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Sample records for n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors

  1. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Antagonists Have Variable Affect in 3-Nitropropionic Acid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-d-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment. PMID:18688711

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists have variable affect in 3-nitropropionic acid toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Payman; Carbery, Timothy; Geddes, James W

    2009-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress resulting from excessive activation of glutamate (N-methyl-D-aspartate) NMDA receptors are major participants in striatal degeneration associated with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) administration. Although excitotoxic and oxidative mechanisms are implicated in 3NP toxicity, there are conflicting reports as to whether NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate or exacerbate the 3NP-induced neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors in striatal degeneration, protein oxidation and motor impairment following systemic 3NP administration. We examined whether NMDA receptor antagonists, memantine and ifenprodil, influence the neurotoxicity of 3NP. The development of striatal lesion and protein oxidation following 3NP administration is delayed by memantine but not affected by ifenprodil. However, in behavioral experiments, memantine failed to improve and ifenprodil exacerbated the motor deficits associated with 3NP toxicity. Together, these findings suggest caution in the application of NMDA receptor antagonists as a neuroprotective agent in neurodegenerative disorders associated with metabolic impairment.

  3. N-Methyl D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Kynurenic Acid Affects Human Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Bagasrawala, Inseyah; Zecevic, Nada; Radonjić, Nevena V.

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a neuroactive metabolite of tryptophan degradation, acts as an endogenous N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist. Elevated levels of KYNA have been observed in pregnant women after viral infections and are considered to play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the consequences of KYNA-induced NMDAR blockade in human cortical development still remain elusive. To study the potential impact of KYNA on human neurodevelopment, we used an in vitro system of multipotent cortical progenitors, i.e., radial glia cells (RGCs), enriched from human cerebral cortex at mid-gestation (16–19 gestational weeks). KYNA treatment significantly decreased RGCs proliferation and survival by antagonizing NMDAR. This alteration resulted in a reduced number of cortical progenitors and neurons while number and activation of astrocytes increased. KYNA treatment reduced differentiation of RGCs into GABAergic neurons, while differentiation into glutamatergic neurons was relatively spared. Furthermore, in mixed cortical cultures KYNA triggered an inflammatory response as evidenced by increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. In conclusion, elevated levels of KYNA play a significant role in human RGC fate determination by antagonizing NMDARs and by activating an inflammatory response. The altered cell composition observed in cell culture following exposure to elevated KYNA levels suggests a mechanism for impairment of cortical circuitry formation in the fetal brain after viral infection, as seen in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27746712

  4. The antiallodynic action target of intrathecal gabapentin: Ca2+ channels, KATP channels or N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Yang, Jia-Rung; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Gabapentin is a novel analgesic whose mechanism of action is not known. We investigated in a postoperative pain model whether adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels, N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and Ca2+ channels are involved in the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal gabapentin. Mechanical allodynia was induced by a paw incision in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Withdrawal thresholds to von Frey filament stimulation near the incision site were measured before and after incision and after intrathecal drug administration. The antiallodynic effect of gabapentin (100 mug) was not affected by intrathecal pretreatment with antagonists of K(ATP) channels, NMDA receptors or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. K(ATP) channel openers and GABA(A) receptor agonist, per se, had little effect on the postincision allodynic response. The Ca2+ channel blocker of N-type (omega-conotoxin GVIA, 0.1-3 microg), but not of P/Q-type (omega-agatoxin IVA), L-type (verapamil, diltiazem or nimodipine), or T-type (mibefradil), attenuated the incision-induced allodynia, as did gabapentin. Both the antiallodynic effects of gabapentin and omega-conotoxin GVIA were attenuated by Bay K 8644, an L-type Ca2+ channel activator. These results provide correlative evidence to support the contention that N-type Ca2+ channels, but not K(ATP) channels or NMDA or GABA(A) receptors, might be involved in the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal gabapentin.

  5. Recovery from severe frontotemporal dysfunction at 3years after N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Leypoldt, Frank; Gelderblom, Mathias; Schöttle, Daniel; Hoffmann, Sascha; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter

    2013-04-01

    Encephalitis associated with antibodies against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor is characterized by severe memory deficits, decreased consciousness, epileptic seizures and movement disorders and occurs most commonly in young women. Recovery is mostly good but little is known about the disease course in patients whose treatment has been delayed severely. We present a 16-year-old girl with a 36-month follow-up. A single course of methylprednisolone attenuated some symptoms but severe and incapacitating frontotemporal syndrome remained. Second-line treatment with rituximab was initiated 12months after the onset of symptoms. A surprising recovery occurred 18months after treatment and 30months after onset. Recovery in NMDA receptor antibody-associated encephalitis can be severely delayed and does not have to be linear. Whether delayed therapy contributed to recovery in this patient cannot be answered with certainty. Spontaneous recovery independent of therapy is possible, as it has been observed previously as late as 3years after onset. Although serum antibodies disappeared with recovery in this patient, previous cases have shown serum antibodies to be unreliable markers of disease activity. Second-line treatment, especially with substances as well tolerated as rituximab, should at least be considered in NMDA receptor encephalitis with persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes after first-line therapy.

  6. EXTENDED FEAR CONDITIONING REVEALS A ROLE FOR BOTH N-METHYL-d-ASPARTIC ACID AND NON-N-METHYL-d-ASPARTIC ACID RECEPTORS IN THE AMYGDALA IN THE ACQUISITION OF CONDITIONED FEAR

    PubMed Central

    PISTELL, P. J.; FALLS, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning is a useful tool for elucidating the neural mechanisms involved with learning and memory, especially in regard to the stimuli associated with aversive events. The amygdala has been repeatedly implicated as playing a significant role in the acquisition and expression of fear. If the amygdala is critical for the acquisition of fear, then it should contribute to this processes regardless of the parameters used to induce or evaluate conditioned fear. A series of experiments using reversible inactivation techniques evaluated the role of the amygdala in the acquisition of conditioned fear when training was conducted over several days in rats. Fear-potentiated startle was used to evaluate the acquisition of conditioned fear. Pretraining infusions of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) or non-NMDA receptor antagonists alone into the amygdala interfered with the acquisition of fear early in training, but not later. Pretraining infusions of a cocktail consisting of both an NMDA and non-NMDA antagonist interfered with the acquisition of conditioned fear across all days of training. Taken together these results suggest the amygdala may potentially be critical for the acquisition of conditioned fear regardless of the parameters utilized. PMID:18675886

  7. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies.

  8. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis.

  9. Centrally mediated ejaculatory response via sympathetic outflow in rats: role of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors in paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xia, J-D; Chen, J; Sun, H-J; Zhou, L-H; Zhu, G-Q; Chen, Y; Dai, Y-T

    2017-01-01

    Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal generator, which integrates inputs related to the sexual activity and coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic, and motor outflow. Previous clinical studies indicate that primary premature ejaculation is related to the hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. In this study, we explored the roles of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) on ejaculatory responses and its potential mechanism in the rats. We found that microinjection of 0.20 nmol NMDA into the PVN reduced the latency of intromission and facilitated ejaculation during copulation. Moreover, delayed ejaculation and intromission were observed after the rats were microinjected with NMDA receptor antagonist D (-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5). However, we discovered that microinjection of NMDA into PVN significantly increased baseline lumbar splanchnic nerve activity (LSNA), and the NMDA dose was positively correlated with the increased LSNA (r = 0.875, p = 0.04). Meanwhile, the plasma norepinephrine level in rats injected with NMDA was much higher than that in rats injected with saline (1453.4 ± 136.4 pg/mL vs. 492.3 ± 36.8 pg/mL, p < 0.01). Additionally, AP-5 reduced the baseline LSNA and abrogated the enhancing activity of NMDA in LSNA. Thus, we propose that NMDA receptors in PVN may facilitate ejaculation through enhancing the activity of sympathetic system.

  10. P2X7 receptor antagonists protect against N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced neuronal injury in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Endo, Kanako; Suzuki, Taishi; Fujimura, Kyosuke; Kurauchi, Yuki; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-06-05

    Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors followed by a large Ca(2+) influx is thought to be a mechanism of glaucoma-induced neuronal cell death. It is possible that damage-associated molecular patterns leak from injured cells, such as adenosine triphosphate, causing retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma. In the present study, we histologically investigated whether antagonists of the P2X7 receptor protected against NMDA-induced retinal injury in the rat in vivo. Under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to intravitreal injection of NMDA. We used A438079 (3-(5-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-1-yl)methyl pyridine) and brilliant blue G as P2X7 receptor antagonists. Upon morphometric evaluation 7 days after an intravitreal injection (200 nmol/eye), NMDA-induced cell loss was apparent in the ganglion cell layer. Intravitreal A438079 (50 pmol/eye) simultaneously injected with NMDA and intraperitoneal brilliant blue G (50 mg/kg) administered just before the NMDA injection as well as 24 and 48h after significantly reduced cell loss. In addition, A438079 decreased the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells 12h after NMDA injection. P2X7 receptors were immunolocalized in the ganglion cell layer and the inner and outer plexiform layers, whereas the immunopositive P2X7 receptor signal was not detected on the Iba1-positive microglial cells that infiltrated the retina 12h after NMDA injection. The present study shows that stimulation of the P2X7 receptor is involved in NMDA-induced histological damage in the rat retina in vivo. P2X7 receptor antagonists may be effective in preventing retinal diseases caused by glutamate excitotoxicity, such as glaucoma and retinal artery occlusion.

  11. Pharmacology of Triheteromeric N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, John; Balsara, Rashna D.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors (NMDARs) are heteromeric cation channels involved in learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity, and their dysregulation leads to various neurodegenerative disorders. Recent evidence has shown that apart from the GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B diheteromeric ion channels, the NMDAR also exists as a GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromeric channel that occupies the majority of the synaptic space. These GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromers exhibit pharmacological and electrophysiological properties that are distinct from the GluN1/GluN2A and GluN1/GluN2B diheteromeric subtypes. However, these receptors have not been characterized with regards to their inhibition by conantokins, as well as their allosteric modulation by polyamines and extracellular protons. Here, we show that the GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromeric channels showed less sensitivity to GluN2B-specific conantokin (con)-G and con-RlB, and subunit non-specific con-T, compared to the GluN2A-specific inhibitor TCN-201. Also, spermine modulation of GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromers switched its nature from potentiation to inhibition in a pH dependent manner, and was 2.5-fold slower compared to the GluN1/GluN2B diheteromeric channels. Unraveling the distinctive functional attributes of the GluN1/GluN2A/GluN2B triheteromers is physiologically relevant since they form an integral part of the synapse, which will aid in understanding spermine/pH-dependent potentiation of these receptors in pathological settings. PMID:26917100

  12. Temperature dependence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor excitatory postsynaptic currents.

    PubMed

    Korinek, M; Sedlacek, M; Cais, O; Dittert, I; Vyklicky, L

    2010-02-03

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) are highly expressed in the CNS and mediate the slow component of excitatory transmission. The present study was aimed at characterizing the temperature dependence of the kinetic properties of native NMDARs, with special emphasis on the deactivation of synaptic NMDARs. We used patch-clamp recordings to study synaptic NMDARs at layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the rat cortex, recombinant GluN1/GluN2B receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, and NMDARs in cultured hippocampal neurons. We found that time constants characterizing the deactivation of NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were similar to those of the deactivation of responses to a brief application of glutamate recorded under conditions of low NMDAR desensitization (whole-cell recording from cultured hippocampal neurons). In contrast, the deactivation of NMDAR-mediated responses exhibiting a high degree of desensitization (outside-out recording) was substantially faster than that of synaptic NMDA receptors. The time constants characterizing the deactivation of synaptic NMDARs and native NMDARs activated by exogenous glutamate application were only weakly temperature sensitive (Q(10)=1.7-2.2), in contrast to those of recombinant GluN1/GluN2B receptors, which are highly temperature sensitive (Q(10)=2.7-3.7). Ifenprodil reduced the amplitude of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs by approximately 50% but had no effect on the time course of deactivation. Analysis of GluN1/GluN2B responses indicated that the double exponential time course of deactivation reflects mainly agonist dissociation and receptor desensitization. We conclude that the temperature dependences of native and recombinant NMDAR are different; in addition, we contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism that controls the time course of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs.

