Science.gov

Sample records for n-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

  1. A rapid and transient ROS generation by cadmium triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells and this is inhibited through N-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Lim, Sung-Chul . E-mail: sclim@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cadmium (Cd)-induced hepatotoxicity, the role of ROS in this pathway remains unclear. Therefore, we attempted to determine the molecular mechanisms relevant to Cd-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. Cd was found to induce apoptosis in the HepG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, as confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis and TUNEL staining. In the early stages, both rapid and transient ROS generation triggered apoptosis via Fas activation and subsequent caspase-8-dependent Bid cleavage, as well as by calpain-mediated mitochondrial Bax cleavage. The timing of Bid activation was coincided with the timing at which the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP) collapsed as well as the cytochrome c (Cyt c) released into the cytosol. Furthermore, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore inhibitors, such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BA), did not block Cd-induced ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the complete inhibition of the Cd-induced apoptosis via catalase upregulation and subsequent Fas downregulation. NAC treatment also completely blocked the Cd-induced intracellular ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release, indicating that Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may be regulated indirectly by ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, a rapid and transient ROS generation by Cd triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway and subsequent mitochondrial pathway. NAC inhibits Cd-induced apoptosis through the blocking of ROS generation as well as the catalase upregulation.

  2. Catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of vasoprotective proteins in venous tissue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Floeren, Melanie; Kumpf, Stephanie; Both, Charlotte; Peter, Bärbel; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kojda, Georg

    2011-11-01

    Physical activity induces favourable changes of arterial gene expression and protein activity, although little is known about its effect in venous tissue. Although our understanding of the initiating molecular signals is still incomplete, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered a key event. This study sought to investigate the effects of two different training protocols on the expression of eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) in venous and lung tissue and to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. C57Bl/6 mice underwent voluntary exercise or forced physical activity. Changes of vascular mRNA and protein levels and activity of eNOS, ecSOD and catalase were determined in aorta, heart, lung and vena cava. Both training protocols similarly increased relative heart weight and resulted in up-regulation of aortic and myocardial eNOS. In striking contrast, eNOS expression in vena cava and lung remained unchanged. Likewise, exercise up-regulated ecSOD in the aorta and in left ventricular tissue but remained unchanged in lung tissue. Catalase expression in lung tissue and vena cava of exercised mice exceeded that in aorta by 6.9- and 10-fold, respectively, suggesting a lack of stimulatory effects of hydrogen peroxide. In accordance, treatment of mice with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole for 6 weeks resulted in significant up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD in vena cava. These data suggest that physiological venous catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD. Furthermore, therapeutic inhibition of vascular catalase might improve pulmonary rehabilitation.

  3. Reprogramming human A375 amelanotic melanoma cells by catalase overexpression: Upregulation of antioxidant genes correlates with regression of melanoma malignancy and with malignant progression when downregulated

    PubMed Central

    Berenstein, Ariel; Notcovich, Cintia; Cerda, María B.; Klamt, Fabio; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Durán, Hebe

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in tumor transformation. The antioxidant system (AOS) protects cells from ROS damage. However, it is also hijacked by cancers cells to proliferate within the tumor. Thus, identifying proteins altered by redox imbalance in cancer cells is an attractive prognostic and therapeutic tool. Gene expression microarrays in A375 melanoma cells with different ROS levels after overexpressing catalase were performed. Dissimilar phenotypes by differential compensation to hydrogen peroxide scavenging were generated. The melanotic A375-A7 (A7) upregulated TYRP1, CNTN1 and UCHL1 promoting melanogenesis. The metastatic A375-G10 (G10) downregulated MTSS1 and TIAM1, proteins absent in metastasis. Moreover, differential coexpression of AOS genes (EPHX2, GSTM3, MGST1, MSRA, TXNRD3, MGST3 and GSR) was found in A7 and G10. Their increase in A7 improved its AOS ability and therefore, oxidative stress response, resembling less aggressive tumor cells. Meanwhile, their decrease in G10 revealed a disruption in the AOS and therefore, enhanced its metastatic capacity. These gene signatures, not only bring new insights into the physiopathology of melanoma, but also could be relevant in clinical prognostic to classify between non aggressive and metastatic melanomas. PMID:27206673

  4. PprM is necessary for up-regulation of katE1, encoding the major catalase of Deinococcus radiodurans, under unstressed culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jong-Il; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a poly-extremophilic organism, capable of tolerating a wide variety of different stresses, such as gamma/ultraviolet radiation, desiccation, and oxidative stress. PprM, a cold shock protein homolog, is involved in the radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, but its role in the oxidative stress response has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of pprM mutation on catalase gene expression. pprM disruption decreased the mRNA and protein levels of KatE1, which is the major catalase in D. radiodurans, under normal culture conditions. A pprM mutant strain (pprM MT) exhibited decreased catalase activity, and its resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decreased accordingly compared with that of the wild-type strain. We confirmed that RecG helicase negatively regulates katE1 under normal culture conditions. Among katE1 transcriptional regulators, the positive regulator drRRA was not altered in pprM (-), while the negative regulators perR, dtxR, and recG were activated more than 2.5-fold in pprM MT. These findings suggest that PprM is necessary for KatE1 production under normal culture conditions by down-regulation of katE1 negative regulators.

  5. Species-specific differences in peroxisome proliferation, catalase, and SOD2 upregulation as well as toxicity in human, mouse, and rat hepatoma cells induced by the explosive and environmental pollutant 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Ekaterina Anatolevna; Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2017-03-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been widely used as an explosive substance and its toxicity is still of interest as it persisted in polluted areas. TNT is metabolized in hepatocytes which are prone to its toxicity. Since analysis of the human liver or hepatocytes is restricted due to ethical reasons, we investigated the effects of TNT on cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, peroxisome proliferation, and antioxidative enzymes in human (HepG2), mouse (Hepa 1-6), and rat (H4IIEC3) hepatoma cell lines. Under control conditions, hepatoma cells of all three species were highly comparable exhibiting identical proliferation rates and distribution of their cell cycle phases. However, we found strong differences in TNT toxicity with the lowest IC50 values (highest cell death rate) for rat cells, whereas human and mouse cells were three to sevenfold less sensitive. Moreover, a strong decrease in cellular dehydrogenase activity (MTT assay) and increased ROS levels were noted. TNT caused peroxisome proliferation with rat hepatoma cells being most responsive followed by those from mouse and human. Under control conditions, rat cells contained fivefold higher peroxisomal catalase and mitochondrial SOD2 activities and a twofold higher capacity to reduce MTT than human and mouse cells. TNT treatment caused an increase in catalase and SOD2 mRNA and protein levels in human and mouse, but not in rat cells. Similarly, human and mouse cells upregulated SOD2 activity, whereas rat cells failed therein. We conclude that TNT induced oxidative stress, peroxisome proliferation and mitochondrial damage which are highest in rat cells rendering them most susceptible toward TNT. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 989-1006, 2017.

  6. Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Neurons from Ischemic Damage by Upregulating Expression of Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Rabbit Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Dae Won; Yim, Hee Sun; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Won, Moo-Ho; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Choi, Soo Young; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of heme oxygenase (HO-1) against ischemic damage in motor neurons of the rabbit spinal cord. A PEP-1-HO-1 fusion protein was made to and confirmed the effective the penetration of HO-1 into spinal cord neurons at 8 h after treatment. Transient spinal cord ischemia was induced by occlusion of the abdominal aorta for 15 min. Vehicle (glycerol) or 0.375 mg/kg PEP-1-HO-1 was administered intraperitoneally to rabbits immediately after ischemia/reperfusion. Animals were sacrificed 15 min after reperfusion to measure lactate levels; 24 h after reperfusion to measure caspase 3 and myeloperoxidase levels, lipid peroxidation, and the activity of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and catalase (CAT); or 72 h after reperfusion to assess neuronal survival and measure the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in spinal cord homogenates. Administration of PEP-1-HO-1 did not significantly alter arterial blood gases (PaCO2 and PaO2), pH, or blood glucose levels before ischemia, 10 min after occlusion, or 10 min after reperfusion. Mean arterial pressure was selectively reduced 10 min after occlusion. Administration of PEP-1-HO-1 improved the rabbit Tarlov scores, and increased neuronal survival, as assessed by NeuN immunohistochemical staining 72 h after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, administration of PEP-1-HO-1 significantly ameliorated lactate accumulation 15 min after reperfusion, and the increases in caspase 3, myeloperoxidase, and lipid peroxidation 24 h after reperfusion. PEP-1-HO-1 administration significantly mitigated the decrease in SOD1 and CAT 24 h after reperfusion, and reversed the decrease in BDNF levels in spinal cord homogenates 72 h after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that PEP-1-HO-1 can protect against neuronal damage after transient spinal cord ischemia by limiting early lactic acidosis and increasing SOD1, CAT, and BDNF levels.

  7. Catalase is inhibited by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Krych, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2013-07-01

    Catalases, heme enzymes, which catalyze decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, belong to the antioxidant defense system of the cell. In this work we have shown that catalase from bovine liver is inhibited by flavonoids. The inhibition is, at least partially, due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between catalase and flavonoids. In the presence of some flavonoids the formation of unreactive catalase compound II has been detected. The most potent catalase inhibitors among the tested flavonoids have appeared myricetin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate. The relationship between the degree of enzyme inhibition and molecular structure of flavonoids has been analyzed.

  8. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    PubMed

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process.

  9. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  10. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  11. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  12. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  13. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila catalase gene by the DRE/DREF system.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Kim, Young-Shin; Yang, Dong-Jin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2004-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress and aging. The catalase gene is a key component of the cellular antioxidant defense network. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we have identified a DNA replication-related element (DRE; 5'-TATCGATA) in the 5'-flanking region of the Drosophila catalase gene. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that a previously identified factor called DREF (DRE- binding factor) binds to the DRE sequence in the Drosophila catalase gene. We used site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro transient transfection assays to establish that expression of the catalase gene is regulated by DREF through the DRE site. To explore the role of DRE/DREF in vivo, we established transgenic flies carrying a catalase-lacZ fusion gene with or without mutation in the DRE. The beta-galactosidase expression patterns of these reporter transgenic lines demonstrated that the catalase gene is upregulated by DREF through the DRE sequence. In addition, we observed suppression of the ectopic DREF-induced rough eye phenotype by a catalase amorphic Cat(n1) allele, indicating that DREF activity is modulated by the intracellular redox state. These results indicate that the DRE/DREF system is a key regulator of catalase gene expression and provide evidence of cross-talk between the DRE/DREF system and the antioxidant defense system.

  15. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanghui, Wang; Hongfei, Ha; Xia, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    Catalase was immobilized by chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles which produced through radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78°C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical "arm" to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed.

  16. Modification of catalase by chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A V; Tischenko, E G

    1997-10-01

    Catalase was chemically modified by sodium chondroitin sulfate using the benzoquinone binding method. Thus, 40-42% of the catalase preparation was modified. Treatment of catalase and superoxide dismutase with benzoquinone-activated chondroitin sulfate results in a bienzymic conjugate with electrophoretically heterogenous composition. The yield of the products and their residual catalytic activity indicate that the method can be used for the preparation of modified catalase and the bienzymic conjugate to study their efficiency in vivo.

  17. Fungal catalases: function, phylogenetic origin and structure.

    PubMed

    Hansberg, Wilhelm; Salas-Lizana, Rodolfo; Domínguez, Laura

    2012-09-15

    Most fungi have several monofunctional heme-catalases. Filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) have two types of large-size subunit catalases (L1 and L2). L2-type are usually induced by different stressors and are extracellular enzymes; those from the L1-type are not inducible and accumulate in asexual spores. L2 catalases are important for growth and the start of cell differentiation, while L1 are required for spore germination. In addition, pezizomycetes have one to four small-size subunit catalases. Yeasts (Saccharomycotina) do not have large-subunit catalases and generally have one peroxisomal and one cytosolic small-subunit catalase. Small-subunit catalases are inhibited by substrate while large-subunit catalases are activated by H(2)O(2). Some small-subunit catalases bind NADPH preventing inhibition by substrate. We present a phylogenetic analysis revealing one or two events of horizontal gene transfers from Actinobacteria to a fungal ancestor before fungal diversification, as the origin of large-size subunit catalases. Other possible horizontal transfers of small- and large-subunit catalases genes were detected and one from bacteria to the fungus Malassezia globosa was analyzed in detail. All L2-type catalases analyzed presented a secretion signal peptide. Mucorales preserved only L2-type catalases, with one containing a secretion signal if two or more are present. Basidiomycetes have only L1-type catalases, all lacking signal peptide. Fungal small-size catalases are related to animal catalases and probably evolved from a common ancestor. However, there are several groups of small-size catalases. In particular, a conserved group of fungal sequences resemble plant catalases, whose phylogenetic origin was traced to a group of bacteria. This group probably has the heme orientation of plant catalases and could in principle bind NADPH. From almost a hundred small-subunit catalases only one fourth has a peroxisomal localization signal and in fact many fungi lack

  18. Similarities between catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Qato, M; Whalen, R; Glomb, S

    1989-01-01

    Cytosolic epoxide hydrolase, measured as trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase activity, was isolated and purified from human and guinea pig liver cytosol. Antiserum to the guinea pig liver preparation reacted strongly with bovine liver catalase. We determined that this lack of selectivity of the antiserum was due to catalase contamination of the epoxide hydrolase preparation. We also determined that several commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with cytosolic epoxide hydrolase. Our human epoxide hydrolase preparation contained no detectable catalase contamination, yet antiserum to this protein also cross-reacted slightly with catalase, indicating some intrinsic similarity between the two enzymes. We conclude that catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase contain some similar immunogenic epitopes, and we surmise that similarities between the subunits of these two enzymes may lead to their partial copurification. Functional similarities between the two enzymes are also demonstrated, as several compounds that inhibit catalase are also shown to inhibit cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activity in the same concentration range and rank order.

  19. Sirt1 protects against oxidative stress-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis by the bidirectional regulation of catalase expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Wakino, Shu Yoshioka, Kyoko; Tatematsu, Satoru; Hara, Yoshikazu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Washida, Naoki; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2008-07-18

    NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase Sirt1 regulates cellular apoptosis. We examined the role of Sirt1 in renal tubular cell apoptosis by using HK-2 cells, proximal tubular cell lines with or without reactive oxygen species (ROS), H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Without any ROS, Sirt1 inhibitors enhanced apoptosis and the expression of ROS scavenger, catalase, and Sirt1 overexpression downregulated catalase. When apoptosis was induced with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Sirt1 was upregulated with the concomitant increase in catalase expression. Sirt1 overexpression rescued H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis through the upregulation of catalase. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced the nuclear accumulation of forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a and the gene silencing of FoxO3a enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, endogenous Sirt1 maintains cell survival by regulating catalase expression and by preventing the depletion of ROS required for cell survival. In contrast, excess ROS upregulates Sirt1, which activates FoxO3a and catalase leading to rescuing apoptosis. Thus, Sirt1 constitutes a determinant of renal tubular cell apoptosis by regulating cellular ROS levels.

  20. Catalases play differentiated roles in the adaptation of a fungal entomopathogen to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Liang; Zhang, Long-Bin; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-02-01

    The catalase family of Beauveria bassiana (fungal entomopathogen) consists of catA (spore-specific), catB (secreted), catP (peroxisomal), catC (cytoplasmic) and catD (secreted peroxidase/catalase), which were distinguished in phylogeny and structure and functionally characterized by constructing single-gene disrupted and rescued mutants for enzymatic and multi-phenotypic analyses. Total catalase activity decreased 89% and 56% in ΔcatB and ΔcatP, corresponding to the losses of upper and lower active bands gel-profiled for all catalases respectively, but only 9-12% in other knockout mutants. Compared with wild type and complement mutants sharing similar enzymatic and phenotypic parameters, all knockout mutants showed significant (9-56%) decreases in the antioxidant capability of their conidia (active ingredients of mycoinsecticides), followed by remarkable phenotypic defects associated with the fungal biocontrol potential. These defects included mainly the losses of 40% thermotolerance (45°C) in ΔcatA, 46-48% UV-B resistance in ΔcatA and ΔcatD, and 33-47% virulence to Spodoptera litura larvae in ΔcatA, ΔcatP and ΔcatD respectively. Moreover, the drastic transcript upregulation of some other catalase genes observed in the normal culture of each knockout mutant revealed functionally complimentary effects among some of the catalase genes, particularly between catB and catC whose knockout mutants displayed little or minor phenotypic changes. However, the five catalase genes functioned redundantly in mediating the fungal tolerance to either hyperosmotic or fungicidal stress. The differentiated roles of five catalases in regulating the B. bassiana virulence and tolerances to oxidative stress, high temperature and UV-B irradiation provide new insights into fungal adaptation to stressful environment and host invasion.

  1. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress.

  2. Studies on the catalase of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, D H

    1983-01-01

    Factors which control the levels of catalase within yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum were studied. Only a small fraction of the total catalase activity could be detected in whole cells. The bulk of the activity was revealed in cell-free extracts or in cells permeabilized with acetone. The formation of the enzyme was regulated by glucose and by oxygen. There were large, consistent differences in the levels of catalase among strains of H. capsulatum. The sensitivity of the strains to H2O2 toxicity also varied remarkably. Peroxidase activity could not be detected in cell-free extracts of the strains. Resistance to H2O2 did not correspond to levels of catalase. There was no obvious correlation of H2O2 sensitivity and virulence among the strains. PMID:6301990

  3. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles.

  4. Mechanisms of oxidant generation by catalase

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Diane E.; Shakarjian, Michael; Kim, Hong Duck; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Vetrano, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme catalase converts solar radiation into reactive oxidant species (ROS). In this study, we report that several bacterial catalases (hydroperoxidases, HP), including Escherichia coli HP-I and HP-II also generate reactive oxidants in response to ultraviolet B light (UVB). HP-I and HP-II are identical except for the presence of NADPH. We found that only one of the catalases, HPI, produces oxidants in response to UVB light, indicating a potential role for the nucleotide in ROS production. This prompts us to speculate that NADPH may act as a cofactor regulating ROS generation by mammalian catalases. Structural analysis of the NADPH domains of several mammalian catalases revealed that the nucleotide is bound in a constrained conformation and that UVB irradiation induces NADPH oxidation and positional changes. Biochemical and kinetic analysis indicate that ROS formation by the enzyme is enhanced by oxidation of the cofactor. Conformational changes following absorption of UVB light by catalase NADPH have the potential to facilitate ROS production by the enzyme. PMID:20716293

  5. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 promote autophagy-dependent cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija; Gwizdz, Sonia; Malolepszy, Anna; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dam, Svend; Bressendorff, Simon; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Lehmann Nielsen, Kåre; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Hofius, Daniel; Van Breusegem, Frank; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and the promotion of autophagy-dependent cell death.

  6. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  7. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  8. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging. PMID:27611371

  9. Molecular cloning, characterization and gene expression of an antioxidant enzyme catalase (MrCat) from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Easwvaran, Sarasvathi; Vanaraja, Puganeshwaran; Singh, Arun; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we reported a full length of catalase gene (designated as MrCat), identified from the transcriptome database of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The complete gene sequence of the MrCat is 2504 base pairs in length, and encodes 516 amino acids. The MrCat protein contains three domains such as catalase 1 (catalase proximal heme-ligand signature) at 350-358, catalase 2 (catalase proximal active site signature) at 60-76 and catalase 3 (catalase family profile) at 20-499. The mRNA expressions of MrCat in healthy and the infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) challenged M. rosenbergii were examined using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The MrCat is highly expressed in digestive tract and all the other tissues (walking leg, gills, muscle, hemocyte, hepatopancreas, pleopods, brain and eye stalk) of M. rosenbergii taken for analysis. The expression is strongly up-regulated in digestive tract after IHHNV challenge. To understand its biological activity, the recombinant MrCat gene was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MrCat existed in high thermal stability and broad spectrum of pH, which showed over 95% enzyme activity between pH 5 and 10.5, and was stable from 40 °C to 70 °C, and exhibited 85-100% enzyme activity from 30 °C to 40 °C.

  10. Protection of Bacillus pumilus spores by catalases.

    PubMed

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present.

  11. Protection of Bacillus pumilus Spores by Catalases

    PubMed Central

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present. PMID:22752169

  12. RESTORATION INDUCED BY CATALASE IN IRRADIATED MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Latarjet, Raymond; Caldas, Luis Renato

    1952-01-01

    1. E. coli, strain K-12, and B. megatherium 899, irradiated in strict but still undefined physiological conditions with certain heavy doses of ultraviolet light, are efficiently restored by catalase, which acts on or fixes itself upon the bacteria in a few minutes. This restoration (C. R.), different from photorestoration, is aided by a little visible light. 2. At 37° the restorability lasts for about 2 hours after UV irradiation; the restored cells begin to divide at the same time as the normal survivors. 3. C. R. is not produced after x-irradiation. 4. B. megatherium Mox and E. coli, strain B/r show little C. R.; E. coli strain B shows none. None of these three strains is lysogenic, whereas the two preceding catalase-restorable strains are. 5. Phage production in the system "K-12 infected with T2 phage" is restored by catalase after UV irradiation, whereas phage production in the system "infected B" is not. 6. With K-12, catalase does not prevent the growth of phage and the lysis induced by UV irradiation (Lwoff's phenomenon). 7. Hypotheses are discussed concerning: (a) the chemical nature of this action of catalase; (b) a possible relation between C. R. and lysogenicity of the sensitive bacteria; (c) the consequences of such chemical restorations on the general problem of cell radiosensitivity. PMID:14898028

  13. Overexpression of Catalase Enhances Benzo(a)pyrene Detoxification in Endothelial Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Yang, Hong; Ramesh, Aramandla; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Okoro, Emmanuel U.; Guo, ZhongMao

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that overexpression of catalase upregulated xenobiotic- metabolizing enzyme (XME) expression and diminished benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) intermediate accumulation in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs). Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the most active organelle involved in BaP metabolism. To examine the involvement of ER in catalase-induced BaP detoxification, we compared the level and distribution of XMEs, and the profile of BaP intermediates in the microsomes of wild-type and catalase transgenic endothelial cells. Our data showed that endothelial microsomes were enriched in cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1B1 and epoxide hydrolase 1 (EH1), and contained considerable levels of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GSTP). Treatment of wild-type MAECs with 1μM BaP for 2 h increased the expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1 and NQO1 by ~300, 64 and 116%, respectively. However, the same treatment did not significantly alter the expression of EH1 and GSTP. Overexpression of catalase did not significantly increase EH1, but upregulated BaP-induced expression of microsomal CYP1A1, 1B1, NQO1 and GSTP in the following order: 1A1>NQO1>GSTP>1B1. Overexpression of catalase did not alter the distribution of each of these enzymes in the microsomes. In contrast to our previous report showing lower level of BaP phenols versus BaP diols/diones in the whole-cell, this report demonstrated that the sum of microsomal BaP phenolic metabolites were ~60% greater than that of the BaP diols/diones after exposure of microsomes to BaP. Overexpression of catalase reduced the concentrations of microsomal BaP phenols and diols/diones by ~45 and 95%, respectively. This process enhanced the ratio of BaP phenol versus diol/dione metabolites in a potent manner. Taken together, upregulation of phase II XMEs and CYP1 proteins, but not EH1 in the ER might be the mechanism by which overexpression of catalase reduces the levels of all the BaP metabolites

  14. Discovery of Catalases in Members of the Chlamydiales Order

    PubMed Central

    Rusconi, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Catalase is an important virulence factor for survival in macrophages and other phagocytic cells. In Chlamydiaceae, no catalase had been described so far. With the sequencing and annotation of the full genomes of Chlamydia-related bacteria, the presence of different catalase-encoding genes has been documented. However, their distribution in the Chlamydiales order and the functionality of these catalases remain unknown. Phylogeny of chlamydial catalases was inferred using MrBayes, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony algorithms, allowing the description of three clade 3 and two clade 2 catalases. Only monofunctional catalases were found (no catalase-peroxidase or Mn-catalase). All presented a conserved catalytic domain and tertiary structure. Enzymatic activity of cloned chlamydial catalases was assessed by measuring hydrogen peroxide degradation. The catalases are enzymatically active with different efficiencies. The catalase of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae is the least efficient of all (its catalytic activity was 2 logs lower than that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, we hypothesize that an ancestral class 2 catalase probably was present in the common ancestor of all current Chlamydiales but was retained only in Criblamydia sequanensis and Neochlamydia hartmannellae. The catalases of class 3, present in Estrella lausannensis and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, probably were acquired by lateral gene transfer from Rhizobiales, whereas for Waddlia chondrophila they likely originated from Legionellales or Actinomycetales. The acquisition of catalases on several occasions in the Chlamydiales suggests the importance of this enzyme for the bacteria in their host environment. PMID:23729651

  15. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  16. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  17. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  18. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is a partially purified liquid or...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  4. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    PubMed

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  5. Growth-dependent catalase localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T reflected by catalase activity of cells.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2(T), exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state.

  6. Role of oxyradicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Hassan, H.M. )

    1988-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase, are inactivated upon exposure to ozone. In this study, the mechanism of this inactivation was examined using catalase as a model system. The data show that the inactivation of catalase is dependent on ozone concentration, time of exposure, and pH. Loss of catalase activity is accompanied with loss of the heme spectra. Tiron, desferal-Mn, trolox-c, and pyruvate protect the enzyme against ozone inactivation. SOD is less effective due to its inactivation by ozone. On the other hand, alcohols do not provide significant protection. The data suggest the possible involvement of superoxide radicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

  7. Role of oxyradicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, C; Hassan, H M

    1988-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase, are inactivated upon exposure to ozone. In this study, the mechanism of this inactivation was examined using catalase as a model system. The data show that the inactivation of catalase is dependent on ozone concentration, time of exposure, and pH. Loss of catalase activity is accompanied with loss of the heme spectra. Tiron, desferal-Mn, trolox-c, and pyruvate protect the enzyme against ozone inactivation. SOD is less effective due to its inactivation by ozone. On the other hand, alcohols do not provide significant protection. The data suggest the possible involvement of superoxide radicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

  8. The effect of catalase on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells by regulating the activities of cathepsin S, L, and K.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Lee, Mon-Juan; Dah-Tsyr Chang, Margaret; Huang, Haimei

    2014-04-15

    Abundant clinical evidences indicate that up-regulation of several cathepsins in many human cancers is correlated with malignant progression and poor patient prognosis. In addition, a decrease in catalase activity or accumulation of hydrogen peroxide correlates with cancer metastasis. Recent studies indicate that cathepsin activation and expression can be modulated via H2O2 treatment. However, the actual relationship between catalase and cathepsins is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we found that catalase expression (or activity) was higher, while intracellular and extracellular Cat S, Cat L, and Cat K activities were lower in the non-invasive CL1-0 cells compared to the highly invasive CL1-5 cells. After CL1-0 cells were transfected with catalase-shRNA, the corresponding ROS (H2O2) level and Cat S, Cat L, or Cat K expression (or activity) was up-regulated, accompanied by an increase in cell migration and invasion. On the other hand, ROS (H2O2) level, cathepsin S, L, and K activities, cell migration and invasion were decreased in catalase-overexpressed CL1-5 cells. It is suggested that catalase may regulate cathepsin activity by controlling the production of ROS (H2O2), leading to variation in migration and invasion ability of lung cancer cells.

  9. Loading PEG-Catalase into Filamentous and Spherical Polymer Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric A.; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vardon, Vanessa; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Based on a unique phase alignment that occurs during formulation, we postulated that PEG-ylation of the cargo enzyme would enhance its encapsulation within diblock copolymer nanocarriers and thus resistance to proteases. Methods A freeze–thaw modified double emulsion technique was utilized to encapsulate either the catalytically active enzyme catalase (MW ~250 kDa) or PEG-catalase in PEG–PLA polymer nanocarriers (PNC). Spectrophotometer measurement of substrate depletion was utilized to monitor enzyme activity. Isotope labeling of the enzyme was used in conjunction with activity measurements to determine PNC loading efficiency and PNC-enzyme resistance to proteases. This labeling also enabled blood clearance measurements of PNC-loaded and non-loaded enzymes in mice. Results Non-loaded PEG-catalase exhibited longer circulation times than catalase, but was equally susceptible to proteolysis. Modulation of the ratio of relatively hydrophilic to hydrophobic domains in the diblock PEG–PLA copolymer provided either filamentous or spherical PNC loaded with PEG-catalase. For both PNC geometries, encapsulation and resistance to proteases of the resultant PNC-loaded enzyme were more effective for PEG-catalase than catalase. Isotope tracing showed similar blood levels of PNC-loaded and free PEG-catalase in mice. Conclusions PEGylation enhances active catalase loading within PNC and resistance to protease degradation, relative to unloaded PEG-catalase. PMID:18956141

  10. Molecular characterization of a catalase from Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D

    2012-06-15

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3'- and 5'- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure.

  11. Development of a new biosensor for determination of catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Teke, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is one of the major antioxidant enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of H2O2. The aim of this study was to suggest a new method for the assay of catalase activity. For this purpose, an amperometric biosensor based on glucose oxidase for determination of catalase activity was developed. Immobilization of glucose oxidase was made by a cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde on a Clark-type electrode (dissolved oxygen probe). Optimization and characterization properties of the biosensor were studied and determination of catalase activity in defined conditions was investigated in artificial serum solution. The results were compared with a reference method.

  12. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  13. [Immobilization of catalase on Fe (III) modified collagen fiber].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Song, Na; Liao, Xuepin; Shi, Bi

    2011-07-01

    Fe (III) modified collagen fibers were used to immobilize catalase through the cross-linking of glutaraldehyde. The loading amount of catalase on the supporting matrix was 16.7 mg/g, and 35% enzymatic activity was remained. A series of experiments were conducted on free and immobilized catalase in order to investigate their optimal pH and temperature, and the thermal, storage and operation stability. Results suggest that the free and immobilized catalase prefer similar pH and temperature condition, which were pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. It should be noted that the thermal stability of catalase was considerably improved after immobilization owing to the fact that the enzyme kept 30% of relative activity after incubation at 75 degrees C for 5 h. On the contrary, the free catalase was completely inactive. As for the storage stability, the immobilized catalase kept 88% of relative activity after stored at room temperature for 12 days while the free one was completely inactive under the same conditions. Moreover, the immobilized catalase preserved 57% of relative activity after being reused 26 times, exhibiting excellent operation stability. Consequently, this investigation suggests that collagen fiber can be used as excellent supporting matrix for the immobilization of catalase, and it is potential to be used for the immobilization of similar enzymes.

  14. Catalase-positive microbial detection by using different ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S. K.; Durán, C.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    A method for rapid detection of catalase enzyme activity using ultrasonic parameters is presented in this work. It is based on the detection of the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide molecule into water and oxygen induced by the enzyme catalase. A special medium was made to amplify changes produced by catalase enzyme during the hydrolysis process. Enzymatic process can be monitored by means of ultrasonic parameters such as wave amplitude, time of flight (TOF), and backscattering measurements which are sensitive to oxygen bubble production. It is shown that catalase activity of the order of 10-3unit/ml can be detected using different ultrasonic parameters. The sensitivity provided by them is discussed.

  15. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Murakami, S; Sagae, T; Hayashi, H; Sakata, M; Sagai, M; Kumagai, Y

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular antioxidant, was investigated because H2O2 is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl-,Br-, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH3COO- or SO4-, and cations such as K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Fe2+, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H2O2 generated from cells in addition to that of O2- generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial function in insulin resistant muscle cells: effect of catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marina R; Sampaio, Igor H; Teodoro, Bruno G; Sousa, Thais A; Zoppi, Claudio C; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Alberici, Luciane C; Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Batista, Thiago M; Cappelli, Ana Paula Gameiro; Reis, Rosana I; Frasson, Danúbia; Kettelhut, Isis C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Carneiro, Everardo M; Curi, Rui; Silveira, Leonardo R

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial redox state plays a central role in the link between mitochondrial overloading and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which the ROS induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells is not completely understood. We examined the association between mitochondrial function and H2O2 production in insulin resistant cells. Our hypothesis is that the low mitochondrial oxygen consumption leads to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with reduced PGC1α transcription and low content of phosphorylated CREB. The cells were transfected with either the encoded sequence for catalase overexpression or the specific siRNA for catalase inhibition. After transfection, myotubes were incubated with palmitic acid (500μM) and the insulin response, as well as mitochondrial function and fatty acid metabolism, was determined. The low mitochondrial oxygen consumption led to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with β-oxidation of fatty acids. Rotenone was observed to reduce the ratio of ROS production. The elevated H2O2 production markedly decreased the PGC1α transcription, an effect that was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. The catalase transfection prevented the reduction in the phosphorylated level of Akt and upregulated the levels of phosphorylated CREB. The mitochondrial function was elevated and H2O2 production reduced, thus increasing the insulin sensitivity. The catalase overexpression improved mitochondrial respiration protecting the cells from fatty acid-induced, insulin resistance. This effect indicates that control of hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial respiration preventing the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism associated with CREB phosphorylation and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  17. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater.

  18. Catalase Deficiency Accelerates Diabetic Renal Injury Through Peroxisomal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jiyoun; Huh, Joo Young; Park, Jehyun; Lee, Hi Bahl; Ho, Ye-Shih; Ha, Hunjoo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in diabetes complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) as well as glucose are increased in diabetes, and peroxisomes and mitochondria participate in FFA oxidation in an interconnected fashion. Therefore, we investigated whether deficiency of catalase, a major peroxisomal antioxidant, accelerates DN through peroxisomal dysfunction and abnormal renal FFA metabolism. Diabetes was induced by multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin into catalase knock-out (CKO) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. Murine mesangial cells (MMCs) transfected with catalase small interfering RNA followed by catalase overexpression were used to further elucidate the role of endogenous catalase. Despite equivalent hyperglycemia, parameters of DN, along with markers of oxidative stress, were more accelerated in diabetic CKO mice than in diabetic WT mice up to 10 weeks of diabetes. CKO mice and MMCs showed impaired peroxisomal/mitochondrial biogenesis and FFA oxidation. Catalase deficiency increased mitochondrial ROS and fibronectin expression in response to FFAs, which were effectively restored by catalase overexpression or N-acetylcysteine. These data provide unprecedented evidence that FFA-induced peroxisomal dysfunction exacerbates DN and that endogenous catalase plays an important role in protecting the kidney from diabetic stress through maintaining peroxisomal and mitochondrial fitness. PMID:22315314

  19. [On the effect of immune and normal sera on catalase].

    PubMed

    Shataeva, L K; Zaikina, N A

    1975-01-01

    Effect of specific immune and normal sera on catalase was studied. The sera activated the enzyme, partially protected catalase against UV-irradiation and heating and also against the effect of inhibitors. Antibodies against catalase were observed in the fraction of 7 S gamma-globulins of immune serum. In studies of heat denaturation of catalase the stabilizing effect of immune serum was more distinct than the influence of normal serum and its protein fractions. In presence of serum protein fractions there was a correlation between the enthalpy of heat denaturation of catalase and decrease in specificity of the protein, in respect to the enxyme, associated with it in a complex. Alterations in enthropy compensated completely the decrease in enthalpy.

  20. EFFECT OF CATALASE AND CULTURAL CONDITIONS ON GROWTH OF BEGGIATOA.

    PubMed

    BURTON, S D; MORITA, R Y

    1964-12-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Effect of catalase and cultural conditions on growth of Beggiatoa. J. Bacteriol. 88:1755-1761. 1964.-The addition of catalase to culture medium increased the period of viability of Beggiatoa from 1 week to 2 months. Addition of catalase also produced a marked increase in cell yield and enzyme activity. Cultures grown without catalase exhibited an absorption peak characteristic of peroxides. This absorption peak was removed by addition of catalase during or after growth. Oxygen was required for growth, but carbon dioxide was not produced. Malate and acetate stimulated growth at low concentrations. Glucose and thiosulfate were not oxidized, and cytochromes were not detectable by spectrophotometric analysis.

  1. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-05-06

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  2. Regulation of catalase expression in healthy and cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Zamocky, Marcel; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2015-10-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that dismutates hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. The catalase gene has all the characteristics of a housekeeping gene (no TATA box, no initiator element sequence, high GC content in promoter) and a core promoter that is highly conserved among species. We demonstrate in this review that within this core promoter, the presence of DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-Y and Sp1, plays an essential role in the positive regulation of catalase expression. Additional transcription factors, such as FoxO3a, are also involved in this regulatory process. There is strong evidence that the protein Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway plays a major role in the expression of catalase by modulating the activity of FoxO3a. Over the past decade, other transcription factors (PPARγ, Oct-1, etc.), as well as genetic, epigenetic, and posttranscriptional processes, have emerged as crucial contributors to the regulation of catalase expression. Altered expression levels of catalase have been reported in cancer tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase expression could, therefore, be of crucial importance for the future development of pro-oxidant cancer chemotherapy.

  3. THE DECOMPOSITION OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BY LIVER CATALASE

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John

    1928-01-01

    1. The velocity of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by catalase as a function of (a) concentration of catalase, (b) concentration of hydrogen peroxide, (c) hydrogen ion concentration, (d) temperature has been studied in an attempt to correlate these variables as far as possible. It is concluded that the reaction involves primarily adsorption of hydrogen peroxide at the catalase surface. 2. The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is regarded as involving two reactions, namely, the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, which is a maximum at the optimum pH 6.8 to 7.0, and the "induced inactivation" of catalase by the "nascent" oxygen produced by the hydrogen peroxide and still adhering to the catalase surface. This differs from the more generally accepted view, namely that the induced inactivation is due to the H2O2 itself. On the basis of the above view, a new interpretation is given to the equation of Yamasaki and the connection between the equations of Yamasaki and of Northrop is pointed out. It is shown that the velocity of induced inactivation is a minimum at the pH which is optimal for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. 3. The critical increment of the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by catalase is of the order 3000 calories. The critical increment of induced inactivation is low in dilute hydrogen peroxide solutions but increases to a value of 30,000 calories in concentrated solutions of peroxide. PMID:19872400

  4. Investigating the active centre of the Scytalidium thermophilum catalase.

    PubMed

    Yuzugullu, Yonca; Trinh, Chi H; Fairhurst, Lucy; Ogel, Zumrut B; McPherson, Michael J; Pearson, Arwen R

    2013-04-01

    Almost all monofunctional haem catalases contain a highly conserved core containing the active site, which is connected to the exterior of the enzyme by three channels. These channels have been identified as potential routes for substrate flow and product release. To further investigate the role of these molecular channels, a series of mutants of Scytalidium thermophilum catalase were generated. The three-dimensional structures of four catalase variants, N155A, V123A, V123C and V123T, have been determined at resolutions of 2.25, 1.93, 1.9 and 1.7 Å, respectively. The V123C variant contains a new covalent bond between the S atom of Cys123 and the imidazole ring of the essential His82. This variant enzyme has only residual catalase activity and contains haem b instead of the normal haem d. The H82A variant demonstrates low catalase and phenol oxidase activities (0.2 and 20% of those of recombinant wild-type catalase-phenol oxidase, respectively). The N155A and N155H variants exhibit 4.5 and 3% of the wild-type catalase activity and contain haem d, showing that Asn155 is essential for catalysis but is not required for the conversion of haem b to haem d. Structural analysis suggests that the cause of the effect of these mutations on catalysis is the disruption of the ability of dioxygen substrates to efficiently access the active site. Additional mutants have been characterized biochemically to further probe the roles of the different channels. Introducing smaller or polar side chains in place of Val123 reduces the catalase activity. The F160V, F161V and F168V mutants show a marked decrease in catalase activity but have a much lower effect on the phenol oxidase activity, despite containing substoichiometric amounts of haem.

  5. Catalase Enhances Growth and Biofilm Production of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Warren L.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes chronic respiratory disease in humans. Factors thought to be important for colonization include the ability of the mycoplasma to form a biofilm on epithelial surfaces and the production of hydrogen peroxide to damage host tissue. Almost all of the mycoplasmas, including M. pneumoniae, lack superoxide dismutase and catalase and a balance should exist between peroxide production and growth. We show here that the addition of catalase to cultures enhanced the formation of biofilms and altered the structure. The incorporation of catalase in agar increased the number of colony-forming units detected and hence could improve the clinical diagnosis of mycoplasmal diseases. PMID:25894997

  6. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. Catalase<-->Abeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro. PMID:10567208

  7. Pulse radiolysis of catalase in solution—II. Reactions of primary products from water radiolysis with catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gȩbicka, Lidia; Gȩbicki, Jerzy L.

    The mechanism of the reaction of catalase with e -aq, H and OH has been studied by pulse radiolysis at room temperature. Some evidences have been found that e -eq/H react with porphyrin ring of catalase to form π-radical without reduction of heme iron within investigated time span of 1 s after the pulse. OH radicals react mainly with the protein moiety of the enzyme but the formation and decay of compound I, an intermediate of the catalytic reaction of catalase can be observed as well.

  8. A Laboratory Experiment of the Purification of Catalase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busquets, Montserrat; Franco, Rafael

    1986-01-01

    Describes a simple method for purifying catalase for the study of proteins. Procedures are systematically and diagramatically presented. Also identifies polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, kinetic studies, and apparent molecular weight determination as possible techniques to be used in studying proteins. (ML)

  9. Recent insights into microbial catalases: isolation, production and purification.

    PubMed

    Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Kauldhar, Baljinder Singh; Puri, Munish

    2014-12-01

    Catalase, an oxidoreductase enzyme, works as a detoxification system inside living cells against reactive oxygen species formed as a by-product of different metabolic reactions. The enzyme is found in a wide range of aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Catalase has also been employed in various analytical and diagnostic methods in the form of biosensors and biomarkers in addition to its other applications in textile, paper, food and pharmaceutical industries. New applications for catalases are constantly emerging thanks to their high turnover rate, distinct evolutionary origin, relatively simple and well-defined reaction mechanisms. The following review provides comprehensive information on isolation, production and purification of catalases with different techniques from various microbial sources along with their types, structure, mechanism of action and applications.

  10. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  11. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D; Becker, Donald F; Alfano, James R

    2012-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H(2)O(2). In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H(2)O(2). Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H(2)O(2) and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H(2)O(2) is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis.

  12. Formulation and characterization of catalase in albumin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Siwale, Rodney C; Oettinger, Carl W; Pai, S Balakrishna; Addo, Richard; Uddin, Nasir; Siddig, Aladin; D'Souza, Martin J

    2009-08-01

    Catalase in albumin microspheres were formulated for intravenous administration to antagonize the effects of over-production of reactive oxygenated species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in septic shock. The aim was to increase effective half-life of catalase and take advantage of the phagocytic uptake of the encapsulated catalase by the vascular endothelium. Catalase microspheres were prepared by spray-drying. The microspheres were evaluated for particle size, particle shape and surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), drug encapsulation efficiency, chemical stability, thermal stability and in vitro drug release characteristics. The microspheres had a mean particle size of 4.7 +/- 2 microm, optimal for phagocytic uptake, as demonstrated by Makino et al. SEM revealed that microspheres were spherical with smooth surface morphology. An encapsulation efficiency of 91.5 +/- 3% was achieved and the encapsulated catalase was chemically and thermally stable. Application of in vitro drug release data to the Higuchi kinetic equation indicated matrix diffusion-controlled catalase release from albumin microspheres.

  13. Ionic adsorption of catalase on bioskin: kinetic and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Solas, M T; Vicente, C; Xavier, L; Legaz, M E

    1994-03-15

    Bioskin is a natural polymer produced by Acetobacter xylinum and several yeasts in culture. It contains glucosamine and N-acetyl galactosamine which promote ionic adsorption of catalase at the adequate pH value. High values of ionic strength are required to enzyme desorption. Adsorption of catalase on bioskin fibers has been visualized by scanning electron microscopy associated to a dispersion X-ray analyzer. At low enzyme density, the affinity of the immobilized catalase for hydrogen peroxide was 30% lower than that of the free enzyme. This affinity decreased dramatically at higher density of immobilized enzyme and could not be increased by agitation of the enzyme reaction mixture. Immobilized catalase retains about 70% of its initial activity after 16 d storage, whereas soluble enzyme is completely inactivated after 3 d at room temperature. The haeme group of catalase is not protected after immobilization since it is accessible to both EDTA and phloroglucinol, chelating agents which inactivate catalase by removing the iron atom from the haeme group.

  14. Increased catalase expression improves muscle function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T

    2011-02-01

    It has been well established that oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). I hypothesized that overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme catalase would improve muscle function in the mdx mouse, the mouse model of DMD. To test this hypothesis, neonatal mdx mice were injected with a recombinant adeno-associated virus driving the catalase transgene. Animals were killed 4 or 6 weeks or 6 months following injection. Muscle function was generally improved by catalase overexpression. Four weeks following injection, extensor digitorum longus specific tension was improved twofold, while soleus was similar between groups. Resistance to contraction-induced injury was similar between groups; however, resistance to fatigue was increased 25% in catalase-treated soleus compared with control muscle. Six weeks following injection, extensor digitorum longus specific tension was increased 15%, while soleus specific tension was similar between treated and untreated limbs. Catalase overexpression reduced contraction-induced injury by 30-45% and fatigue by 20% compared with control limbs. Six months following injection, diaphragm specific tension was similar between groups, but resistance to contraction-induced injury was improved by 35% and fatigue by 25%. Taken together, these data indicate that catalase can improve a subset of parameters of muscle function in dystrophin-deficient skeletal muscle.

  15. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol-initiated DNA oxidation and teratogenesis in acatalasemic and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lutfiya; Shapiro, Aaron M; Wells, Peter G

    2013-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) caused by alcohol (ethanol, EtOH). Although catalase detoxifies hydrogen peroxide, embryonic catalase activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. To determine the roles of ROS and embryonic catalase in FASD, pregnant mice with enhanced (expressing human catalase, hCat) or deficient (acatalasemic, aCat) catalase activity, or their respective wild-type (WT) controls, were treated ip on gestational day 9 with 4 or 6g/kg EtOH or its saline vehicle, and embryos and fetuses were, respectively, evaluated for oxidatively damaged DNA and structural anomalies. Untreated hCat and aCat dams had, respectively, more and less offspring than their WT controls. hCat progenies were protected from all EtOH fetal anomalies at the low dose (p < .01) and from reduced head diameter and resorptions at the high dose (p < .001). Conversely, aCat progenies were more sensitive to dose-dependent EtOH fetal anomalies (p < .001) and exhibited a 50% increase in maternal lethality (p < .05) at the high dose. Maternal pretreatment of aCat mice with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-Cat) reduced EtOH fetal anomalies (p < .001). EtOH-initiated embryonic DNA oxidation was reduced in hCat and WT mice pretreated with PEG-Cat and enhanced in aCat mice. Plasma concentrations of EtOH in catalase-altered mice were similar to controls, precluding a pharmacokinetic basis for altered EtOH teratogenesis. Endogenous embryonic catalase, despite its low level, is an important embryoprotective enzyme for EtOH teratogenesis and a likely determinant of individual risk.

  16. The respiratory burst activity and expression of catalase in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, during long-term exposure to pH stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Na; Li, Bao-Sheng; Liu, Jin-Jian; Shi, Lei; Alam, M J; Su, Shi-Juan; Wu, Juan; Wang, Lei; Wang, An-Li

    2012-08-01

    In this study, changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mRNA expression of catalase of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, exposed to pH (5.4, 6.7, 8.0, and 9.3) stress was investigated at different stress time (24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h). Level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in shrimp also were assessed. The results revealed that acidic (pH 5.4 and 6.7) or alkaline exposure (pH 9.3) induced production of ROS hemocytes and increase of MDA level in shrimp. Moreover, the catalase mRNA expression in hepatopancreas of L. vannamei was up-regulated in 24 h at pH 5.4, in 72 h at pH 6.7 and in 48 h at pH 9.3, whereas was down-regulated significantly after 72 h acidic (pH 5.4 and 6.7) or alkaline (pH 9.4) exposure. In the present study, there was the relationship between ROS and catalase mRNA expression under normal acidic and alkaline conditions. At pH 8, the increase of catalase transcripts due to up-regulation by ROS, whereas MDA level did not significantly change, suggesting activation of corresponding protective mechanisms of detoxifying ROS is essential for the proper functioning of cells and the survival of shrimps.

  17. CatB is Critical for Total Catalase Activity and Reduces Bactericidal Effects of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiayan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Shu; Duan, Yabing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2017-02-01

    Rice bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, and rice bacterial leaf streak, caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, are major diseases of rice. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a natural product that is isolated from Pseudomonas spp. and is used to control many important rice diseases in China. We previously reported that PCA disturbs the redox balance, which results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. In this study, we found that PCA significantly upregulated the transcript levels of catB and katE, which encode catalases, and that PCA sensitivity was reduced when X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola were cultured with exogenous catalase. Furthermore, catB deletion mutants of X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola showed dramatically decreased total catalase activity, increased sensitivity to PCA, and reduced virulence in rice. In contrast, deletion mutants of srpA and katG, which also encode catalases, exhibited little change in PCA sensitivity. The results indicate that catB in both X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola encodes a catalase that helps protect the bacteria against PCA-induced stress.

  18. Increased microglial catalase activity in multiple sclerosis grey matter.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth; Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly; Redondo, Julianna; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2014-04-22

    Chronic demyelination, on-going inflammation, axonal loss and grey matter neuronal injury are likely pathological processes that contribute to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the precise contribution of each process and their aetiological substrates is not fully known, recent evidence has implicated oxidative damage as a major cause of tissue injury in MS. The degree of tissue injury caused by oxidative molecules, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), is balanced by endogenous anti-oxidant enzymes which detoxify ROS. Understanding endogenous mechanisms which protect the brain against oxidative injury in MS is important, since enhancing anti-oxidant responses is a major therapeutic strategy for preventing irreversible tissue injury in the disease. Our aims were to determine expression and activity levels of the hydrogen peroxide-reducing enzyme catalase in MS grey matter (GM). In MS GM, a catalase enzyme activity was elevated compared to control GM. We measured catalase protein expression by immune dot-blotting and catalase mRNA by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Protein analysis studies showed a strong positive correlation between catalase and microglial marker IBA-1 in MS GM. In addition, calibration of catalase mRNA level with reference to the microglial-specific transcript AIF-1 revealed an increase in this transcript in MS. This was reflected by the extent of HLA-DR immunolabeling in MS GM which was significantly elevated compared to control GM. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that microglial catalase activity is elevated in MS grey matter and may be an important endogenous anti-oxidant defence mechanism in MS.

  19. Production of catalase by fungi growing at low pH and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Kimiyasu; Inoue, Nobuaki; Takamatsu, Yuuki; Kamada, Kiyohiro; Wakao, Norio

    2006-01-01

    More than 100 fungi were isolated from cultures at pH 1.0 or 2.5 and 42-45 degrees C, and the production of catalases was investigated. Four strains produced a catalase with high stability at pH 2.0, and three of them produced two extracellular catalases and four intracellular catalases. In these four intracellular catalases, two catalases were similar to extracellular catalases in enzymatic properties and pI. These strains belonged to Aspergillus niger.

  20. A simple assay for measuring catalase activity: a visual approach.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Hironaka, Ippei; Kamata, Yuko; Takada, Koji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-10-30

    In this study, an assay that combines the ease and simplicity of the qualitative approach for measuring catalase activity was developed. The assay reagents comprised only hydrogen peroxide and Triton X-100. The enzyme-generated oxygen bubbles trapped by Triton X-100 were visualized as foam, whose height was estimated. A calibration plot using the defined unit of catalase activity yielded the best linear fit over a range of 20-300 units (U) (y = 0.3794x - 2.0909, r(2) = 0.993). The assay precision and reproducibility at 100 U were 4.6% and 4.8%, respectively. The applicability of the assay for measuring the catalase activity of various samples was assessed using laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, catalase-deficient isogenic mutants, clinically isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and human cells. The assay generated reproducible results. In conclusion, this new assay can be used to measure the catalase activity of bacterial isolates and human cells.

  1. Catalase-negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis strain with a novel point mutation in the catalase gene isolated from a patient with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Yiping; Ling, Buzhi; Ke, Xianfu; Ying, Jianfei; Yu, Yanhong; He, Mingyang; Li, Xiangyang

    2013-04-01

    This report describes the results of the sequence analysis of a methicillin-susceptible strain of catalase-negative Staphylococcus lugdunensis. Molecular characterization of the deduced sequence revealed a novel point mutation in the catalase gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a catalase-negative S. lugdunensis strain, although catalase-negative isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis have been previously reported.

