth. Taken together, nonmuscle myosin II regulates the morphogenesis of immature nephrons derived from the metanephric mesenchyme and the maintenance of nephron progenitors. Our data also suggest that Myh9 deletion in mice results in failure to maintain renal tubules but not in glomerulosclerosis. PMID:25168025

  4. Fibroblast Migration in 3D is Controlled by Haptotaxis in a Non-muscle Myosin II-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arotzena, O; Borau, C; Movilla, N; Vicente-Manzanares, M; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-12-01

    Cell migration in 3D is a key process in many physiological and pathological processes. Although valuable knowledge has been accumulated through analysis of various 2D models, some of these insights are not directly applicable to migration in 3D. In this study, we have confined biomimetic hydrogels within microfluidic platforms in the presence of a chemoattractant (platelet-derived growth factor-BB). We have characterized the migratory responses of human fibroblasts within them, particularly focusing on the role of non-muscle myosin II. Our results indicate a prominent role for myosin II in the integration of chemotactic and haptotactic migratory responses of fibroblasts in 3D confined environments.

  5. Ultraslow myosin molecular motors of placental contractile stem villi in humans.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Lecarpentier, Edouard; Guerin, Catherine; Hébert, Jean-Louis; Arsalane, Abdelilah; Moumen, Abdelouahab; Krokidis, Xénophon; Michel, Francine; Timbely, Oumar

    2014-01-01

    Human placental stem villi (PSV) present contractile properties. In vitro mechanics were investigated in 40 human PSV. Contraction of PSV was induced by both KCl exposure (n = 20) and electrical tetanic stimulation (n = 20). Isotonic contractions were registered at several load levels ranging from zero-load up to isometric load. The tension-velocity relationship was found to be hyperbolic. This made it possible to apply the A. Huxley formalism for determining the rate constants for myosin cross-bridge (CB) attachment and detachment, CB single force, catalytic constant, myosin content, and maximum myosin ATPase activity. These molecular characteristics of myosin CBs did not differ under either KCl exposure or tetanus. A comparative approach was established from studies previously published in the literature and driven by mean of a similar method. As compared to that described in mammalian striated muscles, we showed that in human PSV, myosin CB rate constants for attachment and detachment were about 103 times lower whereas myosin ATPase activity was 105 times lower. Up to now, CB kinetics of contractile cells arranged along the long axis of the placental sheath appeared to be the slowest ever observed in any mammalian contractile tissue.

  6. Analysis of the myosin-II-responsive focal adhesion proteome reveals a role for β-Pix in negative regulation of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Han, Xuemei; Hsiao, Cheng-Te; Yates, John R; Waterman, Clare M

    2011-04-01

    Focal adhesions undergo myosin-II-mediated maturation wherein they grow and change composition to modulate integrin signalling for cell migration, growth and differentiation. To determine how focal adhesion composition is affected by myosin II activity, we performed proteomic analysis of isolated focal adhesions and compared protein abundance in focal adhesions from cells with and without myosin II inhibition. We identified 905 focal adhesion proteins, 459 of which changed in abundance with myosin II inhibition, defining the myosin-II-responsive focal adhesion proteome. The abundance of 73% of the proteins in the myosin-II-responsive focal adhesion proteome was enhanced by contractility, including proteins involved in Rho-mediated focal adhesion maturation and endocytosis- and calpain-dependent focal adhesion disassembly. During myosin II inhibition, 27% of proteins in the myosin-II-responsive focal adhesion proteome, including proteins involved in Rac-mediated lamellipodial protrusion, were enriched in focal adhesions, establishing that focal adhesion protein recruitment is also negatively regulated by contractility. We focused on the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor β-Pix, documenting its role in the negative regulation of focal adhesion maturation and the promotion of lamellipodial protrusion and focal adhesion turnover to drive cell migration. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  7. Switching of actin-myosin motors by voltage-induced pH bias in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kuniyuki; Iwase, Takahiro; Wada, Reito

    2016-08-01

    ATP-driven motor proteins, which function in cell motility and organelle transport, have potential applications as bio-inspired micro-devices; however, their control remains unsatisfactory. Here, we show rapid-velocity control of actin filaments interacting with myosin motors using voltage applied to Pt electrodes in an in vitro motility system, by which immediate increases and decreases in velocity were induced beside the cathode and anode, respectively. Indicator dye revealed pH changes after voltage application, and alternate voltage switching allowed actin filaments to cyclically alter their velocity in response to these changes. This principle provides a basis for on-demand control of not only motor proteins but also pH-sensitive events at a microscopic level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of sea urchin unconventional myosins and analysis of their patterns of expression during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, V; Seipel, S; Krendel, M; Bonder, E M

    2000-10-01

    Early sea urchin development requires a dynamic reorganization of both the actin cytoskeleton and cytoskeletal interactions with cellular membranes. These events may involve the activities of multiple members of the superfamily of myosin motor proteins. Using RT-PCR with degenerate myosin primers, we identified 11 myosin mRNAs expressed in unfertilized eggs and coelomocytes of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Seven of these sea urchin myosins belonged to myosin classes Igamma, II, V, VI, VII, IX, and amoeboid-type I, and the remaining four may be from novel classes. Sea urchin myosins-V, -VI, -VII, and amoeboid-type-I were either completely or partially cloned and their molecular structures characterized. Sea urchin myosins-V, -VI, -VII, and amoeboid-type-I shared a high degree of sequence identity with their respective family members from vertebrates and they retained their class-specific structure and domain organization. Analysis of expression of myosin-V, -VI, -VII, and amoeboid-type-I mRNAs during development revealed that each myosin mRNA displayed a distinct temporal pattern of expression, suggesting that myosins might be involved in specific events of early embryogenesis. Interestingly, the onset of gastrulation appeared to be a pivotal point in modulation of myosin mRNA expression. The presence of multiple myosin mRNAs in eggs and embryos provides insight into the potential involvement of multiple specific motor proteins in the actin-dependent events of embryo development.

  9. Impact of the Motor and Tail Domains of Class III Myosins on Regulating the Formation and Elongation of Actin Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Raval, Manmeet H; Quintero, Omar A; Weck, Meredith L; Unrath, William C; Gallagher, James W; Cui, Runjia; Kachar, Bechara; Tyska, Matthew J; Yengo, Christopher M

    2016-10-21

    Class III myosins (MYO3A and MYO3B) are proposed to function as transporters as well as length and ultrastructure regulators within stable actin-based protrusions such as stereocilia and calycal processes. MYO3A differs from MYO3B in that it contains an extended tail domain with an additional actin-binding motif. We examined how the properties of the motor and tail domains of human class III myosins impact their ability to enhance the formation and elongation of actin protrusions. Direct examination of the motor and enzymatic properties of human MYO3A and MYO3B revealed that MYO3A is a 2-fold faster motor with enhanced ATPase activity and actin affinity. A chimera in which the MYO3A tail was fused to the MYO3B motor demonstrated that motor activity correlates with formation and elongation of actin protrusions. We demonstrate that removal of individual exons (30-34) in the MYO3A tail does not prevent filopodia tip localization but abolishes the ability to enhance actin protrusion formation and elongation in COS7 cells. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that MYO3A slows filopodia dynamics and enhances filopodia lifetime in COS7 cells. We also demonstrate that MYO3A is more efficient than MYO3B at increasing formation and elongation of stable microvilli on the surface of cultured epithelial cells. We propose that the unique features of MYO3A, enhanced motor activity, and an extended tail with tail actin-binding motif, allow it to play an important role in stable actin protrusion length and ultrastructure maintenance.

  10. Evidence of a role for nonmuscle myosin II in herpes simplex virus type 1 egress.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Hans; Elliott, Gill; O'Hare, Peter

    2002-04-01

    After cell entry, herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles are transported through the host cell cytoplasm to nuclear pores. Following replication, newly synthesized virus particles are transported back to the cell periphery via a complex pathway including a cytoplasmic phase involving some form of unenveloped particle. These various transport processes are likely to make use of one or more components of the cellular cytoskeletal systems and associated motor proteins. Here we report that the HSV type 1 (HSV-1) major tegument protein, VP22, interacts with the actin-associated motor protein nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA). HSV-1 infection resulted in reorganization of NMIIA, inducing retraction of NMIIA from the cell periphery and condensation into a spoke-like distribution around the nucleus along with a second effect of accumulation in a perinuclear cluster. VP22 did not appear to colocalize with the reorganized cagelike distribution of NMIIA. However, VP22 has been previously reported to localize in a perinuclear vesicular pattern, and significant overlap was observed between this pattern and the perinuclear clusters of NMIIA. Inhibition of the ATPase activity of NMIIA with the myosin-specific inhibitor butanedione monoxime impaired the formation of the perinuclear vesicular VP22 accumulations and also the release of virus into the extracellular medium while having much less effect on the yield of cell-associated virus. Virus infection frequently results in the induction of highly extended processes emanating from the infected cell, and we observed that VP22-containing particles line up along NMIIA-containing filaments which run through these protrusions.

  11. Phosphorylation of Nonmuscle myosin II-A regulatory light chain resists Sendai virus fusion with host cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Provas; Saha, Shekhar; Chandra, Sunandini; Das, Alakesh; Dey, Sumit K.; Das, Mahua R.; Sen, Shamik; Sarkar, Debi P.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter host cells through membrane fusion and the cells in turn alter their shape to accommodate components of the virus. However, the role of nonmuscle myosin II of the actomyosin complex of host cells in membrane fusion is yet to be understood. Herein, we show that both (−) blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) and small interfering RNA markedly augment fusion of Sendai virus (SeV), with chinese hamster ovary cells and human hepatocarcinoma cells. Inhibition of RLC phosphorylation using inhibitors against ROCK, but not PKC and MRCK, or overexpression of phospho-dead mutant of RLC enhances membrane fusion. SeV infection increases cellular stiffness and myosin light chain phosphorylation at two hour post infection. Taken together, the present investigation strongly indicates that Rho-ROCK-NMII contractility signaling pathway may provide a physical barrier to host cells against viral fusion. PMID:25993465

  12. Contractility parameters of human β-cardiac myosin with the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R403Q show loss of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Suman; Sommese, Ruth F.; Ujfalusi, Zoltan; Combs, Ariana; Langer, Stephen; Sutton, Shirley; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Geeves, Michael A.; Ruppel, Kathleen M.; Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding the force-generating machinery of the cardiac sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin. We present a detailed characterization of the most debated HCM-causing mutation in human β-cardiac myosin, R403Q. Despite numerous studies, most performed with nonhuman or noncardiac myosin, there is no consensus about the mechanism of action of this mutation on the function of the enzyme. We use recombinant human β-cardiac myosin and new methodologies to characterize in vitro contractility parameters of the R403Q myosin compared to wild type. We extend our studies beyond pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin. We find that, with pure actin, the intrinsic force generated by R403Q is ~15% lower than that generated by wild type. The unloaded velocity is, however, ~10% higher for R403Q myosin, resulting in a load-dependent velocity curve that has the characteristics of lower contractility at higher external loads compared to wild type. With regulated actin filaments, there is no increase in the unloaded velocity and the contractility of the R403Q myosin is lower than that of wild type at all loads. Unlike that with pure actin, the actin-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity for R403Q myosin with Ca2+-regulated actin filaments is ~30% lower than that for wild type, predicting a lower unloaded duty ratio of the motor. Overall, the contractility parameters studied fit with a loss of human β-cardiac myosin contractility as a result of the R403Q mutation. PMID:26601291

  13. Contractility parameters of human β-cardiac myosin with the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R403Q show loss of motor function.

    PubMed

    Nag, Suman; Sommese, Ruth F; Ujfalusi, Zoltan; Combs, Ariana; Langer, Stephen; Sutton, Shirley; Leinwand, Leslie A; Geeves, Michael A; Ruppel, Kathleen M; Spudich, James A

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding the force-generating machinery of the cardiac sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin. We present a detailed characterization of the most debated HCM-causing mutation in human β-cardiac myosin, R403Q. Despite numerous studies, most performed with nonhuman or noncardiac myosin, there is no consensus about the mechanism of action of this mutation on the function of the enzyme. We use recombinant human β-cardiac myosin and new methodologies to characterize in vitro contractility parameters of the R403Q myosin compared to wild type. We extend our studies beyond pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin. We find that, with pure actin, the intrinsic force generated by R403Q is ~15% lower than that generated by wild type. The unloaded velocity is, however, ~10% higher for R403Q myosin, resulting in a load-dependent velocity curve that has the characteristics of lower contractility at higher external loads compared to wild type. With regulated actin filaments, there is no increase in the unloaded velocity and the contractility of the R403Q myosin is lower than that of wild type at all loads. Unlike that with pure actin, the actin-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity for R403Q myosin with Ca(2+)-regulated actin filaments is ~30% lower than that for wild type, predicting a lower unloaded duty ratio of the motor. Overall, the contractility parameters studied fit with a loss of human β-cardiac myosin contractility as a result of the R403Q mutation.

  14. Rap1 potentiates endothelial cell junctions by spatially controlling myosin II activity and actin organization.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Moriya, Takahiro; Obara, Yutaro; Nakahata, Norimichi; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2013-09-16

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is responsible for dynamic regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. Circumferential actin bundles (CAB) promote formation of linear adherens junctions (AJs) and tightening of EC junctions, whereas formation of radial stress fibers (RSF) connected to punctate AJs occurs during junction remodeling. The small GTPase Rap1 induces CAB formation to potentiate EC junctions; however, the mechanism underlying Rap1-induced CAB formation remains unknown. Here, we show that myotonic dystrophy kinase-related CDC42-binding kinase (MRCK)-mediated activation of non-muscle myosin II (NM-II) at cell-cell contacts is essential for Rap1-induced CAB formation. Our data suggest that Rap1 induces FGD5-dependent Cdc42 activation at cell-cell junctions to locally activate the NM-II through MRCK, thereby inducing CAB formation. We further reveal that Rap1 suppresses the NM-II activity stimulated by the Rho-ROCK pathway, leading to dissolution of RSF. These findings imply that Rap1 potentiates EC junctions by spatially controlling NM-II activity through activation of the Cdc42-MRCK pathway and suppression of the Rho-ROCK pathway.

  15. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  16. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  17. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    PubMed

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  18. The class I myosin Myo1e regulates TLR4-triggered macrophage spreading, chemokine release and antigen presentation via MHC class II

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Jens; Ouderkirk, Jessica L.; Krendel, Mira; Lang, Roland

    2014-01-01

    TLR-mediated recognition of microbial danger induces substantial changes in macrophage migration, adherence and phagocytosis. Recently, we described the LPS-regulated phosphorylation of many cytoskeleton-associated proteins by phosphoproteomics. The functional role of these cytoskeletal and motor proteins in innate immune cell responses is largely unexplored. Here, we first identified both long-tailed class I myosins Myo1e and Myo1f as important contributors to LPS-triggered macrophage spreading. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) deficient in Myo1e selectively secreted increased amounts of the chemokine CCL2. In addition, the cell surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) on both cell types was reduced in the absence of Myo1e. However, transcriptional changes in CCL2 and MHC-II were not observed in the absence of Myo1e, indicating that Myo1e regulates specific intracellular transport processes. The capacity of macrophages and DCs lacking Myo1e to stimulate antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation was impaired, consistent with the reduced MHC-II surface protein levels. Surprisingly, in Myo1e-deficient DCs, the proteolytic cleavage of endocytosed antigen was also increased. Together, our results provide evidence for a non-redundant function of the motor protein Myo1e in the regulation of TLR4-controlled, cytoskeleton-associated functional properties of macrophages and DCs, and in induction of a full MHC-II-restricted adaptive immune response. PMID:25263281

  19. Myosin Ib modulates the morphology and the protein transport within multi-vesicular sorting endosomes.

    PubMed

    Salas-Cortes, Laura; Ye, Fei; Tenza, Danièle; Wilhelm, Claire; Theos, Alexander; Louvard, Daniel; Raposo, Graça; Coudrier, Evelyne

    2005-10-15

    Members of at least four classes of myosin (I, II, V and VI) have been implicated in the dynamics of a large variety of organelles. Despite their common motor domain structure, some of these myosins, however, are non processive and cannot move organelles along the actin tracks. Here, we demonstrate in the human pigmented MNT-1 cell line that, (1) the overexpression of one of these myosins, myosin 1b, or the addition of cytochalasin D affects the morphology of the sorting multivesicular endosomes; (2) the overexpression of myosin 1b delays the processing of Pmel17 (the product of murine silver locus also named GP100), which occurs in these multivesicular endosomes; (3) myosin 1b associated with endosomes coimmunoprecipitates with Pmel17. All together, these observations suggest that myosin 1b controls the traffic of protein cargo in multivesicular endosomes most probably through its ability to modulate with actin the morphology of these sorting endosomes.

  20. Myosin II filament assemblies in the active lamella of fibroblasts: their morphogenesis and role in the formation of actin filament bundles

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The morphogenesis of myosin II structures in active lamella undergoing net protrusion was analyzed by correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy. In rat embryo fibroblasts (REF 52) microinjected with tetramethylrhodamine-myosin II, nascent myosin spots formed close to the active edge during periods of retraction and then elongated into wavy ribbons of uniform width. The spots and ribbons initially behaved as distinct structural entities but subsequently aligned with each other in a sarcomeric-like pattern. Electron microscopy established that the spots and ribbons consisted of bipolar minifilaments associated with each other at their head-containing ends and arranged in a single row in an "open" zig-zag conformation or as a "closed" parallel stack. Ribbons also contacted each other in a nonsarcomeric, network-like arrangement as described previously (Verkhovsky and Borisy, 1993. J. Cell Biol. 123:637-652). Myosin ribbons were particularly pronounced in REF 52 cells, but small ribbons and networks were found also in a range of other mammalian cells. At the edge of the cell, individual spots and open ribbons were associated with relatively disordered actin filaments. Further from the edge, myosin filament alignment increased in parallel with the development of actin bundles. In actin bundles, the actin cross-linking protein, alpha-actinin, was excluded from sites of myosin localization but concentrated in paired sites flanking each myosin ribbon, suggesting that myosin filament association may initiate a pathway for the formation of actin filament bundles. We propose that zig-zag assemblies of myosin II filaments induce the formation of actin bundles by pulling on an actin filament network and that co-alignment of actin and myosin filaments proceeds via folding of myosin II filament assemblies in an accordion-like fashion. PMID:7490299

  1. Tension regulates myosin dynamics during Drosophila embryonic wound repair.

    PubMed

    Kobb, Anna B; Zulueta-Coarasa, Teresa; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo

    2017-02-15

    Embryos repair epithelial wounds rapidly in a process driven by collective cell movements. Upon wounding, actin and the molecular motor non-muscle myosin II are redistributed in the cells adjacent to the wound, forming a supracellular purse string around the lesion. Purse string contraction coordinates cell movements and drives rapid wound closure. By using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in Drosophila embryos, we found that myosin turns over as the purse string contracts. Myosin turnover at the purse string was slower than in other actomyosin networks that had a lower level of contractility. Mathematical modelling suggested that myosin assembly and disassembly rates were both reduced by tension at the wound edge. We used laser ablation to show that tension at the purse string increased as wound closure progressed, and that the increase in tension was associated with reduced myosin turnover. Reducing purse string tension by laser-mediated severing resulted in increased turnover and loss of myosin. Finally, myosin motor activity was necessary for its stabilization around the wound and for rapid wound closure. Our results indicate that mechanical forces regulate myosin dynamics during embryonic wound repair.

  2. Myosin motor function: the ins and outs of actin-based membrane protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; McConnell, Russell E.

    2011-01-01

    Cells build plasma membrane protrusions supported by parallel bundles of F-actin to enable a wide variety of biological functions, ranging from motility to host defense. Filopodia, microvilli and stereocilia are three such protrusions that have been the focus of intense biological and biophysical investigation in recent years. While it is evident that actin dynamics play a significant role in the formation of these organelles, members of the myosin superfamily have also been implicated as key players in the maintenance of protrusion architecture and function. Based on a simple analysis of the physical forces that control protrusion formation and morphology, as well as our review of available data, we propose that myosins play two general roles within these structures: (1) as cargo transporters to move critical regulatory components toward distal tips and (2) as mediators of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion. PMID:20107861

  3. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Rizal F.; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions. PMID:24591646

  4. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  5. Endothelin-1, but not angiotensin II, induces afferent arteriolar myosin diphosphorylation as a potential contributor to prolonged vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Kosuke; Wang, Xuemei; Kathol, Iris; Loutzenhiser, Kathy; Loutzenhiser, Rodger; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    Bolus administration of endothelin-1 elicits long-lasting renal afferent arteriolar vasoconstriction, in contrast to transient constriction induced by angiotensin II. Vasoconstriction is generally evoked by myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation at Ser19 by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), which is enhanced by Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). LC20 can be diphosphorylated at Ser19 and Thr18, resulting in reduced rates of dephosphorylation and relaxation. Here we tested whether LC20 diphosphorylation contributes to sustained endothelin-1 but not transient angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction. Endothelin-1 treatment of isolated arterioles elicited a concentration- and time-dependent increase in LC20 diphosphorylation at Thr18 and Ser19. Inhibition of MLCK or ROCK reduced endothelin-1-evoked LC20 mono- and diphosphorylation. Pretreatment with an ETB but not an ETA receptor antagonist abolished LC20 diphosphorylation, and an ETB receptor agonist induced LC20 diphosphorylation. In contrast, angiotensin II caused phosphorylation exclusively at Ser19. Thus, endothelin-1 and angiotensin II induce afferent arteriolar constriction via LC20 phosphorylation at Ser19 due to calcium activation of MLCK and ROCK-mediated inhibition of MLCP. Endothelin-1, but not angiotensin II, induces phosphorylation of LC20 at Thr18. This could contribute to the prolonged vasoconstrictor response to endothelin-1.

  6. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Michelle A.; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S.; Sellers, James R.; Fischer, Robert S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A “pulses” occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell–cell or cell–ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase– or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. PMID:27881665

  7. How myosin motors power cellular functions: an exciting journey from structure to function: based on a lecture delivered at the 34th FEBS Congress in Prague, Czech Republic, July 2009.

    PubMed

    Llinas, Paola; Pylypenko, Olena; Isabet, Tatiana; Mukherjea, Monalisa; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors such as myosins are allosteric enzymes that power essential motility functions in the cell. Structural biology is an important tool for deciphering how these motors work. Myosins produce force upon the actin-driven conformational changes controlling the sequential release of the hydrolysis products of ATP (Pi followed by ADP). These conformational changes are amplified by a 'lever arm', which includes the region of the motor known as the converter and the adjacent elongated light chain binding region. Analysis of four structural states of the motor provides a detailed understanding of the rearrangements and pathways of communication in the motor that are necessary for detachment from the actin track and repriming of the motor. However, the important part of the cycle in which force is produced remains enigmatic and awaits new high-resolution structures. The value of a structural approach is particularly evident from clues provided by the structural states of the reverse myosin VI motor. Crystallographic structures have revealed that rearrangements within the converter subdomain occur, which explains why this myosin can produce a large stroke in the opposite direction to all other myosins, despite a very short lever arm. By providing a detailed understanding of the motor rearrangements, structural biology will continue to reveal essential information and help solve current enigma, such as how actin promotes force production, how motors are tuned for specific cellular roles or how motor/cargo interactions regulate the function of myosin in the cell.

  8. Myosin II Isoform Co-assembly and Differential Regulation in Mammalian Systems

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Jordan R.; Hammer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin 2 (NM2) is a major force-producing, actin-based motor in mammalian non-muscle cells, where it plays important roles in a broad range of fundamental biological processes, including cytokinesis, cell migration, and epithelial barrier function.. This breadth of function at the tissue and cellular levels suggests extensive diversity and differential regulation of NM2 bipolar filaments, the major, if not sole, functional form of NM2s in vivo. Previous in vitro, cellular and animal studies indicate that some of this diversity is supported by the existence of multiple NM2 isoforms. Moreover, two recent studies have shown that these isoforms can co-assemble to form heterotypic filaments, further expanding functional diversity. In addition to isoform co-assembly, cells may differentially regulate NM2 function via isoform-specific expression, RLC phosphorylation, MHC phosphorylation or regulation via binding partners. Here, we provide a brief summary of NM2 filament assembly, summarize the recent findings regarding NM2 isoform co-assembly, consider the mechanisms cells might utilize to differentially regulate NM2 isoforms, and review the data available to support these mechanisms. PMID:25655283

  9. A role for non-muscle myosin II function in furrow maturation in the early zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Urven, Lance E; Yabe, Taijiro; Pelegri, Francisco

    2006-10-15

    Cytokinesis in early zebrafish embryos involves coordinated changes in the f-actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeleton, and the recruitment of adhesion junction components to the furrow. We show that exposure to inhibitors of non-muscle myosin II function does not affect furrow ingression during the early cleavage cycles but interferes with the recruitment of pericleavage f-actin and cortical beta-catenin aggregates to the furrow, as well as the remodeling of the furrow microtubule array. This remodeling is in turn required for the distal aggregation of the zebrafish germ plasm. Embryos with reduced myosin activity also exhibit at late stages of cytokinesis a stabilized contractile ring apparatus that appears as a ladder-like pattern of short f-actin cables, supporting a role for myosin function in the disassembly of the contractile ring after furrow formation. Our studies support a role for myosin function in furrow maturation that is independent of furrow ingression and which is essential for the recruitment of furrow components and the remodeling of the cytoskeleton during cytokinesis.