  13. MicroRNA-217 suppresses homocysteine-induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongyan; Li, Yongqiang; Yan, Lijie; Yang, Haitao; Wu, Jintao; Qian, Peng; Li, Bing; Wang, Shanling

    2016-10-01

    Hyperhomocysteine has become a critical risk for atherosclerosis and can stimulate proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) is a receptor of homocysteine and mediates the effects of homocysteine on VSMCs. Bioinformatics analysis has shown NMDAR is a potential target of microRNA-217 (miR-217), which exerts multiple functions in cancer tumorigenesis and carotid plaque progression. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of miR-217 in VSMCs phenotype transition under homocysteine exposure and elucidate its effect on atherosclerotic plaque formation. After treating with several doses of homocysteine (0-8 × 10(-4)  mol/L) for 24 hours, the expression of miR-217 in HA-VSMCs and rat aortic VSMCs was not altered. Intriguingly, the expression of NMDAR mRNA and protein was reduced by homocysteine in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of miR-217 mimic significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of VSMCs with homocysteine treatment, while transfection of miR-217 inhibitor promoted VSMCs migration. Moreover, miR-217 mimic down-regulated while miR-217 inhibitor up-regulated NMDAR protein expression but not NMDAR mRNA expression. Through luciferase reporter assay, we showed that miR-217 could directly bind to the 3'-UTR of NMDAR. MiR-217 mimic transfection also released the inhibition of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-PGC-1α signalling induced by homocysteine. Additionally, restoration of PGC-1α expression via AdPGC-1α infection markedly suppressed VSMCs proliferation through the degradation of NADPH oxidase (NOX1) and reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Collectively, our study identified the role of miR-217 in regulating VSMCs proliferation and migration, which might serve as a target for atherosclerosis therapy.

  14. Dizocilpine (MK-801) induces distinct changes of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunits in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Xi, Dong; Zhang, Wentong; Wang, Huai-Xing; Stradtman, George G; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2009-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction has long been implicated in schizophrenia and NMDARs on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons are proposed to play an essential role in the pathogenesis. However, controversial results have been reported regarding the regulation of NMDAR expression, and direct evidence of how NMDAR antagonists act on specific subpopulations of prefrontal interneurons is missing. We investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) on the expression of NMDAR subtypes in the identified interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) by using laser microdissection and real-time polymerase chain reaction, combined with Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. We found that MK-801 induced distinct changes of NMDAR subunits in the parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons vs. pyramidal neurons in the PFC circuitry. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all NMDAR subtypes, including NR1 and NR2A to 2D, exhibited inverted-U dose-dependent changes in response to MK-801 treatment in the PFC. In contrast, subunit mRNAs of NMDARs in PV-ir interneurons were significantly down-regulated at low doses, unaltered at medium doses, and significantly decreased again at high doses, suggesting a biphasic dose response to MK-801. The differential effects of MK-801 in mRNA expression of NMDAR subunits were consistent with the protein expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits revealed with Western blotting and double immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that PV-containing interneurons in the PFC exhibit a distinct responsiveness to NMDAR antagonism and that NMDA antagonist can differentially and dose-dependently regulate the functions of pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortical circuitry.

  15. Agmatine protects Müller cells from high-concentration glucose-induced cell damage via N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Yu, Li; Song, Zhidu; Luo, Lifu; Wu, Yazhen

    2015-07-01

    Neural injury is associated with the development of diabetic retinopathy. Müller cells provide structural and metabolic support for retinal neurons. High glucose concentrations are known to induce Müller cell activity. Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine, which is enzymatically formed in the mammalian brain and has exhibited neuroprotective effects in a number of experimental models. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether agmatine protects Müller cells from glucose-induced damage and to explore the mechanisms underlying this process. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression were significantly reduced in Müller cells exposed to a high glucose concentration, following agmatine treatment, compared with cells not treated with agmatine. In addition, agmatine treatment inhibited glucose-induced Müller cell apoptosis, which was associated with the regulation of Bax and Bcl-2 expression. Agmatine treatment suppressed glucose-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein in Müller cells. The present study demonstrated that the protective effects of agmatine on Müller cells were inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). The results of the present study suggested that agmatine treatment protects Müller cells from high-concentration glucose-induced cell damage. The underlying mechanisms may relate to the anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects of agmatine, as well as to the inhibition of the MAPK pathway, via NMDA receptor suppression. Agmatine may be of use in the development of novel therapeutic approaches for patients with diabetic retinopathy.

  16. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Activation May Contribute to Glufosinate Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Activation May Contribute to Glufosinate Neurotoxicity Glufosinate (GLF) at high levels in mammals causes convulsions through a mechanism that is not completely understood. The structural similarity of GLF to glutamate (GLU) implicates the glutamate...

  17. [Review of the psychiatric aspects of anti-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) receptor encephalitis, case report, and our plans for a future study].

    PubMed

    Herman, Levente; Zsigmond, Ildiko Reka; Peter, Laszlo; Rethelyi, Janos M

    2016-12-01

    Anti-NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) encephalitis, first described in 2007, is a rare, autoimmune limbic encephalitis. In half of the cases anti-NMDAR antibodies are paraneoplastic manifestations of an underlying tumor (mostly ovarian teratoma). In the early stage of the disease psychiatric symptoms are prominent, therefore 60-70% of the patients are first treated in a psychiatric department. In most of the cases, typical neurological symptoms appear later. Besides the clinical picture and typical symptoms, verifying presence of IgG antibodies in the serum or CSF is necessary to set up the diagnosis. Other diagnostic tools, including laboratory tests, MRI, lumbar puncture or EEG are neither specific, nor sensitive enough. Therapy is based on supportive care, plasma exchange and immune suppression, intensive care administration can be necessary. If there is an underlying tumor, tumor removal is the first-line treatment. The disease can cause fatal complications in the acute phase but with adequate therapy long-term prognosis is good, although rehabilitation can last for months. In the past few years besides the typical clinical picture and illness course an increasing number of case reports described no typical neurological symptoms, only psychiatric symptoms, including psychosis, disorganized behavior, and catatonic symptoms. Immune suppressive treatment was still effective in most of these cases. Such cases present a difficult diagnostic challenge. These patients may receive unnecessary antipsychotic treatment because of the suspected schizophrenia, although they often suffer from serious extrapyramidal side effects. A few years ago there was a hypothesis that a small part of the patients who are treated with therapy-resistant schizophrenia may suffer from anti-NMDAR encephalitis, so they require a different kind of medication. Evidence from the latest publications did not confirm this hypothesis, although the connection between anti-NMDAR antibodies and

  18. Pediatric Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Complicated by N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Antibody Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Alasdair; Crowe, Belinda H A; Hacohen, Yael; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Clarke, Antonia; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Pullaperuma, Sunil P

    2015-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies (NMDAR-Abs) can contribute to neurological relapse after herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). We describe a child with NMDAR-Ab encephalitis after HSE, which was recognized and treated early. We discuss the case in the context of existing reports, and we propose a modified immunotherapy strategy to minimize risk of viral reactivation.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism and excretion of [(14)C]-lanicemine (AZD6765), a novel low-trapping N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor channel blocker, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Zhou, Diansong; Grimm, Scott W; Bui, Khanh H

    2015-03-01

    1.(1S)-1-phenyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanamine (lanicemine; AZD6765) is a low-trapping N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) channel blocker that has been studied as an adjunctive treatment in major depressive disorder. The metabolism and disposition of lanicemine was determined in six healthy male subjects after a single intravenous infusion dose of 150 mg [(14)C]-lanicemine. 2.Blood, urine and feces were collected from all subjects. The ratios of Cmax and AUC(0-∞) of lanicemine to plasma total radioactivity were 84 and 66%, respectively, indicating that lanicemine was the major circulating component with T1/2 at 16 h. The plasma clearance of lanicemine was 8.3 L/h, revealing that lanicemine is a low-clearance compound. The mean recovery of radioactivity from urine was 93.8% of radioactive dose. 3.In urine samples, 10 metabolites of lanicemine were identified. Among which, an O-glucuronide conjugate (M1) was the most abundant metabolite (∼11% of the dose in excreta). In plasma, the circulatory metabolites were identified as a para-hydroxylated metabolite (M1), an O-glucuronide (M2), an N-carbamoyl glucuronide (M3) and an N-acetylated metabolite (M6). The average amount of each of metabolite was less than 4% of total radioactivity detected in plasma or urine. 4.In conclusion, lanicemine is a low-clearance compound. The unchanged drug and metabolites are predominantly eliminated via urinary excretion.

  20. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: review of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Helen; Byrne, Susan; Barrett, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kieran C.; Cotter, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a form of encephalitis occurring primarily in women and associated with antibodies against NR1 or NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. As a potentially treatable differential for symptoms and signs seen in neurology and psychiatric clinics, clinicians practising across the lifespan should be aware of this form of encephalitis. Common clinical features include auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, behavioural change (frequently with agitation), impaired consciousness, motor disturbance (ranging from dyskinesia to catatonia), seizures, and autonomic dysfunction. We present a review of the literature on the disorder, including its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and prognosis. PMID:26191419

  1. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: review of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Barry, Helen; Byrne, Susan; Barrett, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kieran C; Cotter, David R

    2015-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a form of encephalitis occurring primarily in women and associated with antibodies against NR1 or NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. As a potentially treatable differential for symptoms and signs seen in neurology and psychiatric clinics, clinicians practising across the lifespan should be aware of this form of encephalitis. Common clinical features include auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, behavioural change (frequently with agitation), impaired consciousness, motor disturbance (ranging from dyskinesia to catatonia), seizures, and autonomic dysfunction. We present a review of the literature on the disorder, including its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and prognosis.

  2. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis in a young Lebanese girl.

    PubMed

    Safadieh, Layal; Dabbagh, Omar

    2013-10-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a recently recognized autoimmune neurologic disorder that presents with severe neuropsychiatric symptoms in previously healthy children. A 4-year-old Lebanese girl presented with new-onset behavioral changes, orofacial dyskinesias, fluctuation in consciousness, inability to walk, and mutism. Antibodies directed against NMDA receptors were detected in the patient's serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Prompt treatment with a single course of intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in early complete recovery. This is the first case report of a Middle Eastern child affected with this condition.

  3. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis, an Underappreciated Disease in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Lasoff, Daniel R.; Corbett-Detig, Jimmy; Sell, Rebecca; Nolan, Matthew; Wardi, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) Encephalitis is a novel disease discovered within the past 10 years. Antibodies directed at the NMDAR cause the patient to develop a characteristic syndrome of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Patients go on to develop autonomic dysregulation and often have prolonged hospitalizations and intensive care unit stays. There is little literature in the emergency medicine community regarding this disease process, so we report on a case we encountered in our emergency department to help raise awareness of this disease process. PMID:27330659

  4. Prevalence of serum N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor autoantibodies in refractory psychosis.

    PubMed

    Beck, Katherine; Lally, John; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Bloomfield, Michael A P; MacCabe, James H; Gaughran, Fiona; Howes, Oliver D

    2015-02-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) autoantibodies have been reported in people with acute psychosis. We hypothesised that their presence may be implicated in the aetiology of treatment-refractory psychosis. We sought to ascertain the point prevalence of NMDA-R antibody positivity in patients referred to services for treatment-refractory psychosis. We found that 3 (7.0%) of 43 individuals had low positive NMDA-R antibody titres. This suggests that NMDA-R autoantibodies are unlikely to account for a large proportion of treatment-refractory psychosis.