  2. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • Et

  3. Improving catalase-based propelled motor endurance by enzyme encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Simmchen, Juliane; Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2014-08-07

    Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed.

  4. Protandim attenuates intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins cultured ex vivo via a catalase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Joddar, Binata; Reen, Rashmeet K; Firstenberg, Michael S; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; McCord, Joe M; Zweier, Jay L; Gooch, Keith J

    2011-03-15

    Human saphenous veins (HSVs) are widely used for bypass grafts despite their relatively low long-term patency. To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling in intima hyperplasia (IH), an early stage pathology of vein-graft disease, and to explore the potential therapeutic effects of up-regulating endogenous antioxidant enzymes, we studied segments of HSV cultured ex vivo in an established ex vivo model of HSV IH. Results showed that HSV cultured ex vivo exhibit an ~3-fold increase in proliferation and ~3.6-fold increase in intimal area relative to freshly isolated HSV. Treatment of HSV during culture with Protandim, a nutritional supplement known to activate Nrf2 and increase the expression of antioxidant enzymes in several in vitro and in vivo models, blocks IH and reduces cellular proliferation to that of freshly isolated HSV. Protandim treatment increased the activity of SOD, HO-1, and catalase 3-, 7-, and 12-fold, respectively, and decreased the levels of superoxide (O(2)(•-)) and the lipid peroxidation product 4-HNE. Blocking catalase activity by cotreating with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole abrogated the protective effect of Protandim on IH and proliferation. In conclusion, these results suggest that ROS-sensitive signaling mediates the observed IH in cultured HSV and that up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes can have a protective effect.

  5. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat(b)/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug=GD 1), exposed for 24h to 2 or 4mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p<0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p<0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p<0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown-rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p<0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies.

  6. Combining cisplatin with cationized catalase decreases nephrotoxicity while improving antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, S-F; Nishikawa, M; Hyoudou, K; Takahashi, R; Ikemura, M; Kobayashi, Y; Yamashita, F; Hashida, M

    2007-12-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used to treat solid tumors; however, nephrotoxicity due to its reactive oxygen species-mediated effect limits its use. We tested the ability of cationized catalase, a catalase derivative, to inhibit nephrotoxicity in cisplatin-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the catalase derivative concentrated in the kidney more efficiently than native catalase. Repeated intravenous doses of cationized catalase significantly decreased cisplatin-induced changes in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, nitrite/nitrate levels, lactic dehydrogenase activity, and renal total glutathione and malondialdehyde contents. In addition, cationized catalase effectively blunted cisplatin-induced proximal tubule necrosis but had no significant effect on the cisplatin-induced inhibition of subcutaneous tumor growth. Repeated doses of catalase, especially cationized catalase, significantly increased the survival of cisplatin-treated tumor-bearing mice preventing cisplatin-induced acute death. Our studies suggest that catalase and its derivatives inhibit cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, thus improving the efficiency of cisplatin to treat solid tumors.

  7. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. 173.135 Section 173.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION...

  8. Improving catalase-based propelled motor endurance by enzyme encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmchen, Juliane; Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed.Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02459a

  9. Synthesis of catalase in Staphylococcus aureus MF-31.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S E; Chaven, S

    1987-01-01

    During the growth of Staphylococcus aureus MF-31, initial catalase activity dropped to a reduced level at the onset of exponential phase before increasing. When S. aureus was grown at 25, 32, or 37 degrees C, catalase activity was found to decrease by 80 to 90% within 1 h of inoculation. Two catalase-negative mutants and wild-type S. aureus MF-31 cells were exposed to exogenous 20 mM H2O2 for 15 min. For wild-type S. aureus, there was no effect from H2O2 until min 15, at which time a 10% decrease in CFU was observed. Both mutants showed increased sensitivity to the H2O2, with 56 and 71% reductions in the CFU for mutants C3 and C4, respectively, after a 15-min exposure. Cells of mutant and wild-type S. aureus were subjected to sublethal heating at 52 degrees C for 20 min. The lack of catalase activity in the mutants resulted in large decreases in enumeration. PMID:3606102

  10. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  11. Catalase overexpression does not impair extensor digitorum longus muscle function in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingju; Yue, Yongping; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2007-12-01

    Catalase is a major antioxidant enzyme. Increasing catalase expression represents a promising avenue to improve muscle function in certain physiological conditions and in some muscle diseases. We hypothesized that catalase overexpression should not impair normal muscle contraction. We delivered a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged human catalase gene to normal mouse muscle by an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Western blot and immunostaining revealed efficient expression of HA-tagged catalase. Enzymatic assay demonstrated an approximately threefold increase in catalase activity in AAV-infected muscles. Catalase overexpression impaired neither twitch nor tetanic tension in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Furthermore, EDL fatigue response was not altered. Taken together, we have developed a novel AAV vector to enhance catalase expression. Lack of apparent toxicity in normal muscle strongly supports further exploration of this vector to reduce oxidative stress-induced muscle damage.

  12. Two distinct groups of fungal catalase/peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional haem b-containing (Class I) peroxidases with overwhelming catalase activity and substantial peroxidase activity with various one-electron donors. These unique oxidoreductases evolved in ancestral bacteria revealing a complex gene-duplicated structure. Besides being found in numerous bacteria of all phyla, katG genes were also detected in genomes of lower eukaryotes, most prominently of sac and club fungi. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the occurrence of two distinct groups of fungal KatGs that differ in localization, structural and functional properties. Analysis of lateral gene transfer of bacterial katGs into fungal genomes reveals that the most probable progenitor was a katG from a bacteroidetes predecessor. The putative physiological role(s) of both fungal KatG groups is discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships in bacterial KatGs and is related with the acquisition of (phyto)pathogenicity in fungi.

  13. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered.

  14. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by shear alone: Characteristics, activity and stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Nan; Du, Xin-Ying; Xing, Jin-Feng; Ge, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Catalase is a promising therapeutic enzyme; however, it carries risks of inactivation and rapid degradation when it is used in practical bioprocess, such as delivery in vivo. To overcome the issue, we made catalase-only nanoparticles using shear stress alone at a moderate shear rate of 217s(-1) in a coaxial cylinder flow cell. Properties of nanoparticles, including particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential, were characterized. The conformational changes of pre- and post-sheared catalase were determined using spectroscopy techniques. The results indicated that the conformational changes of catalase and reduction in α-helical content caused by shear alone were less significant than that by desolvation method. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by single shear retained over 90% of its initial activity when compared with the native catalase. Catalase nanoparticles lost only 20% of the activity when stored in phosphate buffer solution for 72h at 4°C, whereas native catalase lost 53% under the same condition. Especially, the activity of nanogranulated catalase was decreased only slightly in the simulated intestinal fluid containing α-chymotrypsin during 4h incubation at 37°C, implying that the catalase nanoparticle was more resistant to the degradation of proteases than native catalase molecules. Overall, catalase-only nanoparticles offered a great potential to stabilize enzymes for various pharmaceutical applications.

  15. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, Jay I.; Wood, Christopher S.; Terlecky, Laura J.; Walton, Paul A.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study.

  16. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L; Whelan, Stephen A; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S; McComb, Mark E; Bachschmid, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  17. OVEREXPRESSION OF ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES UPREGULATES ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR EXPRESSION VIA INCREASED SP1 DNA-BINDING ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tian; Lin, Xinghua; Yang, Hong; Zhou, LiChun; Wang, Zefen; Shan, Guang; Guo, ZhongMao

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported up-regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression as a mechanism by which overexpression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and/or catalase accelerates benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) detoxification in mouse aorta endothelial cells (MAECs). The objective of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of specificity protein-1 (Sp1) in AhR expression in MAECs that overexpress Cu/Zn-SOD and/or catalase. Our data demonstrated comparable levels of nuclear Sp1 protein in the transgenic and wild-type MAECs; however, binding of Sp1 protein to the AhR promoter region was more than 2-fold higher in MAECs overexpressing Cu/Zn-SOD and/or catalase than in wild-type cells. Inhibition of Sp1 binding to the AhR promoter by mithramycin A reduced AhR expression and eliminated the differences between wild-type MAECs, and three lines of transgenic cells. Functional promoter analysis indicated that AhR promoter activity was significantly higher in MAECs overexpressing catalase than in wild-type cells. Mutation of an AhR promoter Sp1-binding site or addition of hydrogen peroxide to the culture medium reduced AhR promoter activity, and decreased the differences between wild-type MAECs and transgenic cells overexpressing catalase. These results suggest that increased Sp1 binding to the AhR promoter region is an underlying mechanism for up-regulation of AhR expression in MAECs that overexpress Cu/Zn-SOD and/or catalase. PMID:20478378

  18. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene. Images PMID:1860824

  19. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-08-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene.

  20. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  1. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and Km of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  2. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications.

  3. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma.

  4. Detection of a novel catalase in extracts of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Diaz, G A

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of catalase, which differs from the previously described M- and T-catalases of mycobacteria, was detected in strains of Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare. Designated A-catalase, this enzyme resisted inactivation at 68 degrees C, was inactivated by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole), and exhibited no peroxidase activity. All of these properties distinguished the enzyme from T-catalase. The A-catalase exhibited a Km of 70 mM H2O2, which is between the upper and lower extremes of the ranges reported for T- and M-catalases, respectively. The A-catalase appeared to be more hydrophobic than M-catalase and did not react with antiserum to a representative sample of this class. The banding patterns of T- and M-catalases seen by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were essentially unaffected by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PAGE system, whereas the single band of A-catalase seen by PAGE without SDS resolved into as many as five bands in the presence of SDS; these bands were all of slower mobility than the original band. The banding pattern seen with SDS appeared to be related more to counterion charge effects than to molecular size increases that could be attributed to SDS complexed to the protein. It remains to be determined whether the multiple A-catalase bands reflect different proteins or different SDS micellar complexes of a single protein. Images PMID:3346077

  5. Effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the structure and activity of catalase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian; Tang, Bo-Ping; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-05

    TiO₂ nanoparticles are the most widely used metal oxide nanoparticles and have oxidative toxicity. Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme. Here the understanding of an effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the activity and structure of catalase is crucial to characterize the toxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles. These experimental data revealed that TiO₂ nanoparticles could bind to catalase by the electrostatic and hydrogen bonding forces. On binding TiO₂ nanoparticles, catalase got destabilized with the decrease of α-helices content, the solvent polarity of environment around the fluorescence chromophores on catalase were also affected. In addition, TiO₂ nanoparticles also affected the activity of catalase. TiO₂ nanoparticles acted as an activator of catalase activity at a low molar concentration and as an inhibitor at a higher molar concentration. With regard to human health, the present study could provide a better understanding of the potential nanotoxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles.

  6. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  7. [Fermentation production of microbial catalase and its application in textile industry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxu; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2010-11-01

    Microbial catalase is an important industrial enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. This enzyme has great potential of application in food, textile and pharmaceutical industries. The production of microbial catalase has been significantly improved thanks to advances in bioprocess engineering and genetic engineering. In this paper, we review the progresses in fermentation production of microbial catalase and its application in textile industry. Among these progresses, we will highlight strain isolation, substrate and environment optimization, enzyme induction, construction of engineering strains and application process optimization. Meanwhile, we also address future research trends for microbial catalase production and its application in textile industry. Molecular modification (site-directed mutagenesis and directed revolution) will endue catalase with high pH and temperature stabilities. Improvement of catalase production, based on the understanding of induction mechanism and the process control of recombinant stain fermentation, will further accelerate the application of catalase in textile industry.

  8. Catalase eliminates reactive oxygen species and influences the intestinal microbiota of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Yang, Ming-Chong; Sun, Jie-Jie; Guo, Fang; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal innate immune response is an important defense mechanism of animals and humans against external pathogens. The mechanism of microbiota homeostasis in host intestines has been well studied in mammals and Drosophila. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides have been reported to play important roles in homeostasis. However, how to maintain the microbiota homeostasis in crustacean intestine needs to be elucidated. In this study, we identified a novel catalase (MjCAT) involved in ROS elimination in kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. MjCAT mRNA was widely distributed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. After the shrimp were challenged with pathogenic bacteria via oral infection, the expression level of MjCAT was upregulated, and the enzyme activity was increased in the intestine. ROS level was also increased in the intestine at early time after oral infection and recovered rapidly. When MjCAT was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi), high ROS level maintained longer time, and the number of bacteria number was declined in the shrimp intestinal lumen than those in the control group, but the survival rate of the MjCAT-RNAi shrimp was declined. Further study demonstrated that the intestinal villi protruded from epithelial lining of the intestinal wall were damaged by the high ROS level in MjCAT-knockdown shrimp. These results suggested that MjCAT participated in the intestinal host-microbe homeostasis by regulating ROS level.

  9. Cloning and characterization of monofunctional catalase from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Heon; Oh, Duck-Chul; Oh, You-Sung; Malinverni, Juliana C; Kukor, Jerome J; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel

    2007-09-01

    In this study, an approx. 2.5-kb gene fragment including the catalase gene from Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 was cloned and characterized. The determination of the complete nucleotide sequence revealed that the cloned DNA fragment was organized into three open reading frames, designated as ORF1, catalase, and ORF3 in that order. The catalase gene consisted of 1,455 nucleotides and 484 amino acids, including the initiation and stop codons, and was located 326 bp upstream in the opposite direction of ORF1. The catalase was overproduced in Escherichia coli UM255, a catalase-deficient mutant, and then purified for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 189 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 61 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity over a broad pH range from pH 5.0 to pH 11.0 and temperature range from 20 degrees C to 60 degrees C. The catalase activity was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine. The enzyme's K(m) value and V(max) of the catalase for H2O2 were 21.8 mM and 39,960 U/mg, respectively. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the ratio of A406 to A280 for the catalase was 0.97, indicating the presence of a ferric component. The absorption spectrum of catalase-4 exhibited a Soret band at 406 nm, which is typical of a heme-containing catalase. Treatment of the enzyme with dithionite did not alter the spectral shape and revealed no peroxidase activity. The combined results of the gene sequence and biochemical characterization proved that the catalase cloned from strain S1in this study was a typical monofunctional catalase, which differed from the other types of catalases found in strain S1.

  10. The role of catalase in gonococcal resistance to peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Spence, Stephen A; Clark, Virginia L; Isabella, Vincent M

    2012-02-01

    We have reported that Neisseria gonorrhoeae is extremely resistant to reactive nitrogen species (RNS) including peroxynitrite (PN). Recent literature suggests that catalase can provide protection against commercial preparations of PN. Though wild-type gonococci were shown to be highly resistant to 2 mM PN, Neisseria meningitidis and a gonococcal katA mutant were both shown to be extremely sensitive to 2 mM PN. Analysis of translational fusions to lacZ of the catalase promoters from N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis demonstrated that basal katA expression from gonococci is 80-fold higher than in meningococci, though meningococcal katA retains a greater capacity to be activated by OxyR. This activation capacity was shown to be due to a single base pair difference in the -10 transcription element between the two kat promoters. PN resistance was initially shown to be associated with increasing catalase expression; however, commercial preparations of PN were later revealed to contain higher levels of contaminating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than expected. Removal of H2O2 from PN preparations with manganese dioxide markedly reduced PN toxicity in a gonococcal katA mutant. Simultaneous treatment with non-lethal concentrations of PN and H2O2 was highly lethal, indicating that these agents act synergistically. When treatment was separated by 5 min, high levels of bacterial killing occurred only when PN was added first. Our results suggest that killing of N. gonorrhoeae ΔkatA by commercial PN preparations is likely due to H2O2, that H2O2 is more toxic in the presence of PN, and that PN, on its own, may not be as toxic as previously believed.

  11. Plating isolation of various catalase-negative microorganisms from soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labeda, D. P.; Hunt, C. M.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A unique plating procedure was developed that allows isolation, but not enumeration, of representatives of the catalase-negative soil microflora. The numbers recovered, however, are low as compared to the numbers recovered when the modified dilution-to-extinction isolation procedure is used. The latter procedure provides prolonged inoculation in sealed tubes containing a nutritionally rich broth medium over small submerged agar slants. In contrast, the plating procedure utilizes nutritionally minimal media and the shorter incubations mandated by the inherent problems associated with plating.

  12. [Effects of catalase on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Shi, Ying-Xu; Xie, Yin-Liang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2010-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the growth and multiple differentiation potential of human umbilical cord tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) transfected by a retroviral vector with catalase (CAT) gene. The UC-MSCs cultured in vitro were transfected by using pMSCV carrying GFP (pMSCV-GFP) and pMSCV carrying CAT (pMSCV-GFP-CAT) respectively, then the MSC-GFP cell line and MSC-GFP-CAT cell line were obtained by sorting of flow cytometry. The GFP expression was observed by a fluorescent microscopy at 48 hours after CAT gene transfection. The GFP+ cells were sorted by flow cytometry. The activity of CAT in GFP+ cells was detected by catalase assay kit. The proliferative capacity of transfected UC-MSCs was determined by cell counting kit-8. The differentiation ability of gene-transfected GFP+ cells into osteogenesis and adipogenesis was observed by von Kossa and oil red O staining. The results indicated that green fluorescence in UC-MSCs was observed at 48 hours after transfection, and the fluorescence gradually enhanced to a steady level on day 3. The percentage of MSCs-GFP was (25.54+/-8.65)%, while the percentage of MSCs-GFP-CAT was (35.4+/-18.57)%. The activity of catalase in UC-MSCs, MSCs-GFP, MSCs-GFP-CAT cells were 19.5, 20.3, 67.2 U, respectively. The transfected MSCs-GFP-CAT could be induced into osteoblasts and adipocytes. After 21 days, von Kossa staining showed induced osteoblasts. Many lipid droplets with high refractivity occurred in cytoplasm of the transfected UC-MSCs, and showed red fat granules in oil red O staining cells. There were no significant differences between transfected and non-transfected UC-MSCs cells (p>0.05). It is concluded that UC-MSCs are successfully transfected by retrovirus carrying GFP or CAT gene, the activity of catalase increased by 3.4-fold. The transfected UC-MSCs maintain proliferation potential and ability of differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes.

  13. A new PANI biosensor based on catalase for cyanide determination.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Aydin, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide is one of the most widespread of compounds measured in environmental analysis due to their toxic effects on environment and health. We report a highly sensitive, reliable, selective amperometric sensor for determination of cyanide, using a polyaniline conductive polymer. The enzyme catalase was immobilized by electropolymerization. The steps during the immobilization were controlled by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Optimum pH, temperature, aniline concentration, enzyme concentration, and the number of scans obtained during electropolymerization, were investigated. In addition, the cyanide present in artificial waste water samples was determined. In the characterization studies of the biosensor, some parameters such as reproducibility and storage stability, were analyzed.

  14. Isolation of catalase-deficient Escherichia coli mutants and genetic mapping of katE, a locus that affects catalase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, P C

    1984-01-01

    A number of catalase-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli which exhibit no assayable catalase activity were isolated. The only physiological difference between the catalase mutants and their parents was a 50- to 60-fold greater sensitivity to killing by hydrogen peroxide. For comparison, mutations in the xthA and recA genes of the same strains increased the sensitivity of the mutants to hydrogen peroxide by seven- and fivefold, respectively, showing that catalase was the primary defense against hydrogen peroxide. One class of mutants named katE was localized between pfkB and xthA at 37.8 min on the E. coli genome. A second class of catalase mutants was found which did not map in this region. PMID:6319370

  15. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  16. Catalase degradation in sunflower cotyledons during peroxisome transition from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function. [Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Eising, R.; Gerhardt, B.

    1987-06-01

    First order rate constant for the degradation (degradation constants) of catalase in the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were determined by measuring the loss of catalase containing /sup 14/C-labeled heme. During greening of the cotyledons, a period when peroxisomes change from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function, the degradation of glyoxysomal catalase is significantly slower than during all other stages of cotyledon development in light or darkness. The degradation constant during the transition stage of peroxisome function amounts to 0.205 day/sup -1/ in contrast to the constants ranging from 0.304 day/sup -1/ to 0.515 day/sup -1/ during the other developmental stages. Density labeling experiments comprising labeling of catalase with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and its isopycnic centrifugation on CsCl gradients demonstrated that the determinations of the degradation constants were not substantially affected by reutilization of /sup 14/C-labeled compounds for catalase synthesis. The degradation constants for both glyoxysomal catalase and catalase synthesized during the transition of peroxisome function do not differ. This was shown by labeling the catalases with different isotopes and measuring the isotope ratio during the development of the cotyledons. The results are inconsistent with the concept that an accelerated and selective degradation of glyoxysomes underlies the change in peroxisome function. The data suggest that catalase degradation is at least partially due to an individual turnover of catalase and does not only result from a turnover of the whole peroxisomes.

  17. An Inhibitor of Catalase Induced by Cold in Chilling-Sensitive Plants

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Brian D.; Payne, Linda A.; Chen, Yi-Zhu; Graham, Douglas

    1984-01-01

    An inhibitor of catalase accumulated when leaves of chilling-sensitive species were stored in the dark at 0°C. The inhibitor could be removed from crude extracts by passing them through a column of Sephadex G-25. After this treatment, the catalase activity of extracts of chilled tissues was found to be equal to that of extracts from unchilled leaves. When chilled tissues were incubated at 20°C, the inhibitor of catalase was lost, unless the tissues had been irreversibly damaged. It specifically inhibited plant catalase, and had no effect on mammalian catalase, plant malic dehydrogenase, or plant superoxide dismutase. Despite the presence of catalase inhibitor in extracts of chilled plants, no increase in the level of H2O2 in chilled tissues was found, suggesting either that the inhibitor is compartmentalized and not in contact with catalase in vivo, or that the level of H2O2 is controlled by means other than through catalase activity. Plant tissues normally contain H2O2 which is destroyed by catalase when they are damaged. After chilling, H2O2 leaking from already injured cells would not be so readily removed by the inhibited catalase, and could contribute to further injury by acting as a source of free radical oxidants. PMID:16663941

  18. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus).

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis.

  19. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ-mediated phosphorylation of serine 167.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and in lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine-phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine 167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that S167D catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wild-type enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist tezosentan. S167 is located on the dimeric interface, suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wild-type and S167D catalase. We found that recombinant wild-type catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers, whereas S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wild-type catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wild-type catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity.

  20. High Conformational Stability of Secreted Eukaryotic Catalase-peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; García-Fernández, Queralt; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio; Obinger, Christian; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional heme enzymes widely spread in archaea, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. Here we present the first crystal structure (1.55 Å resolution) of an eukaryotic KatG, the extracellular or secreted enzyme from the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The heme cavity of the homodimeric enzyme is similar to prokaryotic KatGs including the unique distal +Met-Tyr-Trp adduct (where the Trp is further modified by peroxidation) and its associated mobile arginine. The structure also revealed several conspicuous peculiarities that are fully conserved in all secreted eukaryotic KatGs. Peculiarities include the wrapping at the dimer interface of the N-terminal elongations from the two subunits and cysteine residues that cross-link the two subunits. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature- and urea-mediated unfolding followed by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that secreted eukaryotic KatGs have a significantly higher conformational stability as well as a different unfolding pattern when compared with intracellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases. We discuss these properties with respect to the structure as well as the postulated roles of this metalloenzyme in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22822072

  1. A chaperone function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 is required to maintain catalase activity and for multiple stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity.

  2. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  3. Comperative study of catalase immobilization on chitosan, magnetic chitosan and chitosan-clay composite beads.

    PubMed

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin; Dinçer, Ayşe; Becerik, Seda Çınar

    2013-12-01

    Catalase was immobilized on chitosan and modified chitosan. Studies were carried out on free-immobilized catalase concerning the determination of optimum temperature, pH, thermal, storage stability, reusability, and kinetic parameters. Optimum temperature and pH for free catalase and catalase immobilized were found as 35°C and 7.0, respectively. After 100 times of repeated tests, the immobilized catalases on chitosan-clay and magnetic chitosan maintain over 50% and 60% of the original activity, respectively. The ease of catalase immobilization on low-cost matrices and good stability upon immobilization in the present study make it a suitable product for further use in the food industry.

  4. Temporal Variation for the Expression of Catalase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Correlations between Rates of Enzyme Synthesis and Levels of Translatable Catalase-Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Glenn C.; Mackay, William J.; Cook, Julia L.

    1986-01-01

    Two variants that alter the temporal expression of catalase have been isolated from a set of third chromosome substitution lines. Each variant has been mapped to a cytogenetic interval flanked by the visible markers st (3-44.0) and cu (3-50.0) at a map position of 47.0, which is within or near the interval 75D-76A previously identified as containing the catalase structural gene on the bases of dosage responses to segmental aneuploidy. Each variant operates by modulating the rate of enzyme synthesis and the level of translatable catalase-mRNA. PMID:3091448

  5. Gut Catalase-Positive Bacteria Cross-Protect Adjacent Bifidobacteria from Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Eva; Peirotén, Ángela; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria isolated from infant gut and breast milk exhibited different abilities to grow under microaerobic conditions, alone or in the presence of added catalase. In the present study, we demonstrated that some Bifidobacterium strains unable to grow under microaerobic conditions were cross-protected on solid media from oxidative stress by adjacent colonies of gut catalase-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis or Escherichia coli, but not by a catalase-deficient E. coli. The results of this study support the possible contribution of catalase-positive bacteria to the establishment of certain bifidobacteria in non-anaerobic human niches of the infant gastrointestinal tract or mammary gland.

  6. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase.

  7. Stimulation of KatG catalase activity by peroxidatic electron donors.

    PubMed

    Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Moore, Robert L; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2012-09-15

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) use a peroxidase scaffold to support robust catalase activity, an ability no other member of its superfamily possesses. Because catalase turnover requires H(2)O(2) oxidation, whereas peroxidase turnover requires oxidation of an exogenous electron donor, it has been anticipated that the latter should inhibit catalase activity. To the contrary, we report peroxidatic electron donors stimulated catalase activity up to 14-fold, particularly under conditions favorable to peroxidase activity (i.e., acidic pH and low H(2)O(2) concentrations). We observed a "low-" and "high-K(M)" component for catalase activity at pH 5.0. Electron donors increased the apparent k(cat) for the "low-K(M)" component. During stimulated catalase activity, less than 0.008 equivalents of oxidized donor accumulated for every H(2)O(2) consumed. Several classical peroxidatic electron donors were effective stimulators of catalase activity, but pyrogallol and ascorbate showed little effect. Stopped-flow evaluation showed that a Fe(III)-O(2)(·-)-like intermediate dominated during donor-stimulated catalatic turnover, and this intermediate converted directly to the ferric state upon depletion of H(2)O(2). In this respect, the Fe(III)-O(2)(·-) -like species was more prominent and persistent than in the absence of the donor. These results point toward a much more central role for peroxidase substrates in the unusual catalase mechanism of KatG.

  8. Gut Catalase-Positive Bacteria Cross-Protect Adjacent Bifidobacteria from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Eva; Peirotén, Ángela; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria isolated from infant gut and breast milk exhibited different abilities to grow under microaerobic conditions, alone or in the presence of added catalase. In the present study, we demonstrated that some Bifidobacterium strains unable to grow under microaerobic conditions were cross-protected on solid media from oxidative stress by adjacent colonies of gut catalase-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis or Escherichia coli, but not by a catalase-deficient E. coli. The results of this study support the possible contribution of catalase-positive bacteria to the establishment of certain bifidobacteria in non-anaerobic human niches of the infant gastrointestinal tract or mammary gland. PMID:26040451

  9. Importance of catalase in the adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide: analysis of acatalasaemic Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, S; Inoue, Y; Kimura, A

    1996-01-01

    Controversy about the importance of catalase in the detoxification of H2O2 in human erythrocytes continues. It has been suggested that catalase has no role in the clearance of H2O2 in erythrocytes. In the present study we investigated the role of catalase in the defence mechanism against oxidative stress using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae has two catalases, catalase A and catalase T. We constructed a double mutant (acatalasaemic mutant) unable to produce either catalase A or catalase T, and compared it with wild-type and single-mutant cells. The acatalasaemic mutant cells showed a similar growth rate to wild-type cells under non-oxidative stress conditions, and showed a similar susceptibility to H2O2 stress in the exponential growth phase. The acatalasaemic mutant cells at stationary phase were, however, much more sensitive to H2O2 stress than wild-type and single-mutant cells. Moreover, the ability of acatalasaemic and single-mutant cells to show adaptation to 2 mM H2O2 was distinctly inferior to that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that catalase is not essential for yeast cells under normal conditions, but plays an important role in the acquisition of tolerance to oxidative stress in the adaptive response of these cells. PMID:8947468

  10. Prevention of pulmonary metastasis from subcutaneous tumors by binary system-based sustained delivery of catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ikemura, Mai; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mendelsohn, Adam; Miyazaki, Nobuhiko; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2009-07-20

    Catalase delivery can be effective in inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated acceleration of tumor metastasis. Our previous studies have demonstrated that increasing the plasma half-life of catalase by pegylation (PEG-catalase) significantly increases its potency of inhibiting experimental pulmonary metastasis in mice. In the present study, a biodegradable gelatin hydrogel formulation was used to further increase the circulation time of PEG-catalase. Implantation of (111)In-PEG-catalase/hydrogel into subcutaneous tissues maintained the radioactivity in plasma for more than 14 days. Then, the effect of the PEG-catalase/hydrogel on spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of tumor cells was evaluated in mice with subcutaneous tumor of B16-BL6/Luc cells, a murine melanoma cell line stably expressing luciferase. Measuring luciferase activity in the lung revealed that the PEG-catalase/hydrogel significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the pulmonary metastasis compared with PEG-catalase solution. These findings indicate that sustaining catalase activity in the blood circulation achieved by the use of pegylation and gelatin hydrogel can reduce the incidence of tumor cell metastasis.

  11. Purification and characterization of catalase from chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla).

    PubMed

    Dinçer, A; Aydemir, T

    2001-01-01

    Catalase is a major primary antioxidant defence component that primarily catalyses the decomposition of H(2) O(2) to H(2) O. Here we report the purification and characterization of catalase from chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla). Following a procedure that involved chloroform treatment, ammonium sulfate precipitation and three chromatographic steps (CM-cellulose, Sephadex G-25, and Sephadex G-200), catalase was purified about 250-fold to a final specific activity of 56947 U/mg of protein. The molecular weight of the purified catalase and its subunit were determined to be 235 000 and 58 500 daltons, indicating that the chard catalase is a tetramer. The absorption spectra showed a soret peak at 406 nm, and there was slightly reduction by dithionite. The ratio of absorption at 406 and 275 nanometers was 1.5, the value being similar to that obtained for catalase from other plant sources. In the catalytic reaction, the apparent Km value for chard catalase was 50 mM. The purified protein has a broad pH optimum for catalase activity between 6.0 and 8.0. The enzyme had an optimum reaction temperature at 30 degrees C. Heme catalase inhibitors, such as azide and cyanide, inhibited the enzyme activity markedly and the enzyme was also inactivated by ?-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide.

  12. Study of catalase electrode for organic peroxides assays.

    PubMed

    Horozova, Elena; Dimcheva, Nina; Jordanova, Zinaida

    2002-12-01

    The catalytic activity of immobilized catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) for two model peroxide compounds (dibenzoyl peroxide and 3-chloroperoxibenzoic acid) in a non-aqueous medium was used to prepare an organic-phase enzyme electrode (OPEE). The enzyme was immobilized within a polymeric film on spectrographic graphite. The amperometric signal of the enzyme electrode in substrate solutions was found to be due to the reduction of oxygen generated in the enzyme layer. The electrode response is proportional to peroxide concentrations up to about 40 microM within the potential range from -450 to -650 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl), and the response time is at most 90 s. The enzyme electrode retains about 35% of its initial activity after a 3-week storage at room temperature.

  13. Rapid upregulation of heart antioxidant enzymes during arousal from estivation in the Giant African snail (Achatina fulica).

    PubMed

    Salway, Kurtis D; Tattersall, Glenn J; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-01

    Estivation is an adaptive response to environments characterized by elevated temperatures and desiccative stress, as may occur during summer dry seasons. Similar to diapause and hibernation, it is characterized by low levels of activity, a drastically suppressed metabolic rate and enhanced stress resistance. We tested the hypothesis that Achatina fulica, a pulmonate land snail, enhances stress resistance during estivation and/or arousal by upregulating intracellular antioxidant defenses in the heart, kidney, hepatopancreas and foot tissues. No statistically significant changes in mitochondrial or cytosolic superoxide dismutase levels or activities, or glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase or catalase activities were associated with estivation in any tissue, however. In contrast, during arousal from estivation, activities of several antioxidant enzymes increased in heart, hepatopancreas and foot. In heart, a rapid increase in MnSOD protein levels was observed that peaked at 2h post arousal, but no such change was observed in CuZnSOD protein levels. Glutathione peroxidase activity was upregulated at 1h post arousal and remained elevated until 8h post arousal in heart tissue. Glutathione peroxidase was also upregulated at 24h post arousal in foot tissue. Glutathione reductase activity was upregulated at 4h post arousal in heart and foot tissues whereas catalase activity showed no changes. Markers of lipid peroxidation and protein damage revealed no significant increases during estivation or arousal. Therefore, antioxidant enzymes may play a role in oxidative stress defense specifically during arousal from estivation in A. fulica.

  14. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  15. Study of catalase adsorption on two mixed-mode ligands and the mechanism involved therein.

    PubMed

    Shiva Ranjini, S; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2012-11-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography sorbents n-hexylamine HyperCel™ (HEA) and phenylpropylamine HyperCel™ (PPA) were evaluated for the study of adsorption of catalase from two different sources. Various parameters such as buffer composition, ionic strength and pH were investigated to study the mechanism of interaction of commercially available pre-purified catalase from Bovine liver, purified catalase from black gram (Vigna mungo) and crude extract of black gram containing catalase with these mixed-mode ligands. A simple and economical screening protocol for identifying optimal buffer conditions for adsorption and desorption of catalase was established with micro volumes of the sorbent in batch mode. With HEA HyperCel, it was observed that pre-purified catalase from both bovine liver and black gram was completely retained at pH 7.0, irrespective of the presence or absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer, whereas the catalase from crude extract of black gram was completely retained only in the presence of 0.2 M salt in the adsorption buffer. The elution of catalase from both the sources was accomplished by lowering the pH to 4.5 in absence of salt. In case of PPA HyperCel, catalase from both the sources was very strongly adsorbed under different buffer conditions studied, and elution did not yield a significant catalase activity. From the screening experiments, it could be concluded that the interaction of catalase with HEA HyperCel could be dominated by hydrophobic forces with minor contributions from ionic interaction and with PPA HyperCel, it could be a combination of different non-covalent interactions acting on different loci on the surface of the protein.

  16. Efficient protection by cationized catalase against H2O2 injury in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki; Kawakami, Shigeru; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-08-16

    Increasing evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide plays an important role in alveolar epithelial injury produced during many inflammatory lung diseases. In this study, the successful prevention of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in primary cultured rabbit alveolar epithelial cells by cationized catalase is described. Cationized catalase was synthesized by direct chemical modification to enhance its association with alveolar epithelial cells. Cationized catalase exhibited a 22.3-fold higher cellular association at 2 h than native catalase, and incubation of cationized catalase with the cells produced a 2.19-fold intracellular catalase activity, which suggested that cationized catalase distributed both to the cell membrane and into the cell interior. Cationized catalase markedly suppressed H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury. In addition, electron spin resonance spectrometry analysis revealed that cationized catalase effectively eliminated H(2)O(2) produced in the medium by glucose plus glucose oxidase. On the other hand, polyethylene glycol-modified catalase (PEG-catalase) did not have any protective effect against H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury although PEG-catalase exhibited a 2.49-fold higher cellular association at 2 h than native catalase. These results suggest that cationization of catalase is a promising strategy for the treatment of many of inflammatory lung diseases.

  17. The molecular characterization of a catalase from Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, L; Zhou, Z; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Shi, X; Gai, Y; Mu, C; Song, L

    2013-06-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an antioxidant enzyme and plays a significant role in the protection against oxidative stress by reducing hydrogen peroxide. The CAT cDNA of Eriocheir sinensis (EsCAT) was cloned via RACE technique. The complete sequence of EsCAT cDNA consisted of a 5' untranslated regions (UTR) of 224 bp, a 3' UTR of 1287 bp with a poly (A) tail and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1542 bp, which encoded a polypeptide of 513 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 58.86 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 6.880. The deduced amino acid sequence of EsCAT contained a highly conserved proximal active-site signature motif ((60)FDRERIPERVVHAKGAL(76)) and a proximal heme-ligand signature motif ((350)RLFSYNDTH(358)) and exhibited high similarity with other reported CATs. In the phylogenetic tree, EsCAT was clustered with the CATs from Scylla serrata and Portunus trituberculatus. The EsCAT transcripts were constitutively expressed in haepatopancreas, haemocytes, gill, gonad, muscle and heart, with highest expression level in haepatopancreas. The relative expression level of EsCAT mRNA in haemocytes was continuously up-regulated and reached the peak level at 48 h post-Vibrio anguillarum challenge. The purified recombinant EsCAT protein displayed antioxidant activity against hydrogen peroxide with high thermal stability and broad spectrum of pH values. All these results demonstrated that EsCAT was an efficient antioxidant enzyme and potentially involved in the regulation of redox and innate immune response of crabs.

  18. Inhibition of catalase by tea catechins in free and cellular state: a biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M(-1) and 1.66×106 M(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition.

  19. The Cryptococcus neoformans catalase gene family and its role in antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Giles, Steven S; Stajich, Jason E; Nichols, Connie; Gerrald, Quincy D; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Dietrich, Fred; Perfect, John R

    2006-09-01

    In the present study, we sought to elucidate the contribution of the Cryptococcus neoformans catalase gene family to antioxidant defense. We employed bioinformatics techniques to identify four members of the C. neoformans catalase gene family and created mutants lacking single or multiple catalase genes. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, CAT1 and CAT3 encode putative spore-specific catalases, CAT2 encodes a putative peroxisomal catalase, and CAT4 encodes a putative cytosolic catalase. Only Cat1 exhibited detectable biochemical activity in vitro, and Cat1 activity was constitutive in the yeast form of this organism. Although they were predicted to be important in spores, neither CAT1 nor CAT3 was essential for mating or spore viability. Consistent with previous studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the single (cat1, cat2, cat3, and cat4) and quadruple (cat1 cat2 cat3 cat4) catalase mutant strains exhibited no oxidative-stress phenotypes under conditions in which either exogenous or endogenous levels of reactive oxygen species were elevated. In addition, there were no significant differences in the mean times to mortality between groups of mice infected with C. neoformans catalase mutant strains (the cat1 and cat1 cat2 cat3 cat4 mutants) and those infected with wild-type strain H99. We conclude from the results of this study that C. neoformans possesses a robust antioxidant system, composed of functionally overlapping and compensatory components that provide protection against endogenous and exogenous oxidative stresses.

  20. Covalent Immobilization of Catalase onto Regenerated Silk Fibroins via Tyrosinase-Catalyzed Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Qi, Chenglong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Tang, Gengtie; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong

    2015-09-01

    Regenerated silk fibroins could be used as medical scaffolds and carrier materials for enzyme immobilization. In the present work, tyrosinase enzyme was used for enzymatic oxidation of silk fibroins, followed by immobilization of catalase onto the fibroin surfaces through physical adsorption and covalent cross-linking as well. Spectrophotometry, SDS-PAGE, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to examine the efficiency of enzymatic oxidation and catalase immobilization, respectively. The results indicate that tyrosine residues in silk fibroins could be oxidized and converted to the active o-quinones. Incubating silk fibroins with catalase and tyrosinase led to a noticeable change of molecular weight distribution, indicating the occurrence of the cross-links between silk fibroins and catalase molecules. Two different pathways were proposed for the catalase immobilizations, and the method based on grafting of catalase onto the freeze-dried fibroin membrane is more acceptable. The residual enzyme activity for the immobilized catalase exhibited higher than that of the control after repeated washing cycles. Meanwhile, the thermal stability and alkali resistance were also slightly improved as compared to free catalase. The mechanisms of enzymatic immobilization are also concerned.

  1. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus aureus Blood Culture Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Steven; Jureen, Roland; Lin, Raymond T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a catalase-negative methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolate collected from a blood culture. Sequencing through the gene encoding catalase, katA, demonstrated a 2-bp insertion. The resulting frameshift mutation generates a protein that has lost 26 amino acids (aa) at its C-terminal domain. PMID:26354811

  2. [Effect of protonofore 2,4-dinitrophenol on catalase activity of intact Escherichia coli bacteria].

    PubMed

    Semchyshyn, H M; Lushchak, V I

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity of intact E. coli bacteria had a broad pH-optimum (4.0-7.5). Addition of protonofore 2,4-dinitrophenol (200 microM) caused pH-dependency modification (6.5-7.0). Both the catalase activity and curves mode of native cells in the presence of dinitrophenol and cell-free extracts are almost identical. The loss of catalase activity at acid pH was caused by cells destruction and dinitrophenol addition, that makes it possible to suppose that this activity is connected with some membrane component functioning. The induction of "acid" catalase by oxidative stress was blocked with addition of chloramphenicol--protein synthesis inhibitor in prokaryotes. Probably this membrane complex is a part of OxyR regulon, because it is activated by hydrogen peroxide. The activation was not detected in the strain E. coli UM202, which is lacked of catalase HPI (H2O2 response). The catalase activity at acid pH was not observed in the strain E. coli AB1157, that produces both catalase forms and probably has the membrane defect. However, known genetic characteristics of AB1157 stain not let to identify a gene responsible for the "acid" catalase activity.

  3. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  4. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results.

  5. A simple method of catalase purification for the undergraduate experimental course.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Cheng, Meng; Wang, Yinnan; Yao, Ming; Chen, Yongchun; Gao, Yuan; Ding, Wenyuan

    2015-02-01

    Catalase is a characteristic enzyme of peroxisomes, of which it is the most abundant protein. This enzyme serves as a typical example of a peroxisomal enzyme and is important in the teaching of biochemistry and molecular biology. Although there is substantial information regarding catalase purification, purifying catalase for the junior‑grade undergraduate experimental course face challenges in obtaining materials and increasingly expensive purification equipment. This study presents a simple method for the purification of mouse liver catalase using ethanol‑chloroform treatment, sodium sulfate fractionation, dialysis and Sephadex G‑200 gel filtration chromatography. Catalase was purified 31.8‑fold with an 18.3% yield. The advantages of this method were its low operating environment requirements, simple procedure and reduced cost. Furthermore, the method was designed to improve students' comprehensive ability and manipulative ability and to introduce a sense of innovation in the fields of biochemistry and molecular biology during their junior year.

  6. Enzyme activity of catalase immobilized in Langmuir-Blodgett films of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Goto, Thiago E; Lopez, Ricardo F; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Caseli, Luciano

    2010-07-06

    A major challenge for producing low cost biosensors based on nanostructured films with control of molecular architectures is to preserve the catalytic activity of the immobilized biomolecules. In this study, we show that catalase (HRP) keeps its activity if immobilized in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG). The incorporation of catalase into a DPPG monolayer at the air-water interface was demonstrated with surface pressure and surface potential isotherms, in addition to polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). According to the PM-IRRAS data, catalase was not denatured upon adsorption on a preformed DPPG monolayer and could be transferred onto a solid substrate. The catalytic activity of catalase in a mixed LB film with DPPG was ca. 13% higher than in solution. The control of molecular architecture and choice of a suitable phospholipid matrix allows catalase-containing LB films to be used in sensing hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Mitochondrial targeted catalase suppresses invasive breast cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of invasive breast cancer has an alarmingly high rate of failure because effective targets have not been identified. One potential target is mitochondrial generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) because ROS production has been associated with changes in substrate metabolism and lower concentration of anti-oxidant enzymes in tumor and stromal cells and increased metastatic potential. Methods Transgenic mice expressing a human catalase gene (mCAT) were crossed with MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice that develop metastatic breast cancer. All mice (33 mCAT positive and 23 mCAT negative) were terminated at 110 days of age, when tumors were well advanced. Tumors were histologically assessed for invasiveness, proliferation and metastatic foci in the lungs. ROS levels and activation status of p38 MAPK were determined. Results PyMT mice expressing mCAT had a 12.5 per cent incidence of high histological grade primary tumor invasiveness compared to a 62.5 per cent incidence in PyMT mice without mCAT. The histological grade correlated with incidence of metastasis with 56 per cent of PyMT mice positive for mCAT showing evidence of pulmonary metastasis compared to 85.4 per cent of PyMT mice negative for mCAT with pulmonary metastasis (p ≤ 0.05). PyMT tumor cells expressing mCAT had lower ROS levels and were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress than wild type tumor cells, suggesting that mCAT has the potential of quenching intracellular ROS and subsequent invasive behavior. The metastatic tumor burden in PyMT mice expressing mCAT was 0.1 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue compared with 1.3 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue in PyMT mice expressing the wild type allele (p ≤ 0.01), indicating that mCAT could play a role in mitigating metastatic tumor progression at a distant organ site. Expression of mCAT in the lungs increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress that was associated with decreased activation of p38MAPK suggesting ROS signaling

  8. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  9. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band.

  10. Ethanol intake and motor sensitization: the role of brain catalase activity in mice with different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Pastor, R; Aragon, C M G

    2004-09-15

    The C57BL/6J strain of inbred mice shows a characteristic pattern of ethanol-induced behaviors: very weak acute locomotor stimulation, a lack of locomotor-sensitizing effect of ethanol, and a high level of ethanol intake. This strain has relatively low levels of activity of the ethanol metabolizing enzyme catalase, and it has been proposed that brain catalase plays a role in the modulation of some behavioral effects of ethanol. In the first study of the present paper, we investigated the effects of pharmacological manipulations of brain catalase activity on C57BL/6J mice in acute ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol intake. Results indicated that the reduction in motor activity produced by ethanol was reversed by pretreatment with catalase potentiators and it was enhanced by catalase inhibitors. In addition, ethanol intake was highly correlated with brain catalase activity in mice treated with a catalase potentiator. In the second study, F1 hybrid mice (SWXB6) from the outbred Swiss-Webster mice and the inbred C57BL/6J mice were used. Basal brain catalase activity levels of F1 mice were intermediate between to those of the two progenitor genotypes. That profile of catalase activity was parallel to the acute-ethanol-induced locomotion and to repeated-ethanol-induced motor sensitization effects observed across the three types of mice. These data suggest that brain catalase activity modifications in the C57BL/6J strain change the pattern of several ethanol-related behaviors in this inbred mouse.

  11. Cloning and sequencing of a Candida albicans catalase gene and effects of disruption of this gene.

    PubMed

    Wysong, D R; Christin, L; Sugar, A M; Robbins, P W; Diamond, R D

    1998-05-01

    Catalase plays a key role as an antioxidant, protecting aerobic organisms from the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases has been postulated to be a virulence factor. To help elucidate the function of catalase in Candida albicans, a single C. albicans-derived catalase gene, designated CAT1, was isolated and cloned. Degenerate PCR primers based on highly conserved areas of other fungal catalase genes were used to amplify a 411-bp product from genomic DNA of C. albicans ATCC 10261. By using this product as a probe, catalase clones were isolated from genomic libraries of C. albicans. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 487 amino acid residues. Construction of a CAT1-deficient mutant was achieved by using the Ura-blaster technique for sequential disruption of multiple alleles by integrative transformation using URA3 as a selectable marker. Resulting mutants exhibited normal morphology and comparable growth rates of both yeast and mycelial forms. Enzymatic analysis revealed an abundance of catalase in the wild-type strain but decreasing catalase activity in heterozygous mutants and no detectable catalase in a homozygous null mutant. In vitro assays showed the mutant strains to be more sensitive to damage by both neutrophils and concentrations of exogenous peroxide that were sublethal for the parental strain. Compared to the parental strain, the homozygous null mutant strain was far less virulent for mice in an intravenous infection model of disseminated candidiasis. Definitive linkage of CAT1 with virulence would require restoration of activity by reintroduction of the gene into mutants. However, initial results in mice, taken together with the enhanced susceptibility of catalase-deficient hyphae to damage by human neutrophils, suggest that catalase may enhance the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  12. Inhibition of the catalase activity from Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa by sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tejera García, Noel A; Iribarne, Carmen; Palma, Francisco; Lluch, Carmen

    2007-08-01

    Changes in catalase activity during the development of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis as well as its response in salinized plants of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa, was studied. Besides, it was examined the behavior of the enzyme, isolated from leaves and root nodules, during in vitro incubation with NaCl doses. Nodule catalase activities of both legumes were assayed with several enzyme inhibitors and also purified. Leaf catalase activity of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa decreased and increased respectively throughout the ontogeny, but root nodule catalase kept a high and stable value. This last result suggests that both legumes require the maintenance of high nodule catalase in nitrogen-fixing nodules. Under salt stress conditions leaf and nodule catalase activity decreased in both, grain and pasture legumes. Because catalase from leaf of Medicago sativa and nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris were relatively sensitive to NaCl during in vitro experiments, the detoxifying role of this enzyme for H(2)O(2) should be limited in such conditions. Both catalases, from determinate and indeterminate nodules, were affected neither by oxygen nor superoxide radicals but showed a strong (Phaseolus vulgaris) or partial (Medicago sativa) inhibition with dithiothreitol, dithionite and beta-mercaptoethanol. Besides, cyanide was the most potent inhibitor of nodule catalases. Finally, catalases partially purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography migrated at 42 (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 46kDa (Medicago sativa) on SDS-PAGE, whereas native forms on sephacryl S-300 columns exhibited a molecular mass of 59 and 48kDa (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 88 and 53kDa (Medicago sativa).

  13. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  14. Production of IFN-γ and IL-4 Against Intact Catalase and Constructed Catalase Epitopes of Helicobacter pylori From T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Fazeli, Hossein; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Adib, Minoo; Rashidi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent in the developing countries. It causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastrocarcinoma. Treatment with drugs and antibiotics is problematic due to the following reasons: cost, resistance to antibiotics, prolonged treatment and using multiple drugs. Catalase is highly conserved among the Helicobacter species and is important to the survival of the organism. It is expressed in high amounts and is exposed to the surface of this bacterium; therefore it represents a suitable candidate vaccine antigen. Objectives: A suitable approach in H. pylori vaccinology is the administration of epitope based vaccines. Therefore the responses of T-cells (IFN-γ and IL-4 production) against the catalase of H. pylori were determined. Then the quality of the immune responses against intact catalase and three epitopes of catalase were compared. Materials and Methods: In this study, a composition of three epitopes of the H. pylori catalase was selected based on Propred software. The effect of catalase epitopes on T-cells were assayed and immune responses identified. Results: The results of IFN-γ, IL-4 production against antigens, epitopes, and recombinant catalase by T-cells were compared for better understanding of epitope efficiency. Conclusions: The current research demonstrated that epitope sequence stimulates cellular immune responses effectively. In addition, increased safety and potency as well as a reduction in time and cost were advantages of this method. Authors are going to use this sequence as a suitable vaccine candidate for further research on animal models and humans in future. PMID:26862387

  15. Amelioration of hepatic reperfusion injury by superoxide dismutase and catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, M.G.; Burke, F.; Chaudry, I.H.

    1986-03-05

    Oxygen-derived free radicals have been implicated in reperfusion injury in various tissues. The present study determined if enzymatic scavenging of free radicals could improve recovery of hepatic function following ischemia. Livers from fasted rats were perfused with Krebs-HCO/sub 3/ buffer with substrates for gluconeogenesis for 30 min (control) followed by 60 min warm ischemia and 90 min reperfusion. At the beginning and end of ischemia the liver was flushed with buffered Ringer's with superoxide dismutase + catalase (150,000 U/L each)(SOD) or without additions (Untreated). Bile flow and glucose release were monitored during control and reperfusion periods and tissue sampled at the end of the experiment to determine tissue water and electrolytes. Bile flow and gluconeogenesis were markedly depressed after ischemia in both groups. At the end of 90 min reperfusion bile flow in Untreated and SOD were 23 +/- 6 and 46 +/- 8 ..mu..l/15 min (20% and 41% of control respectively, p < .01). Gluconeogenesis recovered to 83 +/- 4% of control in Untreated vs 103 +/- 6% with SOD (p < .05). Tissue water and electrolytes were not different. These results suggest that generation of oxygen-derived free radicals contributes to functional deficits in the liver following ischemia and that these defects can be attenuated by enzymatic scavenging.