  10. Myosin phosphatase Fine-tunes Zebrafish Motoneuron Position during Axonogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During embryogenesis the spinal cord shifts position along the anterior-posterior axis relative to adjacent tissues. How motor neurons whose cell bodies are located in the spinal cord while their axons reside in adjacent tissues compensate for such tissue shift is not well understood. Using live cell imaging in zebrafish, we show that as motor axons exit from the spinal cord and extend through extracellular matrix produced by adjacent notochord cells, these cells shift several cell diameters caudally. Despite this pronounced shift, individual motoneuron cell bodies stay aligned with their extending axons. We find that this alignment requires myosin phosphatase activity within motoneurons, and that mutations in the myosin phosphatase subunit mypt1 increase myosin phosphorylation causing a displacement between motoneuron cell bodies and their axons. Thus, we demonstrate that spinal motoneurons fine-tune their position during axonogenesis and we identify the myosin II regulatory network as a key regulator. PMID:27855159

  11. Analysis of the myosinII-responsive focal adhesion proteome reveals a role for β-Pix in negative regulation of focal adhesion maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Han, Xuemei; Hsiao, Cheng-Te; Yates, John R.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) undergo myosinII-mediated maturation wherein they grow and change composition to modulate integrin signaling for cell migration, growth and differentiation. To determine how FA composition is modulated by myosinII activity, we performed proteomic analysis of isolated FAs and compared protein abundance in FAs from cells with and without myosinII inhibition. We identified FA 905 proteins, 459 of which changed in FA abundance with myosinII inhibition, defining the myosinII-responsive FA proteome. FA abundance of 73% of proteins was enhanced by contractility, including those involved in Rho-mediated FA maturation and endocytosis- and calpain-dependent FA disassembly. 27% of proteins, including those involved in Rac-mediated lamellipodial protrusion, were enriched in FA by myosinII inhibition, establishing for the first time negative regulation of FA protein recruitment by contractility. We focused on the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, β-PIX, documenting its role in negative regulation of FA maturation and promotion of lamellipodial protrusion, FA turnover to drive cell migration. PMID:21423176

  12. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro.

  13. The ultrastructural organization of actin and myosin II filaments in the contractile ring: new support for an old model of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Henson, John H; Ditzler, Casey E; Germain, Aphnie; Irwin, Patrick M; Vogt, Eric T; Yang, Shucheng; Wu, Xufeng; Shuster, Charles B

    2017-03-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the components and spatial regulation of the contractile ring (CR), the precise ultrastructure of actin and myosin II within the animal cell CR remains an unanswered question. We used superresolution light microscopy and platinum replica transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the structural organization of actin and myosin II in isolated cortical cytoskeletons prepared from dividing sea urchin embryos. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy indicated that within the CR, actin and myosin II filaments were organized into tightly packed linear arrays oriented along the axis of constriction and restricted to a narrow zone within the furrow. In contrast, myosin II filaments in earlier stages of cytokinesis were organized into small, discrete, and regularly spaced clusters. TEM showed that actin within the CR formed a dense and anisotropic array of elongate, antiparallel filaments, whereas myosin II was organized into laterally associated, head-to-head filament chains highly reminiscent of mammalian cell stress fibers. Together these results not only support the canonical "purse-string" model for contractile ring constriction, but also suggest that the CR may be derived from foci of myosin II filaments in a manner similar to what has been demonstrated in fission yeast.

  14. The ultrastructural organization of actin and myosin II filaments in the contractile ring: new support for an old model of cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Henson, John H.; Ditzler, Casey E.; Germain, Aphnie; Irwin, Patrick M.; Vogt, Eric T.; Yang, Shucheng; Wu, Xufeng; Shuster, Charles B.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of the components and spatial regulation of the contractile ring (CR), the precise ultrastructure of actin and myosin II within the animal cell CR remains an unanswered question. We used superresolution light microscopy and platinum replica transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the structural organization of actin and myosin II in isolated cortical cytoskeletons prepared from dividing sea urchin embryos. Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy indicated that within the CR, actin and myosin II filaments were organized into tightly packed linear arrays oriented along the axis of constriction and restricted to a narrow zone within the furrow. In contrast, myosin II filaments in earlier stages of cytokinesis were organized into small, discrete, and regularly spaced clusters. TEM showed that actin within the CR formed a dense and anisotropic array of elongate, antiparallel filaments, whereas myosin II was organized into laterally associated, head-to-head filament chains highly reminiscent of mammalian cell stress fibers. Together these results not only support the canonical “purse-string” model for contractile ring constriction, but also suggest that the CR may be derived from foci of myosin II filaments in a manner similar to what has been demonstrated in fission yeast. PMID:28057763

  15. Cofilin Regulates Nuclear Architecture through a Myosin-II Dependent Mechanotransduction Module.

    PubMed

    Wiggan, O'Neil; Schroder, Bryce; Krapf, Diego; Bamburg, James R; DeLuca, Jennifer G

    2017-01-19

    Structural features of the nucleus including shape, size and deformability impact its function affecting normal cellular processes such as cell differentiation and pathological conditions such as tumor cell migration. Despite the fact that abnormal nuclear morphology has long been a defining characteristic for diseases such as cancer relatively little is known about the mechanisms that control normal nuclear architecture. Mounting evidence suggests close coupling between F-actin cytoskeletal organization and nuclear morphology however, mechanisms regulating this coupling are lacking. Here we identify that Cofilin/ADF-family F-actin remodeling proteins are essential for normal nuclear structure in different cell types. siRNA mediated silencing of Cofilin/ADF provokes striking nuclear defects including aberrant shapes, nuclear lamina disruption and reductions to peripheral heterochromatin. We provide evidence that these anomalies are primarily due to Rho kinase (ROCK) controlled excessive contractile myosin-II activity and not to elevated F-actin polymerization. Furthermore, we demonstrate a requirement for nuclear envelope LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex proteins together with lamin A/C for nuclear aberrations induced by Cofilin/ADF loss. Our study elucidates a pivotal regulatory mechanism responsible for normal nuclear structure and which is expected to fundamentally influence nuclear function.

  16. Cofilin Regulates Nuclear Architecture through a Myosin-II Dependent Mechanotransduction Module

    PubMed Central

    Wiggan, O’Neil; Schroder, Bryce; Krapf, Diego; Bamburg, James R.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2017-01-01

    Structural features of the nucleus including shape, size and deformability impact its function affecting normal cellular processes such as cell differentiation and pathological conditions such as tumor cell migration. Despite the fact that abnormal nuclear morphology has long been a defining characteristic for diseases such as cancer relatively little is known about the mechanisms that control normal nuclear architecture. Mounting evidence suggests close coupling between F-actin cytoskeletal organization and nuclear morphology however, mechanisms regulating this coupling are lacking. Here we identify that Cofilin/ADF-family F-actin remodeling proteins are essential for normal nuclear structure in different cell types. siRNA mediated silencing of Cofilin/ADF provokes striking nuclear defects including aberrant shapes, nuclear lamina disruption and reductions to peripheral heterochromatin. We provide evidence that these anomalies are primarily due to Rho kinase (ROCK) controlled excessive contractile myosin-II activity and not to elevated F-actin polymerization. Furthermore, we demonstrate a requirement for nuclear envelope LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex proteins together with lamin A/C for nuclear aberrations induced by Cofilin/ADF loss. Our study elucidates a pivotal regulatory mechanism responsible for normal nuclear structure and which is expected to fundamentally influence nuclear function. PMID:28102353

  17. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Sellers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds. PMID:26827725

  18. MYOSIN IIB REGULATES ACTIN DYNAMICS DURING SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY AND MEMORY FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Rex, Christopher S.; Gavin, Cristin F.; Rubio, Maria D.; Kramar, Eniko A.; Chen, Lulu Y.; Jia, Yousheng; Huganir, Richard L.; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Gall, Christine M.; Miller, Courtney A.; Lynch, Gary; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is essential for synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Presently, the mechanisms that trigger actin dynamics during these brain processes are poorly understood. In this study, we show that myosin II motor activity is downstream of LTP induction and is necessary for the emergence of specialized actin structures that stabilize an early phase of LTP. We also demonstrate that myosin II activity contributes importantly to an actin-dependent process that underlies memory consolidation. Pharmacological treatments that promote actin polymerization reversed the effects of a myosin II inhibitor on LTP and memory. We conclude that myosin II motors regulate plasticity by imparting mechanical forces onto the spine actin cytoskeleton in response to synaptic stimulation. These cytoskeletal forces trigger the emergence of actin structures that stabilize synaptic plasticity. Our studies provide a novel mechanical framework for understanding cytoskeletal dynamics associated with synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:20797537

  19. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C.; Schindler, Tony D.; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears—speed up, slow down or switch directions—when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport.

  20. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  1. A Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 Isoform Controls Myosin II-Mediated Cell Migration and Matrix Assembly by Trapping ROCK II

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wait, Robin; Couchman, John R.; Wewer, Ulla M.

    2012-01-01

    Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) is known as a regulator of neuronal polarity and differentiation through microtubule assembly and trafficking. Here, we show that CRMP-2 is ubiquitously expressed and a splice variant (CRMP-2L), which is expressed mainly in epithelial cells among nonneuronal cells, regulates myosin II-mediated cellular functions, including cell migration. While the CRMP-2 short form (CRMP-2S) is recognized as a substrate of the Rho-GTP downstream kinase ROCK in neuronal cells, a CRMP-2 complex containing 2L not only bound the catalytic domain of ROCK II through two binding domains but also trapped and inhibited the kinase. CRMP-2L protein levels profoundly affected haptotactic migration and the actin-myosin cytoskeleton of carcinoma cells as well as nontransformed epithelial cell migration in a ROCK activity-dependent manner. Moreover, the ectopic expression of CRMP-2L but not -2S inhibited fibronectin matrix assembly in fibroblasts. Underlying these responses, CRMP-2L regulated the kinase activity of ROCK II but not ROCK I, independent of GTP-RhoA levels. This study provides a new insight into CRMP-2 as a controller of myosin II-mediated cellular functions through the inhibition of ROCK II in nonneuronal cells. PMID:22431514

  2. Mesenchymal chemotaxis requires selective inactivation of myosin II at the leading edge via a noncanonical PLCγ/PKCα pathway.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Sreeja B; Johnson, Heath E; Rahman, Anisur; King, Samantha J; Rotty, Jeremy D; Lebedeva, Irina P; Haugh, Jason M; Bear, James E

    2014-12-22

    Chemotaxis, migration toward soluble chemical cues, is critical for processes such as wound healing and immune surveillance and is exhibited by various cell types, from rapidly migrating leukocytes to slow-moving mesenchymal cells. To study mesenchymal chemotaxis, we observed cell migration in microfluidic chambers that generate stable gradients of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Surprisingly, we found that pathways implicated in amoeboid chemotaxis, such as PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, are dispensable for PDGF chemotaxis. Instead, we find that local inactivation of Myosin IIA, through a noncanonical Ser1/2 phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain, is essential. This site is phosphorylated by PKCα, which is activated by an intracellular gradient of diacylglycerol generated by PLCγ. Using a combination of live imaging and gradients of activators/inhibitors in the microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate that this signaling pathway and subsequent inhibition of Myosin II activity at the leading edge are required for mesenchymal chemotaxis.

  3. Release of Nonmuscle Myosin II from the Cytosolic Domain of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Is Required for Target Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Dechert, Lisa; Davidson, Uchechukwu I.; Waitkus, Matthew; Mavrakis, Lori; Lyons, Katherine; Beach, Jordan R.; Li, Xiaoxia; Egelhoff, Thomas T.; Fox, Paul L.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) elicits its biological activities through activation of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1, also known as p55) and TNFR2 (also known as p75). The activities of both receptors are required for the TNF-α–induced proinflammatory response. The adaptor protein TNFR-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is critical for either p55- or p75-mediated activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as for target gene expression. Here, we identified nonmuscle myosin II (myosin) as a binding partner of p75. TNF-α–dependent signaling by p75 and induction of target gene expression persisted for substantially longer in cells deficient in myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC, a component of myosin) than in cells replete in myosin. In resting endothelial cells, myosin was bound constitutively to the intracellular region of p75, a region that overlaps with the TRAF2-binding domain, and TNF-α caused the rapid dissociation of myosin from p75. At early time points after exposure to TNF-α, p75 activated Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1). Inhibition of ROCK1 activity blocked TNF-α–dependent phosphorylation of MRLC and the dissociation of myosin from p75. ROCK1-dependent release of myosin was necessary for the TNF-α–dependent recruitment of TRAF2 to p75 and for p75-specific activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Thus, our findings have revealed a previously uncharacterized, noncanonical regulatory function of myosin in cytokine signaling. PMID:23861542

  4. Cooperation between the two heads of smooth muscle myosin is essential for full activation of the motor function by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong-Na; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Li, Jing; Lu, Zekuan; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert; Li, Xiang-dong

    2013-09-10

    The motor function of smooth muscle myosin (SmM) is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) bound to the neck region of the SmM heavy chain. It is generally accepted that unphosphorylated RLC induces interactions between the two heads and between the head and the tail, thus inhibiting the motor activity of SmM, whereas phosphorylation of RLC interrupts those interactions, thus reversing the inhibition and restoring the motor activity to the maximal value. One assumption of this model is that single-headed SmM is fully active regardless of phosphorylation. To re-evaluate this model, we produced a number of SmM constructs with coiled coils of various lengths and examined their structure and regulation. With these constructs we identified the segment in the coiled-coil key for the formation of a stable double-headed structure. In agreement with the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of unphosphorylated SmM increased with shortening of the coiled-coil. However, contrary to the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of phosphorylated SmM decreased with shortening coiled-coil and only the stable double-headed SmM was fully activated by phosphorylation. These results indicate that single-headed SmM is neither fully active nor fully inhibited. Based on our findings, we propose that cooperation between the two heads is essential, not only for the inhibition of unphosphorylated SmM, but also for the activation of phosphorylated SmM.

  5. Role of Nonmuscle Myosin II in Migration of Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sneha; Saha, Shekhar; Roy, Saheli; Das, Madhurima; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    It is the promise of regeneration and therapeutic applications that has sparked an interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Following infusion, MSCs migrate to sites of injury or inflammation by virtue of their homing property. To exert optimal clinical benefits, systemically delivered MSCs need to migrate efficiently and in adequate numbers to pathological areas in vivo. However, underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for MSC migration are still not well understood. The Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord is an attractive source of MSCs for stem cell therapy because of its abundant availability and painless collection. In this study, we attempted to identify the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII), if any, in the migration of WJ-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). Expression of NMII isoforms, NMIIA, and NMIIB was observed both at RNA and protein levels in WJ-MSCs. Inhibition of NMII or its regulator ROCK, by pharmacological inhibitors, resulted in significant reduction in the migration of WJ-MSCs as confirmed by the scratch migration assay and time-lapse microscopy. Next, trying to dissect the role of each NMII isoform in migration of WJ-MSCs, we found that siRNA-mediated downregulation of NMIIA, but not NMIIB expression, led to cells failing to retract their trailing edge and losing cell–cell cohesiveness, while exhibiting a nondirectional migratory pathway. Migration, moreover, is also dependent on optimal affinity adhesion, which would allow rapid attachment and release of cells and, hence, can be influenced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules. We demonstrated that inhibition of NMII and more specifically NMIIA resulted in increased gene expression of ECM and adhesion molecules, which possibly led to stronger adhesions and, hence, decreased migration. Therefore, these data suggest that NMII acts as a regulator of cell migration and adhesion in WJ-MSCs. PMID:25923805

  6. Cortical mechanics and myosin-II abnormalities associated with post-ovulatory aging: implications for functional defects in aged eggs

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Amelia C.L.; Kyle, Diane D.; McGinnis, Lauren A.; Lee, Hyo J.; Aldana, Nathalia; Robinson, Douglas N.; Evans, Janice P.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY HYPOTHESIS Cellular aging of the egg following ovulation, also known as post-ovulatory aging, is associated with aberrant cortical mechanics and actomyosin cytoskeleton functions. STUDY FINDING Post-ovulatory aging is associated with dysfunction of non-muscle myosin-II, and pharmacologically induced myosin-II dysfunction produces some of the same deficiencies observed in aged eggs. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Reproductive success is reduced with delayed fertilization and when copulation or insemination occurs at increased times after ovulation. Post-ovulatory aged eggs have several abnormalities in the plasma membrane and cortex, including reduced egg membrane receptivity to sperm, aberrant sperm-induced cortical remodeling and formation of fertilization cones at the site of sperm entry, and reduced ability to establish a membrane block to prevent polyspermic fertilization. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Ovulated mouse eggs were collected at 21–22 h post-human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) (aged eggs) or at 13–14 h post-hCG (young eggs), or young eggs were treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, to test the hypothesis that disruption of myosin-II function could mimic some of the effects of post-ovulatory aging. Eggs were subjected to various analyses. Cytoskeletal proteins in eggs and parthenogenesis were assessed using fluorescence microscopy, with further analysis of cytoskeletal proteins in immunoblotting experiments. Cortical tension was measured through micropipette aspiration assays. Egg membrane receptivity to sperm was assessed in in vitro fertilization (IVF) assays. Membrane topography was examined by low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Aged eggs have decreased levels and abnormal localizations of phosphorylated myosin-II regulatory light chain (pMRLC; P = 0.0062). Cortical tension, which is mediated in part by myosin-II, is reduced in aged mouse eggs when compared with

  7. Chitin synthases with a myosin motor-like domain control the resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to echinocandins.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Muszkieta, Laetitia; Mouyna, Isabelle; Alsteens, David; Pire, Stéphane; Beau, Remi; Krappmann, Sven; Beauvais, Anne; Dufrêne, Yves F; Roncero, César; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus has two chitin synthases (CSMA and CSMB) with a myosin motor-like domain (MMD) arranged in a head-to-head configuration. To understand the function of these chitin synthases, single and double csm mutant strains were constructed and analyzed. Although there was a slight reduction in mycelial growth of the mutants, the total chitin synthase activity and the cell wall chitin content were similar in the mycelium of all of the mutants and the parental strain. In the conidia, chitin content in the ΔcsmA strain cell wall was less than half the amount found in the parental strain. In contrast, the ΔcsmB mutant strain and, unexpectedly, the ΔcsmA/ΔcsmB mutant strain did not show any modification of chitin content in their conidial cell walls. In contrast to the hydrophobic conidia of the parental strain, conidia of all of the csm mutants were hydrophilic due to the presence of an amorphous material covering the hydrophobic surface-rodlet layer. The deletion of CSM genes also resulted in an increased susceptibility of resting and germinating conidia to echinocandins. These results show that the deletion of the CSMA and CSMB genes induced a significant disorganization of the cell wall structure, even though they contribute only weakly to the overall cell wall chitin synthesis.

  8. Chitin Synthases with a Myosin Motor-Like Domain Control the Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to Echinocandins

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Muszkieta, Laetitia; Mouyna, Isabelle; Alsteens, David; Pire, Stéphane; Beau, Remi; Krappmann, Sven; Beauvais, Anne; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus has two chitin synthases (CSMA and CSMB) with a myosin motor-like domain (MMD) arranged in a head-to-head configuration. To understand the function of these chitin synthases, single and double csm mutant strains were constructed and analyzed. Although there was a slight reduction in mycelial growth of the mutants, the total chitin synthase activity and the cell wall chitin content were similar in the mycelium of all of the mutants and the parental strain. In the conidia, chitin content in the ΔcsmA strain cell wall was less than half the amount found in the parental strain. In contrast, the ΔcsmB mutant strain and, unexpectedly, the ΔcsmA/ΔcsmB mutant strain did not show any modification of chitin content in their conidial cell walls. In contrast to the hydrophobic conidia of the parental strain, conidia of all of the csm mutants were hydrophilic due to the presence of an amorphous material covering the hydrophobic surface-rodlet layer. The deletion of CSM genes also resulted in an increased susceptibility of resting and germinating conidia to echinocandins. These results show that the deletion of the CSMA and CSMB genes induced a significant disorganization of the cell wall structure, even though they contribute only weakly to the overall cell wall chitin synthesis. PMID:22964252

  9. Heterotrimeric Kinesin II Is the Microtubule Motor Protein Responsible for Pigment Dispersion in Xenopus Melanophores

    PubMed Central

    Tuma, M. Carolina; Zill, Andrew; Le Bot, Nathalie; Vernos, Isabelle; Gelfand, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    Melanophores move pigment organelles (melanosomes) from the cell center to the periphery and vice-versa. These bidirectional movements require cytoplasmic microtubules and microfilaments and depend on the function of microtubule motors and a myosin. Earlier we found that melanosomes purified from Xenopus melanophores contain the plus end microtubule motor kinesin II, indicating that it may be involved in dispersion (Rogers, S.L., I.S. Tint, P.C. Fanapour, and V.I. Gelfand. 1997. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 94: 3720–3725). Here, we generated a dominant-negative construct encoding green fluorescent protein fused to the stalk-tail region of Xenopus kinesin-like protein 3 (Xklp3), the 95-kD motor subunit of Xenopus kinesin II, and introduced it into melanophores. Overexpression of the fusion protein inhibited pigment dispersion but had no effect on aggregation. To control for the specificity of this effect, we studied the kinesin-dependent movement of lysosomes. Neither dispersion of lysosomes in acidic conditions nor their clustering under alkaline conditions was affected by the mutant Xklp3. Furthermore, microinjection of melanophores with SUK4, a function-blocking kinesin antibody, inhibited dispersion of lysosomes but had no effect on melanosome transport. We conclude that melanosome dispersion is powered by kinesin II and not by conventional kinesin. This paper demonstrates that kinesin II moves membrane-bound organelles. PMID:9852150

  10. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  11. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross- absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations of atrial muscle fibers were distinguished in the bovine heart: (a) fibers reactive with anti-bAm and unreactive with anti-bVm, like most fibers in the left atrium; (b) fibers reactive with both antibodies, especially numerous in the right atrium; (c) fibers reactive with anti-bVm and unreactive with anti-bAm, present only in the interatrial septum and in specific regions of the right atrium, such as the crista terminalis. These findings can be accounted for by postulating the existence of two distinct types of atrial myosin heavy chains, one of which is antigenically related to ventricular myosin. The tendency for fibers labeled by anti-bVm to occur frequently in bundles and their preferential distribution in the crista terminalis, namely along one of the main conduction pathways between the sinus node and the atrioventricular node, and in the interatrial septum, where different internodal tracts are known to converge, suggests that these fibers may be specialized for faster conduction. PMID:6218175

  12. Myosin II ATPase Activity Mediates the Long-Term Potentiation-Induced Exodus of Stable F-Actin Bound by Drebrin A from Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement. PMID:24465547

  13. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Mizui, Toshiyuki; Sekino, Yuko; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Yuta; Takahashi, Hideto; Kojima, Nobuhiko; Kojima, Masami; Shirao, Tomoaki

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin) from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1) chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2) Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3) the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  14. Cell rigidity and shape override CD47’s “self”-signaling in phagocytosis by hyperactivating myosin-II

    PubMed Central

    Sosale, Nisha G.; Rouhiparkouhi, Tahereh; Bradshaw, Andrew M.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    A macrophage engulfs another cell or foreign particle in an adhesive process that often activates myosin-II, unless the macrophage also engages “marker of self” CD47 that inhibits myosin. For many cell types, adhesion-induced activation of myosin-II is maximized by adhesion to a rigid rather than a flexible substrate. Here we demonstrate that rigidity of a phagocytosed cell also hyperactivates myosin-II, which locally overwhelms self-signaling at a phagocytic synapse. Cell stiffness is one among many factors including shape that changes in erythropoiesis, in senescence and in diseases ranging from inherited anemias and malaria to cancer. Controlled stiffening of normal human red blood cells (RBCs) in different shapes does not compromise CD47’s interaction with the macrophage self-recognition receptor signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA). Uptake of antibody-opsonized RBCs is always fastest with rigid RBC discocytes, which also show that maximal active myosin-II at the synapse can dominate self-signaling by CD47. Rigid but rounded RBC stomatocytes signal self better than rigid RBC discocytes, highlighting the effects of shape on CD47 inhibition. Physical properties of phagocytic targets thus regulate self signaling, as is relevant to erythropoiesis, to clearance of rigid RBCs after blood storage, clearance of rigid pathological cells such as thalassemic or sickle cells, and even to interactions of soft/stiff cancer cells with macrophages. PMID:25411427

  15. Myosin Vc Interacts with Rab32 and Rab38 Proteins and Works in the Biogenesis and Secretion of Melanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Bultema, Jarred J.; Boyle, Judith A.; Malenke, Parker B.; Martin, Faye E.; Dell'Angelica, Esteban C.; Cheney, Richard E.; Di Pietro, Santiago M.

    2014-01-01

    Class V myosins are actin-based motors with conserved functions in vesicle and organelle trafficking. Herein we report the discovery of a function for Myosin Vc in melanosome biogenesis as an effector of melanosome-associated Rab GTPases. We isolated Myosin Vc in a yeast two-hybrid screening for proteins that interact with Rab38, a Rab protein involved in the biogenesis of melanosomes and other lysosome-related organelles. Rab38 and its close homolog Rab32 bind to Myosin Vc but not to Myosin Va or Myosin Vb. Binding depends on residues in the switch II region of Rab32 and Rab38 and regions of the Myosin Vc coiled-coil tail domain. Myosin Vc also interacts with Rab7a and Rab8a but not with Rab11, Rab17, and Rab27. Although Myosin Vc is not particularly abundant on pigmented melanosomes, its knockdown in MNT-1 melanocytes caused defects in the trafficking of integral membrane proteins to melanosomes with substantially increased surface expression of Tyrp1, nearly complete loss of Tyrp2, and significant Vamp7 mislocalization. Knockdown of Myosin Vc in MNT-1 cells more than doubled the abundance of pigmented melanosomes but did not change the number of unpigmented melanosomes. Together the data demonstrate a novel role for Myosin Vc in melanosome biogenesis and secretion. PMID:25324551

  16. Cortical Mechanics and Meiosis II Completion in Mammalian Oocytes Are Mediated by Myosin-II and Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Stephanie M.; Lee, Hyo J.; Hung, Pei-hsuan; Matthews, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Cell division is inherently mechanical, with cell mechanics being a critical determinant governing the cell shape changes that accompany progression through the cell cycle. The mechanical properties of symmetrically dividing mitotic cells have been well characterized, whereas the contribution of cellular mechanics to the strikingly asymmetric divisions of female meiosis is very poorly understood. Progression of the mammalian oocyte through meiosis involves remodeling of the cortex and proper orientation of the meiotic spindle, and thus we hypothesized that cortical tension and stiffness would change through meiotic maturation and fertilization to facilitate and/or direct cellular remodeling. This work shows that tension in mouse oocytes drops about sixfold during meiotic maturation from prophase I to metaphase II and then increases ∼1.6-fold upon fertilization. The metaphase II egg is polarized, with tension differing ∼2.5-fold between the cortex over the meiotic spindle and the opposite cortex, suggesting that meiotic maturation is accompanied by assembly of a cortical domain with stiffer mechanics as part of the process to achieve asymmetric cytokinesis. We further demonstrate that actin, myosin-II, and the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) family of proteins are enriched in complementary cortical domains and mediate cellular mechanics in mammalian eggs. Manipulation of actin, myosin-II, and ERM function alters tension levels and also is associated with dramatic spindle abnormalities with completion of meiosis II after fertilization. Thus, myosin-II and ERM proteins modulate mechanical properties in oocytes, contributing to cell polarity and to completion of meiosis. PMID:20660156

  17. Mammalian myosin-18A, a highly divergent myosin.

    PubMed

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Yang, Yi; Knight, Peter J; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R

    2013-03-29

    The Mus musculus myosin-18A gene is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, α and β, with reported roles in Golgi localization, in maintenance of cytoskeleton, and as receptors for immunological surfactant proteins. Both myosin-18A isoforms feature a myosin motor domain, a single predicted IQ motif, and a long coiled-coil reminiscent of myosin-2. The myosin-18Aα isoform, additionally, has an N-terminal PDZ domain. Recombinant heavy meromyosin- and subfragment-1 (S1)-like constructs for both myosin-18Aα and -18β species were purified from the baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system. These constructs bound both essential and regulatory light chains, indicating an additional noncanonical light chain binding site in the neck. Myosin-18Aα-S1 and -18Aβ-S1 molecules bound actin weakly with Kd values of 4.9 and 54 μm, respectively. The actin binding data could be modeled by assuming an equilibrium between two myosin conformations, a competent and an incompetent form to bind actin. Actin binding was unchanged by presence of nucleotide. Both myosin-18A isoforms bound N-methylanthraniloyl-nucleotides, but the rate of ATP hydrolysis was very slow (<0.002 s(-1)) and not significantly enhanced by actin. Phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain had no effect on ATP hydrolysis, and neither did the addition of tropomyosin or of GOLPH3, a myosin-18A binding partner. Electron microscopy of myosin-18A-S1 showed that the lever is strongly angled with respect to the long axis of the motor domain, suggesting a pre-power stroke conformation regardless of the presence of ATP. These data lead us to conclude that myosin-18A does not operate as a traditional molecular motor in cells.