  5. Prevalence of serum N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoantibodies in refractory psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Katherine; Lally, John; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Bloomfield, Michael A. P.; MacCabe, James H.; Gaughran, Fiona; Howes, Oliver D.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) autoantibodies have been reported in people with acute psychosis. We hypothesised that their presence may be implicated in the aetiology of treatment-refractory psychosis. We sought to ascertain the point prevalence of NMDA-R antibody positivity in patients referred to services for treatment-refractory psychosis. We found that 3 (7.0%) of 43 individuals had low positive NMDA-R antibody titres. This suggests that NMDA-R autoantibodies are unlikely to account for a large proportion of treatment-refractory psychosis. PMID:25431428

  6. Slowly developing depression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated responses in young rat hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail; Li, Rui; Xu, Hui-Ping; Jilderos, Barbro; Wigström, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Background Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors is essential in triggering various forms of synaptic plasticity. A critical issue is to what extent such plasticity involves persistent changes of glutamate receptor subtypes and many prior studies have suggested a main role for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in mediating the effect. Our previous work in hippocampal slices revealed that, under pharmacological unblocking of NMDA receptors, both AMPA and NMDA receptor mediated responses undergo a slowly developing depression. In the present study we have further adressed this phenomenon, focusing on the contribution via NMDA receptors. Pharmacologically isolated NMDA receptor mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded for two independent synaptic pathways in CA1 area using perfusion with low Mg2+ (0.1 mM) to unblock NMDA receptors. Results Following unblocking of NMDA receptors, there was a gradual decline of NMDA receptor mediated EPSPs for 2–3 hours towards a stable level of ca. 60–70 % of the maximal size. If such an experimental session was repeated twice in the same pathway with a period of NMDA receptor blockade in between, the depression attained in the first session was still evident in the second one and no further decay occurred. The persistency of the depression was also validated by comparison between pathways. It was found that the responses of a control pathway, unstimulated in the first session of receptor unblocking, behaved as novel responses when tested in association with the depressed pathway under the second session. In similar experiments, but with AP5 present during the first session, there was no subsequent difference between NMDA EPSPs. Conclusions Our findings show that merely evoking NMDA receptor mediated responses results in a depression which is input specific, induced via NMDA receptor activation, and is maintained for several hours through

  7. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  8. Effects of the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, LY235959 [(-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid], on responding for cocaine under both fixed and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard M; Carelli, Regina M; Dykstra, Linda A; Suchey, Therese L; Everett, Carson V

    2005-10-01

    It is difficult to determine the precise role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system in the reinforcing effects of cocaine since uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists alter cocaine self-administration in different ways, depending on the antagonist examined and the behavior being measured. To increase understanding of the role of the NMDA system in cocaine's reinforcing effects, this study measured the effects of the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, LY235959 [(-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid], in rats that self-administered cocaine under both fixed ratio (FR) 1 and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.33 mg/infusion) under an FR1 schedule of reinforcement. Thereafter, the effects of pretreatment with LY235959, or the uncompetitive antagonists dextromethorphan and dizocilpine, were examined. The number of infusions earned during the first 10 min of responding under the FR1 schedule was analyzed separately. When rats responded for 0.33 mg/infusion cocaine under an FR1 schedule of reinforcement, 3 mg/kg LY235959 decreased cocaine self-administration only during the first 10 min of the responding. This effect was dose and time dependent and blocked by the competitive NMDA receptor agonist, NMDA. LY235959 (3 mg/kg) decreased total responding for cocaine only when the self-administered dose of cocaine was small (0.02-0.04 mg/infusion) or when responding was reinforced under the PR schedule. In contrast, dizocilpine decreased responding under the FR1 schedule but increased responding under the PR schedule. These data suggest that LY235959 decreased the reinforcing effectiveness of cocaine, a finding reported with systemically administered NMDA receptor antagonists other than dizocilpine.

  9. Inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors increases paraoxon-induced apoptosis in cultured neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xuan; Tian Feng; Okagaki, Peter; Marini, Ann M. . E-mail: amarini@usuhs.mil

    2005-10-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compounds, used as insecticides and chemical warfare agents, are potent neurotoxins. We examined the neurotoxic effect of paraoxon (O,O-diethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphate), an organophosphate compound, and the role of NMDA receptors as a mechanism of action in cultured cerebellar granule cells. Paraoxon is neurotoxic to cultured rat cerebellar granule cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Cerebellar granule cells are less sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of paraoxon on day in vitro (DIV) 4 than neurons treated on DIV 8. Surprisingly, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, enhances paraoxon-mediated neurotoxicity suggesting that NMDA receptors may play a protective role. Pretreatment with a subtoxic concentration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) [100 {mu}M] protects about 40% of the vulnerable neurons that would otherwise die from paraoxon-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, addition of a neuroprotective concentration of NMDA 3 h after treatment with paraoxon provides the same level of protection. Because paraoxon-mediated neuronal cell death is time-dependent, we hypothesized that apoptosis may be involved. Paraoxon increases apoptosis about 10-fold compared to basal levels. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor (Boc-D-FMK) and the caspase-9-specific inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK) protect against paraoxon-mediated apoptosis, paraoxon-stimulated caspase-3 activity and neuronal cell death. MK-801 increases, whereas NMDA blocks paraoxon-induced apoptosis and paraoxon-stimulated caspase-3 activity. These results suggest that activation of NMDA receptors protect neurons against paraoxon-induced neurotoxicity by blocking apoptosis initiated by paraoxon.

  10. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis in a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing-Jing; Lv, He; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Juan; Hao, Hong-Jun; Gao, Feng; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2016-07-01

    We described a female patient with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis occurring sequentially with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). The 19-year-old patient initially presented a diencephalic syndrome with aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies (AQP4-IgG) and brain lesions which involving bilateral medial temporal lobes and periependymal surfaces of the third ventricle on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten months later, the patient developed cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and dyskinesia with left basal ganglia lesions on brain MRI. Meanwhile, the anti-NMDAR antibodies were positive in the patient's serum and cerebrospinal fluid, while the screening tests for an ovarian teratoma and other tumors were all negative. Hence, the patient was diagnosed NMOSD and anti-NMDAR encephalitis followed by low-dose rituximab treatment with a good response. This case was another evidence for demyelinating syndromes overlapping anti-NMDAR encephalitis in Chinese patients.

  11. Postpartum Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doden, Tadashi; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Junji; Ozawa, Kazuki; Ohashi, Nobuhiko; Kodaira, Minori; Hineno, Akiyo; Tachibana, Naoko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 24-year-old woman with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis that developed 3 weeks after normal delivery. She was treated with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis, in addition to teratoma excision. However, her recovery was slow, and dysmnesia and mental juvenility persisted even two years after onset. To date, five patients with postpartum anti-NMDAR encephalitis have been reported. All of those patients showed psychotic symptoms and were suspected of having postpartum psychosis in the early period of the encephalitis. Changes in hormonal factors, modification of immune tolerance, or retrograde infection of the ovary may be contributing factors for postpartum anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:28154283

  12. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patarata, Eunice; Bernardino, Vera; Martins, Ana; Pereira, Rui; Loureiro, Conceição; Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a rare condition characterized by emotional and behavioral disturbances, dyskinesias, and extrapyramidal signs. It occurs in young women of reproductive age and is classically described as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. We present a 36-year-old, HIV-positive female who was admitted to the hospital in an acute confusional state, with a stiff posture, periods of motor agitation, and myoclonic jerks of the hands. Her mental state progressively deteriorated. Without evidence of infection, the presence of anti-NMDAR antibodies both in serum and cerebrospinal fluid clinched the diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis. No evidence of neoplastic disease was found, and the beneficial response to immunosuppressive therapy was exceptional. This is the first report of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in an HIV-infected individual, reminding us that autoimmune encephalitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a young patient presenting in an acute confusional state. PMID:28101036

  13. ON or OFF?: Modulating the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shi Yu; Matthews, Edward; Burnet, Philip W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery that a single dose of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, had rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects, there has been increased interest in using NMDAR modulators in the pharmacotherapy of depression. Ketamine’s efficacy seems to imply that depression is a disorder of NMDAR hyperfunctionality. However, studies showing that not all NMDAR antagonists are able to act as antidepressants challenge this notion. Furthermore, NMDAR co-agonists have also been gaining attention as possible treatments. Co-agonists such as D-serine and sarcosine have shown efficacy in both pre-clinical models and human trials. This raises the question of how both NMDAR antagonists and agonists are able to have converging behavioral effects. Here we critically review the evidence and proposed therapeutic mechanisms for both NMDAR antagonists and agonists, and collate several theories on how both activation and inhibition of NMDARs appear to have antidepressant effects. PMID:28133445

  14. Pharmacological specificity of the discriminative stimulus properties of 2-amino-4,5-(1,2-cyclohexyl)-7-phosphono-heptanoic acid (NPC 12626), a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bobelis, D J; Balster, R L

    1993-02-01

    A drug discrimination based upon the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist 2-amino-4,5-(1,2-cyclohexyl)-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (NPC 12626) was assessed for pharmacological specificity. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 20 mg/kg i.p. of NPC 12626 from saline under a standard two-lever fixed ratio 32 schedule of food reinforcement. Stimulus generalization tests were conducted to examine the similarities and differences between NPC 12626, its active (2R,4R,5S) enantiomer NPC 17742, other competitive and noncompetitive NMDA antagonists and a number of drugs representative of other classes. During test sessions, the competitive NMDA antagonists NPC 12626, CGS 19755, [1-(cis-2-carboxypiperidine-4-yl)- methyl-1-phosphonic acid], NPC 17742, CSP 37849 [DL-(E)-2-amino-4-methyl-5-phosphono-3-pen-tenoic acid] and CPPene [D-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-1-propenyl-1-phosphonic acid] all completely substituted for the training dose of NPC 12626 with ED50 values of 18.1, 2.3, 2.1, 0.8 and 0.8 mg/kg, respectively. In contrast, drugs that failed to substitute for NPC 12626 included (+)-amphetamine, baclofen, chlorpromazine, dextromethorphan, diazepam, dizocilpine (MK-801), imipramine, (-)-ketocyclazocine, L-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, methocarbamol, morphine, muscimol, phenytoin, physostigmine and valproate. These results provide evidence that the NPC 12626 discriminative stimulus is unique and specific, shared fully only by its active enantiomer NPC 17742 and other competitive NMDA antagonists. This specificity provides further support for the hypothesis of NMDA receptor mediation of NPC 12626 discrimination, and suggests that this is a useful model to evaluate behavioral effects of competitive NMDA antagonists.

  15. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors modify N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors via Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Trepanier, Catherine; Lei, Gang; Xie, Yu-Feng; MacDonald, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) have emerged as important targets for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has also been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia, we examined whether postsynaptic mGluR2/3 regulate NMDAR function. Activation of mGluR2/3 significantly decreased the ratio of AMPA-to-NMDA excitatory postsynaptic currents at Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapses and enhanced the peak of NMDA-evoked currents in acutely isolated CA1 neurons. The mGluR2/3-mediated potentiation of NMDAR currents was selective for GluN2A-containing NMDARs and was mediated by the Src family kinase Src. Activation of mGluR2/3 inhibited the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway and thereby activated Src by inhibiting its regulatory C-terminal Src kinase (Csk). We suggest a novel model of regulation of NMDARs by Gi/o-coupled receptors whereby inhibition of the cAMP-PKA pathway via mGluR2/3 activates Src kinase and potentiates GluN2A-containing NMDAR currents. This represents a potentially novel mechanism to correct the hypoglutamatergic state found in schizophrenia. PMID:23378895

  16. Expression and characterization of a glycine-binding fragment of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, J; Nakanishi, S; Jingami, H

    1999-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels are composed of an NR1 subunit and at least one of the NR2 subunits (NR2A-D). Activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor requires the co-agonists glycine and glutamate. It has been proposed that the NR1 subunit possesses a glycine-binding site. We have expressed a soluble form of the NR1 subunit, which was produced by connecting the N-terminal extracellular region with the extracellular loop between the third and fourth membrane segments, by a baculovirus system along with full-length and truncated membrane-bound forms. The soluble NR1 receptor was efficiently secreted into the culture medium and showed a high affinity for ligands. The Kd of a glycine-site antagonist, [3H]MDL 105,519 [(E)-3-(2-phenyl-2-carboxyethenyl)-4, 6-dichloro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid], for the soluble receptor was 3.89+/-0.97 nM, which was comparable to the Kd of 4.47+/-1.39 nM for the membrane-bound full-length form. These values were close to the values reported previously with the use of rat brain membranes and Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the full-length form of the NR1 subunit. The Ki values of other glycine-site antagonists, L-689,560 (trans-2-carboxy-5,7-dichloro - 4 - phenylaminocarbonylamino - 1,2,3,4 - tetrahydroquinoline), 5, 7-dichlorokynurenate and 5,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, for the soluble receptor were also similar to those for the full-length form of NR1. [3H]MDL 105,519 binding was also inhibited by the agonists glycine and d-serine. Thus the affinity and selectivity of ligand-binding characteristics of the NR1 subunit is conferred on the soluble form of the NR1 subunit. This soluble receptor provides a good experimental tool for initiating a biophysical analysis of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel protein. PMID:10359652

  17. An N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker with neuroprotective activity

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Kwok-Keung; Blondelle, Sylvie E.; Ostresh, John M.; Houghten, Richard A.; Montal, Mauricio