  16. Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushant; Singh, Abhay Narayan; Verma, Anil; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were successfully synthesized using double emulsion (w/o/w) solvent evaporation technique. Characterization of the nanosphere using dynamic light scattering, field emission scanning electron microscope, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed a spherical-shaped nanosphere in a size range of 812 ± 64 nm with moderate protein encapsulation efficiency of 55.42 ± 3.7 % and high in vitro protein release. Human skin HaCat cells were used for analyzing antioxidative properties of SOD- and CAT-encapsulated PCL nanospheres. Oxidative stress condition in HaCat cells was optimized with exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 1 mM) as external stress factor and verified through reactive oxygen species (ROS) analysis using H2DCFDA dye. PCL nanosphere encapsulating SOD and CAT together indicated better antioxidative defense against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human skin HaCat cells in comparison to PCL encapsulating either SOD or CAT alone as well as against direct supplement of SOD and CAT protein solution. Increase in HaCat cells SOD and CAT activities after treatment hints toward uptake of PCL nanosphere into the human skin HaCat cells. The result signifies the role of PCL-encapsulating SOD and CAT nanosphere in alleviating oxidative stress.

  17. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min).

  18. Overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria attenuates murine cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Santana, Luis F.; Vermulst, Marc; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Emond, M.J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Gollahon, Katherine; Martin, George M.; Loeb, Lawrence A.; Ladiges, Warren C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Age is a major risk for cardiovascular diseases. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed as one of the causes of aging, their role in cardiac aging remains unclear. We have previously shown that overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT) prolongs murine median lifespan by 17-21%. Methods and Results: We used echocardiography to study cardiac function in aging cohorts of wild type (WT) and mCAT mice. Changes found in WT mice recapitulate human aging: age-dependent increases in left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and left atrial dimension, worsening of the myocardial performance index (MPI), and a decline in diastolic function. Cardiac aging in mice is accompanied by accumulation of mitochondrial protein oxidation, increased mitochondrial DNA mutations and deletions and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased ventricular fibrosis, enlarged myocardial fiber size, decreased cardiac SERCA2 protein and activation of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. All of these age-related changes were significantly attenuated in mCAT mice. Analysis of survival of 130 mice demonstrated that echocardiographic cardiac aging risk scores were significant predictors of mortality. The estimated attributable risk to mortality for these two parameters was 55%. Conclusion: This study shows that cardiac aging in the mouse closely recapitulates human aging and demonstrates the critical role of mitochondrial ROS in cardiac aging and the impact of cardiac aging on survival. These findings also support the potential application of mitochondrial antioxidants in ROS-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19451351

  19. Microbial resistance in relation to catalase activity to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanism of microbial resistance to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in relation to microbial catalase activity. In microbicidal tests, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were killed and this was accompanied by production of hydroxyl radicals. C. albicans was more resistant to hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) than was S. aureus. A catalase activity assay demonstrated that C. albicans had stronger catalase activity; accordingly, catalase activity could be one of the reasons for the resistance of the fungus to photolysis of H(2)O(2). Indeed, it was demonstrated that C. albicans with strong catalase activity was more resistant to photolysis of H(2)O(2) than that with weak catalase activity. Kinetic analysis using a modified Lineweaver-Burk plot also demonstrated that the microorganisms reacted directly with hydroxyl radicals and that this was accompanied by decomposition of H(2)O(2). The results of the present study suggest that the microbicidal effects of hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) can be alleviated by decomposition of H(2)O(2) by catalase in microorganisms.

  20. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed.

  1. The kinetic properties producing the perfunctory pH profiles of catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert L; Powell, Luke J; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    Many structure-function relationship studies performed on the catalase-peroxidase enzymes are based on limited kinetic data. To provide a more substantive understanding of catalase-peroxidase function, we undertook a more exhaustive evaluation of catalase-peroxidase catalysis as a function of pH. Kinetic parameters across a broad pH range for the catalase and peroxidase activities of E. coli catalase peroxidase (KatG) were obtained, including the separate analysis of the oxidizing and reducing substrates of the peroxidase catalytic cycle. This investigation identified ABTS-dependent inhibition of peroxidase activity, particularly at low pH, unveiling that previously reported pH optima are clearly skewed. We show that turnover and efficiency of peroxidase activity increases with decreasing pH until the protein unfolds. The data also suggest that the catalase pH optimum is more complex than it is often assumed to be. The apparent optimum is in fact the intersection of the optimum for binding (7.00) and the optimum for activity (5.75). We also report the apparent pK(a)s for binding and catalysis of catalase activity as well as approximate values for certain peroxidatic and catalatic steps.

  2. Catalase characterization and implication in bleaching of a symbiotic sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Sabourault, Cécile; Richier, Sophie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2007-01-15

    Symbiotic cnidarians are marine invertebrates harboring photosynthesizing microalgae (named zooxanthellae), which produce great amounts of oxygen and free radicals upon illumination. Studying antioxidative balance is then crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. In particular, it is suspected that oxidative stress triggers cnidarian bleaching, i.e., the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the animal host, responsible for symbiotic cnidarian mass mortality worldwide. This study therefore investigates catalase antioxidant enzymes and their role in bleaching of the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using specific separation of animal tissues (ectoderm and endoderm) from the symbionts (zooxanthellae), spectrophotometric assays and native PAGE revealed both tissue-specific and activity pattern distribution of two catalase electrophoretypes, E1 and E2. E1, expressed in all three tissues, presents high sensitivity to the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) and elevated temperatures. The ectodermal E1 form is responsible for 67% of total catalase activity. The E2 form, expressed only within zooxanthellae and their host endodermal cells, displays low sensitivity to ATZ and relative thermostability. We further cloned an ectodermal catalase, which shares 68% identity with mammalian monofunctional catalases. Last, 6 days of exposure of whole sea anemones to ATZ (0.5 mM) led to effective catalase inhibition and initiated symbiont expulsion. This demonstrates the crucial role of this enzyme in cnidarian bleaching, a phenomenon responsible for worldwide climate-change-induced mass mortalities, with catastrophic consequences for marine biodiversity.

  3. Monofunctional catalase P of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: identification, characterization, molecular cloning and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Sabrina F I; Bailão, Alexandre M; Barbosa, Mônica S; Jesuino, Rosalia S A; Felipe, M Sueli Soares; Pereira, Maristela; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2004-01-30

    Within the context of studies on genes from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb) potentially associated with fungus-host interaction, we isolated a 61 kDa protein, pI 6.2, that was reactive with sera of patients with paracoccidioidomycosis. This protein was identified as a peroxisomal catalase. A complete cDNA encoding this catalase was isolated from a Pb cDNA library and was designated PbcatP. The cDNA contained a 1509 bp ORF containing 502 amino acids, whose molecular mass was 57 kDa, with a pI of 6.5. The translated protein PbCATP revealed canonical motifs of monofunctional typical small subunit catalases and the peroxisome-PTS-1-targeting signal. The deduced and the native PbCATP demonstrated amino acid sequence homology to known monofunctional catalases and was most closely related to catalases from other fungi. The protein and mRNA were diminished in the mycelial saprobic phase compared to the yeast phase of infection. Protein synthesis and mRNA levels increased during the transition from mycelium to yeast. In addition, the catalase protein was induced when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide. The identification and characterization of the PbCATP and cloning and characterization of the cDNA are essential steps for investigating the role of catalase as a defence of P. brasiliensis against oxygen-dependent killing mechanisms. These results suggest that this protein exerts an influence in the virulence of P. brasiliensis.

  4. Catalase ameliorates hepatic fibrosis by inhibition of hepatic stellate cells activation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuwei; Qu, Ying; Xu, Mingyi; Wang, Xingpeng; Lu, Lungen

    2014-01-01

    Catalase, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, is thought to have rescue effects on hepatic fibrosis. In this study, the regulation of catalase in CCl₄-induced hepatic fibrogenesis was investigated. Our results indicated that catalase expression was decreased upon CCl₄ treatment in a time-dependent manner, while the expression of several profibrosis and proangiogenic factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and angiopoietin 1 were significantly increased. To assess the role of catalase in hepatic fibrosis, catalase was overexpressed in HSC-T6 cells. This overexpression resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migratory activity, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, key features that characterize activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Overexpression of catalase led to a decrease in the secretion of collagen type 1 and angiopoietin 1. These results indicate that loss of catalase activity is involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis caused by the activation of HSCs.

  5. Over-expression of catalase in myeloid cells confers acute protection following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Brown, Milton E; Che, Pao Lin; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chiang, Bryce; Taylor, W Robert; Davis, Michael E

    2014-05-21

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  6. Catalase function in plants: a focus on Arabidopsis mutants as stress-mimic models.

    PubMed

    Mhamdi, Amna; Queval, Guillaume; Chaouch, Sejir; Vanderauwera, Sandy; Van Breusegem, Frank; Noctor, Graham

    2010-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signal molecule involved in plant development and environmental responses. Changes in H(2)O(2) availability can result from increased production or decreased metabolism. While plants contain several types of H(2)O(2)-metabolizing proteins, catalases are highly active enzymes that do not require cellular reductants as they primarily catalyse a dismutase reaction. This review provides an update on plant catalase genes, function, and subcellular localization, with a focus on recent information generated from studies on Arabidopsis. Original data are presented on Arabidopsis catalase single and double mutants, and the use of some of these lines as model systems to investigate the outcome of increases in intracellular H(2)O(2) are discussed. Particular attention is paid to interactions with cell thiol-disulphide status; the use of catalase-deficient plants to probe the apparent redundancy of reductive H(2)O(2)-metabolizing pathways; the importance of irradiance and growth daylength in determining the outcomes of catalase deficiency; and the induction of pathogenesis-related responses in catalase-deficient lines. Within the context of strategies aimed at understanding and engineering plant stress responses, the review also considers whether changes in catalase activities in wild-type plants are likely to be a significant part of plant responses to changes in environmental conditions or biotic challenge.

  7. Catalase is a key enzyme in seed recovery from ageing during priming.

    PubMed

    Kibinza, Serge; Bazin, Jérémie; Bailly, Christophe; Farrant, Jill M; Corbineau, Françoise; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat

    2011-09-01

    Ageing induces seed deterioration expressed as the loss of seed vigour and/or viability. Priming treatment, which consists in soaking of seeds in a solution of low water potential, has been shown to reinvigorate aged seeds. We investigate the importance of catalase in oxidation protection during accelerated ageing and repair during subsequent priming treatment of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds. Seeds equilibrated to 0.29g H2Og(-1) dry matter (DM) were aged at 35°C for different durations and then primed by incubation for 7 days at 15°C in a solution of polyethylene glycol 8000 at -2MPa. Accelerated ageing affected seed germination and priming treatment reversed partially the ageing effect. The inhibition of catalase by the addition of aminotriazol during priming treatment reduced seed repair indicating that catalase plays a key role in protection and repair systems during ageing. Ageing was associated with H2O2 accumulation as showed by biochemical quantification and CeCl3 staining. Catalase was reduced at the level of gene expression, protein content and affinity. Interestingly, priming induced catalase synthesis by activating expression and translation of the enzyme. Immunocytolocalization of catalase showed that the enzyme co-localized with H2O2 in the cytosol. These results clearly indicate that priming induce the synthesis of catalase which is involved in seed recovery during priming.

  8. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  9. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  10. Immunolocalization of hypochlorite-induced, catalase-bound free radical formation in mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Marcelo G.; Siraki, Arno G.; Atanassov, Boyko S.; Mason., Ronald P.

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of oxidants as mediators of signal transduction has renewed the interest of investigators in oxidant production and metabolism. In particular, H2O2 has been demonstrated to play pivotal roles in mediating cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are modulated by its rate of production and its rate of decomposition by catalase and peroxidases. In inflammation and infection some of the H2O2 is converted to hypochlorous acid, a key mediator of the host immune response against pathogens. In vivo HOCl production is mediated by myeloperoxidase, which uses excess H2O2 to oxidize Cl−. Mashino and Fridovich (1988) observed that a high excess of HOCl over catalase inactivated the enzyme by mechanisms that remain unclear. The potential relevance of this as an alternative mechanism for catalase activity control and its potential impact on H2O2-mediated signaling and HOCl-production compelled us to explore in depth the HOCl-mediated catalase inactivation pathways. Here, we demonstrate that HOCl induces formation of catalase protein radicals and carbonyls, which are temporally correlated with catalase aggregation. Hypochlorite-induced catalase aggregation and free radical formation that paralleled the enzyme loss of function in vitro were also detected in mouse hepatocytes treated with the oxidant. Interestingly, the novel immunospin-trapping technique was applied to image radical production in the cells. Indeed, in HOCl-treated hepatocytes, catalase and protein-DMPO nitrone adducts were colocalized in the cells’ peroxisomes. In contrast, when hepatocytes from catalase-knockout mice were treated with hypochlorous acid, there was extensive production of free radicals in the plasma membrane. Because free radicals are short-lived species with fundamental roles in biology, the possibility of their detection and localization to cell compartments is expected to open new and stimulating research venues in the interface of

  11. The Genetics of Catalase in Drosophila Melanogaster: Isolation and Characterization of Acatalasemic Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, W. J.; Bewley, G. C.

    1989-01-01

    Activated oxygen species have been demonstrated to be the important agents in oxygen toxicity by disrupting the structural and functional integrity of cells through lipid peroxidation events, DNA damage and protein inactivation. The biological consequences of free radical damage have long been hypothesized to be a causal agent in many aging-related diseases. Catalase (H(2)O(2):H(2)O(2) oxidoreductase; EC 1.15.1.1) is one of several enzymes involved in the scavenging of oxygen free radicals and free radical derivatives. The structural gene for catalase in Drosophila melanogaster has been localized to region 75D1-76A on chromosome 3L by dosage responses to segmental aneuploidy. This study reports the isolation of a stable deficiency, Df(3L)Cat(DH104)(75C1-2;75F1), that uncovers the catalase locus and the subsequent isolation of six acatalasemic mutants. All catalase mutants are viable under standard culture conditions and recessive lethal mutations within the 75C1-F1 interval have been shown not to affect catalase activity. Two catalase mutations are amorphic while four are hypomorphic alleles of the Cat(+) locus. The lack of intergenic complementation between the six catalase mutations strongly suggests that there is only one functional gene in Drosophila. One acatalesemic mutation was mapped to position 3-47.0 which resides within the catalase dosage sensitive region. While complete loss of catalase activity confers a severe viability effect, residual levels are sufficient to restore viability to wild type levels. These results suggest a threshold effect for viability and offer an explanation for the general lack of phenotypic effects associated with the known mammalian acatalasemics. PMID:2503418

  12. Involvement of OS-2 MAP kinase in regulation of the large-subunit catalases CAT-1 and CAT-3 in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Shiozawa, Azusa; Banno, Shinpei; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Ichiishi, Akihiko; Kimura, Makoto; Fujimura, Makoto

    2007-08-01

    Neurospora crassa has four catalase genes--cat-1, cat-2, cat-3, and ctt-1/cat-4. cat-1 and cat-3 encode two fungal-specific large-subunit catalases CAT-1 and CAT-3 normally produced in conidia and growing hyphae, respectively. cat-2 encodes CAT-2 catalase-peroxidase normally produced in conidia. ctt-1 (or cat-4), of which expression was controlled by OS-2 MAP kinase (Noguchi et al., Fungal Genet. Biol. 44, 208-218), encodes a small-subunit catalase with unknown function. To clarify the contribution of OS-2 on the regulation of CAT-1, CAT-2, and CAT-3, we performed quantitative RT-PCR and in-gel catalase activity analyses. When the hyphae were treated with a fungicide (1 mug/ml fludioxonil) or subjected to an osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol), cat-1 was strongly upregulated and CAT-1 was reasonably induced in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, fludioxonil caused not only the CAT-1 induction but also a remarkable CAT-3 decrease in the wild-type hyphae, implying of an abnormal stimulation of asexual differentiation. These responses were not observed in an os-2 mutant hyphae, indicating an involvement of OS-2 in the cat-1 expression; however, os-2 was dispensable for the production of CAT-1 in conidia. In contrast, the expression of cat-2 was significantly induced by heat shock (45 degrees C) and that of cat-3 was moderately stimulated by an oxidative stress (50 microg/ml methyl viologen) in both the wild-type strain and the os-2 mutant, and corresponding enzyme activities were detected after the treatments. Although basal levels of transcription of cat-1 and cat-3 in an os-2 mutant hyphae were a few-fold lower than in the wild-type hyphae, the os-2 mutant exhibited a considerably lower levels of CAT-3 activity than the wild-type strain. These findings suggest that OS-2 MAP kinase regulated the expression of cat-1 and cat-3 transcriptionally, and probably that of cat-3 posttranscriptionally, even though the presence of another regulatory system for each of these two

  13. Study of the temperature influence on catalase using spin labelling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoszek, M.; Kściuczyk, M.

    2005-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used to study the temperature influence on spin labelled catalase. The measurements were made in the temperature range 300-345 K. The spin label technique allows to observe the structural changes in catalase with increasing temperature. The rotational correlation time of the 3-(2-iodoacetamido)-proxyl spin marker placed in metalloenzyme was determined. The details of ESR spectra contain information on the character of the spin label motion. It indicates the changes in the structure of catalase before the denaturation temperature, determined with dsc microcalorimetry.

  14. [Thermo-alkali-stable catalase from Thermoascus aurantiacus and its potential use in textile bleaching process].

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Li, Yin; Du, Guo-Cheng; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Jian

    2004-05-01

    The effect of growth and fermentation conditions on the production of catalase by T. aurantiacus WSH 03-01 was investigated in shaking flasks. Catalase activity reached 1594 u/mL when the culture was grown on a complex carbon source containing 20 g/L dextrin and 1% (V/V) ethanol, which was 23% higher than the sum produced on 20 g/L dextrin and 1% (V/V) ethanol, respectively. It was concluded that dextrin might act as a major carbon source in the complex, while ethanol was rather a stimulator than a carbon source. The stimulation effect of ethanol on catalase production was postulated to be two aspects; catalase-dependent alcohol metabolism is activated by acute alcohol, thus more catalase need to be synthesized for that use, named direct induction. As for indirect induction, which may result from little amount of H2O2 generation in process of NADH regeneration in respiratory chain. Peptone was shown to be a favorable nitrogen source for catalase production and its optimum concentration was found to be 10 g/L. Catalase production by T. aurantiacus WSH 03-01 was further improved by optimizing the initial pH, volume of medium in flasks as well as the concentration of external H2O2. Under the optimum culture conditions, the activity of catalase reached 2762 u/mL, which was nearly 6.8 times higher than that of the initiate conditions. Furthermore, the potential application of this novel catalase in the treatment of textile bleaching effluents was evaluated. Thermo-and alkaline stability of this catalase was compared with the commercial available catalases produced from bovine and Aspergillus niger. The crude enzyme from T. aurantiacus WSH 03-01 showed stronger stabilities at (70 degrees C, 80 degrees C, 90 degrees C) and (pH 9.0, pH 10.0, pH 11.0) than the other two types of catalases, indicating a great application potential in the clean production process of textile industry.

  15. [Relationship between the aggressiveness and catalase activity of Septoria nodorum berk. in wheat].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I V; Iarullina, L G; Burkhanova, G F; Zaĭkina, E A

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of hydrogen peroxide (H202) generation, the character of a fungal catalase gene expression, and the catalase activity in wheat plants, infected with Septoria nodorum Berk. strains differing in their aggressiveness, has been carried out. The decreased intensity of H202 accumulation in infected tissues, influenced by an aggressive S. nodorum strain and caused by the enhanced transcriptional activity of the fungal catalase gene and the heightened synthesis of its product, has been revealed to be more expressed compared to a similar decrease influenced by a less aggressive strain. An assumption was made that the expression activity of the catalase gene and, therefore, the activity ofcatalase involved in the regulation of the H202 content in the infected zone represent important factors providing high.aggressiveness and pathogenicity of S. nodorum.

  16. Catalase in testes and epididymidis of wistar rats fed zinc deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Bedwal, S; Prasad, S; Nair, N; Saini, M R; Bedwal, R S

    2009-01-01

    Catalase activities have been evaluated in testes and caput and cauda epididymis of Wistar rats fed on zinc deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks. The enzyme activity has been measured as chromic acetate formed by heating of dichromate (in acetic acid) in presence of H(2) O(2) with perchromic acid as an unstable intermediate. Observed non-significant increase in catalase activity in testes as well as in caput and cauda epididymis of 2 weeks experiments has been related to low levels of H(2) O(2) produced in two organs whereas significant (P<0.01/0.001) increase in catalase activity in 4-weeks experiments indicate for increased oxidative stress due to phagocytotic activity of Sertoli cells in testes and damaged spermatozoa in epididymis. Thus, zinc deficiency increases catalase activity in testes and epididymis.

  17. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of catalase with bifendate and analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Li, Hua; Wang, Yi; Pu, Juanjuan; Wang, Ruiyong

    2013-02-01

    The interactions of bifendate (DDB) or analogs (Bicyclol, I, II and III) with catalase are analyzed by spectrophotometric methods. The fluorescence spectra results show the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase is strongly quenched by DDB or analogs with a static quenching procedure. The binding constants are obtained at three temperatures. The thermodynamics parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) indicate the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play a major role in the interaction. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrate that the microenvironments of Trp residue of catalase are disturbed by the analogs. Thermodynamic results showed that DDB is the strongest quencher and bind to catalase with the highest affinity among five compounds.

  18. Immobilization of catalase on chitosan and amino acid- modified chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin

    2013-08-01

    Bovine liver catalase was covalently immobilized onto amino acid-modified chitosan beads. The beads were characterized with SEM, FTIR, TGA and the effects of immobilization on optimum pH and temperature, thermostability, reusability were evaluated. Immobilized catalase showed the maximal enzyme activity at pH 7.0 at 30°C. The kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, for immobilized catalase on alanine-chitosan beads and lysine-chitosan beads were estimated to be 25.67 mM, 27 mM and 201.39 μmol H2O2/min, 197.50 μmol H2O2/min, respectively. The activity of the immobilized catalase on Ala-CB and Lys-CB retained 40% of its high initial activity after 100 times of reuse.

  19. Occurrence of High Catalase-containing Acinetobacter in Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, K. B.; Derecho, I.; La Duc, M. T.; Vaishampayan, P.; Venkateswaran, K. J.; Mogul, R.

    2010-04-01

    In summary, the measurement of high catalase specific activity values for spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains is potentially the result of adaptation towards the harsh conditions of the clean rooms and assembly process.

  20. A Simple Method for Demonstrating Enzyme Kinetics Using Catalase from Beef Liver Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kristin A.

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes a simple visual method of demonstrating enzyme kinetics using beef liver catalase. A catalase solution is obtained by homogenizing beef liver in a phosphate buffer. In the demonstration, filter paper is saturated with beef liver extract and placed into a solution of hydrogen peroxide. The catalase in the extract decomposes the hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. Oxygen forms on the filter paper, and the filter paper rises to the top of the beaker. Catalase activity is measured by timing the rise of the enzyme-soaked filter paper to the top of beakers containing different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The data are plotted as a Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plot, and the Km and Vmax for the reaction are calculated.

  1. Production, characterization, cloning and sequence analysis of a monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-Wei; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Da-Bing

    2011-04-01

    A monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08 produced by liquid state fermentation in 7 liter fermenter was isolated and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and gel filtration (GF) and characterized. Its sequence was analyzed by LC-MS/MS technique and gene cloning. The highest catalase production (20,289 U · ml(-1)) was achieved after incubation for 40 h. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 230 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 58 kDa. High specific activity of the catalase (199,584 U · mg(-1) protein) was 3.44 times higher than that of Halomonas sp. Sk1 catalase (57,900 U · mg(-1) protein). The enzyme without peroxidase activity was found to be an atypical electronic spectrum of monofunctional catalase. The apparent K(m) and V(max) were 78 mM and 188, 212 per µM H(2) O(2) µM heme(-1) s(-1), respectivly. The enzyme displayed a broad pH activity range (pH 5.0-11.0), with optimal pH range of 7.0-9.0: It was most active at 20 °C and had 78% activity at 0 °C. Its thermo stability was slightly higher compared to that of commercial catalase from bovine liver. LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence of cloning gene was the catalase sequence from Serratia marcescens SYBC08. The sequence was compared with that of 23 related catalases. Although most of active site residues, NADPH-binding residues, proximal residues of the heme, distal residues of the heme and residues interacting with a water molecule in the enzyme were well conserved in 23 related catalases, weakly conserved residues were found. Its sequence was closely related with that of catalases from pathogenic bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. This result imply that the enzyme with high specific activity plays a significant role in preventing those microorganisms of the family Enterobacteriaceae against hydrogen peroxide resulted in cellular damage. Calalase yield by Serratia

  2. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (P<0.05). In addition, catalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  3. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed.

  4. Catalase overexpression reduces the germination time and increases the pathogenicity of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae.

    PubMed

    Morales Hernandez, Claudia Erika; Padilla Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Gonzalez Hernandez, Gloria Angelica; Salazar Solis, Eduardo; Torres Guzman, Juan Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Catalases and peroxidases are the most important enzymes that degrade hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. These enzymes and superoxide dismutase are the first lines of cell defense against reactive oxygen species. Metarhizium anisopliae displays an increase in catalase-peroxidase activity during germination and growth. To determine the importance of catalase during the invasion process of M. anisopliae, we isolated the cat1 gene. cat1 cDNA expression in Escherichia coli and the subsequent purification of the protein confirmed that the cat1 gene codes for a monofunctional catalase. Expression analysis of this gene by RT-PCR from RNA isolated from fungus grown in liquid cultures showed a decrease in the expression level of the cat1 gene during germination and an increase during mycelium growth. The expression of this gene in the fungus during the infection process of the larvae of Plutella xylostella also showed a significant increase during invasive growth. Transgenic strains overexpressing the cat1 gene had twice the catalase activity of the wild-type strain. This increase in catalase activity was accompanied by a higher level of resistance to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and a reduction in the germination time. This improvement was also observed during the infection of P. xylostella larvae. M. anisopliae transgenic strains overexpressing the cat1 gene grew and spread faster in the soft tissue of the insect, reducing the time to death of the insect by 25% and the dose required to kill 50% of the population 14-fold.

  5. Purification of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis catalase P: subsequent kinetic and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Ronney Fernandes; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia; Winters, Michael S; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2010-03-01

    Catalases are essential components of the cellular equipment to cope with oxidative stress. Here we have purified a highly abundant catalase P of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (PbCatP) that is preferentially expressed in the parasitic yeast phase. This oxidative stress-induced protein was isolated from yeast cells grown in the presence of 15 mM of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We have used consecutive steps of protein precipitation and gel filtration chromatography to achieve the purified protein. Protein purification was validated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis. The purified enzyme showed strong similarity to small-subunit catalases. Like most monofunctional catalases, PbCatP is a homotetramer, resistant to inactivation by acidic conditions, temperature and denaturants. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviour of catalase P was observed to be different at low compared to high H(2)O(2) concentrations. The results demonstrated that a purified PbCatP is a homotetrameric enzyme, classified as a small subunit catalase.

  6. Leptospira interrogans catalase is required for resistance to H2O2 and for virulence.

    PubMed

    Eshghi, Azad; Lourdault, Kristel; Murray, Gerald L; Bartpho, Thanatchaporn; Sermswan, Rasana W; Picardeau, Mathieu; Adler, Ben; Snarr, Brendan; Zuerner, Richard L; Cameron, Caroline E

    2012-11-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira spp. are likely to encounter higher concentrations of reactive oxygen species induced by the host innate immune response. In this study, we characterized Leptospira interrogans catalase (KatE), the only annotated catalase found within pathogenic Leptospira species, by assessing its role in resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress and during infection in hamsters. Pathogenic L. interrogans bacteria had a 50-fold-higher survival rate under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress than did saprophytic L. biflexa bacteria, and this was predominantly catalase dependent. We also characterized KatE, the only annotated catalase found within pathogenic Leptospira species. Catalase assays performed with recombinant KatE confirmed specific catalase activity, while protein fractionation experiments localized KatE to the bacterial periplasmic space. The insertional inactivation of katE in pathogenic Leptospira bacteria drastically diminished leptospiral viability in the presence of extracellular H(2)O(2) and reduced virulence in an acute-infection model. Combined, these results suggest that L. interrogans KatE confers in vivo resistance to reactive oxygen species induced by the host innate immune response.

  7. Inhibitory effects of a novel Val to Thr mutation on the distal heme of human catalase.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    True catalases efficiently breakdown hydrogen peroxide, whereas the catalase-related enzyme allene oxide synthase (cAOS) is completely unreactive and instead metabolizes a fatty acid hydroperoxide. In cAOS a Thr residue adjacent to the distal His restrains reaction with H2O2 (Tosha et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281:12610; De Luna et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117: 14635) and its mutation to the consensus Val of true catalases permits the interaction. Here we investigated the effects of the reciprocal experiment in which the Val74 of human catalase is mutated to Thr, Ser, Met, Pro, or Ala. The Val74Thr substitution decreased catalatic activity by 3.5-fold and peroxidatic activity by 3-fold. Substitution with Ser had similar negative effects (5- and 3-fold decreases). Met decreased catalatic activity 2-fold and eliminated peroxidatic activity altogether, whereas the Val74Ala substitution was well tolerated. (The Val74Pro protein lacked heme). We conclude that the conserved Val74 of true catalases helps optimize catalysis. There are rare substitutions of Val74 with Ala, Met, or Pro, but not with Ser of Thr, possibly due their hydrogen bonding affecting the conformation of His75, the essential distal heme residue for activity in catalases.

  8. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  9. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    PubMed

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  10. Fluorescence Spectrometry of the Interaction of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Li, Y.; Cai, H.; Li, J.; Miao, J.; Fu, D.; Yang, Q.

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process.

  11. Reversible adsorption of catalase onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels.

    PubMed

    Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Uygun, Murat; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2015-05-01

    In this presented study, poly(acrylamide-glycidyl methacrylate) [poly(AAm-GMA)] cryogels were synthesized by cryopolymerization technique at sub-zero temperature. Prepared cryogels were then functionalized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and chelated with Fe(3+) ions in order produce the metal chelate affinity matrix. Synthesized cryogels were characterized with FTIR, ESEM and EDX analysis, and it was found that the cryogel had sponge like structure with interconnected pores and their pore diameter was about 200 μm. Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of catalase and optimum adsorption conditions were determined by varying the medium pH, initial catalase concentration, temperature and ionic strength. Maximum catalase adsorption onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was found to be 12.99 mg/g cryogel at 25 °C, by using pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Adsorbed catalase was removed from the cryogel by using 1.0M of NaCl solution and desorption yield was found to be 96%. Additionally, reusability profile of the Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was also investigated and it was found that, adsorption capacity of the cryogels didn't decrease significantly at the end of the 40 reuses. Catalase activity studies were also tested and it was demonstrated that desorbed catalase retained 70% of its initial activity.

  12. Effect of iron concentration on the expression and activity of catalase-peroxidases in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Sundaram, C A S Sivagami; Sritharan, Manjula

    2005-02-01

    Mycobacterial catalases are known to exist in different isoforms. We studied the influence of iron concentration on the expression and activity of the different isoforms in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum, M. kansasii and M. vaccae by growing them under iron-sufficient (4 microg Fe/mL) and iron-deficient (0.02 microg Fe/ml) conditions. Upon iron deprivation, significant differences were observed in the catalase/peroxidase activities in both quantitative spectrophotometric assays and in the activity staining in native gels. Notable feature was that the peroxidase activity showed a significant decrease upon iron deprivation in all the mycobacteria, except M. vaccae. Peroxidase activity in all the mycobacteria, irrespective of the iron status was susceptible to heat inactivation. However, the isoforms of catalase showed differences in their heat stability, indicating possible structural differences in these proteins. For example, M. bovis BCG expressed a heat labile catalase under iron-sufficient conditions, while a heat stable catalase band of similar mobility was expressed under iron-deprivation conditions. The study clearly indicates that iron plays an important role in the regulation of expression of the different isoforms of the catalase-peroxidases.

  13. Inhibitor and temperature effect on catalase in the liver of adult diploid and haploid Rana rugosa.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, A; Kashiwagi, K; Takase, M; Hanada, H; Yamashita, M; Naitoh, T; Nakamura, M

    1998-01-01

    The authors succeeded in raising a single mature haploid Rana rugosa female to the age of 2 years from an egg artificially fertilized with ultraviolet-irradiated sperm. In order to discover why this particular haploid individual should survive so long, hydrogen peroxide detoxifying catalase in the liver of this individual and age-matched diploids was examined and compared for total activity, temperature stability, and chemical inhibition. Total activity was found to be significantly higher in the haploid frog than in the diploids, suggesting that this particular haploid had a unique system for hydrogen peroxide detoxification which protected the liver against cell death, preventing hepatic failure, and leading to a prolonged survival. Liver catalase from the haploid proved to be more labile to aminotriazole and urea, losing 60-70% of its original activity after 30 min treatment, whereas diploid catalase lost only 40% under the same conditions. Haploid and diploid catalase responded similarly to heat, however. It seems likely that inhibitor-binding sites differ considerably between the catalase of normal diploids and the catalase of this particular haploid, while overall structure is generally similar.

  14. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  15. Catalase inhibition in the Arcuate nucleus blocks ethanol effects on the locomotor activity of rats.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Correa, Mercé; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-03-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a bidirectional modulation of ethanol-induced locomotion produced by drugs that regulate brain catalase activity. In the present study we have assessed the effect in rats of intraperitoneal, intraventricular or intracraneal administration of the catalase inhibitor sodium azide in the locomotor changes observed after ethanol (1 g/kg) administration. Our results show that sodium azide prevents the effects of ethanol in rats locomotion not only when sodium azide was systemically administered but also when it was intraventricularly injected, then confirming that the interaction between catalase and ethanol takes place in Central Nervous System (CNS). Even more interestingly, the same results were observed when sodium azide administration was restricted to the hypothalamic Arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region which has one of the highest levels of expression of catalase. Therefore, the results of the present study not only confirm a role for brain catalase in the mediation of ethanol-induced locomotor changes in rodents but also point to the ARC as a major neuroanatomical location for this interaction. These results are in agreement with our reports showing that ethanol-induced locomotor changes are clearly dependent of the ARC integrity and, especially of the POMc-synthesising neurons of this nucleus. According to these data we propose a model in which ethanol oxidation via catalase could produce acetaldehyde into the ARC and to promote a release of beta-endorphins that would activate opioid receptors to produce locomotion and other ethanol-induced neurobehavioural changes.

  16. CATALASE ACTIVITY OF TWO STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS STRAINS AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY AEROBIOSIS AND ADDED CATIONS1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dorothy; Deibel, R. H.; Niven, C. F.

    1964-01-01

    Jones, Dorothy (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), R. H. Deibel, and C. F. Niven, Jr. Catalase activity of two Streptococcus faecalis strains and its enhancement by aerobiosis and added cations. J. Bacteriol. 88:602–610. 1964.—The nature of catalase activity noted in two unusual Streptococcus faecalis strains was determined. Enzyme activity was lost slowly when cultures were maintained by daily transfer in test tubes of broth media. Loss of activity could be prevented by aerobic culture. Supplementation of the growth medium with ferric, manganese, and zinc ions, as well as aerobiosis, enhanced catalase activity. However, addition of these cations to cell suspensions or to cell-free extracts did not increase catalase activity. Although oxygen was observed to be one of the reaction end products, the catalase activity was not inhibited by cyanide or azide, and the iron-porphyrin coenzyme of classical catalase was not detected. The enzyme was purified 185-fold by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromotography on a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column. PMID:14208495

  17. Influence of Catalase Activity on Resistance of Coagulase-positive Staphylococci to Hydrogen Peroxide1

    PubMed Central

    Amin, V. M.; Olson, N. F.

    1968-01-01

    Catalase activities of intact cells and cell-free extracts of coagulase-positive staphylococcal cultures 105B and 558D isolated from milk, culture 25042 from a clinical source, and Staphylococcus aureus 196E were determined at 32.2 C. Cultures were treated with 0.025 and 0.05% hydrogen peroxide at 37.8 and 54.4 C and without hydrogen peroxide at 54.4 C to determine the relationship between catalase activity and resistance to these treatments. The relationship held true for cultures 105B and 196E; culture 105B had the lowest catalase activity and lowest resistance to H2O2 at 37.8 C, whereas S. aureus 196E possessed a high catalase activity and was most resistant at 37.8 C. Catalase activities of cell-free extracts of cultures 25042, 558, and 196E were similar, but resistance to H2O2 at 37.8 C was greater for culture 196E. The lower resistance of culture 25042 was related to low catalase activities of whole cells of this culture, which were only one-third that of whole cells of culture 196E. Culture 558 was least resistant to heat treatment at 54.4 C and showed the greatest sensitivity to added H2O2 at this temperature. PMID:5645413

  18. A novel impedimetric nanobiosensor for low level determination of hydrogen peroxide based on biocatalysis of catalase.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Asgari, Mehdi; Maragheh, Mohammad Ghannadi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2012-02-01

    A robust and effective nanocomposite film-glassy carbon modified electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate was prepared by a layer-by-layer self-assembly method. The fabricated modified electrode was used as a novel impedimetric catalase nanobiosensor for the determination of H(2)O(2). Direct electron transfer and electrocatalysis of catalase were fully investigated. The results suggested that catalase could be firmly adsorbed at the modified electrode. A pair of quasi-reversible redox peaks of catalase was observed in a 0.20 M degassed phosphate buffer solution of pH 7.0. The nanocomposite film showed a pronounced increase in direct electron transfer between catalase and the electrode. The immobilized catalase exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H(2)O(2). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements revealed that the charge transfer resistance decreases significantly after enzymatic reaction with hydrogen peroxide, so that the prepared modified electrode can be used for the detection of ultra traces of H(2)O(2) (5-1700 nM).

  19. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H2O2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H2O2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells.

  20. Nitrite-catalase interaction as an important element of nitrite toxicity.

    PubMed

    Titov, V Yu; Petrenko, Yu M

    2003-06-01

    It was established that nitrite in the presence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate decreases the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase. The decrease was recorded by the permanganatometric method and by a method of dynamic calorimetry. Nitrite was not destroyed in the course of the reaction and the total value of heat produced in the process was not changed by its presence. These facts suggest that nitrite induces inhibition of catalase with no change in the essence of the enzymatic process. Even micromolar nitrite concentrations induced a considerable decrease in catalase activity. However, in the absence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate inhibition was not observed. In contrast, fluoride protected catalase from nitrite inhibition in the presence of the above-mentioned halides and pseudohalide. As hydrogen peroxide is a necessary factor for triggering a number of important toxic effects of nitrite, the latter increases its toxicity by inhibiting catalase. This was shown by the example of nitrite-induced hemoglobin oxidation. The naturally existing gradient of chloride and other anion concentrations between intra- and extracellular media appears to be the most important mechanism of cell protection from inhibition of intracellular catalase by nitrite. Possible mechanisms of this inhibition are discussed.

  1. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53.

    PubMed

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2-catalase and p53/PIG3-catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively.

  2. High resistance to oxidative damage in the Antarctic midge Belgica antarctica, and developmentally linked expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase, catalase and heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Elnitsky, Michael A; Benoit, Joshua B; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2008-08-01

    Intense ultraviolet radiation, coupled with frequent bouts of freezing-thawing and anoxia, have the potential to generate high levels of oxidative stress in Antarctic organisms. In this study, we examined mechanisms used by the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, to counter oxidative stress. We cloned genes encoding two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (Cat), and showed that SOD mRNA was expressed continuously and at very high levels in larvae, but not in adults, while Cat mRNA was expressed in both larvae and adults but at a somewhat reduced level. SOD mRNA was expressed at even higher levels in larvae that were exposed to direct sunlight. Catalase, a small heat shock protein, Hsp70 and Hsp90 mRNAs were also strongly upregulated in response to sunlight. Total antioxidant capacity of the adults was higher than that of the larvae, but levels in both stages of the midge were much higher than observed in a freeze-tolerant, temperate zone insect, the gall fly Eurosta solidaginis. Assays to measure oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation TBARS and carbonyl proteins) demonstrated that the Antarctic midge is highly resistant to oxidative stress.

  3. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Thermo-Alkali-Stable Catalase from Thermus brockianus

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Vicki Sue; Schaller, Kastli Dianne; Apel, William Arnold

    2003-10-01

    A novel thermo-alkali-stable catalase from Thermus brockianus was purified and characterized. The protein was purified from a T. brockianus cell extract in a three-step procedure that resulted in 65-fold purification to a specific activity of 5300 U/mg. The enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 42.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE and a total molecular mass measured by gel filtration of 178 kDa. The catalase was active over a temperature range from 30 to 94 C and a pH range from 6 to 10, with optimum activity occurring at 90 C and pH 8. At pH 8, the enzyme was extremely stable at elevated temperatures with half-lives of 330 h at 80 C and 3 h at 90 C. The enzyme also demonstrated excellent stability at 70 C and alkaline pH with measured half-lives of 510 h and 360 h at pHs of 9 and 10, respectively. The enzyme had an unusual pyridine hemochrome spectrum and appears to utilize eight molecules of heme c per tetramer rather than protoheme IX present in the majority of catalases studied to date. The absorption spectrum suggested that the heme iron of the catalase was in a 6-coordinate low spin state rather than the typical 5-coordinate high spin state. A Km of 35.5 mM and a Vmax of 20.3 mM/min·mg protein for hydrogen peroxide was measured, and the enzyme was not inhibited by hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 450 mM. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by cyanide and the traditional catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The enzyme also showed no peroxidase activity to peroxidase substrates o-dianisidine and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), a trait of typical monofunctional catalases. However, unlike traditional monofunctional catalases, the T. brockianus catalase was easily reduced by dithionite, a characteristic of catalase-peroxidases. The above properties indicate that this catalase has potential for applications in industrial bleaching processes to remove residual hydrogen peroxide from process streams.

  4. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and toxicity by a catalase from Mycoplasma iowae.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rachel E; Prassinos, Alexandre J; Osborne, John D; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute.

  5. Evaluation on the Toxic Effects of NanoAg to Catalase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhai, Wenxin; Liu, Rutao; Yu, Zehua; Shen, Hengmei; Hu, Xinxin

    2015-02-01

    Protein is the functional actor of life. Research on protein damage induced by nanomaterials may give insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanoparticles. Studying nano silver over the impact of the structure and function of catalase (CAT) at the molecular level, is of great significance for a comprehensive evaluation of their toxic effects. The toxic effects of nanoAg on catalase were thoroughly investigated using steady state and time resolved fluorescence quenching measurements, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering spectroscopy (RLS), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). NanoAg could decrease the amount of alpha-helix and increase the beta sheet structure, leading to loose the skeleton structure of catalase. The characteristic fluorescence of catalase was obviously quenched, which showed the exposal of internal hydrophobic amino acids enhanced, and its quenching type is dynamic quenching. The result of RLS and TEM showed that the distribution and size of nanoAg become more uniform and smaller after their interaction, resulting in a decrease of RLS intensity. NanoAg could make the activity of catalase rise. By changing the structure of catalase, nanoAg increases its enzymatic activity to a certain extent, breaking down its balance in vivo, thereby affecting the normal physiological activities. NanoAg has obvious toxic effects on catalase. This paper provided a new perspective and method for the toxic effects of nanoAg to biological macromolecules; provided basic data and reference gist for the hygienics and toxicology studies of nanoAg. It is conducive to the toxicity prevention and control work of nanoAg, promoting nano-technology applied to human production and living better.

  6. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated Catalase Expression Suppresses Optic Neuritis in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    1998-11-01

    Suppression of oxidative injury by viral-mediated transfer of the human catalase gene was tested in the optic nerves of animals with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of primary central nervous system demyelination that has been frequently used as an animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic nerve is a frequent site of involvement common to both EAE and MS. Recombinant adeno-associated virus containing the human gene for catalase was injected over the right optic nerve heads of SJL/J mice that were simultaneously sensitized for EAE. After 1 month, cell-specific catalase activity, evaluated by quantitation of catalase immunogold, was increased approximately 2-fold each in endothelia, oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and axons of the optic nerve. Effects of catalase on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of the myelin sheath area (for demyelination), optic disc area (for optic nerve head swelling), extent of the cellular infiltrate, extravasated serum albumin labeled by immunogold (for blood-brain barrier disruption), and in vivo H2O2 reaction product. Relative to control, contralateral optic nerves injected with the recombinant virus without a therapeutic gene, catalase gene inoculation reduced demyelination by 38%, optic nerve head swelling by 29%, cellular infiltration by 34%, disruption of the blood-brain barrier by 64%, and in vivo levels of H2O2 by 61%. Because the efficacy of potential treatments for MS are usually initially tested in the EAE animal model, this study suggests that catalase gene delivery by using viral vectors may be a therapeutic strategy for suppression of MS.

  7. Two Cytoplasmic Effectors of Phytophthora sojae Regulate Plant Cell Death via Interactions with Plant Catalases1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Li, Qi; Liu, Tingli; Liu, Li; Shen, Danyu; Zhu, Ye; Liu, Peihan; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora sojae, secrete an arsenal of host cytoplasmic effectors to promote infection. We have shown previously that P. sojae PsCRN63 (for crinkling- and necrosis-inducing proteins) induces programmed cell death (PCD) while PsCRN115 blocks PCD in planta; however, they are jointly required for full pathogenesis. Here, we find that PsCRN63 alone or PsCRN63 and PsCRN115 together might suppress the immune responses of Nicotiana benthamiana and demonstrate that these two cytoplasmic effectors interact with catalases from N. benthamiana and soybean (Glycine max). Transient expression of PsCRN63 increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, whereas PsCRN115 suppresses this process. Transient overexpression of NbCAT1 (for N. benthamiana CATALASE1) or GmCAT1 specifically alleviates PsCRN63-induced PCD. Suppression of the PsCRN63-induced PCD by PsCRN115 is compromised when catalases are silenced in N. benthamiana. Interestingly, the NbCAT1 is recruited into the plant nucleus in the presence of PsCRN63 or PsCRN115; NbCAT1 and GmCAT1 are destabilized when PsCRN63 is coexpressed, and PsCRN115 inhibits the processes. Thus, PsCRN63/115 manipulates plant PCD through interfering with catalases and perturbing H2O2 homeostasis. Furthermore, silencing of catalase genes enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora capsici, indicating that catalases are essential for plant resistance. Taken together, we suggest that P. sojae secretes these two effectors to regulate plant PCD and H2O2 homeostasis through direct interaction with catalases and, therefore, overcome host immune responses. PMID:25424308

  8. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase, alleviates ion transport dysfunction in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhoea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H2 O2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H2 O2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H2 O. Mice were administered either pegylated catalase or saline at day -1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca(2+) -dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic Isc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhoea.

  9. Intron loss and gain during evolution of the catalase gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed Central

    Frugoli, J A; McPeek, M A; Thomas, T L; McClung, C R

    1998-01-01

    Angiosperms (flowering plants), including both monocots and dicots, contain small catalase gene families. In the dicot, Arabidopsis thaliana, two catalase (CAT) genes, CAT1 and CAT3, are tightly linked on chromosome 1 and a third, CAT2, which is more similar to CAT1 than to CAT3, is unlinked on chromosome 4. Comparison of positions and numbers of introns among 13 angiosperm catalase genomic sequences indicates that intron positions are conserved, and suggests that an ancestral catalase gene common to monocots and dicots contained seven introns. Arabidopsis CAT2 has seven introns; both CAT1 and CAT3 have six introns in positions conserved with CAT2, but each has lost a different intron. We suggest the following sequence of events during the evolution of the Arabidopsis catalase gene family. An initial duplication of an ancestral catalase gene gave rise to CAT3 and CAT1. CAT1 then served as the template for a second duplication, yielding CAT2. Intron losses from CAT1 and CAT3 followed these duplications. One subclade of monocot catalases has lost all but the 5'-most and 3'-most introns, which is consistent with a mechanism of intron loss by replacement of an ancestral intron-containing gene with a reverse-transcribed DNA copy of a fully spliced mRNA. Following this event of concerted intron loss, the Oryza sativa (rice, a monocot) CAT1 lineage acquired an intron in a novel position, consistent with a mechanism of intron gain at proto-splice sites. PMID:9584109

  10. Catalase, a target of glycation damage in rat liver mitochondria with aging.

    PubMed

    Bakala, Hilaire; Hamelin, Maud; Mary, Jean; Borot-Laloi, Caroline; Friguet, Bertrand

    2012-10-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline of major cell functions, associated with accumulation of altered macromolecules, particularly proteins. This deterioration parallels age-related dysfunction of mitochondria, thought to be a major determinant of this decline in cell function, since these organelles are both the main sources of reactive oxygen species and targets for their damaging effects. To investigate the link between glycation damages that accumulate with aging and the status of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, we identified, by mass spectrometry after two dimensional-gel electrophoresis and western blotting, advanced glycation end product-modified matrix proteins in rat liver mitochondria. Catalase appeared to be the only antioxidant enzyme markedly glycated in old rats. Immunogold labeling performed on isolated mitochondria confirmed the mitochondrial matrix location of this enzyme. The content of catalase protein in mitochondrial extract increased with aging whereas the catalase activity was not significantly modified, in spite of a significant increase rate of glycation. Treatment of catalase with the glycating agent fructose led to significant time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme, while methylglyoxal had no noticeable effect. Catalase was co-identified with unglycated glutathione peroxidase-1 in the mitochondrial extracts. Taken together, these results indicate that both anti-oxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase-1 housed in liver mitochondria, exhibited a differential sensitivity to glycation; moreover, they lend support to the hypothesis that glycation damages targeting catalase with aging may severely affect its activity, suggesting a link between glycation stress and the age-related decline in antioxidant defense in the mitochondria.

  11. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Roe, Nathan D; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complications in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity, and carbonyl formation. A Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival after LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice after LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O(2)(-), and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury after LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy.

  12. Bioefficacy of Graviola leaf extracts in scavenging free radicals and upregulating antioxidant genes.

    PubMed

    Son, Yu-Ra; Choi, Eun-Hye; Kim, Goon-Tae; Park, Tae-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine bioactive components of Graviola leaf extracts and to examine the radical scavenging capacity, gene expression and transcription factors of antioxidant enzymes. Rutin, kaempferol-rutinoside, and vitamin U were identified from the steaming and 50% EtOH extracts of Graviola leaves. Graviola leaf extracts effectively scavenged peroxy and nitrogen radicals. 50% EtOH of Graviola leaves provided a 1-2.9 times higher trolox equivalent than the steaming extract. It also had a higher VCEAC. Graviola leaf extracts reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% EtOH extract of Graviola leaves upregulated SOD1 and Nrf2, but catalase and HMOX1 were not altered by the 50% EtOH extract of Graviola leaves.

  13. Purification and characterization of oxygen-inducible haem catalase from oxygen-tolerant Bifidobacterium asteroides.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kyohei; Maekawa, Itaru; Tanaka, Kunifusa; Ijyuin, Susumu; Shiwa, Yu; Suzuki, Ippei; Niimura, Youichi; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacterium asteroides, originally isolated from honeybee intestine, was found to grow under 20% O(2) conditions in liquid shaking culture using MRS broth. Catalase activity was detected only in cells that were exposed to O(2) and grown in medium containing a haem source, and these cells showed higher viability on exposure to H(2)O(2). Passage through multiple column chromatography steps enabled purification of the active protein, which was identified as a homologue of haem catalase on the basis of its N-terminal sequence. The enzyme is a homodimer composed of a subunit with a molecular mass of 55 kDa, and the absorption spectrum shows the typical profile of bacterial haem catalase. A gene encoding haem catalase, which has an amino acid sequence coinciding with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein, was found in the draft genome sequence data of B. asteroides. Expression of the katA gene was induced in response to O(2) exposure. The haem catalase from B. asteroides shows about 70-80% identity with those from lactobacilli and other lactic acid bacteria, and no homologues were found in other bifidobacterial genomes.

  14. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  15. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  16. Production of catalases by Aspergillus niger isolates as a response to pollutant stress by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Buckova, M.; Godocikova, J.; Simonovicova, A.; Polek, B.

    2005-04-15

    Isolates of Aspergillus niger, selected from the coal dust of a mine containing arsenic (As; 400 mg/kg) and from the river sediment of mine surroundings (As, 1651 mg/kg, Sb, 362 mg/kg), growing in minimal nitrate medium in the phase of hyphal development and spore formation, exhibited much higher levels of total catalase activity than the same species from the culture collection or a culture adapted to soil contaminated with As (5 mg/L). Electrophoretic resolution of catalases in cell-free extracts revealed three isozymes of catalases and production of individual isozymes was not significantly affected by stress environments. Exogenously added stressors (As{sup 5+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}) at final concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/L and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (20 or 40 m(M)) mostly stimulated production of catalases only in isolates from mines surroundings, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Hg{sup 2+} caused the disappearance of the smallest catalase I. Isolates exhibited a higher tolerance of the toxic effects of heavy metals and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as monitored by growth, than did the strain from the culture collection.