  18. Mammalian Myosin-18A, a Highly Divergent Myosin

    PubMed Central

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Heissler, Sarah M.; Billington, Neil; Takagi, Yasuharu; Yang, Yi; Knight, Peter J.; Homsher, Earl; Sellers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The Mus musculus myosin-18A gene is expressed as two alternatively spliced isoforms, α and β, with reported roles in Golgi localization, in maintenance of cytoskeleton, and as receptors for immunological surfactant proteins. Both myosin-18A isoforms feature a myosin motor domain, a single predicted IQ motif, and a long coiled-coil reminiscent of myosin-2. The myosin-18Aα isoform, additionally, has an N-terminal PDZ domain. Recombinant heavy meromyosin- and subfragment-1 (S1)-like constructs for both myosin-18Aα and -18β species were purified from the baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system. These constructs bound both essential and regulatory light chains, indicating an additional noncanonical light chain binding site in the neck. Myosin-18Aα-S1 and -18Aβ-S1 molecules bound actin weakly with Kd values of 4.9 and 54 μm, respectively. The actin binding data could be modeled by assuming an equilibrium between two myosin conformations, a competent and an incompetent form to bind actin. Actin binding was unchanged by presence of nucleotide. Both myosin-18A isoforms bound N-methylanthraniloyl-nucleotides, but the rate of ATP hydrolysis was very slow (<0.002 s−1) and not significantly enhanced by actin. Phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain had no effect on ATP hydrolysis, and neither did the addition of tropomyosin or of GOLPH3, a myosin-18A binding partner. Electron microscopy of myosin-18A-S1 showed that the lever is strongly angled with respect to the long axis of the motor domain, suggesting a pre-power stroke conformation regardless of the presence of ATP. These data lead us to conclude that myosin-18A does not operate as a traditional molecular motor in cells. PMID:23382379

  19. Planar polarization of Vangl2 in the vertebrate neural plate is controlled by Wnt and Myosin II signaling.

    PubMed

    Ossipova, Olga; Kim, Kyeongmi; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2015-04-24

    The vertebrate neural tube forms as a result of complex morphogenetic movements, which require the functions of several core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins, including Vangl2 and Prickle. Despite the importance of these proteins for neurulation, their subcellular localization and the mode of action have remained largely unknown. Here we describe the anteroposterior planar cell polarity (AP-PCP) of the cells in the Xenopus neural plate. At the neural midline, the Vangl2 protein is enriched at anterior cell edges and that this localization is directed by Prickle, a Vangl2-interacting protein. Our further analysis is consistent with the model, in which Vangl2 AP-PCP is established in the neural plate as a consequence of Wnt-dependent phosphorylation. Additionally, we uncover feedback regulation of Vangl2 polarity by Myosin II, reiterating a role for mechanical forces in PCP. These observations indicate that both Wnt signaling and Myosin II activity regulate cell polarity and cell behaviors during vertebrate neurulation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  1. Targeting a dynamic protein-protein interaction: fragment screening against the malaria myosin A motor complex.

    PubMed

    Douse, Christopher H; Vrielink, Nina; Wenlin, Zhang; Cota, Ernesto; Tate, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    Motility is a vital feature of the complex life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the apicomplexan parasite that causes human malaria. Processes such as host cell invasion are thought to be powered by a conserved actomyosin motor (containing myosin A or myoA), correct localization of which is dependent on a tight interaction with myosin A tail domain interacting protein (MTIP) at the inner membrane of the parasite. Although disruption of this protein-protein interaction represents an attractive means to investigate the putative roles of myoA-based motility and to inhibit the parasitic life cycle, no small molecules have been identified that bind to MTIP. Furthermore, it has not been possible to obtain a crystal structure of the free protein, which is highly dynamic and unstable in the absence of its natural myoA tail partner. Herein we report the de novo identification of the first molecules that bind to and stabilize MTIP via a fragment-based, integrated biophysical approach and structural investigations to examine the binding modes of hit compounds. The challenges of targeting such a dynamic system with traditional fragment screening workflows are addressed throughout.

  2. Tubule-Guided Cell-to-Cell Movement of a Plant Virus Requires Class XI Myosin Motors

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Lerich, Alexander; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Dolja, Valerian V.; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of plant viruses occurs via plasmodesmata (PD), organelles that evolved to facilitate intercellular communications. Viral movement proteins (MP) modify PD to allow passage of the virus particles or nucleoproteins. This passage occurs via several distinct mechanisms one of which is MP-dependent formation of the tubules that traverse PD and provide a conduit for virion translocation. The MP of tubule-forming viruses including Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) recruit the plant PD receptors called Plasmodesmata Located Proteins (PDLP) to mediate tubule assembly and virus movement. Here we show that PDLP1 is transported to PD through a specific route within the secretory pathway in a myosin-dependent manner. This transport relies primarily on the class XI myosins XI-K and XI-2. Inactivation of these myosins using dominant negative inhibition results in mislocalization of PDLP and MP and suppression of GFLV movement. We also found that the proper targeting of specific markers of the Golgi apparatus, the plasma membrane, PD, lipid raft subdomains within the plasma membrane, and the tonoplast was not affected by myosin XI-K inhibition. However, the normal tonoplast dynamics required myosin XI-K activity. These results reveal a new pathway of the myosin-dependent protein trafficking to PD that is hijacked by GFLV to promote tubule-guided transport of this virus between plant cells. PMID:22046131

  3. Actin Age Orchestrates Myosin-5 and Myosin-6 Runlengths

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies where motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and the two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1–3]. Myosin-5 walks towards the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks towards the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling towards the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3 to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, while myosin-6 takes 1.7 to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  4. Cyclical compressive stress induces differentiation of rat primary mandibular condylar chondrocytes through phosphorylated myosin light chain II.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limin; Chen, Lin; Mai, Zhihui; Peng, Zhuli; Yu, Kafung; Liu, Guanqi; Ai, Hong

    2016-11-01

    The role of myosin light chain II (MLC‑II) in cellular differentiation of rat mandibular condylar chondrocytes (MCCs) induced by cyclical uniaxial compressive stress (CUCS) remains unclear. In the current study, a four‑point bending system was used to apply CUCS to primary cultured MCCs from rats. It was identified that CUCS stimulated features of cellular differentiation including morphological alterations, cytoskeleton rearrangement and overproduction of proteoglycans. Furthermore, CUCS promoted runt‑related transcription factor‑2 (RUNX2) expression at mRNA (P<0.01) and protein levels (P<0.05) and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (P<0.01), which are both markers of osteogenic differentiation. Under conditions of stress, western blotting indicated that the ratio of phosphorylated MLC‑II to total MLC‑II was increased significantly (P<0.05). Silencing MLC‑II by RNA interference reduced ALP activity (P<0.01), and eliminated RUNX2 mRNA expression (P<0.01). Addition of the MLC kinase inhibitor, ML‑7, reduced the CUCS‑associated upregulation of RUNX2 expression (P<0.01) and ALP activity (P<0.01). The data indicated that CUCS promoted cellular differentiation of rat primary MCCs, and this was suggested to be via the phosphorylation of MLC‑II.

  5. Dasatinib reversibly disrupts endothelial vascular integrity by increasing non-muscle myosin II contractility in a ROCK-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kreutzman, Anna; Colom-Fernández, Beatriz; Marcos Jiménez, Ana; Ilander, Mette; Cuesta-Mateos, Carlos; Perez-García, Yaiza; Delgado Arévalo, Cristina; Brück, Oscar; Hakanen, Henna; Saarela, Jani; Ortega-Carrión, Alvaro; de Rosendo, Ana; Juanes-García, Alba; Steegmann, Juan Luis; Mustjoki, Satu; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Muñoz-Calleja, Cecilia

    2017-08-18

    Dasatinib is a short-acting dual ABL/SRC family tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), which is frequently used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia. Although very effective, dasatinib often displays severe adverse effects, including pleural effusions and increased risk of bleeding primarily in the gastrointestinal tract. The actual causes of these side effects are currently undetermined. We hypothesize that endothelial cells (ECs) that line the inner walls of blood vessels and control the traffic to the underlying tissues, might be involved. The effects of TKIs on ECs were studied by various assays, such as real-time cell impedance measurements, live-cell microscopy, wound healing, western blot and an in vivo model. Dasatinib uniquely causes a profound, dose-dependent disorganization of the EC monolayers. Dasatinib promoted the disassembly of cell-cell contacts, altered cell-matrix contacts and further altered the wound healing. A key observation is that this effect is fully reversible after drug washout. In line with these in vitro observations, intraperitoneal administration of dasatinib to mice caused significant vascular leakage in the intestine. The underlying molecular mechanism of dasatinib-induced reorganization of the actin involves ROCK activation, which increases the amount of the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and consequently activates the non-muscle myosin II. Our data are consistent with a scenario in which dasatinib triggers a transient increase in vascular leakage that probably contributes to adverse effects such as bleeding diathesis and pleural effusions. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Genetic analysis demonstrates a direct link between rho signaling and nonmuscle myosin function during Drosophila morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Halsell, S R; Chu, B I; Kiehart, D P

    2000-01-01

    A dynamic actomyosin cytoskeleton drives many morphogenetic events. Conventional nonmuscle myosin-II (myosin) is a key chemomechanical motor that drives contraction of the actin cytoskeleton. We have explored the regulation of myosin activity by performing genetic screens to identify gene products that collaborate with myosin during Drosophila morphogenesis. Specifically, we screened for second-site noncomplementors of a mutation in the zipper gene that encodes the nonmuscle myosin-II heavy chain. We determined that a single missense mutation in the zipper(Ebr) allele gives rise to its sensitivity to second-site noncomplementation. We then identify the Rho signal transduction pathway as necessary for proper myosin function. First we show that a lethal P-element insertion interacts genetically with zipper. Subsequently we show that this second-site noncomplementing mutation disrupts the RhoGEF2 locus. Next, we show that two EMS-induced mutations, previously shown to interact genetically with zipper(Ebr), disrupt the RhoA locus. Further, we have identified their molecular lesions and determined that disruption of the carboxyl-terminal CaaX box gives rise to their mutant phenotype. Finally, we show that RhoA mutations themselves can be utilized in genetic screens. Biochemical and cell culture analyses suggest that Rho signal transduction regulates the activity of myosin. Our studies provide direct genetic proof of the biological relevance of regulation of myosin by Rho signal transduction in an intact metazoan. PMID:10880486

  7. Broad disorder and the allosteric mechanism of myosin II regulation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Vileno, Bertrand; Chamoun, Jean; Liang, Hua; Brewer, Paul; Haldeman, Brian D.; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Salzameda, Bridget; Song, Likai; Li, Hui-Chun; Cremo, Christine R.; Fajer, Piotr G.

    2011-01-01

    Double electron electron resonance EPR methods was used to measure the effects of the allosteric modulators, phosphorylation, and ATP, on the distances and distance distributions between the two regulatory light chain of myosin (RLC). Three different states of smooth muscle myosin (SMM) were studied: monomers, the short-tailed subfragment heavy meromyosin, and SMM filaments. We reconstituted myosin with nine single cysteine spin-labeled RLC. For all mutants we found a broad distribution of distances that could not be explained by spin-label rotamer diversity. For SMM and heavy meromyosin, several sites showed two heterogeneous populations in the unphosphorylated samples, whereas only one was observed after phosphorylation. The data were consistent with the presence of two coexisting heterogeneous populations of structures in the unphosphorylated samples. The two populations were attributed to an on and off state by comparing data from unphosphorylated and phosphorylated samples. Models of these two states were generated using a rigid body docking approach derived from EM [Wendt T, Taylor D, Trybus KM, Taylor K (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98:4361–4366] (PNAS, 2001, 98:4361–4366), but our data revealed a new feature of the off-state, which is heterogeneity in the orientation of the two RLC. Our average off-state structure was very similar to the Wendt model reveal a new feature of the off state, which is heterogeneity in the orientations of the two RLC. As found previously in the EM study, our on-state structure was completely different from the off-state structure. The heads are splayed out and there is even more heterogeneity in the orientations of the two RLC. PMID:21536903

  8. N-terminal polar amino acids of the C2 insert of nonmuscle myosin II-C2 regulate its functional properties.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shekhar; Halder, Debdatta; Goswami, Swagata; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the regions in the alternatively spliced C2 insert of nonmuscle myosin (NM) II-C conferring unique functional properties to the protein. We used constructs carrying deletions within different regions of C2 in neuronal cells; namely, the polar N terminus, the proline/serine-rich middle, and the nonpolar C terminus. We compared the wild-type NM II-C2 and deletion mutants with respect to ATPase activity, coassembly with NM II-B, regulation by myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and solubility, to determine the C2 region(s) involved in these processes. In addition, we examined the ability of the mutants to rescue the neurite-shortening phenotype upon NM II-C2 knockdown in Neuro-2a cells. Our data highlight the importance of the polar N terminus in NM II-C2 function. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II.

    PubMed

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism.

  10. Conditional deletion of nonmuscle myosin II-A in mouse tongue epithelium results in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Conti, Mary Anne; Saleh, Anthony D; Brinster, Lauren R; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Zhong; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Liu, Chengyu; Ma, Xuefei; Van Waes, Carter; Adelstein, Robert S

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the contribution of nonmuscle myosin II-A (NM II-A) to early cardiac development we crossed Myh9 floxed mice and Nkx2.5 cre-recombinase mice. Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early heart (E7.5) and later in the tongue epithelium. Mice homozygous for deletion of NM II-A (A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) are born at the expected ratio with normal hearts, but consistently develop an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (32/32 A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) as early as E17.5. To assess reproducibility a second, independent line of Myh9 floxed mice derived from a different embryonic stem cell clone was tested. This second line also develops SCC indistinguishable from the first (15/15). In A(Nkx)/A(Nkx) mouse tongue epithelium, genetic deletion of NM II-A does not affect stabilization of TP53, unlike a previous report for SCC. We attribute the consistent, early formation of SCC with high penetrance to the role of NM II in maintaining mitotic stability during karyokinesis.

  11. The Rho family GEF Asef2 regulates cell migration in three dimensional (3D) collagen matrices through myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Léolène; Yang, Lijie; Majumdar, Devi; Gao, Yandong; Shi, Mingjian; Brewer, Bryson M.; Li, Deyu; Webb, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to a variety of physiological processes, including tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Migration has been extensively studied with cells on 2-dimensional (2D) substrates, but much less is known about cell migration in 3D environments. Tissues and organs are 3D, which is the native environment of cells in vivo, pointing to a need to understand migration and the mechanisms that regulate it in 3D environments. To investigate cell migration in 3D environments, we developed microfluidic devices that afford a controlled, reproducible platform for generating 3D matrices. Using these devices, we show that the Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Asef2 inhibits cell migration in 3D type I collagen (collagen I) matrices. Treatment of cells with the myosin II (MyoII) inhibitor blebbistatin abolished the decrease in migration by Asef2. Moreover, Asef2 enhanced MyoII activity as shown by increased phosphorylation of serine 19 (S19). Furthermore, Asef2 increased activation of Rac, which is a Rho family small GTPase, in 3D collagen I matrices. Inhibition of Rac activity by treatment with the Rac-specific inhibitor NSC23766 abrogated the Asef2-promoted increase in S19 MyoII phosphorylation. Thus, our results indicate that Asef2 regulates cell migration in 3D collagen I matrices through a Rac-MyoII-dependent mechanism. PMID:25517435

  12. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sumit K; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC20) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC20 phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation.

  13. N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Subunits Are Non-myosin Targets of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Gaurav; Zhang, Yong; Schimerlik, Michael I.; Hau, Andrew M.; Yang, Jing; Filtz, Theresa M.; Kioussi, Chrissa; Ishmael, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    Excitatory synapses contain multiple members of the myosin superfamily of molecular motors for which functions have not been assigned. In this study we characterized the molecular determinants of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding to two major subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NR). Myosin RLC bound to NR subunits in a manner that could be distinguished from the interaction of RLC with the neck region of non-muscle myosin II-B (NMII-B) heavy chain; NR-RLC interactions did not require the addition of magnesium, were maintained in the absence of the fourth EF-hand domain of the light chain, and were sensitive to RLC phosphorylation. Equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy experiments indicate that the affinity of myosin RLC for NR1 is high (30 nm) in the context of the isolated light chain. Binding was not favored in the context of a recombinant NMII-B subfragment one, indicating that if the RLC is already bound to NMII-B it is unlikely to form a bridge between two binding partners. We report that sequence similarity in the “GXXXR” portion of the incomplete IQ2 motif found in NMII heavy chain isoforms likely contributes to recognition of NR2A as a non-myosin target of the RLC. Using site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt NR2A-RLC binding in intact cells, we find that RLC interactions facilitate trafficking of NR1/NR2A receptors to the cell membrane. We suggest that myosin RLC can adopt target-dependent conformations and that a role for this light chain in protein trafficking may be independent of the myosin II complex. PMID:18945678

  14. Porcine myosin-VI: characterization of a new mammalian unconventional myosin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned a new mammalian unconventional myosin, porcine myosin-VI from the proximal tubule cell line, LLC-PK1 (CL4). Porcine myosin-VI is highly homologous to Drosophila 95F myosin heavy chain, and together these two myosins comprise a sixth class of myosin motors. Myosin-VI exhibits ATP-sensitive actin-binding activities characteristic of myosins, and it is associated with a calmodulin light chain. Within LLC- PK1 cells, myosin-VI is soluble and does not associate with the major actin-containing domains. Within the kidney, however, myosin-VI is associated with sedimentable structures and specifically locates to the actin- and membrane-rich apical brush border domain of the proximal tubule cells. This motor was not enriched within the glomerulus, capillaries, or distal tubules. Myosin-VI associates with the proximal tubule cytoskeleton in an ATP-sensitive fashion, suggesting that this motor is associated with the actin cytoskeleton within the proximal tubule cells. Given the difference in association of myosin-VI with the apical cytoskeleton between LLC-PK1 cells and adult kidney, it is likely that this cell line does not fully differentiate to form functional proximal tubule cells. Myosin-VI may require the presence of additional elements, only found in vivo in proximal tubule cells, to properly locate to the apical domain. PMID:7929586

  15. Mutation in the SH1 helix reduces the activation energy of the ATP-induced conformational transition of myosin.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Sosuke; Chaen, Shigeru

    2007-05-25

    The SH1 helix is a joint that links the converter subdomain to the rest of the myosin motor domain. Recently, we showed that a mutation within the SH1 helix in Dictyostelium myosin II (R689H) reduced the elasticity and thermal stability of the protein. To reveal the involvement of the SH1 helix in ATP-dependent conformational changes of the motor domain, we have investigated the effects of the R689H mutation on the conformational changes of the converter, using a GFP-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer method. Although the mutation does not seem to strongly affect conformations, we found that it significantly reduced the activation energy required for the ATP-induced conformational transition corresponding to the recovery stroke. Given the effects of the mutation on the mechanical properties of myosin, we propose that the SH1 helix plays an important role in the mechanochemical energy conversion underlying the conformational change of the myosin motor domain.

  16. Aurora B but not rho/MLCK signaling is required for localization of diphosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain to the midzone in cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tomo; Isoda, Rieko; Ookusa, Takayuki; Kamijo, Keiju; Hamao, Kozue; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II is stimulated by monophosphorylation of its regulatory light chain (MRLC) at Ser19 (1P-MRLC). MRLC diphosphorylation at Thr18/Ser19 (2P-MRLC) further enhances the ATPase activity of myosin II. Phosphorylated MRLCs localize to the contractile ring and regulate cytokinesis as subunits of activated myosin II. Recently, we reported that 2P-MRLC, but not 1P-MRLC, localizes to the midzone independently of myosin II heavy chain during cytokinesis in cultured mammalian cells. However, the mechanism underlying the distinct localization of 1P- and 2P-MRLC during cytokinesis is unknown. Here, we showed that depletion of the Rho signaling proteins MKLP1, MgcRacGAP, or ECT2 inhibited the localization of 1P-MRLC to the contractile ring but not the localization of 2P-MRLC to the midzone. In contrast, depleting or inhibiting a midzone-localizing kinase, Aurora B, perturbed the localization of 2P-MRLC to the midzone but not the localization of 1P-MRLC to the contractile ring. We did not observe any change in the localization of phosphorylated MRLC in myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK)-inhibited cells. Furrow regression was observed in Aurora B- and 2P-MRLC-inhibited cells but not in 1P-MRLC-perturbed dividing cells. Furthermore, Aurora B bound to 2P-MRLC in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Aurora B, but not Rho/MLCK signaling, is essential for the localization of 2P-MRLC to the midzone in dividing HeLa cells.

  17. Regulation and expression of metazoan unconventional myosins.

    PubMed

    Sokac, A M; Bement, W M

    2000-01-01

    Unconventional myosins are molecular motors that convert adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis into movement along actin filaments. On the basis of primary structure analysis, these myosins are represented by at least 15 distinct classes (classes 1 and 3-16), each of which is presumed to play a specific cellular role. However, in contrast to the conventional myosins-2, which drive muscle contraction and cytokinesis and have been studied intensively for many years in both uni- and multicellular organisms, unconventional myosins have only been subject to analysis in metazoan systems for a short time. Here we critically review what is known about unconventional myosin regulation, function, and expression. Several points emerge from this analysis. First, in spite of the high relative conservation of motor domains among the myosin classes, significant differences are found in biochemical and enzymatic properties of these motor domains. Second, the idea that characteristic distributions of unconventional myosins are solely dependent on the myosin tail domain is almost certainly an oversimplification. Third, the notion that most unconventional myosins function as transport motors for membranous organelles is challenged by recent data. Finally, we present a scheme that clarifies relationships between various modes of myosin regulation.

  18. Modulating Beta-Cardiac Myosin Function at the Molecular and Tissue Levels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wanjian; Blair, Cheavar A.; Walton, Shane D.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a common form of heart disease that are caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins with beta cardiac myosin (MYH7) being one of the most frequently affected genes. Since the discovery of the first cardiomyopathy associated mutation in beta-cardiac myosin, a major goal has been to correlate the in vitro myosin motor properties with the contractile performance of cardiac muscle. There has been substantial progress in developing assays to measure the force and velocity properties of purified cardiac muscle myosin but it is still challenging to correlate results from molecular and tissue-level experiments. Mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more common than mutations that lead to dilated cardiomyopathy and are also often associated with increased isometric force and hyper-contractility. Therefore, the development of drugs designed to decrease isometric force by reducing the duty ratio (the proportion of time myosin spends bound to actin during its ATPase cycle) has been proposed for the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Para-Nitroblebbistatin is a small molecule drug proposed to decrease the duty ratio of class II myosins. We examined the impact of this drug on human beta cardiac myosin using purified myosin motor assays and studies of permeabilized muscle fiber mechanics. We find that with purified human beta-cardiac myosin para-Nitroblebbistatin slows actin-activated ATPase and in vitro motility without altering the ADP release rate constant. In permeabilized human myocardium, para-Nitroblebbistatin reduces isometric force, power, and calcium sensitivity while not changing shortening velocity or the rate of force development (ktr). Therefore, designing a drug that reduces the myosin duty ratio by inhibiting strong attachment to actin while not changing detachment can cause a reduction in force without changing shortening velocity or relaxation. PMID:28119616

  19. Actin-binding cleft closure in myosin II probed by site-directed spin labeling and pulsed EPR.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer C; Burr, Adam R; Svensson, Bengt; Kennedy, Daniel J; Allingham, John; Titus, Margaret A; Rayment, Ivan; Thomas, David D

    2008-09-02

    We present a structurally dynamic model for nucleotide- and actin-induced closure of the actin-binding cleft of myosin, based on site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in Dictyostelium myosin II. The actin-binding cleft is a solvent-filled cavity that extends to the nucleotide-binding pocket and has been predicted to close upon strong actin binding. Single-cysteine labeling sites were engineered to probe mobility and accessibility within the cleft. Addition of ADP and vanadate, which traps the posthydrolysis biochemical state, influenced probe mobility and accessibility slightly, whereas actin binding caused more dramatic changes in accessibility, consistent with cleft closure. We engineered five pairs of cysteine labeling sites to straddle the cleft, each pair having one label on the upper 50-kDa domain and one on the lower 50-kDa domain. Distances between spin-labeled sites were determined from the resulting spin-spin interactions, as measured by continuous wave EPR for distances of 0.7-2 nm or pulsed EPR (double electron-electron resonance) for distances of 1.7-6 nm. Because of the high distance resolution of EPR, at least two distinct structural states of the cleft were resolved. Each of the biochemical states tested (prehydrolysis, posthydrolysis, and rigor), reflects a mixture of these structural states, indicating that the coupling between biochemical and structural states is not rigid. The resulting model is much more dynamic than previously envisioned, with both open and closed conformations of the cleft interconverting, even in the rigor actomyosin complex.