    2001-01-01

    Excitotoxicity, resulting from sustained activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype, is considered to play a causative role in the etiology of ischemic stroke and several neurodegenerative diseases. The NMDA receptor is therefore a target for the development of neuroprotective agents. Here, we identify an N-benzylated triamine (denoted as NBTA) as a highly selective and potent NMDA-receptor channel blocker selected by screening a reduced dipeptidomimetic synthetic combinatorial library. NBTA blocks recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with a mean IC50 of 80 nM; in contrast, it does not block GluR1, a glutamate receptor of the non-NMDA subtype. The blocking activity of NBTA on NMDA receptors exhibits the characteristics of an open-channel blocker: (i) no competition with agonists, (ii) voltage dependence, and (iii) use dependence. Significantly, NBTA protects rodent hippocampal neurons from NMDA receptor, but not kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxic cell death, in agreement with its selective action on the corresponding recombinant receptors. Mutagenesis data indicate that the N site, a key asparagine on the M2 transmembrane segment of the NR1 subunit, is the main determinant of the blocker action. The results highlight the potential of this compound as a neuroprotectant. PMID:11248110

  18. Functional plasticity of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in differentiating human erythroid precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hänggi, Pascal; Telezhkin, Vsevolod; Kemp, Paul J.; Schmugge, Markus; Gassmann, Max; Goede, Jeroen S.; Speer, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is essential to support erythroid proliferation and differentiation. Precise control of the intracellular Ca2+ levels in erythroid precursor cells (EPCs) is afforded by coordinated expression and function of several cation channels, including the recently identified N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here, we characterized the changes in Ca2+ uptake and electric currents mediated by the NMDARs occurring during EPC differentiation using flow cytometry and patch clamp. During erythropoietic maturation, subunit composition and properties of the receptor changed; in proerythroblasts and basophilic erythroblasts, fast deactivating currents with high amplitudes were mediated by the GluN2A subunit-dominated receptors, while at the polychromatic and orthochromatic erythroblast stages, the GluN2C subunit was getting more abundant, overriding the expression of GluN2A. At these stages, the currents mediated by the NMDARs carried the features characteristic of the GluN2C-containing receptors, such as prolonged decay time and lower conductance. Kinetics of this switch in NMDAR properties and abundance varied markedly from donor to donor. Despite this variability, NMDARs were essential for survival of EPCs in any subject tested. Our findings indicate that NMDARs have a dual role during erythropoiesis, supporting survival of polychromatic erythroblasts and contributing to the Ca2+ homeostasis from the orthochromatic erythroblast stage to circulating red blood cells. PMID:25788577

  19. Regional development of glutamate-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sites in asphyxiated newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Andersen, D L; Tannenberg, A E; Burke, C J; Dodd, P R

    1998-04-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subclass of glutamate receptors was examined in newborn infants dying between 25 weeks' gestation and term, either from acute cerebral hypoxia, or from other noncerebral conditions incompatible with life. Frontal, occipital, temporal, and motor cortex tissue samples were obtained at autopsy (post mortem delay: median, 45.9 hr; range, 24-96 hr) and frozen for subsequent [3H]MK801 homogenate binding assays. Whereas no significant variation was observed in ligand affinity (KD), in all cases receptor density (BMAX) increased with gestational age, in occipital cortex (27 weeks, BMAX = 222 +/- 44 fmol x mg protein(-1); 39 weeks, 439 +/- 42 fmol x mg protein[-1]), but not in motor or temporal cortex. The gestational-age increase also occurred in control frontal cortex (27 weeks, 284 +/- 80; 39 weeks, 567 +/- 40 fmol x mg protein[-1]), but was significantly less marked in frontal cortex in hypoxia cases (27 weeks, 226 +/- 90; 39 weeks, 326 +/- 47 fmol x mg protein[-1]). In all cortical areas except temporal, the maximal response to glutamate did not vary across case groups. Hypoxia cases showed an increased response to glutamate enhancement selectively in temporal cortex. Binding site density did not correlate with degree of hypoxia as assessed pathologically, suggesting that receptor differences preceded the hypoxic episode. Regional differences in glutamate-NMDA receptor sites may underlie increased vulnerability to hypoxia at birth.

  20. Modulation of nicotinic acetylcholine and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors by some Hymenopteran venoms.

    PubMed

    Zalat, Samy; Elbana, Shereen; Rizzoli, Silvio; Schmidt, Justin O; Mellor, Ian R

    2005-09-01

    The effect of 19 venoms from solitary wasps, solitary bees, social wasps and ants were investigated for their effects on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) and ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs) of both the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDAR) and non-NMDAR type. Whole-cell patch clamp of human muscle TE671 cells was used to study nAChR, and of rat cortical and cerebellar granule cells for IGRs. Solitary wasp venoms caused significant voltage-dependent antagonism of nAChR responses to 10 microM ACh and NMDAR responses to 100 microM NMDA (+10 microM glycine) when co-applied at 1 microg/ml with the agonists. At positive holding potentials (V(H)) potentiation of these receptors was observed with some venoms. Solitary bee venoms only affected nAChR by causing either voltage-independent antagonism or potentiation of their responses to 10 microM ACh. Of four social wasp venoms, one acted on nAChR by potentiating responses to 10 ACh, while another generated an ACh-like response when applied alone. They had no effect on IGRs. Of the two ant venoms, one caused voltage-independent inhibition of nAChR. Neither affected IGRs. The data indicate the presence of nAChR agonists and antagonists and NMDAR antagonists in Hymenopteran venoms and warrant further investigation to separate and identify these venom components.

  1. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-like immunoreactivity in the brain of Sepia and Octopus.

    PubMed

    Di Cosmo, Anna; Paolucci, Marina; Di Cristo, Carlo

    2004-09-13

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors have been subdivided into N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and AMPA/kainate classes. NMDA receptor subunit 2A and 2B immunoreactivity is shown to be present in specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS) of the cephalopod molluscs Sepia officinalis and Octopus vulgaris. An antibody that recognizes both mammalian NMDAR2A and NMDAR2B subunits equally was used. SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis performed on membrane proteins revealed an immunoreactive band at 170 kDa for both species. Immunoreactive bands from both Octopus and Sepia brains disappeared when the antibody was preabsorbed with membrane proteins from rat hippocampus or from their own brains. The same antibody was then used for immunohistochemical staining of serial sections of the CNS to reveal localized specific staining of cell bodies and fibers in several lobes of the brain. Staining was found in lower motor centers, in some higher motor centers, in learning centers, and in the optic lobes. Immunopositivity was also found in the areas of brain that control the activity of the optic gland, a gonadotropic endocrine gland. These findings suggest that glutamate, via NMDA receptors, may be involved as a signaling molecule in motor, learning, visual, and olfactory systems in the cephalopod brain.

  2. Selective Impairment of Spatial Cognition Caused by Autoantibodies to the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eric H.; Volpe, Bruce T.; Mackay, Meggan; Aranow, Cynthia; Watson, Philip; Kowal, Czeslawa; Storbeck, Justin; Mattis, Paul; Berlin, RoseAnn; Chen, Huiyi; Mader, Simone; Huerta, Tomás S.; Huerta, Patricio T.; Diamond, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) experience cognitive abnormalities in multiple domains including processing speed, executive function, and memory. Here we show that SLE patients carrying antibodies that bind DNA and the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), termed DNRAbs, displayed a selective impairment in spatial recall. Neural recordings in a mouse model of SLE, in which circulating DNRAbs penetrate the hippocampus, revealed that CA1 place cells exhibited a significant expansion in place field size. Structural analysis showed that hippocampal pyramidal cells had substantial reductions in their dendritic processes and spines. Strikingly, these abnormalities became evident at a time when DNRAbs were no longer detectable in the hippocampus. These results suggest that antibody-mediated neurocognitive impairments may be highly specific, and that spatial cognition may be particularly vulnerable to DNRAb-mediated structural and functional injury to hippocampal cells that evolves after the triggering insult is no longer present. PMID:26286205

  3. Contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors to attention and episodic spatial memory during senescence.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Michael; Rani, Asha; Karic, Semir; Severance, Barrett; Kumar, Ashok; Foster, Thomas C

    2015-11-01

    A decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function is associated with age-related cognitive impairments. However, NMDAR antagonists are prescribed for cognitive decline associated with age-related neurodegenerative disease, raising questions as to the role of NMDAR activity in cognitive function during aging. The current studies examined effects of NMDAR blockade on cognitive task that are sensitive to aging. Young and middle-age rats were trained on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and challenged with MK-801 (0.025, 0.05, and 0.1mg/kg or vehicle). Attention deficits were apparent in middle-age and performance of young and middle-age rats was enhanced for low doses of MK-801 (0.025 and 0.05). The beneficial effects on attention were reversed by the highest dose of MK-801. Older animals exhibited a delay-dependent impairment of episodic spatial memory examined on a delayed-matching to place water maze task. Similarly, a low dose of MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) impaired performance with increasing delay and aged animals were more susceptible to disruption by NMDAR blockade. Despite MK-801 impairment of episodic spatial memory, MK-801 had minimal effects on spatial reference memory. Our results confirm that NMDARs contribute to rapidly acquired and flexible spatial memory and support the idea that a decline in NMDAR function contributes to the age-related impairments in cognition.

  4. Contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors to attention and episodic spatial memory during senescence

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Michael; Rani, Asha; Karic, Semir; Severance, Barrett; Kumar, Ashok; Foster, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    A decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function is associated with age-related cognitive impairments. However, NMDAR antagonists are prescribed for cognitive decline associated with age-related neurodegenerative disease, raising questions as to the role of NMDAR activity in cognitive function during aging. The current studies examined effects of NMDAR blockade on cognitive task that are sensitive to aging. Young and middle-age rats were trained on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and challenged with MK-801 (0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 mg/kg or vehicle). Attention deficits were apparent in middle-age and performance of young and middle-age rats was enhanced for low doses of MK-801 (0.025 and 0.05). The beneficial effects on attention were reversed by the highest dose of MK-801. Older animals exhibited a delay-dependent impairment of episodic spatial memory examined on a delayed-matching to place water maze task. Similarly, a low dose of MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg) impaired performance with increasing delay and aged animals were more susceptible to disruption by NMDAR blockade. Despite MK-801 impairment of episodic spatial memory, MK-801 had minimal effects on spatial reference memory. Our results confirm that NMDARs contribute to rapidly acquired and flexible spatial memory and support the idea that a decline in NMDAR function contributes to the age-related impairments in cognition. PMID:26234588

  5. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis neurological relapse.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Deiva, Kumaran; Pettingill, Phillipa; Waters, Patrick; Siddiqui, Ata; Chretien, Pascale; Menson, Esse; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Tardieu, Marc; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming J

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) is a devastating condition that relapses, often with a chorea in children, despite adequate antiviral treatment. At relapse, evidence of viral replication is frequently absent, suggesting that the relapse may be immune-mediated. Seven children who had a neurological relapse following their initial encephalitis, identified from 20 cases of pediatric HSVE, were studied. Serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were tested for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and other antibodies previously reported in central nervous system autoimmunity. Five of the 7 relapsing children had choreoathetosis; 2 of these were NMDAR antibody-positive, 2 were negative (1 with HSV-positive CSF), and 1 was not available for testing. An additional patient, who relapsed with cognitive regression but with no movement disorder, was also NMDAR antibody-positive. In 2 of the NMDAR antibody-positive patients who were treated at relapse and in 1 who was treated only after 10 years of having a relapsing encephalopathy, a beneficial response was observed. Neurological relapses after HSVE may frequently be immune-mediated, particularly in children with chorea. NMDAR antibodies are common, and immunotherapy may be beneficial.