  17. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment.

  18. Functional and structural changes of human erythrocyte catalase induced by cimetidine: proposed model of binding.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Jahngirvand, Mahboubeh; Almasirad, Ali; Mousavi, Zahra; Masoud, Masoudeh; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza

    2015-06-01

    In erythrocyte, catalase plays an important role to protect cells from hydrogen peroxide toxicity. Hydrogen peroxide is a byproduct compound which is produced during metabolic pathway of cells. Cimetidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, is used for gastrointestinal tract diseases and prevents the extra release of gastric acid. In this study, the effect of cimetidine on the activity of human erythrocyte catalase was investigated. Erythrocytes were broken by hypotonic solution. The supernatant was used for catalase assay and kinetics study. Lineweaver-Burk plot was performed to determine the type of inhibition. The kinetics data revealed that cimetidine inhibited the catalase activity by mixed inhibition. The IC50 (1.54 μM) and Ki (0.45 μM) values of cimetidine determined that the drug was bound to the enzyme with high affinity. Circular dichroism and fluorescence measurement showed that the binding of cimetidine to the enzyme affected the content of secondary structure of the enzyme as well as its conformational changes. Docking studies were carried out to detect the site in which the drug was bound to the enzyme. Molecular modeling and energy calculation of the binding showed that the cyanoguanidine group of the drug connected to Asp59 via two hydrogen bonds, while the imidazole group of the drug interacted with Phe64 in the enzyme by a hydrophobic interaction. In conclusion, cimetidine could bind to human erythrocyte catalase, and its interaction caused functional and conformational changes in the enzyme.

  19. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings.

  20. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined.

  1. Purification and characterization of catalase from sprouted black gram (Vigna mungo) seeds.

    PubMed

    Kandukuri, Sai Srikar; Noor, Ayesha; Ranjini, S Shiva; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2012-03-15

    Black gram (Vigna mungo) is a legume which belongs to Fabaceae family. It is a rich source of protein. It has been known to have interesting small molecule antioxidant activity. However, its enzymatic antioxidant properties have not been explored much. In the present work we studied catalase, a principal antioxidant enzyme from black gram seeds. Day four sprouted black gram seeds were found to have a significant catalase content approximately of 15,240 U/g seeds. IMAC (Seph 4B-IDA-Zn(II)) was used for purifying this catalase, a purification fold of 106 and a high specific activity of 25,704 U/mg was obtained. The K(m) and V(max) of the purified catalase were found to be 16.2 mM and 2.5 μmol/min. The effect of inhibitors like Sodium azide (NaN(3)) and EDTA and different metal ions on catalase activity were studied. NaN(3), Fe(3+)and Cu(2+) were found to have profound inhibitory effects on the enzyme activity. Other metal ions like Ni(2+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) had both enhancing and inhibitory effects. The enzyme showed optimal activity at a temperature of 40°C and pH 7.0. It was stable over a broad range of pH 6.0-10.0 and had a half life of 7h 30 min at 50°C.

  2. Enhanced antioxidant defense due to extracellular catalase activity in Syrian hamster during arousal from hibernation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hitomi; Okamoto, Iwao; Hanaya, Toshiharu; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Tsunetaka; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian hibernators are considered a natural model for resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injuries, and protective mechanisms against oxidative stress evoked by repeated hibernation-arousal cycles in these animals are increasingly the focus of experimental investigation. Here we show that extracellular catalase activity provides protection against oxidative stress during arousal from hibernation in Syrian hamster. To examine the serum antioxidant defense system, we first assessed the hibernation-arousal state-dependent change in serum attenuation of cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide. Serum obtained from hamsters during arousal from hibernation at a rectal temperature of 32 degrees C, concomitant with the period of increased oxidative stress, attenuated the cytotoxicity four-fold more effectively than serum from cenothermic control hamsters. Serum catalase activity significantly increased during arousal, whereas glutathione peroxidase activity decreased by 50%, compared with cenothermic controls. The cytoprotective effect of purified catalase at the concentration found in serum was also confirmed in a hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity model. Moreover, inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole led to an 80% loss of serum hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. These results suggest that extracellular catalase is effective for protecting hibernators from oxidative stress evoked by arousal from hibernation.

  3. Targeting catalase but not peroxiredoxins enhances arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Li; Tu, Yao-Yao; Xia, Li; Wang, Wei-Wei; Wei, Wei; Ma, Chun-Min; Wen, Dong-Hua; Lei, Hu; Xu, Han-Zhang; Wu, Ying-Li

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable efficacy of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treatment, other non-APL leukemias, such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are less sensitive to As2O3 treatment. However, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here we show that relative As2O3-resistant K562 cells have significantly lower ROS levels than As2O3-sensitive NB4 cells. We compared the expression of several antioxidant enzymes in these two cell lines and found that peroxiredoxin 1/2/6 and catalase are expressed at high levels in K562 cells. We further investigated the possible role of peroxirdoxin 1/2/6 and catalase in determining the cellular sensitivity to As2O3. Interestingly, knockdown of peroxiredoxin 1/2/6 did not increase the susceptibility of K562 cells to As2O3. On the contrary, knockdown of catalase markedly enhanced As2O3-induced apoptosis. In addition, we provide evidence that overexpression of BCR/ABL cannot increase the expression of PRDX 1/2/6 and catalase. The current study reveals that the functional role of antioxidant enzymes is cellular context and treatment agents dependent; targeting catalase may represent a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of As2O3 in CML treatment.

  4. Direct Measurement of Catalase Activity in Living Cells and Tissue Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharamacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. PMID:26772884

  5. Relationship between uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms and its catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Naito, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms (Shiitake) artifically grown on an oak tree and the uptake in vitro by catalase extracts prepared from mushroom Hay Bacillus and spinach are reported. Mushrooms were exposed to 1.4 mg/Hg/cu m for 11 days. Measurement of total mercury was as previously described (Ogata et al. 1978, 1979). Levels in mushrooms ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ..mu..g/g at 0.5 days to 4.6 +/- 0.2 ..mu..g/g at 10.5 days and steady-state thereafter. In in vitro studies Hy uptake by mushroom catalase extract was estimated by the perborate method. Uptake was found to parallel catalase activity and was inhibited by potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Similar results were obtained with Hay Bacillus and spinach catalase extracts. Results suggest that the level of mercury in the mushroom can be used as an indicator of mercury pollution in the environment. It is also suggested that catalase has an important role in uptake of mercury vapor in the plant. 2 tables (JMT)

  6. The oxidation of chiral alcohols catalyzed by catalase in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, E.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1995-04-20

    The catalytic properties of bovine liver catalase have been investigated in organic solvents. In tetrahydrofuran, dioxane, and acetone (all containing 1% to 3% of water), the enzyme breaks down tert-butyl hydroperoxide several fold faster than in pure water. Furthermore, the rate of catalase-catalyzed production of tert-butanol from tert-butyl hydroperoxide increases more than 400-fold upon transition from aqueous buffer to ethanol as the reaction medium. The mechanistic rationale for this striking effect is that in aqueous buffer the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic process involves the reduction of catalase`s compound 1 by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. In ethanol, an additional step in the reaction scheme becomes available in which ethanol, greatly outcompeting the hydroperoxide, is oxidized by compound 1 regenerating the free enzyme. In solvents, such as acetonitrile or tetrahydrofuran, which themselves are not oxidizable by compound 1, catalase catalyzes the oxidation of numerous primary and secondary alcohols with tert-butyl hydroperoxide to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. The enzymatic oxidation of some chiral alcohols (2,3-butanediol, citronellol, and menthol) under these conditions occurs enantioselectively. Examination of the enantioselectivity for the oxidation of 2,3-butanediol in a series of organic solvents reveals a considerable solvent dependence.

  7. Protective Effect of an Isoflavone, Tectorigenin, Against Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death via Catalase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Oh, Min Chang; Park, Jeong Eon; Shilnikova, Kristina; Moon, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Isoflavones are biologically active compounds that occur naturally in a variety of plants, with relatively high levels in soybean. Tectorigenin, an isoflavone, protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Methods The MTT assay was performed to determine cell viability. Catalase activity was assessed by determining the amount of enzyme required to degrade 1 μM H2O2. Protein expression of catalase, phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), IκB-α, and NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot analysis. A mobility shift assay was performed to assess the DNA-binding ability of NF-κB. Transient transfection and a NF-κB luciferase assay were performed to assess transcriptional activity. Results Tectorigenin reduced H2O2-induced death of Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79-4). In addition, tectorigenin increased the activity and protein expression of catalase. Blockade of catalase activity attenuated the protective effect of tectorigenin against oxidative stress. Furthermore, tectorigenin enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and nuclear expression of NF-κB, while inhibition of ERK and NF-κB attenuated the protective effect of tectorigenin against oxidative stress. Conclusions Tectorigenin protects cells against oxidative damage by activating catalase and modulating the ERK and NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:28053960

  8. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO) exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1) and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2) regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:27597806

  9. Effect of cimetidine on catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a suggested mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Masoudeh; Ebrahimi, Farnoosh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an important enzyme for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in cells. Bacteria have potent catalase to deal with H2O2 in their medium culture. Any chemicals that inhibit catalase activity can be harmful for cells. Histamine H2 antagonist drugs such as cimetidine and ranitidine are used for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The present results showed that cimetidine could inhibit the catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a competitive inhibition. The determination of IC50 value and Ki (6.5 μM) of cimetidine demonstrated that the enzyme binds to the drug with high affinity. Binding of the drug to the enzyme was pH-dependent and no binding was observed at basic pH (>9) and acidic pH (<6). Moreover, the imidazole ring and cyanoguanidine group of cimetidine may play an important role in inhibition by binding to Fe in heme group and glutamic acid 51 residue on the enzyme, respectively. Ranitidine had no effect on the catalase activity.

  10. Effect of Catalase and Sodium Fluoride on Human Enamel bleached with 35% Carbamide Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Shigli, Anand L; Sharma, Divya S; Thakur, Gagan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the effects of postbleaching antioxidant application fluoridation treatment on the surface morphology and microhardness of human enamel. Materials and methods: Ten freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were cut at cementoenamel junction. Crown portion was sectioned into six slabs which were divided into five groups: group A – untreated controls; group B – 35% carbamide peroxide (CP); group C – 35% CP and catalase; group D – treatment with 35% CP and 5% sodium fluoride; group E – 35% CP, catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Thirty-five percent carbamide peroxide application included two applications of 30 minutes each at a 5-day interval. After treatment, the slabs were thoroughly washed with water for 10 seconds and stored in artificial saliva at 37°C until the next treatment. Two percent sodium fluoride included application for 5 minutes. Three catalase included application for 3 minutes. Results: After 5 days, groups B and C showed significantly decreased enamel microhardness compared to control. Group D specimens showed relatively less reduction in enamel micro-hardness than group C specimens. There is a marked increase in enamel microhardness in group E specimens. Conclusions: Fluoride take up was comparatively enhanced after catalase application resulting in less demineralization and increased microhardness. How to cite this article: Thakur R, Shigli AL, Sharma DS, Thakur G. Effect of Catalase and Sodium Fluoride on Human Enamel bleached with 35% Carbamide Peroxide. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):12-17. PMID:26124575

  11. Immobilization and kinetics of catalase on calcium carbonate nanoparticles attached epoxy support.

    PubMed

    Preety; Hooda, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid epoxy/nano CaCO3 composite matrix for catalase immobilization was prepared by polymerizing epoxy resin in the presence of CaCO3 nanoparticles. The hybrid support was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Catalase was successfully immobilized onto epoxy/nano CaCO3 support with a conjugation yield of 0.67 ± 0.01 mg/cm(2) and 92.63 ± 0.80 % retention of activity. Optimum pH and optimum temperature of free and immobilized catalases were found to be 7.0 and 35 °C. The value of Km for H2O2 was higher for immobilized enzyme (31.42 mM) than native enzyme (27.73 mM). A decrease in Vmax value from 1,500 to 421.10 μmol (min mg protein)(-1) was observed after immobilization. Thermal and storage stabilities of catalase improved immensely after immobilization. Immobilized enzyme retained three times than the activity of free enzyme when kept at 75 °C for 1 h and the half-life of enzyme increased five times when stored in phosphate buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.0) at 5 °C. The enzyme could be reused 30 times without any significant loss of its initial activity. Desorption of catalase from the hybrid support was minimum at pH 7.0.

  12. Protective effects of catalase overexpression on UVB-induced apoptosis in normal human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mazurier, Frédéric; Cario-André, Muriel; Pain, Catherine; Ged, Cécile; Taïeb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert

    2006-06-30

    UV-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes is a highly complex process in which various molecular pathways are involved. These include the extrinsic pathway via triggering of death receptors and the intrinsic pathway via DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. In this study we investigated the effect of catalase and CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) overexpression on apoptosis induced by UVB exposure at room temperature or 4 degrees C on normal human keratinocytes. Irradiation at low temperature reduced UV-induced apoptosis by 40% in normal keratinocytes independently of any change in p53 and with a decrease in caspase-8 activation. Catalase overexpression decreased apoptosis by 40% with a reduction of caspase-9 activation accompanied by a decrease in p53. Keeping cells at low temperature and catalase overexpression had additive effects. CuZn-SOD overexpression had no significant effect on UVB-induced apoptosis. UVB induced an increase in ROS levels at two distinct stages: immediately following irradiation and around 3 h after irradiation. Catalase overexpression inhibited only the late increase in ROS levels. We conclude that catalase overexpression has a protective role against UVB irradiation by preventing DNA damage mediated by the late ROS increase.

  13. Apparent Catalase Synthesis in Sunflower Cotyledons during the Change in Microbody Function

    PubMed Central

    Betsche, Thomas; Gerhardt, Bernt

    1978-01-01

    Density-labeling with 10 mm K15NO3/70% 2H2O has been used to investigate catalase synthesis in different developmental stages of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cotyledons. A mathematical approach is introduced for the quantitative evaluation of the density-labeling data. The method allows, in the presence of preexisting enzyme activity, calculation of this synthesized activity (apparent enzyme synthesis) which results from the balance between actual enzyme synthesis and the degradation of newly synthesized enzyme at a given time. During greening of the cotyledons, when the catalase activity declines and the population of leaf peroxisomes is formed, the apparent catalase synthesis is lower than, or at best equal to, that occurring during a developmental stage when the leaf peroxisome population is established and catalase synthesis and degradation of total catalase are in equilibrium. This result suggests a formation, in fatty cotyledons, of the leaf peroxisomes by transformation of the glyoxysomes rather than by de novo synthesis. PMID:16660565

  14. Tumour suppressor PTEN enhanced enzyme activity of GPx, SOD and catalase by suppression of PI3K/AKT pathway in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Akca, Hakan; Demiray, Aydin; Aslan, Mutay; Acikbas, Ibrahim; Tokgun, Onur

    2013-06-01

    Phosphates and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a tumour suppressor gene which dephosphorilates phosphoinositol 3,4,5 triphosphates. Therefore PTEN can regulate PI3K/AKT pathway in cells. Because of promoter methylation or gene deletion, PTEN expression is commonly decreased or lost in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Therefore, we hypothesized that PTEN could regulate the activity of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase. We first recreated PTENwt, G129R and G129E expressions in lung cell lines, in which endogenous PTEN expression was not detected. Then, we showed that PTEN could suppress AKT activity by its lipid phosphatase domain. We then examined the effect of recreated PTEN expressions in NSCLC cells. While PTENwt expression caused enhanced activity of SOD, GPx and catalase in transfected cells lines, neither G129R nor G129E expression effected enzyme activities. These results suggest that PTEN can up-regulate SOD, GPx and catalase activity by inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway in NSCLC cell lines.

  15. Expression of a bacterial catalase in a strictly anaerobic methanogen significantly increases tolerance to hydrogen peroxide but not oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew E; Schaff, Cody W; Horne, Alexandra J; Lessner, Faith H; Lessner, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Haem-dependent catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that degrades H2O2, producing H2O and O2, and is common in aerobes. Catalase is present in some strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens), but the importance of catalase to the antioxidant system of methanogens is poorly understood. We report here that a survey of the sequenced genomes of methanogens revealed that the majority of species lack genes encoding catalase. Moreover, Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methanogen capable of synthesizing haem and encodes haem-dependent catalase in its genome; yet, Methanosarcina acetivorans cells lack detectable catalase activity. However, inducible expression of the haem-dependent catalase from Escherichia coli (EcKatG) in the chromosome of Methanosarcina acetivorans resulted in a 100-fold increase in the endogenous catalase activity compared with uninduced cells. The increased catalase activity conferred a 10-fold increase in the resistance of EcKatG-induced cells to H2O2 compared with uninduced cells. The EcKatG-induced cells were also able to grow when exposed to levels of H2O2 that inhibited or killed uninduced cells. However, despite the significant increase in catalase activity, growth studies revealed that EcKatG-induced cells did not exhibit increased tolerance to O2 compared with uninduced cells. These results support the lack of catalase in the majority of methanogens, since methanogens are more likely to encounter O2 rather than high concentrations of H2O2 in the natural environment. Catalase appears to be a minor component of the antioxidant system in methanogens, even those that are aerotolerant, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. Importantly, the experimental approach used here demonstrated the feasibility of engineering beneficial traits, such as H2O2 tolerance, in methanogens.

  16. Insights into the selective binding and toxic mechanism of microcystin to catalase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuandong; Da, Liangjun

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin is a sort of cyclic nonribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. It is cyanotoxin, which can be very toxic for plants and animals including humans. The present study evaluated the interaction of microcystin and catalase, under physiological conditions by means of fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and enzymatic reactionkinetic techniques. The fluorescence data showed that microcystin could bind to catalase to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which electrostatic interactions played a major role. Energy transfer and fluorescence studies proved the existence of a static binding process. Additionally, as shown by the three-dimensional fluorescence, CD and FT-IR results, microcystin could lead to conformational and microenvironmental changes of the protein, which may affect the physiological functions of catalase. The work provides important insights into the toxicity mechanism of microcystin in vivo.

  17. Insights into the selective binding and toxic mechanism of microcystin to catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuandong; Da, Liangjun

    2014-03-01

    Microcystin is a sort of cyclic nonribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. It is cyanotoxin, which can be very toxic for plants and animals including humans. The present study evaluated the interaction of microcystin and catalase, under physiological conditions by means of fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and enzymatic reactionkinetic techniques. The fluorescence data showed that microcystin could bind to catalase to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which electrostatic interactions played a major role. Energy transfer and fluorescence studies proved the existence of a static binding process. Additionally, as shown by the three-dimensional fluorescence, CD and FT-IR results, microcystin could lead to conformational and microenvironmental changes of the protein, which may affect the physiological functions of catalase. The work provides important insights into the toxicity mechanism of microcystin in vivo.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE AND CATALASE ACTIVITY AND EXPRESSION IN HONEY BEE.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Tatjana V; Purać, Jelena; Orčić, Snežana; Kojić, Danijela; Vujanović, Dragana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Gržetić, Ivan; Ilijević, Konstantin; Šikoparija, Branko; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the cellular stress response in honey bees will significantly contribute to their conservation. The aim of this study was to analyze the response of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in honey bees related to the presence of toxic metals in different habitats. Three locations were selected: (i) Tunovo on the mountain Golija, as control area, without industry and large human impact, (ii) Belgrade as urban area, and (iii) Zajača, as mining and industrial zone. Our results showed that the concentrations of lead (Pb) in whole body of bees vary according to habitat, but there was very significant increase of Pb in bees from investigated industrial area. Bees from urban and industrial area had increased expression of both Sod1 and Cat genes, suggesting adaptation to increased oxidative stress. However, in spite increased gene expression, the enzyme activity of catalase was lower in bees from industrial area suggesting inhibitory effect of Pb on catalase.

  19. Enzymatic exploration of catalase from a nanoparticle producing and biodecolorizing algae Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Xu, Fangxin; Zhang, Xia; Ye, Chiming

    2015-05-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis (SXM) was found to produce nanoparticles (NPs) under aerobic condition. The oxidoreductase enzymatic activities including of catalase, manganese peroxidase, laccase, NADH dehydrogenase, flavin reductase, azoreductase and Fe reductase are first investigated. Catalase showed the greatest enzymatic activity among all oxidoreductases in SXM, which with strong activities in multiple substrates of ABTS, guaiacol and 2,6-DMP. The optimum temperature, pH, concentrations of H2O2 and 2,6-DMP for this enzyme were found to be 65 °C, pH 4.0, 128.7 mM and 10 mM, respectively. Finally, from the kinetic parameters and structure simulation of catalase, implied that SXM would potentially apply in bioremediation, microbe fuel cells (MFCs) and nano-biotechnology based on its distinguished enzymatic system.

  20. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju; Cho, Jinhan

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-AuNP), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-AuNP, which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-AuNP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-AuNP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-AuNP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and AuNP, and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H2O2.

  1. Metabolic Damage and Premature Thymus Aging Caused by Stromal Catalase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Ann V; Venables, Thomas; Shi, Jianjun; Farr, Andrew; van Remmen, Holly; Szweda, Luke; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rabinovitch, Peter; Petrie, Howard T

    2015-08-18

    T lymphocytes are essential mediators of immunity that are produced by the thymus in proportion to its size. The thymus atrophies rapidly with age, resulting in progressive diminution of new T cell production. This decreased output is compensated by duplication of existing T cells, but it results in gradual dominance by memory T cells and decreased ability to respond to new pathogens or vaccines. Here, we show that accelerated and irreversible thymic atrophy results from stromal deficiency in the reducing enzyme catalase, leading to increased damage by hydrogen peroxide generated by aerobic metabolism. Genetic complementation of catalase in stromal cells diminished atrophy, as did chemical antioxidants, thus providing a mechanistic link between antioxidants, metabolism, and normal immune function. We propose that irreversible thymic atrophy represents a conventional aging process that is accelerated by stromal catalase deficiency in the context of an intensely anabolic (lymphoid) environment.

  2. Amplification of glutathione-mediated oxidative stress by catalase in an aqueous solution at hyperthermal temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Megumi; Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Nyui, Minako; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH)-mediated superoxide (O2•−) generation in an aqueous solution and relation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and effect of catalase were investigated. GSH-induced O2•− generation in hyperthermal temperatures was measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) mehod. Heating an aqueous solution containing GSH caused superoxide from dissolved O2. H2O2 was generated simultaneously in this reaction mixture probably from the hydroperoxy radical (HO2•), which is equilibrated with O2•− in an aqueous condition, and then H2O2 consumed O2•−. Coexisting catalase in the reaction mixture, as a result, could increase O2•− generation. The catalase-exaggerated extracellular O2•− generation could give a harmful effect to living cells. This GSH-induced oxidative stress can be a part of mechanisms of hyperthermia therapy. PMID:28366987

  3. Resonance scattering spectral detection of catalase activity using Au@Ag nanoparticle as probe and coupling catalase catalytic reaction with Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Aihui; Liang, Yueyuan; Jiang, Zhiliang; Jiang, Hesheng

    2009-11-01

    The Au(core)Ag(shell) (Au@Ag) nanoparticles in size of 30 nm were prepared using 10 nm gold nanoparticles as seeds at 90 degrees C, and were purified by high-speed centrifugation to remove the excess trisodium citrate to obtain Au@Ag nanoprobe. In the medium of pH 4.0 acetate buffer solution--7.2 micromol/L H2O2--67 micromol/L Fe(II), Au@Ag nanoparticles exhibited a resonance scattering (RS) peak at 538 nm. Upon addition of Catalase (Ct), the system produced hydroxyl radical that oxidized the Au@Ag nanoprobe to form the AuAg nanoparticles with partly bare nanogold. Those AuAg nanoparticles aggregated to large nanoclusters that led to the RS peak wavelength red-shift and its RS peak intensity enhanced. The catalase activity (C) is linear to the enhanced RS intensity (DeltaI) in the range of 6 to 2,800 U/L, with regression equation of DeltaI = 0.168 C-0.2, the correlation coefficient of 0.9952, and detection limit of 2.8 U/L. This method was applied to the detection of serum samples, and the results were agreement with that of the spectrophotometry. A new catalytic mechanism of catalase was proposed with oxywater principle that was agreement with the results of resonance scattering spectroscopy, absorption spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy and laser scattering.

  4. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  5. A Salt-Inducible Mn-Catalase (KatB) Protects Cyanobacterium from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalases, enzymes that detoxify H2O2, are widely distributed in all phyla, including cyanobacteria. Unlike the heme-containing catalases, the physiological roles of Mn-catalases remain inadequately characterized. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena, pretreatment of cells with NaCl resulted in unusually enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. On exposure to H2O2, the NaCl-treated Anabaena showed reduced formation of reactive oxygen species, peroxides, and oxidized proteins than the control cells (i.e. not treated with NaCl) exposed to H2O2. This protective effect correlated well with the substantial increase in production of KatB, a Mn-catalase. Addition of NaCl did not safeguard the katB mutant from H2O2, suggesting that KatB was indeed responsible for detoxifying the externally added H2O2. Moreover, Anabaena deficient in KatB was susceptible to oxidative effects of salinity stress. The katB gene was strongly induced in response to osmotic stress or desiccation. Promoter-gfp analysis showed katB to be expressed only in the vegetative cells but not in heterocysts. Biochemically, KatB was an efficient, robust catalase that remained active in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl. Our findings unravel the role of Mn-catalase in acclimatization to salt/oxidative stress and demonstrate that the oxidative stress resistance of an organism can be enhanced by a simple compound such as NaCl. PMID:26645454

  6. Isolation and expression of the catA gene encoding the major vegetative catalase in Streptomyces coelicolor Müller.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Y H; Roe, J H

    1997-01-01

    We isolated the catA gene for the major vegetative catalase from Streptomyces coelicolor Müller. It encodes a polypeptide of 488 residues (55,440 Da) that is highly homologous to typical monofunctional catalases. We investigated catA expression by analyzing both catA mRNA and catalase activity. catA expression was increased by H2O2 treatment but did not increase during stationary phase. A putative catalase (CatB) cross-reactive with anti-CatA antibody appeared during stationary phase and in the aerial mycelium. PMID:9190825

  7. A Eukaryote without Catalase-Containing Microbodies: Neurospora crassa Exhibits a Unique Cellular Distribution of Its Four Catalases†

    PubMed Central

    Schliebs, Wolfgang; Würtz, Christian; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Veenhuis, Marten; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter

    2006-01-01

    Microbodies usually house catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide generated within the organelle by the action of various oxidases. Here we have analyzed whether peroxisomes (i.e., catalase-containing microbodies) exist in Neurospora crassa. Three distinct catalase isoforms were identified by native catalase activity gels under various peroxisome-inducing conditions. Subcellular fractionation by density gradient centrifugation revealed that most of the spectrophotometrically measured activity was present in the light upper fractions, with an additional small peak coinciding with the peak fractions of HEX-1, the marker protein for Woronin bodies, a compartment related to the microbody family. However, neither in-gel assays nor monospecific antibodies generated against the three purified catalases detected the enzymes in any dense organellar fraction. Furthermore, staining of an N. crassa wild-type strain with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and H2O2 did not lead to catalase-dependent reaction products within microbodies. Nonetheless, N. crassa does possess a gene (cat-4) whose product is most similar to the peroxisomal type of monofunctional catalases. This novel protein indeed exhibited catalase activity, but was not localized to microbodies either. We conclude that N. crassa lacks catalase-containing peroxisomes, a characteristic that is probably restricted to a few filamentous fungi that produce little hydrogen peroxide within microbodies. PMID:16963632

  8. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  9. Ascorbic acid, catalase and chlorpromazine reduce cryopreservation-induced damages to crossbred bull spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Paudel, K P; Kumar, S; Meur, S K; Kumaresan, A

    2010-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of ascorbic acid, catalase, chlorpromazine and their combinations in reducing the cryodamages to crossbred bull (Bos taurus x Bos indicus) spermatozoa. A total of 32 ejaculates (eight each from four bulls) were diluted in Tris-citric acid-fructose-egg yolk-glycerol extender. Each ejaculate was split into six parts (five treatment and one control). Treatment groups included 10 mm ascorbic acid, 0.1 mm chlorpromazine, 200 IU/ml catalase, 10 mm ascorbic acid + 0.1 mm chlorpromazine or 200 IU/ml catalase + 0.1 mm chlorpromazine in the extender. Fluorescent probes (Fluorescein isothiocyanate--Pisum sativum agglutinin + Propidium iodide) were used for the assessment of spermatozoa viability and acrosomal status. The proportion of acrosome intact live (AIL), acrosome intact dead, acrosome reacted live and acrosome reacted dead sperm was assessed in fresh, equilibrated and frozen-thawed semen. The functional status of the sperm was assessed using hypo-osmotic sperm swelling test (HOSST). Activities of acrosin and hyaluronidase enzyme were also determined. Lipid peroxidation level was assayed based on the melonaldehyde (MDA) production. In cryopreserved semen, the values of AIL spermatozoa, HOSST response, hyaluronidase and acrosin activity were reduced by 53%, 47%, 34% and 54%, respectively from their initial values in fresh semen. However, MDA level was threefold higher in the frozen-thawed sperm compared with fresh sperm. Significant (p < 0.05) improvement in motility, viability, HOSST response, retention of hyaluonidase and acrosin and reduction in MDA was recorded in ascorbic acid, catalase, ascorbic acid + chlorpromazine and catalase + chlorpromazine incorporated groups. The percentage of AIL sperm was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in ascorbic acid, catalase and ascorbic acid + chlorpromazine incorporated groups compared with the control. Chlorpromazine alone did not improve the post-thaw semen quality but when combined

  10. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  11. Catalase activity as a potential indicator of the reducer component of small closed ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangova, A. B.; Somova, L. A.; Pisman, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of catalase activity has been shown to reflect the growth curve of microorganisms in batch cultivation (celluloselythic bacteria Bacillus acidocaldarius and bacteria of the associated microflora Chlorella vulgaris). Gas and substrate closure of the three component ecosystems with spatially separated components ``producer-consumer-reducer'' (Chl. vulgaris-Paramecium caudatum-B. acidocaldarius, two bacterial strains isolated from the associated microflora Chl. vulgaris) demonstrated that the functioning of the reducer component can be estimated by the catalase activity of microorganisms of this component.

  12. A novel role for catalase B in the maintenance of fungal cell-wall integrity during host invasion in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Skamnioti, Pari; Henderson, Catherine; Zhang, Ziguo; Robinson, Zena; Gurr, Sarah Jane

    2007-05-01

    Asexual spores of the rice blast fungus germinate to produce a specialized and melanized infection structure, the appressorium, which is pivotal to successful plant penetration. To investigate whether Magnaporthe grisea counteracts the toxic burst of H2O2 localized beneath the site of attempted invasion, we examined the temporal expression of five candidate antioxidant genes. Of these, the putatively secreted large subunit catalase CATB gene was 600-fold up-regulated in vivo, coincident with penetration, and moderately up-regulated in vitro, in response to exogenous H2O2. Targeted gene replacement of CATB led to compromised pathogen fitness; the catB mutant displayed paler pigmentation and accelerated hyphal growth but lower biomass, poorer sporulation, fragile conidia and appressoria, and impaired melanization. The catB mutant was severely less pathogenic than Guy 11 on barley and rice, and its infectivity was further reduced on exposure to H2O2. The wild-type phenotype was restored by the reintroduction of CATB into the catB mutant We found no evidence to support a role for CATB in detoxification of the host-derived H2O2 at the site of penetration. Instead, we demonstrated that CATB plays a part in strengthening the fungal wall, a role of particular importance during forceful entry into the host.

  13. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration.

  14. Structure, recombinant expression and mutagenesis studies of the catalase with oxidase activity from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Yuzugullu, Yonca; Trinh, Chi H; Smith, Mark A; Pearson, Arwen R; Phillips, Simon E V; Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Ogel, Zumrut B; McPherson, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Scytalidium thermophilum produces a catalase with phenol oxidase activity (CATPO) that catalyses the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water and also oxidizes various phenolic compounds. A codon-optimized catpo gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The crystal structures of native and recombinant S. thermophilum CATPO and two variants, H82N and V123F, were determined at resolutions of 2.7, 1.4, 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. The structure of CATPO reveals a homotetramer with 698 residues per subunit and with strong structural similarity to Penicillium vitale catalase. The haem component is cis-hydroxychlorin γ-spirolactone, which is rotated 180° with respect to small-subunit catalases. The haem-binding pocket contains two highly conserved water molecules on the distal side. The H82N mutation resulted in conversion of the native d-type haem to a b-type haem. Kinetic studies of the H82N and V123F mutants indicate that both activities are likely to be associated with the haem centre and suggest that the secondary oxidase activity may be a general feature of catalases in the absence of hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Oxidative stress response in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: assessing catalase and cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Alessandra S; Andrade, Rosângela V; de Carvalho, Maria J; Felipe, Maria Sueli S; Campos, Elida G

    2008-06-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that infects humans and establishes infection in the yeast form. We are interested in the mechanisms this fungus uses to evade the human immune system, and in its survival strategies within infected host cells. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in host defence, but are detoxified by pathogen-derived antioxidant enzymes to prevent oxidative damage. The transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of P. brasiliensis catalase and cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP) antioxidant enzymes upon culture treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is described. High H(2)O(2) concentrations (up to 100 mm) still permitted 70-100% survival of exponential and stationary phase yeast cells, though stationary phase cells were consistently more resistant. P. brasiliensis has both cytosolic and peroxisomal catalase isoenzymes and a single cytochrome-c peroxidase. High-dose treatments with H(2)O(2) led to an early increase in total catalase and CCP enzymatic activities, indicative of post-transcriptional regulation. The expression levels of the catalase genes increased three to fourfold when the cells were treated with 50 mm H(2)O(2) for 40 or 50 min. Lipid peroxidation, as assessed by the thiobarbituric acid method, was relatively low upon treatment with H(2)O(2), which was consistent with our results demonstrating that P. brasiliensis has a powerful antioxidant defence system enabling it to survive H(2)O(2)-mediated stress.

  16. A study of the inhibition of catalase by dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K₂[B₃O₃F₄OH].

    PubMed

    Islamovic, Safija; Galic, Borivoj; Milos, Mladen

    2014-10-01

    In the development of boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors as potential pharmaceutical drugs, dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K2[B3O3F4OH] was listed as a promising new therapeutic for treatment of these diseases. The catalase-mediated conversion of hydrogen peroxide, in the presence and absence of K2[B3O3F4OH] was studied. The kinetics conformed to the Michaelis-Menten model. Lineweaver-Burk plots were linear and plotted the family of straight lines intersected on the abscissa indicating non-competitive inhibition of the catalase. It appears that in the absence of inhibitor, catalase operates the best at conditions around pH 7.1 and in the presence of K2[B3O3F4OH] the optimum is around pH 6.2. The uncatalyzed reaction of hydrogen peroxide decomposition generally has a value of activation energy of 75 kJ mole(-1), whereas catalase, in the absence of inhibitor, lowers the value to 11.2 kJ mole(-1), while in the presence 69 mmoles L(-1) of K2[B3O3F4OH] it was 37.8 kJ mole(-1).

  17. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    PubMed

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10(4) s(-1) subunit(-1) at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  18. Catalase C-262T polymorphism and risk of prostate cancer: evidence from meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jieping; Feng, Fupeng; Zhu, Shimiao; Sun, Libin; Li, Gang; Jiang, Ning; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie

    2015-03-10

    Catalase is an important endogenous antioxidant enzyme that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water, thus limiting the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. Several studies investigated the role of the Catalase (CAT) C-262T gene polymorphism on the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), but get conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis based on five studies, to determine whether Catalase C-262T polymorphism contributes to the risk of prostate cancer using odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). On the whole, our evidence indicates that CAT C-262T polymorphism significantly increases PCa risk in the allele comparison model (OR=1.094, 95% CI=1.015-1.178, P=0.018). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, the same results are found among Caucasians (allele model, OR=1.090, 95% CI=1.009-1.177, P=0.028, dominant model, OR=1.108, 95% CI=1.023-1.201, P=0.012, recessive model, OR=1.379, 95% CI=1.158-1.641, P=0.000, homozygous model, OR=1.429, 95% CI=1.196-1.707, P=0.000, and heterozygote model, OR=1.224, 95% CI=1.020-1.469, P=0.030). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests a positive correlation between Catalase C-262T polymorphism and the development of PCa.

  19. Direct evidence for catalase and peroxidase activities of ferritin-platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jia; Yin, Jun-Jie; Ning, Bo; Wu, Xiaochun; Hu, Ye; Ferrari, Mauro; Anderson, Gregory J; Wei, Jingyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2011-02-01

    Using apoferritin (apoFt) as a nucleation substrate, we have successfully synthesized 1-2 nm platinum nanoparticles (Pt-Ft) which are highly stable. By directly measuring the products of Pt-Ft-catalyzed reactions, we showed, with no doubt, Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities. With hydrogen peroxide as substrate, we observed oxygen gas bubbles were generated from hydrogen peroxide decomposed by Pt-Ft; the generation of oxygen gas strongly supports Pt-Ft reacts as catalase, other than peroxidase. While with organic dyes and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, distinctive color products were formed catalyzed by Pt-Ft, which indicates a peroxidase-like activity. Interestingly, these biomimetic properties showed differential response to pH and temperature for different reaction substrates. Pt-Ft showed a significant increase in catalase activity with increasing pH and temperature. The HRP-like activity of Pt-Ft was optimal at physiological temperature and slightly acidic conditions. Our current study demonstrates that Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities for different substrates under different conditions.

  20. A facile method for improving the covalent crosslinking adsorption process of catalase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jingyu; Jia, Shaoyi; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Songhai; Pan, Xiaolei

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we introduced a polydiol (mixture of 1,2-propanediol, 1,3-propanediol, and 2,3-butanediol) to improve the covalent crosslinking adsorption process of immobilized catalase onto chitosan beads. The adsorption behavior was investigated by means of adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherm. The protein content in crosslinking agent required for approximately 45 min to reach the relative equilibrium, and the protein content in solution of the control group and the pretreated group were 6.63 microg/mL and 6.20 microg/mL, respectively. The maximum catalase adsorption capacity of the control group and the pretreated group were observed as 23.118 microg/g and 25.688 microg/g at pH 7.0, respectively. Temperature profiles showed that 40 degrees C was the ideal temperature for active domain of catalase, and the relative activity of pretreated group was 1.12 times higher than that of the control group. The K(m) value of the control group (67 mM) was higher than that of the pretreated group (54 mM). Thermal stability, operational stability, and the effect of surfactant on catalase adsorption were also explored in this study.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  2. Protective role of extracellular catalase (KatA) against UVA radiation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2014-02-05

    One of the more stressful factors that Pseudomonas aeruginosa must face in nature is solar UVA radiation. In this study, the protective role of KatA catalase in both planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa against UVA radiation was determined by using the wild-type (PAO1) and an isogenic catalase deficient strain (katA). The katA strain was more sensitive than the wild-type, especially in the case of biofilms. Moreover, the wild-type biofilm was more resistant than its planktonic counterpart, but this was not observed in the katA strain. Striking KatA activity was detected in the matrix of katA(+) strains, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of this activity in the matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Provision of bovine catalase or KatA to the matrix of a katA biofilm significantly increased its UVA tolerance, demonstrating that extracellular KatA is essential to optimal defense against UVA in P. aeruginosa biofilms. Efficiency of photocatalytic treatments using TiO2 and UVA was lower in biofilms than in planktonic cells, but KatA and KatB catalases seem not to be responsible for the higher resistance of the sessile cells to this treatment.

  3. Induction and inactivation of catalase and superoxide dismutase of Escherichia coli by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Hassan, H.M.

    1987-09-01

    Oxyradicals have been implicated in ozone (O/sub 3/) toxicity and in other oxidant stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of O/sub 3/ on the biosynthesis of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase in Escherichia coli to determine their role in the defense against ozone toxicity. Inhibition of growth and loss of viability were observed in cultures exposed to ozone. Results also showed an increase in the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase in cultures exposed to ozone, which was shown to be due to true induction rather than activation of preexisting apoproteins. Cessation of O/sub 3/ exposure resulted in 30 min of continual high rate of catalase biosynthesis followed by a gradual decrease in the level of the enzyme approaching that of control cultures. This decrease was attributed to a concomitant cessation of de novo enzyme synthesis and dilution of preexisting enzyme by cellular growth. Ozonation of cell-free extracts showed that superoxide dismutase and catalase are subject to oxidative inactivation by ozone. In vivo induction of these enzymes may represent an adaptive response evolved to protect cells against ozone toxicity.

  4. Purification of a catalase from Thermus thermophilus via IMAC chromatography: effect of the support.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Aurelio; Betancor, Lorena; Mateo, Cesar; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Moreno, Renata; Berenguer, Jose; Guisán, José M; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    A hexameric Mn-catalase was purified from crude extracts of Thermus thermophilus using ammonium sulfate precipitation and ion metal-chelate affinity chromatography (IMAC). Eupergit 250 and Sepabeads FP-EP3 epoxy supports derivatized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and copper were used, at similar micromole/packed milliliter of support. Although Eupergit 250-IDA-Cu support adsorbed 80% of the total proteins in the extract, it exhibited a minimum affinity for the catalase. On the other hand, Sepabeads FP-EP3-IDA-Cu allowed the full adsorption of the catalase activity, which could be desorbed in fractions of different purity. This was attributed to a different geometrical congruence of the support surfaces with the enzyme surface, resulting in a different ability to form multipoint interactions with the proteins. Thus, by a cleanup step, followed by a negative chromatographic step using Eupergit 250-IDA-Cu2+ and by the adsorption of the catalase on Sepabeads-IDA-Cu2+ support, a pure enzyme fraction was obtained and its N-terminal end was sequenced.

  5. Role of catalase in the virulence of Brucella melitensis in pregnant goats.

    PubMed

    Gee, Jason M; Kovach, Michael E; Grippe, Vanessa K; Hagius, Sue; Walker, Joel V; Elzer, Philip H; Roop, R Martin

    2004-08-19

    An isogenic katE mutant derived from virulent Brucella melitensis 16M displays hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in disk sensitivity assays but retains the capacity to colonize pregnant goats and induce abortion. These experimental findings indicate that although the sole periplasmic catalase of Brucella melitensis functions as an antioxidant, this enzyme does not play a critical role in virulence in the natural host.

  6. Intracerebroventricular Catalase Reduces Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity and Increases Responses to Hypoglycemia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pauliina Markkula, S; Lyons, David; Yueh, Chen-Yu; Riches, Christine; Hurst, Paul; Fielding, Barbara; Heisler, Lora K; Evans, Mark L

    2016-12-01

    Specialized metabolic sensors in the hypothalamus regulate blood glucose levels by influencing hepatic glucose output and hypoglycemic counterregulatory responses. Hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a metabolic signal-mediating responses to changes in glucose, other substrates and hormones. The role of ROS in the brain's control of glucose homeostasis remains unclear. We hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a relatively stable form of ROS, acts as a sensor of neuronal glucose consumption and availability and that lowering brain H2O2 with the enzyme catalase would lead to systemic responses increasing blood glucose. During hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps in rats, intracerebroventricular catalase infusion resulted in increased hepatic glucose output, which was associated with reduced neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Electrophysiological recordings revealed a subset of arcuate nucleus neurons expressing proopiomelanocortin that were inhibited by catalase and excited by H2O2. During hypoglycemic clamps, intracerebroventricular catalase increased glucagon and epinephrine responses to hypoglycemia, consistent with perceived lower glucose levels. Our data suggest that H2O2 represents an important metabolic cue, which, through tuning the electrical activity of key neuronal populations such as proopiomelanocortin neurons, may have a role in the brain's influence of glucose homeostasis and energy balance.

  7. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  8. Intracerebroventricular Catalase Reduces Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity and Increases Responses to Hypoglycemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pauliina Markkula, S.; Lyons, David; Yueh, Chen-Yu; Riches, Christine; Hurst, Paul; Fielding, Barbara; Heisler, Lora K.

    2016-01-01

    Specialized metabolic sensors in the hypothalamus regulate blood glucose levels by influencing hepatic glucose output and hypoglycemic counterregulatory responses. Hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as a metabolic signal-mediating responses to changes in glucose, other substrates and hormones. The role of ROS in the brain's control of glucose homeostasis remains unclear. We hypothesized that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a relatively stable form of ROS, acts as a sensor of neuronal glucose consumption and availability and that lowering brain H2O2 with the enzyme catalase would lead to systemic responses increasing blood glucose. During hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps in rats, intracerebroventricular catalase infusion resulted in increased hepatic glucose output, which was associated with reduced neuronal activity in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Electrophysiological recordings revealed a subset of arcuate nucleus neurons expressing proopiomelanocortin that were inhibited by catalase and excited by H2O2. During hypoglycemic clamps, intracerebroventricular catalase increased glucagon and epinephrine responses to hypoglycemia, consistent with perceived lower glucose levels. Our data suggest that H2O2 represents an important metabolic cue, which, through tuning the electrical activity of key neuronal populations such as proopiomelanocortin neurons, may have a role in the brain's influence of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. PMID:27740870

  9. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  10. Structural and functional alterations of catalase induced by acriflavine, a compound causing apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Attar, Farnoosh; Khavari-Nejad, Sarah; Keyhani, Jacqueline; Keyhani, Ezzatollah

    2009-08-01

    Acriflavine is an antiseptic agent causing both apoptosis and necrosis in yeast. In this work, its effect on the structure and function of catalase, a vital enzyme actively involved in protection against oxidative stress, was investigated. In vitro kinetic studies showed that acriflavine inhibited the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. The residual activity detectable after preincubation of catalase (1.5 nmol/L) with various concentrations of acriflavine went from 50% to 20% of the control value as the acriflavine concentration increased from 30 to 90 micromol/L. Correlatively with the decrease in activity, alterations in the enzyme's conformation were observed as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. The enzyme's intrinsic fluorescence obtained upon excitation at either 297 nm (tryptophan residues) or 280 nm (tyrosine and tryptophan residues) decreased as a function of acriflavine concentration. Circular dichroism studies showed alterations of the protein structure by acriflavine with up to 13% decrease in alpha helix, 16% increase in beta-sheet content, 17% increase in random coil, and 4% increase in beta turns. Spectrophotometric studies showed a blueshift and modifications in the chromicity of catalase at 405 nm, corresponding to an absorbance band due to the enzyme's prosthetic group. Thus, acriflavine induced in vitro a profound change in the structure of catalase so that the enzyme could no longer function. Our results showed that acriflavine, a compound producing apoptosis and necrosis, can have a direct effect on vital functions in cells by disabling key enzymes.

  11. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  12. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  13. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities as biomarkers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin-Nadif, R.; Dusch, M.; Mur, J.M.; Koch, C.; Schmitt, P.

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the role of three blood antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant status (TAS) as biological markers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury (Hg{degrees}) vapors. Twenty-two female workers took part in the study. Blood and urine sampling for biological analyses was performed. The workers were classified into three subgroups according to their creatinine-corrected Hg concentration in urine. Blood antioxidant enzyme activities and TAS were compared between groups with nonparametric distribution-free methods. A significant difference existed in catalase activity and a slight, but not significant, difference existed in Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} superoxide dismutase (Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD) activity between the three groups. No differences were observed in either the glutathione peroxidase activity or the TAS between these groups. Catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities were increased in the groups of workers with higher creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations when compared with the group of lower creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations. Catalase activity was positively correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine, and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activity was slightly correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine. The role of erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities we have measured is in agreement with the hypothesis of the involvement of reactive oxygen species production as an important event in chronic exposure to Hg{degrees} vapors in humans. In spite of the small sample size, results indicate that erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities could be considered as markers of biological effect in workers exposed to Hg{degrees} vapors. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Attenuation of cyclosporine A toxicity by sublethal heat shock. Role of catalase.

    PubMed

    Andrés, David; Bautista, Mirandeli; Cascales, María

    2005-02-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the immunosuppressor most frequently used in transplant surgery and in the treatment of autoimmune diseases because of its specific inhibiting effect on signal transduction pathways of cell T receptor. It has been shown that CsA is able to generate reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which are directly involved in the CsA hepatotoxicity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a sublethal heat pre-treatment (43 degrees C for 30 min) on the hepatoma cell line HepG2 exposed to cytotoxic concentrations of CsA (10 and 25 microM) for 3 and 24 h. Parameters of cytotoxicity were assayed by measuring LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) leakage into the medium. Peroxide concentration was tested by flow cytometry by measuring the fluorescence intensity of DCF (dichlorofluorescein). Gene expression of catalase was detected by measuring the respective mRNA and proteins, as well as protein level of HSP70. The enzymatic activity of catalase was also determined. Heat pre-treatment significantly reduced CsA cytotoxicity as well as the level of peroxide generation. The protective effect of the previous heat treatment (corroborated by the irreversible catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole) against the CsA cytotoxicity was due to an increased expression and activity of catalase that was significantly reduced by the effect of CsA. We conclude that heat pre-treatment strongly protects against CsA injury, and the mechanism of this protection is by means of inducing not only the expression of HSP70 but also the expression and activity of catalase, the main enzyme system involved in H(2)O(2) elimination.

  15. The effect of superoxide dismutase mimetic and catalase on the quality of postthawed goat semen.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mojtaba; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2015-05-01

    Manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE) is a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent which can convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Supplementation of MnTE to a commercial semen extender can protect sperm from superoxide but not H2O2. Therefore, we proposed that addition of catalase (0.0, 200, or 400 IU/mL) in combination with MnTE (0.1 μM) may further improve the cryopreservation efficiency of goat semen in commercially optimized freezing media such as Andromed. Therefore, ejaculates were obtained from three adult bucks twice a week during the breeding season and diluted with Andromed supplemented with or without MnTE and catalase and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species contents were evaluated 2 hours after dilution (before freezing) and after freezing/thawing. The results revealed that all the treatments significantly (P ≤ 0.05) improved sperm motility, viability, and membrane integrity after freezing and reduced reactive oxygen species content compared with the control group, but maximum improvement was obtained in MnTE + 400 IU/mL catalase. In addition, supplementation with these antioxidants significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increases the cleavage rate after IVF. In conclusion, the results of present study suggest that addition of antioxidant MnTE or catalase to commercial optimized media, such as Andromed, improves total motility, membrane integrity, and viability of goat semen samples after thawing. But the degree of improvement for these parameters significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher when MnTE and catalase were simultaneously added to the cryopreservation media.

  16. Catalase and superoxide dismutase in alfalfa root nodules. [Medicago sativa L

    SciTech Connect

    Becana, M.; Aparicio-Tejo, P.M.; Sanchez-Diaz, M.

    1986-04-01

    Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), in scavenging H/sub 2/ O/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/, respectively, have been recently proposed to play a role in leghemoglobin protection. The occurrence of catalase and SOD activities in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) nodule cytosol is reported here. Enzymes were extracted at 0-4/sup 0/C from 0.5 g fresh nodules with 12 ml of a medium containing K-phosphate buffer 50 mM, pH 7.8 and Na/sub 2/EDTA 0.1 mM. The homogenate was filtered and centrifuged at 18,000 xg for 10 min, and the resulting supernatant was used for catalase assay. A further precipitation of leghemoglobin was required to avoid interferences with SOD determination. Catalase was determined by back-titration with KMnO/sub 4/. SOD was assayed by measuring the inhibition of nitro blue tetrazolium reduction. The sensitivity of SOD activity to CN/sup -/ was tested by including 1 mM KCN in the reaction mixture. Catalase activity of alfalfa nodule cytosol was 237 +/- 1 units/mg protein, decreasing very significantly (P < 0.01, Duncan's multiple range test) at 20 mM NO/sub 3//sup -/. Typical specific SOD activities were 94 +/- 5 and 65 +/- 4 units/mg protein, without CN/sup -/ and with CN/sup -/, respectively. Both activities increased very significantly at 20 mM NO/sub 3//sup -/. SOD activities with CN/sup -/ were 70-80% those without CN/sup -/ within the range of NO/sub 3//sup -/ investigated (0-20 mM).