  20. Targeted subendothelial matrix oxidation by myeloperoxidase triggers myosin II-dependent de-adhesion and alters signaling in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rees, Martin D; Dang, Lei; Thai, Thuan; Owen, Dylan M; Malle, Ernst; Thomas, Shane R

    2012-12-15

    During inflammation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by circulating leukocytes accumulates within the subendothelial matrix by binding to and transcytosing the vascular endothelium. Oxidative reactions catalyzed by subendothelial-localized MPO are implicated as a cause of endothelial dysfunction in vascular disease. While the subendothelial matrix is a key target for MPO-derived oxidants during disease, the implications of this damage for endothelial morphology and signaling are largely unknown. We found that endothelial-transcytosed MPO produced hypochlorous acid (HOCl) that reacted locally with the subendothelial matrix and induced covalent cross-linking of the adhesive matrix protein fibronectin. Real-time biosensor and live cell imaging studies revealed that HOCl-mediated matrix oxidation triggered rapid membrane retraction from the substratum and adjacent cells (de-adhesion). De-adhesion was linked with the alteration of Tyr-118 phosphorylation of paxillin, a key adhesion-dependent signaling process, as well as Rho kinase-dependent myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation. De-adhesion dynamics were dependent on the contractile state of cells, with myosin II inhibition with blebbistatin attenuating the rate of membrane retraction. Rho kinase inhibition with Y-27632 also conferred protection, but not during the initial phase of membrane retraction, which was driven by pre-existing actomyosin tensile stress. Notably, diversion of MPO from HOCl production by thiocyanate or nitrite attenuated de-adhesion and associated signaling responses, despite the latter substrate supporting MPO-catalyzed fibronectin nitration. These data show that subendothelial-localized MPO employs a novel "outside-in" mode of redox signaling, involving HOCl-mediated matrix oxidation. These MPO-catalyzed oxidative events are likely to play a previously unrecognized role in altering endothelial integrity and signaling during inflammatory vascular disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  1. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hindman, Bridget; Goeckeler, Zoe; Sierros, Kostas; Wysolmerski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa), parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa). These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling. PMID:26136073

  2. Effect of ATP and regulatory light-chain phosphorylation on the polymerization of mammalian nonmuscle myosin II.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Billington, Neil; Shu, Shi; Yu, Shu-Hua; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Sellers, James R; Korn, Edward D

    2017-08-08

    Addition of 1 mM ATP substantially reduces the light scattering of solutions of polymerized unphosphorylated nonmuscle myosin IIs (NM2s), and this is reversed by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC). It has been proposed that these changes result from substantial depolymerization of unphosphorylated NM2 filaments to monomers upon addition of ATP, and filament repolymerization upon RLC-phosphorylation. We now show that the differences in myosin monomer concentration of RLC-unphosphorylated and -phosphorylated recombinant mammalian NM2A, NM2B, and NM2C polymerized in the presence of ATP are much too small to explain their substantial differences in light scattering. Rather, we find that the decrease in light scattering upon addition of ATP to polymerized unphosphorylated NM2s correlates with the formation of dimers, tetramers, and hexamers, in addition to monomers, an increase in length, and decrease in width of the bare zones of RLC-unphosphorylated filaments. Both effects of ATP addition are reversed by phosphorylation of the RLC. Our data also suggest that, contrary to previous models, assembly of RLC-phosphorylated NM2s at physiological ionic strength proceeds from folded monomers to folded antiparallel dimers, tetramers, and hexamers that unfold and polymerize into antiparallel filaments. This model could explain the dynamic relocalization of NM2 filaments in vivo by dephosphorylation of RLC-phosphorylated filaments, disassembly of the dephosphorylated filaments to folded monomers, dimers, and small oligomers, followed by diffusion of these species, and reassembly of filaments at the new location following rephosphorylation of the RLC.

  3. Force-generating capacity of human myosin isoforms extracted from single muscle fibre segments.

    PubMed

    Li, Meishan; Larsson, Lars

    2010-12-15

    Muscle, motor unit and muscle fibre type-specific differences in force-generating capacity have been investigated for many years, but there is still no consensus regarding specific differences between slow- and fast-twitch muscles, motor units or muscle fibres. This is probably related to a number of different confounding factors disguising the function of the molecular motor protein myosin. We have therefore studied the force-generating capacity of specific myosin isoforms or combination of isoforms extracted from short single human muscle fibre segments in a modified single fibre myosin in vitro motility assay, in which an internal load (actin-binding protein) was added in different concentrations to evaluate the force-generating capacity. The force indices were the x-axis intercept and the slope of the relationship between the fraction of moving filaments and the α-actinin concentration. The force-generating capacity of the β/slow myosin isoform (type I) was weaker (P < 0.05) than the fast myosin isoform (type II), but the force-generating capacity of the different human fast myosin isoforms types IIa and IIx or a combination of both (IIax) were indistinguishable. A single fibre in vitro motility assay for both speed and force of specific myosin isoforms is described and used to measure the difference in force-generating capacity between fast and slow human myosin isoforms. The assay is proposed as a useful tool for clinical studies on the effects on muscle function of specific mutations or post-translational modifications of myosin.

  4. Delta II JPSS-1 Solid Rocket Motor Hoist and Mate

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-19

    The United Launch Alliance/Orbital ATK Delta II solid rocket motor arrives at Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Technicians and engineers lift and mate the solid rocket motor to a Delta II rocket in preparation for launch of the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) later this year. JPSS, a next-generation environmental satellite system, is a collaborative program between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA.

  5. Delta II JPSS-1 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) Installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-04

    The United Launch Alliance/Orbital ATK Delta II solid rocket motor arrives at Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Technicians and engineers lift and mate the solid rocket motor to a Delta II rocket in preparation for launch of the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) later this year. JPSS, a next-generation environmental satellite system, is a collaborative program between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA.

  6. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes. PMID:27597808

  7. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes.

  8. Conformational flexibility of loops of myosin enhances the global bias in the actin-myosin interaction landscape.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing-Miao; Sasai, Masaki; Terada, Tomoki P

    2014-04-14

    A long-standing controversy on the mechanism of an actomyosin motor is the role of the Brownian motion of the myosin head in force generation. In order to shed light on this problem, we calculate free-energy landscapes of interaction between an actin filament and the head (S1) of myosin II by using a coarse-grained model of actomyosin. The results show that the free-energy landscape has a global gradient toward the strong-binding site on actin filament, which explains the biased Brownian motion of myosin S1 observed in a single-molecule experiment [Kitamura et al., Nature, 1999, 397, 129 and Biophysics, 2005, 1, 1]. The distinct global gradient in the landscape is brought about only when the conformation of loop 2 at the actin interface of myosin S1 is flexible. The conformational flexibility of loop 3 also contributes to the gradient in the landscape by compensating the role of loop 2. Though the structure of loop 2 is expanded in the weak-binding state, loop 2 shows the larger fluctuation of compaction and expansion due to the actin-myosin interactions as myosin S1 moves toward the strong-binding site on actin filament. Hence, the increase in the compaction-expansion fluctuation of loop 2, the stronger binding of myosin to actin, and the biased Brownian motion of myosin S1 are coupled with each other and should take place in a concurrent way. This predicted coupling should provide opportunities to further test the hypothesis of the biased Brownian motion in actomyosin.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of the Feedback of the Robust Signaling Pathway Network of Myosin V Molecular Motors on GluR1 of AMPA in Neurons: A Networking Approach for Controlling Nanobiomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Qin; Nakano, Tadashi

    Acting as nanobiomachines within the cell, myosin V molecular motors contribute greatly to the LTP (Long Term Potentiation) in neural signaling, which transport the recycling endosomes from the dendrite to the spine of neurons and the GluR1 in AMPA receptors lead to the activities of memorization in brains. However it is unknown that how the restriction of GluR1 at the spine of neuron is caused by the signaling cascade of myosin V and Rab11/Rab11-FIP2 during the myosin V centered signaling process in neurons. Here we report that the feedback of the biochemical reaction for binding Myosin V and Rab11/Rab11-FIP2 plays a pivotal role to restrict the accumulation of GluR1 at the spine. We have investigated the feedback of myosin V and Rab11/Rab11-FIP2 on the convergence of GluR1 by using the computational model of intracellular signaling pathway networks we designed and the simulation software Cell Illustrator Professional Version 3.0 ®. The obtained results show that controllability of molecular motor based nanobiomachines is inevitable for exploring the molecular mechanism of neuroscience at the nanoscale.

  10. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Day, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. RESULTS: Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined.

  11. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Day, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. RESULTS: Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined.

  12. Assembly of Acanthamoeba myosin-II minifilaments. Definition of C-terminal residues required to form coiled-coils, dimers, and octamers.

    PubMed

    Turbedsky, Kirsi; Pollard, Thomas D

    2005-01-14

    Acanthamoeba myosin-II forms bipolar octamers by three successive steps of dimerization of the C-terminal, coiled-coil tail. In this study, we generated N-terminal and C-terminal truncation constructs and point mutants of the Acanthamoeba myosin-II tail to delineate the structural requirements for assembly of bipolar mini-filaments. By the use of light-scattering, CD spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and tryptophan fluorescence experiments, we determined that: (1) the C-terminal 14 heptad repeats plus most of the tailpiece (residues 1381-1509) are required to form antiparallel dimers of coiled-coils; (2) amino acid residues within heptads 23-32 (residues 1254-1325) are required to form tetramers; (3) the C-terminal 32 heptad repeats suffice to assemble octameric minifilaments; (4) A1378 is outside of the interaction interface; (5) the mutation L1475W inhibits dimerization; and (6) F1443 is involved in the dimerization interface but is exposed to the solvent. We propose that the tailpiece (residues 1483-1509) interacts with two heptads (13 and 14, residues 1381-1393), which are important for dimerization and coiled-coil formation. These results support a model in which hydrophobic as well as electrostatic interactions control the register between myosin-II coiled-coils and guide sequential steps of dimerization that generate stable, octameric mini-filaments.

  13. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  14. Regulation of jaw-specific isoforms of myosin-binding protein-C and tropomyosin in regenerating cat temporalis muscle innervated by limb fast and slow motor nerves.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lucia H D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2010-11-01

    Cat jaw-closing muscles are a distinct muscle allotype characterized by the expression of masticatory-specific myofibrillar proteins. Transplantation studies showed that expression of masticatory myosin heavy chain (m-MyHC) is promoted by fast motor nerves, but suppressed by slow motor nerves. We investigated whether masticatory myosin-binding protein-C (m-MBP-C) and masticatory tropomyosin (m-Tm) are similarly regulated. Temporalis muscle strips were transplanted into limb muscle beds to allow innervation by fast or slow muscle nerve during regeneration. Regenerated muscles were examined postoperatively up to 168 days by peroxidase IHC using monoclonal antibodies to m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm. Regenerates in both muscle beds expressed fetal and slow MyHCs, m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm during the first 4 weeks. Longer-term regenerates innervated by fast nerve suppressed fetal and slow MyHCs, retaining m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm, whereas fibers innervated by slow nerve suppressed fetal MyHCs and the three masticatory-specific proteins, induced slow MyHC, and showed immunohistochemical characteristics of jaw-slow fibers. We concluded that expression of m-MBP-C and m-Tm is coregulated by m-MyHC and that neural impulses to limb slow muscle are capable of suppressing masticatory-specific proteins and to channel gene expression along the jaw-slow phenotype unique to jaw-closing muscle.

  15. Importance of the converter region for the motility of myosin as revealed by the studies on chimeric Chara myosins.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masaya; Kashiyama, Taku; Hachikubo, You; Ito, Kohji; Yamamoto, Keiichi

    2004-11-19

    A long alpha-helix in myosin head constitutes a lever arm together with light chains. It is known from X-ray crystallographic studies that the first three turns of this lever arm alpha-helix are inserted into the converter region of myosin. We previously showed that chimeric Chara myosin in which the motor domain of Chara myosin was connected to the lever arm alpha-helix of Dictyostelium myosin had motility far less than that expected for the motor domain of Chara myosin. Here, we replaced the inserted three turns of alpha-helix of Dictyostelium myosin with that of the Chara myosin and found that the replacement enhanced the motility 2.6-fold without changing the ATPase activity so much. The result clearly showed the importance of interaction between the converter region and the lever arm alpha-helix for the efficient motility of myosin.

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infects the human endocervix by activating non-muscle myosin II-mediated epithelial exfoliation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qian; Lin, Brian; Qiu, Jessica; Stein, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    Colonization and disruption of the epithelium is a major infection mechanism of mucosal pathogens. The epithelium counteracts infection by exfoliating damaged cells while maintaining the mucosal barrier function. The sexually transmitted bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) infects the female reproductive tract primarily from the endocervix, causing gonorrhea. However, the mechanism by which GC overcome the mucosal barrier remains elusive. Using a new human tissue model, we demonstrate that GC can penetrate into the human endocervix by inducing the exfoliation of columnar epithelial cells. We found that GC colonization causes endocervical epithelial cells to shed. The shedding results from the disassembly of the apical junctions that seal the epithelial barrier. Apical junction disruption and epithelial exfoliation increase GC penetration into the endocervical epithelium without reducing bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Both epithelial exfoliation and junction disruption require the activation and accumulation of non-muscle myosin II (NMII) at the apical surface and GC adherent sites. GC inoculation activates NMII by elevating the levels of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ and NMII regulatory light chain phosphorylation. Piliation of GC promotes, but the expression of a GC opacity-associated protein variant, OpaH that binds to the host surface proteins CEACAMs, inhibits GC-induced NMII activation and reorganization and Ca2+ flux. The inhibitory effects of OpaH lead to reductions in junction disruption, epithelial exfoliation, and GC penetration. Therefore, GC phase variation can modulate infection in the human endocervix by manipulating the activity of NMII and epithelial exfoliation. PMID:28406994

  17. Planar polarity of multiciliated ependymal cells involves the anterior migration of basal bodies regulated by non-muscle myosin II.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yuki; Meunier, Alice; Huang, Shihhui; Shimozawa, Togo; Yamada, Osamu; Kida, Yasuyuki S; Inoue, Masashi; Ito, Tsubasa; Kato, Hiroko; Sakaguchi, Masanori; Sunabori, Takehiko; Nakaya, Masa-Aki; Nonaka, Shigenori; Ogura, Toshihiko; Higuchi, Hideo; Okano, Hideyuki; Spassky, Nathalie; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2010-09-01

    Motile cilia generate constant fluid flow over epithelial tissue, and thereby influence diverse physiological processes. Such functions of ciliated cells depend on the planar polarity of the cilia and on their basal bodies being oriented in the downstream direction of fluid flow. Recently, another type of basal body planar polarity, characterized by the anterior localization of the basal bodies in individual cells, was reported in the multiciliated ependymal cells that line the surface of brain ventricles. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which this polarity is established. Here, we report in mice that basal bodies move in the apical cell membrane during differentiation to accumulate in the anterior region of ependymal cells. The planar cell polarity signaling pathway influences basal body orientation, but not their anterior migration, in the neonatal brain. Moreover, we show by pharmacological and genetic studies that non-muscle myosin II is a key regulator of this distribution of basal bodies. This study demonstrates that the orientation and distribution of basal bodies occur by distinct mechanisms.

  18. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of ∼0.3 µM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of βPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells. PMID:20713598

  19. Purification and characterization of the plasmodial phosphatase that hydrolyses the phosphorylated light chain of Physarum myosin II from Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Okada, Chisa; Nakamura, Akio; Tomioka, Shigeo; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Takako S

    2010-08-01

    A phosphatase was purified through a combination of ion-exchange and hydrophobic chromatography followed by native PAGE from Physarum plasmodia. Recently, we demonstrated that this phosphatase isoform has a hydrolytic activity towards the PMLC (phosphorylated light chain of Physarum myosin II) at pH 7.6. The apparent molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated at approximately 50 kDa by means of analytical gel filtration. The enzyme was purified 340-fold to a final phosphatase activity of 400 pkat/mg of protein. Among the phosphorylated compounds tested for hydrolytic activity at pH 7.6, the enzyme showed no activity towards nucleotides. At pH 7.6, hydrolytic activity of the enzyme against PMLC was detected; at pH 5.0, however, no hydrolytic activity towards PMLC was observed. The Km of the enzyme for PMLC was 10 microM, and the V(max) was 1.17 nkat/mg of protein. Ca(2+) (10 microM) inhibited the activity of the enzyme, and Mg(2+) (8.5 microM) activated the dephosphorylation of PMLC. Mn(2+) (1.6 microM) highly stimulated the enzyme's activity. Based on these results, we concluded that the enzyme is likely to be a phosphatase with hydrolytic activity towards PMLC.

  20. Structural abnormalities develop in the brain after ablation of the gene encoding nonmuscle myosin II-B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Tullio, A N; Bridgman, P C; Tresser, N J; Chan, C C; Conti, M A; Adelstein, R S; Hara, Y

    2001-04-23

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II-B (NMHC-B) in mice results in severe hydrocephalus with enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. All B(-)/B(-) mice died either during embryonic development or on the day of birth (PO). Neurons cultured from superior cervical ganglia of B(-)/B(-) mice between embryonic day (E) 18 and P0 showed decreased rates of neurite outgrowth, and their growth cones had a distinctive narrow morphology compared with those from normal mice. Serial sections of E12.5, E13.5, and E15 mouse brains identified developmental defects in the ventricular neuroepithelium. On E12.5, disruption of the coherent ventricular surface and disordered cell migration of neuroepithelial and differentiated cells were seen at various points in the ventricular walls. These abnormalities resulted in the formation of rosettes in various regions of the brain and spinal cord. On E13.5 and E15, disruption of the ventricular surface and aberrant protrusions of neural cells into the ventricles became more prominent. By E18.5 and P0, the defects in cells lining the ventricular wall resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus due to stenosis or occlusion of the third ventricle and cerebral aqueduct. These defects may be caused by abnormalities in the cell adhesive properties of neuroepithelial cells and suggest that NMHC-B is essential for both early and late developmental processes in the mammalian brain.

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Signalling Controls Myosin II Planar Polarity to Orchestrate Convergent Extension Movements during Drosophila Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunt, Stephanie; Bischoff, Marcus; VijayRaghavan, Krishnaswamy; Skaer, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Most epithelial tubes arise as small buds and elongate by regulated morphogenetic processes including oriented cell division, cell rearrangements, and changes in cell shape. Through live analysis of Drosophila renal tubule morphogenesis we show that tissue elongation results from polarised cell intercalations around the tubule circumference, producing convergent-extension tissue movements. Using genetic techniques, we demonstrate that the vector of cell movement is regulated by localised epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling from the distally placed tip cell lineage, which sets up a distal-to-proximal gradient of pathway activation to planar polarise cells, without the involvement for PCP gene activity. Time-lapse imaging at subcellular resolution shows that the acquisition of planar polarity leads to asymmetric pulsatile Myosin II accumulation in the basal, proximal cortex of tubule cells, resulting in repeated, transient shortening of their circumferential length. This repeated bias in the polarity of cell contraction allows cells to move relative to each other, leading to a reduction in cell number around the lumen and an increase in tubule length. Physiological analysis demonstrates that animals whose tubules fail to elongate exhibit abnormal excretory function, defective osmoregulation, and lethality. PMID:25460353

  2. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9) and Rac1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbir, Mohammad G.; Dillon, Rachelle; Mowat, Michael R. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1) gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9), plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype. PMID:26977077

  3. Control of nuclear centration in the C. elegans zygote by receptor-independent Gα signaling and myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Morgan B.; Canman, Julie C.; Senning, Eric N.; Marcus, Andrew H.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Mitotic spindle positioning in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote involves microtubule-dependent pulling forces applied to centrosomes. In this study, we investigate the role of actomyosin in centration, the movement of the nucleus–centrosome complex (NCC) to the cell center. We find that the rate of wild-type centration depends equally on the nonmuscle myosin II NMY-2 and the Gα proteins GOA-1/GPA-16. In centration- defective let-99(−) mutant zygotes, GOA-1/GPA-16 and NMY-2 act abnormally to oppose centration. This suggests that LET-99 determines the direction of a force on the NCC that is promoted by Gα signaling and actomyosin. During wild-type centration, NMY-2–GFP aggregates anterior to the NCC tend to move further anterior, suggesting that actomyosin contraction could pull the NCC. In GOA-1/GPA-16–depleted zygotes, NMY-2 aggregate displacement is reduced and largely randomized, whereas in a let-99(−) mutant, NMY-2 aggregates tend to make large posterior displacements. These results suggest that Gα signaling and LET-99 control centration by regulating polarized actomyosin contraction. PMID:17893243

  4. Insights into the mechanisms of myosin and kinesin molecular motors from the single-molecule unbinding force measurements.

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, Sergey V; Oguchi, Yusuke; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2010-06-06

    In cells, ATP (adenosine triphosphate)-driven motor proteins, both cytoskeletal and nucleic acid-based, operate on their corresponding 'tracks', that is, actin, microtubules or nucleic acids, by converting the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During each mechanochemical cycle, a motor proceeds via several nucleotide states, characterized by different affinities for the 'track' filament and different nucleotide (ATP or ADP) binding kinetics, which is crucial for a motor to efficiently perform its cellular functions. The measurements of the rupture force between the motor and the track by applying external loads to the individual motor-substrate bonds in various nucleotide states have proved to be an important tool to obtain valuable insights into the mechanism of the motors' performance. We review the application of this technique to various linear molecular motors, both processive and non-processive, giving special attention to the importance of the experimental geometry.

  5. Temperature dependent measurements reveal similarities between muscle and non-muscle myosin motility

    PubMed Central

    Yengo, Christopher M.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Sellers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of muscle and non-muscle myosin (heavy meromyosin, HMM) with in vitro motility and actin-activated ATPase assays. Our results indicate that myosin V (MV) has a temperature dependence that is similar in both ATPase and motility assays. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle myosin (SK), smooth muscle myosin (SM), and non-muscle myosin IIA (NM) have a different temperature dependence in ATPase compared to in vitro motility assays. In the class II myosins we examined (SK, SM, and NM) the rate-limiting step in ATPase assays is thought to be attachment to actin or phosphate release, while for in vitro motility assays it is controversial. In myosin V the rate-limiting step for both in vitro motility and ATPase assays is known to be ADP release. Consequently, in MV the temperature dependence of the ADP release rate constant is similar to the temperature dependence of in vitro motility. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of the ADP release rate constant of SM and NM was shifted toward the in vitro motility temperature dependence. Our results suggest that the rate-limiting step in SK, SM, and NM may shift from attachment-limited in solution to detachment-limited in the in vitro motility assay. Internal strain within the myosin molecule or by neighboring myosin motors may slow ADP release which becomes rate-limiting in the in vitro motility assay. Within this small subset of myosins examined, the in vitro sliding velocity correlates reasonably well with actin-activated ATPase activity, which was suggested by the original study by Barany et al. (Barany 1967). PMID:22930330

  6. Directional Mechanosensing in Myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yubo; Tehver, Riina

    2013-03-01

    Myosin is a family of versatile motor proteins that perform various tasks, such as organelle transport, anchoring and cell deformation. Although the general mechanism of the motors has been fairly well established, details on dynamic aspects like force response of the motor, and force propagation are yet to be fully understood. In this poster, we present the response of the ATP binding region to force exerted on the tail domain in order to test the proposed tension-dependent gating mechanism of myosin VI processive motion. We employed the Self-Organized Polymer model in a computer simulation to explore the effect. Current results show that the ATP binding domain of myosin VI indeed exhibits tension dependence - both structurally and dynamically.

  7. Role of the two type II myosins, Myo2 and Myp2, in cytokinetic actomyosin ring formation and function in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Daniel P; Hyams, Jeremy S

    2003-03-01

    The formation and contraction of a cytokinetic actomyosin ring (CAR) is essential for the execution of cytokinesis in fission yeast. Unlike most organisms in which its composition has been investigated, the fission yeast CAR contains two type II myosins encoded by the genes myo2(+) and myp2(+). myo2(+) is an essential gene whilst myp2(+) is dispensable under normal growth conditions. Myo2 is hence the major contractile protein of the CAR whilst Myp2 plays a more subtle and, as yet, incompletely documented role. Using a fission yeast strain in which the chromosomal copy of the myo2(+) gene is fused to the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), we analysed CAR formation and function in the presence and absence of Myp2. No change in the rate of CAR contraction was observed when Myp2 was absent although the CAR persisted longer in the contracted state and was occasionally observed to split into two discrete rings. This was also observed in myp2Delta cells following actin depolymerisation with latrunculin. CAR contraction in the absence of Myp2 was completely abolished in the presence of elevated levels of chloride ions. Thus, Myp2 appears to contribute to the stability of the CAR, in particular at a late stage of CAR contraction, and to be a component of the signalling pathway that regulates cytokinesis in response to elevated levels of chloride. To determine whether the presence of two type II myosins was a feature of cytokinesis in other fungi that divide by septation, we searched the genomes of two filamentous fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus and Neurospora crassa, for myosin genes. As in fission yeast, both A. fumigatus and N. crassa contained myosins of classes I, II, and V. Unlike fission yeast, both contained a single type II myosin gene that, on the basis of its tail structure, was more reminiscent of Myp2 than Myo2. The significance of these observations to our understanding of septum to formation and cleavage is discussed. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Characteristics of Myosin V Processivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Ping; Liu, Yi; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Xiaoyang; La, Ta; Guo, Wei-Sheng

    2017-02-14

    Myosin V is a processive doubled-headed biomolecular motor involved in many intracellular organelle and vesicle transport. The unidirectional movement is coupled with the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis and product release cycle. With the progress of experimental techniques and the enhancement of measuring directness, detailed knowledge of the motility of myosin V has been obtained.Following the ATPase cycle, the 4-state mechanochemical model of the myosin V's processive movement is used. The transitions between various states take place in a stochastic manner. We can use the master equation to analyze and calculate quantitatively. Meanwhile the effect of the reverse reaction is takenfully into account. We fit the mean velocity, the mean dwell time, the mean run length andtheratio of forward/backward steps as a functionof ATP, ADP and Pi concertration. The theoretical curves are generally in line with the experimental data. This work provides a new insight for the characteristic of myosin V.