  6. Blockade of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in rat kidney reduces renal perfusion and ultrafiltration. Hypoperfusion-induced ischemia is the most frequent cause of functional insufficiency in the endotoxemic kidney. Here, we used non-hypotensive rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia to examine whether NMDA receptor hyperfunction contributes to acute kidney injury. Lipopolysaccharide-induced renal damage via increased enzymuria and hemodynamic impairments were ameliorated by co-treatment with the NMDA receptor blocker, MK-801. The NMDA receptor NR1 subunit in the rat kidney mainly co-localized with serine racemase, an enzyme responsible for synthesizing the NMDA receptor co-agonist, D-serine. The NMDA receptor hyperfunction in lipopolysaccharide-treated kidneys was demonstrated by NR1 and serine racemase upregulation, particularly in renal tubules, and by increased D-serine levels. Lipopolysaccharide also induced cell damage in cultured tubular cell lines and primary rat proximal tubular cells. This damage was mitigated by MK-801 and by small interfering RNA targeting NR1. Lipopolysaccharide increased cytokine release in tubular cell lines via toll-like receptor 4. The release of interleukin-1β from these cells are the most abundant. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist not only attenuated cell death but also abolished lipopolysaccharide-induced NR1 and serine racemase upregulation and increases in D-serine secretion, suggesting that interleukin-1β-mediated NMDA receptor hyperfunction participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced tubular damage. The results of this study indicate NMDA receptor hyperfunction via cytokine effect participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced renal insufficiency. Blockade of NMDA receptors may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis-associated renal failure. PMID:26133372

  7. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  8. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss.

  9. Early Growth Response 1 (Egr-1) Regulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor (NMDAR)-dependent Transcription of PSD-95 and α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole Propionic Acid Receptor (AMPAR) Trafficking in Hippocampal Primary Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xike; Jiang, Yongjun; Tse, Yiu Chung; Wang, Yunling; Wong, Tak Pan; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) controls synaptic plasticity and memory function and is one of the major inducers of transcription factor Egr-1 in the hippocampus. However, how Egr-1 mediates the NMDAR signal in neurons has remained unclear. Here, we show that the hippocampus of mice lacking Egr-1 displays electrophysiology properties and ultrastructure that are similar to mice overexpressing PSD-95, a major scaffolding protein of postsynaptic density involved in synapse formation, synaptic plasticity, and synaptic targeting of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), which mediate the vast majority of excitatory transmission in the CNS. We demonstrate that Egr-1 is a transcription repressor of the PSD-95 gene and is recruited to the PSD-95 promoter in response to NMDAR activation. Knockdown of Egr-1 in rat hippocampal primary neurons blocks NMDAR-induced PSD-95 down-regulation and AMPAR endocytosis. Likewise, overexpression of Egr-1 in rat hippocampal primary neurons causes reduction in PSD-95 protein level and promotes AMPAR endocytosis. Our data indicate that Egr-1 is involved in NMDAR-mediated PSD-95 down-regulation and AMPAR endocytosis, a process important in the expression of long term depression. PMID:26475861

  10. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393.

    PubMed

    Castro, N G; de Mello, M C; de Mello, F G; Aracava, Y

    1999-04-01

    1. Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors. 2. Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 microM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms. 3. The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 microM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (-)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 microM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393. 4. The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM. 5. Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393. 6. These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands.

  11. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Newton G; de Mello, Maria Christina F; de Mello, Fernando G; Aracava, Yasco

    1999-01-01

    Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors.Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 μM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms.The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 μM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (−)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 μM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393.The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM.Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393.These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands. PMID:10372829

  12. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor-Mediated Axonal Injury in Adult Rat Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Jianuo; Fox, Howard S.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Damage to white matter such as corpus callosum (CC) is a pathological characteristic in many brain disorders. Glutamate (Glut) excitotoxicity through AMPA receptors on oligodendrocyte (OL) was previously considered as a mechanism for white matter damage. Recent studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed on myelin sheath of neonatal rat OL processes and that activation of these receptors mediated demyelization. Whether NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic axonal injury remains to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of NMDARs in the adult rat CC and their distributions in myelinated nerve fibers and OL somata by means of immunocytochemical staining and Western blot. Incubation of the CC slices with Glut or NMDA induced axonal injury as revealed by analyzing amplitude of CC fiber compound action potentials (CAPs) and input–output response. Both Glut and NMDA decreased the CAP amplitude and input–output responses, suggesting an involvement of NMDARs in Glut- and NMDA-induced axonal injury. The involvement of NMDAR in Glut-induced axonal injury was further assayed by detection of β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) in the CC axonal fibers. Treatment of the CC slices with Glut resulted in β-APP accumulation in the CC fibers as detected by Western blot, reflecting an impairment of axonal transport function. This injurious effect of Glut on CC axonal transport was significantly blocked by MK801. Taken together, these results show that NMDARs are expressed in the adult CC and are involved in excitotoxic activity in adult CC slices in vitro. PMID:23161705

  13. Developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor expression in the rat spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegenga, S. L.; Kalb, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons undergo experience-dependent development during a critical period in early postnatal life. It has been suggested that the repertoire of glutamate receptor subunits differs between young and mature motor neurons and contributes to this activity-dependent development. In the present study we examined the expression patterns of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor subunits during the postnatal maturation of the spinal cord. Young motor neurons express much higher levels of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 than do adult motor neurons. Although there are eight potential splice variants of NR1, only a subgroup is expressed by motor neurons. With respect to NR2 receptor subunits, young motor neurons express NR2A and C, while adult motor neurons express only NR2A. Young motor neurons express kainate receptor subunits GluR5, 6 and KA2 but we are unable to detect these or any other kainate receptor subunits in the adult spinal cord. Other spinal cord regions display a distinct pattern of developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptor subunit expression in comparison to motor neurons. Our findings indicate a precise spatio-temporal regulation of individual subunit expression in the developing spinal cord. Specific combinations of subunits in developing neurons influence their excitable properties and could participate in the emergence of adult neuronal form and function.

  14. Human cerebrospinal fluid monoclonal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor autoantibodies are sufficient for encephalitis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kreye, Jakob; Wenke, Nina K; Chayka, Mariya; Leubner, Jonas; Murugan, Rajagopal; Maier, Nikolaus; Jurek, Betty; Ly, Lam-Thanh; Brandl, Doreen; Rost, Benjamin R; Stumpf, Alexander; Schulz, Paulina; Radbruch, Helena; Hauser, Anja E; Pache, Florence; Meisel, Andreas; Harms, Lutz; Paul, Friedemann; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Garner, Craig; Schmitz, Dietmar; Wardemann, Hedda; Prüss, Harald

    2016-10-01

    SEE ZEKERIDOU AND LENNON DOI101093/AWW213 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently discovered autoimmune syndrome associated with psychosis, dyskinesias, and seizures. Little is known about the cerebrospinal fluid autoantibody repertoire. Antibodies against the NR1 subunit of the NMDAR are thought to be pathogenic; however, direct proof is lacking as previous experiments could not distinguish the contribution of further anti-neuronal antibodies. Using single cell cloning of full-length immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes, we generated a panel of recombinant monoclonal NR1 antibodies from cerebrospinal fluid memory B cells and antibody secreting cells of NMDAR encephalitis patients. Cells typically carried somatically mutated immunoglobulin genes and had undergone class-switching to immunoglobulin G, clonally expanded cells carried identical somatic hypermutation patterns. A fraction of NR1 antibodies were non-mutated, thus resembling 'naturally occurring antibodies' and indicating that tolerance induction against NMDAR was incomplete and somatic hypermutation not essential for functional antibodies. However, only a small percentage of cerebrospinal fluid-derived antibodies reacted against NR1. Instead, nearly all further antibodies bound specifically to diverse brain-expressed epitopes including neuronal surfaces, suggesting that a broad repertoire of antibody-secreting cells enrich in the central nervous system during encephalitis. Our functional data using primary hippocampal neurons indicate that human cerebrospinal fluid-derived monoclonal NR1 antibodies alone are sufficient to cause neuronal surface receptor downregulation and subsequent impairment of NMDAR-mediated currents, thus providing ultimate proof of antibody pathogenicity. The observed formation of immunological memory might be relevant for clinical relapses.

  15. A case of non-paraneoplastic anti-N-methyl d-aspartate receptor encephalitis presenting as a neuropsychiatric disorder.

    PubMed

    Yoga, Bindu; Kunc, Marek; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis can often be a paraneoplastic manifestation of occult malignancy such as ovarian teratoma and rarely teratoma of mediastinum or testis and small cell lung carcinoma. We report a case of non-paraneoplastic anti-N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antibody-positive autoimmune encephalitis in a young patient who presented with neuropsychiatric features and made a very good recovery following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids. The case highlights the need for increased vigilance for the condition in young females with or without a previous psychiatric history and emphasises the need for a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this challenging disorder with a good prognosis.

  16. A case of non-paraneoplastic anti-N-methyl d-aspartate receptor encephalitis presenting as a neuropsychiatric disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kunc, Marek; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2014-01-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antibody encephalitis can often be a paraneoplastic manifestation of occult malignancy such as ovarian teratoma and rarely teratoma of mediastinum or testis and small cell lung carcinoma. We report a case of non-paraneoplastic anti-N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antibody–positive autoimmune encephalitis in a young patient who presented with neuropsychiatric features and made a very good recovery following treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids. The case highlights the need for increased vigilance for the condition in young females with or without a previous psychiatric history and emphasises the need for a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this challenging disorder with a good prognosis. PMID:27489663

  17. Long-term potentiation and the role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Volianskis, Arturas; France, Grace; Jensen, Morten S.; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Jane, David E.; Collingridge, Graham L.

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are known for their role in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Here we start by reviewing the early evidence for their role in LTP at CA1 synapses in the hippocampus. We then discuss more recent evidence that NMDAR dependent synaptic plasticity at these synapses can be separated into mechanistically distinct components. An initial phase of the synaptic potentiation, which is generally termed short-term potentiation (STP), decays in an activity-dependent manner and comprises two components that differ in their kinetics and NMDAR subtype dependence. The faster component involves activation of GluN2A and GluN2B subunits whereas the slower component involves activation of GluN2B and GluN2D subunits. The stable phase of potentiation, commonly referred to as LTP, requires activation of primarily triheteromeric NMDARs containing both GluN2A and GluN2B subunits. In new work, we compare STP with a rebound potentiation (RP) that is induced by NMDA application and conclude that they are different phenomena. We also report that NMDAR dependent long-term depression (NMDAR-LTD) is sensitive to a glycine site NMDAR antagonist. We conclude that NMDARs are not synonymous for either LTP or memory. Whilst important for the induction of LTP at many synapses in the CNS, not all forms of LTP require the activation of NMDARs. Furthermore, NMDARs mediate the induction of other forms of synaptic plasticity and are important for synaptic transmission. It is, therefore, not possible to equate NMDARs with LTP though they are intimately linked. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25619552

  18. Indistinguishable Synaptic Pharmacodynamics of the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Channel Blockers Memantine and Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Emnett, Christine M.; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Taylor, Amanda M.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Memantine and ketamine, voltage- and activation-dependent channel blockers of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs), have enjoyed a recent resurgence in clinical interest. Steady-state pharmacodynamic differences between these blockers have been reported, but it is unclear whether the compounds differentially affect dynamic physiologic signaling. In this study, we explored nonequilibrium conditions relevant to synaptic transmission in hippocampal networks in dissociated culture and hippocampal slices. Equimolar memantine and ketamine had indistinguishable effects on the following measures: steady-state NMDA currents, NMDAR excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) decay kinetics, progressive EPSC inhibition during repetitive stimulation, and extrasynaptic NMDAR inhibition. Therapeutic drug efficacy and tolerability of memantine have been attributed to fast kinetics and strong voltage dependence. However, pulse depolarization in drug presence revealed a surprisingly slow and similar time course of equilibration for the two compounds, although memantine produced a more prominent fast component (62% versus 48%) of re-equilibration. Simulations predicted that low gating efficacy underlies the slow voltage–dependent relief from block. This prediction was empirically supported by faster voltage-dependent blocker re-equilibration with several experimental manipulations of gating efficacy. Excitatory postsynaptic potential–like voltage commands produced drug differences only with large, prolonged depolarizations unlikely to be attained physiologically. In fact, we found no difference between drugs on measures of spontaneous network activity or acute effects on plasticity in hippocampal slices. Despite indistinguishable synaptic pharmacodynamics, ketamine provided significantly greater neuroprotection from damage induced by oxygen glucose deprivation, consistent with the idea that under extreme depolarizing conditions, the biophysical difference between drugs

  19. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  20. The N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmitter receptor is a mammalian brain target for the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida toxin.