  17. Lead-induced catalase activity differentially modulates behaviors induced by short-chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Pascual, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Guerri, C; Aragon, C M G

    2005-11-01

    Acute lead administration produces a transient increase in brain catalase activity. This effect of lead has been used to assess the involvement of brain ethanol metabolism, and therefore centrally formed acetaldehyde, in the behavioral actions of ethanol. In mice, catalase is involved in ethanol and methanol metabolism, but not in the metabolism of other alcohols such as 1-propanol or tert-butanol. In the present study, we assessed the specificity of the effects of lead acetate on catalase-mediated metabolism of alcohols, and the ability of lead to modulate the locomotion and loss of the righting reflex (LRR) induced by 4 different short-chain alcohols. Animals were pretreated i.p. with lead acetate (100 mg/kg) or saline, and 7 days later were injected i.p. with ethanol (2.5 or 4.5 g/kg), methanol (2.5 or 6.0 g/kg), 1-propanol (0.5 or 2.5 g/kg) or tert-butanol (0.5 or 2.0 g/kg) for locomotion and LRR, respectively. Locomotion induced by ethanol was significantly potentiated in lead-treated mice, while methanol-induced locomotion was reduced by lead treatment. The loss of righting reflex induced by ethanol was shorter in lead-treated mice, and lead produced the opposite effect in methanol-treated mice. There was no effect of lead on 1-propanol or tert-butanol-induced behaviors. Lead treatment was effective in inducing catalase activity and protein both in liver and brain. These results support the hypothesis that the effects of lead treatment on ethanol-induced behaviors are related to changes in catalase activity, rather than some nonspecific effect that generalizes to all alcohols.

  18. Catalase evolved to concentrate H2O2 at its active site.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Laura; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Catalase is a homo-tetrameric enzyme that has its heme active site deeply buried inside the protein. Its only substrate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), reaches the heme through a 45 A-long channel. Large-subunit catalases, but not small-subunit catalases, have a loop (gate loop) that interrupts the major channel. Two accesses lead to a gate that opens the final section of the channel to the heme; gates from the R-related subunits are interconnected. Using molecular dynamic simulations of the Neurospora crassa catalase-1 tetramer in a box of water (48,600 molecules) or 6M H2O2, it is shown that the number of H2O2 molecules augments at the surface of the protein and in the accesses to the gate and the final section of the channel. Increase in H2O2 is due to the prevalence and distribution of amino acids that have an increased residency for H2O2 (mainly histidine, proline and charged residues), which are localized at the protein surface and the accesses to the gate. In the section of the channel from the heme to the gate, turnover rate of water molecules was faster than for H2O2 and increased residence sites for water and H2O2 were determined. In the presence of H2O2, the exclusion of water molecules from a specific site suggests a mechanism that could contend with the competing activity of water, allowing for catalase high kinetic efficiency.

  19. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids.

  20. On the enzymatic activity of catalase: an iron L-edge X-ray absorption study of the active centre.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nora; Bonhommeau, Sébastien; Lange, Kathrin M; Greil, Stefanie M; Eisebitt, Stefan; de Groot, Frank; Chergui, Majed; Aziz, Emad F

    2010-05-14

    Catalase and methaemoglobin have very similar haem groups, which are both ferric, yet catalase decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen very efficiently, while methaemoglobin does not. Structural studies have attributed this behaviour to their different distal environments. Here we present Fe L(2,3)-edge X-ray absorption spectra of these proteins in physiological solutions, which reveal clear differences in their electronic structures, in that pi back-donation of the Fe atom occurs in catalase, which confers on it a partial ferryl (Fe(4+)) character, while this is not the case in methaemoglobin. The origin of the Fe(4+) character stems from the proximal tyrosine residue. We also find that both systems are in a high spin state. Temperature effects influence the spectra of catalase only weakly, in agreement with previous studies of its chemical activity. We conclude that the high activity of catalase is not only determined by its distal environment but also by its partial ferryl character.

  1. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Investigation of the Interactions of Ionic Liquids and Catalase.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xing; Fan, Yunchang; Yang, Peng; Kong, Jichuan; Li, Dandan; Miao, Juan; Hua, Shaofeng; Hu, Chaobing

    2016-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of nine ionic liquids (ILs) on the catalase activity were investigated using fluorescence, absorption ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The interactions of ILs and catalase on the molecular level were studied. The experimental results indicated that ILs could inhibit the catalase activity and their inhibitory abilities depended on their chemical structures. Fluorescence experiments showed that hydrogen bonding played an important role in the interaction process. The inhibitory abilities of ILs on catalase activity could be simply described by their hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding abilities. Unexpected less inhibitory effects of trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO(-)) might be ascribed to its larger size, which makes it difficult to go through the substrate channel of catalase to the active site.

  2. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain☆

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. PMID:26887242

  3. Catalase and superoxide dismutase double staining zymogram technique for Deinococcus and Kocuria species exposed to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Manish R; Yadav, Radhika; Desai, Anjana

    2009-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase expression is associated with oxidative stress. Existing techniques for the individual staining of SOD and catalase have been described in the past. The objective of this study was to achieve a simple and rapid technique for the double staining of bacterial SOD and catalase on the same polyacrylamide gel. SOD detection was carried out using nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBT) dye reduction followed by ferricyanide precipitation for negative staining of the catalase enzyme on the same gel. The staining procedure resulted in pale blue SOD bands while catalase appeared as yellow bands against a greenish blue background on the same gel. This technique was used to detect changes in the polymorphic forms of these enzymes in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and Kocuria sp. C2 subjected to stresses like UV and gamma radiation and desiccation.

  4. A Catalase-related Hemoprotein in Coral Is Specialized for Synthesis of Short-chain Aldehydes: DISCOVERY OF P450-TYPE HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE ACTIVITY IN A CATALASE.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tarvi; Lõhelaid, Helike; Boeglin, William E; Calcutt, Wade M; Brash, Alan R; Samel, Nigulas

    2015-08-07

    In corals a catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein transforms arachidonic acid to the allene oxide 8R,9-epoxy-5,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid from which arise cyclopentenones such as the prostanoid-related clavulones. Recently we cloned two catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein genes (a and b) from the coral Capnella imbricata, form a being an allene oxide synthase and form b giving uncharacterized polar products (Lõhelaid, H., Teder, T., Tõldsepp, K., Ekins, M., and Samel, N. (2014) PloS ONE 9, e89215). Here, using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and NMR methods, we identify a novel activity of fusion protein b, establishing its role in cleaving the lipoxygenase product 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid into the short-chain aldehydes (5Z)-8-oxo-octenoic acid and (3Z,6Z)-dodecadienal; these primary products readily isomerize in an aqueous medium to the corresponding 6E- and 2E,6Z derivatives. This type of enzymatic cleavage, splitting the carbon chain within the conjugated diene of the hydroperoxide substrate, is known only in plant cytochrome P450 hydroperoxide lyases. In mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled substrate and incubations in H2(18)O, we established synthesis of the C8-oxo acid and C12 aldehyde with the retention of the hydroperoxy oxygens, consistent with synthesis of a short-lived hemiacetal intermediate that breaks down spontaneously into the two aldehydes. Taken together with our initial studies indicating differing gene regulation of the allene oxide synthase and the newly identified catalase-related hydroperoxide lyase and given the role of aldehydes in plant defense, this work uncovers a potential pathway in coral stress signaling and a novel enzymatic activity in the animal kingdom.

  5. The effects of hydrogen peroxide promoted by homocysteine and inherited catalase deficiency on human hypocatalasemic patients.

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Vitai, Márta

    2003-10-15

    Elevated plasma homocysteine can generate oxygen free radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme catalase is involved in the protection against hydrogen peroxide. We examined the effect of oxidative stress promoted by homocysteine on erythrocyte metabolism (blood hemoglobin, MCV, folate, B12, serum LDH, LDH isoenzymes, haptoglobin) in the oxidative stress sensitive Hungarian patients with inherited catalase deficiency. The plasma homocysteine (HPLC method, Bio-Rad), folate, B12 (capture binding assay, Abbott), blood hemoglobin concentrations, blood catalase activity (spectrophotometric assay of hydrogen peroxide), and MCV values were determined in 7 hypocatalasemic families including hypocatalasemic (male:12, female:18) patients and their results were compared to those of the normocatalasemic (male:17 female: 12) family members. We found decreased (p <.036) folate (ng/ml) concentrations (male hypocatalasemic 5.44 +/- 2.81 vs. normocatalasemic 7.56 +/- 1.97, female 5.01 +/- 1.93 vs. 6.61 +/- 1.91), blood hemoglobin (p <.010, male:140.2 +/- 11.0 vs. 153.6 +/- 11.6 g/l, female: 128.4 +/- 10.9 vs. 139.6 +/- 9.2 g/l). Increased levels of MCV (p <.001) were detected in hypocatalasemic patients (male: 98.6 +/- 3.4 vs. 90.1 +/- 7.5 fl, female: 95.9 +/- 3.9 vs. 90.1 +/- 2.5 fl), plasma homocysteine (p <.049, male: 9.72 +/- 3.61 vs. 7.36 +/- 2.10 umol/l, female: 9.06 +/- 3.10 vs. 6.84 +/- 2.50 umol/l) and not significant (p >.401) plasma B12 (male: 336 +/- 108 vs. 307 +/- 76 pg/ml, female: 373 +/- 180 vs. 342 +/- 75 pg/ml). The serum markers of hemolysis (LDH, LDH isoenzymes, haptoglobin) did not show significant (p >.228) signs of oxidative erythrocyte damage. We report firstly on increased plasma homocysteine concentrations in inherited catalase deficiency. The increased plasma homocysteine and inherited catalase deficiency together could promote oxidative stress via hydrogen peroxide. The patients with inherited catalase deficiency are more sensitive to oxidative stress

  6. Protective effects of catalase on retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baihua; Tang, Luosheng

    2011-11-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury causes profound tissue damage, especially retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. The aims of the study were to investigate whether catalase (CAT) has a neuroprotective effect on RGC after I/R injury in rats, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanism. Wistar female rats were randonmized into four groups: normal control group (Control group), retinal I/R with vehicle group (I/R with vehicle group), retinal I/R with AAV-CAT group (I/R with AAV-CAT group), and normal retina with AAV-CAT group (normal with AAV-CAT group). One eye of each rat was pretreated with recombinant adeno-associated virus containing catalase gene (I/R with AAV-CAT group or normal with AAV-CAT group) and recombinant adeno-associated virus containing GFP gene (I/R with vehicle group) by intravitreal injection 21 days before initiation of I/R injury. Retinal I/R injury was induced by elevating intraocular pressure to 100mmHg for 1h. The number of RGC and inner plexiform layer (IPL) thickness were measured by fluorogold retrograde labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining at 6h, 24h, 72 h and 5d after injury. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the number of RGC, IPL thickness, malondialdehyde(MDA), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), CAT activity and nitrotyrosine were measured by fluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis at 5 days after injury. Electroretinographic (ERG) evaluation was also used. Pretreatment of AAV-CAT significantly decreased the levels of H(2)O(2), MDA, 8-OHdG and nitrotyrosine, increased the catalase activity, and prevented the reduction of a- and b- waves in the I/R with AAV-CAT group compare with the I/R with vehicle group (p<0.01). Catalase attenuated the I/R-induced damage of RGC and IPL and retinal function. Therefore, catalase can protect the rat retina from I/R-induced injury by enhancing the antioxidative ability and reducing oxidative stress, which suggests that catalase may be

  7. Mn-catalase (Alr0998) protects the photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120 from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Manisha; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Role of the non-haem, manganese catalase (Mn-catalase) in oxidative stress tolerance is unknown in cyanobacteria. The ORF alr0998 from the Anabaena PCC7120, which encodes a putative Mn-catalase, was constitutively overexpressed in Anabaena PCC7120 to generate a recombinant strain, AnKat(+). The Alr0998 protein could be immunodetected in AnKat(+) cells and zymographic analysis showed a distinct thermostable catalase activity in the cytosol of AnKat(+) cells but not in the wild-type Anabaena PCC7120. The observed catalase activity was insensitive to inhibition by azide indicating that Alr0998 protein is indeed a Mn-catalase. In response to oxidative stress, the AnKat(+) showed reduced levels of intracellular ROS which was also corroborated by decreased production of an oxidative stress-inducible 2-Cys-Prx protein. Treatment of wild-type Anabaena PCC7120 with H(2)O(2) caused (i) RNA degradation in vivo, (ii) severe reduction of photosynthetic pigments and CO(2) fixation, (iii) fragmentation and lysis of filaments and (iv) loss of viability. In contrast, the AnKat(+) strain was protected from all the aforesaid deleterious effect under oxidative stress. This is the first report on protection of an organism from oxidative stress by overexpression of a Mn-catalase.

  8. Upregulation of intracellular antioxidant enzymes in brain and heart during estivation in the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Salway, Kurtis D; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Chew, Shit F; Warren, Sarah A; Ballantyne, James S; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2010-03-01

    The African slender lungfish, Protopterus dolloi, is highly adapted to withstand periods of drought by secreting a mucous cocoon and estivating for periods of months to years. Estivation is similar to the diapause and hibernation of other animal species in that it is characterized by negligible activity and a profoundly depressed metabolic rate. As is typically observed in quiescent states, estivating P. dolloi are resistant to environmental stresses. We tested the hypothesis that P. dolloi enhances stress resistance during estivation by upregulating intracellular antioxidant defences in brain and heart tissues. We found that most of the major intracellular antioxidant enzymes, including the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, cytosolic superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, were upregulated in brain tissue of lungfish that had estivated for 60 days. Several of these enzymes were also elevated in heart tissue of estivators. These changes were not due to food deprivation, as they did not occur in a group of fish that were deprived of food but maintained in water for the same period of time. We found little evidence of tissue oxidative damage in estivators. Products of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal adducts) and oxidative protein damage (carbonylation) were similar in estivating and control lungfish. However, protein nitrotyrosine levels were elevated in brain tissue of estivators. Taken together, these data indicate that estivating P. dolloi have enhanced oxidative stress resistance in brain and heart due to a significant upregulation of intracellular antioxidant capacity.

  9. Understanding the role of the catalase/peroxide genes in H2O2 resistance of E. coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 defenses against H2O2 include the peroxiredoxin AhpC and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR in exponential phase, while KatE is indu...

  10. Catalase protects tumor cells from apoptosis induction by intercellular ROS signaling.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Wibke; Bauer, Georg

    2009-11-01

    Transformed cells are subject to intercellular induction of apoptosis by neighbouring nontransformed cells and to autocrine apoptotic self-destruction. Both processes depend on extracellular superoxide anion generation by the transformed cells and on the release of peroxidase from both nontransformed and transformed cells. This concerted action results in HOCl synthesis, HOCl-superoxide anion interaction and generation of apoptosis-inducing hydroxyl radicals. In contrast to transformed cells, ex vivo tumor cells are resistant against intercellular induction of apoptosis and autocrine apoptotic self-destruction. Resistance of tumor cells against intercellular ROS signaling depends on interference through catalase expression on the membrane. Intercellular ROS signaling of tumor cells can be restored when i) exogenous HOCl is added; ii) exogenous hydrogen peroxide is supplied, or iii) catalase is inhibited. These findings define the biochemical basis for specific apoptosis induction in tumor cells through re-establishment of intercellular ROS signaling, a potential novel approach in tumor prevention and therapy.

  11. A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

    1997-02-01

    The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

  12. Catalase-Modified Carbon Electrodes: Persuading Oxygen To Accept Four Electrons Rather Than Two.

    PubMed

    Sepunaru, Lior; Laborda, Eduardo; Compton, Richard G

    2016-04-18

    We successfully exploited the natural highly efficient activity of an enzyme (catalase) together with carbon electrodes to produce a hybrid electrode for oxygen reduction, very appropriate for energy transformation. Carbon electrodes, in principle, are cheap but poor oxygen reduction materials, because only two-electron reduction of oxygen occurs at low potentials, whereas four-electron reduction is key for energy-transformation technology. With the immobilization of catalase on the surface, the hydrogen peroxide produced electrochemically is decomposed back to oxygen by the enzyme; the enzyme natural activity on the surface regenerates oxygen, which is further reduced by the carbon electrode with no direct electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode. Near full four-electron reduction of oxygen is realised on a carbon electrode, which is modified with ease by a commercially available enzyme. The value of such enzyme-modified electrode for energy-transformation devices is evident.

  13. Purification and characterization of a homodimeric catalase-peroxidase from the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Obinger, C; Regelsberger, G; Strasser, G; Burner, U; Peschek, G A

    1997-06-27

    Cytosolic extracts of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans exhibit both catalase and o-dianisidine peroxidase activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrates one distinct enzyme, which has been purified to essential homogeneity and found to be composed of two identical subunits of equal size (80.5 kDa). The isoelectric point is at pH 4.7. It is a very efficient catalase with a broad pH optimum between 6.5 and 7.5 and a Km for H2O2 of 4.3 mM, a calculated turnover number of 7200 s(-1), and an overall-rate constant of 3.5 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The behaviour of this protoheme-enzyme is typical of the class of prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases, which is sensitive to cyanide (Ki = 27.2 microM) and insensitive to the eukaryotic catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The enzyme accepts electrons from o-dianisidine, but not from ascorbate, glutathione, and NADH. With hydrogen peroxide in steady-state conditions the enzyme is mainly in the ferric state indicating that Compound I is much faster reduced by H2O2 than it is formed. The native enzyme is in the high-spin state, which is transformed to low-spin upon addition of cyanide. With peroxoacetic acid Compound I is formed at a rate of 5.9 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C with about 50% hypochromicity, a Soret-maximum at 405 nm and isosbestic points at 354 and 427 nm.

  14. Ergot cluster-encoded catalase is required for synthesis of chanoclavine-I in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Kerry E; Coyle, Christine M; Cheng, Johnathan Z; O'Connor, Sarah E; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2011-06-01

    Genes required for ergot alkaloid biosynthesis are clustered in the genomes of several fungi. Several conserved ergot cluster genes have been hypothesized, and in some cases demonstrated, to encode early steps of the pathway shared among fungi that ultimately make different ergot alkaloid end products. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of these conserved genes (easC) indicates a catalase as the product, but a role for a catalase in the ergot alkaloid pathway has not been established. We disrupted easC of Aspergillus fumigatus by homologous recombination with a truncated copy of that gene. The resulting mutant (ΔeasC) failed to produce the ergot alkaloids typically observed in A. fumigatus, including chanoclavine-I, festuclavine, and fumigaclavines B, A, and C. The ΔeasC mutant instead accumulated N-methyl-4-dimethylallyltryptophan (N-Me-DMAT), an intermediate recently shown to accumulate in Claviceps purpurea strains mutated at ccsA (called easE in A. fumigatus) (Lorenz et al. Appl Environ Microbiol 76:1822-1830, 2010). A ΔeasE disruption mutant of A. fumigatus also failed to accumulate chanoclavine-I and downstream ergot alkaloids and, instead, accumulated N-Me-DMAT. Feeding chanoclavine-I to the ΔeasC mutant restored ergot alkaloid production. Complementation of either ΔeasC or ΔeasE mutants with the respective wild-type allele also restored ergot alkaloid production. The easC gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein product displayed in vitro catalase activity with H(2)O(2) but did not act, in isolation, on N-Me-DMAT as substrate. The data indicate that the products of both easC (catalase) and easE (FAD-dependent oxidoreductase) are required for conversion of N-Me-DMAT to chanoclavine-I.

  15. Changes in gene expression and catalase activity in Oryza sativa L. under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Vighi, I L; Benitez, L C; do Amaral, M N; Auler, P A; Moraes, G P; Rodrigues, G S; da Maia, L C; Pinto, L S; Braga, E J B

    2016-11-03

    Different rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes were subjected to high salinity and low temperature (150 mM NaCl and 13°C, respectively) for 0, 6, 24, 48, or 72 h. We evaluated the simultaneous expression of the genes OsCATA, OsCATB, and OsCATC, correlated gene expression with enzyme activity, and verified the regulation of these genes through identification of cis-elements in the promoter region. The hydrogen peroxide content increased in a tolerant genotype and decreased in a sensitive genotype under both stress conditions. Lipid peroxidation increased in the tolerant genotype when exposed to cold, and in the sensitive genotype when exposed to high salinity. Catalase activity significantly increased in both genotypes when subjected to 13°C. In the tolerant genotype, OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to high salinity and cold, while in the sensitive genotype, OsCATA and OsCATC responded positively to saline stress, as did OsCATA and OsCATB to low temperature. Cis-element analysis identified different regulatory sequences in the catalase promoter region of each genotype. The sensitive genotype maintained a better balance between hydrogen oxyacid levels, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation under low temperature than the resistant genotype. OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive in the salt-tolerant genotype to cold, OsCATA and OsCATC were the most responsive to saline stress, and OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to chilling stress in the sensitive genotype. There were positive correlations between catalase activity and OsCATB expression in the tolerant genotype under saline stress and in the sensitive genotype under cold stress.

  16. Ectopic expression of catalase in Drosophila mitochondria increases stress resistance but not longevity.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Robin J; Bayne, Anne Cécile V; Kwong, Linda K; Orr, William C; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2003-01-15

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the rate of mitochondrial oxidant production governs the aging process of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Catalase, an antioxidative enzyme expressed in the cytosol and peroxisomes of Drosophila, was targetted ectopically to the mitochondrial matrix by fusion of a leader peptide derived from ornithine aminotransferase with its N-terminus. The presence of the transgene encoding this fusion protein was associated with moderate (35 +/- 13%) increases in total catalase activity in most lines, and measurable levels of catalase activity in the mitochondria (30-140 U/mg protein). There was no impact on the life span of the flies at 25 degrees C, even in an exceptional line with a 149% increase in total catalase activity, and there was a small decrease in longevity at 29 degrees C. There were no compensatory changes in the rate of metabolism or physical activity, or in the levels of other major antioxidants, suggesting that the aging process was largely unaffected. Resistance to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and cold stress was enhanced, but there was no appreciable effect on resistance to hyperoxia. The results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial antioxidant levels in the resistance to oxidative stress at the organismal level, and illustrate that different effects on aging and stress resistance may ensue from a single treatment. The main inferences drawn are that: (i) levels of stress resistance may neither be a cause nor a reliable indicator of the rate of aging, and (ii) bolstering antioxidant levels in Drosophila may not delay or slow down the aging process.

  17. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  18. Purification and characterization of a mesohalic catalase from the halophilic bacterium Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Peterson, N J; Salin, M L

    1995-01-01

    When subjected to the stress of growth in a relatively low-salt environment (1.25 M NaCl), the halophilic bacterium Halobacterium halobium induces a catalase. The protein has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and has an M(r) of 240,000 and a subunit size of approximately 62,000. The enzyme is active over a broad pH range of 6.5 to 10.0, with a peak in activity at pH 7.0. It has an isoelectric point of 4.0. This catalse, which is not readily reduced by dithionite, shows a Soret peak at 406 nm. Cyanide and azide inhibit the enzyme at micromolar concentrations, whereas maleimide is without effect. The addition of 20 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole results in a 33% inhibition in enzymatic activity. The tetrameric protein binds NADP in a 1:1 ratio but does not peroxidize NADPH, NADH, or ascorbate. Although the enzymatic activity is maximal when assayed in a 50 mM potassium phosphate buffer with no NaCl, prolonged incubation in a buffer lacking NaCl results in inactive enzyme. Moreover, purification must be performed in the presence of 2 M NaCl. Equally as effective in retaining enzymatic function are NaCl, LiCl, KCl, CsCl, and NH4Cl, whereas divalent salts such as MgCl2 and CaCl2 result in the immediate loss of activity. The catalase is stained by pararosaniline, which is indicative of a glycosidic linkage. The Km for H2O2 is 60 mM, with inhibition observed at concentrations in excess of 90 mM. Thus, the mesohalic catalase purified from H. halobium seems to be similar to other catalases, except for the salt requirements, but differs markedly from the constitutive halobacterial hydroperoxidase. PMID:7814327

  19. A structural and dynamic investigation of the inhibition of catalase by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Candelaresi, Marco; Gumiero, Andrea; Adamczyk, Katrin; Robb, Kirsty; Bellota-Antón, César; Sangal, Vartul; Munnoch, John; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Hoskisson, Paul A; Parker, Anthony W; Tucker, Nicholas P; Walsh, Martin A; Hunt, Neil T

    2013-11-28

    Determining the chemical and structural modifications occurring within a protein during fundamental processes such as ligand or substrate binding is essential to building up a complete picture of biological function. Currently, significant unanswered questions relate to the way in which protein structural dynamics fit within the structure-function relationship and to the functional role, if any, of bound water molecules in the active site. Addressing these questions requires a multidisciplinary approach and complementary experimental techniques that, in combination, enhance our understanding of the complexities of protein chemistry. We exemplify this philosophy by applying both physical and biological approaches to investigate the active site chemistry that contributes to the inhibition of the Corynebacterium glutamicum catalase enzyme by nitric oxide. Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) experiments exploit the NO ligand as a local probe of the active site molecular environment and shows that catalase displays a dynamically-restricted, 'tight,' structure. X-ray crystallography studies of C. glutamicum catalase confirm the presence of a conserved chain of hydrogen-bonded bound water molecules that link the NO ligand and the protein scaffold. This combination of bound water and restricted dynamics stands in stark contrast to other haem proteins, such as myoglobin, that exhibit ligand transport functionality despite the presence of a similar distal architecture in close proximity to the ligand. We conclude not only that the bound water molecules in the catalase active site play an important role in molecular recognition of NO but also may be part of the mechanistic operation of this important enzyme.

  20. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase Isozyme Expression in Cotton Seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, RN

    1991-01-01

    We reported previously that expression of the five tetrameric catalase isozymes during postgerminative growth of cotton seedings was a consequence of interactions between two subunits (SU 1 and SU 2) temporally synthesized from two distinct catalase genes. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of these two catalase subunits during the changeover from glyoxysomal to leaf-type peroxisomal metabolism. The steady-state level of glyoxysomal SU 1 protein (present in 12-hour-old seeds) increased through day 3 and then declined linearly through day 6, whereas SU 2 protein (first detected in 24-hour-old seeds) increased continuously through day 6. The time courses for steady-state levels of the mRNAs encoding these two subunits revealed two clearly separated peaks: the first at day 1 (SU 1) and the other at day 4 (SU 2). Accumulation of these mRNAs preceded the accumulation of their corresponding proteins by at least 24 hours, suggesting temporal, pretranslational regulation of synthesis of both subunits. Results from run-on transcriptional assays with isolated nuclei, however, revealed that transcripts encoding both subunits were synthesized together on days 1 through 5. Hence, it appears that the accumulations of SU 1 and SU 2 mRNAs are controlled primarily at the post-transcriptional level, which has not been reported for catalase or any other eukaryotic peroxisomal enzymes. The accumulation of SU 1 mRNA is not light dependent, whereas the accumulation of SU 2 mRNA, which directs synthesis of the predominant subunit comprising the leaf-type peroxisomal isozyme, occurs only after exposure of seedlings to light. PMID:12324611

  1. Benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole inhibit neuroprotection against amyloid peptides by catalase overexpression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chilumuri, Amrutha; Odell, Mark; Milton, Nathaniel G N

    2013-11-20

    Alzheimer's disease, Familial British dementia, Familial Danish dementia, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, plus Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are associated with amyloid fibril deposition and oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzyme catalase is a neuroprotective amyloid binding protein. Herein the effects of catalase overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells on the toxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), amyloid-Bri (ABri), amyloid-Dan (ADan), amylin (IAPP), and prion protein (PrP) peptides were determined. Results showed catalase overexpression was neuroprotective against Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) and catalase-amyloid interaction inhibitor benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) (BTA-EG4) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity of amyloid peptides in catalase overexpressing neuronal cells. This suggests catalase neuroprotection involves breakdown of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus a direct binding interaction between catalase and the Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. Kisspeptin 45-50 had additive neuroprotective actions against the Aβ peptide in catalase overexpressing cells. The effects of 3-AT had an intracellular site of action, while catalase-amyloid interactions had an extracellular component. These results suggest that the 3-AT and BTA-EG4 compounds may be able to inhibit endogenous catalase mediated neuroprotection. Use of BTA-EG4, or compounds that inhibit catalase binding to amyloid peptides, as potential therapeutics for Neurodegenerative diseases may therefore result in unwanted effects.

  2. Role of. pi. -cation radicals in the enzymatic cycles of peroxidases, catalases, and nitrite and sulfite reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L K; Chang, C K; Davis, M S; Fajer, J

    1980-01-01

    Charge iterative extended Hueckel calculations, and magnetic and optical results on porphyrins, chlorins, and isobacteriochlorins (1) suggest that the catalytic cycles of the enzymes horseradish peroxidase, catalase, Neurospora crassa catalase, and nitrite and sulfite reductases proceed via ..pi..-cation radicals of their prosthetic groups; (2) offer distinguishing features for the optical and magnetic spectra of these radicals, pertinent to their detection as enzymatic intermediates; (3) reconcile the seemingly contradictory optical and NMR data on Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase; and (4) predict that the axial ligation of the heme differs for horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

  3. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  4. Interaction and complex formation between catalase and cationic polyelectrolytes: chitosan and Eudragit E100.

    PubMed

    Boeris, Valeria; Romanini, Diana; Farruggia, Beatriz; Picó, Guillemo

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between catalase and the cationic polyelectrolytes: chitosan and Eudragit E100 have been investigated owing to their scientific and technological importance. These interactions have been characterized by turbidimetry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the catalase conformation does not change significantly during the chain entanglements between the protein and the polyelectrolytes. The effects of pH, ionic strength and anions which modify the water structure were evaluated on the polymer-protein complex formation. A net coulombic interaction force between them was found since the insoluble complex formation decreased after the NaCl addition. Both polymers were found to precipitate around 80% of the protein in solution. No modification of the tertiary and secondary protein structure or the enzymatic activity was observed when the precipitate was dissolved by changing the pH of the medium. Chitosan and Eudragit E100 proved to be a useful framework to isolate catalase or proteins with a slightly acid isoelectrical pH by means of precipitation.

  5. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-05-15

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from <10 min to 40 h, reduced immunogenicity, and decreases sensitivity to proteolysis. Because PEG has surface active properties and can induce cell fusion, the authors hypothesized that PEG conjugation could enhance cell binding and association of normally membrane-impermeable enzymes. Incubation of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with /sup 125/I-PEG-catalase or /sup 125/I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species.

  6. On the role of catalase in the oxidation of tissue fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, D.; Masters, C.

    1984-02-15

    The role of catalase in lipid metabolism has been studied by means of a comparison of the turnover characteristics of the major lipid classes in the normal mouse with those of animals in which the catalase activity had been inhibited and blocked by aminotriazole and allylisopropylacetamide. Double isotope ratios were determined in the lipid fractions of several tissues following the injection of labeled glycerol, and a number of significant differences were identified between these treatments. Since catalase is recognized as an integral component of the peroxisomal pathway of fatty acid oxidation, these results may be taken as indicating that interruption of the process of peroxisomal beta-oxidation in this manner cause extensive perturbations of lipid metabolism in the living animal, and these perturbations extend well beyond those tissues where the predominant localization of these organelles occurs. The concept which derives from these data--that of a significant regulatory role of peroxisomes in relation to the overall balance of lipid metabolism in the animal body--is described and discussed.

  7. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate.

  8. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  9. Probing the two-domain structure of homodimeric prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Srijib; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are ancestral bifunctional heme peroxidases found in archaeons, bacteria and lower eukaryotes. In contrast to homologous cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APx) homodimeric KatGs have a two-domain monomeric structure with a catalytic N-terminal heme domain and a C-terminal domain of high sequence and structural similarity but without obvious function. Nevertheless, without its C-terminal counterpart the N-terminal domain exhibits neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Except some hybrid-type proteins all other members of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily lack this C-terminal domain. In order to probe the role of the two-domain monomeric structure for conformational and thermal stability urea and temperature-dependent unfolding experiments were performed by using UV-Vis-, electronic circular dichroism- and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Recombinant prokaryotic (cyanobacterial KatG from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803) and eukaryotic (fungal KatG from Magnaporthe grisea) were investigated. The obtained data demonstrate that the conformational and thermal stability of bifunctional KatGs is significantly lower compared to homologous monofunctional peroxidases. The N- and C-terminal domains do not unfold independently. Differences between the cyanobacterial and the fungal enzyme are relatively small. Data will be discussed with respect to known structure and function of KatG, CcP and APx.

  10. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. )

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  11. Terazosin-induced alterations in catalase expression and lipid peroxidation in the rat seminal vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, D; Patris, E; Deliconstantinos, G; Kyroudi-Voulgari, A; Anastasiou, I; Perea, D

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists may alter seminal vesicle contractility and impair fertility in male rats. This study was designed to investigate the effects of terazosin on the catalase expression in the seminal vesicles and the lipid peroxidation of the seminal fluid in normal adult rats. Wistar rats were treated with terazosin (1.2 mg kg(-1) body weight, given orally every second day) for 120 days. Catalase expression was assessed immunohistochemically in tissue sections of the seminal vesicles, and lipid peroxidation was estimated by measuring the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the seminal vesicles' fluid. The seminal vesicles in terazosin-treated rats were particularly distended in comparison with those of controls, and their secreting epithelium was suppressed. Cytoplasmic catalase expression in the secreting epithelial cells (% of cells) was increased in terazosin-treated specimens in comparison with controls (76.1 ± 17.1 versus 51.3 ± 25.1, P = 0.005). MDA levels (μm) were also higher in samples from treated subjects in comparison with controls (2.67 ± 1.19 versus 1.39 ± 0.19, P = 0.01). Although the direct effect of terazosin treatment on the seminal vesicles is that of impaired contractility, an indirect effect is that on fertility by increasing lipid peroxidation in the seminal fluid and/or through degrading of hydrogen peroxide that is essential for sperm capacitation.

  12. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  13. Spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular simulation studies on the interaction of catalase with copper ion.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Jing, Mingyang; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    In this research, the binding mechanism of Cu(2+) to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking methods. The cellar experiment was firstly carried out to investigate the inhibition effect of catalase. During the fluorescence quenching study, after correcting the inner filter effect (IFE), the fluorescence of BLC was found to be quenched by Cu(2+). The quenching mechanism was determined by fluorescence lifetime measurement, and was confirmed to be the dynamic mode. The secondary structure content of BLC was changed by the addition of Cu(2+), as revealed by UV-vis absorption and CD spectra, which further induces the decrease in BLC activity. Molecular simulation study indicates that Cu(2+) is located between two β-sheets and two random coils of BLC near to the heme group, and interacts with His 74 and Ser 113 residues near a hydrophilic area. The decrease of α-helix and the binding of His 74 are considered to be the major reason for the inhibition of BLC activity caused by Cu(2+). The ITC results indicate that the binding stoichiometry of Cu(2+) to catalase is 11.4. Moreover, the binding of Cu(2+) to BLC destroyed H-bonds, which was confirmed by the CD result.

  14. Specific function of the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct radical and residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the atypical catalase reaction of catalase-peroxidase KatG.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Khajo, Abdelahad; Jarrett, Sanchez; Suarez, Javier; Levitsky, Yan; Burger, Richard M; Jarzecki, Andrzej A; Magliozzo, Richard S

    2012-10-26

    Catalase activity of the dual-function heme enzyme catalase-peroxidase (KatG) depends on several structural elements, including a unique adduct formed from covalently linked side chains of three conserved amino acids (Met-255, Tyr-229, and Trp-107, Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG numbering) (MYW). Mutagenesis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical stopped-flow experiments, along with calculations using density functional theory (DFT) methods revealed the basis of the requirement for a radical on the MYW-adduct, for oxyferrous heme, and for conserved residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the rapid catalase reaction. The participation of an oxyferrous heme intermediate (dioxyheme) throughout the pH range of catalase activity is suggested from our finding that carbon monoxide inhibits the activity at both acidic and alkaline pH. In the presence of H(2)O(2), the MYW-adduct radical is formed normally in KatG[D137S] but this mutant is defective in forming dioxyheme and lacks catalase activity. KatG[R418L] is also catalase deficient but exhibits normal formation of the adduct radical and dioxyheme. Both mutants exhibit a coincidence between MYW-adduct radical persistence and H(2)O(2) consumption as a function of time, and enhanced subunit oligomerization during turnover, suggesting that the two mutations disrupting catalase turnover allow increased migration of the MYW-adduct radical to protein surface residues. DFT calculations showed that an interaction between the side chain of residue Arg-418 and Tyr-229 in the MYW-adduct radical favors reaction of the radical with the adjacent dioxyheme intermediate present throughout turnover in WT KatG. Release of molecular oxygen and regeneration of resting enzyme are thereby catalyzed in the last step of a proposed catalase reaction.

  15. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase.

  16. Catalase in fluvial biofilms: a comparison between different extraction methods and example of application in a metal-polluted river.

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Bonet, Berta; Corcoll, Natàlia; Guasch, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes are involved in important processes of cell detoxification during oxidative stress and have, therefore, been used as biomarkers in algae. Nevertheless, their limited use in fluvial biofilms may be due to the complexity of such communities. Here, a comparison between different extraction methods was performed to obtain a reliable method for catalase extraction from fluvial biofilms. Homogenization followed by glass bead disruption appeared to be the best compromise for catalase extraction. This method was then applied to a field study in a metal-polluted stream (Riou Mort, France). The most polluted sites were characterized by a catalase activity 4-6 times lower than in the low-polluted site. Results of the comparison process and its application are promising for the use of catalase activity as an early warning biomarker of toxicity using biofilms in the laboratory and in the field.

  17. [Role of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to hydrogen peroxide in exponential phase of growth].

    PubMed

    Baĭliak, M M; Semchyshyn, H M; Lushchak, V I

    2006-01-01

    The role of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide in the middle-exponential phase has been investigated. It was shown that cell survival is significantly decreased after yeast exposure to hydrogen peroxide in the strains defective in cytosolic or peroxisomal catalases. Treatment of the wild-type cells with 0.5 mM H2O2 for 30 min causes an increase in the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase, but the effect was not observed in all strains investigated. It was also shown that hydrogen peroxide leads to an increase in the activities of both catalases and Cu,Zn-containing SOD. The effect was cancelled by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis.

  18. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  19. Effects of the seminal plasma zinc content and catalase activity on the semen quality of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Rezai, S Asri; Ansari, M H Kh; Khaki, A

    2009-01-15

    In order to determine zinc and catalase content of seminal plasma in the buffalo and to study their associations with the semen characteristics, 54 semen samples were collected from 10 buffalo bulls; semen volume and sperm concentration, gross and progressive motility and viability were evaluated, seminal plasma was then harvested by centrifugation and its zinc content was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometer and its catalase activity determined by using a commercial kit. The zinc content of the seminal plasma (Mean +/- SEM) was recorded as 154.40 +/- 1.74 mg L(-1), while, the mean catalase value was 32.00 +/- 0.42 U mL(-1). The mean zinc values was highly correlated with sperm progressive motility and viability and with catalase values (p = 0.000 for all) and also was associated with gross motility (p = 0.020) and negatively with abnormal morphology (p = 0.049). The catalase values were highly associated with sperm progressive motility, viability and zinc content (p = 0.000 for all) and was associated with sperm gross motility (p = 0.024). For further clarification of these correlations, the samples were categorized in three groups of excellent (Ex, >90% motile, n = 33), good (Go, 80-89% motile, n = 15) and moderate (Mo, <79% motile, n = 6) according to their percentage of sperm motility. The mean progressive motility in Ex group was 92.54 +/- 0.51%, in Go group was 81.66 +/- 0.62% and in Mo group was 71.66 +/- 1.05%. The mean zinc and catalase values were recorded as 161.07 +/- 1.63 mg L(-1) and 33.41 +/- 0.34 U mL(-1) in Ex, 146.70 +/- 1.91 mg L(-1) and 31.01 +/- 0.67 in Go and 136.42 +/- 4.97 mg L(-1) and 26.51 +/- 0.87 U mL(-1) in Mo groups. The mean zinc value in Ex group was highly associated with sperm motility, viability and catalase values, in Go group was associated with catalase values and highly associated with sperm abnormal morphology and in Mo group it was highly associations with catalase values only. The mean catalase value in Ex group

  20. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  1. Purification, cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a monofunctional catalase, KatP, from Pigmentiphaga sp. DL-8.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Yicheng; Huang, Fei; Fu, Lei; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-04-01

    Catalases are essential components of the cellular equipment used to cope with oxidative stress. The monofunctional catalase KatP was purified from Pigmentiphaga sp. using ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), diethylaminoethyl ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The purified catalase formed polymer with an estimated monomer molecular mass of 54kDa, which were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and zymogram analysis. KatP exhibited a specific catalytic activity of 73,000U/mg, which was higher than that of catalase-1 of Comamonas terrigena N3H (55,900U/mg). Seven short tryptic fragments of this catalase were obtained by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS), and the gene, katP, was cloned by PCR amplification and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Based on the complete amino acid sequence, KatP was identified as a clade 3 monofunctional catalase. The specific activities of recombinant KatP for hydrogen peroxide (690,000U/mg) increased 9-fold over that of the parent strain. The Km and Vmax of recombinant KatP were 9.48mM and 81.2mol/minmg, respectively. The optimal pH and temperature for KatP were 7.0 and 37°C, respectively, and the enzyme displayed abroad pH-stable range of 4.0-11.0. The enzyme was inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(2+), and Mn(2+), whereas Fe(3+) and Mg(2+) stimulated KatP enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the catalase activity of recombinant KatP displayed high stability under different temperature and pH conditions, suggesting that KatP is a potential candidate for the production of catalase.

  2. Catalase -262C>T polymorphisms in Hungarian vitiligo patients and in controls: further acatalasemia mutations in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Zsuzsanna; Fejes, Zsolt; Nagy, Teréz; Csordás, Melinda; Simics, Enikő; Remenyik, Eva; Góth, László

    2012-04-01

    Catalase is the main regulator of hydrogen peroxide metabolism. In vitiligo patients there are conflicting data on its activity and no data on the effect of -262C>T polymorphism in the catalase gene. Blood catalase activity, -262C>T polymorphism and acatalasemia mutations were examined in 75 vitiligo patients and in 162 controls, in Hungary. We measured blood catalase activity and conducted analyses with PCR-SSCP, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining in combination with RFLP and nucleotide sequencing. Comparison of the wild (CC) genotype and the mutant (TT) genotype in the vitiligo patients revealed a non significant (P > 0.19) increase in blood catalase. Male controls with the CT genotype had significantly (P < 0.04) lower blood catalase activity than CC genotype controls. Female vitiligo patients with CC genotype had lower (P < 0.04) blood catalase than female controls. The frequency of wild genotype (CC) and C alleles is significantly (P < 0.04) decreased in Hungarian controls when compared to controls in Slovenia, Morocco, UK, Greece, Turkey, USA, China. The detection of a novel acatalasemia mutation (37C>T in exon 9) and the 113G>A (exon 9) mutation in Hungary are further proofs of genetic heterogeneity origin of acatalasemia mutations. In conclusion, the -262 C>T polymorphism has a reverse effect on blood catalase in vitiligo patients and in controls. In controls the mutant genotypes and alleles are more frequent in Hungary than in several other populations. The new acatalasemia mutations are further examples of heterogeneity of acatalasemia.

  3. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalytic activity of catalase immobilized onto electrodeposited nano-scale islands of nickel oxide.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Abdollah; Sharifi, Ensiyeh; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah; Soltanian, Saied

    2007-02-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used for simultaneous formation and immobilization of nickel oxide nano-scale islands and catalase on glassy carbon electrode. Electrodeposited nickel oxide may be a promising material for enzyme immobilization owing to its high biocompatibility and large surface. The catalase films assembled on nickel oxide exhibited a pair of well defined, stable and nearly reversible CV peaks at about -0.05 V vs. SCE at pH 7, characteristic of the heme Fe (III)/Fe (II) redox couple. The formal potential of catalase in nickel oxide film were linearly varied in the range 1-12 with slope of 58.426 mV/pH, indicating that the electron transfer is accompanied by single proton transportation. The electron transfer between catalase and electrode surface, (k(s)) of 3.7(+/-0.1) s(-1) was greatly facilitated in the microenvironment of nickel oxide film. The electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide at glassy carbon electrode modified with nickel oxide nano-scale islands and catalase enzyme has been studied. The embedded catalase in NiO nanoparticles showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide reduction. Also the modified rotating disk electrode shows good analytical performance for amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide. The resultant catalase/nickel oxide modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibited fast amperometric response (within 2 s) to hydrogen peroxide reduction (with a linear range from 1 microM to 1 mM), excellent stability, long term life and good reproducibility. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is calculated to be 0.96(+/-0.05)mM, which shows a large catalytic activity of catalase in the nickel oxide film toward hydrogen peroxide. The excellent electrochemical reversibility of redox couple, high stability, technical simplicity, lake of need for mediators and short preparations times are advantages of this electrode. Finally the activity of biosensor for nitrite reduction was also investigated.

  4. Expression and purification of soluble bio-active rice plant catalase-A from recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ray, Mamata; Mishra, Panchanand; Das, Priyanka; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Catalase in plants is a heme-coordinated tetrameric protein that primarily disproportionates hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. It plays an important role in maintaining cellular concentration of hydrogen peroxide to a level, necessary for all aspects of normal plant growth and development. Except for its recombinant expression in transgenic plants and insect cell line, the protein is yet to be synthesized in its bio-active form in prokaryotic expression system. Attempts made in past for recombinant expression of plant catalase in Escherichia coli consistently resulted in formation of insoluble and inactive aggregates of inclusion body. Here we have shown the specific requirement of a thioredoxin fusion partner, the involvement of trigger factor protein and the low temperature treatment during induction period for synthesis of completely solubilized rice plant catalase-A in recombinant E. coli. Furthermore, the bacteria required the supplementation of δ-aminolevulinic acid to produce bio-active recombinant rice catalase-A. The molecular and biochemical properties of the purified recombinant protein showed the characteristic features of a typical mono-functional plant catalase. These results attest to the usefulness of the present protocol for production of plant catalase using E. coli as heterologous expression system.

  5. Investigating catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition by bacteria biofilms in real time using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, Erwin; Ke, Neng; Cornut, Renaud; Patelunas, Anthony; Miller, Douglas; Nishiguchi, Michele K; Zoski, Cynthia G

    2014-01-07

    Catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a 1 mM bulk solution above Vibrio fischeri (γ-Protebacteria-Vibrionaceae) bacterial biofilms of either symbiotic or free-living strains was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The catalase activity, in units of micromoles hydrogen peroxide decomposed per minute over a period of 348 s, was found to vary with incubation time of each biofilm in correlation with the corresponding growth curve of bacteria in liquid culture. Average catalase activity for the same incubation times ranging from 1 to 12 h was found to be 0.28 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the symbiotic biofilms and 0.31 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the free-living biofilms, suggesting similar catalase activity. Calculations based on Comsol Multiphysics simulations in fitting experimental biofilm data indicated that approximately (3 ± 1) × 10(6) molecules of hydrogen peroxide were decomposed by a single bacterium per second, signifying the presence of a highly active catalase. A 2-fold enhancement in catalase activity was found for both free-living and symbiotic biofilms in response to external hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 1 nM in the growth media, implying a similar mechanism in responding to oxidative stress.

  6. Catalase supplementation on thawed bull spermatozoa abolishes the detrimental effect of oxidative stress on motility and DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Santos, M R; Domínguez-Rebolledo, A E; Esteso, M C; Garde, J J; Martínez-Pastor, F

    2009-08-01

    The potential protective effect of catalase supplementation during in vitro culture of frozen/thawed bull spermatozoa was investigated. Frozen/thawed semen collected from three fighting bulls was diluted in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and incubated at 37 degrees C under different experimental conditions: Control, Catalase (CAT) (200 U/mL), Oxidant (OXI) (100 microm Fe(2+)/1 mm ascorbate), and Catalase + Oxidant (CAT/OXI). We assessed sperm motility, acrosomal integrity, viability and chromatin status (SCSA) at 0, 2 and 6 h of incubation. Our results showed that catalase abolished the effect of the oxidant, protecting spermatozoa against reactive oxygen species, and improving both sperm motility and chromatin status during incubation. The OXI treatment significantly reduced the percentage of motile sperm after 6 h of incubation. The statistical model also showed that there were differences in sperm motility between CAT/OXI (20.8 +/- 2.9%) and OXI (11.6 +/- 7.6%) (p < 0.001). There were no significant effects of OXI on sperm viability, acrosomal status or proportion of abnormal tails. %DFI (spermatozoa with moderate or high DNA Fragmentation Index) was significantly higher on OXI (p < 0.001). Catalase prevented DNA fragmentation even in the presence of the oxidant (%DFI: 30.3 +/- 0.8% OXI vs. 17.4 +/- 0.7% CAT/OXI). We conclude that catalase supplementation after thawing could protect bull spermatozoa against oxidative stress, and it could improve media used for processing thawed spermatozoa.

  7. A comprehensive evaluation of catalase-like activity of different classes of redox-active therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Maia, Clarissa G C; Weitner, Tin; Carballal, Sebastián; Sampaio, Romulo S; Lieb, Dominik; Ghazaryan, Robert; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael; Reboucas, Julio S; Spasojevic, Ivan; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2015-09-01

    Because of the increased insight into the biological role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under physiological and pathological conditions and the role it presumably plays in the action of natural and synthetic redox-active drugs, there is a need to accurately define the type and magnitude of reactions that may occur with this intriguing and key species of redoxome. Historically, and frequently incorrectly, the impact of catalase-like activity has been assigned to play a major role in the action of many redox-active drugs, mostly SOD mimics and peroxynitrite scavengers, and in particular MnTBAP(3-) and Mn salen derivatives. The advantage of one redox-active compound over another has often been assigned to the differences in catalase-like activity. Our studies provide substantial evidence that Mn(III) N-alkylpyridylporphyrins couple with H2O2 in actions other than catalase-related. Herein we have assessed the catalase-like activities of different classes of compounds: Mn porphyrins (MnPs), Fe porphyrins (FePs), Mn(III) salen (EUK-8), and Mn(II) cyclic polyamines (SOD-active M40403 and SOD-inactive M40404). Nitroxide (tempol), nitrone (NXY-059), ebselen, and MnCl2, which have not been reported as catalase mimics, were used as negative controls, while catalase enzyme was a positive control. The dismutation of H2O2 to O2 and H2O was followed via measuring oxygen evolved with a Clark oxygen electrode at 25°C. The catalase enzyme was found to have kcat(H2O2)=1.5×10(6)M(-1) s(-1). The yield of dismutation, i.e., the maximal amount of O2 evolved, was assessed also. The magnitude of the yield reflects an interplay between the kcat(H2O2) and the stability of compounds toward H2O2-driven oxidative degradation, and is thus an accurate measure of the efficacy of a catalyst. The kcat(H2O2) values for 12 cationic Mn(III) N-substituted (alkyl and alkoxyalkyl) pyridylporphyrin-based SOD mimics and Mn(III) N,N'-dialkylimidazolium porphyrin, MnTDE-2-ImP(5+), ranged from 23 to 88M(-1) s

  8. Genome-wide Screening of Regulators of Catalase Expression: ROLE OF A TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX AND HISTONE AND tRNA MODIFICATION COMPLEXES ON ADAPTATION TO STRESS.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Encinar Del Dedo, Javier; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2016-01-08

    In response to environmental cues, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1-driven signaling cascade activates hundreds of genes to induce a robust anti-stress cellular response in fission yeast. Thus, upon stress imposition Sty1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus where it up-regulates transcription through the Atf1 transcription factor. Several regulators of transcription and translation have been identified as important to mount an integral response to oxidative stress, such as the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyl transferase or Elongator complexes, respectively. With the aim of identifying new regulators of this massive gene expression program, we have used a GFP-based protein reporter and screened a fission yeast deletion collection using flow cytometry. We find that the levels of catalase fused to GFP, both before and after a threat of peroxides, are altered in hundreds of strains lacking components of chromatin modifiers, transcription complexes, and modulators of translation. Thus, the transcription elongation complex Paf1, the histone methylase Set1-COMPASS, and the translation-related Trm112 dimers are all involved in full expression of Ctt1-GFP and in wild-type tolerance to peroxides.