  9. Lens fiber cell elongation and differentiation is associated with a robust increase in myosin light chain phosphorylation in the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Skiba, Nikolai; Vasantha Rao, Ponugoti

    2007-10-01

    Myosin II, a molecular motor, plays a critical role in cell migration, cell shape changes, cell adhesion, and cytokinesis. To understand the role of myosin II in lens fiber cell elongation and differentiation, we determined the distribution pattern of nonmuscle myosin IIA, IIB, and phosphorylated regulatory myosin light chain-2 (phospho-MLC) in frozen sections of the developing mouse lens by immunofluorescence analysis. While myosin IIA was distributed uniformly throughout the differentiating lens, including the epithelium and fibers, myosin IIB was localized predominantly to the epithelium and the posterior tips of the lens fibers. In contrast, immunostaining with a di-phospho-MLC antibody localized intensely and precisely to the elongating and differentiating primary and secondary lens fibers, co-localizing with actin filaments. An in situ analysis of Rho GTPase activation revealed that Rho-GTP was distributed uniformly throughout the embryonic lens, including epithelium and fibers. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity by ML-7 in organ cultured mouse lenses led to development of nuclear lens opacity in association with abnormal fiber cell organization. Taken together, these data reveal a distinct spatial distribution pattern of myosin II isoforms in the developing lens and a robust activation of MLC phosphorylation in the differentiating lens fibers. Moreover, the regulation of MLC phosphorylation by MLCK appears to be critical for crystallin organization and for maintenance of lens transparency and lens membrane function.

  10. Rho-Associated Kinases and Non-muscle Myosin IIs Inhibit the Differentiation of Human iPSCs to Pancreatic Endoderm.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Taro; Kimura, Azuma; Tanaka, Hiromi; Ameku, Tomonaga; Mima, Atsushi; Hirose, Yurie; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Osafune, Kenji

    2017-08-08

    There has been increasing success with the generation of pancreatic cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs); however, the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to reveal novel molecular mechanisms for differentiation to PDX1(+)NKX6.1(+) pancreatic endoderm cells, which are pancreatic committed progenitor cells. PDX1(+) posterior foregut cells differentiated from hiPSCs failed to differentiate into pancreatic endoderm cells at low cell density, but Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) or non-muscle myosin II (NM II) inhibitors rescued the differentiation potential. Consistently, the expression of phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 and NM IIA was downregulated in aggregation culture. Notably, the soluble factors we tested were substantially effective only with ROCK-NM II inhibition. The PDX1(+)NKX6.1(+) cells induced with NM II inhibitors were successfully engrafted and maturated in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that NM IIs play inhibitory roles for the differentiation of hiPSCs to pancreatic endoderm cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Kohei; Tanaka, Masateru; Hirose, Keiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Honda, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin) was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  12. Myosin V and iNOS expression is enhanced in J774 murine macrophages treated with IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Reis, D; Souza, M; Mineo, J; Espindola, F

    2001-02-01

    Actin-based motor protein requirements and nitric oxide (NO) production are important features of macrophage activity during phagocytosis or microbicidal processes. Different classes of myosins contribute directly or indirectly to phagocytosis by providing mechanical force for phagosome closure or organelle movement. Recent data have shown the presence of myosins IC, II, V and IXb in phagosomes of bone marrow-derived murine macrophages. In our investigation we demonstrated the presence of different classes of myosins in J774 macrophages. We also analyzed the effect of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), with or without calcium ionophore or cytochalasin B, on myosins as well as on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO production. Myosins IC, II, Va, VI and IXb were identified in J774 macrophages. There was an increase of myosin V expression in IFN-gamma-treated cells. iNOS expression was increased by IFN-gamma treatment, while calcium ionophore and cytochalasin B had a negative influence on both myosin and iNOS expression, which was decreased. The increases in NO synthesis were reflected by increased iNOS expression. Macrophages activated by IFN-gamma released significant amounts of NO when compared to control groups. In contrast, NO production by calcium ionophore- and cytochalasin B-treated cells was similar to that of control cells. These results suggest that IFN-gamma is involved in macrophage activation by stimulating protein production to permit both phagocytosis and microbicidal activity.

  13. alphaB-crystallin maintains skeletal muscle myosin enzymatic activity and prevents its aggregation under heat-shock stress.

    PubMed

    Melkani, Girish C; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2006-05-05

    Here, we provide functional and direct structural evidence that alphaB-crystallin, a member of the small heat-shock protein family, suppresses thermal unfolding and aggregation of the myosin II molecular motor. Chicken skeletal muscle myosin was thermally unfolded at heat-shock temperature (43 degrees C) in the absence and in the presence of alphaB-crystallin. The ATPase activity of myosin at 25 degrees C was used as a parameter to monitor its unfolding. Myosin retained only 65% and 8% of its ATPase activity when incubated at heat-shock temperature for 15 min and 30 min, respectively. However, 84% and 58% of the myosin ATPase activity was maintained when it was incubated with alphaB-crystallin under the same conditions. Furthermore, actin-stimulated ATPase activity of myosin was reduced by approximately 90%, when myosin was thermally unfolded at 43 degrees C for 30 min, but was reduced by only approximately 42% when it was incubated with alphaB-crystallin under the same conditions. Light-scattering assays and bound thioflavin T fluorescence indicated that myosin aggregates when incubated at 43 degrees C for 30 min, while alphaB-crystallin suppressed this thermal aggregation. Photo-labeled bis-ANS alphaB-crystallin fluorescence studies confirmed the transient interaction of alphaB-crystallin with myosin. These findings were further supported by electron microscopy of rotary shadowed molecules. This revealed that approximately 94% of myosin molecules formed inter and intra-molecular aggregates when incubated at 43 degrees C for 30 min. alphaB-Crystallin, however, protected approximately 48% of the myosin molecules from thermal aggregation, with protected myosin appearing identical to unheated molecules. These results are the first to show that alphaB-crystallin maintains myosin enzymatic activity and prevents the aggregation of the motor under heat-shock conditions. Thus, alphaB-crystallin may be critical for nascent myosin folding, promoting myofibrillogenesis

  14. The RhoA-Rok-Myosin II Pathway is Involved in Extracellular Matrix-Mediated Regulation of Prolactin Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jyun-Yi; Chen, Meng-Chi; Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Wang, Jen-Hsing; Brackenbury, Lisa; Lin, Ting-Hui; Wu, Yi-Ying; Yang, Zhihong; Streuli, Charles H; Lee, Yi-Ju

    2012-01-01

    In mammary epithelial cells (MECs), prolactin-induced signaling and gene expression requires integrin-mediated cell adhesion to basement membrane (BM). In the absence of proper cell–BM interactions, for example, culturing cells on collagen-coated plastic dishes, signal propagation is substantially impaired. Here we demonstrate that the RhoA-Rok-myosin II pathway accounts for the ineffectiveness of prolactin signaling in MECs cultured on collagen I. Under these culture conditions, the RhoA pathway is activated, leading to downregulation of prolactin receptor expression and reduced prolactin signaling. Enforced activation of RhoA in MECs cultured on BM suppresses prolactin receptor levels, and prevents prolactin-induced Stat5 tyrosine phosphorylation and β-casein expression. Overexpression of dominant negative RhoA in MECs cultured on collagen I, or inhibiting Rok activity, increases prolactin receptor expression, and enhances prolactin signaling. In addition, inhibition of myosin II ATPase activity by blebbistatin also exerts a beneficial effect on prolactin receptor expression and prolactin signaling, suggesting that tension exerted by the collagen substratum, in collaboration with the RhoA-Rok-myosin II pathway, contributes to the failure of prolactin signaling. Furthermore, MECs cultured on laminin-coated plastic have similar morphology and response to prolactin as those cultured on collagen I. They display high levels of RhoA activity and are inefficient in prolactin signaling, stressing the importance of matrix stiffness in signal transduction. Our results reveal that RhoA has a central role in determining the fate decisions of MECs in response to cell–matrix interactions. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 1553–1560, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21678418

  15. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  16. Myosin is involved in postmitotic cell spreading

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated a role for myosin in postmitotic Potoroo tridactylis kidney (PtK2) cell spreading by inhibitor studies, time- lapse video microscopy, and immunofluorescence. We have also determined the spatial organization and polarity of actin filaments in postmitotic spreading cells. We show that butanedione monoxime (BDM), a known inhibitor of muscle myosin II, inhibits nonmuscle myosin II and myosin V adenosine triphosphatases. BDM reversibly inhibits PtK2 postmitotic cell spreading. Listeria motility is not affected by this drug. Electron microscopy studies show that some actin filaments in spreading edges are part of actin bundles that are also found in long, thin, structures that are connected to spreading edges and substrate (retraction fibers), and that 90% of this actin is oriented with barbed ends in the direction of spreading. The remaining actin in spreading edges has a more random orientation and spatial arrangement. Myosin II is associated with actin polymer in spreading cell edges, but not retraction fibers. Myosin II is excluded from lamellipodia that protrude from the cell edge at the end of spreading. We suggest that spreading involves myosin, possibly myosin II. PMID:7559774

  17. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-02-18

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  18. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  19. cAPK-phosphorylation controls the interaction of the regulatory domain of cardiac myosin binding protein C with myosin-S2 in an on-off fashion.

    PubMed

    Gruen, M; Prinz, H; Gautel, M

    1999-06-25

    Myosin binding protein C is a protein of the myosin filaments of striated muscle which is expressed in isoforms specific for cardiac and skeletal muscle. The cardiac isoform is phosphorylated rapidly upon adrenergic stimulation of myocardium by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and together with the phosphorylation of troponin-I and phospholamban contributes to the positive inotropy that results from adrenergic stimulation of the heart. Cardiac myosin binding protein C is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase on three sites in a myosin binding protein C specific N-terminal domain which binds to myosin-S2. This interaction with myosin close to the motor domain is likely to mediate the regulatory function of the protein. Cardiac myosin binding protein C is a common target gene of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most mutations encode N-terminal subfragments of myosin binding protein C. The understanding of the signalling interactions of the N-terminal region is therefore important for understanding the pathophysiology of myosin binding protein C associated cardiomyopathy. We demonstrate here by cosedimentation assays and isothermal titration calorimetry that the myosin-S2 binding properties of the myosin binding protein C motif are abolished by cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated tris-phosphorylation, decreasing the S2 affinity from a Kd of approximately 5 microM to undetectable levels. We show that the slow and fast skeletal muscle isoforms are no cAMP-dependent protein kinase substrates and that the S2 interaction of these myosin binding protein C isoforms is therefore constitutively on. The regulation of cardiac contractility by myosin binding protein C therefore appears to be a 'brake-off' mechanism that will free a specific subset of myosin heads from sterical constraints imposed by the binding to the myosin binding protein C motif.

  20. Novel configuration of a myosin II transient intermediate analogue revealed by quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimori, Yoshitaka; Baba, Norio; Katayama, Eisaku

    2013-02-15

    In the present paper, we described our attempt to characterize the rough three-dimensional features of the structural analogue of the key intermediate of myosin's cross-bridge cycle. Using quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy, we observed that actin-attached myosin during in vitro sliding was bent superficially as postulated by the conventional hypothesis, but in the opposite direction of the putative pre-power-stroke configuration, as for ADP·Vi (inorganic vanadate)-bound myosin. We searched for the conformational species with a similar appearance and found that SH1-SH2 (thiols 1 and 2)-cross-linked myosin is a good candidate. To characterize such small asymmetric structures, we employed a new pattern-recognition procedure that accommodates the metal-replicated samples. In this method, the best-matched views of the target microscopic images were selected from a comprehensive set of images simulated from known atomic co-ordinates of relevant proteins. Together with effective morphological filtering, we could define the conformational species and the view angles of the catalytic domain and the lever arm cropped from averaged images of disulfide-cross-linked myosin. Whereas the catalytic domain of the new conformer closely resembled the pPDM (N,N'-p-phenylenedimaleimide)-treated, but SH2 Lys705-cross-linked, structure (PDB code 1L2O), a minor product of the same cross-linking reaction, the lever arm projected differently. Using separately determined view angles of the catalytic domain and the lever arm, we built a model of disulfide-cross-linked myosin. Further combination with the 'displacement-mapping' procedure enabled us to reconstruct the global three-dimensional envelope of the unusual structure whose lever arm orientation is compatible with our reports on the actin-sliding cross-bridge structure. Assuming this conformer as the structural analogue of the transient intermediate during actin sliding, the power stroke of the lever arm might

  1. The Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Motility, Pseudopod and Uropod Formation, Chemotaxis and the Cortical Localization of Myosin II in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lusche, Daniel F.; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular Ca++, a ubiquitous cation in the soluble environment of cells both free living and within the human body, regulates most aspects of amoeboid cell motility, including shape, uropod formation, pseudopod formation, velocity and turning in Dictyostelium discoideum. Hence it affects the efficiency of both basic motile behavior and chemotaxis. Extracellular Ca++ is optimal at 10 mM. A gradient of the chemoattractant cAMP generated in the absence of added Ca++ only affects turning, but in combination with extracellular Ca++, enhances the effects of extracellular Ca++. Potassium, at 40 mM, can substitute for Ca++. Mg++, Mn++, Zn++ and Na+ cannot. Extracellular Ca++, or K+, also induce the cortical localization of myosin II in a polar fashion. The effects of Ca++, K+ or a cAMP gradient do not appear to be similarly mediated by an increase in the general pool of free cytosolic Ca++. These results suggest a model, in which each agent functioning through different signaling systems, converge to affect the cortical localization of myosin II, which in turn effects the behavioral changes leading to efficient cell motility and chemotaxis. PMID:19363786

  2. Plant-Specific Myosin XI, a Molecular Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Motoki; Nakano, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, organelle movement, positioning, and communications are critical for maintaining cellular functions and are highly regulated by intracellular trafficking. Directional movement of motor proteins along the cytoskeleton is one of the key regulators of such trafficking. Most plants have developed a unique actin-myosin system for intracellular trafficking. Although the composition of myosin motors in angiosperms is limited to plant-specific myosin classes VIII and XI, there are large families of myosins, especially in class XI, suggesting functional diversification among class XI members. However, the molecular properties and regulation of each myosin XI member remains unclear. To achieve a better understanding of the plant-specific actin-myosin system, the characterization of myosin XI members at the molecular level is essential. In the first half of this review, we summarize the molecular properties of tobacco 175-kDa myosin XI, and in the later half, we focus on myosin XI members in Arabidopsis thaliana. Through detailed comparison of the functional domains of these myosins with the functional domain of myosin V, we look for possible diversification in enzymatic and mechanical properties among myosin XI members concomitant with their regulation.

  3. Structure of the Rigor Actin-Tropomyosin-Myosin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Behrmann, Elmar; Müller, Mirco; Penczek, Pawel A.; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Manstein, Dietmar J.; Raunser, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of myosin with actin filaments is the central feature of muscle contraction and cargo movement along actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. Myosin converts the chemical energy stored in ATP into force and movement along actin filaments. Myosin binding to actin induces conformational changes that are coupled to the nucleotide-binding pocket and amplified by a specialized region of the motor domain for efficient force generation. Tropomyosin plays a key role in regulating the productive interaction between myosins and actin. Here, we report the 8 Å resolution structure of the actin-tropomyosin-myosin complex determined by cryo electron microscopy. The pseudo-atomic model of the complex obtained from fitting crystal structures into the map defines the large actin-myosin-tropomyosin interface and the molecular interactions between the proteins in detail and allows us to propose a structural model for tropomyosin dependent myosin binding to actin and actin-induced nucleotide release from myosin. PMID:22817895

  4. Myosinome: a database of myosins from select eukaryotic genomes to facilitate analysis of sequence-structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Syamaladevi, Divya P; Sunitha, Margaret S; Kalaimathy, S; Reddy, Chandrashekar C; Iftekhar, Mohammed; Pasha, Shaik N; Sowdhamini, R

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are one of the largest protein superfamilies with 24 classes. They have conserved structural features and catalytic domains yet show huge variation at different domains resulting in a variety of functions. Myosins are molecules driving various kinds of cellular processes and motility until the level of organisms. These are ATPases that utilize the chemical energy released by ATP hydrolysis to bring about conformational changes leading to a motor function. Myosins are important as they are involved in almost all cellular activities ranging from cell division to transcriptional regulation. They are crucial due to their involvement in many congenital diseases symptomatized by muscular malfunctions, cardiac diseases, deafness, neural and immunological dysfunction, and so on, many of which lead to death at an early age. We present Myosinome, a database of selected myosin classes (myosin II, V, and VI) from five model organisms. This knowledge base provides the sequences, phylogenetic clustering, domain architectures of myosins and molecular models, structural analyses, and relevant literature of their coiled-coil domains. In the current version of Myosinome, information about 71 myosin sequences belonging to three myosin classes (myosin II, V, and VI) in five model organisms (Homo Sapiens, Mus musculus, D. melanogaster, C. elegans and S. cereviseae) identified using bioinformatics surveys are presented, and several of them are yet to be functionally characterized. As these proteins are involved in congenital diseases, such a database would be useful in short-listing candidates for gene therapy and drug development. The database can be accessed from http://caps.ncbs.res.in/myosinome.

  5. Cell Adhesion, Signaling and Myosin in Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    calmodulin-binding myosins. Trends Cell Bio 5:310- 316. 4. de Lanerolle, P. and Paul, R.J. (1991) Myosin phosphorylation/ dephosphorylation and...muscle myosin heavy chain is phosphorylated in intact cells by casein kinase II on a serine near the carboxyl terminus. J. Bio. Chem., 265:17876-17882 10

  6. Contractile properties of motor units and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in rat fast-type muscle after volitional weight-lifting training.

    PubMed

    Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Mrówczyński, Włodzimierz; Warchoł, Wojciech; Majerczak, Joanna; Karasiński, Janusz; Korostyński, Michał; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic resistance training increases the force and speed of muscle contraction, but little is known about modifications to the contractile properties of the main physiological types of motor units (MUs) that contribute to these muscle adaptations. Although the contractile profile of MU muscle fibers is tightly coupled to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression, it is not well understood if MyHC transition is a prerequisite for modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs. In this study, we examined MU contractile properties, the mRNA expression of MyHC, parvalbumin, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump isoforms, as well as the MyHC protein content after 5 wk of volitional progressive weight-lifting training in the medial gastrocnemius muscle in rats. The training had no effect on MyHC profiling or Ca(2+)-handling protein gene expression. Maximum force increased in slow (by 49%) and fast (by 21%) MUs. Within fast MUs, the maximum force increased in most fatigue-resistant and intermediate but not most fatigable MUs. Twitch contraction time was shortened in slow and fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Twitch half-relaxation was shortened in fast most fatigue-resistant and intermediate MUs. The force-frequency curve shifted rightward in fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Fast fatigable MUs fatigued less within the initial 15 s while fast fatigue-resistant units increased the ability to potentiate the force within the first minute of the standard fatigue test. In conclusion, at the early stage of resistance training, modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs appear in the absence of MyHC transition and the upregulation of Ca(2+)-handling genes.

  7. A chitin synthase with a myosin-like motor domain is essential for hyphal growth, appressorium differentiation, and pathogenicity of the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stefan; Sugui, Janyce A; Steinberg, Gero; Deising, Holger B

    2007-12-01

    Chitin synthesis contributes to cell wall biogenesis and is essential for invasion of solid substrata and pathogenicity of filamentous fungi. In contrast to yeasts, filamentous fungi contain up to 10 chitin synthases (CHS), which might reflect overlapping functions and indicate their complex lifestyle. Previous studies have shown that a class VI CHS of the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola is essential for cell wall synthesis of conidia and vegetative hyphae. Here, we report on cloning and characterization of three additional CHS genes, CgChsI, CgChsIII, and CgChsV, encoding class I, III, and V CHS, respectively. All CHS genes are expressed during vegetative and pathogenic development. DeltaCgChsI and DeltaCgChsIII mutants did not differ significantly from the wild-type isolate with respect to hyphal growth and pathogenicity. In contrast, null mutants in the CgChsV gene, which encodes a CHS with an N-terminal myosin-like motor domain, are strongly impaired in vegetative growth and pathogenicity. Even in osmotically stabilized media, vegetative hyphae of DeltaCgChsV mutants exhibited large balloon-like swellings, appressorial walls appeared to disintegrate during maturation, and infection cells were nonfunctional. Surprisingly, DeltaCgChsV mutants were able to form dome-shaped hyphopodia that exerted force and showed host cell wall penetration rates comparable with the wild type. However, infection hyphae that formed within the plant cells exhibited severe swellings and were not able to proceed with plant colonization efficiently. Consequently, DeltaCgChsV mutants did not develop macroscopically visible anthracnose disease symptoms and, thus, were nonpathogenic.

  8. The Myosin II Inhibitor, Blebbistatin, Ameliorates FeCl3-induced Arterial Thrombosis via the GSK3β-NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Long; Zhao, Yazheng; Han, Han; Hu, Yang; Liang, Di; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis and its related diseases are major healthcare problems worldwide. Blebbistatin is an inhibitor of myosin II, which plays an important role in thrombosis. The aim of our study is to explore the effect and potential mechanism of blebbistatin on arterial thrombosis. A ferric chloride (FeCl3) solution at a concentration of 5% was used to induce carotid artery thrombosis in mice. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression or activation of non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC IIA), tissue factor (TF), GSK3β and NF-κB. Blebbistatin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced carotid artery thrombosis induced by FeCl3 solution in mice, inhibited NMMHC IIA expression and impeded TF expression via the GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathway in mouse arterial vascular tissues. The present study demonstrates that blebbistatin may impede TF expression partly via the Akt/GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathways in the endothelium in a FeCl3 model, shedding new insights into the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis and providing new clues for the development of antithrombotic drugs. PMID:28539835

  9. The Myosin II Inhibitor, Blebbistatin, Ameliorates FeCl3-induced Arterial Thrombosis via the GSK3β-NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Long; Zhao, Yazheng; Han, Han; Hu, Yang; Liang, Di; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis and its related diseases are major healthcare problems worldwide. Blebbistatin is an inhibitor of myosin II, which plays an important role in thrombosis. The aim of our study is to explore the effect and potential mechanism of blebbistatin on arterial thrombosis. A ferric chloride (FeCl3) solution at a concentration of 5% was used to induce carotid artery thrombosis in mice. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression or activation of non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC IIA), tissue factor (TF), GSK3β and NF-κB. Blebbistatin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced carotid artery thrombosis induced by FeCl3 solution in mice, inhibited NMMHC IIA expression and impeded TF expression via the GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathway in mouse arterial vascular tissues. The present study demonstrates that blebbistatin may impede TF expression partly via the Akt/GSK3β-NF-κB signalling pathways in the endothelium in a FeCl3 model, shedding new insights into the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis and providing new clues for the development of antithrombotic drugs.

  10. Early stages of energy transduction by myosin: roles of Arg in switch I, of Glu in switch II, and of the salt-bridge between them.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hirofumi; Ohki, Takashi; Mochizuki, Naoki; Morales, Manuel F

    2002-11-26

    On the basis of the crystallographic snapshots of Rayment and his collaborators [Fisher, A. J., Smith, C. A., Thoden, J. B., Smith, R., Sutoh, K., Holden, H. M., & Rayment, I. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 8960-8972], we have understood some basic principles about the early stages of myosin catalysis, namely, ATP is drawn into the active site, over which the cleft closes. Catalyzed hydrolysis occurs, and the first product (orthophosphate) is released from the backdoor of the cleft. In the cleft-closing process, the active site incidentally signals its movement to a particular remote tryptophan residue, Trp-512. In this work, we expand on some of these ideas to rationalize the behavior of a mutated system in action. From the behavior of recombinant myosin systems in which Arg-247 and Glu-470 were substituted in several ways, we draw the conclusions that (i) the force between Arg-247 and gamma-phosphate of ATP may assist in closing the cleft, and incidentally in signaling to the remote Trp, and (ii) in catalysis, Glu-470 is involved in holding the lytic H(2)O (w(1)). We also propose that w(1) and also a second water, w(2), enter into a structure that bridges Glu-470 and the gamma-phosphate of bound ATP, and at the same time positions w(1) for its in-line hydrolytic attack.

  11. Effects of a myosin-II inhibitor (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide, BTS) on contractile characteristics of intact fast-twitch mammalian muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Pinniger, G J; Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the effects of N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), a potent and specific inhibitor of fast muscle myosin-II, using small bundles of intact fibres or single fibres from rat foot muscle. BTS decreased tetanic tension reversibly in a concentration-dependent manner with half-maximal inhibition at approximately approximately 2 microM at 20 degrees C. The inhibition of tension with 10 microM BTS was marked at the three temperatures examined (10, 20 and 30 degrees C), but greatest at 10 degrees C. BTS decreased active muscle stiffness to a lesser extent than tetanic tension indicating that not all of the tension inhibition was due to a reduced number of attached cross-bridges. BTS-induced inhibition of active tension was not accompanied by any change in the free myoplasmic Ca2+ transients. The potency and specificity of BTS make it a very suitable myosin inhibitor for intact mammalian fast muscle and should be a useful tool for the examination of outstanding questions in muscle contraction.

  12. Unconventional myosin traffic in cells reveals a selective actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Brawley, Crista M.; Rock, Ronald S.