    PubMed

    El-Nabawi, A; Quesenberry, M; Saito, K; Silbergeld, E; Vasta, G; Eldefrawi, A

    2000-11-15

    Blooms of Pfiesteria piscicida, a dinoflagellate in eastern U.S. coastal rivers, are believed to secrete toxins that kill fish and produce short-term memory loss in humans. Only one or two of Pfiesteria's multiple stages secrete the toxin, and only under certain environmental conditions. Thus, neither the presence of Pfiesteria nor fish kill alone can be indicative of toxin presence. The objective of this study was to identify the mammalian molecular brain target for the toxin that is associated with decrements in memory. Seven rat brain neurotransmitter receptors were selected to study because of their reported roles in cognitive function: receptors for nicotine, muscarine, AMPA/kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), gamma-aminobutyric acid, and dopamine 1 and 2. The effects of 17 environmental and laboratory samples on radioactive ligand binding to these receptors were studied. Of the seven receptors, binding only to the NMDA receptor was inhibited by only the two Pfiesteria-containing waters (identified by PCR) that also killed fish, and not by any of the other 15 samples tested. It is suggested that inhibition of NMDA-receptor binding is the cause of memory loss in exposed humans. Thus, it could be a useful biomarker for the toxin's presence in rivers for decisions on closures and for identification of the fractions containing the toxin during its purification. Knowledge of the toxin's molecular target, and how it affects its function, also leads to suggestions for therapeutics to use in animal models.

  1. Investigations on CXCL13 in Anti–N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Höftberger, Romana; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Armangue, Thaís; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Jahn, Holger; Rostásy, Kevin; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Meyer, Thomas; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Anti–N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a severe but treatable autoimmune encephalitis affecting mainly young adults and children. The lack of suitable biomarkers of disease activity makes treatment decisions and identification of relapses challenging. OBJECTIVE To determine the levels of the B-cell–attracting C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13) in serum samples and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and whether they can be used as biomarkers of treatment response and outcome. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of 167 patients consecutively diagnosed as having anti-NMDAR encephalitis between May 1, 2008, and January 31, 2013. Concentration of CXCL13 was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all available patients’ samples (272 CSF and 55 serum samples). Samples from 25 patients with noninflammatory neurological disorders and 9 with neuroborreliosis served as controls. Expression of CXCL13 in the brain biopsy of a patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis was determined by immunohistochemistry. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Percentage of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and elevated CXCL13 in CSF. RESULTS Compared with control individuals, 70% of patients with early-stage anti-NMDAR encephalitis had increased CXCL13 in CSF (>7 pg/mL; P < .001) but none in serum samples (>1047 pg/mL; P > .99). High concentration of CSF CXCL13 was associated with the presence of prodromal fever or headache (P = .01), limited response to therapy (P = .003), clinical relapses (P = .03), and intrathecal NMDAR-antibody synthesis (P < .001). Among patients with monophasic disease assessed 2 to 6 months after starting treatment, 10 of 15 with limited treatment response vs 0 of 13 with favorable response had increased CSF CXCL13 (specificity, 100%; 95% CI, 75–100 and sensitivity, 67%; 95% CI, 38–88; P = .02). Six of 12 patients had elevated CSF CXCL13 at relapse including 3 with

  2. Human T lymphocytes express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors functionally active in controlling T cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Miglio, Gianluca; Varsaldi, Federica; Lombardi, Grazia . E-mail: lombardi@pharm.unipmn.it

    2005-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and the functional role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in human T cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and Jurkat T cells express genes encoding for both NR1 and NR2B subunits: phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated PBL also expresses both these genes and the NR2A and NR2D genes. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that NR1 expression increases as a consequence of PHA (10 {mu}g/ml) treatment. D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine [(+)-MK 801], competitive and non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, respectively, inhibited PHA-induced T cell proliferation, whereas they did not affect IL-2 (10 U/ml)-induced proliferation of PHA blasts. These effects were due to the prevention of T cell activation (inhibition of cell aggregate formation and CD25 expression), but not to cell cycle arrest or death. These results demonstrate that human T lymphocytes express NMDA receptors, which are functionally active in controlling cell activation.

  3. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor requires two distinct agonists to operate. Glycine is assumed to be the endogenous ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine site, but this notion has been challenged by the discovery of high levels of endogenous d-serine in the mammalian forebrain. I have outlined an evolutionary framework for the appearance of a glycine site in animals and the metabolic events leading to high levels of D-serine in brain. Sequence alignments of the glycine-binding regions, along with the scant experimental data available, suggest that the properties of invertebrate NMDA receptor glycine sites are probably different from those in vertebrates. The synthesis of D-serine in brain is due to a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (B(6))-requiring serine racemase in glia. Although it remains unknown when serine racemase first evolved, data concerning the evolution of B(6) enzymes, along with the known occurrences of serine racemases in animals, point to D-serine synthesis arising around the divergence time of arthropods. D-Serine catabolism occurs via the ancient peroxisomal enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO), whose ontogenetic expression in the hindbrain of mammals is delayed until the postnatal period and absent from the forebrain. The phylogeny of D-serine metabolism has relevance to our understanding of brain ontogeny, schizophrenia and neurotransmitter dynamics. PMID:15306409

  4. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis In A Young Child With Histological Evidence On Brain Biopsy Of Coexistent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Ellul, Mark A; Griffiths, Michael J; Iyer, Anand; Avula, Shivaram; Defres, Sylviane; Baborie, Atik; Vincent, Angela; Martin, Natalie G; Sadarangani, Manish; Pollard, Andrew J; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with a typical syndrome of movement disorder and encephalopathy and evidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 infection on brain biopsy. HSV type 1 infection and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis are temporally linked in some cases: this case suggests that prodromal HSV type-1 infection may be clinically subtle and easily missed.

  5. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dysfunction or dysregulation: the final common pathway on the road to schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Kantrowitz, Joshua T.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder associated with a characteristic constellation of symptoms and neurocognitive deficits. At present, etiological mechanisms remain relatively unknown, although multiple points of convergence have been identified over recent years. One of the primary convergence points is dysfunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR)-type glutamate receptors. Antagonists of NMDAR produce a clinical syndrome that closely resembles, and uniquely incorporates negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia, along with the specific pattern of neurocognitive dysfunction seen in schizophrenia. Genetic polymorphisms involving NMDAR subunits, particularly the GRIN2B subunit have been described. In addition, polymorphisms have been described in modulatory systems involving the NMDAR, including the enzymes serine racemase and D-amino acid oxidase/G72 that regulate brain D-serine synthesis. Reductions in plasma and brain glycine, D-serine and glutathione levels have been described as well, providing potential mechanisms underlying NMDAR dysfunction. Unique characteristics of the NMDAR are described that may explain the characteristic pattern of symptoms and neurocognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Finally, the NMDAR complex represents a convergence point for potential new treatment approaches in schizophrenia aimed at correcting underlying abnormalities in synthesis and regulation of allosteric modulators, as well as more general potentiation of pre- and post-synaptic glutamatergic and NMDAR function. PMID:20417696

  6. Psychotic symptoms in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: A case report and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Sagar, Rajesh; Patra, Bichitrananda; Saini, Lokesh; Gulati, Sheffali; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop

    2016-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, only recently first described, is an increasingly well-recognized inflammatory encephalitis that is seen in children and adults. An 11-year old girl admitted to the psychiatry ward with a presentation of acute psychosis was diagnosed with NMDA receptor encephalitis following neurology referral and was treated accordingly. This case highlights psychiatric manifestations in encephalitis and the need for the psychiatrist to have high index of suspicion when atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesia, seizure, fever etc.) present in acutely psychotic patients.

  7. Stress-induced impairments in prefrontal-mediated behaviors and the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Kiselycznyk, Carly; Holmes, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) mediates higher-order cognitive and executive functions that subserve various complex, adaptable behaviors such as cognitive flexibility, attention and working memory. Deficits in these functions typify multiple neuropsychiatric disorders that are caused or exacerbated by exposure to psychological stress. Here we review recent evidence examining the effects of stress on executive and cognitive functions in rodents, and discuss an emerging body of evidence that implicates the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) as a potentially critical molecular mechanism mediating these effects. Future work in this area could open up new avenues for developing pharmacotherapies for ameliorating cognitive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:22414923

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers prevent pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions and morphological changes in rat brain neurons.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Aleksey V; Kim, Kira Kh; Vasilev, Dmitry S; Lukomskaya, Nera Ya; Lavrentyeva, Valeria V; Tumanova, Natalia L; Zhuravin, Igor A; Magazanik, Lev G

    2015-03-01

    Alterations in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission play a central role in the etiology of epilepsy, with overstimulation of glutamate receptors influencing epileptic activity and corresponding neuronal damage. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which belong to a class of ionotropic glutamate receptors, play a primary role in this process. This study compared the anticonvulsant properties of two NMDA receptor channel blockers, memantine and 1-phenylcyclohexylamine (IEM-1921), in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model of seizures in rats and investigated their potencies in preventing PTZ-induced morphological changes in the brain. The anticonvulsant properties of IEM-1921 (5 mg/kg) were more pronounced than those of memantine at the same dose. IEM-1921 and memantine decreased the duration of convulsions by 82% and 37%, respectively. Both compounds were relatively effective at preventing the tonic component of seizures but not myoclonic seizures. Memantine significantly reduced the lethality caused by PTZ-induced seizures from 42% to 11%, and all animals pretreated with IEM-1921 survived. Morphological examination of the rat brain 24 hr after administration of PTZ revealed alterations in the morphology of 20-25% of neurons in the neocortex and the hippocampus, potentially induced by excessive glutamate. The expression of the excitatory amino acid transporter 1 protein was increased in the hippocampus of the PTZ-treated rats. However, dark neurons did not express caspase-3 and were immunopositive for the neuronal nuclear antigen protein, indicating that these neurons were alive. Both NMDA antagonists prevented neuronal abnormalities in the brain. These results suggest that NMDA receptor channel blockers might be considered possible neuroprotective agents for prolonged seizures or status epilepticus leading to neuronal damage.

  9. Longitudinal electroencephalographic (EEG) findings in pediatric anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis: the Padua experience.

    PubMed

    Nosadini, Margherita; Boniver, Clementina; Zuliani, Luigi; de Palma, Luca; Cainelli, Elisa; Battistella, Pier Antonio; Toldo, Irene; Suppiej, Agnese; Sartori, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    To contribute to characterize electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in pediatric anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis, we reviewed electroclinical data of 5 children with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis diagnosed in our department. We identified 4 longitudinal electroencephalographic phases: in the early phase, background activity was normal, with intermixed nonreactive slow waves; in the florid phase, background activity deteriorated with appearance of sequences of peculiar rhythmic theta and/or delta activity unrelated to clinical changes, unresponsive to stimuli and antiepileptic medications; in the recovery phase, these sequences decreased and reactive posterior rhythm re-emerged; electroencephalogram normalized 2 to 5 months after onset. In conclusion, in the presence of evocative clinical history, recognizing a characteristic longitudinal electroencephalographic activity could provide ancillary aspects addressing the diagnosis and the overall management of children with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis; in particular, knowing that peculiar and recurrent paroxysmal nonepileptic rhythmic theta-delta patterns can occur in these patients could help distinguish paroxysmal epileptic and nonepileptic electroencephalographic activity.

  10. Evidence for spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor involvement in prolonged chemical nociception in the rat.