  9. Integrin-linked kinase mediates the hydrogen peroxide-dependent transforming growth factor-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ramos, M; de Frutos, S; Griera, M; Luengo, A; Olmos, G; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Calleros, L; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2013-08-01

    Transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) has been recognized as a central mediator in many pathological events related to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins accumulation, where their locally increased expression has been implicated in the fibrosis process of numerous organs, including glomerular fibrosis in the kidney. We and others have reported the TGF-β1 synthesis regulation by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and moreover we also described the implication of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in the AP-1-dependent TGF-β1 up-regulation. Thus, we propose here that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent TGF-β1 regulation may be mediated by ILK activation. First we confirmed the increase in TGF-β1 expression in human mesangial cells (HMC) after treatment with H2O2 or with an alternative H2O2-generating system such as the glucose-oxidase enzyme (GOX). By using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and ELISA techniques, we demonstrate that extracellular H2O2 up-regulates TGF-β1 transcription, as well as increases TGF-β1 promoter activity. Furthermore, catalase-decreased intracellular H2O2 abolished TGF-β1 up-regulation. The use of pharmacological inhibitors as well as knockdown of ILK with small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated the implication of a PI3K/ILK/AKT/ERK MAPK signaling pathway axis in the H2O2-induced TGF-β1 overexpression. Finally, we explored the physiological relevance of these findings by treating HMC with angiotensin II, a known stimuli of H2O2 synthesis. Our results confirm the relevance of previous findings after a more physiological stimulus. In summary, our results provide evidence that ILK activity changes may act as a mechanism in response to different stimuli such as H2O2 in the induced TGF-β1 up-regulation in pathological or even physiological conditions.

  10. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  11. A bio-mimetic zinc/tau protein as an artificial catalase.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi, Kazem; Jasemi, Neda Sadat Kazemein; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Katuli, Fatemeh Hedayati; Yazdani, Fahimeh; Sartipnia, Nasrin; Moosavi, Mohammad Amin; Rahimi, Arash; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the catalase-like activity of monomeric tau protein was reported in the presence of of zinc (Zn(II)) ions at low pH value. Monomeric tau protein contains two SH groups that are a target of disulfide bond formation. However these SH groups are able to interact with Zn(II) ion at pH 7.2 which creates a thiol bond as a mimetic model of chloroperoxidase active site which performs catalase like activity at low pH. Zn(II)/tau protein complex decomposed H2O2 with a high rate (Vm) as well as an efficient turn oven number (kcat) at pH 3. This remarkable catalase like activity is may be attributed to the conformational reorientation of protein at low pH. Circular dichroism (CD) studies did not demonstrate any secondary structural changes of tau protein after addition of Zn(II) ions at pH 7.2. In addition, tau protein shows identical CD bands at pH 7.2 and 3. Moreover, fluorescence quenching of tau by Zn(II) at pH 7.2 was initiated by complex formation rather than by dynamic collision. A significant red shift (6nm) was observed in the emission maximum of the fluorescence spectra when the protein was dissolved at pH 3 compared to pH 7.2. This conformational change can provide information regarding the rearrangements of the protein structure and exposure of Cys-Zn(II) group to the solvent which induces easy access of active site to H2O2 molecules and corresponding enhanced catalytic activity of Zn(II)/tau protein complex. This study introduces tau protein as a bio-inspired high performing scaffold for transition metal encapsulation and introducing an engineered apoprotein-induced biomimetic enzyme.

  12. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Catalase Is Strongly Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival.

    PubMed

    Belotte, Jimmy; Fletcher, Nicole M; Saed, Mohammed G; Abusamaan, Mohammed S; Dyson, Gregory; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. Recent evidence demonstrates an association between enzymatic activity altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with human cancer susceptibility. We sought to evaluate the association of SNPs in key oxidant and antioxidant enzymes with increased risk and survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Individuals (n = 143) recruited were divided into controls, (n = 94): healthy volunteers, (n = 18), high-risk BRCA1/2 negative (n = 53), high-risk BRCA1/2 positive (n = 23) and ovarian cancer cases (n = 49). DNA was subjected to TaqMan SNP genotype analysis for selected oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. Of the seven selected SNP studied, no association with ovarian cancer risk (Pearson Chi-square) was found. However, a catalase SNP was identified as a predictor of ovarian cancer survival by the Cox regression model. The presence of this SNP was associated with a higher likelihood of death (hazard ratio (HR) of 3.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.149-11.836)) for ovarian cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significant median overall survival difference (108 versus 60 months, p<0.05) for those without the catalase SNP as compared to those with the SNP. Additionally, age at diagnosis greater than the median was found to be a significant predictor of death (HR of 2.78 (95% CI: 1.022-7.578)). This study indicates a strong association with the catalase SNP and survival of ovarian cancer patients, and thus may serve as a prognosticator.

  13. Gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci from dry cured Iberian ham and their enterotoxigenic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, M; Núñez, F; Córdoba, J J; Bermúdez, E; Asensio, M A

    1996-01-01

    Iberian ham is an uncooked, cured meat product ripened under natural uncontrolled conditions for 18 to 24 months. Gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci are the main microbial population in Iberian ham for most of the ripening time. Since some of these organisms are able to produce enterotoxins, adequate characterization and toxicological study are needed. For this, 1,327 gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci, isolated from Iberian hams at different stages and locations, were characterized by physiological and biochemical tests. Selected isolates were further characterized by guanine-cytosine (G+C) content and restriction enzyme analysis of genes coding for 16S rRNA. The toxigenic potential of these organisms was tested with specific DNA gene probes for staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B, C, and D and confirmed by semiquantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay. The majority of the isolates were identified as Staphylococcus spp. and Micrococcus spp. Non-identified gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci which were moderately halophilic and showed a 42 to 52% G+C content were detected. A great variety of staphylococcal strains were found within the different species at any sampling time. Two strains of Staphylococcus xylosus, one Staphylococcus cohnii strain, and four of the non-identified organisms with 42 to 52% G+C contents hybridized with some of the DNA probes for C and D staphylococcal enterotoxin genes. S. xylosus hybridizing with C-enterotoxin probe reacted with both C and D enterotoxins in the immunological test. In addition, enterotoxin D was confirmed in the nonidentified strains. Some toxigenic organisms were isolated from the final product, posing a health hazard for the consumer. PMID:8787389

  14. Peroxisomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: immunofluorescence analysis and import of catalase A into isolated peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Thieringer, R; Shio, H; Han, Y S; Cohen, G; Lazarow, P B

    1991-01-01

    To isolate peroxisomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a quality sufficient for in vitro import studies, we optimized the conditions for cell growth and for cell fractionation. Stability of the isolated peroxisomes was monitored by catalase latency and sedimentability of marker enzymes. It was improved by (i) using cells that were shifted to oleic acid medium after growth to stationary phase in glucose precultures, (ii) shifting the pH from 7.2 to 6.0 during cell fractionation, and (iii) carrying out equilibrium density centrifugation with Nycodenz containing 0.25 M sucrose throughout the gradient. A concentrated peroxisomal fraction was used for in vitro import of catalase A. After 2 h of incubation, 62% of the catalase was associated with, and 16% was imported into, the organelle in a protease-resistant fashion. We introduced immunofluorescence microscopy for S. cerevisiae peroxisomes, using antibodies against thiolase, which allowed us to identify even the extremely small organelles in glucose-grown cells. Peroxisomes from media containing oleic acid were larger in size, were greater in number, and had a more intense fluorescence signal. The peroxisomes were located, sometimes in clusters, in the cell periphery, often immediately adjacent to the plasma membrane. Systematic immunofluorescence observations of glucose-grown S. cerevisiae demonstrated that all such cells contained at least one and usually several very small peroxisomes despite the glucose repression. This finding fits a central prediction of our model of peroxisome biogenesis: peroxisomes form by division of preexisting peroxisomes; therefore, every cell must have at least one peroxisome if additional organelles are to be induced in that cell. Images PMID:1986244

  15. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  16. Catalase activity of cytochrome C oxidase assayed with hydrogen peroxide-sensitive electrode microsensor.

    PubMed

    Bolshakov, I A; Vygodina, T V; Gennis, R; Karyakin, A A; Konstantinov, A A

    2010-11-01

    An iron-hexacyanide-covered microelectrode sensor has been used to continuously monitor the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition catalyzed by oxidized cytochrome oxidase. At cytochrome oxidase concentration ~1 µM, the catalase activity behaves as a first order process with respect to peroxide at concentrations up to ~300-400 µM and is fully blocked by heat inactivation of the enzyme. The catalase (or, rather, pseudocatalase) activity of bovine cytochrome oxidase is characterized by a second order rate constant of ~2·10(2) M(-1)·sec(-1) at pH 7.0 and room temperature, which, when divided by the number of H2O2 molecules disappearing in one catalytic turnover (between 2 and 3), agrees reasonably well with the second order rate constant for H2O2-dependent conversion of the oxidase intermediate F(I)-607 to F(II)-580. Accordingly, the catalase activity of bovine oxidase may be explained by H2O2 procession in the oxygen-reducing center of the enzyme yielding superoxide radicals. Much higher specific rates of H2O2 decomposition are observed with preparations of the bacterial cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The observed second order rate constants (up to ~3000 M(-1)·sec(-1)) exceed the rate constant of peroxide binding with the oxygen-reducing center of the oxidized enzyme (~500 M(-1)·sec(-1)) several-fold and therefore cannot be explained by catalytic reaction in the a(3)/Cu(B) site of the enzyme. It is proposed that in the bacterial oxidase, H2O2 can be decomposed by reacting with the adventitious transition metal ions bound by the polyhistidine-tag present in the enzyme, or by virtue of reaction with the tightly-bound Mn2+, which in the bacterial enzyme substitutes for Mg2+ present in the mitochondrial oxidase.

  17. Role of oxyR from Sinorhizobium meliloti in regulating the expression of catalases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Qi, Ming-Sheng; Yao, Shi-Yi; Cheng, Hai-Ping; Zhu, Jia-Bi; Yu, Guan-Qiao

    2005-06-01

    The process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation results in the generation of reactive oxygen species such as the superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The response of rhizobia to these toxic oxygen species is an important factor in nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, one oxyR homologue and three catalase genes, katA, katB, and katC were detected by sequence analysis. This oxyR gene is located next to and divergently from katA on the chromosome. To investigate the possible roles of oxyR in regulating the expression of catalases at the transcriptional level in S. meliloti, an insertion mutant of this gene was constructed. The mutant was more sensitive and less adaptive to H2O2 than the wild type strain, and total catalase/peroxidase activity was reduced approximately fourfold with the OxyR mutation relative to controls. The activities of KatA and KatB and the expression of katA::lacZ and katB::lacZ promoter fusions were increased in the mutant strain compared with the parental strain grown in the absence of H2O2, indicating that katA and katB are repressed by OxyR. However, when exposed to H2O2, katA expression was also increased in both S. meliloti and Escherichia coli. When exposed to H2O2, OxyR is converted from a reduced to an oxidized form in E. coli. We concluded that the reduced form of OxyR functions as a repressor of katA and katB expression. Thus, in the presence of H2O2, reduced OxyR is converted to the oxidized form of OxyR that then results in increased katA expression. We further showed that oxyR expression is autoregulated via negative feedback.

  18. Post-transcriptional regulator Hfq binds catalase HPII: crystal structure of the complex.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kageyama, Yuko; Hirata, Kunio; Yamamoto, Masaki; Maki-Yonekura, Saori

    2013-01-01

    We report a crystal structure of Hfq and catalase HPII from Escherichia coli. The post-transcriptional regulator Hfq plays a key role in the survival of bacteria under stress. A small non-coding RNA (sRNA) DsrA is required for translation of the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, which is the central regulator of the general stress response. Hfq facilitates efficient translation of rpoS mRNA, which encodes RpoS. Hfq helps in the function of other specific proteins involved in RNA processing, indicating its versatility in the cell. However, structural information regarding its interactions with partners is missing. Here we obtained crystals of Hfq and HPII complexes from cell lysates following attempts to overexpress a foreign membrane protein. HPII is one of two catalases in E. coli and its mRNA is transcribed by an RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing RpoS, which in turn is under positive control of small non-coding RNAs and of the RNA chaperone Hfq. This sigma factor is known to have a pronounced effect on the expression of HPII. The crystal structure reveals that a Hfq hexamer binds each subunit of a HPII tetramer. Each subunit of the Hfq hexamer exhibits a unique binding mode with HPII. The hexamer of Hfq interacts via its distal surface. The proximal and distal surfaces are known to specifically bind different sRNAs, and binding of HPII could affect Hfq function. Hfq-HPII complexation has no effect on catalase HPII activity.

  19. Two temporally synthesized charge subunits interact to form the five isoforms of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, R N; Eising, R

    1990-01-01

    Five charge isoforms of tetrameric catalase were isolated from cotyledons of germinated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings. Denaturing isoelectric focusing of the individual isoforms in polyacrylamide gels indicated that isoforms A (most anodic) and E (most cathodic) consisted of one subunit of different charge, whereas isoforms B, C and D each consisted of a mixture of these two subunits. Thus the five isoforms apparently were formed through combinations of two subunits in different ratios. Labelling cotyledons in vivo with [35S]methionine at three daily intervals in the dark, and translation in vivo of polyadenylated RNA isolated from cotyledons at the same ages, revealed synthesis of two different subunits. One of the subunits was synthesized in cotyledons at all ages studied (days 1-3), whereas the other subunit was detected only at days 2 and 3. This differential expression of two catalase subunits helped explain previous results from this laboratory showing that the two anodic forms (A and B) found in maturing seeds were supplemented with three cathodic forms (C-E) after the seeds germinated. These subunit data also helped clarify our new findings that proteins of isoforms A, B and C (most active isoforms) accumulated in cotyledons of plants kept in the dark for 3 days, then gradually disappeared during the next several days, whereas isoforms D and E (least active isoforms) remained in the cells. This shift in isoform pattern occurred whether seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to continuous light after day 3, although exposure to light enhanced this process. These sequential molecular events were responsible for the characteristic developmental changes (rise and fall) in total catalase activity. We believe that the isoform changeover is physiologically related to the changeover in glyoxysome to leaf-type-peroxisome metabolism. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1695843

  20. Epigenetic Silencing of the Key Antioxidant Enzyme Catalase in Karyotypically Abnormal Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konki, Mikko; Pasumarthy, Kalyan; Malonzo, Maia; Sainio, Annele; Valensisi, Cristina; Söderström, Mirva; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Stubb, Aki; Närvä, Elisa; Ghimire, Bishwa; Laiho, Asta; Järveläinen, Hannu; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Hawkins, R. David; Lund, Riikka J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenomic regulation is likely to be important in the maintenance of genomic integrity of human pluripotent stem cells, however, the mechanisms are unknown. We explored the epigenomes and transcriptomes of human pluripotent stem cells before and after spontaneous transformation to abnormal karyotypes and in correlation to cancer cells. Our results reveal epigenetic silencing of Catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress and DNA damage control in abnormal cells. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms associated with spontaneous transformation of human pluripotent stem cells towards malignant fate. The same mechanisms may control the genomic stability of cells in somatic tissues. PMID:26911679

  1. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution through catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović-Bijelić, A.; Bijelić, G.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.; Vukojević, V.

    2007-09-01

    By experimental investigations of the temperature dependence of catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase in the temperature range 278 328 K, different kinetic profiles for oxygen evolution were found below and above 298 K. Extension of the model is proposed to account for these observations. By numeric simulations of the reaction kinetics at different temperatures, it was found that enhanced evaporation of molecular oxygen from the reaction solution is the main root through which oxygen is lost at elevated temperatures in laboratory conditions.

  2. A catalase from the freshwater mussel Cristaria plicata with cloning, identification and protein characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xilan; Li, Gang; Wen, Chungen; Hu, Baoqing; Deng, Lirong; Pei, Pengzu; Xie, Yanhai

    2011-09-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant protein which can protect organisms against various oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. The catalase cDNA of Cristaria plicata (cpCAT) was cloned from the haemocytes using degenerate primers by the method of 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The gene is 4863 bp long and has a total of two introns and three exons. The precise size and location of the introns and exons have been determined. In addition the full-length cDNA of cpCAT contained 2618 bp, The cDNA contained a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 136 nucleotides, the 3' UTR of 979 bp with a canonical polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA and a polyA tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1503 bp, encoding 501 amino acid residues with 56.86 kDa predicted molecular weight. The theoretical isoelectric point was 6.77. BLAST analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of cpCAT had significant homology to catalases from animals, plants and bacteria. The deduced amino acid sequence of cpCAT had characteristic features of catalase family such as catalytic site motif (61FNRERIPERVVHAKGAG77), heme-ligand signature motif (351RLYSYSDTH359), two glycosylation sites (N145, N436), NADPH binding site and the three catalytic amino acid residues (His72, Asn145 and Tyr355). It had no signal peptide. The phylogenetic tree indicated that cpCAT gene was very close to the gene of scallops, Chlamys farreri. The enzymatic activity of purified recombinant cpCAT was 11194.4 ± 40.4 U/mg, it might resist against H(2)O(2). The recombinant enzyme held higher thermal stability, the optimum temperature was 25 °C, it retained more than 82% activity between 25 and 60 °C. The stability of the recombinant enzyme were higher between pH 5 and 10, and the optimal pH value was 7.0. When cpCAT was treated with 2-4 moL/L urea and 1%-3% SDS, the activity was also stable, it kept more than 80% activity.

  3. Dynamics of the reaction glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Číp, M.; Schreiberová, L.; Schreiber, I.

    2011-12-01

    Glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide reaction is one of the few known enzymatic systems studied in vitro in the field of nonlinear chemical dynamics. This reaction belongs to the family of oscillatory enzymatic reactions, which form a natural basis of oscillations in biological systems. A parametric study of dependence on mixing, temperature and initial concentrations of components in a batch stirred reactor was carried out. A newly proposed mathematical model of the reaction conforms to the obtained experimental data. Results of our experiments and simulations hint at further directions of research of non-linear dynamics in this reaction.

  4. Extraction of erythrocyte enzymes for the preparation of polyhemoglobin-catalase-superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jingsong; Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2009-01-01

    In sustained severe ischemia, reperfusion with oxygen carriers may result in ischemia-reperfusion injuries because of the release of damaging oxygen radicals. A nanobiotechnology-based polyhemogloin-calatase-superoxide dismutase can prevent this because the oxygen carrier, polyhemoglobin, is linked to antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase. However, these antioxidant enzymes come from nonhuman sources and recombinant human enzymes are expensive. This paper describes our study on extracting these enzymes from red blood cells and analyzing the amount of enzymes needed for adequate protection from ischemia-reperfusion.

  5. The effect of catalase amplification on immortal lens epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Spector, A; Ma, W; Wang, R R; Larsen, K; Kleiman, N J

    1998-12-01

    Utilizing a human beta-actin promoter, a catalase cDNA expression vector was constructed. This construct was used to transfect two immortal cell lines, mouse alpha TN4-1 and rabbit N/N 1003A. The catalase activity was increased about 3.4 fold in the alpha TN4-1 cells and 38 fold in the N/N 1003A cells. Some changes in other enzyme activities were also observed as a result of the transfections. Surprisingly, the ability to degrade H2O2 in the extracellular environment of the cells did not markedly change as a result of the catalase amplification. However, the ability to resist H2O2 stress was dramatically altered. Non-protein thiol (NP-SH) levels, choline uptake and glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activity were all markedly decreased in the non-transfected cells when they were subjected to 300 microM H2O2. However, in both transfected cell lines, these parameters remained in the normal range during H2O2 stress. The results obtained upon observing aspects of DNA metabolism were more complicated. While on H2O2 stress, non-transfected cell lines showed a marked decrease in thymidine incorporation, only the transfected alpha TN4-1 line remained in the normal range. Thymidine incorporation in transfected rabbit N/N 1003A cells was decreased compared to normal cells. In contrast, studies on single strand DNA breaks indicated that transfected rabbit cells had little damage compared to the significant DNA damage observed in the normal cells. The normal N/N 1003A cells were also much more susceptible to H2O2 induced damage than normal alpha TN4-1 cells, suggesting that the high GSH peroxidase activity observed in the rabbit cells may be detrimental since the low glutathione reductase activity in such cells results in an accelerated depletion of glutathione. The overall results suggest that augmenting lens catalase may prevent cataract development caused by H2O2 stress.

  6. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  7. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  8. Intracellular antioxidant enzymes are not globally upregulated during hibernation in the major oxidative tissues of the 13-lined ground squirrel Spermophilus tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Peters, Craig W; Staples, James F; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Hibernating mammals exhibit oxidative stress resistance in brain, liver and other tissues. In many animals, cellular oxidative stress resistance is associated with enhanced expression of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Intracellular antioxidant capacity may be upregulated during hibernation to protect against oxidative damage associated with the ischemia-reperfusion that occurs during transitions between torpor and arousal. We tested the hypothesis that the 13-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), upregulates intracellular antioxidant enzymes in major oxidative tissues during hibernation. The two major intracellular isoforms of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and CuZnSOD), which catalyze the first step in superoxide detoxification, were quantified in heart, brain and liver tissue using immunodetection and an in-gel activity assay. However, no differences in SOD protein expression or activity were found between active and hibernating squirrels. Measurements of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, which catalyze hydrogen peroxide removal, were not broadly upregulated during hibernation. The activity of catalase, which catalyzes an alternative hydrogen peroxide detoxification pathway, was higher in heart and brain of torpid squirrels, but lower in liver. Taken together, these data do not support the hypothesis that hibernation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress resistance due to an upregulation of intracellular antioxidant enzymes in the major oxidative tissues.

  9. Hypoxia Up-Regulates Galectin-3 in Mammary Tumor Progression and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Barros, Rita; Gomes, Catarina; de Matos, Augusto J; Reis, Celso A; Rutteman, Gerard R; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment encompasses several stressful conditions for cancer cells such as hypoxia, oxidative stress and pH alterations. Galectin-3, a well-studied member of the beta-galactoside-binding animal family of lectins has been implicated in multiple steps of metastasis as cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, promotion of angiogenesis, cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. However, both its aberrantly up- and down-regulated expression was observed in several types of cancer. Thus, the mechanisms that regulate galectin-3 expression in neoplastic settings are not clear. In order to demonstrate the putative role of hypoxia in regulating galectin-3 expression in canine mammary tumors (CMT), in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. In malignant CMT cells, hypoxia was observed to induce expression of galectin-3, a phenomenon that was almost completely prevented by catalase treatment of CMT-U27 cells. Increased galectin-3 expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Under hypoxic conditions the expression of galectin-3 shifts from a predominant nuclear location to cytoplasmic and membrane expressions. In in vivo studies, galectin-3 was overexpressed in hypoxic areas of primary tumors and well-established metastases. Tumor hypoxia thus up-regulates the expression of galectin-3, which may in turn increase tumor aggressiveness.

  10. N-glycosylation-negative catalase: a useful tool for exploring the role of hydrogen peroxide in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lortz, S; Lenzen, S; Mehmeti, I

    2015-03-01

    Disulfide bond formation during protein folding of nascent proteins is associated with the generation of H2O2 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Approaches to quantifying H2O2 directly within the ER failed because of the oxidative environment in the ER lumen, and ER-specific catalase expression to detoxify high H2O2 concentrations resulted in an inactive protein owing to N-glycosylation. Therefore, the N-glycosylation motifs at asparagine-244 and -439 of the human catalase protein were deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. The ER-targeted expression of these variants revealed that the deletion of the N-glycosylation motif only at asparagine-244 (N244) was associated with the maintenance of full enzymatic activity in the ER. Expression of catalase N244 in the ER (ER-Catalase N244) was ER-specific and protected the cells significantly against exogenously added H2O2. With the expression of ER-Catalase N244, a highly effective H2O2 inactivation within the ER was achieved for the first time. Catalase has a high H2O2-inactivation capacity without the need of reducing cofactors, which might interfere with the ER redox homeostasis, and is not involved in protein folding. With these characteristics ER-Catalase N244 is an ideal tool to explore the impact of ER-generated H2O2 on the generation of disulfide bonds or to study the induction of ER-stress pathways through protein folding overload and accumulation of H2O2.

  11. Antioxidant catalase rescues against high fat diet-induced cardiac dysfunction via an IKKβ-AMPK-dependent regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lei; Shou, Xi-Ling; Zhao, Hai-Kang; Ren, Gu-Qun; Wang, Jian-Bang; Wang, Xi-Hui; Ai, Wen-Ting; Maris, Jackie R; Hueckstaedt, Lindsay K; Ma, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Yingmei

    2015-02-01

    Autophagy, a conservative degradation process for long-lived and damaged proteins, participates in a variety of biological processes including obesity. However, the precise mechanism of action behind obesity-induced changes in autophagy still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the role of the antioxidant catalase in high fat diet-induced changes in cardiac geometry and function as well as the underlying mechanism of action involved with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of catalase were fed low or high fat diet for 20 weeks prior to assessment of myocardial geometry and function. High fat diet intake triggered obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, the effects of which were unaffected by catalase transgene. Myocardial geometry and function were compromised with fat diet intake as manifested by cardiac hypertrophy, enlarged left ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte contractile capacity and intracellular Ca²⁺ mishandling, the effects of which were ameliorated by catalase. High fat diet intake promoted reactive oxygen species production and suppressed autophagy in the heart, the effects of which were attenuated by catalase. High fat diet intake dampened phosphorylation of inhibitor kappa B kinase β(IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) while promoting phosphorylation of mTOR, the effects of which were ablated by catalase. In vitro study revealed that palmitic acid compromised cardiomyocyte autophagy and contractile function in a manner reminiscent of fat diet intake, the effect of which was significantly alleviated by inhibition of IKKβ, activation of AMPK and induction of autophagy. Taken together, our data revealed that the antioxidant catalase counteracts against high fat diet-induced cardiac geometric and functional anomalies possibly via an IKKβ-AMPK-dependent restoration of myocardial

  12. Distribution of a Nocardia brasiliensis Catalase Gene Fragment in Members of the Genera Nocardia, Gordona, and Rhodococcus

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Johnson, Wendy M.; Welsh, Oliverio; Resendiz-Uresti, Francisco L.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.

    1999-01-01

    An immunodominant protein from Nocardia brasiliensis, P61, was subjected to amino-terminal and internal sequence analysis. Three sequences of 22, 17, and 38 residues, respectively, were obtained and compared with the protein database from GenBank by using the BLAST system. The sequences showed homology to some eukaryotic catalases and to a bromoperoxidase-catalase from Streptomyces violaceus. Its identity as a catalase was confirmed by analysis of its enzymatic activity on H2O2 and by a double-staining method on a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and ferricyanide; the result showed only catalase activity, but no peroxidase. By using one of the internal amino acid sequences and a consensus catalase motif (VGNNTP), we were able to design a PCR assay that generated a 500-bp PCR product. The amplicon was analyzed, and the nucleotide sequence was compared to the GenBank database with the observation of high homology to other bacterial and eukaryotic catalases. A PCR assay based on this target sequence was performed with primers NB10 and NB11 to confirm the presence of the NB10-NB11 gene fragment in several N. brasiliensis strains isolated from mycetoma. The same assay was used to determine whether there were homologous sequences in several type strains from the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordona, and Streptomyces. All of the N. brasiliensis strains presented a positive result but only some of the actinomycetes species tested were positive in the PCR assay. In order to confirm these findings, genomic DNA was subjected to Southern blot analysis. A 1.7-kbp band was observed in the N. brasiliensis strains, and bands of different molecular weight were observed in cross-reacting actinomycetes. Sequence analysis of the amplicons of selected actinomycetes showed high homology in this catalase fragment, thus demonstrating that this protein is highly conserved in this group of bacteria. PMID:10325357

  13. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by benzo(a)pyrene ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Schults, Marten A; Chiu, Roland K; Nagle, Peter W; Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification attenuates underlying relationships. Conversely, ex vivo studies offer the advantage of controlled exposure settings, allowing the possibility to better elucidate genotype-phenotype relationships and gene-gene interactions. Therefore, we exposed lymphocytes of 168 non-smoking volunteers ex vivo to the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and BaP-related DNA adducts were quantified. Thirty-four genetic polymorphisms were assessed in genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, oxidative stress and DNA repair. Polymorphisms in catalase (CAT, rs1001179) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1, rs1800440) were significantly associated with DNA adduct levels, especially when combined. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in a subset of 30 subjects revealed that expression of catalase correlated strongly with expression of CYP1B1 (R = 0.92, P < 0.001). To further investigate the mechanism by which catalase influences CYP1B1 and how they simultaneously affect BaP-related DNA adduct levels, catalase expression was transiently knocked down in the human lung epithelial cell line A549. Although catalase knockdown did not immediately change CYP1B1 gene expression, recovery of catalase expression 8 h after the knockdown coincided with a 2.2-fold increased expression of CYP1B1 (P < 0.05). We conclude that the genetic polymorphism in the promoter region of CAT may determine the amount and activity of catalase, which may subsequently regulate the expression of CYP1B1. As a result, both genetic polymorphisms modulate DNA adduct levels in lymphocytes by BaP ex vivo.

  14. Prevention of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury by pre-administration of catalase-expressing adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Ushitora, Masahiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Nakamura, Shin-ichiro; Kondoh, Masuo; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-19

    Liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is mainly caused by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the reperfusion, remains an important clinical problem associated with liver transplantation and major liver surgery. Therefore, ROS should be detoxified to prevent hepatic I/R-induced injury. Delivery of antioxidant genes into liver is considered to be promising for prevention of hepatic I/R injury; however, therapeutic effects of antioxidant gene transfer to the liver have not been fully examined. The aim of this study was to examine whether adenovirus (Ad) vector-mediated catalase gene transfer in the liver is an effective approach for scavenging ROS and preventing hepatic I/R injury. Intravenous administration of Ad vectors expressing catalase, which is an antioxidant enzyme scavenging H(2)O(2), resulted in a significant increase in catalase activity in the liver. Pre-injection of catalase-expressing Ad vectors dramatically prevented I/R-induced elevation in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, and hepatic necrosis. The livers were also protected in another liver injury model, CCl(4)-induced liver injury, by catalase-expressing Ad vectors. Furthermore, the survival rates of mice subjected to both partial hepatectomy and I/R treatment were improved by pre-injection of catalase-expressing Ad vectors. On the other hand, control Ad vectors expressing beta-galactosidase did not show any significant preventive effects in the liver on the models of I/R-induced or CCl(4)-induced hepatic injury described above. These results indicate that hepatic delivery of the catalase gene by Ad vectors is a promising approach for the prevention of oxidative stress-induced liver injury.

  15. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and. alpha. -tocopherol content of stored potato tubers. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Spychalla, J.P.; Desborough, S.L. )

    1990-11-01

    Activated oxygen or oxygen free radical mediated damage to plants has been established or implicated in many plant stress situations. The extent of activated oxygen damage to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during low temperature storage and long-term storage is not known. Quantitation of oxygen free radical mediated damage in plant tissues is difficult. However, it is comparatively easy to quantitate endogenous antioxidants, which detoxify potentially damaging forms of activated oxygen. Three tuber antioxidants, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol were assayed from four potato cultivars stored at 3{degree}C and 9{degree}C for 40 weeks. Tubers stored at 3{degree}C demonstrated increased superoxide dismutase activities (up to 72%) compared to tubers stored at 9{degree}C. Time dependent increases in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol occurred during the course of the 40 week storage. The possible relationship between these increases in antioxidants and the rate of activated oxygen production in the tubers is discussed.

  16. Evaluation of the catalase promoter for expressing the alkaline xylanase gene (alx) in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchika; Katoch, Meenu; Govindappa, Nagraj; Srivastava, P S; Sastry, Kedarnath N; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi

    2012-02-01

    Aspergillus niger represents a promising host for the expression of recombinant proteins, but only a few expression systems are available for this organism. In this study, the inducible catalase promoter (PcatR) from A. niger was characterized. For this, constructs were developed and checked for the expression of the alkaline xylanase gene transcriptionally fused under the cat R promoter. Two versions of the catalase (catR) promoter sequence from A. niger (P(cat300,) P(cat924)) were isolated and tested for their ability to drive expression of the alkaline xylanase (alx) gene. P(cat924) showed better efficiency (more than 10-fold increase in AlX activity compared to P(cat300)) under the optimized culture conditions. Induction of the catR promoter with 0.20% H(2)O(2) and 1.5% CaCO(3) in the culture medium, further increased expression of AlX 2.61- and 2.20-fold, respectively, clarifying its inducible nature. Specific induction or repression of the catR promoter provides the possibility for utilization of this promoter in heterologous protein production.

  17. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Catalase Gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Zheng, Xingfei; Diao, Ying; Wang, Youwei; Zhou, Mingquan; Hu, Zhongli

    2015-11-01

    Rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) assay was established to achieve the complete cDNA sequence of a catalase gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera. The obtained full-length cDNA was 1666 bp in size and contained a 1476-bp open reading frame. The 3D structural model of NnCAT was constructed by homology modeling. The putative NnCAT possessed all the main characteristic amino acid residues and motifs of catalase (CAT) protein family, and the phylogenetic analysis revealed that NnCAT grouped together with high plants. Moreover, recombinant NnCAT showed the CAT activity (758 U/mg) at room temperature, holding high activity during temperature range of 20-50 °C, then the optimal pH of recombinant protein was assessed from pH 4 to pH 11. Additionally, real-time PCR assay demonstrated that NnCAT mRNA was expressed in various tissues of N. nucifera, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest level in the root, and mRNA level of NnCAT was significantly augmented in response to short-time mechanical wounding. Different expression pattern of NnCAT gene suggested that NnCAT probably played a defensive role in the initial stages of oxidative stress, regulating the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by extracellular stimuli such as short-time mechanical wounding.

  18. Sulfheme formation during homocysteine S-oxygenation by catalase in cancers and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Padovani, Dominique; Hessani, Assia; Castillo, Francine T.; Liot, Géraldine; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Lan, Annaïg; Pilati, Camilla; Blachier, François; Sen, Suvajit; Galardon, Erwan; Artaud, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that abnormal levels of homocysteine are associated with vascular dysfunctions, cancer cell proliferation and various neurodegenerative diseases. With respect to the latter, a perturbation of transition metal homeostasis and an inhibition of catalase bioactivity have been reported. Herein, we report on some of the molecular bases for the cellular toxicity of homocysteine and demonstrate that it induces the formation of sulfcatalase, an irreversible inactive state of the enzyme, without the intervention of hydrogen sulfide. Initially, homocysteine reacts with native catalase and/or redox-active transition metal ions to generate thiyl radicals that mediate compound II formation, a temporarily inactive state of the enzyme. Then, the ferryl centre of compound II intervenes into the unprecedented S-oxygenation of homocysteine to engender the corresponding sulfenic acid species that further participates into the prosthetic heme modification through the formation of an unusual Fe(II) sulfonium. In addition, our ex cellulo studies performed on cancer cells, models of neurodegenerative diseases and ulcerative colitis suggest the likelihood of this scenario in a subset of cancer cells, as well as in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease. Our findings expand the repertoire of heme modifications promoted by biological compounds and point out another deleterious trait of disturbed homocysteine levels that could participate in the aetiology of these diseases. PMID:27848965

  19. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Effraimidou, Styliani; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 as a model, we investigated the impact of the culturing temperature on mild-oxidative-stress-induced (cross-)protection toward multiple stresses, including severe oxidative, heat, and acid stresses. Culturing at a refrigeration temperature (7°C) compared to the optimal growth temperature (30°C) affected both the robustness level of B. weihenstephanensis and the oxidative stress adaptive response. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species have a crucial role in adaptation to oxidative stresses, and this points to a possible predictive role in mild-oxidative-stress-induced robustness. Therefore, the catalase activity was determined upon mild oxidative stress treatment and was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with the robustness level of mild-stress-treated cells toward severe oxidative and heat stresses but not toward severe acid stress for cells grown at both refrigeration and optimal temperatures. The quantified correlations supported the predictive quality of catalase activity as a biomarker and also underlined that the predictive quality is stress specific. Biomarkers that are able to predict stress-induced enhanced robustness can be used to better understand stress adaptation mechanisms and might allow the design of effective combinations of hurdles to control microbial behavior.

  20. Temperature-dependent requirement for catalase in aerobic growth of Listeria monocytogenes F2365.

    PubMed

    Azizoglu, Reha Onur; Kathariou, Sophia

    2010-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, psychrotrophic, facultative intracellular food-borne pathogen responsible for severe illness (listeriosis). The bacteria can grow in a wide range of temperatures (1 to 45°C), and low-temperature growth contributes to the food safety hazards associated with contamination of ready-to-eat foods with this pathogen. To assess the impact of oxidative stress responses on the ability of L. monocytogenes to grow at low temperatures and to tolerate repeated freeze-thaw stress (cryotolerance), we generated and characterized a catalase-deficient mutant of L. monocytogenes F2365 harboring a mariner-based transposon insertion in the catalase gene (kat). When grown aerobically on blood-free solid medium, the kat mutant exhibited impaired growth, with the extent of impairment increasing with decreasing temperature, and no growth was detected at 4°C. Aerobic growth in liquid was impaired at 4°C, especially under aeration, but not at higher temperatures (10, 25, or 37°C). Genetic complementation of the mutant with the intact kat restored normal growth, confirming that inactivation of this gene was responsible for the growth impairment. In spite of the expected impact of oxidative stress responses on cryotolerance, cryotolerance of the kat mutant was not affected.

  1. Catalase and lipid peroxidation values in serum of Tunisian patients with pemphigus vulgaris and foliaceus.

    PubMed

    Abida, Olfa; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Gargouri, Bochra; Ben Ayed, Mourad; Masmoudi, Abderrahmen; Turki, Hamida; Masmoudi, Hatem; Lassoued, Saloua

    2012-12-01

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune disorder resulting from the interaction between autoantibodies and desmoglein. Oxidative stress seems to be responsible for the onset/aggravation of many human diseases. Actually, it is considered as one of the several factors for the etiopathogenesis of pemphigus. The present study aims to evaluate the oxidative state in the sera of pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus patients by assessing lipid peroxidation, proteins oxidation, and antioxidant enzyme activity. This study included 36 pemphigus vulgaris and 42 pemphigus foliaceus patients as well as a group of controls consisting of 78 healthy volunteers. Malondialdehyde levels (p < 0.001) and catalase activity (p < 0.001) are higher in both groups of patients than in the control group. The two groups of patients showed a nonsignificant decrease in the thiol groups compared with the healthy one. A nonsignificant difference was shown between pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus patients, except for the catalase which shows an increase in the pemphigus vulgaris group. We have also found significant correlations between serum oxidative stress marker levels and serum anti-desmoglein antibody levels in the two pemphigus groups. These findings underline the implication of oxidative stress in the physiopathology of pemphigus by the increase in the autoantibodies' reactivity.

  2. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  3. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  4. Cyanobacterial Mn-catalase ‘KatB’: Molecular link between salinity and oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Dhiman; Banerjee, Manisha; Waghmare, Namrata; Ballal, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Catalases are ubiquitous enzymes that detoxify H2O2 in virtually all organisms exposed to oxygen. The filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC 7120, shows the presence of 2 genes (katA and katB) that encode Mn-catalases. We have recently shown that pre-treatment of Anabaena with NaCl causes substantial induction of the KatB protein, which consequently leads to increased oxidative stress resistance in that cyanobacterium. Interestingly, when compared to the wild-type, the katB mutant shows decreased growth and impaired photosynthetic activity in the presence of NaCl. Furthermore, the NaCl-treated katB mutant is extremely sensitive to H2O2. In this study, the ultrastructural changes occurring in the katB mutant and the wild-type Anabaena cells are analyzed to understand the cellular basis of the above-mentioned protective phenomena. Other data show that a wide variety of osmolytes induce katB expression in Anabaena, indicating that katB is a genuine osmo-inducible gene. These results have important biotechnological implications for the development of novel cyanobacterial biofertilzers and transgenic plants with improved resistance to salinity. PMID:27829979

  5. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide conversion to Isonicotinyl-NAD by catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Ben; Carpena, Xavi; Feliz, Miguel; Donald, Lynda J; Pons, Miquel; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2010-08-20

    Activation of the pro-drug isoniazid (INH) as an anti-tubercular drug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis involves its conversion to isonicotinyl-NAD, a reaction that requires the catalase-peroxidase KatG. This report shows that the reaction proceeds in the absence of KatG at a slow rate in a mixture of INH, NAD(+), Mn(2+), and O(2), and that the inclusion of KatG increases the rate by >7 times. Superoxide, generated by either Mn(2+)- or KatG-catalyzed reduction of O(2), is an essential intermediate in the reaction. Elimination of the peroxidatic process by mutation slows the rate of reaction by 60% revealing that the peroxidatic process enhances, but is not essential for isonicotinyl-NAD formation. The isonicotinyl-NAD(*+) radical is identified as a reaction intermediate, and its reduction by superoxide is proposed. Binding sites for INH and its co-substrate, NAD(+), are identified for the first time in crystal complexes of Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase with INH and NAD(+) grown by co-crystallization. The best defined INH binding sites were identified, one in each subunit, on the opposite side of the protein from the entrance to the heme cavity in a funnel-shaped channel. The NAD(+) binding site is approximately 20 A from the entrance to the heme cavity and involves interactions primarily with the AMP portion of the molecule in agreement with the NMR saturation transfer difference results.

  6. Identification and characteristic analysis of the catalase gene from Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyao; Li, Yahong; Wang, Junxiu; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Tao; Dong, Wei; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2016-09-01

    Catalase (CAT) is a ubiquitous antioxidant enzyme in almost all living organisms exposed to atmosphere, which involved in decomposing harmful hydrogen peroxide, into oxygen and water. In this study, a full-length cDNA (1524bp) encoding the catalase gene (LmCAT) from Locusta migratoria was cloned (accession number KT716445). The open reading frame of the LmCAT gene encoded 507 amino acids and shared 57.8%-97.8% amino acid identities with other insect CATs. The coding region was interrupted by 9 introns, while its promoter region contained 15 putative binding sites for 5 kinds of transcriptional regulation factors. For the stage-specific expression profile, LmCAT was highly expressed in the fourth-instar nymphs. For the tissue-specific expression profile, the LmCAT transcripts were highest in the fat bodies, and relatively abundant in the gastric caecum, Malpighian tubules, ovary and integument. Moreover, the result showed that quercetin could significantly induce the expression level of LmCAT. The expression of LmCAT could be silenced by RNAi, but the moralities were not significantly different between control and RNAi groups. Our results would provide valuable information for further study on the ROS regulation mechanism in insect.

  7. Catalase plays a key role in salt stress acclimation induced by hydrogen peroxide pretreatment in maize.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Franklin Aragão; Gomes-Filho, Enéas; Costa, José Hélio; Mendes Alencar, Nara Lídia; Prisco, José Tarquinio

    2012-07-01

    Pretreatment in plants is recognized as a valuable strategy to stimulate plant defenses, leading to better plant development. This study evaluated the effects of H₂O₂ leaf spraying pretreatment on plant growth and investigated the antioxidative mechanisms involved in the response of maize plants to salt stress. It was found that salinity reduced maize seedling growth when compared to control conditions, and H₂O₂ foliar spraying was effective in minimizing this effect. Analysis of the antioxidative enzymes catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), guaiacol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.1) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) revealed that H₂O₂ spraying increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Catalase (CAT) was the most responsive of these enzymes to H₂O₂, with higher activity early (48 h) in the treatment, while guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were responsive only at later stages (240 h) of treatment. Increased CAT activity appears linked to gene expression regulation. Lower malondialdehyde levels were detected in plants with higher CAT activity, which may result from the protective function of this enzyme. Overall, we can conclude that pretreatment with H₂O₂ leaf spraying was able to reduce the deleterious effects of salinity on seedling growth and lipid peroxidation. These responses could be attributed to the ability of H₂O₂ to induce antioxidant defenses, especially CAT activity.

  8. Motor-based microprobe powered by bio-assembled catalase for motion detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuzhe; Fu, Shizhe; Wu, Jie; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-01-15

    A motor-based microprobe is proposed using a tubular microengine powered by bio-assembled enzyme as catalyst and exploited for washing-free detection of DNA through motion readout. The microprobe is fabricated by assembling a catalase layer on the inner surface of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Au (PEDOT/Au) microtube through DNA conjugate, which is responsible for the biocatalytic bubble propulsion. The sensing concept of the microprobe relies on the target-induced release of catalase through the DNA strand-replacement hybridization, which decreases the amount of enzyme assembled on microtube to slow down the movement of the microprobe. Therefore, the motion speed is negatively correlated with the target concentration. At the optimal conditions, the microprobe can conveniently distinguish the concentration of specific DNA in a range of 0.5-10µM without any washing and separation step. This microprobe can be prepared in batch with good reproducibility and stability, and its motion speed can be conveniently visualized by optical microscope. The proposed motor-based microprobe and its dynamic sensing method provide a novel platform for the development of intelligent microprobe and clinical diagnostic strategy.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition by a non-heme iron(III) catalase mimic: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Sicking, Willi; Korth, Hans-Gert; Jansen, Georg; de Groot, Herbert; Sustmann, Reiner

    2007-01-01

    Non-heme iron(III) complexes of 14-membered tetraaza macrocycles have previously been found to catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, like the native enzyme catalase. Here the mechanism of this reaction is theoretically investigated by DFT calculations at the (U)B3LYP/6-31G* level, with focus on the reactivity of the possible spin states of the FeIII complexes. The computations suggest that H2O2 decomposition follows a homolytic route with intermediate formation of an iron(IV) oxo radical cation species (L.+FeIV==O) that resembles Compound I of natural iron porphyrin systems. Along the whole catalytic cycle, no significant energetic differences were found for the reaction proceeding on the doublet (S=1/2) or on the quartet (S=3/2) hypersurface, with the single exception of the rate-determining O--O bond cleavage of the first associated hydrogen peroxide molecule, for which reaction via the doublet state is preferred. The sextet (S=5/2) state of the FeIII complexes appears to be unreactive in catalase-like reactions.

  10. The effect of deep eutectic solvents on catalytic function and structure of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Harifi-Mood, Ali Reza; Ghobadi, Roohollah; Divsalar, Adeleh

    2017-02-01

    Aqueous solutions of reline and glyceline, the most common deep eutectic solvents, were used as a medium for Catalase reaction. By some spectroscopic methods such as UV-vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) function and structure of Catalase were investigated in aqueous solutions of reline and glyceline. These studies showed that the binding affinity of the substrate to the enzyme increased in the presence of 100mM glyceline solution, which contrasts with reline solution that probably relates to instructive changes in secondary structure of protein. Meanwhile, enzyme remained nearly 70% and 80% active in this concentration of glyceline and reline solutions respectively. In the high concentration of DES solutions, enzyme became mainly inactive but surprisingly stayed in nearly 40% active in choline chloride solution, which is the common ion species in reline and glyceline solvents. It is proposed that the chaotropic nature of choline cation might stop the reducing trend of activity in concentrated choline chloride solutions but this instructive effect is lost in aqueous deep eutectic solvents. In this regard, the presence of various concentrations of deep eutectic solvents in the aqueous media of human cells would be an activity adjuster for this important enzyme in its different operation conditions.

  11. Ability of recombinant human catalase to suppress inflammation of the murine lung induced by influenza A.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xunlong; Shi, Zhihui; Huang, Hai; Zhu, Hongguang; Zhou, Pei; Zhu, Haiyan; Ju, Dianwen

    2014-06-01

    Influenza A virus pandemics and emerging antiviral resistance highlight the urgent need for novel generic pharmacological strategies that reduce both viral replication and inflammation of the lung. We have previously investigated the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human catalase (rhCAT) against viral pneumonia in mice, but the protection mechanisms involved were not explored. In the present study, we have performed a more in-depth analysis covering survival, lung inflammation, immune cell responses, production of cytokines, and inflammation signaling pathways in mice. Male imprinting control region mice were infected intranasally with high pathogenicity (H1N1) influenza A virus followed by treatment with recombinant human catalase. The administration of rhCAT resulted in a significant reduction in inflammatory cell infiltration (e.g., macrophages and neutrophils), inflammatory cytokine levels (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ), the level of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 chemokine and the mRNA levels of toll-like receptors TLR-4, TLR-7, and NF-κB, as well as partially maintaining the activity of the antioxidant enzymes system. These findings indicated that rhCAT might play a key protective role in viral pneumonia of mice via suppression of inflammatory immune responses.

  12. Fructose protects baker's yeast against peroxide stress: potential role of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Semchyshyn, Halyna M; Lozinska, Liudmyla M

    2012-11-01

    The negative effects of fructose due to its chronic consumption are well documented, while short-term application of fructose is found to protect different types of cells against oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are suggested to mediate both the cytotoxic and defensive effects. Here, we compare the influence of glucose and fructose on yeast under H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Under control conditions, fructose-grown comparing with glucose-grown yeast demonstrated higher metabolic activity and ROS level. Therefore, fructose was suggested to provoke a mild stress that resulted in the acquisition of cellular resistance to lethal challenges, which explained the higher survival of fructose-grown yeast under H(2)O(2)-induced shock. Exposure to H(2)O(2) increased ROS level in glucose-grown cells, whereas it decreased the ROS level in fructose-grown cells. Hydrogen peroxide activated superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in both the cell types studied, but glucose-grown cells demonstrated a sharp rise of the activities, while cells grown on fructose showed a broad peak of activation. Thus, fructose is likely to protect the antioxidant enzymes against their inactivation by H(2)O(2). Despite a different type of the enzyme activation in both the studied cell types (glucose- and fructose-grown), a strong positive correlation between SOD and catalase was found. The physiological meaning of this relationship and possible mechanisms of the fructose protective effect are discussed.

  13. Catalytic activity of catalase under strong magnetic fields of up to 8 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Iwasaka, M.

    1996-04-01

    The question of whether or not magnetic fields affect enzymatic activity is of considerable interest in biomagnetics and biochemistry. This study focuses on whether magnetically related enzymatic activities can be affected by magnetic fields. We examined the effect of magnetic fields of up to 8 T on catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We observed changes in absorbance of reaction mixture of hydrogen peroxide and catalase at 240 nm, during and after magnetic field exposures. When the reaction mixture was not treated with nitrogen-gas bubbling, it was observed that the initial reaction rate of the reaction which was exposed to magnetic fields of up to 8 T was 50%-85% lower than the control data. This magnetic field effect was not observed, however, when the reaction mixture was bubbled with nitrogen gas to remove the dissolved oxygen molecules which were produced in the solution. We also measured concentration of dissolved oxygen which was produced by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the reaction mixture which was exposed to magnetic fields increased 20%-25% compared to the control solution. The results of the present study indicate that magnetic fields affect dynamic movement of oxygen bubbles which are produced in the reaction mixture by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, but not the catalytic activity of catalase itself.

  14. Copper suppresses abscisic acid catabolism and catalase activity, and inhibits seed germination of rice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Nenghui; Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Xu, Weifeng; Jing, Yu; Peng, Xinxiang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-11-01

    Although copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, a slight excess of Cu in soil can be harmful to plants. Unfortunately, Cu contamination is a growing problem all over the world due to human activities, and poses a soil stress to plant development. As one of the most important biological processes, seed germination is sensitive to Cu stress. However, little is known about the mechanism of Cu-induced inhibition of seed germination. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between Cu and ABA which is the predominant regulator of seed germination. Cu at a concentration of 30 µM effectively inhibited germination of rice caryopsis. ABA content in germinating seeds under copper stress was also higher than that under control conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that Cu treatment reduced the expression of OsABA8ox2, a key gene of ABA catabolism in rice seeds. In addition, both malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were increased by Cu stress in the germinating seeds. Antioxidant enzyme assays revealed that only catalase activity was reduced by excess Cu, which was consistent with the mRNA profile of OsCATa during seed germination under Cu stress. Together, our results demonstrate that suppression of ABA catabolism and catalase (CAT) activity by excess Cu leads to the inhibition of seed germination of rice.

  15. Important role of catalase in the cellular response of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation indirectly causes oxidative stress in cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals (OH(-)) generated by the radiolysis of water. We investigated how the catalase function was affected by ionizing radiation and analyzed the phenotype of mutants with a disrupted catalase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to radiation. The wild-type yeast strain and isogenic mutants with disrupted catalase genes were exposed to various doses of (60)Co gamma-rays. There was no difference between the wild-type strain and the cta1 disruption mutant following exposure to gamma-ray irradiation. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that this strain exhibited decreased survival on gamma-ray exposure compared with other strains. In all three strains, stationary phase cells were more tolerant to the exposure of gamma-rays than exponential phase cells, whereas the catalase activity in the wild-type strain and cta1 disruption mutant was higher in the stationary phase than in the exponential phase. These data suggest a correlation between catalase activity and survival following gamma-ray exposure. However, this correlation was not clear in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that other factors are involved in the tolerance to ROS induced by irradiation.