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have a self-organizing cytoskeleton where motors transport cargoes along cytoskeletal tracks. To understand the sorting process, we developed a system to observe single-molecule motility in a cellular context. We followed myosin classes V, VI, and X on triton-extracted actin cytoskeletons from Drosophila S2, mammalian COS-7, and mammalian U2OS cells. We find that these cells vary considerably in their global traffic patterns. The S2 and U2OS cells have regions of actin that either enhance or inhibit specific myosin classes. U2OS cells allow for 1 motor class, myosin VI, to move along stress fiber bundles, while motility of myosin V and X are suppressed. Myosin X motors are recruited to filopodia and the lamellar edge in S2 cells, whereas myosin VI motility is excluded from the same regions. Furthermore, we also see different velocities of myosin V motors in central regions of S2 cells, suggesting regional control of motor motility by the actin cytoskeleton. We also find unexpected features of the actin cytoskeletal network, including a population of reversed filaments with the barbed-end toward the cell center. This myosin motor regulation demonstrates that native actin cytoskeletons are more than just a collection of filaments. PMID:19478066

  13. Myosins as fundamental components during tumorigenesis: diverse and indispensable

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Ruide; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Myosin is a kind of actin-based motor protein. As the crucial functions of myosin during tumorigenesis have become increasingly apparent, the profile of myosin in the field of cancer research has also been growing. Eighteen distinct classes of myosins have been discovered in the past twenty years and constitute a diverse superfamily. Various myosins share similar structures. They all convert energy from ATP hydrolysis to exert mechanical stress upon interactions with microfilaments. Ongoing research is increasingly suggesting that at least seven kinds of myosins participate in the formation and development of cancer. Myosins play essential roles in cytokinesis failure, chromosomal and centrosomal amplification, multipolar spindle formation and DNA microsatellite instability. These are all prerequisites of tumor formation. Subsequently, myosins activate various processes of tumor invasion and metastasis development including cell migration, adhesion, protrusion formation, loss of cell polarity and suppression of apoptosis. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the roles of myosins during tumorigenesis and discuss the factors and mechanisms which may regulate myosins in tumor progression. Furthermore, we put forward a completely new concept of “chromomyosin” to demonstrate the pivotal functions of myosins during karyokinesis and how this acts to optimize the functions of the members of the myosin superfamily. PMID:27121062

  14. Myosin II regulatory light chain as a novel substrate for AIM-1, an aurora/Ipl1p-related kinase from rat.

    PubMed

    Murata-Hori, M; Fumoto, K; Fukuta, Y; Iwasaki, T; Kikuchi, A; Tatsuka, M; Hosoya, H

    2000-12-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the phosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC) is localized at the cleavage furrow of dividing cells, suggesting that phosphorylation of MRLC plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, it remains unclear which kinase(s) phosphorylate MRLC during cytokinesis. AIM-1, an Aurora/Ipl1p-related kinase from rat, is known as a serine/threonine kinase that is required for cytokinesis. Here we examined the possibility that AIM-1 is a candidate for a kinase that phosphorylates MRLC during cytokinesis. As a result, we showed that AIM-1 monophosphorylated MRLC at Ser19 using two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping analysis and several MRLC mutants. Furthermore, AIM-1 was colocalized with monophosphorylated MRLC at the cleavage furrow of dividing cells. We propose here that AIM-1 may participate in monophosphorylation of MRLC during cytokinesis.

  15. The fission yeast Chs2 protein interacts with the type-II myosin Myo3p and is required for the integrity of the actomyosin ring.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Rebeca; Valdivieso, M-Henar

    2006-07-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe cytokinesis requires the function of a contractile actomyosin ring. Fission yeast Chs2p is a transmembrane protein structurally similar to chitin synthases that lacks such enzymatic activity. Chs2p localisation and assembly into a ring that contracts during division requires the general system for polarised secretion, some components of the actomyosin ring, and an active septation initiation network. Chs2p interacts physically with the type-II myosin Myo3p revealing a physical link between the plasma membrane and the ring. In chs2Delta mutants, actomyosin ring integrity is compromised during the last stages of contraction and it remains longer in the midzone. In synchronous cultures, chs2Delta cells exhibit a delay in septation with respect to the control strain. All these results show that Chs2p participates in the correct functioning of the medial ring.

  16. Actin immobilization on chitin for purifying myosin II: A laboratory exercise that integrates concepts of molecular cell biology and protein chemistry.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marcelle Gomes; Grossi, André Luiz; Pereira, Elisângela Lima Bastos; da Cruz, Carolina Oliveira; Mendes, Fernanda Machado; Cameron, Luiz Claudio; Paiva, Carmen Lucia Antão

    2008-01-01

    This article presents our experience on teaching biochemical sciences through an innovative approach that integrates concepts of molecular cell biology and protein chemistry. This original laboratory exercise is based on the preparation of an affinity chromatography column containing F-actin molecules immobilized on chitin particles for purifying skeletal myosin II. It favors the active learning of protein extraction and purification, the learning of concepts such as muscle contraction, cytoskeleton structure, and its importance for the living cell. This laboratory exercise also promotes learning biotechnological applications of chitin and the applications of protein immobilization in different industrial fields. Furthermore, the activities target the development of laboratorial abilities, problem-solving skills, and the ability to write a scientific report, following the model of a scientific article. The trials are mainly proposed for either an undergraduate project for advanced students in the life sciences or a postgraduate practical training course. In both the cases, the students must have had biochemistry as part of their regular curriculum. Alternatively, the affinity chromatography method can fit in any regular biochemistry course if active chitin, F-actin, and a myosin II extract are provided. It is very important to mention that this laboratory exercise can be used even in places where a facility such as ultracentrifugation is lacking. For that, the steps of actin purification are skipped, and actin is commercially obtained. Therefore, it is an adequate approach for the active learning of biochemical and molecular cell biology principles and techniques even in poor countries. Copyright © 2008 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Cloning and sequence analysis of a gene encoding a 67-kilodalton myosin-cross-reactive antigen of Streptococcus pyogenes reveals its similarity with class II major histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Kil, K S; Cunningham, M W; Barnett, L A

    1994-01-01

    The group A streptococcal sequela acute rheumatic fever (ARF) has been associated with immunological cross-reactivity between streptococcal and heart proteins. To identify Streptococcus pyogenes genes that encode a myosin cross-reactive antigen(s) recognized by ARF sera, a genomic library from an emm deletion strain (T28/51/4) was screened with a single ARF serum. A positively identified lambda EMBL3 clone (T.2.18) produced a protein which reacted with myosin-specific antibodies affinity purified from individual ARF sera. The recombinant protein was initially estimated to be 60 kDa in size by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; however, upon sequence analysis it had a molecular mass equivalent to 67 kDa. Sera from patients with streptococcal infections, acute glomerulonephritis, and ARF were reactive with the recombinant 67-kDa protein. However, individual sera from healthy persons were negative or demonstrated low levels of reactivity with the 67-kDa antigen. The gene encoding the 67-kDa myosin-cross-reactive antigen was subcloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined by using a combined strategy of DNA sequencing of the cloned gene and N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protein expressed in Escherichia coli. The amino-terminal sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of an open reading frame was identical to that determined from the 67-kDa protein expressed in E. coli. The gene encoded 590 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 67,381. No cleavable signal peptide was detected with the 67-kDa protein expressed in E. coli. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 67-kDa protein did not exhibit significant similarity to any known streptococcal proteins. However, it was found to be 19% identical and 62% similar over 151 amino acid residues to the beta chain of mouse major histocompatibility complex class II antigen (I-Au). Similar degrees of homology to the beta chains of other murine and human class II haplotypes were

  18. Size and speed of the working stroke of cardiac myosin in situ

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Pinzauti, Francesca; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The power in the myocardium sarcomere is generated by two bipolar arrays of the motor protein cardiac myosin II extending from the thick filament and pulling the thin, actin-containing filaments from the opposite sides of the sarcomere. Despite the interest in the definition of myosin-based cardiomyopathies, no study has yet been able to determine the mechanokinetic properties of this motor protein in situ. Sarcomere-level mechanics recorded by a striation follower is used in electrically stimulated intact ventricular trabeculae from the rat heart to determine the isotonic velocity transient following a stepwise reduction in force from the isometric peak force TP to a value T (0.8–0.2 TP). The size and the speed of the early rapid shortening (the isotonic working stroke) increase by reducing T from ∼3 nm per half-sarcomere (hs) and 1,000 s−1 at high load to ∼8 nm⋅hs−1 and 6,000 s−1 at low load. Increases in sarcomere length (1.9–2.2 μm) and external [Ca2+]o (1–2.5 mM), which produce an increase of TP, do not affect the dependence on T, normalized for TP, of the size and speed of the working stroke. Thus, length- and Ca2+-dependent increase of TP and power in the heart can solely be explained by modulation of the number of myosin motors, an emergent property of their array arrangement. The motor working stroke is similar to that of skeletal muscle myosin, whereas its speed is about three times slower. A new powerful tool for investigations and therapies of myosin-based cardiomyopathies is now within our reach. PMID:26984499

  19. Size and speed of the working stroke of cardiac myosin in situ.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marco; Pinzauti, Francesca; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Stienen, Ger J M; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2016-03-29

    The power in the myocardium sarcomere is generated by two bipolar arrays of the motor protein cardiac myosin II extending from the thick filament and pulling the thin, actin-containing filaments from the opposite sides of the sarcomere. Despite the interest in the definition of myosin-based cardiomyopathies, no study has yet been able to determine the mechanokinetic properties of this motor protein in situ. Sarcomere-level mechanics recorded by a striation follower is used in electrically stimulated intact ventricular trabeculae from the rat heart to determine the isotonic velocity transient following a stepwise reduction in force from the isometric peak force TP to a value T(0.8-0.2 TP). The size and the speed of the early rapid shortening (the isotonic working stroke) increase by reducing T from ∼3 nm per half-sarcomere (hs) and 1,000 s(-1) at high load to ∼8 nm⋅hs(-1) and 6,000 s(-1) at low load. Increases in sarcomere length (1.9-2.2 μm) and external [Ca(2+)]o (1-2.5 mM), which produce an increase of TP, do not affect the dependence on T, normalized for TP, of the size and speed of the working stroke. Thus, length- and Ca(2+)-dependent increase of TP and power in the heart can solely be explained by modulation of the number of myosin motors, an emergent property of their array arrangement. The motor working stroke is similar to that of skeletal muscle myosin, whereas its speed is about three times slower. A new powerful tool for investigations and therapies of myosin-based cardiomyopathies is now within our reach.

  20. Distinct Roles of Myosins in Aspergillus fumigatus Hyphal Growth and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M.; Richards, Amber D.; Asfaw, Yohannes G.; Juvvadi, Praveen R.

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are a family of actin-based motor proteins found in many organisms and are categorized into classes based on their structures. Class II and V myosins are known to be important for critical cellular processes, including cytokinesis, endocytosis, exocytosis, and organelle trafficking, in the model fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. However, the roles of myosins in the growth and virulence of the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are unknown. We constructed single- and double-deletion strains of the class II and class V myosins in A. fumigatus and found that while the class II myosin (myoB) is dispensable for growth, the class V myosin (myoE) is required for proper hyphal extension; deletion of myoE resulted in hyperbranching and loss of hyphal polarity. Both myoB and myoE are necessary for proper septation, conidiation, and conidial germination, but only myoB is required for conidial viability. Infection with the ΔmyoE strain in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella model and also in a persistently immunosuppressed murine model of invasive aspergillosis resulted in hypovirulence, while analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and cellular infiltration were similar compared to those of the wild-type strain. The ΔmyoE strain showed fungal growth in the murine lung, while the ΔmyoB strain exhibited little fungal burden, most likely due to the reduced conidial viability. These results show, for the first time, the important role these cytoskeletal components play in the growth of and disease caused by a known pathogen, prompting future studies to understand their regulation and potential targeting for novel antifungal therapies. PMID:26953327

  1. Input-specific regulation of hippocampal circuit maturation by non-muscle Myosin IIB

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Emin D.; Aceti, Massimiliano; Creson, Thomas K.; Rojas, Camilo S.; Hubbs, Cristopher; McGuire, Megan N.; Kakad, Priyanka P.; Miller, Courtney A.; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Myh9 and Myh10, which encode two major isoforms of non-muscle myosin II expressed in the brain, have emerged as risk factors for developmental brain disorders. Myosin II motors regulate neuronal cytoskeletal dynamics leading to optimization of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the role of these motor complexes in brain development remains poorly understood. Here, we disrupted the in vivo expression of Myh9 and/or Myh10 in developing hippocampal neurons to determine how these motors contribute to circuit maturation in this brain area important for cognition. We found that Myh10 ablation in early postnatal, but not mature, CA1 pyramidal neurons reduced excitatory synaptic function in the Schaffer collateral pathway, while more distal inputs to CA1 neurons were relatively unaffected. Myh10 ablation in young neurons also selectively impaired the elongation of oblique dendrites that receive Schaffer collateral inputs, while the structure of distal dendrites was normal. We observed normal spine density and spontaneous excitatory currents in these neurons, indicating that Myh10 KO impaired proximal pathway synaptic maturation through disruptions to dendritic development rather than postsynaptic strength or spine morphogenesis. To address possible redundancy and/or compensation by other Myosin II motors expressed in neurons, we performed similar experiments in Myh9 null neurons. In contrast to findings in Myh10 mutants, evoked synaptic function in young Myh9 KO hippocampal neurons was normal. Data obtained from double Myh9/Myh10 KO neurons largely resembled the MyH10 KO synaptic phenotype. These data indicate that Myosin IIB is a key molecular factor that guides input-specific circuit maturation in the developing hippocampus. PMID:25931194

  2. Identification and localization of myosin superfamily members in fish retina and retinal pigmented epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Sohlberg, Lorraine; Dosé, Andréa; Breckler, Jennifer; Hillman, David W; Burnside, Beth

    2009-03-10

    Myosins are cytoskeletal motors critical for generating the forces necessary for establishing cell structure and mediating actin-dependent cell motility. In each cell type a multitude of myosins are expressed, each myosin contributing to aspects of morphogenesis, transport, or motility occurring in that cell type. To examine the roles of myosins in individual retinal cell types, we first used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening to identify myosins expressed in retina and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), followed by immunohistochemistry to examine the cellular and subcellular localizations of seven of these expressed myosins. In the myosin PCR screen of cDNA from striped bass retina and striped bass RPE, we amplified 17 distinct myosins from eight myosin classes from retinal cDNA and 11 distinct myosins from seven myosin classes from RPE cDNA. By using antibodies specific for myosins IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB, VI, VIIA, and IXB, we examined the localization patterns of these myosins in retinas and RPE of fish, and in isolated inner/outer segment fragments of green sunfish photoreceptors. Each of the myosins exhibited unique expression patterns in fish retina. Individual cell types expressed multiple myosin family members, some of which colocalized within a particular cell type. Because much is known about the functions and properties of these myosins from studies in other systems, their cellular and subcellular localization patterns in the retina help us understand which roles they might play in the vertebrate retina and RPE.

  3. A vertebrate myosin-I structure reveals unique insights into myosin mechanochemical tuning.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Henry; Greenberg, Michael J; Zwolak, Adam; Lin, Tianming; Sindelar, Charles V; Dominguez, Roberto; Ostap, E Michael

    2014-02-11

    Myosins are molecular motors that power diverse cellular processes, such as rapid organelle transport, muscle contraction, and tension-sensitive anchoring. The structural adaptations in the motor that allow for this functional diversity are not known, due, in part, to the lack of high-resolution structures of highly tension-sensitive myosins. We determined a 2.3-Å resolution structure of apo-myosin-Ib (Myo1b), which is the most tension-sensitive myosin characterized. We identified a striking unique orientation of structural elements that position the motor's lever arm. This orientation results in a cavity between the motor and lever arm that holds a 10-residue stretch of N-terminal amino acids, a region that is divergent among myosins. Single-molecule and biochemical analyses show that the N terminus plays an important role in stabilizing the post power-stroke conformation of Myo1b and in tuning the rate of the force-sensitive transition. We propose that this region plays a general role in tuning the mechanochemical properties of myosins.

  4. Novel Interactome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Myosin Type II Identified by a Modified Integrated Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (iMYTH) Screen

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ednalise; Akamine, Pearl; Snider, Jamie; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Gagarinova, Alla; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Phanse, Sadhna; San Antonio, Andrea; Cubano, Luis A.; Rymond, Brian C.; Babu, Mohan; Stagljar, Igor; Rodriguez-Medina, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin type II (Myo1p) is required for cytokinesis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Loss of Myo1p activity has been associated with growth abnormalities and enhanced sensitivity to osmotic stress, making it an appealing antifungal therapeutic target. The Myo1p tail-only domain was previously reported to have functional activity equivalent to the full-length Myo1p whereas the head-only domain did not. Since Myo1p tail-only constructs are biologically active, the tail domain must have additional functions beyond its previously described role in myosin dimerization or trimerization. The identification of new Myo1p-interacting proteins may shed light on the other functions of the Myo1p tail domain. To identify novel Myo1p-interacting proteins, and determine if Myo1p can serve as a scaffold to recruit proteins to the bud neck during cytokinesis, we used the integrated split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (iMYTH) system. Myo1p was iMYTH-tagged at its C-terminus, and screened against both cDNA and genomic prey libraries to identify interacting proteins. Control experiments showed that the Myo1p-bait construct was appropriately expressed, and that the protein colocalized to the yeast bud neck. Thirty novel Myo1p-interacting proteins were identified by iMYTH. Eight proteins were confirmed by coprecipitation (Ape2, Bzz1, Fba1, Pdi1, Rpl5, Tah11, and Trx2) or mass spectrometry (AP-MS) (Abp1). The novel Myo1p-interacting proteins identified come from a range of different processes, including cellular organization and protein synthesis. Actin assembly/disassembly factors such as the SH3 domain protein Bzz1 and the actin-binding protein Abp1 represent likely Myo1p interactions during cytokinesis. PMID:26921299

  5. Regulation of myosin-VI targeting to endocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Dance, Amber L; Miller, Matthew; Seragaki, Shinobu; Aryal, Prafulla; White, Breanne; Aschenbrenner, Laura; Hasson, Tama

    2004-10-01

    Myosin-VI has been implicated in endocytic trafficking at both the clathrin-coated and uncoated vesicle stages. The identification of alternative splice forms led to the suggestion that splicing defines the vesicle type to which myosin-VI is recruited. In contrast to this hypothesis, we find that in all cell types examined, myosin-VI is associated with uncoated endocytic vesicles, regardless of splice form. GIPC, a PDZ-domain containing adapter protein, co-assembles with myosin-VI on these vesicles. Myosin-VI is only recruited to clathrin-coated vesicles in cells that express high levels of Dab2, a clathrin-binding adapter protein. Overexpression of Dab2 is sufficient to reroute myosin-VI to clathrin-coated pits in cells where myosin-VI is normally associated with uncoated vesicles. In normal rat kidney (NRK) cells, which express high endogenous levels of Dab2, splicing of the globular tail domain further modulates targeting of ectopically expressed myosin-VI. Although myosin-VI can be recruited to clathrin-coated pits, we find no requirement for myosin-VI motor activity in endocytosis in NRK cells. Instead, our data suggest that myosin-VI recruitment to clathrin-coated pits may be an early step in the recruitment of GIPC to the vesicle surface.

  6. Random myosin loss along thick-filaments increases myosin attachment time and the proportion of bound myosin heads to mitigate force decline in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; McNabb, Mark; Palmer, Bradley M.; Toth, Michael J.; Miller, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished skeletal muscle performance with aging, disuse, and disease may be partially attributed to the loss of myofilament proteins. Several laboratories have found a disproportionate loss of myosin protein content relative to other myofilament proteins, but due to methodological limitations, the structural manifestation of this protein loss is unknown. To investigate how variations in myosin content affect ensemble cross-bridge behavior and force production we simulated muscle contraction in the half-sarcomere as myosin was removed either i) uniformly, from the Z-line end of thick-filaments, or ii) randomly, along the length of thick-filaments. Uniform myosin removal decreased force production, showing a slightly steeper force-to-myosin content relationship than the 1:1 relationship that would be expected from the loss of cross-bridges. Random myosin removal also decreased force production, but this decrease was less than observed with uniform myosin loss, largely due to increased myosin attachment time (ton) and fractional cross-bridge binding with random myosin loss. These findings support our prior observations that prolonged ton may augment force production in single fibers with randomly reduced myosin content from chronic heart failure patients. These simulation also illustrate that the pattern of myosin loss along thick-filaments influences ensemble cross-bridge behavior and maintenance of force throughout the sarcomere. PMID:24486373

  7. Random myosin loss along thick-filaments increases myosin attachment time and the proportion of bound myosin heads to mitigate force decline in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Bertrand C W; McNabb, Mark; Palmer, Bradley M; Toth, Michael J; Miller, Mark S

    2014-06-15

    Diminished skeletal muscle performance with aging, disuse, and disease may be partially attributed to the loss of myofilament proteins. Several laboratories have found a disproportionate loss of myosin protein content relative to other myofilament proteins, but due to methodological limitations, the structural manifestation of this protein loss is unknown. To investigate how variations in myosin content affect ensemble cross-bridge behavior and force production we simulated muscle contraction in the half-sarcomere as myosin was removed either (i) uniformly, from the Z-line end of thick-filaments, or (ii) randomly, along the length of thick-filaments. Uniform myosin removal decreased force production, showing a slightly steeper force-to-myosin content relationship than the 1:1 relationship that would be expected from the loss of cross-bridges. Random myosin removal also decreased force production, but this decrease was less than observed with uniform myosin loss, largely due to increased myosin attachment time (ton) and fractional cross-bridge binding with random myosin loss. These findings support our prior observations that prolonged ton may augment force production in single fibers with randomly reduced myosin content from chronic heart failure patients. These simulations also illustrate that the pattern of myosin loss along thick-filaments influences ensemble cross-bridge behavior and maintenance of force throughout the sarcomere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactions between relay helix and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix drive the converter domain rotation during the recovery stroke of myosin II.

    PubMed

    Baumketner, Andrij

    2012-06-01

    Myosin motor protein exists in two alternative conformations, prerecovery state M* and postrecovery state M**, on adenosine triphosphate binding. The details of the M*-to-M** transition, known as the recovery stroke to reflect its role as the functional opposite of the force-generating power stroke, remain elusive. The defining feature of the postrecovery state is a kink in the relay helix, a key part of the protein involved in force generation. In this article, we determine the interactions that are responsible for the appearance of the kink. We design a series of computational models that contain three other segments, relay loop, converter domain, and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix, with which relay helix interacts and determine their structure in accurate replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. By conducting an exhaustive combinatorial search among different models, we find that: (1) the converter domain must be attached to the relay helix during the transition, so it does not interfere with other parts of the protein and (2) the structure of the relay helix is controlled by SH1 helix. The kink is strongly coupled to the position of SH1 helix. It arises as a result of direct interactions between SH1 and the relay helix and leads to a rotation of the C-terminal part of the relay helix, which is subsequently transmitted to the converter domain.

  9. Human myosin-Vc is a novel class V myosin expressed in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Olga C; Cheney, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Class V myosins are one of the most ancient and widely distributed groups of the myosin superfamily and are hypothesized to function as motors for actin-dependent organelle transport. We report the discovery and initial characterization of a novel member of this family, human myosin-Vc (Myo5c). The Myo5c protein sequence shares approximately 50% overall identity with the two other class V myosins in vertebrates, myosin-Va (Myo5a) and myosin-Vb (Myo5b). Systematic analysis of the mRNA and protein distribution of these myosins indicates that Myo5a is most abundant in brain, whereas Myo5b and Myo5c are expressed chiefly in non-neuronal tissues. Myo5c is particularly abundant in epithelial and glandular tissues including pancreas, prostate, mammary, stomach, colon and lung. Immunolocalization in colon and exocrine pancreas indicates that Myo5c is expressed chiefly in epithelial cells. A dominant negative approach using a GFP-Myo5c tail construct in HeLa cells reveals that the Myo5c tail selectively colocalizes with and perturbs a membrane compartment containing the transferrin receptor and rab8. Transferrin also accumulates in this compartment, suggesting that Myo5c is involved in transferrin trafficking. As a class V myosin of epithelial cells, Myo5c is likely to power actin-based membrane trafficking in many physiologically crucial tissues of the human body.

  10. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: the parallel cluster model.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  11. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  12. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  13. The molecular structure of the fastest myosin from green algae, Chara.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, M; Nakamura, A; Sumiyoshi, H; Sakaba, N; Taniguchi, H; Kohama, K; Higashi-Fujime, S

    2000-04-02

    Chara myosin in green algae, Chara corallina, is the fastest myosin of all those observed so far. To shed light on the molecular mechanism of this fast sliding, we determined the primary structure of Chara myosin heavy chain (hc). It has a motor domain, six IQ motifs for calmodulin binding, a coiled-coil structure to dimerize, and a globular tail. Chara myosin hc is very similar to some plant myosins and has been predicted to belong to the class XI. Short loop 1 and loop 2 may account for the characteristics of mechanochemical properties of Chara myosin. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Functions of plant-specific myosin XI: from intracellular motility to plant postures.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Haruko; Tamura, Kentaro; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-12-01

    The plant-specific protein motor class myosin XI is known to function in rapid bulk flow of the cytoplasm (cytoplasmic streaming) and in organellar movements. Recent studies unveiled a wide range of physiological functions of myosin XI motors, from intracellular motility to organ movements. Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members of myosin XI class. In vegetative organs, myosins XIk, XI1, and XI2 primarily contribute to dynamics and spatial configurations of endoplasmic reticulum that develops a tubular network in the cell periphery and thick strand-like structures in the inner cell regions. Myosin XI-i forms a nucleocytoplasmic linker and is responsible for nuclear movement and shape. In addition to these intracellular functions, myosin XIf together with myosin XIk is involved in the fundamental nature of plants; the actin-myosin XI cytoskeleton regulates organ straightening to adjust plant posture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetic properties and small-molecule inhibition of human myosin-6

    PubMed Central

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Selvadurai, Jayashankar; Bond, Lisa M.; Fedorov, Roman; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin-6 is an actin-based motor protein that moves its cargo towards the minus-end of actin filaments. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin-6 heavy chain and changes in the cellular abundance of the protein have been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Here, we present a detailed kinetic characterization of the human myosin-6 motor domain, describe the effect of 2,4,6-triiodophenol on the interaction of myosin-6 with F-actin and nucleotides, and show how addition of the drug reduces the number of myosin-6-dependent vesicle fusion events at the plasma membrane during constitutive secretion. PMID:22884421

  16. Direct real-time detection of the actin-activated power stroke within the myosin catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Muretta, Joseph M; Petersen, Karl J; Thomas, David D

    2013-04-30

    We have used transient kinetics, nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and kinetics simulations to resolve a structural transition in the Dictyostelium myosin II relay helix during the actin-activated power stroke. The relay helix plays a critical role in force generation in myosin, coupling biochemical changes in the ATPase site with the force-transducing rotation of the myosin light-chain domain. Previous research in the absence of actin showed that ATP binding to myosin induces a dynamic equilibrium between a bent prepower stroke state of the relay helix and a straight postpower stroke state, which dominates in the absence of ATP or when ADP is bound. We now ask whether actin binding reverses this transition and if so, how this reversal is coordinated with actin-activated phosphate release. We labeled a Cys-lite Dictyostelium myosin II motor domain with donor and acceptor probes at two engineered Cys residues designed to detect relay helix bending. We then performed transient time-resolved FRET following stopped-flow mixing of actin with labeled myosin, preincubated with ATP. We determined the kinetics of actin-activated phosphate release, using fluorescent phosphate-binding protein. The results show that actin binding to the myosin.ADP.P complex straightens the relay helix before phosphate dissociation. This actin-activated relay helix straightening is reversible, but phosphate irreversibly dissociates from the postpower stroke state, preventing reversal of the power stroke. Thus, relay helix straightening gates phosphate dissociation, whereas phosphate dissociation provides the thermodynamic driving force underlying force production.