    PubMed

    Haley, J E; Sullivan, A F; Dickenson, A H

    1990-06-04

    Subcutaneous injection of formalin into the hindpaw peripheral receptive field of deep dorsal horn multireceptive (convergent) nociceptive neurones was used to produce a prolonged (1 h) activation of the cells. This chemical noxious stimulus produced a first peak of firing which lasted 10 min followed by a second peak of prolonged activity which was monitored for 50 min. gamma-D-glutamylglycine (DGG), a non-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and quisqualate/kainate (non-NMDA) receptor antagonist was applied intrathecally both as a pretreatment and after the formalin. A complete abolition of both peaks of the formalin response was produced by DGG pretreatment (1000 micrograms) (n = 4). This dose produced profound inhibition of the acute C-fibre evoked responses of the same cells. However, no inhibitions were produced when the antagonist was applied once the formalin response had developed (n = 4). The selective NMDA receptor antagonist 5-amino-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) was administered intrathecally (250 and 500 micrograms) as a 40 min pretreatment and caused a small inhibition of the first peak but a marked dose-related reduction in the second prolonged phase (n =7). AP5 did not influence the C-fibre inputs onto the cells. The non-competitive NMDA receptor channel blockers, ketamine and MK801, were administered i.v. during the second phase of firing. Ketamine (1-8 mg/kg) caused a short-lasting but marked and dose-related inhibition of the neuronal responses to formalin (n = 11). MK801 (0.5-1 mg/kg) resulted in a prolonged inhibition of cell firing during the second phase of the response (n = 11).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Functional polymorphisms of the glutamate receptor N-methyl D-aspartate 2A gene are associated with heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H J; Huo, Z H; Dang, J; Chen, J; Zhu, Y S; Liu, J H

    2014-10-27

    Heroin dependence is a debilitating psychiatric disorder with a complex inheritance mechanism. Genetic polymorphisms in functional regions of the glutamate receptor, N-methyl D-aspartate 2A (GRIN2A) gene, which encodes the 2A subunit of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, may modulate the risk of heroin addiction. We investigated the potential association between 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GRIN2A gene (SNPs rs3219790, rs1014531, rs8044472, rs8045712, rs9933624, rs9940680, rs1420040, and rs767749) and heroin addiction using the MassARRAY system and GeneScan. A total of 405 heroin-addicted patients and 397 healthy control subjects were recruited for this study. Statistically significant differences were observed for rs3219790 in the promoter region of the GRIN2A gene. The frequency of the (GT)26 repeats in the heroin addiction group was significantly higher than that in the control group [X(2) = 5.475, P = 0.019, odds ratio (OR) = 1.367, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.051-1.776]. Strong linkage disequilibrium was observed in block 1 (D' > 0.9). However, significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium was not observed between the 7 SNPs in our sample population. These data suggest that GRIN2A gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to heroin addiction and support the hypothesis that dysfunction of GRIN2A is involved in the pathophysiological process of heroin addiction.

  12. Glycine site N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 7-CTKA produces rapid antidepressant-like effects in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Li; Wang, Shen-Jun; Liu, Meng-Meng; Shi, Hai-Shui; Zhang, Ruo-Xi; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists exert fast-acting antidepressant effects, providing a promising way to develop a new classification of antidepressant that targets the glutamatergic system. In the present study, we examined the potential antidepressant action of 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CTKA), a glycine recognition site NMDA receptor antagonist, in a series of behavioural models of depression and determined the molecular mechanisms that underlie the behavioural actions of 7-CTKA. Methods We administered the forced swim test, novelty-suppressed feeding test, learned helplessness paradigm and chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm in male rats to evaluate the possible rapid antidepressant-like actions of 7-CTKA. In addition, we assessed phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK3β) level, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) function, and postsynaptic protein expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. Results Acute 7-CTKA administration produced rapid antidepressant-like actions in several behavioural tests. It increased p-GSK3β, enhanced mTOR function and increased postsynaptic protein levels in the mPFC. Activation of GSK3β by LY294002 completely blocked the antidepressant-like effects of 7-CTKA. Moreover, 7-CTKA did not produce rewarding properties or abuse potential. Limitations It is possible that 7-CTKA modulates glutamatergic transmission, thereby causing enduring alterations of GSK3β and mTOR signalling, although we did not provide direct evidence to support this possibility. Thus, the therapeutic involvement of synaptic adaptions engaged by 7-CTKA requires further study. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that acute 7-CTKA administration produced rapid antidepressant-like effects, indicating that the behavioural response to 7-CTKA is mediated by GSK3β and mTOR signalling function in the mPFC. PMID:23611177

  13. Evidence for spinal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor involvement in prolonged chemical nociception in the rat.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jane E; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2016-08-15

    We used in vivo electrophysiology and a model of more persistent nociceptive inputs to monitor spinal cord neuronal activity in anaesthetised rats to reveal the pharmacology of enhanced pain signalling. The study showed that all responses were blocked by non-selective antagonism of glutamate receptors but a selective and preferential role of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the prolonged plastic responses was clearly seen. The work lead to many publications, initially preclinical but increasingly from patient studies, showing the importance of the NMDA receptor in central sensitisation within the spinal cord and how this could relate to persistent pain states. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue.

  14. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis mimicking a primary psychiatric disorder in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Sébastien; Mayor-Dubois, Claire; Popea, Irina; Poloni, Claudia; Selvadoray, Nalini; Gumy, Alain; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2012-12-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis likely has a wider clinical spectrum than previously recognized. This article reports a previously healthy 16-year-old girl who was diagnosed with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis 3 months after onset of severe depression with psychotic features. She had no neurological manifestations, and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was normal. Slow background on electroencephalogram and an oligoclonal band in the cerebrospinal fluid prompted the search for anti-NMDA receptor antibodies. She markedly improved over time but remained with mild neuropsychological sequelae after a trial of late immunotherapy. Only a high index of suspicion enables recognition of the milder forms of the disease masquerading as primary psychiatric disorders.

  15. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: an unusual cause of autistic regression in a toddler.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ori; Richer, Lawrence; Forbes, Karen; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Currie, Angela; Eliyashevska, Myroslava; Goez, Helly R

    2014-05-01

    Anti N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis in children is associated with psychiatric changes, seizures, and dyskinesias. We present the first report of autistic regression in a toddler caused by this entity. A 33-month-old boy presented with decreased appetite, irritability, and insomnia following an upper respiratory tract infection. Over the next few weeks he lost language and social skills, and abnormal movements of his hand developed. Within a month, this patient came to fit the diagnostic criteria for autistic spectrum disorder. Upon investigation, anti-NMDA receptor antibodies were found in the boy's cerebrospinal fluid. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins and steroids, resulting in reacquisition of language and social skills and resolution of movements. Our case emphasizes the significance of suspecting anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis as the cause of autistic regression, even in an age group where the diagnosis of autistic spectrum disorder is typically made, and especially when presentation follows a febrile illness.

  16. [Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis associated with ovarian teratoma: Description of a case and anesthetic implications].

    PubMed

    Arteche Andrés, M A; Zugasti Echarte, O; de Carlos Errea, J; Pérez Rodríguez, M; Leyún Pérez de Zabalza, R; Azcona Calahorra, M A

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is an autoimmune encephalitis relationated or not with a neoplasm. Although its incidence is unknown, probably remains underdiagnosed. Epidemiological studies place it as the second cause of immune-mediated encephalitis and the first in patients aged less of 30 years. It shows neuropsychiatric symptoms and autonomic instability. After diagnosis, based on the detection of antibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid, an occult malignancy must be investigated. While increasing number of cases have been diagnosed and the important role of this receptor in general anesthesia mechanisms, the interaction of the disease with anesthetic agents and perioperative stress is unknown. We describe the case of a patient with encephalitis associated to ovarian teratoma that underwent gynaecological laparoscopy.

  17. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake in Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Receptor Encephalitis Associated With an Immature Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis associated with an immature teratoma developed in a 38-year-old woman. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed focal intense uptake of F-fluorodeoxyglucose in an area of the brain corresponding to the right medial temporal lobe as well as an intrapelvic tumor. After the PET examination, the patient complained of disorientation and short-term memory loss. The ovarian tumor was resected and diagnosed as an immature teratoma. The cerebrospinal fluid analysis was positive for anti-NMDAR antibody. After surgery, the patient's neurologic symptoms improved. The PET finding of encephalitis associated with an immature teratoma was unexpected.

  18. Effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonists on oscillatory signal propagation in the guinea-pig accessory olfactory bulb slice: characterization by optical, field potential and patch clamp recordings.

    PubMed

    Sugai, T; Onoda, N

    2005-01-01

    To characterize the role of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors in oscillations induced by a single electrical stimulation of the vomeronasal nerve layer, optical, field potential and patch clamp recordings were carried out in guinea-pig accessory olfactory bulb slice preparations. Bath application of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid or MK-801, produced an increase in frequency of oscillating waves (oscillation) in external plexiform and mitral cell layers. The removal of Mg2+ from perfusate abolished oscillations, while subsequent application of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid or MK-801 restored oscillations. Vomeronasal nerve layer-evoked postsynaptic currents were analyzed by whole-cell clamp recordings from mitral and granule cells. A long-lasting excitatory postsynaptic current and periodic inhibitory postsynaptic currents, which were superimposed on the long excitatory postsynaptic current, were observed in mitral cells. The frequency of the periodic inhibitory postsynaptic currents correlated with the frequency of oscillations observed in the optical and field potential recordings. Furthermore, periodic inhibitory postsynaptic currents were blocked by puff application of bicuculline to the external plexiform layer/mitral cell layer, where mitral cells make dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells. In addition, puff application of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, to the external plexiform layer/mitral cell layer suppressed an early phase of periodic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (membrane oscillation), whereas 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid suppressed the late phase of periodic inhibitory postsynaptic currents. These data indicate that periodic excitatory postsynaptic currents of granule cells induce relevantly periodic inhibitory postsynaptic currents in mitral cells via dendrodendritic synapses and suggest that feedback inhibition regulates generation of

  19. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram enhances hippocampal synaptic efficacy via glycine-binding site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-10-01

    Sunifiram is a novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug structurally related to piracetam, which was developed for neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease. Sunifiram is known to enhance cognitive function in some behavioral experiments such as Morris water maze task. To address question whether sunifiram affects N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic function in the hippocampal CA1 region, we assessed the effects of sunifiram on NMDAR-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) by electrophysiology and on phosphorylation of synaptic proteins by immunoblotting analysis. In mouse hippocampal slices, sunifiram at 10-100 nM significantly enhanced LTP in a bell-shaped dose-response relationship which peaked at 10 nM. The enhancement of LTP by sunifiram treatment was inhibited by 7-chloro-kynurenic acid (7-ClKN), an antagonist for glycine-binding site of NMDAR, but not by ifenprodil, an inhibitor for polyamine site of NMDAR. The enhancement of LTP by sunifilam was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisozazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) through activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and an increase in phosphorylation of NMDAR through activation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Sunifiram treatments at 1-1000 nM increased the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a dose-dependent manner. The enhancement was associated with an increase in phosphorylation of AMPAR receptor through activation of CaMKII. Interestingly, under the basal condition, sunifiram treatments increased PKCα (Ser-657) and Src family (Tyr-416) activities with the same bell-shaped dose-response curve as that of LTP peaking at 10 nM. The increase in phosphorylation of PKCα (Ser-657) and Src (Tyr-416) induced by sunifiram was inhibited by 7-ClKN treatment. The LTP enhancement by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by PP2, a Src family inhibitor. Finally, when pretreated with a high

  20. The endocytic receptor protein LRP also mediates neuronal calcium signaling via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bacskai, B. J.; Xia, M. Q.; Strickland, D. K.; Rebeck, G. W.; Hyman, B. T.

    2000-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is an endocytic receptor that is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family. We report that the LRP ligand, activated α2-macroglobulin (α2M*), induces robust calcium influx in cultured primary neurons, but not in nonneuronal LRP-containing cells in the same culture. The calcium influx is mediated through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channels, which explains the neuron specificity of the response. Microapplication of α2M* leads to a localized response at the site of application that dissipates rapidly, suggesting that the calcium signal is temporally and spatially discrete. Calcium influx to α2M* is blocked by the physiological LRP inhibitor, receptor-associated protein. Bivalent antibodies to the extracellular domain of LRP, but not Fab fragments of the same antibody, cause calcium influx, indicating that the response is specific to LRP and may require dimerization of the receptor. Thus, LRP is an endocytic receptor with a novel signaling role. PMID:11016955

  1. Apelin-36 is protective against N-methyl-D-aspartic-acid-induced retinal ganglion cell death in the mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Murakami, Yuta; Sawada, Shohei; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-11-15

    Retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma is caused at least in part by a large Ca(2+) influx through N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. Apelin is a peptide originally found in the tissue extracts of bovine stomach. Recent studies have been shown that apelin protects against the ischemic-reperfused injury in the brain. We examined whether apelin had protective effects on the NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death using B6.Cg-TgN(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J transgenic mice, which express the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein in RGCs in the retina, in vivo. The mice were anesthetized by ketamine and xylazine, and NMDA (40 nmol/eye) was intravitreally injected. We evaluated the effects of apelin-13, [Glp(1)]-apelin-13, a potent agonist of apelin receptor, and apelin-36 on the NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell death. NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell loss was clearly seen 7 days after NMDA injection. Intravitreal apelin-36 (0.33 nmol/eye), but not apelin-13 (1 nmol/eye) nor [Glp(1)]-apelin-13 (1 nmol/eye), simultaneously injected with NMDA significantly reduced the cell loss. The protective effect of apelin-36 was not reduced by ML221 (0.1 nmol/eye; 5-[(4-Nitrobenzoyl)oxy]-2-[(2-pyrimidinylthio)methyl]-4H-pyran-4-one), an apelin receptor antagonist, GF109203X (0.03 nmol/eye), a protein kinase C inhibitor, U0126 (0.2 nmol/eye), a MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor, LY294002 (0.1 nmol/eye), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, Akti 1/2 (0.05 nmol/eye), an Akt inhibitor, or 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole (0.2 nmol/eye), a casein kinase-2 inhibitor. In addition, human apelin-36 did not affect the kainic-acid (20 nmol/eye)-induced ganglion cell death. The present study suggests that apelin-36 protects against the NMDA-induced ganglion cell death independently of the activation of apelin receptor in the murine retina in vivo.