  16. A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase.

    PubMed

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2015-08-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 were converted to culturable by coculture with eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, we isolated a factor converting VBNC V. cholerae to culturable (FCVC) from a eukaryotic cell line, HT-29. In this study, we purified FCVC by successive column chromatographies comprising UNO Q-6 anion exchange, Bio-Scale CHT2-1 hydroxyapatite, and Superdex 200 10/300 GL. Homogeneity of the purified FCVC was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. Nano-LC MS/MS analysis showed that the purified FCVC was a human catalase. An experiment of RNAi knockdown of catalase mRNA from HT-29 cells and treatment of the purified FCVC with a catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole confirmed that the FCVC was a catalase. A possible role of the catalase in converting a VBNC V. cholerae to a culturable state in the human intestine is discussed.

  17. Down-regulation of catalase activity allows transient accumulation of a hydrogen peroxide signal in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Laure; Roach, Thomas; Fischer, Beat B; Bedhomme, Mariette; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2013-06-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, excess light is a stress that induces production of reactive oxygen species inside the chloroplasts. As a response, the capacity of antioxidative defence mechanisms increases. However, when cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were shifted from dark to high light, a reversible partial inactivation of catalase activity was observed, which correlated with a transient increase in the level of H2 O2 in the 10 μm range. This concentration range seems to be necessary to activate H2 O2 -dependent signalling pathways stimulating the expression of H2 O2 responsive genes, such as the heat shock protein HSP22C. Catalase knock-down mutants had lost the transient accumulation of H2 O2 , suggesting that a decrease in catalase activity was the key element for establishing a transient H2 O2 burst. Catalase was inactivated by a one-electron event consistent with the reduction of a single cysteine. We propose that under high light intensity, the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain is sensed and transmitted to the cytosol to regulate the catalase activity. This allows a transient accumulation of H2 O2 , inducing a signalling event that is transmitted to the nucleus to modulate the expression of chloroplast-directed protection enzymes.

  18. Scavenging of free radicals in gas-phase mainstream cigarette smoke by immobilized catalase at filter level.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Hua, Zhaozhe; Du, Guocheng; Ma, Xiaolong; Cao, Jianhua; Yang, Zhanping; Chen, Jian

    2008-03-01

    Catalase is well known as capable of inducing the decomposition of H(2)O(2). In this study, a kind of immobilized catalase (entrapped in cross-linked chitosan beads) was dispersed in conventional acetate filter as an antioxidant additive. Quantitative estimation of the free radicals in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) was performed to address the effect of this modified filter. It was found that the levels of PBN adduct and NO(*)/NO(2)(*) associated with the gas-phase mainstream cigarette smoke (GPCS) were efficiently decreased by approximately 40% through catalase filtering. Besides, the modified filter was found to lower the MCS-induced adverse biological effects including lipid peroxidation and mutagenicity. This was proved to be substantially attributed to the catalase-dependent breakdown of NO(*), which was stimulated by some of peroxides (most probably being H(2)O(2)), the dismutation products of tar particulate matters (TPM). These results highlighted a promising approach to reduce the smoking-associated health risks to passive smokers. Moreover, the mechanisms of catalase filtering may be helpful for the development of appropriate immobilized enzyme systems to be applied for reducing health risks associated with gaseous pollutants.

  19. Ultraviolet Light B-Mediated Inhibition of Skin Catalase Activity Promotes Gr-1+CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Nicholas J.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Burns, Erin M.; Schick, Jonathan S.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Mace, Thomas A.; Bill, Matthew A.; Young, Gregory S.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence and mortality are higher in men compared to women, but the causes of this sex discrepancy remain largely unknown. Ultraviolet light exposure induces cutaneous inflammation and neutralizes cutaneous antioxidants. Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells are heterogeneous bone marrow-derived cells that promote inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Reduced activity of catalase, an antioxidant present within skin, has been associated with skin carcinogenesis. We utilized the outbred, immune competent Skh-1 hairless mouse model of ultraviolet light B (UVB)-induced inflammation and non-melanoma skin cancer to further define sex discrepancies in UVB-induced inflammation. Our results demonstrated that male skin had relatively lower baseline catalase activity, which was inhibited following acute UVB exposure in both sexes. Further analysis revealed that skin catalase activity inversely correlated with splenic Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cell percentage. Acute UVB exposure induced Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cell skin infiltration, which was inhibited to a greater extent in males by topical catalase treatment. In chronic UVB studies, we demonstrated that the percentage of splenic Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells was 55% higher in male tumor-bearing mice compared to their female counterparts. Together, our findings indicate that lower skin catalase activity in male mice may at least in part contribute to increased UVB-induced Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells and subsequent skin carcinogenesis. PMID:22030957

  20. Immunohistochemical localization and biochemical changes in catalase and superoxide dismutase during metamorphosis in the olfactory system of frog Microhyla ornata.

    PubMed

    Gaupale, Tekchand C; Londhe, Jayant; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Subhedar, N K; Bhargava, Shobha

    2012-02-01

    Amphibian metamorphosis is characterized by rapid tissue remodeling and drastic changes in the body structure and function. Like other organs, olfactory system also undergoes a dramatic rearrangement as the animal experiences transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitat. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to play an important role during anuran metamorphosis and role of antioxidant enzymes like catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are believed to play a major role in these processes. Therefore, we hypothesize that antioxidant enzymes in the olfactory system may undergo changes that reflect metamorphic processes. Immunohistochemical study revealed the presence of catalase and SOD in the olfactory receptor neurons and also granular reaction in olfactory epithelium of medial diverticulum during metamorphosis. Catalase and SOD immunoreactivity were seen in the epithelium of lateral diverticulum, vomeronasal organ as metamorphosis proceeds and in the apical lining of olfactory epithelium of adult frog. Biochemical study showed that catalase activity gradually increases in the olfactory system from metamorphic stage 40-46 and adult, while SOD activity decreases from stage 40 to 46 and increases in adult. Thus, the localization and relative levels of catalase and SOD during metamorphosis in the olfactory system suggests that these enzymes may be involved in protection from oxidative damage.

  1. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  2. Hesperidin protects against cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity by upregulation of PPARγ and abrogation of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ayman M

    2014-09-01

    The most important reason for the non-approval and withdrawal of drugs by the Food and Drug Administration is hepatotoxicity. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effects of hesperidin against cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. The rats received a single intraperitoneal dose of CYP of 200 mg/kg body mass, followed by treatment with hesperidin, orally, at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 11 consecutive days. CYP induced hepatic damage, as evidenced by the significantly elevated levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, serum transaminases, liver lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide. As a consequence, there was reduced glutathione content, and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were markedly reduced. In addition, CYP administration induced a considerable downregulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and upregulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression. Hesperidin, in a dose-dependent manner, rejuvenated the altered markers to an almost normal state. In conclusion, hesperidin showed a potent protective effect against CYP-induced oxidative stress and inflammation leading to hepatotoxicity. The study suggests that hesperidin exerts its protective effect against CYP-induced hepatotoxicity through upregulation of hepatic PPARγ expression and abrogation of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity under conditions of normal or reduced catalase activity in H2O2-sensitive and -resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell variants.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, O; Guidarelli, A; Sestili, P; Mannello, F; Gazzanelli, G; Cattabeni, F

    1994-09-01

    H2O2-sensitive and -resistant sublines of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were tested for their sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effect elicited by increasing concentrations of the oxidant under conditions of normal or reduced catalase activity. Experimental results have demonstrated that, under conditions of reduced catalase activity, the cytotoxic action of H2O2 was differentially regulated in resistant and sensitive cells. Indeed, the parental cell line and cells resistant to low concentrations of H2O2 (V 250 cells) depended on catalase to a lower extent than did highly resistant cells (V 850 cells). It is interesting to note that V 250 cells had more catalase, on a per million cell basis, than V 850 cells. We conclude that acquired resistance to oxidative stress is not entirely dependent on catalase and that the contribution of catalase depends on the degree of resistance to the oxidant.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    SciTech Connect

    Riise, Ellen Kristin; Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Helland, Ronny; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  5. siRNA-based Analysis of the Abrogation of the Protective Function of Membrane-associated Catalase of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2017-02-01

    Tumor cells, in contrast to non-malignant cells, show sustained expression of membrane-associated NADPH oxidase-1 and therefore generate extracellular superoxide anions and their dismutation product H2O2 In order to prevent intercellular reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling, tumor cells need to express membrane-associated catalase that interferes with HOCl and nitric oxide/peroxynitrite signaling. Catalase is attached to tumor cells through the activity of transglutaminase-2 and is prevented from superoxide anion-dependent inhibition through coexpression of membrane-associated superoxide dismutase. Therefore, specific inhibition of membrane-associated catalase should reactivate intercellular ROS/RNS-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling. These processes are analyzed here through small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of essential signaling compounds. This allows to establish a rather comprehensive picture of intercellular ROS/RNS signaling that may be instrumental for future therapeutic approaches.

  6. Effects of molecular oxygen on detection of superoxide radical with nitroblue tetrazolium and on activity stains for catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Clare, D.A.; Duong, M.N.; Darr, D.; Archibald, F.; Fridovich, I.

    1984-08-01

    The usual method of staining polyacrylamide gel electropherograms for superoxide dismutase activity utilizes a photochemical flux of O/sub 2//sup -/ to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium. Superoxide dismutases intercept O/sub 2//sup -/, preventing formazan production and thus causing achromatic bands. In the presence of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, catalase also yield achromatic bands during this staining procedure. This is due to local elevation of pO/sub 2/ by the catalytic decomposition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. O/sub 2/, in turn, inhibits the reduction of the tetrazolium by O/sub 2//sup -/. This phenomenon provides a new activity stain for catalase. A previously described activity stain for catalase has also been reexamined and significantly improved.

  7. A first principles study of the binding of formic acid in catalase complementing high resolution X-ray structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovira, Carme; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Biarnés, Xevi; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2006-03-01

    Density functional molecular dynamics simulations using a QM/MM approach are used to get insight into the binding modes of formic acid in catalase. Two ligand binding sites are found, named A and B, in agreement with recent high resolution structures of catalase with bound formic acid. In addition, the calculations show that the His56 residue is protonated and the ligand is present as a formate anion. The lowest energy minimum structure ( A) corresponds to the ligand interacting with both the heme iron and the catalytic residues (His56 and Asn129). The second minimum energy structure ( B) corresponds to the situation in which the ligand interacts solely with the catalytic residues. A mechanism for the process of formic acid binding in catalase is suggested.

  8. The catalase C-262T gene polymorphism and cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yongchun; Li, Diandian; Tian, Panwen; Shen, Konglong; Zhu, Jing; Feng, Mei; Wan, Chun; Yang, Ting; Chen, Lei; Wen, Fuqiang

    2015-04-01

    Many studies suggest that catalase C-262T gene polymorphism is associated with cancer risk, but with inconsistent results. This study aimed to summarize the overall association between catalase C-262T polymorphism and cancer risk. Literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, and other databases, studies regarding the association between catalase C-262T polymorphism and cancer risk were identified, and data were retrieved and analyzed by using Review Manager 5.0.24 and STATA 12.0. A total of 18 publications with 22 case-control studies, including 9777 cancer patients and 12,223 controls, met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis results showed significant association between catalase C-262 T polymorphism and cancer risk (TT vs CT + CC: odds ratio [OR] = 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.31, P = 0.01). Subgroup analyses stratified by cancer types suggested the catalase C-262T polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased prostate cancer risk (TT vs CT + CC: OR = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.17-2.22, P = 0.004); for subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, no associations between this polymorphism and Asians or whites were identified (CT + TT vs CC: OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 0.98-1.26, P = 0.09 for whites; OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.78-1.80, P = 0.42 for Asians). In summary, the catalase C-262T polymorphism may be a risk factor for cancer with cancer type-specific effects. Further studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  9. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-03-27

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  10. The catalase gene family in cucumber: genome-wide identification and organization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lifang; Yang, Yingui; Jiang, Lunwei; Liu, Shiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Catalase (CAT) is a common antioxidant enzyme in almost all living organisms. Currently, detailed reports on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) CAT (CsCAT) genes and tissue expression profiling are limited. In the present study, four candidate CsCAT genes were identified in cucumber. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCAT1-CsCAT3 are closely related to Arabidopsis AtCAT1-AtCAT3, but no obvious counterpart was observed for CsCAT4. Intron/exon structure analysis revealed that only one of the 15 positions was completely conserved. Motif analysis showed that, unlike the CAT genes of other species, none of CsCAT genes contained all 10 motifs. Expression data showed that transcripts of all of the CsCAT genes, except CsCAT4, were detected in five tissues. Moreover, their transcription levels displayed differences under different stress treatments. PMID:27560990

  11. Spectroscopic investigations on the interaction between carbon nanotubes and catalase on molecular level.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jin; Dai, Jingping; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Chunhua; Gao, Canzhu; Liu, Rutao

    2014-05-01

    The interactions between well-dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and catalase (CAT) were investigated. The activity of CAT was inhibited with the addition of MWCNTs. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence spectra revealed that the tryptophan (Trp) residues were exposed and the fluorescence intensities of CAT increased with the increase in the MWCNTs concentration. At the same time, the environment of the Trp residues became more hydrophobic. The results of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and CD spectra indicated that the secondary structure of CAT had been changed, and the amino acid residues were located in a more hydrophobic environment. Meanwhile, the UV-vis spectra indicated that the conformation of the heme porphyrin rings was changed. The microenvironment of CAT activity sites may be interfered by MWCNTs. This research showed that MWCNTs could not only contribute to the conformational changes of protein but also change the enzyme function.

  12. Molecular mechanism on cadmium-induced activity changes of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium contributes to adverse effects of organisms probably because of its ability to induce oxidative stress via alterations in activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), but their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the molecular mechanism of CAT and SOD response under Cd-induced oxidative stress in the liver of zebrafish. The enzyme activity changes observed in vitro were consistent with those seen in vivo, indicating the direct interaction of CAT and SOD with Cd contributes to their activity change in vivo. Further experiments utilizing multiple spectroscopic methods, isothermal titration calorimetry and a molecular docking study were performed to explore the mechanism of molecular interaction of CAT and SOD with Cd. Different interaction patterns were found that resulted in misfolding and changed the enzyme activities. Taken together, we suggest the misfolding of CAT and SOD contributes to their activity change under Cd-induced oxidative stress in vivo.

  13. Genipin Cross-Linked Glucose Oxidase and Catalase Multi-enzyme for Gluconic Acid Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Caixia; Chen, Haibin; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-02-01

    In this work, glucose oxidase (GOD) and catalase (CAT) were used simultaneously to produce gluconic acid from glucose. In order to reduce the distance between the two enzymes, and therefore improve efficiency, GOD and CAT were cross-linked together using genipin. Improvements in gluconic acid production were due to quick removal of harmful intermediate hydrogen peroxide by CAT. GOD activity was significantly affected by the proportion of CAT in the system, with GOD activity in the cross-linked multi-enzyme (CLME) being 10 times higher than that in an un-cross-linked GOD/CAT mixture. The glucose conversion rate after 15 h using 15 % glucose was also 10 % higher using the CLME than was measured using a GOD/CAT mixture.

  14. Catalase HPI influences membrane permeability in Escherichia coli following near-UV stress

    SciTech Connect

    Leven, S.; Heimberger, A.; Eisenstark, A. )

    1990-09-28

    The katG gene in Escherichia coli encodes catalase HPI, which is involved in membrane transport and protects the cell during oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces synthesis of HPI. We examined the role of HPI in membrane permeability (proline uptake) following exposure to near-ultraviolet radiation (NUV). We found that NUV resulted in the same type of induction as H2O2. KatG::Tn10 cells experienced a large drop in uptake after NUV exposure, and levels remained low following incubation. A strain carrying a katG+ plasmid, however, showed considerably less decrease in uptake after NUV, and uptake quickly resumed upon incubation. Further, in an srd mutant which lacks 4-thiouracil, NUV resulted in only a small drop in proline uptake, which was immediately resumed.

  15. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities after heat injury of listeria monocytogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmier, A.W.; Martin, S.E.

    1988-02-01

    Four strains of Listeria monocytogenes were examined for catalase (CA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The two strains having the highest CA activities (LCDC and Scott A) also possessed the highest SOD activities. The CA activity of heated cell extracts of all four strains examined decreased sharply between 55 and 60/sup 0/C. SOD was more heat labile than CA. Two L. monocytogenes strains demonstrated a decline in SOD activity after heat treatment at 45/sup 0/C, whereas the other two strains demonstrated a decline at 50/sup 0/C. Sublethal heating of the cells at 55/sup 0/C resulted in increased sensitivity to 5.5% NaCl. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide was added to suspensions of L. monocytogenes; strains producing the highest CA levels showed the greatest H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resistance.

  16. Evaluation of Malondialdehyde, Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activity in Fetal Cord Blood of Depressed Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; Bakacak, Murat; Tolun, Fatma İnanç; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Objective The umbilical cord consists of two arteries and one vein and it functions in the transport between the maternal and fetal circulation. Biochemical analysis of fetal cord blood (FCB) during delivery could be beneficial in terms of understanding the fetal environment. In this study, we aimed to investigate oxidative parameters like malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) levels in FCB during delivery. Methods We collected FCB samples during caesarean section. Our study included 33 depressed mothers and 37 healthy controls. We investigated MDA, SOD, and CAT levels in FCB samples. Results We found no significant difference between groups in terms of MDA (p=0.625), SOD (p=0.940), and CAT (p=0.413) levels. Conclusion Our study reveals probable protective effects of the placenta from oxidative stress. Future studies should include larger samples. PMID:28138108

  17. Catalase-like and peroxidase-like catalytic activities of silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Jiang, Wenwen; Wang, Yanwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Yao, Jianlin; Yuan, Lin; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Dan; Song, Bo; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-08

    Silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs) were found to have catalytic activities similar to those of biological enzymes catalase and peroxidase. Thus not only can these materials catalyze the decomposition reaction of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, but they can also catalyze the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), a common substrate for peroxidases, by H(2)O(2). The presence of Si-H bonds and the morphology of the SiNWAs are found to be crucial to the occurrence of such catalytic activity. When the SiNWAs are reacted with H(2)O(2), the data from Raman spectroscopy suggests the formation of (Si-H)(2)···(O species) ((Si-H)(2)···Os), which is presumably responsible for the catalytic activity. These findings suggest the potential use of SiNWAs as enzyme mimics in medicine, biotechnology, and environmental chemistry.

  18. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  19. Compounds I of catalase and horse radish peroxidase: pi-cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, D; Forman, A; Borg, D C; Fajer, J; Felton, R H

    1971-03-01

    Two-electron oxidation of cobaltous octaethylporphyrin [Co(II)(Et)(8)P] yields a stable pi-cation radical [Co(III)(Et)(8)P](2+.), the optical spectrum of which exhibits spectral changes dependent upon the nature of the counterion. Comparison of these spectra with those of Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase and catalase leads us to propose that these Compounds I contain a pi-cation radical of the heme prosthetic group. This proposal explains the oxidation level, optical spectra, and stability of the primary compounds without recourse to properties such as stoichiometric mixtures of special porphyrins, stable Fe(V) porphyrins, or unique conformers of heme porphyrins. Explanations are advanced to account for the missing electron spin resonance signal of Compound I of horseradish peroxidase.

  20. Molecular interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with catalase reveals a potentially toxic mechanism of the inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yue; Zou, Luyi; Huang, Ming; Zong, Wansong

    2014-12-01

    2-Mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) is widely utilized as a corrosion inhibitor, copper-plating brightener and rubber accelerator. The residue of MBI in the environment possesses a potential risk to human health. In this work, the toxic interaction of MBI with the important antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) was investigated using spectroscopic and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. MBI can spontaneously bind with CAT with one binding site through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces to form MBI-CAT complex. The molecular docking study revealed that MBI bound into the CAT interface of chains B and C, which led to some conformational and microenvironmental changes of CAT and further resulted in the inhibition of CAT activity. This present study provides direct evidence at a molecular level to show that exposure to MBI could induce changes in the structure and function of the enzyme CAT.

  1. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function.

  2. A gas-phase amplified quartz crystal microbalance immunosensor based on catalase modified immunoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-02-21

    A novel signal amplification strategy for quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based on catalytic gas generation was developed to construct an ultrasensitive immunosensor for the detection of proteins (immunoglobulin G, IgG, used as a model). A catalase modified immunoparticle was prepared to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex with the IgG and anti-IgG antibodies that were immobilized on the QCM sensor. The amount of immunoparticles on the sensor surface was thus controlled by the IgG concentration. Then H2O2 was added and catalyzed by catalase for oxygen generation. The generated oxygen replaced some of the liquid on the sensor surface, leading to the change in the shear modulus of the immunocomplex layer and the apparent viscosity and density of the liquid layer. Due to the ultrasensitive response of QCM to these changes, a significant frequency shift related to the IgG concentration was achieved. Different parameters, including the flow cell structure, operation temperature, immunoparticle concentration, and H2O2 concentration were optimized to achieve steady and efficient frequency shifts. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed gas-phase amplified QCM sensor could achieve up to 72 times improvement of detection sensitivity compared to the label-free sensor as a control, in the concentration range of 0.1-3.0 μg mL(-1). The detection limit was also reduced from 236 ng mL(-1) to 51.0 ng mL(-1) at the 3Sblank level.

  3. Catalase ameliorates polychlorinated biphenyl-induced cytotoxicity in non-malignant human breast epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesha, Venkatasubbaiah A.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Buettner, Garry R.; Robertson, Larry W.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental chemical contaminants believed to adversely affect cellular processes. We investigated the hypothesis that PCB-induced changes in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce DNA damage resulting in cytotoxicity. Exponentially growing cultures of human non-malignant breast epithelial cells (MCF10A) were incubated with PCBs for 3 days and assayed for cell number, ROS levels, DNA damage, and cytotoxicity. Exposure to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) or 2-(4-chlorophenyl)benzo-1,4-quinone (4-Cl-BQ), a metabolite of 4-chlorobiphenyl (PCB3) significantly decreased cell number, MTS reduction, and increased the percentage of cells with sub G1 DNA content. Results from electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy showed a 4-fold increase in the steady-state levels of ROS, which was suppressed in cells pre-treated with catalase. EPR measurements in cells treated with 4-Cl-BQ detected the presence of a semiquinone radical, suggesting that the increased levels of ROS could be due to the redox-cycling of 4-Cl-BQ. A dose-dependent increase in micronuclei frequency was observed in PCB-treated cells, consistent with an increase in histone 2AX-phosphorylation. Treatment of cells with catalase blunted the PCB-induced increase in micronuclei frequency and H2AX phosphorylation that was consistent with an increase in cell survival. Our results demonstrate a PCB-induced increase in cellular levels of ROS causing DNA damage, resulting in cell killing. PMID:18691649

  4. Cu(II)-disulfide complexes display simultaneous superoxide dismutase- and catalase-like activities.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Margarita E; Andrade-Acuña, Daniela; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Sandoval-Acuña, Cristián; Speisky, Hernán

    2013-12-01

    Superoxide is a potentially toxic by-product of cellular metabolism. We have addressed here the in vitro ability of complexes formed between copper(II) ions and various biologically-occurring disulfides (RSSR: oxidized glutathione, cystine, homocystine and α-lipoic acid) to react with superoxide. The studied complexes were found to react with superoxide (generated by a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system) at rate constants (kCu(II)-RSSR) close to 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), which are three orders of magnitude lower than that reported for superoxide dismutase (SOD) but comparable to that of several other copper-containing complexes reported as SOD mimetics. The interaction between the tested Cu(II)-RSSR and superoxide, led to the generation and recovery of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen that were, respectively, below and above those theoretically-expected from a sole SOD mimetic action. Interestingly, oxygen was generated when the Cu(II)-RSSR complexes were directly incubated with hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results reveal that the Cu(II)-RSSR complexes not only have the capacity to dismutate superoxide but also to simultaneously act like catalase mimetic molecules. When added to superoxide-overproducing mitochondria (condition attained by its exposure to diclofenac), three of the tested complexes were able (2-4μM), not only to totally restore, but also to lower below the basal level the mitochondrial production of superoxide. The present study is first in reporting on the potential of Cu(II)-disulfide complexes to act as SOD and catalase like molecules, suggesting a potential for these types of molecules to act as such under physiological and/or oxidative-stress conditions.

  5. Differential effects of superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Thompson, Erik W; Dusting, Gregory J; Peshavariya, Hitesh M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have been implicated in development and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 on superoxide and H2O2 formation as well as proliferation, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Superoxide and H2O2 production was examined using dihydroethidium and Amplex red assays, respectively. Cell viability and adhesion were measured using a tetrazolium-based MTT assay. Cell proliferation was determined using trypan blue assay. Cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Clonal expansion of a single cell was performed using a colony formation assay. Cell migration was measured using transwell migration assay. Dual luciferase assay was used to determine NF-κB reporter activity. EUK 134 effectively reduced both superoxide and H2O2, whereas MnTmPyP removed superoxide but enhanced H2O2 formation. EUK 134 effectively attenuated viability, proliferation, clonal expansion, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In contrast, MnTmPyP only reduced clonal expansion of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but had no effect on adhesion and cell cycle progression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced NF-κB activity was reduced by EUK 134, whereas MnTmPyP enhanced this activity. These data indicate that the SOD mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 exert differential effects on breast cancer cell growth. Inhibition of H2O2 signaling using EUK 134-like compound might be a promising approach to breast cancer therapy.

  6. Toward "stable-on-the-table" enzymes: improving key properties of catalase by covalent conjugation with poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Caterina M; Cole, Kyle S; Benson, Kyle R; Ward, Jessamyn R; Bassett, Kayla M; Zhang, Yiren; Zore, Omkar V; Stromer, Bobbi; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Kumar, Challa V

    2014-08-20

    Several key properties of catalase such as thermal stability, resistance to protease degradation, and resistance to ascorbate inhibition were improved, while retaining its structure and activity, by conjugation to poly(acrylic acid) (PAA, Mw 8000) via carbodiimide chemistry where the amine groups on the protein are appended to the carboxyl groups of the polymer. Catalase conjugation was examined at three different pH values (pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0) and at three distinct mole ratios (1:100, 1:500, and 1:1000) of catalase to PAA at each reaction pH. The corresponding products are labeled as Cat-PAA(x)-y, where x is the protein to polymer mole ratio and y is the pH used for the synthesis. The coupling reaction consumed about 60-70% of the primary amines on the catalase; all samples were completely water-soluble and formed nanogels, as evidenced by gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated substantial retention of protein secondary structure for all samples, which increased to 100% with increasing pH of the synthesis and polymer mole fraction. Soret CD bands of all samples indicated loss of ∼50% of band intensities, independent of the reaction pH. Catalytic activities of the conjugates increased with increasing synthesis pH, where 55-80% and 90-100% activity was retained for all samples synthesized at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0, respectively, and the Km or Vmax values of Cat-PAA(100)-7 did not differ significantly from those of the free enzyme. All conjugates synthesized at pH 7.0 were thermally stable even when heated to ∼85-90 °C, while native catalase denatured between 55 and 65 °C. All conjugates retained 40-90% of their original activities even after storing for 10 weeks at 8 °C, while unmodified catalase lost all of its activity within 2 weeks, under similar storage conditions. Interestingly, PAA surrounding catalase limited access to the enzyme from large molecules like proteases and significantly increased

  7. Novel immobilization process of a thermophilic catalase: efficient purification by heat treatment and subsequent immobilization at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Luo, Hui; López, Claudia; Xiao, Jing; Chang, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of the present work is to investigate a novel process of purification and immobilization of a thermophilic catalase at high temperatures. The catalase, originated from Bacillus sp., was overexpressed in a recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pET28-CATHis and efficiently purified by heat treatment, achieving a threefold purification. The purified catalase was then immobilized onto an epoxy support at different temperatures (25, 40, and 55 °C). The immobilizate obtained at higher temperatures reached its maximum activity in a shorter time than that obtained at lower temperatures. Furthermore, immobilization at higher temperatures required a lower ionic strength than immobilization at lower temperatures. The characteristics of immobilized enzymes prepared at different temperatures were investigated. The high-temperature immobilizate (55 °C) showed the highest thermal stability, followed by the 40 °C immobilizate. And the high-temperature immobilizate (55 °C) had slightly higher operational stability than the 25 °C immobilizate. All of the immobilized catalase preparations showed higher stability than the free enzyme at alkaline pH 10.0, while the alkali resistance of the 25 °C immobilizate was slightly better than that of the 40 and 55 °C immobilizates.

  8. The Antitumor Effect of Single-domain Antibodies Directed Towards Membrane-associated Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg; Motz, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed towards catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) caused efficient reactivation of intercellular reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent apoptosis-inducing signaling specifically in human tumor cells. Single-domain antibodies targeted tumor cell-specific membrane-associated SOD and catalase, but not the corresponding intracellular enzymes. They were shown to be about 200-fold more effective than corresponding classical recombinant antigen-binding fragments and more than four log steps more efficient than monoclonal antibodies. Combined addition of single-domain antibodies against catalase and SOD caused a remarkable synergistic effect. Proof-of-concept experiments in immunocompromised mice using human tumor xenografts and single-domain antibodies directed towards SOD showed an inhibition of tumor growth. Neutralizing single-domain antibodies directed to catalase and SOD also caused a very strong synergistic effect with the established chemotherapeutic agent taxol, indicating an overlap of signaling pathways. This effect might also be useful in order to avoid unwanted side-effects and to drastically lower the costs for taxol-based therapy.

  9. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced heme degradation in red blood cells: the protective roles of catalase and glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nagababu, Enika; Chrest, Francis J; Rifkind, Joseph M

    2003-03-17

    Catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX) react with red cell hydrogen peroxide. A number of recent studies indicate that catalase is the primary enzyme responsible for protecting the red cell from hydrogen peroxide. We have used flow cytometry in intact cells as a sensitive measure of the hydrogen-peroxide-induced formation of fluorescent heme degradation products. Using this method, we have been able to delineate a unique role for GSHPX in protecting the red cell from hydrogen peroxide. For extracellular hydrogen peroxide, catalase completely protected the cells, while the ability of GSHPX to protect the cells was limited by the availability of glutathione. The effect of endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide in conjunction with hemoglobin autoxidation was investigated by in vitro incubation studies. These studies indicate that fluorescent products are not formed during incubation unless the glutathione is reduced to at least 40% of its initial value as a result of incubation or by reacting the glutathione with iodoacetamide. Reactive catalase only slows down the depletion of glutathione, but does not directly prevent the formation of these fluorescent products. The unique role of GSHPX is attributed to its ability to react with hydrogen peroxide generated in close proximity to the red cell membrane in conjunction with the autoxidation of membrane-bound hemoglobin.

  10. The induction of human superoxide dismutase and catalase in vivo: a fundamentally new approach to antioxidant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sally K; Bose, Swapan K; Grunwald, Gary K; Myhill, Paul; McCord, Joe M

    2006-01-15

    A composition consisting of extracts of five widely studied medicinal plants (Protandim) was administered to healthy human subjects ranging in age from 20 to 78 years. Individual ingredients were selected on the basis of published findings of induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and/or catalase in rodents in vivo, combined with evidence of decreasing lipid peroxidation. Each ingredient was present at a dosage sufficiently low to avoid any accompanying unwanted pharmacological effects. Blood was analyzed before supplementation and after 30 and 120 days of supplementation (675 mg/day). Erythrocytes were assayed for SOD and catalase, and plasma was assayed for lipid peroxidation products as thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), as well as uric acid, C-reactive protein, and cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL). Before supplementation, TBARS showed a strong age-dependent increase. After 30 days of supplementation, TBARS declined by an average of 40% (p = 0.0001) and the age-dependent increase was eliminated. By 120 days, erythrocyte SOD increased by 30% (p < 0.01) and catalase by 54% (p < 0.002). We conclude that modest induction of the catalytic antioxidants SOD and catalase may be a much more effective approach than supplementation with antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E) that can, at best, stoichiometrically scavenge a very small fraction of total oxidant production.

  11. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    PubMed

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants.

  12. Horizontal gene transfer confers adaptive advantages to phytopathogenic fungi: a case study of catalase-peroxidase in Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange and stable integration of genetic material between different evolutionary lineages, is widely observed in fungi. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of HGT elements provides adaptive advantages (e.g., virulence). Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are ...

  13. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  14. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase-Negative Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Strain Collected from a Patient with Cutaneous Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Crawford, Katrina; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Merrell, D. Scott

    2014-01-01

    We describe a cutaneous abscess caused by catalase-negative methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus in a patient who was concomitantly colonized with virulent USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Sequencing of the katA gene demonstrated a thymine insertion leading to a frameshift mutation and premature truncation of catalase to 21 amino acids. PMID:24131694

  15. The role of a bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatA in protection of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from menadione toxicity.

    PubMed

    Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2004-03-19

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is an aerobic plant pathogenic bacterium that is exposed to reactive oxygen species produced either as by-products of aerobic metabolism or by the defense systems of host plants. The physiological function of the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase (KatA) in the protection of A. tumefaciens from reactive oxygen species other than H(2)O(2) was evaluated in the katA mutant (PB102). Unexpectedly, PB102 was highly sensitive to the superoxide generator menadione. The expression of katA from a plasmid vector complemented the menadione-hypersensitive phenotype. A. tumefaciens possesses an additional catalase gene, a monofunctional catalase encoded by catE. Neither inactivation nor high-level expression of the catE gene altered the menadione resistance level. Moreover, heterologous expression of the catalase-peroxidase-encoding gene katG from Burkholderia pseudomallei, but not the monofunctional catalase gene katE from Xanthomonas campestris could restore normal levels of menadione resistance to PB102. A recent observation suggests that the menadione resistance phenotype involves increased activities of organic peroxide-metabolizing enzymes. Heterologous expression of X. campestris alkyl hydroperoxide reductase from a plasmid vector failed to complement the menadione-sensitive phenotype of PB102. The level of menadione resistance shows a direct correlation with the level of peroxidase activity of KatA. This is a novel role for KatA and suggests that resistance to menadione toxicity is mediated by a new, and as yet unknown, mechanism in A. tumefaciens.

  16. Further studies on O sub 2 -resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M{sub 4} progeny of an O{sub 2}-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O{sub 2} has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M{sub 3} mutant produced M{sub 4} progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F{sub 1} progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M{sub 3} mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO{sub 2} as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO{sub 2}-free 21% O{sub 2} and 36% less in CO{sub 2}-free 42% O{sub 2} compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less {sup 14}CO{sub 2} per (1-{sup 14}C)glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O{sub 2} where the stoichiometry of CO{sub 2} release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  17. Isolation of a Novel Peroxisomal Catalase Gene from Sugarcane, Which Is Responsive to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Liping; Allan, Andrew C.; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05–179) resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03–182), suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183), was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA) treatments, oxidative (H2O2) stress, heavy metal (CuCl2) and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl) stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli. PMID:24392135

  18. Catalase-conjugated liposomes encapsulating glucose oxidase for controlled oxidation of glucose with decomposition of hydrogen peroxide produced.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Takaki, Noriyuki; Yamasaki, Miku

    2010-09-01

    The catalase-conjugated liposome encapsulating glucose oxidase (CLG) was prepared for developing a novel liposomal system for glucose oxidation with controllable enzyme activities. The catalase molecules were conjugated to the surface of liposome with 100 nm in mean diameter through coupling with the membrane-incorporated 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(glutaryl) (NGPE) at its mole fraction f(G) of 0.05 or 0.15. The average number of enzyme molecules per CLG with f(G) of 0.15 was 8.7 for glucose oxidase and 6.5 for catalase. The CLG-catalyzed oxidation of glucose was performed at 40 degrees C for prolonged period up to 99 h. The CLG with f(G) of 0.15 gave larger oxidation rate than that with f(G) of 0.05. In the fed-batch oxidation of glucose catalyzed by the former CLG, the stable oxidation rate was observed for 75 h with negligible accumulation of H(2)O(2) produced because of the durable catalytic actions of the liposomal enzymes. The oxidation rate of the CLG reaction increased to 1.1 mM-glucose/(hmM-lipid) at the acidic pH in the internal phase of liposome and the neutral pH in the external one corresponding to the optimal pH conditions for the activities of glucose oxidase and catalase, respectively. The oxidation rate catalyzed by the CLG could be controlled by adding sublytic concentrations of cholate to increase permeability of the liposome membrane to glucose. The catalase-conjugated liposomal system is potentially utilized for controlling the rate of reactions catalyzed by a variety of oxidases.

  19. Isolation of a novel peroxisomal catalase gene from sugarcane, which is responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Su, Yachun; Guo, Jinlong; Ling, Hui; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Liping; Allan, Andrew C; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05-179) resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03-182), suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183), was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA) treatments, oxidative (H2O2) stress, heavy metal (CuCl2) and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl) stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli.

  20. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase attenuates paraquat-induced myocardial geometric and contractile alteration: role of ER stress.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Ge, We; Zhang, Yingmei; Han, Xuefeng; Ren, Jun

    2010-12-15

    Paraquat, a quaternary nitrogen herbicide, is a highly toxic pro-oxidant that causes multiorgan failure including that of the heart via generation of reactive oxygen species, although the underlying mechanism has not been well elucidated. This study examined the influence of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase, an antioxidant detoxifying H(2)O(2), on paraquat-induced myocardial geometric and functional alterations, with a focus on ER stress. FVB and catalase transgenic mice were administered paraquat for 48h. Myocardial geometry, contractile function, apoptosis, and ER stress were evaluated using echocardiography, edge detection, caspase-3 activity, and immunoblotting. Our results revealed that paraquat treatment significantly enlarged left ventricular (LV) end diastolic and systolic diameters; increased LV mass and resting myocyte length; reduced fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte peak shortening, and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening; and prolonged relengthening duration in the FVB group. Whereas the catalase transgene itself did not alter myocardial geometry and function, it mitigated or significantly attenuated paraquat-elicited myocardial geometric and functional changes. Paraquat promoted overt apoptosis and ER stress as evidenced by increased caspase-3 activity, apoptosis, and ER stress markers including Bax, Bcl-2, GADD153, calregulin, and phosphorylated JNK, IRE1α, and eIF2α; all were ablated by the catalase transgene. Paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction was mitigated by the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Moreover, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed paraquat-induced ER stress as evidenced by enhanced GADD153 and IRE1α phosphorylation. Taken together, these data revealed that catalase may rescue paraquat-induced myocardial geometric and functional alteration possibly by alleviating JNK-mediated ER stress.

  1. Apparent Catalase Synthesis in Sunflower Cotyledons during the Change in Microbody Function: A Mathematical Approach for the Quantitative Evaluation of Density-labeling Data.

    PubMed

    Betsche, T; Gerhardt, B

    1978-10-01

    Density-labeling with 10 mm K(15)NO(3)/70% (2)H(2)O has been used to investigate catalase synthesis in different developmental stages of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cotyledons. A mathematical approach is introduced for the quantitative evaluation of the density-labeling data. The method allows, in the presence of preexisting enzyme activity, calculation of this synthesized activity (apparent enzyme synthesis) which results from the balance between actual enzyme synthesis and the degradation of newly synthesized enzyme at a given time. During greening of the cotyledons, when the catalase activity declines and the population of leaf peroxisomes is formed, the apparent catalase synthesis is lower than, or at best equal to, that occurring during a developmental stage when the leaf peroxisome population is established and catalase synthesis and degradation of total catalase are in equilibrium. This result suggests a formation, in fatty cotyledons, of the leaf peroxisomes by transformation of the glyoxysomes rather than by de novo synthesis.

  2. Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Guindon, Katherine A.; Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2008-03-01

    The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

  3. Oxidative stress upregulates PDCD4 expression in patients with gastric cancer via miR-21.

    PubMed

    Tu, Honglei; Sun, Haibing; Lin, Yan; Ding, Jie; Nan, Kejun; Li, Zongfang; Shen, Qiang; Wei, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in carcinogenesis by aberrantly inducing signaling networks that initiatiate tumorigenesis and stimulate tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a novel class of endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate approximately 30% of the genes in a cell via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. However, the effects of ROS on miRNAs expression and the role of miRNAs in ROS-mediated injury on carcinogenesis are uncertain. Using UV spectrophotometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we examined tissues from human gastric cancers and tissues adjascent to gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues and found that total anti-oxidation competence (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) concentrations were lower in gastric cancer patients compared to the control subjects, while the concentrations of DNA oxidative damage product 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was higher. To determine the potential role of miRNA in gastric carcinogenesis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis was performed. We found that human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) mRNA and miR-21 expression were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues than in the adjacent normal gastric tissues. Furthermore, the expression of programmed cell death 4 protein (PDCD4) in gastric cancer tissues was significantly lower than in adjacent normal gastric tissues. The expression of miR-21 and PDCD4 was highly correlated with the degree of differentiation, tumor staging, local lymphatic node metastasis and remote metastasis. Expression of miR-21 was negatively correlated with T-AOC, SOD and CAT, but positively correlated with 8-OHdG and hOGG1mRNA. In addition, the relative expression of PDCD4 was negatively correlated with miR-21. These results suggest that the defensive balance of oxidation and antioxidant system in patients with GC was impaired, resulting in

  4. Analysis of Oxidative Stress Status, Catalase and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphisms in Egyptian Vitiligo Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehaney, Dina A.; Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Hegazy, Rehab A.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Tawdy, Amira M.; Gawdat, Heba I.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmentation disorder of the skin. Oxidative stress is implicated as one of the probable events involved in vitiligo pathogenesis possibly contributing to melanocyte destruction. Evidence indicates that certain genes including those involved in oxidative stress and melanin synthesis are crucial for development of vitiligo. This study evaluates the oxidative stress status, the role of catalase (CAT) and catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms in the etiology of generalized vitiligo in Egyptians. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as well as CAT exon 9 T/C and COMT 158 G/A polymorphisms were determined in 89 patients and 90 age and sex-matched controls. Our results showed significantly lower TAC along with higher MDA levels in vitiligo patients compared with controls. Meanwhile, genotype and allele distributions of CAT and COMT polymorphisms in cases were not significantly different from those of controls. Moreover, we found no association between both polymorphisms and vitiligo susceptibility. In conclusion, the enhanced oxidative stress with the lack of association between CAT and COMT polymorphisms and susceptibility to vitiligo in our patients suggest that mutations in other genes related to the oxidative pathway might contribute to the etiology of generalized vitiligo in Egyptian population. PMID:24915010

  5. An iron-based cytosolic catalase and superoxide dismutase mimic complex.

    PubMed

    Horn, Adolfo; Parrilha, Gabrieli L; Melo, Karen V; Fernandes, Christiane; Horner, Manfredo; Visentin, Lorenzo do C; Santos, Jullyane A S; Santos, Monique S; Eleutherio, Elis C A; Pereira, Marcos D

    2010-02-15

    The development of metallodrugs with antioxidant activities is of importance as a way to protect organisms exposed to stressful conditions. Although iron chemistry in the presence of H(2)O(2) is usually associated with pro-oxidant activity, mainly via the Fenton reaction, we found that the mononuclear compound [Fe(HPClNOL)Cl(2)]NO(3) (1; C(15)H(18)Cl(3)FeN(4)O(4), a = 8.7751(3) A, b = 9.0778(4) A, c = 24.3869(10) A, beta = 93.370(2) degrees , monoclinic, P2(1)/c, Z = 4), containing the tripodal ligand 1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol, decomposes hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion in vitro as well as shows in vivo protection because it prevents the harmful effects promoted by H(2)O(2) on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, decreasing the level of lipid peroxidation. This protective effect was observed for wild-type cells, as well as for mutant cells, which do not present the antioxidant metalloenzymes catalase (Ctt1) or copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Sod1).

  6. Purification and some kinetic properties of catalase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense Hoffm., Apiaceae) leaves.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Lokman; Bülbül, Metin; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Ciftçi, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    In this study, catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves; analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps, including preparation of homogenate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and fractionation by DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 9.5% and had a specific activity of 1126 U (mg proteins)(-1). The overall purification was about 5.83-fold. A temperature of 4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured at 240 nm. In order to control the purification of the enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acryl amide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for the enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 183.29 kDa by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. The stable pH, optimum pH, and ionic strength were determined for phosphate and Tris-HCl buffer systems. In addition, K(M) and V(max) values for H(2)O(2), at optimum pH and 25 degrees C, were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk plots.

  7. The resolution dependence of optimal exposures in liquid nitrogen temperature electron cryomicroscopy of catalase crystals.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay A; Smith, Eric A; Bueler, Stephanie A; Rubinstein, John L

    2010-03-01

    Electron beam damage is the fundamental limit to resolution in electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) of frozen, hydrated specimens. Radiation damage increases with the number of electrons used to obtain an image and affects information at higher spatial frequencies before low-resolution information. For the experimentalist, a balance exists between electron exposures sufficient to obtain a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in images and exposures that limit the damage to structural features. In single particle cryo-EM this balance is particularly delicate: low-resolution features must be imaged with a sufficient SNR to allow image alignment so that high-resolution features recorded below the noise level can be recovered by averaging independent images. By measuring the fading of Fourier components from images obtained at 200 kV of thin crystals of catalase embedded in ice, we have determined the electron exposures that will maximize the SNR at resolutions between 86 and 2.9A. These data allow for a rational choice of exposure for single particle cryo-EM. For example, for 20A resolution, the SNR is maximized at approximately 20e(-)/A(2), whereas for 3A resolution, it is maximized at approximately 10 e(-)/A(2). We illustrate the effects of exposure in single particle cryo-EM with data collected at approximately 12-15 and approximately 24-30 e(-)/A(2).

  8. Catalasic activity in fish liver: improvement of the UV to visible analytic method.

    PubMed

    Paris-Palacios, Séverine; Delahaut, Laurence; Carreras, Alexis; Thomas, Marielle; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative defenses and more especially catalasic activity (CAT) are studied in a large range of scientific research thematics. In environmental sciences, the problematic of oxidative stress is of great interest as pollutants can induce perturbations of redox homeostasis. Consequently, changes in antioxidative defenses levels in fish tissues and particularly in liver are used as potential biomarkers of pollution. In most studies, the CAT was assayed by following during 5 min the consumption of H2O2 in cytosolic buffered extracts at 240 nm (UV-method). This study proposed a development of this method in the visible, using permanganate and a 525-nm detection, which was more accurate, sensitive, and rapid. Moreover, the hepatic CAT of six different fish species [a cyclidae (Nimbochromis linni), 3 cyprinidae (Brachydanio rerio, Rutilus rutilus, Cyprinus carpio), an anguillidae (Anguilla anguilla), and a percidae (Perca fluviatilus)] was evaluated with the two protocols (UV- and KMnO4-method). The results but also the thermal optimum of the reaction and the interest of CAT as biomarker in ecotoxicology were discussed.

  9. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  10. Self-cloning significantly enhances the production of catalase in Bacillus subtilis WSHDZ-01.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sha; Guo, Yaqiong; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-08-01

    The katA gene that encodes catalase (CAT) in Bacillus subtilis WSHDZ-01 was overexpressed in B. subtilis WB600 and B. subtilis WSHDZ-01. The CAT yield in both transformed strains was significantly improved compared to that in the wild-type WSHDZ-01 in shake flask culture. When cultured in a 3-L stirred tank reactor (STR), the recombinant CAT activity in B. subtilis WSHDZ-01 could be improved by 419 %, reaching up to 39,117 U/mL and was 8,149.4 U/mg dry cell weight, which is the highest activity reported in Bacillus sp. However, the recombinant CAT in B. subtilis WB600 cultured in a 3-L STR was not significantly improved by any of the common means for process optimization, and the highest CAT activity was 3,673.5 U/mg dry cell weight. The results suggest that self-cloning of the complete expression cassette in the original strain is a reasonable strategy to improve the yield of wild-type enzymes.

  11. Study on the interaction of catalase with pesticides by flow injection chemiluminescence and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xijuan; Wang, Zhuming; Chen, Donghua; Luo, Kai; Xiong, Xunyu; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-08-01

    The interaction mechanisms of catalase (CAT) with pesticides (including organophosphates: disulfoton, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, isocarbophos, dimethoate, dipterex, methamidophos and acephate; carbamates: carbaryl and methomyl; pyrethroids: fenvalerate and deltamethrin) were first investigated by flow injection (FI) chemiluminescence (CL) analysis and molecular docking. By homemade FI-CL model of lg[(I0-I)/I]=lgK+nlg[D], it was found that the binding processes of pesticides to CAT were spontaneous with the apparent binding constants K of 10(3)-10(5) L mol(-1) and the numbers of binding sites about 1.0. The binding abilities of pesticides to CAT followed the order: fenvalerate>deltamethrin>disulfoton>isofenphos-methyl>carbaryl>malathion>isocarbophos>dimethoate>dipterex>acephate>methomyl>methamidophos, which was generally similar to the order of determination sensitivity of pesticides. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that CAT bound with hydrophobic pesticides by hydrophobic interaction force, and with hydrophilic pesticides by hydrogen bond and van der Waals force. The pesticides to CAT molecular docking study showed that pesticides could enter into the cavity locating among the four subdomains of CAT, giving the specific amino acid residues and hydrogen bonds involved in CAT-pesticides interaction. It was also found that the lgK values of pesticides to CAT increased regularly with increasing lgP, Mr, MR and MV, suggesting that the hydrophobicity and steric property of pesticide played essential roles in its binding to CAT.

  12. Molecular Insights into the Potential Toxicological Interaction of 2-Mercaptothiazoline with the Antioxidant Enzyme—Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenxing; Huang, Ming; Mi, Chenyu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Dong; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    2-mercaptothiazoline (2-MT) is widely used in many industrial fields, but its residue is potentially harmful to the environment. In this study, to evaluate the biological toxicity of 2-MT at protein level, the interaction between 2-MT and the pivotal antioxidant enzyme—catalase (CAT) was investigated using multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The results indicated that the CAT fluorescence quenching caused by 2-MT should be dominated by a static quenching mechanism through formation of a 2-MT/CAT complex. Furthermore, the identifications of the binding constant, binding forces, and the number of binding sites demonstrated that 2-MT could spontaneously interact with CAT at one binding site mainly via Van der Waals’ forces and hydrogen bonding. Based on the molecular docking simulation and conformation dynamic characterization, it was found that 2-MT could bind into the junctional region of CAT subdomains and that the binding site was close to enzyme active sites, which induced secondary structural and micro-environmental changes in CAT. The experiments on 2-MT toxicity verified that 2-MT significantly inhibited CAT activity via its molecular interaction, where 2-MT concentration and exposure time both affected the inhibitory action. Therefore, the present investigation provides useful information for understanding the toxicological mechanism of 2-MT at the molecular level. PMID:27537873

  13. Catalase-Based Modified Graphite Electrode for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection in Different Beverages

    PubMed Central

    Bollella, Paolo; Favero, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    A catalase-based (NAF/MWCNTs) nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was developed. The developed biosensor was characterized in terms of its bioelectrochemical properties. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique was employed to study the redox features of the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of nanomaterials dispersed in Nafion® polymeric solution. The electron transfer coefficient, α, and the electron transfer rate constant, ks, were found to be 0.42 and 1.71 s−1, at pH 7.0, respectively. Subsequently, the same modification steps were applied to mesoporous graphite screen-printed electrodes. Also, these electrodes were characterized in terms of their main electrochemical and kinetic parameters. The biosensor performances improved considerably after modification with nanomaterials. Moreover, the association of Nafion with carbon nanotubes retained the biological activity of the redox protein. The enzyme electrode response was linear in the range 2.5–1150 μmol L−1, with LOD of 0.83 μmol L−1. From the experimental data, we can assess the possibility of using the modified biosensor as a useful tool for H2O2 determination in packaged beverages. PMID:28078163

  14. A rapid and sensitive alcohol oxidase/catalase conductometric biosensor for alcohol determination.

    PubMed

    Hnaien, M; Lagarde, F; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2010-04-15

    A new conductometric biosensor has been developed for the determination of short chain primary aliphatic alcohols. The biosensor assembly was prepared through immobilization of alcohol oxidase from Hansenula sp. and bovine liver catalase in a photoreticulated poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane at the surface of interdigitated microelectrodes. The local conductivity increased rapidly after alcohol addition, reaching steady-state within 10 min. The sensitivity was maximal for methanol (0.394+/-0.004 microS microM(-1), n=5) and decreased by increasing the alcohol chain length. The response was linear up to 75 microM for methanol, 70 microM for ethanol and 65 microM for 1-propanol and limits of detection were 0.5 microM, 1 microM and 3 microM, respectively (S/N=3). No significant loss of the enzyme activities was observed after 3 months of storage at 4 degrees C in a 20mM phosphate buffer solution pH 7.2 (two or three measurements per week). After 4 months, 95% of the initial signal still remained. The biosensor response to ethanol was not significantly affected by acetic, lactic, ascorbic, malic, oxalic, citric, tartaric acids or glucose. The bi-enzymatic sensor was successfully applied to the determination of ethanol in different alcoholic beverages.