  17. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors.

  18. The Carboxy-Terminal Tails of Septins Cdc11 and Shs1 Recruit Myosin-II Binding Factor Bni5 to the Bud Neck in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finnigan, Gregory C.; Booth, Elizabeth A.; Duvalyan, Angela; Liao, Elizabeth N.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that form heterooctameric complexes that assemble into higher-order structures. In yeast, septin superstructure at the bud neck serves as a barrier to separate a daughter cell from its mother and as a scaffold to recruit the proteins that execute cytokinesis. However, how septins recruit specific factors has not been well characterized. In the accompanying article in this issue, (Finnigan et al. 2015), we demonstrated that the C-terminal extensions (CTEs) of the alternative terminal subunits of septin heterooctamers, Cdc11 and Shs1, share a role required for optimal septin function in vivo. Here we describe our use of unbiased genetic approaches (both selection of dosage suppressors and analysis of synthetic interactions) that pinpointed Bni5 as a protein that interacts with the CTEs of Cdc11 and Shs1. Furthermore, we used three independent methods—construction of chimeric proteins, noncovalent tethering mediated by a GFP-targeted nanobody, and imaging by fluorescence microscopy—to confirm that a physiologically important function of the CTEs of Cdc11 and Shs1 is optimizing recruitment of Bni5 and thereby ensuring efficient localization at the bud neck of Myo1, the type II myosin of the actomyosin contractile ring. Related article in GENETICS: Finnigan, G. C. et al., 2015 Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of Paralogous Terminal Septin Subunits Shs1 and Cdc11 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 200: 821–841. PMID:25971666

  19. Differential localization of cytoplasmic myosin II isoforms A and B in avian interphase and dividing embryonic and immortalized cardiomyocytes and other cell types in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Jaffredo, T.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Two principal isoforms of cytoplasmic myosin II, A and B (CMIIA and CMIIB), are present in different proportions in different tissues. Isoform-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to avian CMIIA and CMIIB reveal the cellular distributions of these isoforms in interphase and dividing embryonic avian cardiac, intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia cells in primary cell culture. Embryonic cardiomyocytes react with antibodies to CMIIB but not to CMIIA, localize CMIIB in stress-fiber-like-structures during interphase, and markedly concentrate CMIIB in networks in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In contrast, cardiac fibroblasts localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks during interphase, and demonstrate slight and independently regulated concentration of CMIIA and CMIIB in networks in their cleavage furrows. V-myc-immortalized cardiomyocytes, an established cell line, have regained the ability to express CMIIA, as well as CMIIB, and localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks in interphase cells and in cleavage furrows in dividing cells. Conversely, some intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia interphase cells express only CMIIA, organized primarily in networks. Of these, intestinal epithelial cells express both CMIIA and CMIIB when they divide, whereas some dividing cells from both spleen and dorsal root ganglia express only CMIIA and concentrate it in their cleavage furrows. These results suggest that within a given tissue, different cell types express different isoforms of CMII, and that cells expressing either CMIIA or CMIIB alone, or simultaneously, can form a cleavage furrow and divide.

  20. Differential localization of cytoplasmic myosin II isoforms A and B in avian interphase and dividing embryonic and immortalized cardiomyocytes and other cell types in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Jaffredo, T.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Two principal isoforms of cytoplasmic myosin II, A and B (CMIIA and CMIIB), are present in different proportions in different tissues. Isoform-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to avian CMIIA and CMIIB reveal the cellular distributions of these isoforms in interphase and dividing embryonic avian cardiac, intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia cells in primary cell culture. Embryonic cardiomyocytes react with antibodies to CMIIB but not to CMIIA, localize CMIIB in stress-fiber-like-structures during interphase, and markedly concentrate CMIIB in networks in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In contrast, cardiac fibroblasts localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks during interphase, and demonstrate slight and independently regulated concentration of CMIIA and CMIIB in networks in their cleavage furrows. V-myc-immortalized cardiomyocytes, an established cell line, have regained the ability to express CMIIA, as well as CMIIB, and localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks in interphase cells and in cleavage furrows in dividing cells. Conversely, some intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia interphase cells express only CMIIA, organized primarily in networks. Of these, intestinal epithelial cells express both CMIIA and CMIIB when they divide, whereas some dividing cells from both spleen and dorsal root ganglia express only CMIIA and concentrate it in their cleavage furrows. These results suggest that within a given tissue, different cell types express different isoforms of CMII, and that cells expressing either CMIIA or CMIIB alone, or simultaneously, can form a cleavage furrow and divide.

  1. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track. © 2012 American Physical Society

  2. Duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2012-02-01

    Molecular motors are found throughout the cells of the human body and have many different and important roles. These micromachines move along filament tracks and have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical work that powers cellular motility. Different types of motors are characterized by different duty ratios, which is the fraction of time that a motor is attached to its filament. In the case of myosin II (a nonprocessive molecular machine with a low duty ratio), cooperativity between several motors is essential to induce motion along its actin filament track. In this work we use statistical mechanical tools to calculate the duty ratio of cooperative molecular motors. The model suggests that the effective duty ratio of nonprocessive motors that work in cooperation is lower than the duty ratio of the individual motors. The origin of this effect is the elastic tension that develops in the filament which is relieved when motors detach from the track.

  3. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-04-15

    Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression.

  4. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. PMID:26940917

  5. Actin polymerization or myosin contraction: two ways to build up cortical tension for symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Kevin; Lemière, Joël; Faqir, Fahima; Manzi, John; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie; Betz, Timo; Sykes, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cells use complex biochemical pathways to drive shape changes for polarization and movement. One of these pathways is the self-assembly of actin filaments and myosin motors that together produce the forces and tensions that drive cell shape changes. Whereas the role of actin and myosin motors in cell polarization is clear, the exact mechanism of how the cortex, a thin shell of actin that is underneath the plasma membrane, can drive cell shape changes is still an open question. Here, we address this issue using biomimetic systems: the actin cortex is reconstituted on liposome membranes, in an ‘outside geometry’. The actin shell is either grown from an activator of actin polymerization immobilized at the membrane by a biotin–streptavidin link, or built by simple adsorption of biotinylated actin filaments to the membrane, in the presence or absence of myosin motors. We show that tension in the actin network can be induced either by active actin polymerization on the membrane via the Arp2/3 complex or by myosin II filament pulling activity. Symmetry breaking and spontaneous polarization occur above a critical tension that opens up a crack in the actin shell. We show that this critical tension is reached by growing branched networks, nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex, in a concentration window of capping protein that limits actin filament growth and by a sufficient number of motors that pull on actin filaments. Our study provides the groundwork to understanding the physical mechanisms at work during polarization prior to cell shape modifications. PMID:24062578

  6. Myosin-IIA regulates leukemia engraftment and brain infiltration in a mouse model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wigton, Eric J.; Thompson, Scott B.; Long, Robert A.; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia dissemination (the spread of leukemia cells from the bone marrow) and relapse are associated with poor prognosis. Often, relapse occurs in peripheral organs, such as the CNS, which acts as a sanctuary site for leukemia cells to escape anti-cancer treatments. Similar to normal leukocyte migration, leukemia dissemination entails migration of cells from the blood circulation into tissues by extravasation. To extravasate, leukemia cells cross through vascular endothelial walls via a process called transendothelial migration, which requires cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the specific molecular players in leukemia extravasation are not fully known. We examined the role of myosin-IIA a cytoskeletal class II myosin motor protein, in leukemia progression and dissemination into the CNS by use of a mouse model of Bcr-Abl-driven B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Small hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of myosin-IIA did not affect apoptosis or the growth rate of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. However, in an in vivo leukemia transfer model, myosin-IIA depletion slowed leukemia progression and prolonged survival, in part, by reducing the ability of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to engraft efficiently. Finally, myosin-IIA inhibition, either by small hairpin RNA depletion or chemical inhibition by blebbistatin, drastically reduced CNS infiltration of leukemia cells. The effects on leukemia cell entry into tissues were mostly a result of the requirement for myosin-IIA to enable leukemia cells to complete the transendothelial migration process during extravasation. Overall, our data implicate myosin-IIA as a key mediator of leukemia cell migration, making it a promising target to inhibit leukemia dissemination in vivo and potentially reduce leukemia relapses. PMID:26792819

  7. Visualization of an unstable coiled coil from the scallop myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Brown, Jerry H; Reshetnikova, Ludmilla; Blazsek, Antal; Farkas, László; Nyitray, László; Cohen, Carolyn

    2003-07-17

    Alpha-helical coiled coils in muscle exemplify simplicity and economy of protein design: small variations in sequence lead to remarkable diversity in cellular functions. Myosin II is the key protein in muscle contraction, and the molecule's two-chain alpha-helical coiled-coil rod region--towards the carboxy terminus of the heavy chain--has unusual structural and dynamic features. The amino-terminal subfragment-2 (S2) domains of the rods can swing out from the thick filament backbone at a hinge in the coiled coil, allowing the two myosin 'heads' and their motor domains to interact with actin and generate tension. Most of the S2 rod appears to be a flexible coiled coil, but studies suggest that the structure at the N-terminal region is unstable, and unwinding or bending of the alpha-helices near the head-rod junction seems necessary for many of myosin's functional properties. Here we show the physical basis of a particularly weak coiled-coil segment by determining the 2.5-A-resolution crystal structure of a leucine-zipper-stabilized fragment of the scallop striated-muscle myosin rod adjacent to the head-rod junction. The N-terminal 14 residues are poorly ordered; the rest of the S2 segment forms a flexible coiled coil with poorly packed core residues. The unusual absence of interhelical salt bridges here exposes apolar core atoms to solvent.

  8. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation enhances cardiac β-myosin in vitro motility under load.

    PubMed

    Karabina, Anastasia; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2015-08-15

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and myofibrillar disarray, and often results in sudden cardiac death. Two HCM mutations, N47K and R58Q, are located in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The RLC mechanically stabilizes the myosin lever arm, which is crucial to myosin's ability to transmit contractile force. The N47K and R58Q mutations have previously been shown to reduce actin filament velocity under load, stemming from a more compliant lever arm (Greenberg, 2010). In contrast, RLC phosphorylation was shown to impart stiffness to the myosin lever arm (Greenberg, 2009). We hypothesized that phosphorylation of the mutant HCM-RLC may mitigate distinct mutation-induced structural and functional abnormalities. In vitro motility assays were utilized to investigate the effects of RLC phosphorylation on the HCM-RLC mutant phenotype in the presence of an α-actinin frictional load. Porcine cardiac β-myosin was depleted of its native RLC and reconstituted with mutant or wild-type human RLC in phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated form. Consistent with previous findings, in the presence of load, myosin bearing the HCM mutations reduced actin sliding velocity compared to WT resulting in 31-41% reductions in force production. Myosin containing phosphorylated RLC (WT or mutant) increased sliding velocity and also restored mutant myosin force production to near WT unphosphorylated values. These results point to RLC phosphorylation as a general mechanism to increase force production of the individual myosin motor and as a potential target to ameliorate the HCM-induced phenotype at the molecular level.

  9. Dynamic Exchange of Myosin VI on Endocytic Structures*

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M.; Arden, Susan D.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Sellers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The actin-based molecular motor myosin VI functions in the endocytic uptake pathway, both during the early stages of clathrin-mediated uptake and in later transport to/from early endosomes. This study uses fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to examine the turnover rate of myosin VI during endocytosis. The results demonstrate that myosin VI turns over dynamically on endocytic structures with a characteristic half-life common to both the large insert isoform of myosin VI on clathrin-coated structures and the no-insert isoform on early endosomes. This half-life is shared by the myosin VI-binding partner Dab2 and is identical for full-length myosin VI and the cargo-binding tail region. The 4-fold slower half-life of an artificially dimerized construct of myosin VI on clathrin-coated structures suggests that wild type myosin VI does not function as a stable dimer, but either as a monomer or in a monomer/dimer equilibrium. Taken together, these FRAP results offer insight into both the basic turnover dynamics and the monomer/dimer nature of myosin VI. PMID:22992744

  10. Myosin I contributes to the generation of resting cortical tension.

    PubMed

    Dai, J; Ting-Beall, H P; Hochmuth, R M; Sheetz, M P; Titus, M A

    1999-08-01

    The amoeboid myosin I's are required for cellular cortical functions such as pseudopod formation and macropinocytosis, as demonstrated by the finding that Dictyostelium cells overexpressing or lacking one or more of these actin-based motors are defective in these processes. Defects in these processes are concomitant with changes in the actin-filled cortex of various Dictyostelium myosin I mutants. Given that the amoeboid myosin I's possess both actin- and membrane-binding domains, the mutant phenotypes could be due to alterations in the generation and/or regulation of cell cortical tension. This has been directly tested by analyzing mutant Dictyostelium that either lacks or overexpresses various myosin I's, using micropipette aspiration techniques. Dictyostelium cells lacking only one myosin I have normal levels of cortical tension. However, myosin I double mutants have significantly reduced (50%) cortical tension, and those that mildly overexpress an amoeboid myosin I exhibit increased cortical tension. Treatment of either type of mutant with the lectin concanavalin A (ConA) that cross-links surface receptors results in significant increases in cortical tension, suggesting that the contractile activity of these myosin I's is not controlled by this stimulus. These results demonstrate that myosin I's work cooperatively to contribute substantially to the generation of resting cortical tension that is required for efficient cell migration and macropinocytosis.

  11. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  12. Enucleation of human erythroblasts involves non-muscle myosin IIB

    PubMed Central

    Ubukawa, Kumi; Guo, Yong-Mei; Takahashi, Masayuki; Hirokawa, Makoto; Michishita, Yoshihiro; Nara, Miho; Tagawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Naoto; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Nunomura, Wataru; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian erythroblasts undergo enucleation, a process thought to be similar to cytokinesis. Although an assemblage of actin, non-muscle myosin II, and several other proteins is crucial for proper cytokinesis, the role of non-muscle myosin II in enucleation remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of various cell-division inhibitors on cytokinesis and enucleation. For this purpose, we used human colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) and mature erythroblasts generated from purified CD34+ cells as target cells for cytokinesis and enucleation assay, respectively. Here we show that the inhibition of myosin by blebbistatin, an inhibitor of non-muscle myosin II ATPase, blocks both cell division and enucleation, which suggests that non-muscle myosin II plays an essential role not only in cytokinesis but also in enucleation. When the function of non-muscle myosin heavy chain (NMHC) IIA or IIB was inhibited by an exogenous expression of myosin rod fragment, myosin IIA or IIB, each rod fragment blocked the proliferation of CFU-E but only the rod fragment for IIB inhibited the enucleation of mature erythroblasts. These data indicate that NMHC IIB among the isoforms is involved in the enucleation of human erythroblasts. PMID:22049517

  13. Four things to know about myosin light chains as reporters for non-muscle myosin-2 dynamics in live cells.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2015-02-01

    The interplay between non-muscle myosins-2 and filamentous actin results in cytoplasmic contractility which is essential for eukaryotic life. Concomitantly, there is tremendous interest in elucidating the physiological function and temporal localization of non-muscle myosin-2 in cells. A commonly used method to study the function and localization of non-muscle myosin-2 is to overexpress a fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged version of the regulatory light chain (RLC) which binds to the myosin-2 heavy chain by mass action. Caveats about this approach include findings from recent studies indicating that the RLC does not bind exclusively to the non-muscle myosin-2 heavy chain. Rather, it can also associate with the myosin heavy chains of several other classes as well as other targets than myosin. In addition, the presence of the FP moiety may compromise myosin's enzymatic and mechanical performance. This and other factors to be discussed in this commentary raise questions about the possible complications in using FP-RLC as a marker for the dynamic localization and regulatory aspects of non-muscle myosin-2 motor functions in cell biological experiments. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min−1, respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2′/3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μm, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg2+ ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3–6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  15. Motor Training Promotes Both Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity of Layer II/III Pyramidal Neurons in the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Yasumasa; Ito, Nana; Yamamoto, Yui; Owada, Yuji; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Mitsushima, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Motor skill training induces structural plasticity at dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex (M1). To further analyze both synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the layer II/III area of M1, we subjected rats to a rotor rod test and then prepared acute brain slices. Motor skill consistently improved within 2 days of training. Voltage clamp analysis showed significantly higher α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/N-methyl-d-aspartate (AMPA/NMDA) ratios and miniature EPSC amplitudes in 1-day trained rats compared with untrained rats, suggesting increased postsynaptic AMPA receptors in the early phase of motor learning. Compared with untrained controls, 2-days trained rats showed significantly higher miniature EPSC amplitude and frequency. Paired-pulse analysis further demonstrated lower rates in 2-days trained rats, suggesting increased presynaptic glutamate release during the late phase of learning. One-day trained rats showed decreased miniature IPSC frequency and increased paired-pulse analysis of evoked IPSC, suggesting a transient decrease in presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release. Moreover, current clamp analysis revealed lower resting membrane potential, higher spike threshold, and deeper afterhyperpolarization in 1-day trained rats—while 2-days trained rats showed higher membrane potential, suggesting dynamic changes in intrinsic properties. Our present results indicate dynamic changes in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and intrinsic plasticity in M1 layer II/III neurons after the motor training. PMID:27193420

  16. Myosins in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of cell-cell junctions was a fundamental step in metazoan evolution, and human health depends on the formation and function of cell junctions. Although it has long been known that actin and conventional myosin have important roles in cell junctions, research has begun to reveal the specific functions of the different forms of conventional myosin. Exciting new data also reveals that a growing number of unconventional myosins have important roles in cell junctions. Experiments showing that cell junctions act as mechanosensors have also provided new impetus to understand the functions of myosins and the forces they exert. In this review we will summarize recent developments on the roles of myosins in cell junctions. PMID:22954512

  17. Biochemical studies of myosin.

    PubMed

    Trybus, K M

    2000-12-01

    This article describes methods for expressing and obtaining purified smooth muscle myosin subfragments using the baculovirus/insect cell expression system, as well as methods for purifying whole myosin from tissue. Protocols for several gel assays that are routinely used with myosin are given, including gels to monitor light chain phosphorylation state and native gels to determine protein homogeneity. Steady-state myosin ATPase and actin-activated ATPase determinations are described, as are some of the more basic transient-state kinetic parameters that can be measured. The in vitro motility assay, in which the rate of actin movement over myosin or its subfragments is quantified, is also presented. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation and Inspection Programs for Pershing II motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    2. Maintenance instructions. 3. Electrical schematics. 4. Parts lists. 40 APPENDIX D: ULTRASONIC THICKNESS GAGE FOR PERSHING-H NDI Background A...Specifications for Real-Time Digital Radiographic Inspection System 26 APPENDIX C: Borescope System Specification 37 APPENDIX D: Ultrasonic Thickness Gage for...returned from the field. Motors are now being removed from the field as part of an ongoing program of replacement. These motors have been subjected to

  19. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery.

    PubMed

    Jorrisch, Melissa H; Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2013-04-15

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B), we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  20. A simple theory of motor protein kinetics and energetics. II.

    PubMed

    Qian, H

    2000-01-10

    A three-state stochastic model of motor protein [Qian, Biophys. Chem. 67 (1997) pp. 263-267] is further developed to illustrate the relationship between the external load on an individual motor protein in aqueous solution with various ATP concentrations and its steady-state velocity. A wide variety of dynamic motor behavior are obtained from this simple model. For the particular case of free-load translocation being the most unfavorable step within the hydrolysis cycle, the load-velocity curve is quasi-linear, V/Vmax = (cF/Fmax-c)/(1-c), in contrast to the hyperbolic relationship proposed by A.V. Hill for macroscopic muscle. Significant deviation from the linearity is expected when the velocity is less than 10% of its maximal (free-load) value--a situation under which the processivity of motor diminishes and experimental observations are less certain. We then investigate the dependence of load-velocity curve on ATP (ADP) concentration. It is shown that the free load Vmax exhibits a Michaelis-Menten like behavior, and the isometric Fmax increases linearly with ln([ATP]/[ADP]). However, the quasi-linear region is independent of the ATP concentration, yielding an apparently ATP-independent maximal force below the true isometric force. Finally, the heat production as a function of ATP concentration and external load are calculated. In simple terms and solved with elementary algebra, the present model provides an integrated picture of biochemical kinetics and mechanical energetics of motor proteins.

  1. Cooperative behavior of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karen C; Stienen, Ger J M; Schmid, Christoph F

    2002-01-01

    Both experimental evidence and theoretical models for collective effects in the working mechanism of molecular motors are reviewed at three different levels, namely: (i) interaction between the two heads of double-headed motors, particularly in processive motors like kinesin, myosin V and myosin VI, (ii) cooperative regulation of muscle thin filaments by accessory proteins and the Ca2+ level, and (iii) collective dynamic effects stemming from the mechanical coupling of molecular motors within macroscopic structures such as muscle thick filaments or axonemes. We aim to bridge the gap between structural information at the molecular level and physiological data with accompanying specific models on the one hand, and general stochastic physical models for the action of molecular motors on the other hand. An underlying assumption is that while, ultimately, the function of molecular motors will be explainable by a quantitative description of specific intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions, for some coarse grained larger scale dynamic features it will be sufficient and illuminating to construct physical models that are simplified to the bare essentials.

  2. On the kinetics that moves Myosin V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; O'Kelly de Galway, Winny

    2015-10-01

    Molecular motor proteins such as Myosin V, Dynein or Kinesin are no ratchets, at least not with a flashing asymmetric potential; the crucial asymmetry is in the dynamical activity. We make that explicit in terms of a simple Markov model, emphasizing the kinetic (and non-thermodynamic) aspects of stochastic transport. The analysis shows the presence of a fluctuation symmetry in that part of the dynamical activity which is antisymmetric under reversal of trailing and leading head of the motor. The direction of the motor motion is determined by it.

  3. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part II: analyses.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-09-01

    The mechanics of the friction drive of a surface acoustic wave motor were investigated by means of contact mechanics theory. As a means to control the contact condition, the motor's slider had projections on its frictional surface. Assuming the projection was a rigid circular punch and the slider body was an elastic half-space allowed application of contact mechanics formulae to the analyses of the friction drive. Because the projection contacted the Rayleigh wave vibration, the projection's responses were considered dynamic; thus, the dynamics were also analyzed in the same framework of contact mechanics formulae. Moreover, the analyses were applied to measurements of the projection's displacement to examine the detailed mechanics during the friction drive. We calculated the contact/frictional forces based on the measurement and indicated the necessity of further investigation of the surface acoustic wave motor's friction drive, because the usual friction law was unable to explain the measurement.

  4. LGM-30B, Stage II Dissected Motors Test Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    natural curl in the rubber insulation obtained from the head-end of motor 22687. The rub - ber specimens from motors 22135 and 22788 were taken from the...oo’ds 00*dh oo’d2 00.10 00*02-0 JOTMISd = 3unl9BJW ADO ±INf Sfllfoow XH13U SS3Y19 Y313WBUdU 611 - 0 - Li uoco -3 C3 M 0 ria GT 11 aI [ ola 6 010 2 1 r

  5. Cardiac V1 and V3 myosins differ in their hydrolytic and mechanical activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, P; Harris, D E; Alpert, N R; Warshaw, D M

    1995-08-01

    The two mammalian cardiac myosin heavy chain isoforms, alpha and beta, have 93% amino acid homology, but hearts expressing these myosins exhibit marked differences in their mechanical activities. To further understand the function of these cardiac myosins as molecular motors, we compared the ability of these myosins to hydrolyze ATP and to both translocate actin filaments and generate force in an in vitro motility assay. V1 myosin has twice the actin-activated ATPase activity and three times the actin filament sliding velocity when compared with V3 myosin. In contrast, the force-generating ability of these myosins is quite different when the total force produced by a small population of myosin molecules (> 50) is examined. V1 myosin produces only one half the average cross-bridge force of V3 myosin. With discrete areas of primary structural heterogeneity known to exist between alpha and beta heavy chains, the differences we report in the hydrolytic and mechanical activities of the motors are explored in the context of potential structural and kinetic differences between the V1 and V3 myosins.

  6. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  7. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Sarah F; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-03-29

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V.