  15. Overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase confers cassava resistance to Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fuping; Liang, Xiao; Lu, Hui; Li, Qian; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Peng; Li, kaimian; Liu, Guanghua; Yan, Wei; Song, Jiming; Duan, Chunfang; Zhang, Linhui

    2017-01-01

    To explore the role of protective enzymes in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) resistance to mites, transgenic cassava lines overproducing copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) were used to evaluate and molecularly confirm cassava resistance to Tetranychus cinnabarinus. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated that, compared with the control cultivar TMS60444 (wild type, WT), the survival, reproduction, development and activities of SOD and CAT in T. cinnabarinus feeding on transgenic cassava lines SC2, SC4, and SC11 significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the activities of SOD and CAT in transgenic cassava lines SC2, SC4, and SC11 damaged by T. cinnabarinus significantly increased. These findings were similar to the results in the mite-resistant cassava cultivars. Besides, field evaluation indicated that the transgenic cassava lines SC2, SC4, and SC11 were slightly damaged as the highly mite-resistant control C1115, while the highly mite-susceptible WT was severely damaged by T. cinnabarinus. Laboratory and field evaluation demonstrated that transgenic cassava lines were resistant to T. cinnabarinus, which directly confirmed that the increase in SOD and CAT activities was positively related to cassava resistance to T. cinnabarinus. These results will help in understanding the antioxidant defense responses in the cassava–mite interaction and molecular breeding of mite-resistant cassava for effective pest control. PMID:28054665

  16. A catalase-peroxidase for oxidation of β-lactams to their (R)-sulfoxides.

    PubMed

    Sangar, Shefali; Pal, Mohan; Moon, Lomary S; Jolly, Ravinder S

    2012-07-01

    In this communication we report for the first time a biocatalytic method for stereoselective oxidation of β-lactams, represented by penicillin-G, penicillin-V and cephalosporin-G to their (R)-sulfoxides. The method involves use of a bacterium, identified as Bacillus pumilis as biocatalyst. The enzyme responsible for oxidase activity has been purified and characterized as catalase-peroxidase (KatG). KatG of B. pumilis is a heme containing protein showing characteristic heme spectra with soret peak at 406 nm and visible peaks at 503 and 635 nm. The major properties that distinguish B. pumilis KatG from other bacterial KatGs are (i) it is a monomer and contains one heme per monomer, whereas KatGs of other bacteria are dimers or tetramers and have low heme content of about one per dimer or two per tetramer and (ii) its 12-residue, N-terminal sequence obtained by Edman degradation did not show significant similarity with any of known KatGs.

  17. Catalase-Based Modified Graphite Electrode for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection in Different Beverages.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Giovanni; Bollella, Paolo; Mazzei, Franco; Favero, Gabriele; Antiochia, Riccarda; Tortolini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A catalase-based (NAF/MWCNTs) nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was developed. The developed biosensor was characterized in terms of its bioelectrochemical properties. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique was employed to study the redox features of the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of nanomaterials dispersed in Nafion® polymeric solution. The electron transfer coefficient, α, and the electron transfer rate constant, ks , were found to be 0.42 and 1.71 s(-1), at pH 7.0, respectively. Subsequently, the same modification steps were applied to mesoporous graphite screen-printed electrodes. Also, these electrodes were characterized in terms of their main electrochemical and kinetic parameters. The biosensor performances improved considerably after modification with nanomaterials. Moreover, the association of Nafion with carbon nanotubes retained the biological activity of the redox protein. The enzyme electrode response was linear in the range 2.5-1150 μmol L(-1), with LOD of 0.83 μmol L(-1). From the experimental data, we can assess the possibility of using the modified biosensor as a useful tool for H2O2 determination in packaged beverages.

  18. Imipramine enhances neuroprotective effect of PEP-1-Catalase against ischemic neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kim, Mi Jin; Kwon, Soon Won; Ahn, Eun Hee; Jeong, Hoon Jae; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Dutta, Suman; Lim, Soon Sung; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kil Soo; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-10-01

    The protein transduction domains have been reported to have potential to deliver the exogenous molecules, including proteins, to living cells. However, poor transduction of proteins limits therapeutic application. In this study, we examined whether imipramine could stimulate the transduction efficiency of PEP-1 fused proteins into astrocytes. PEP-1-catalase (PEP-1- CAT) was transduced into astrocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner, reducing cellular toxicity induced by H(2)O(2). Additionally, the group of PEP-1-CAT (+) imipramine showed enhancement of transduction efficiency and therefore increased cellular viability than that of PEP-1-CAT alone. In the gerbil ischemia models, PEP-1-CAT displayed significant neuroprotection in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Interestingly, PEP-1-CAT (+) imipramine prevented neuronal cell death and lipid peroxidation more markedly than PEP-1-CAT alone. Therefore, our results suggest that imipramine can be used as a drug to enhance the transduction of PEP-1 fusion proteins to cells or animals and their efficacies against various disorders.

  19. Potential toxicity of sarafloxacin to catalase: spectroscopic, ITC and molecular docking descriptions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhaozhen; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Bingjun

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sarafloxacin and catalase (CAT) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking method. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence of CAT was quenched regularly by different concentrations of sarafloxacin. The quenching mechanism was studied by lifetime measurement, and it was proved to be mostly due to static quenching. The formation of sarafloxacin-CAT complex alters the micro-environment of amide moieties and tryptophan (Trp) residues, reduces the α-helix content of the enzyme, changes the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring of heme and leads to the inhibition of the enzyme activity. Molecular docking study reveals that sarafloxacin is located between two α-helix of CAT near to Trp 182 and Trp 185 residues, which supports the experimental results and helps to have a more clear understanding about the interaction mechanism. The change in the relative position of His 74 to heme induced by the variation of secondary structure is considered to be the major reason for the reduction of CAT activity. Moreover, sarafloxacin binds into a hydrophobic area of CAT mainly through hydrophobic interactions, which is consistent with the ITC analysis.

  20. Potential toxicity of sarafloxacin to catalase: Spectroscopic, ITC and molecular docking descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaozhen; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Bingjun

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sarafloxacin and catalase (CAT) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking method. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence of CAT was quenched regularly by different concentrations of sarafloxacin. The quenching mechanism was studied by lifetime measurement, and it was proved to be mostly due to static quenching. The formation of sarafloxacin-CAT complex alters the micro-environment of amide moieties and tryptophan (Trp) residues, reduces the α-helix content of the enzyme, changes the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring of heme and leads to the inhibition of the enzyme activity. Molecular docking study reveals that sarafloxacin is located between two α-helix of CAT near to Trp 182 and Trp 185 residues, which supports the experimental results and helps to have a more clear understanding about the interaction mechanism. The change in the relative position of His 74 to heme induced by the variation of secondary structure is considered to be the major reason for the reduction of CAT activity. Moreover, sarafloxacin binds into a hydrophobic area of CAT mainly through hydrophobic interactions, which is consistent with the ITC analysis.

  1. A new polyaniline-catalase-glutaraldehyde-modified biosensor for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    PubMed

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Oyman, Gizem; Cınar, Ezgi; Odabas, Gorkem

    2017-01-02

    A new biosensor based on catalase enzyme immobilized on electrochemically constructed polyaniline (PANI) film modified with glutaraldehyde has been developed for the determination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in milk samples. Assembly processes of polyaniline and immobilization of the enzyme were monitored with the help of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Amperometric measurements have been performed at cathodic peak (-0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCI) which was attributed to reduction of PANI. Hydrogen peroxide was determined by using amperometric method at -0.3 V. The biosensor responses were correlated linearly with the hydrogen peroxide concentrations between 5.0 × 10(-6) and 1.0 × 10(-4) M by amperometric method. Detection limit of the biosensor is 2.18 × 10(-6) M for H2O2. In the optimization studies of the biosensor, some parameters such as optimum pH, temperature, concentration of aniline, amount of enzyme, and number of scans during electropolymerization were investigated.

  2. Activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in people protractedly exposed to lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    Lead can modify pro/antioxidant status by influencing antioxidant enzymes. As the results of experimental researches are divergent, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the activity of enzymes that play a vital role in the defence against ROS in blood of people protractedly exposed to lead compounds. The study population included 172 healthy employees of zinc and lead steelworks. Workers exposed to lead (L) were divided into 2 groups: the first included workers with mean lead concentration (PbB) from 25-35 microl/dl (LL group), and the second group of high exposure (HL group)--with PbB over 35 microl/dl. The administration workers were the control group. There were no significant changes in activity of catalase and mitochondrial SOD in the study population. The activity of ZnCu-SOD significantly increased, both in plasma and erythrocytes, but first in plasma in the LL subgroup by about 42% (p=0.044), and then in erythrocytes in the HL subgroup by about 23% (p=0.012) when compared to the control group. Concentration of TBARS-MDA increased both in serum and erythrocytes. In people protractedly exposed to lead (mean 15 +/- 10 years), there is observed an increased activity of SOD in blood, which seems to be an adoptive mechanism against the raised amount of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by lead.

  3. Flavonoid-induced conversion of catalase to its inactive form--Compound II.

    PubMed

    Krych, J; Gebicki, J L; Gebicka, L

    2014-11-01

    Flavonoids (FlaOHs), plant polyphenols, are ubiquitous components of human diet and are known as antioxidants. However, their prooxidant activity has also been reported. We have recently found that FlaOHs inhibit catalase, the heme enzyme which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and molecular oxygen. The catalytic cycle proceeds with the formation of the intermediate, Compound I (Cpd I), an oxoferryl porphyrin π-cation radical, the two-electron oxidation product of a heme group. Under conditions of low H2O2 fluxes and in the presence of an appropriate substrate, Cpd I can undergo one-electron reduction to inactive Compound II (Cpd II), oxoferryl derivative without radical site. Here we show that in vitro, under low fluxes of H2O2, FlaOHs reduce Cpd I to inactive Cpd II. Measurable amounts of Cpd II can be formed even in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) at concentration comparable with the investigated FlaOHs. Possible mechanisms of electron transfer from FlaOH molecule to the heme are discussed.

  4. Effects of Greek legume plant extracts on xanthine oxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities.

    PubMed

    Spanou, Chrysoula I; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Stagos, Dimitrios; Liadaki, Kalliopi; Aligiannis, Nectarios; Angelis, Apostolos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Anastasiadi, Maria; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Legumes are considered to have beneficial health implications, which have been attributed to their phytochemical content. Polyphenols are considered the most important phytochemical compounds extensively studied for their antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of potent antioxidant legume plant extracts on xanthine oxidase (XO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. XO exerts a dual role, as it is the major contributor of free radicals during exercise while it generates uric acid, the most potent antioxidant molecule in plasma. CAT and SOD are two of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defence of tissues. We demonstrate that the majority of the extracts inhibited XO activity, but they had no effect on CAT inhibition and SOD induction when used at low concentrations. These results imply that the tested extracts may be considered as possible source of novel XO inhibitors. However, we have shown that allopurinol administration, a known XO inhibitor, before exercise reduces performance and induces oxidative stress in rats. Considering the fact that the extracts examined had an inhibitory effect on XO activity, possibly posing a restriction in their characterization as antioxidants, phytochemical antioxidant administration before exercise should probably be reconsidered.

  5. Differential response of maize catalases and superoxide dismutases to the photoactivated fungal toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J D; Scandalios, J G

    1992-05-01

    Many fungi of the genus Cercospora produce a light-induced, photoactivated polyketide toxin called cercosporin. In the presence of light an excited form (triplet state) of the toxin molecule is produced which, depending on the reducing potential of the environment, reacts with molecular oxygen to produce singlet oxygen and/or superoxide radicals. In this paper a system is presented for analysis of antioxidant defense gene response using purified cercosporin under conditions demonstrated to favor superoxide formation. Under the assay conditions employed, changes in total catalase activity, as well as individual isozyme protein levels generally mirrored the changes observed in corresponding steady-state RNA levels in response to applied cercosporin. In contrast, while transcript accumulation for most maize superoxide dismutases increased dramatically, both total superoxide dismutase activity and individual isozyme protein levels remained constant in all toxin treatments. In one case, the analyses indicated that there are two distinct transcripts that hybridize with a gene-specific probe for Sod3. These two transcripts responded differentially to applied toxin (levels of the larger transcript increased while the smaller decreased), whereas corresponding steady-state levels for the SOD-3 isozyme proteins remained constant. This suggests that protein turnover might play a role in the response of these SODs to activated oxygen species.

  6. Catalase and ascorbate peroxidase-representative H2O2-detoxifying heme enzymes in plants.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Naser A; Sharma, Pallavi; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Khan, Ekhlaque A; Kachhap, Kiran; Mohamed, Amal A; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Devi, Gurumayum Devmanjuri; Vasudhevan, Palanisamy; Sofo, Adriano; Khan, Nafees A; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Lukatkin, Alexander S; Singh, Harminder Pal; Pereira, Eduarda; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-10-01

    Plants have to counteract unavoidable stress-caused anomalies such as oxidative stress to sustain their lives and serve heterotrophic organisms including humans. Among major enzymatic antioxidants, catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) are representative heme enzymes meant for metabolizing stress-provoked reactive oxygen species (ROS; such as H2O2) and controlling their potential impacts on cellular metabolism and functions. CAT mainly occurs in peroxisomes and catalyzes the dismutation reaction without requiring any reductant; whereas, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and utilizes ascorbate (AsA) as specific electron donor for the reduction of H2O2 into H2O in organelles including chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Literature is extensive on the glutathione-associated H2O2-metabolizing systems in plants. However, discussion is meager or scattered in the literature available on the biochemical and genomic characterization as well as techniques for the assays of CAT and APX and their modulation in plants under abiotic stresses. This paper aims (a) to introduce oxidative stress-causative factors and highlights their relationship with abiotic stresses in plants; (b) to overview structure, occurrence, and significance of CAT and APX in plants;

  7. Multifrequency EPR Studies of Manganese Catalases Provide a Complete Description of Proteinaceous Nitrogen Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Stich, Troy A.; Whittaker, James W.; Britt, R. David

    2012-01-01

    Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is employed at two very different excitation frequencies, 9.77 and 30.67 GHz, in the study of the nitrogen coordination environment of the Mn(III)Mn(IV) state of the dimanganese-containing catalases from Lactobacillus plantarum and Thermus thermophilus. Consistent with previous studies, the lower-frequency results reveal one unique histidine nitrogen-Mn cluster interaction. For the first time, a second, more strongly hyperfine-coupled 14N atom is unambiguously observed through the use of higher frequency/higher field EPR spectroscopy. The low excitation frequency spectral features are rationalized as arising from the interaction of a histidine nitrogen that is bound to the Mn(IV) ion, while the higher excitation frequency features are attributed to the histidine nitrogen bound to the Mn(III) ion. These results allow for the computation of intrinsic hyperfine coupling constants, which range from 2.2 to 2.9 MHz, for sp2-hybridized nitrogens coordinating equatorially to high-valent Mn ions. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the context of recent results from analogous higher frequency EPR studies of the Mn cluster in photosystem II and other exchange-coupled transition metal-containing systems. PMID:20055466

  8. Influence of catalase gene silencing on the survivability of Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide produced in cell metabolism, result in the disruption of cellular function and structure. Catalase (CAT), an enzyme which exists in almost all organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, acts in scavenging ROS. In this study, a sequence fragment encoding a CAT-like protein from wheat aphids ( Sitobion avenae) was cloned. Amino acid sequence alignment showed this CAT shared relatively high conservation with CAT sequences from other insects. We detected cat mRNA levels at nymphs of different stages and adults and results showed that cat expression in adults was significantly higher compared to juvenile stages. At the third instar stage, ingestion of dsCAT significantly knocked down CAT expression. Continuous feeding of dsCAT mixed in an artificial diet led to reduced survival rate and ecdysis index. This study indicates that cat, a potential target gene for management of insect pests, is important for maintaining the survival of  S. avenae.

  9. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  10. Catalase prevents maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-β1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

  11. Expression of a cloned sweet potato catalase SPCAT1 alleviates ethephon-mediated leaf senescence and H₂O₂ elevation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Jung; Wu, Sin-Dai; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Shen, Che-Yu; Afiyanti, Mufidah; Li, Wei-Jhen; Lin, Yaw-Huei

    2012-01-01

    In this report a full-length cDNA, SPCAT1, was isolated from ethephon-treated mature L3 leaves of sweet potato. SPCAT1 contained 1479 nucleotides (492 amino acids) in its open reading frame, and exhibited high amino acid sequence identities (ca. 71.2-80.9%) with several plant catalases, including Arabidopsis, eggplant, grey mangrove, pea, potato, tobacco and tomato. Gene structural analysis showed that SPCAT1 encoded a catalase and contained a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif and calmodulin binding domain around its C-terminus. RT-PCR showed that SPCAT1 gene expression was enhanced significantly in mature L3 and early senescent L4 leaves and was much reduced in immature L1, L2 and completely yellowing senescent L5 leaves. In dark- and ethephon-treated L3 leaves, SPCAT1 expression was significantly enhanced temporarily from 0 to 24h, then decreased gradually until 72h after treatment. SPCAT1 gene expression levels also exhibited approximately inverse correlation with the qualitative and quantitative H(2)O(2) amounts. Effector treatment showed that ethephon-enhanced SPCAT1 expression was repressed by antioxidant reduced glutathione, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI), calcium ion chelator EGTA and de novo protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. These data suggest that elevated reactive oxygen species H(2)O(2), NADPH oxidase, external calcium influx and de novo synthesized proteins are required and associated with ethephon-mediated enhancement of sweet potato catalase SPCAT1 expression. Exogenous application of expressed catalase SPCAT1 fusion protein delayed or alleviated ethephon-mediated leaf senescence and H(2)O(2) elevation. Based on these data we conclude that sweet potato SPCAT1 is an ethephon-inducible peroxisomal catalase, and its expression is regulated by reduced glutathione, DPI, EGTA and cycloheximide. Sweet potato catalase SPCAT1 may play a physiological role or function in cope with H(2)O(2

  12. Characterizing dose-responses of catalase to nitrofurazone exposure in model ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for ecotoxicity assessment: enzyme activity and mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiqiu; Zhou, Liang; Lin, Xiaofeng; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2014-02-01

    In environmental studies, some biological responses, known as biomarkers, have been used as a powerful bioassay tool for more than four decades. Disparity between enzyme activity and mRNA abundance leads to correlation equivocality, which makes the application of biomarkers for environmental risk assessment more complicated. This study investigates this disparity in the case of catalase when used as a biomarker for detecting ecotoxicity induced by antibiotics in aquatic ecosystems. In particular, dose-responses for catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance were investigated in Euplotes vannus which were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations, and dose-response models were developed to characterize the dose-response dynamics. Significant differences were found in both catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance among the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone. Catalase activity showed a hormetic-like effect in terms of dose-response, characterized by a biphasic relationship which was more clearly evident after a longer exposure period, while mRNA expression abundance increased linearly with the exposure duration. Additionally, the correlation between catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance reversed along with the duration of exposure to nitrofurazone. Taken together, our results demonstrate that catalase mRNA expression offers a more straightforward dose-response model than enzyme activity. Our findings suggest that both catalase enzyme activity and mRNA expression abundance can be used jointly as bioassay tools for detecting ecotoxicity induced by nitrofurazone in aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Improving of catalase stability properties by encapsulation in alginate/Fe3O4 magnetic composite beads for enzymatic removal of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin Ispirli; Çinar, Mürvet; Teke, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was enhancing of stability properties of catalase enzyme by encapsulation in alginate/nanomagnetic beads. Amounts of carrier (10-100 mg) and enzyme concentrations (0.25-1.5 mg/mL) were analyzed to optimize immobilization conditions. Also, the optimum temperature (25-50°C), optimum pH (3.0-8.0), kinetic parameters, thermal stability (20-70°C), pH stability (4.0-9.0) operational stability (0-390 min), and reusability were investigated for characterization of the immobilized catalase system. The optimum pH levels of both free and immobilized catalase were 7.0. At the thermal stability studies, the magnetic catalase beads protected 90% activity, while free catalase maintained only 10% activity at 70°C. The thermal profile of magnetic catalase beads was spread over a large area. Similarly, this system indicated the improving of the pH stability. The reusability, which is especially important for industrial applications, was also determined. Thus, the activity analysis was done 50 times in succession. Catalase encapsulated magnetic alginate beads protected 83% activity after 50 cycles.

  14. Immunodetection of a brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens Stål) salivary catalase-like protein into tissues of rice, Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Petrova, A; Smith, C M

    2014-02-01

    Saliva plays an important role in host plant-phloem-feeding insect molecular interactions. To better elucidate the role of insect saliva, a series of experiments were conducted to establish if catalase from the salivary glands of the brown planthopper (BPH; Nilaparvata lugens Stål) was secreted into rice host plant tissue during feeding. Catalase is the main enzyme that decomposes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at high concentrations. H2O2 is a part of the free radicals system that mediates important physiological roles including signalling and defence. Previous studies have suggested that H2O2 is involved in the rice endogenous response to BPH feeding. If, the BPH secretes catalase into host plant tissue this will counter the effects of H2O2, from detoxification to interfering with plant signalling and defence mechanisms. When BPHs were fed on a hopper-resistant rice variety for 24 h, catalase activity in the salivary glands increased 3.5-fold compared with hoppers fed on a susceptible rice variety. Further supporting evidence of the effects of BPH catalase was demonstrated by immunodetection analyses where results from two independent sources: BPH-infested rice tissue and BPH-probed artificial diets, suggest that the BPH secretes catalase-like protein during feeding. The possible physiological roles of BPH-secreted catalase are discussed.

  15. [Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in carotenoid-synthesizing fungi Blakeslea trispora and Neurospora crassa under the oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Gessler, N N; Sokolov, A V; Bykhovskiĭ, V Ia; Belozerskaia, T A

    2002-01-01

    The addition of menadione into the medium during cultivation of Neurospora crassa in the dark activated its constitutive superoxide dismutase. Exposure to light not only activated superoxide dismutase and catalase, but also increased the content of neurosporaxanthin. Superoxide dismutase activity in the mixed (+/-) mycelium of Blakeslea trispora synthesizing beta-carotene in the dark was much lower than that in Neurospora crassa. The superoxide dismutase activity further decreased in oxidative stress. The catalase activity decreased with an increase in the content of beta-carotene. Our results indicate that neurosporaxanthin possesses photoprotective properties in Neurospora crassa. In Blakeslea trispora (+/-) fungi, this compound acts as a major antioxidant during inactivation of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species.

  16. The use of glucose oxidase and catalase for the enzymatic reduction of the potential ethanol content in wine.

    PubMed

    Röcker, Jessica; Schmitt, Matthias; Pasch, Ludwig; Ebert, Kristin; Grossmann, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Due to the increase of sugar levels in wine grapes as one of the impacts of climate change, alcohol reduction in wines becomes a major focus of interest. This study combines the use of glucose oxidase and catalase activities with the aim of rapid conversion of glucose into non-fermentable gluconic acid. The H2O2 hydrolysing activity of purified catalase is necessary in order to stabilize glucose oxidase activity. After establishing the adequate enzyme ratio, the procedure was applied in large-scale trials (16L- and 220L-scale) of which one was conducted in a winery under industrial wine making conditions. Both enzyme activity and wine flavour were clearly influenced by the obligatory aeration in the different trials. With the enzyme treatment an alcohol reduction of 2%vol. was achieved after 30h of aeration. However the enzyme treated wines were significantly more acidic and less typical.

  17. Dynamics of erythrocyte count, hemoglobin, and catalase activity in rat blood in hypokinesia, muscular activity and restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneyeva, G. V.; Potapovich, G. M.; Voloshko, N. A.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted to prove that muscular exertion (in this instance swimming) of different duration and intensity, as well as hypodynamia, result in an increase of hemoglobin and number of red blood cells in peripheral blood rats. Catalase activity increased with an increase in the duration of swimming, but only up to 6 hr; with 7-9 hr of swimming as well as in hypodynamia, catalase activity decreased. It was also observed that under hypodynamia as well as in 3, 5 and 6 hr exertion (swimming) the color index of blood decreased. Pressure chamber treatment (for 8 min each day for one week), alternating a 2 min negative pressure up to 35 mm Hg with 1 min positive pressure, increased the erythrocyte count and hemoglobin content.

  18. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and acetylcholinesterase: biomarkers for the joint effects of cadmium, zinc and methyl parathion contamination in water.

    PubMed

    Ling, XuePing; Zhang, YiHeng; Lu, YingHua; Huang, HeQing

    2011-10-01

    Heavy metals are known to reduce the activities of antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase, catalase), while organophosphorous insecticides are known to inhibit the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. In this study, the activities of these three enzymes in zebrafish (Danio rerio) tissues were assessed to evaluate the consequences heavy metal and organophosphate contamination in aquatic systems. When the fish were contacted with water containing a single pollutant, superoxide dismutase activity was affected by the presence of Cd but not by methyl parathion or Zn. However, catalase and acetylcholinesterase activities were sensitive to all three pollutants. The combined treatment showed that the three enzymes could be chosen as biomarkers of joint pollution by both metals and organophosphate. Toxicity tests showed an antagonism interaction between methyl parathion and Cd or Zn, and the change of enzyme activities at 96 hours was in accordance with that.

  19. The alteration of intracellular enzymes. III. The effect of temperature on the kinetics of altered and unaltered yeast catalase.

    PubMed

    FRASER, M J; KAPLAN, J G

    1955-03-20

    1. The very large increase in catalase activity (Euler effect) which follows treatment of yeast cells with CHCl(3), UV and n-propanol is accompanied by highly significant changes in kinetic properties. With respect to the enzymatic decomposition of H(2)O(2), the thermodynamic constants of the activation process micro, DeltaHdouble dagger, DeltaSdouble dagger, DeltaFdouble dagger, decrease, following treatment of the intracellular enzyme, by 4.5 kcal., 4.5 kcal., 10.1 e.u. and 1.7 kcal., respectively, all these differences being significant at the 1 per cent level. 2. Similar differences exist between the untreated, intracellular enzyme on the one hand, and the extracted yeast and crystalline beef liver catalases on the other. Significant differences in these thermodynamic constants do not exist among the treated intracellular, extracted yeast, and crystalline liver catalases. 3. These data provide unequivocal confirmation of the phenomenon of enzyme alteration reported previously, and confirm previous evidence that the extracted and crystalline enzymes have also undergone enzyme alteration and have properties which are identical with, or very similar to, those of the catalase altered in situ. 4. With respect to the process of heat destruction of catalase, the greatly diminished stability to heat of the altered enzymes, previously reported, has been confirmed. The thermodynamic constants of activation of this process have likewise changed following alteration, in the case of micro, DeltaHdouble dagger, and DeltaSdouble dagger an increase of 20.6 kcal., 20.6 kcal., and 70 e.u., respectively, and of DeltaFdouble dagger a decrease of 2.8 kcal. 5. All these data have been shown to be consistent with, and in some cases predictable from, the interfacial hypothesis, which states that the unaltered catalase exists within the cell adsorbed to some interface, in a partially, but reversibly, unfolded configuration of relatively low specificity; enzyme alteration consists, in

  20. Catalase expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is mainly controlled by PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Auquier, Julien; Dejeans, Nicolas; Sid, Brice; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Luc; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2014-05-15

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes mainly the transformation of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. Although catalase is frequently down-regulated in tumors the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Few transcription factors have been reported to directly bind the human catalase promoter. Among them FoxO3a has been proposed as a positive regulator of catalase expression. Therefore, we decided to study the role of the transcription factor FoxO3a and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway, which regulates FoxO3a, in the expression of catalase. To this end, we developed an experimental model of mammary breast MCF-7 cancer cells that acquire resistance to oxidative stress, the so-called Resox cells, in which catalase is overexpressed as compared with MCF-7 parental cell line. In Resox cells, Akt expression is decreased but its phosphorylation is enhanced when compared with MCF-7 cells. A similar profile is observed for FoxO3a, with less total protein but more phosphorylated FoxO3a in Resox cells, correlating with its higher Akt activity. The modulation of FoxO3a expression by knockdown and overexpression strategies did not affect catalase expression, neither in MCF-7 nor in Resox cells. Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR by LY295002 and rapamycin, respectively, decreases the phosphorylation of downstream targets (i.e. GSK3β and p70S6K) and leads to an increase of catalase expression only in MCF-7 but not in Resox cells. In conclusion, FoxO3a does not appear to play a critical role in the regulation of catalase expression in both cancer cells. Only MCF-7 cells are sensitive and dependent on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling.

  1. Salicylic acid is a modulator of catalase isozymes in chickpea plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri.

    PubMed

    Gayatridevi, S; Jayalakshmi, S K; Sreeramulu, K

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between salicylic acid level catalases isoforms chickpea cv. ICCV-10 infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri was investigated. Pathogen-treated chickpea plants showed high levels of SA compared with the control. Two isoforms of catalases in shoot extract (CAT-IS and CAT-IIS) and single isoform in root extract (CAT-R) were detected in chickpea. CAT-IS and CAT-R activities were inhibited in respective extracts treated with pathogen whereas, CAT-IIS activity was not inhibited. These isoforms were purified and their kinetic properties studied in the presence or absence of SA. The molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE of CAT-IS, CAT-IIS and CAT-R was found to be 97, 40 and 66 kDa respectively. Kinetic studies indicated that Km and V(max) of CAT-IS were 0.2 mM and 300 U/mg, 0.53 mM and 180 U/mg for CAT-IIS and 0.25 mM and 280 U/mg for CAT-R, respectively. CAT-IS and CAT-R were found to be more sensitive to SA and 50% of their activities were inhibited at 6 and 4 μM respectively, whereas CAT-IIS was insensitive to SA up to 100 μM. Quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of purified catalases were used to quantitate SA binding; the estimated K(d) value for CAT-IS, CAT-IIS and CAT-R found to be 2.3 μM, 3.1 mM and 2.8 μM respectively. SA is a modulator of catalase isozymes activity, supports its role in establishment of SAR in chickpea plants infected with the pathogen.

  2. Catalase Expression Is Modulated by Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin and Influences the Formation of Free Radicals in Staphylococcus aureus Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hougaard, Anni B; Paulander, Wilhelm; Skibsted, Leif H; Ingmer, Hanne; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of free radicals in biological systems is challenging due to their short half-lives. We have applied electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin traps using the probes PBN (N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone) and DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to assess free radical formation in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus treated with a bactericidal antibiotic, vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. While we were unable to detect ESR signals in bacterial cells, hydroxyl radicals were observed in the supernatant of bacterial cell cultures. Surprisingly, the strongest signal was detected in broth medium without bacterial cells present and it was mitigated by iron chelation or by addition of catalase, which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. This suggests that the signal originates from hydroxyl radicals formed by the Fenton reaction, in which iron is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide. Previously, hydroxyl radicals have been proposed to be generated within bacterial cells in response to bactericidal antibiotics. We found that when S. aureus was exposed to vancomycin or ciprofloxacin, hydroxyl radical formation in the broth was indeed increased compared to the level seen with untreated bacterial cells. However, S. aureus cells express catalase, and the antibiotic-mediated increase in hydroxyl radical formation was correlated with reduced katA expression and catalase activity in the presence of either antibiotic. Therefore, our results show that in S. aureus, bactericidal antibiotics modulate catalase expression, which in turn influences the formation of free radicals in the surrounding broth medium. If similar regulation is found in other bacterial species, it might explain why bactericidal antibiotics are perceived as inducing formation of free radicals.

  3. Interaction with the Redox Cofactor MYW and Functional Role of a Mobile Arginine in Eukaryotic Catalase-Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique bifunctional heme peroxidases with an additional posttranslationally formed redox-active Met-Tyr-Trp cofactor that is essential for catalase activity. On the basis of studies of bacterial KatGs, controversial mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide oxidation were proposed. The recent discovery of eukaryotic KatGs with differing pH optima of catalase activity now allows us to scrutinize those postulated reaction mechanisms. In our study, secreted KatG from the fungus Magnaporthe grisea (MagKatG2) was used to analyze the role of a remote KatG-typical mobile arginine that was shown to interact with the Met-Tyr-Trp adduct in a pH-dependent manner in bacterial KatGs. Here we present crystal structures of MagKatG2 at pH 3.0, 5.5, and 7.0 and investigate the mobility of Arg461 by molecular dynamics simulation. Data suggest that at pH ≥4.5 Arg461 mostly interacts with the deprotonated adduct Tyr. Elimination of Arg461 by mutation to Ala slightly increases the thermal stability but does not alter the active site architecture or the kinetics of cyanide binding. However, the variant Arg461Ala lost the wild-type-typical optimum of catalase activity at pH 5.25 (kcat = 6450 s–1) but exhibits a broad plateau between pH 4.5 and 7.5 (kcat = 270 s–1 at pH 5.5). Moreover, significant differences in the kinetics of interconversion of redox intermediates of wild-type and mutant protein mixed with either peroxyacetic acid or hydrogen peroxide are observed. These findings together with published data from bacterial KatGs allow us to propose a role of Arg461 in the H2O2 oxidation reaction of KatG. PMID:27293030

  4. Rhodococcus equi’s Extreme Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide Is Mainly Conferred by One of Its Four Catalase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Barbey, Corinne; Appourchaux, Anne-Cécile; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Laugier, Claire; Petry, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is one of the most widespread causes of disease in foals aged from 1 to 6 months. R. equi possesses antioxidant defense mechanisms to protect it from reactive oxygen metabolites such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated during the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. These defense mechanisms include enzymes such as catalase, which detoxify hydrogen peroxide. Recently, an analysis of the R. equi 103 genome sequence revealed the presence of four potential catalase genes. We first constructed ΔkatA-, ΔkatB-, ΔkatC-and ΔkatD-deficient mutants to study the ability of R. equi to survive exposure to H2O2 in vitro and within mouse peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that ΔkatA and, to a lesser extent ΔkatC, were affected by 80 mM H2O2. Moreover, katA deletion seems to significantly affect the ability of R. equi to survive within murine macrophages. We finally investigated the expression of the four catalases in response to H2O2 assays with a real time PCR technique. Results showed that katA is overexpressed 367.9 times (±122.6) in response to exposure to 50 mM of H2O2 added in the stationary phase, and 3.11 times (±0.59) when treatment was administered in the exponential phase. In untreated bacteria, katB, katC and katD were overexpressed from 4.3 to 17.5 times in the stationary compared to the exponential phase. Taken together, our results show that KatA is the major catalase involved in the extreme H2O2 resistance capability of R. equi. PMID:22879963

  5. recA and catalase in H sub 2 O sub 2 -mediated toxicity in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Charniga, L.; Cohen, M.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae cells defective in the biosynthesis of the recA gene product are no more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type cells. Although gonococci possess nearly 100-fold-greater catalase levels than Escherichia coli, they are more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide than this organism. The natural niche of gonococci undoubtedly results in exposure to oxidant stress; however, they do not demonstrate particularly efficient antioxidant defense systems.

  6. Imparting functionality to biocatalysts via embedding enzymes into nanoporous materials by a de novo approach: size-selective sheltering of catalase in metal-organic framework microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Fa-Kuen; Wang, Shao-Chun; Yen, Chia-I; Wu, Chang-Cheng; Dutta, Saikat; Chou, Lien-Yang; Morabito, Joseph V; Hu, Pan; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Wu, Kevin C-W; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2015-04-08

    We develop a new concept to impart new functions to biocatalysts by combining enzymes and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The proof-of-concept design is demonstrated by embedding catalase molecules into uniformly sized ZIF-90 crystals via a de novo approach. We have carried out electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, electrophoresis, thermogravimetric analysis, and confocal microscopy to confirm that the ~10 nm catalase molecules are embedded in 2 μm single-crystalline ZIF-90 crystals with ~5 wt % loading. Because catalase is immobilized and sheltered by the ZIF-90 crystals, the composites show activity in hydrogen peroxide degradation even in the presence of protease proteinase K.

  7. Effect of catalase inactivation on levels of inorganic peroxides, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, oxygen consumption and life span in adult houseflies (Musca domestica).

    PubMed Central

    Allen, R G; Farmer, K J; Sohal, R S

    1983-01-01

    The effects of total inhibition of catalase, induced by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, on the adult housefly (Musca domestica) were examined. The lack of catalase activity had no effect on the longevity of the houseflies. Inorganic-peroxide concentration was elevated at younger ages, but declined in older flies. The rate of oxygen consumption by the flies was greatly decreased and the levels of oxidized as well as reduced glutathione were augmented. Superoxide dismutase activity showed a slight increase. This study suggests that loss of catalase activity does not affect survival of houseflies due to adaptive responses. PMID:6661212

  8. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.01), the quadratic effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.05), the linear effects of copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( P<0.05). Additionally, the synergistic effects of temperature and copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  9. TRIS-lecithin extender supplemented with antioxidant catalase for chilling of canine semen.

    PubMed

    Beccaglia, M; Anastasi, P; Chigioni, S; Luvoni, G C

    2009-07-01

    The aims were to evaluate the suitability of a non-commercial TRIS-lecithin (LC) extender and the effect of different concentrations of catalase (CAT) on motility, capacitation status (Chlortetracycline-assay) and zona pellucida (ZP) binding capacity of canine spermatozoa stored at +5 degrees C for 4 days. The sperm-rich fractions of the ejaculates of four stud dogs were divided into four aliquots. After centrifugation, sperm pellets were diluted (200 x 10(6) sperm/ml) in TRIS buffer, citric acid, fructose, antibiotics, supplemented with 20% egg yolk (TRIS-EY) or 0.04% soybean lecithin (TRIS-LC) with CAT (150 or 450 UI/ml) or without CAT, and then preserved at 5 degrees C for 4 days. The results showed that LC is a valid alternative to EY for chilling canine semen, as similar rates of motility, number of uncapacitated spermatozoa and of spermatozoa binding the oocyte ZP were obtained in semen chilled in TRIS-LC or TRIS-EY. Different concentrations of CAT in a TRIS-LC based extender did not improve the quality of semen after chilling. However, a concentration of 150 UI/ml CAT resulted in an increased number of spermatozoa bound to the oocyte ZP, after 4 days of chilling when compared to semen chilled with TRIS-EY and TRIS-LC. In conclusion, an animal protein-free extender with soybean LC, as a replacement of EY, is suitable for 4 days chilling of canine spermatozoa, but the addition of CAT does not improve general semen quality except for a slight effect on sperm-ZP binding.

  10. Simultaneous and sequential co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase onto florisil.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Gul; Tukel, S Seyhan

    2007-06-01

    The co-immobilization of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (GOD) with bovine liver catalase (CAT) onto florisil (magnesium silicate-based porous carrier) was investigated to improve the catalytic efficiency of GOD against H2O2 inactivation. The effect of the amount of bound CAT on the GOD activity was also studied for 12 different initial combinations of GOD and CAT, using simultaneous and sequential coupling. The sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT showed a higher efficiency than the simultaneously co-immobilized GOD-CAT in terms of the GOD activity and economic costs. The highest activity was shown by the sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT when the initial amounts of GOD and CAT were 10 mg and 5 mg per gram of carrier. The optimum pH, buffer concentration, and temperature for GOD activity for the same co-immobilized GOD-CAT sample were then determined as pH 6.5, 50 mM, and 30 degrees C, respectively. When compared with the individually immobilized GOD, the catalytic activity of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was 70% higher, plus the reusability was more than two-fold. The storage stability of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was also found to be higher than that of the free form at both 5 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The increased GOD activity and reusability resulting from the co-immobilization process may have been due to CAT protecting GOD from inactivation by H2O2 and supplying additional O2 to the reaction system.

  11. Effects of sodium nitroprusside on mouse erythrocyte catalase activity and malondialdehyde status.

    PubMed

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Refinetti, Roberto; Mondal, Mohan; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy about the anti- or pro-oxidative effects of the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Hence, the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) and the status of malondialdehyde (MDA) were investigated after a 2.5 mg/kg dose of SNP had been i.p. administered to different and comparable groups of mice (n = 48). The drug was administered at two different circadian times (1 and 13 h after light onset [HALO]). There were, irrespectively of sampling time, no significant differences in the means of CAT activity and MDA status between control and SNP-treated groups, no matter the treatment time. However, CAT activity was significantly (Student's t-test, p < 0.001) increased 1 h following SNP administration at 1 HALO, whereas the significant (p < 0.001) increase in the enzyme activity was found only 3 h after injection at 13 HALO. The drug dosing either at 1 or 13 HALO resulted in no significant differences of MDA status between control and treated groups regardless to the sampling time. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) detected a significant (F0.05(7,88)= 5.3; p < 0.0006) interaction between sampling time and treatment in mice injected at 1 HALO, suggesting the influence of treatment on sampling-time-related changes in CAT activity. However, ANOVA validated no interaction between the two factors in mice treated at 13 HALO, illustrating that the sampling-time differences in enzyme activity were greater. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA revealed no interaction in the variation of MDA status in animals treated either at 1 or 13 HALO. This study indicates that SNP significantly affected the anti-oxidant system.

  12. Pregnancy rates in cattle with cryopreserved sexed spermatozoa: effects of laser intensity, staining conditions and catalase.

    PubMed

    Schenk, J L; Seidel, G E

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of this research was to improve fertility of cattle inseminated with sexed spermatozoa by improving sperm sorting procedures. Six field trials were conducted in which 4,264 heifers were inseminated into the uterine body with cryopreserved sexed or unsexed control spermatozoa. Pregnancy or calving rates with doses of 2 x 10(6) sexed spermatozoa ranged from 32 to 51%; these averaged 69% of the pregnancy rates with 20 x 10(6) unsexed, control spermatozoa (range 53 to 79% of controls). Fertility of sexed spermatozoa was especially low on farms where control fertility was low. Accuracy of sexing ranged from 86 to 91%. Laser power of 150 mW for interrogating spermatozoa did not result in lower pregnancy rates (43%) than when power was decreased as much as possible for a particular sorting batch (50 to 130 mW) to still achieve sexing accuracy (38% pregnant). Addition of catalase to fluids containing spermatozoa was beneficial when thawed spermatozoa were incubated in vitro for 2 h but had no effect on pregnancy rates. There also was no effect on pregnancy rates between two concentrations of Hoechst 33342 for staining spermatozoa. Freezing 2 x 10(6) sexed spermatozoa at 20 x 10(6)/ml resulted in a slightly higher rate of pregnancy (P < 0.05) than at 10 x 10(6)/ml. The information obtained in these trials, along with other improvements, notably lowering pressure in the sorting system from 50 to 40 psi, has been used to improve procedures for sexing spermatozoa commercially.

  13. Bioaccumulation of fullerene (C60) and corresponding catalase elevation in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafan; Wages, Mike; Yu, Shuangying; Maul, Jonathan D; Mayer, Greg; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Cobb, George P

    2014-05-01

    Fullerene (C(60)), with its unique physical properties and nanometer size, has been mass-produced for many applications in recent decades. The increased likelihood of direct release into the environment has raised interest in understanding both the environmental fate and corresponding biological effects of fullerenes to living organisms. Because few studies have emphasized fullerene uptake and resulting biochemical responses by living organisms, a toxicity screening test and a 28-d bioaccumulation test for Lumbriculus variegatus were performed. No mortality was observed in the range of 0.05 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment to 11.33 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment. A biota-sediment accumulation factor of micron-sized fullerene agglomerates (µ-C(60)) was 0.032 ± 0.008 at day 28, which is relatively low compared with pyrene (1.62 ± 0.22). Catalase (CAT) activity, an oxidative stress indicator, was elevated significantly on day 14 for L. variegatus exposed to µ-C(60) (p = 0.034). This peak CAT activity corresponded to the highest body residues observed in the present study, 199 ± 80 µg C(60) /kg dry weight sediment. Additionally, smaller C(60) agglomerate size increased bioaccumulation potential in L. variegatus. The relationship between C(60) body residue and the increased CAT activity followed a linear regression. All results suggest that C(60) has a lower bioaccumulation potential than pyrene but a higher potential to induce oxidative stress in L. variegatus.

  14. A novel pyrogallol red-based assay to assess catalase activity: Optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Mohamed; Arribas, Silvia M; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2017-05-01

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) was identified as a novel optical probe for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed oxidation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied as a tool to optimize the concentrations of PGR (100µmolL(-1)), HRP (1UmL(-1)) and H2O2 (250µmolL(-1)) and used to develop a sensitive PGR-based catalase (CAT) activity assay (PGR-CAT assay). N-ethylmaleimide -NEM- (102mmolL(-1)) was used to avoid interference produced by thiol groups while protecting CAT activity. Incubation time (30min) for samples or CAT used as standard and H2O2 as well as signal stability (stable between 5 and 60min) were also evaluated. PGR-CAT assay was linear within the range of 0-4UmL(-1) (R(2)=0.993) and very sensitive with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.005UmL(-1) and quantitation (LOQ) of 0.01UmL(-1). PGR-CAT assay showed an adequate intra-day RSD=0.6-9.5% and inter-day RSD=2.4-8.9%. Bland-Altman analysis and Passing-Bablok and Pearson correlation analysis showed good agreement between CAT activity as measured by the PRG-CAT assay and the Amplex Red assay. The PGR-CAT assay is more sensitive than all the other colorimetric assays reported, particularly the Amplex Red assay, and the cost of PGR is a small fraction (about 1/1000) of that of an Amplex Red probe, so it can be expected to find wide use among scientists studying CAT activity in biological samples.

  15. Mutation of Arabidopsis CATALASE2 results in hyponastic leaves by changes of auxin levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Yuan, Hong-Mei; Hu, Ye-Qin; Li, Jing; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and H2 O2 play vital roles in plant development and environmental responses; however, it is unclear whether and how H2 O2 modulates auxin levels. Here, we investigate this question using cat2-1 mutant, which exhibits reduced catalase activity and accumulates high levels of H2 O2 under photorespiratory conditions. At a light intensity of 150 μmol m(-2) s(-1) , the mutant exhibited up-curled leaves that have increased H2 O2 contents and decreased auxin levels. At low light intensities (30 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), the leaves of the mutant were normal, but exhibited reduced H2 O2 contents and elevated auxin levels. These findings suggest that H2 O2 modulates auxin levels. When auxin was directly applied to cat2-1 leaves, the up-curled leaves curled downwards. In addition, transformation of cat2-1 plants with pCAT2:iaaM, which increases auxin levels, rescued the hyponastic leaf phenotype. Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that the transcription of auxin synthesis-related genes and of genes that regulate leaf curvature is suppressed in cat2-1. Furthermore, application of glutathione rescued the up-curled leaves of cat2-1 and increased auxin levels, but did not change H2 O2 levels. Thus, the hyponastic leaves of cat2-1 reveal crosstalk between H2 O2 and auxin signalling that is mediated by changes in glutathione redox status.

  16. Legionella pneumophila Catalase-Peroxidases Are Required for Proper Trafficking and Growth in Primary Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Purnima; Byrne, Brenda; Chan, Yolande; Swanson, Michele S.; Steinman, Howard M.

    2003-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a parasite of aquatic amoebae and pathogen of pulmonary macrophages, replicates intracellularly, utilizing a type IV secretion system to subvert the trafficking of Legionella-containing phagosomes. Defense against host-derived reactive oxygen species has been proposed as critical for intracellular replication. Virulence traits of null mutants in katA and katB, encoding the two Legionella catalase-peroxidases, were analyzed to evaluate the hypothesis that L. pneumophila must decompose hydrogen peroxide to establish a replication niche in macrophages. Phagosomes containing katA or katB mutant Legionella colocalize with LAMP-1, a late endosomal-lysosomal marker, at twice the frequency of those of wild-type strain JR32 and show a decreased frequency of bacterial replication, in similarity to phenotypes of mutants with mutations in dotA and dotB, encoding components of the Type IV secretion system. Quantitative similarity of the katA/B phenotypes indicates that each contributes to virulence traits largely independently of intracellular compartmentalization (KatA in the periplasm and KatB in the cytosol). These data support a model in which KatA and KatB maintain a critically low level of H2O2 compatible with proper phagosome trafficking mediated by the type IV secretion apparatus. During these studies, we observed that dotA and dotB mutations in wild-type strain Lp02 had no effect on intracellular multiplication in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii, indicating that certain dotA/B functions in Lp02 are dispensable in that experimental model. We also observed that wild-type JR32, unlike Lp02, shows minimal contact-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting that cytotoxicity of JR32 is not a prerequisite for formation of replication-competent Legionella phagosomes in macrophages. PMID:12874332

  17. Impact of Microscale and Pilot-Scale Freeze-Drying on Protein Secondary Structures: Sucrose Formulations of Lysozyme and Catalase.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn-Hendrik; Leskinen, Jari T T; Molnár, Ferdinand; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2015-11-01

    Microscale (MS) freeze-drying offers rapid process cycles for early-stage formulation development. The effects of the MS approach on the secondary structures of two model proteins, lysozyme and catalase, were compared with pilot-scale (PS) vial freeze-drying. The secondary structures were assessed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Formulations were made with increasing sucrose-protein ratios. Freeze-drying protocols involved regular cooling without thermal treatment and annealing with MS and PS equipment, and cooling rate variations with the MS. Principal component analysis of smoothed second-derivative amide I spectra revealed sucrose-protein ratio-dependent shifts toward α-helical structures. Transferability of sucrose-protein formulations from MS to PS vial freeze-drying was evidenced at regular cooling rates. Local differences in protein secondary structures between the bottom and top of sucrose-catalase samples could be detected at the sucrose-catalase ratios of 1 and 2, this being related to the initial filling height and ice crystal morphology. Annealing revealed temperature, protein, formulation, and sample location-dependent effects influencing surface morphology at the top, or causing protein secondary structure perturbation at the bottom. With the MS approach, protein secondary structure differences at different cooling rates could be detected for sucrose-lysozyme samples at the sucrose-lysozyme ratio of 1.

  18. Ethanol injected into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces behavioral stimulation in rats: an effect prevented by catalase inhibition and naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Raúl; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2008-10-01

    It is suggested that some of the behavioral effects of ethanol, including its psychomotor properties, are mediated by beta-endorphin and opioid receptors. Ethanol-induced increases in the release of hypothalamic beta-endorphin depend on the catalasemic conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. Here, we evaluated the locomotor activity in rats microinjected with ethanol directly into the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ArcN), the main site of beta-endorphin synthesis in the brain and a region with high levels of catalase expression. Intra-ArcN ethanol-induced changes in motor activity were also investigated in rats pretreated with the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (0-2 mg/kg) or the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (AT; 0-1 g/kg). We found that ethanol microinjections of 64 or 128, but not 256 microg, produced locomotor stimulation. Intra-ArcN ethanol (128 microg)-induced activation was prevented by naltrexone and AT, whereas these compounds did not affect spontaneous activity. The present results support earlier evidence indicating that the ArcN and the beta-endorphinic neurons of this nucleus are necessary for ethanol to induce stimulation. In addition, our data suggest that brain structures that, as the ArcN, are rich in catalase may support the formation of ethanol-derived pharmacologically relevant concentrations of acetaldehyde and, thus be of particular importance for the behavioral effects of ethanol.

  19. A volumetric meter chip for point-of-care quantitative detection of bovine catalase for food safety control.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xingye; Hu, Jie; Choi, Jane Ru; Huang, Yalin; Wang, Xuemin; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2016-09-07

    A volumetric meter chip was developed for quantitative point-of-care (POC) analysis of bovine catalase, a bioindicator of bovine mastitis, in milk samples. The meter chip displays multiplexed quantitative results by presenting the distance of ink bar advancement that is detectable by the naked eye. The meter chip comprises a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer, a double-sided adhesive (DSA) layer and a glass slide layer fabricated by the laser-etching method, which is typically simple, rapid (∼3 min per chip), and cost effective (∼$0.2 per chip). Specially designed "U shape" reaction cells are covered by an adhesive tape that serves as an on-off switch, enabling the simple operation of the assay. As a proof of concept, we employed the developed meter chip for the quantification of bovine catalase in raw milk samples to detect catalase concentrations as low as 20 μg/mL. The meter chip has great potential to detect various target analytes for a wide range of POC applications.

  20. Catalase in peroxidase clothing: Interdependent cooperation of two cofactors in the catalytic versatility of KatG.

    PubMed

    Njuma, Olive J; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2014-02-15

    Catalase-per