  8. The unconventional myosin-VIIa associates with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Lily E.; Warren, Carmen M.; Bucci, Cecilia; Orten, Dana J.; Hasson, Tama

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the myosin-VIIa (MYO7a) gene cause human Usher disease, characterized by hearing impairment and progressive retinal degeneration. In the retina, myosin-VIIa is highly expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium, where it plays a role in the positioning of melanosomes and other digestion organelles. Using a human cultured retinal pigmented epithelia cell line, ARPE-19, as a model system, we have found that a population of myosin-VIIa is associated with cathepsin D- and Rab7-positive lysosomes. Association of myosin-VIIa with lysosomes was Rab7 independent, as dominant negative and dominant active versions of Rab7 did not disrupt myosin-VIIa recruitment to lysosomes. Association of myosin-VIIa with lysosomes was also independent of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. Myosin-VIIa copurified with lysosomes on density gradients, and fractionation and extraction experiments suggested that it was tightly associated with the lysosome surface. These studies suggest that myosin-VIIa is a lysosome motor. PMID:16001398

  9. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  10. Myosin-I nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, P G; Albanesi, J P; Bahler, M; Bement, W M; Berg, J S; Burgess, D R; Burnside, B; Cheney, R E; Corey, D P; Coudrier, E; de Lanerolle, P; Hammer, J A; Hasson, T; Holt, J R; Hudspeth, A J; Ikebe, M; Kendrick-Jones, J; Korn, E D; Li, R; Mercer, J A; Milligan, R A; Mooseker, M S; Ostap, E M; Petit, C; Pollard, T D; Sellers, J R; Soldati, T; Titus, M A

    2001-11-26

    We suggest that the vertebrate myosin-I field adopt a common nomenclature system based on the names adopted by the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). At present, the myosin-I nomenclature is very confusing; not only are several systems in use, but several different genes have been given the same name. Despite their faults, we believe that the names adopted by the HUGO nomenclature group for genome annotation are the best compromise, and we recommend universal adoption.

  11. Unidirectional Brownian motion observed in an in silico single molecule experiment of an actomyosin motor

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Mitsunori; Terada, Tomoki P.; Sasai, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    The actomyosin molecular motor, the motor composed of myosin II and actin filament, is responsible for muscle contraction, converting chemical energy into mechanical work. Although recent single molecule and structural studies have shed new light on the energy-converting mechanism, the physical basis of the molecular-level mechanism remains unclear because of the experimental limitations. To provide a clue to resolve the controversy between the lever-arm mechanism and the Brownian ratchet-like mechanism, we here report an in silico single molecule experiment of an actomyosin motor. When we placed myosin on an actin filament and allowed myosin to move along the filament, we found that myosin exhibits a unidirectional Brownian motion along the filament. This unidirectionality was found to arise from the combination of a nonequilibrium condition realized by coupling to the ATP hydrolysis and a ratchet-like energy landscape inherent in the actin-myosin interaction along the filament, indicating that a Brownian ratchet-like mechanism contributes substantially to the energy conversion of this molecular motor. PMID:20385833

  12. Myosin-5, kinesin-1 and myosin-17 cooperate in secretion of fungal chitin synthase.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Treitschke, Steffi; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Molloy, Justin; Harmer, Nicholas J; Steinberg, Gero

    2012-01-04

    Plant infection by pathogenic fungi requires polarized secretion of enzymes, but little is known about the delivery pathways. Here, we investigate the secretion of cell wall-forming chitin synthases (CHSs) in the corn pathogen Ustilago maydis. We show that peripheral filamentous actin (F-actin) and central microtubules (MTs) form independent tracks for CHSs delivery and both cooperate in cell morphogenesis. The enzyme Mcs1, a CHS that contains a myosin-17 motor domain, is travelling along both MTs and F-actin. This transport is independent of kinesin-3, but mediated by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. Arriving vesicles pause beneath the plasma membrane, but only ~15% of them get exocytosed and the majority is returned to the cell centre by the motor dynein. Successful exocytosis at the cell tip and, to a lesser extent at the lateral parts of the cell requires the motor domain of Mcs1, which captures and tethers the vesicles prior to secretion. Consistently, Mcs1-bound vesicles transiently bind F-actin but show no motility in vitro. Thus, kinesin-1, myosin-5 and dynein mediate bi-directional motility, whereas myosin-17 introduces a symmetry break that allows polarized secretion.

  13. Association of myosin I alpha with endosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Raposo, G; Cordonnier, M N; Tenza, D; Menichi, B; Dürrbach, A; Louvard, D; Coudrier, E

    1999-05-01

    Myosin Is, which constitute a ubiquitous monomeric subclass of myosins with actin-based motor properties, are associated with plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles. Myosin Is have been proposed as key players for membrane trafficking in endocytosis or exocytosis. In the present paper we provide biochemical and immunoelectron microscopic evidence indicating that a pool of myosin I alpha (MMIalpha) is associated with endosomes and lysosomes. We show that the overproduction of MMIalpha or the production of nonfunctional truncated MMIalpha affects the distribution of the endocytic compartments. We also show that truncated brush border myosin I proteins, myosin Is that share 78% homology with MMIalpha, promote the dissociation of MMIalpha from vesicular membranes derived from endocytic compartments. The analysis at the ultrastructural level of cells producing these brush border myosin I truncated proteins shows that the delivery of the fluid phase markers from endosomes to lysosomes is impaired. MMIalpha might therefore be involved in membrane trafficking occurring between endosomes and lysosomes.

  14. Association of Myosin I Alpha with Endosomes and Lysosomes in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Graça; Cordonnier, Marie-Neige; Tenza, Danièle; Menichi, Bernadette; Dürrbach, Antoine; Louvard, Daniel; Coudrier, Evelyne

    1999-01-01

    Myosin Is, which constitute a ubiquitous monomeric subclass of myosins with actin-based motor properties, are associated with plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles. Myosin Is have been proposed as key players for membrane trafficking in endocytosis or exocytosis. In the present paper we provide biochemical and immunoelectron microscopic evidence indicating that a pool of myosin I alpha (MMIα) is associated with endosomes and lysosomes. We show that the overproduction of MMIα or the production of nonfunctional truncated MMIα affects the distribution of the endocytic compartments. We also show that truncated brush border myosin I proteins, myosin Is that share 78% homology with MMIα, promote the dissociation of MMIα from vesicular membranes derived from endocytic compartments. The analysis at the ultrastructural level of cells producing these brush border myosin I truncated proteins shows that the delivery of the fluid phase markers from endosomes to lysosomes is impaired. MMIα might therefore be involved in membrane trafficking occurring between endosomes and lysosomes. PMID:10233157

  15. Myosin superfamily: The multi-functional and irreplaceable factors in spermatogenesis and testicular tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ruide; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-15

    Spermatogenesis is a fundamental process in sexual development and reproduction, in which the diploid spermatogonia transform into haploid mature spermatozoa. This process is under the regulation of multiple factors and pathway. Myosin has been implicated in various aspects during spermatogenesis. Myosins constitute a diverse superfamily of actin-based molecular motors that translocate along microfilament in an ATP-dependent manner, and six kinds of myosins have been proved that function during spermatogenesis. In mitosis and meiosis, myosins play an important role in spindle assembly and positioning, karyokinesis and cytokinesis. During spermiogenesis, myosins participate in acrosomal formation, nuclear morphogenesis, mitochondrial translocation and spermatid individualization. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the functions of myosin in spermatogenesis and some reproductive system diseases such as testicular tumors and prostate cancer, and discuss the roles of possible upstream molecules which regulate myosin in these processes.

  16. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-08-15

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  17. Differential signalling by muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle: m2-mediated inactivation of myosin light chain kinase via Gi3, Cdc42/Rac1 and p21-activated kinase 1 pathway, and m3-mediated MLC20 (20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II) phosphorylation via Rho-associated kinase/myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 and protein kinase C/CPI-17 pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Karnam S; Zhou, Huiping; Grider, John R; Brautigan, David L; Eto, Masumi; Makhlouf, Gabriel M

    2003-01-01

    Signalling via m3 and m2 receptors in smooth muscles involved activation of two G-protein-dependent pathways by each receptor. m2 receptors were coupled via Gbetagammai3 with activation of phospholipase C-beta3, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and Cdc42/Rac1 (where Cdc stands for cell division cycle) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Each step was inhibited by methoctramine and pertussis toxin. PAK1 activity was abolished in cells expressing both Cdc42-DN (where DN stands for dominant negative) and Rac1-DN. MLCK phosphorylation was inhibited by PAK1 antibody, and in cells expressing Cdc42-DN and Rac1-DN. m3 receptors were coupled via Galpha(q/11) with activation of phospholipase C-beta1 and via RhoA with activation of Rho-associated kinase (Rho kinase), phospholipase D and protein kinase C (PKC). Rho kinase and phospholipase D activities were inhibited by C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. PKC activity was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide, and in cells expressing RhoA-DN; PKC activity was also inhibited partly by Y27632 (44+/-5%). PKC-induced phosphorylation of PKC-activated 17 kDa inhibitor protein of type 1 phosphatase (CPI-17) at Thr38 was abolished by bisindolylmaleimide and inhibited partly by Y27632 (28+/-3%). Rho-kinase-induced phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and was abolished by Y27632. Sustained phosphorylation of 20 kDa regulatory light chain of myosin II (MLC20) and contraction were abolished by bisindolylmaleimide Y27632 and C3 exoenzyme and in cells expressing RhoA-DN. The results suggest that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 and PKC-dependent phosphorylation and enhancement of CPI-17 binding to the catalytic subunit of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) act co-operatively to inhibit MLCP activity, leading to sustained stimulation of MLC20 phosphorylation and contraction. Because Y27632 inhibited both Rho kinase and PKC activities

  18. Myosin 18A coassembles with nonmuscle myosin 2 to form mixed bipolar filaments.

    PubMed

    Billington, Neil; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yingfan; Barzik, Melanie; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2015-03-30

    Class-18 myosins are most closely related to conventional class-2 nonmuscle myosins (NM2). Surprisingly, the purified head domains of Drosophila, mouse, and human myosin 18A (M18A) lack actin-activated ATPase activity and the ability to translocate actin filaments, suggesting that the functions of M18A in vivo do not depend on intrinsic motor activity. M18A has the longest coiled coil of any myosin outside of the class-2 myosins, suggesting that it might form bipolar filaments similar to conventional myosins. To address this possibility, we expressed and purified full-length mouse M18A using the baculovirus/Sf9 system. M18A did not form large bipolar filaments under any of the conditions tested. Instead, M18A formed an ∼ 65-nm-long bipolar structure with two heads at each end. Importantly, when NM2 was polymerized in the presence of M18A, the two myosins formed mixed bipolar filaments, as evidenced by cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and single-molecule imaging. Moreover, super-resolution imaging of NM2 and M18A using fluorescently tagged proteins and immunostaining of endogenous proteins showed that NM2 and M18A are present together within individual filaments inside living cells. Together, our in vitro and live-cell imaging data argue strongly that M18A coassembles with NM2 into mixed bipolar filaments. M18A could regulate the biophysical properties of these filaments and, by virtue of its extra N- and C-terminal domains, determine the localization and/or molecular interactions of the filaments. Given the numerous, fundamental cellular and developmental roles attributed to NM2, our results have far-reaching biological implications.

  19. Interactions of actin, myosin, and a new actin-binding protein of rabbit pulmonary macrophages. II. Role in cytoplasmic movement and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stossel, T P; Hartwig, J H

    1976-03-01

    Actin and myosin of rabbit pulmonary macrophages are influenced by two other proteins. A protein cofactor is required for the actin activation of macrophage myosin Mg2 ATPase activity, and a high molecular weight actin-binding protein aggregates actin filaments (Stossel T.P., and J.H. Hartwig. 1975. J. Biol. Chem. 250:5706-5711)9 When warmed in 0.34 M sucrose solution containing Mg2-ATP and dithiothreitol, these four proteins interact cooperatively. Acin-binding protein in the presence of actin causes the actin to form a gel, which liquifies when cooled. The myosin contracts the gel into an aggregate, and the rate of aggregation is accelerated by the cofactor. Therefore, we believe that these four proteins also effec the temperature-dependent gelation and aggregation of crude sucrose extracts pulmonary macrophages containing Mg2-ATP and dithiothreitol. The gelled extracts are composed of tangled filaments. Relative to homogenates of resting macrophages, the distribution of actin-binding protein in homogenates of phagocytizing macrophages is altered such that 2-6 times more actin-binding protein is soluble. Sucrose extracts of phagocytizing macrophages gel more rapidly than extracts of resting macrophages. Phagocytosis by pulmonary macrophages involves the formation of peripheral pseudopods containing filaments. The findings suggest that the actin-binding protein initiates a cooperative interaction of contractile proteins to generate cytoplasmic gelation, and that phagocytosis influences the behavior of the actin-binding protein.

  20. Cytoplasmic myosin from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Myosin is identified and purified from three different established Drosophila melanogaster cell lines (Schneider's lines 2 and 3 and Kc). Purification entails lysis in a low salt, sucrose buffer that contains ATP, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, precipitation with actin in the absence of ATP, gel filtration in a discontinuous KI-KCl buffer system, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Yield of pure cytoplasmic myosin is 5-10%. This protein is identified as myosin by its cross-reactivity with two monoclonal antibodies against human platelet myosin, the molecular weight of its heavy chain, its two light chains, its behavior on gel filtration, its ATP-dependent affinity for actin, its characteristic ATPase activity, its molecular morphology as demonstrated by platinum shadowing, and its ability to form bipolar filaments. The molecular weight of the cytoplasmic myosin's light chains and peptide mapping and immunochemical analysis of its heavy chains demonstrate that this myosin, purified from Drosophila cell lines, is distinct from Drosophila muscle myosin. Two-dimensional thin layer maps of complete proteolytic digests of iodinated muscle and cytoplasmic myosin heavy chains demonstrate that, while the two myosins have some tryptic and alpha-chymotryptic peptides in common, most peptides migrate with unique mobility. One-dimensional peptide maps of SDS PAGE purified myosin heavy chain confirm these structural data. Polyclonal antiserum raised and reacted against Drosophila myosin isolated from cell lines cross-reacts only weakly with Drosophila muscle myosin isolated from the thoraces of adult Drosophila. Polyclonal antiserum raised against Drosophila muscle myosin behaves in a reciprocal fashion. Taken together our data suggest that the myosin purified from Drosophila cell lines is a bona fide cytoplasmic myosin and is very likely the product of a different myosin gene than the muscle myosin heavy chain gene that has been previously identified and characterized. PMID

  1. Myosin light chain kinase-regulated endothelial cell contraction: the relationship between isometric tension, actin polymerization, and myosin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chains by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been shown to be essential and sufficient for initiation of endothelial cell retraction in saponin permeabilized monolayers (Wysolmerski, R. B. and D. Lagunoff. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:16-20). We now report the effects of thrombin stimulation on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVE) actin, myosin II and the functional correlate of the activated actomyosin based contractile system, isometric tension development. Using a newly designed isometric tension apparatus, we recorded quantitative changes in isometric tension from paired monolayers. Thrombin stimulation results in a rapid sustained isometric contraction that increases 2- to 2.5-fold within 5 min and remains elevated for at least 60 min. The phosphorylatable myosin light chains from HUVE were found to exist as two isoforms, differing in their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Resting isometric tension is associated with a basal phosphorylation of 0.54 mol PO4/mol myosin light chain. After thrombin treatment, phosphorylation rapidly increases to 1.61 mol PO4/mol myosin light chain within 60 s and remains elevated for the duration of the experiment. Myosin light chain phosphorylation precedes the development of isometric tension and maximal phosphorylation is maintained during the sustained phase of isometric contraction. Tryptic phosphopeptide maps from both control and thrombin-stimulated cultures resolve both monophosphorylated Ser-19 and diphosphorylated Ser-19/Thr-18 peptides indicative of MLCK activation. Changes in the polymerization of actin and association of myosin II correlate temporally with the phosphorylation of myosin II and development of isometric tension. Activation results in a 57% increase in F-actin content within 90 s and 90% of the soluble myosin II associates with the reorganizing F-actin. Furthermore, the disposition of actin and

  2. In vitro receptor autoradiography reveals angiotensin II (Ang II) binding associated with sensory and motor components of the vagus

    SciTech Connect

    Diz, D.I.; Barnes, K.L.; Ferrario, C.M.

    1986-03-05

    Specific, high affinity Ang II binding in the dog's dorsal medulla is concentrated in the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmnX). More recently Ang II binding sites were observed where bundles of vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla 6 mm rostral to obex and in the nodose ganglia and peripheral vagal nerves. Since Ang II binding in the nTS and dmnX overlies the distribution of vagal afferent fibers and efferent neurons, the effects of nodose ganglionectomy and cervical vagotomy on Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla were studied in rats and dogs using autoradiography after incubation of 14 ..mu..m coronal sections with 0.4 nM /sup 125/I-Ang II. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 1 ..mu..M unlabeled Ang II. Two weeks after unilateral nodose ganglionectomy Ang II binding sites were absent ipsilaterally in the region where vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla. In the nTS and dmnX, binding near obex was reduced, while more rostrally these nuclei were almost completely devoid of Ang II binding on the denervated side. After cervical vagotomy, the loss of binding was restricted to the ipsilateral dmnX. These data are the first to reveal that Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla requires an intact vagal system.

  3. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  4. Myosins VIII and XI play distinct roles in reproduction and transport of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Amari, Khalid; Di Donato, Martin; Dolja, Valerian V; Heinlein, Manfred

    2014-10-01

    Viruses are obligatory parasites that depend on host cellular factors for their replication as well as for their local and systemic movement to establish infection. Although myosin motors are thought to contribute to plant virus infection, their exact roles in the specific infection steps have not been addressed. Here we investigated the replication, cell-to-cell and systemic spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) using dominant negative inhibition of myosin activity. We found that interference with the functions of three class VIII myosins and two class XI myosins significantly reduced the local and long-distance transport of the virus. We further determined that the inactivation of myosins XI-2 and XI-K affected the structure and dynamic behavior of the ER leading to aggregation of the viral movement protein (MP) and to a delay in the MP accumulation in plasmodesmata (PD). The inactivation of myosin XI-2 but not of myosin XI-K affected the localization pattern of the 126k replicase subunit and the level of TMV accumulation. The inhibition of myosins VIII-1, VIII-2 and VIII-B abolished MP localization to PD and caused its retention at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that class XI myosins contribute to the viral propagation and intracellular trafficking, whereas myosins VIII are specifically required for the MP targeting to and virus movement through the PD. Thus, TMV appears to recruit distinct myosins for different steps in the cell-to-cell spread of the infection.

  5. Myosins VIII and XI Play Distinct Roles in Reproduction and Transport of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Di Donato, Martin; Dolja, Valerian V.; Heinlein, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory parasites that depend on host cellular factors for their replication as well as for their local and systemic movement to establish infection. Although myosin motors are thought to contribute to plant virus infection, their exact roles in the specific infection steps have not been addressed. Here we investigated the replication, cell-to-cell and systemic spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) using dominant negative inhibition of myosin activity. We found that interference with the functions of three class VIII myosins and two class XI myosins significantly reduced the local and long-distance transport of the virus. We further determined that the inactivation of myosins XI-2 and XI-K affected the structure and dynamic behavior of the ER leading to aggregation of the viral movement protein (MP) and to a delay in the MP accumulation in plasmodesmata (PD). The inactivation of myosin XI-2 but not of myosin XI-K affected the localization pattern of the 126k replicase subunit and the level of TMV accumulation. The inhibition of myosins VIII-1, VIII-2 and VIII-B abolished MP localization to PD and caused its retention at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that class XI myosins contribute to the viral propagation and intracellular trafficking, whereas myosins VIII are specifically required for the MP targeting to and virus movement through the PD. Thus, TMV appears to recruit distinct myosins for different steps in the cell-to-cell spread of the infection. PMID:25329993

  6. Removal of the cardiac myosin regulatory light chain increases isometric force production

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Kiran; Watt, James; Greenberg, Michael; Jones, Michelle; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    The myosin neck, which is supported by the interactions between light chains and the underlying α-helical heavy chain, is thought to act as a lever arm to amplify movements originating in the globular motor domain. Here, we studied the role of the cardiac myosin regulatory light chains (RLCs) in the capacity of myosin to produce force using a novel optical-trap-based isometric force in vitro motility assay. We measured the isometric force and actin filament velocity for native porcine cardiac (PC) myosin, RLC-depleted PC (PCdepl) myosin, and PC myosin reconstituted with recombinant bacterially expressed human cardiac RLC (PCrecon). RLC depletion reduced unloaded actin filament velocity by 58% and enhanced the myosin-based isometric force ∼2-fold. No significant change between PC and PCdepl preparations was observed in the maximal rate of actin-activated myosin ATPase activity. Reconstitution of PCdepl myosin with human RLC partially restored the velocity and force levels to near untreated values. The reduction in unloaded velocity after RLC extraction is consistent with the myosin neck acting as a lever, while the enhancement in isometric force can be directly related to enhancement of unitary force. The force data are consistent with a model in which the neck region behaves as a cantilevered beam.—Pant, K., Watt, J., Greenberg, M., Jones, M., Szczesna-Cordary, D., Moore, J. R. Removal of the cardiac myosin regulatory light chain increases isometric force production. PMID:19470801

  7. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Motor Disabilities. Volume II, Part A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section A of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of motor disabilities--stroke, spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  8. LGM-30B, Stage II Dissected Motors Test Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    LGM-30 A & B Nov 1972 Stage II Phase VI Series II, Report Nr 259(72) Air Force Contract F42600-72-2002 1972 Aerojet Solid Propulsion Company LGM-30...from the mean of the series after division by one less than the total number of test results. 3-Sigma Band The area between the upper and lower 3...ZZ 0 0LLk.~N 0 0 c oJ 0 + LOLD L(0 4 LL U LLLJA LL. ..1 N LL LJEE CL a.ZZZL C-2 c m CL mLQ0 LLJ I- CC 0* 00 I. In m 0 - 19d ! ; LOlS~ ( nIIf 99Y1

  9. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Joshua C.; Larson, Matthew E.; Hine, Ken J.

    2016-01-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein’s spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10’s close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10’s spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10’s contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. PMID:27220038

  10. Discovery of myosin genes by physical mapping in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Titus, M A; Kuspa, A; Loomis, W F

    1994-01-01

    The diversity of the myosin family in a single organism, Dictyostelium discoideum, has been investigated by a strategy devised to rapidly identify and clone additional members of a gene family. An ordered array of yeast artificial chromosome clones that encompasses the Dictyostelium genome was probed at low stringency with conserved regions of the myosin motor domain to identify all possible myosin loci. The previously identified myosin loci (mchA, myoA-E) were detected by hybridization to the probes, as well as an additional seven previously unidentified loci (referred to as myoF-L). Clones corresponding to four of these additional loci (myoF, myoH-J) were obtained by using the isolated yeast artificial chromosomes as templates in a PCR employing degenerate primers specific for conserved regions of the myosin head. Sequence analysis and physical mapping of these clones confirm that these PCR products are derived from four previously unidentified myosin genes. Preliminary analysis of these sequences suggests that at least one of the genes (myoJ) encodes a member of a potentially different class of myosins. With the development of whole genome libraries for a variety of organisms, this approach can be used to rapidly explore the diversity of this and other gene families in a number of systems. PMID:7937787

  11. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Complete nucleotide sequence and deduced polypeptide sequence of a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain gene from Acanthamoeba: evidence of a hinge in the rodlike tail

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have completely sequenced a gene encoding the heavy chain of myosin II, a nonmuscle myosin from the soil ameba Acanthamoeba castellanii. The gene spans 6 kb, is split by three small introns, and encodes a 1,509-residue heavy chain polypeptide. The positions of the three introns are largely conserved relative to characterized vertebrate and invertebrate muscle myosin genes. The deduced myosin II globular head amino acid sequence shows a high degree of similarity with the globular head sequences of the rat embryonic skeletal muscle and nematode unc 54 muscle myosins. By contrast, there is no unique way to align the deduced myosin II rod amino acid sequence with the rod sequence of these muscle myosins. Nevertheless, the periodicities of hydrophobic and charged residues in the myosin II rod sequence, which dictate the coiled-coil structure of the rod and its associations within the myosin filament, are very similar to those of the muscle myosins. We conclude that this ameba nonmuscle myosin shares with the muscle myosins of vertebrates and invertebrates an ancestral heavy chain gene. The low level of direct sequence similarity between the rod sequences of myosin II and muscle myosins probably reflects a general tolerance for residue changes in the rod domain (as long as the periodicities of hydrophobic and charged residues are largely maintained), the relative evolutionary "ages" of these myosins, and specific differences between the filament properties of myosin II and muscle myosins. Finally, sequence analysis and electron microscopy reveal the presence within the myosin II rodlike tail of a well-defined hinge region where sharp bending can occur. We speculate that this hinge may play a key role in mediating the effect of heavy chain phosphorylation on enzymatic activity. PMID:3040773

  13. Central and peripheral cardiovascular, ventilatory, and motor effects of trout urotensin-II in the trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Leprince, Jérôme; Conlon, J Michael; Vaudry, Hubert

    2008-05-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) was originally considered to be exclusively the product of the caudal neurosecretory system (CNSS) of teleost fish, but it has now been demonstrated that U-II is widely expressed in peripheral tissues and nervous structures of species from lampreys to mammals. However, very little is known regarding the physiological effects of this peptide in its species of origin. In the present review, we summarize the most significant results relating to the cardiovascular, ventilatory, and motor effects of centrally and peripherally administered synthetic trout U-II in our experimental animal model, the unanesthetized trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. In addition, we compare the actions of U-II with those of other neurohormonal peptides, particularly with the actions of urotensin-I, a 41-amino acid residue peptide paralogous to corticotropin-releasing hormone that is co-localized with U-II within neurons of the CNSS.

  14. Self-organization of actin networks by a monomeric myosin

    PubMed Central

    Saczko-Brack, Dario; Warchol, Ewa; Rogez, Benoit; Kröss, Markus; Heissler, Sarah M.; Sellers, James R.; Batters, Christopher; Veigel, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of actomyosin networks lies at the center of many types of cellular motility, including cell polarization and collective cell migration during development and morphogenesis. Myosin-IXa is critically involved in these processes. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we resolved actin bundles assembled by myosin-IXa. Electron microscopic data revealed that the bundles consisted of highly ordered lattices with parallel actin polarity. The myosin-IXa motor domains aligned across the network, forming cross-links at a repeat distance of precisely 36 nm, matching the helical repeat of actin. Single-particle image processing resolved three distinct conformations of myosin-IXa in the absence of nucleotide. Using cross-correlation of a modeled actomyosin crystal structure, we identified sites of additional mass, which can only be accounted for by the large insert in loop 2 exclusively found in the motor domain of class IX myosins. We show that the large insert in loop 2 binds calmodulin and creates two coordinated actin-binding sites that constrain the actomyosin interactions generating the actin lattices. The actin lattices introduce orientated tracks at specific sites in the cell, which might install platfo