  2. Propofol effectively inhibits lithium-pilocarpine- induced status epilepticus in rats via downregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henglin; Wang, Zhuoqiang; Mi, Weidong; Zhao, Cong; Liu, Yanqin; Wang, Yongan; Sun, Haipeng

    2012-01-01

    Status epilepticus was induced via intraperitoneal injection of lithium-pilocarpine. The inhibitory effects of propofol on status epilepticus in rats were judged based on observation of behavior, electroencephalography and 24-hour survival rate. Propofol (12.5–100 mg/kg) improved status epilepticus in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced the number of deaths within 24 hours of lithium-pilocarpine injection. Western blot results showed that, 24 hours after induction of status epilepticus, the levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A and 2B subunits were significantly increased in rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Propofol at 50 mg/kg significantly suppressed the increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit levels, but not the increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A subunit levels. The results suggest that propofol can effectively inhibit status epilepticus induced by lithium-pilocarpine. This effect may be associated with downregulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B subunit expression after seizures. PMID:25737709

  3. Impairment of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-controlled motor activity in LYN-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Umemori, H; Ogura, H; Tozawa, N; Mikoshiba, K; Nishizumi, H; Yamamoto, T

    2003-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, an ionotropic glutamate receptor, is implicated in motor activity that is regulated in the striatum and nucleus accumbens of the brain. A Src family kinase Lyn is highly expressed in striatum, cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum in the brain. Here we show that spontaneous motor activity is suppressed in lyn-/- mice. S.c. injection of methylphenidate, which causes accumulation of dopamine in synapses, reveals that dopaminergic pathway is normal in lyn-/- mice. After blocking the NMDA receptor, motor activity of lyn-/- mice increased to the same level as that of wild type mice. Therefore, the NMDA receptor-mediated signaling is enhanced in lyn-/- mice, indicating that Lyn regulates the NMDA receptor pathway negatively. Intriguingly, the activity of protein kinase C (PKC), an enzyme regulated downstream of NMDA receptors, is increased in lyn-/- mice. The present data suggest that the NMDA receptor signal that is enhanced in the absence of Lyn suppresses the motor activity, probably through inhibition of dopaminergic pathway at striatum. We conclude that Lyn contributes to coordination of motor activity through regulation of the NMDA pathway. It appears that this negative regulation involves suppression of downstream signaling of NMDA receptor such as those mediated by PKC.

  4. Src, a Molecular Switch Governing Gain Control of Synaptic Transmission Mediated by N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xian-Min; Salter, Michael W.

    1999-07-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a principal subtype of glutamate receptor mediating fast excitatory transmission at synapses in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and other regions of the central nervous system. NMDA receptors are crucial for the lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission that occurs both physiologically and in pathological conditions such as chronic pain. Over the past several years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the activity of NMDA receptors is regulated by the protein tyrosine kinase, Src. Recently it has been discovered that, by means of up-regulating NMDA receptor function, activation of Src mediates the induction of the lasting enhancement of excitatory transmission known as long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Also, Src has been found to amplify the up-regulation of NMDA receptor function that is produced by raising the intracellular concentration of sodium. Sodium concentration increases in neuronal dendrites during high levels of firing activity, which is precisely when Src becomes activated. Therefore, we propose that the boost in NMDA receptor function produced by the coincidence of activating Src and raising intracellular sodium may be important in physiological and pathophysiological enhancement of excitatory transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and elsewhere in the central nervous system.

  5. Long-term imipramine treatment increases N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activity and expression via epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nghia, Nguyen An; Hirasawa, Takae; Kasai, Hirotake; Obata, Chie; Moriishi, Kohji; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Koizumi, Schuichi; Kubota, Takeo

    2015-04-05

    Imipramine, a major antidepressant, is known to inhibit reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine, which contributes to recovery from major depressive disorder. It has recently been reported that acute imipramine treatment inhibits N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity. However, the mechanisms underlying long-term effects of imipramine have not been identified. We tested these distinct effects in mouse cortical neurons and found that acute (30s) imipramine treatment decreased Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors, whereas long-term treatment (48h) increased Ca(2+) influx via the same receptors. Furthermore, long-term treatment increased NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit expression via epigenetic changes, including increased acetylation of histones H3K9 and H3K27 in the NR2B promoter and decreased activity of histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and HDAC4. These results suggest that the long-term effects of imipramine on NMDA receptors are quite different from its acute effects. Furthermore, increased NR2B expression via epigenetic alterations might be a part of the mechanism responsible for this long-term effect.

  6. Changes in the striatal extracellular levels of dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid evoked by ammonia and N-methyl-D-aspartate: modulation by taurine.

    PubMed

    Anderzhanova, Elmira; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo; Albrecht, Jan

    2003-07-11

    Acute hyperammonemia is associated with motor disturbances that are thought to involve striatal dopaminergic dysfunction. Discharge of striatal dopaminergic neurons is controlled by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, the excessive activation of which contributes to ammonia neurotoxicity. Here we show that ammonium chloride ("ammonia", extracellular concentration 5 mM) or NMDA (1 mM), when directly administered to the rat striatum via a microdialysis probe, evoke a prompt accumulation of dopamine (DA) in the microdialysates. However, while ammonia increases, NMDA decreases, the extracellular dihydroxyphenylacetate (DOPAC) level. The results point to the NMDA receptor-mediated enhancement of DA release and increased DA metabolism as two independent ways by which ammonia affects the striatal dopaminergic system. Taurine (extracellular concentration 10 mM) attenuated the NMDA- and ammonia-evoked DA release and ammonia-induced accumulation of DOPAC, reflecting two different neuroprotective mechanisms of this amino acid.

  7. [Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: experience with six pediatric patients. Potential efficacy of methotrexate].

    PubMed

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Quezada-Corona, Arturo; Dalmau, Josep; Campos-Guevara, Verónica

    2013-11-01

    INTRODUCTION. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a condition that is increasingly more frequently diagnosed in the paediatric age. Unlike adults, in many cases it is not associated to tumours and the most common initial manifestations in children are seizures and movement disorders, while in adults there is a predominance of psychiatric alterations. CASE REPORTS. We present six confirmed paediatric cases with antibodies against the subunit NR1 of the NMDA receptor in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Five of the cases began with seizures as the initial clinical symptom prior to the development of the classical clinical features of this condition. In all cases, steroids were used as the first line of treatment, although these only brought about control over the manifestations in one of them; the other patients therefore required second-line immunomodulators. All the patients received methotrexate as immunomodulator treatment to prevent relapses, and in all cases there was an improvement in the patients' situation. CONCLUSIONS. In our series of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, none were associated with tumours. All of them were given methotrexate for at least one year and no adverse clinical or analytical events were observed; likewise, there were no neurological sequelae or relapses during treatment. Although it is a small series and it would be advisable to increase the number and time to progression, we see methotrexate as an excellent alternative immunomodulator treatment for this pathology.

  8. The N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor in Heart Development: A Gene Knockdown Model Using siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Octavian V.; Bennett, Gregory D.; Rosenquist, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    Antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) may disrupt the development of the cardiac neural crest (CNC) and contribute to conotruncal heart defects. To test this interaction, a loss-of-function model was generated using small interfering RNAs (siRNA) directed against the critical NR1-subunit of this receptor in avian embryos. The coding sequence of the chicken NR1-gene and predicted protein sequences were characterized and found to be homologous with other vertebrate species. Analysis of its spatiotemporal expression demonstrated its expression within the neural tube at pre-migratory CNC sites. siRNA targeted to the NR1-mRNA in pre-migratory CNC lead to a significant decrease in NR1 protein expression. However, embryo survival and heart development were not adversely affected. These results indicate that the CNC may function normally in the absence of functional NMDAR, and that NMDAR antagonists may have a complex impact upon the CNC that transcends impairment of a single receptor type. PMID:19737608

  9. Rehabilitation for a child with recalcitrant anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yao-Hong; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Hsieh, Pei-Chun; Lien, Wei-Chih; Chang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognized, potentially fatal, but treatable autoimmune disease. Good outcome predictors include milder severity of symptoms, no need for intensive care unit admission, early aggressive immunotherapy, and prompt tumor removal. We report a case of a young girl aged 3 years 2 months and diagnosed as recalcitrant anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis without any underlying neoplasm. The patient had initial symptoms of behavioral changes that progressed to generalized choreoathetosis and orofacial dyskinesia, which resulted in 6 months of hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit. One year after initial onset of the disease, she had only achieved the developmental age of an infant aged 6–8 months in terms of gross and fine motor skills, but she resumed total independence in activities of daily living after receiving extensive immunotherapy and 28 months of rehabilitation. Our brief review will help clinical practitioners become more familiar with this disease and the unique rehabilitation programs. PMID:25473290

  10. Pediatric anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: experience of a tertiary care teaching center from north India.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Tripathi, Manjari; Gulati, Sheffali; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Pandit, Awadh Kishore; Sinha, Aditi; Rathi, Bhim Singh

    2014-11-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is characterized by acute- or subacute-onset encephalopathy with extrapyramidal, psychiatric, and epileptic manifestations. Diagnosis is confirmed by positive antibodies to NMDA receptor in cerebrospinal fluid and serum. Eleven pediatric cases presented over a 2-year period at a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. The average age at presentation was 9 years (range: 2.5 to 18 years, median: 10 years) with a slight female predominance (1.2:1). The common modes of presentation were progressive extrapyramidal syndrome with global neuroregression in 45% (5 of 11), epileptiform encephalopathy in 27% (3 of 11), and an overlap between the 2 in 27% (3 of 11). Fifty-eight percent showed significant response to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. This entity should be considered in an acute- or subacute-onset encephalopathy if common infectious etiologies are ruled out and there are specific clinical pointers. Early diagnosis and treatment significantly improves the outcome.

  11. Glypican 6 Enhances N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Function in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Kanako; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Chujo, Kaori; Sekino, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro use of neurons that are differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-neurons) is expected to improve the prediction accuracy of preclinical tests for both screening and safety assessments in drug development. To achieve this goal, hiPSC neurons are required to differentiate into functional neurons that form excitatory networks and stably express N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Recent studies have identified some astrocyte-derived factors that are important for the functional maturation of neurons. We therefore examined the effects of the astrocyte-derived factor glypican 6 (GPC6) on hiPSC-neurons. When we pharmacologically examined which receptor subtypes mediate L-glutamate (L-Glu)-induced changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in hiPSC neurons using fura-2 Ca2+ imaging, NMDAR-mediated responses were not detected through 7 days in vitro (DIV). These cells were also not vulnerable to excitotoxicity at 7 DIV. However, a 5-days treatment with GPC6 from 3 DIV induced an NMDAR-mediated Ca2+ increase in hiPSC-neurons and increased the level of NMDARs on the cell surface. We also found that GPC6-treated hiPSC-neurons became responsive to excitotoxicity. These results suggest that GPC6 increases the level of functional NMDARs in hiPSC-neurons. Glial factors may play a key role in accelerating the functional maturation of hiPSC neurons for drug-development applications. PMID:27895553

  12. N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Excessive Activation Inhibited Fetal Rat Lung Development In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhengchang; Zhou, Xiaocheng; Luo, Ziqiang; Huo, Huiyi; Wang, Mingjie; Yu, Xiaohe; Cao, Chuanding; Ding, Ying; Xiong, Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intrauterine hypoxia is a common cause of fetal growth and lung development restriction. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are distributed in the postnatal lung and play a role in lung injury, little is known about NMDAR's expression and role in fetal lung development. Methods. Real-time PCR and western blotting analysis were performed to detect NMDARs between embryonic days (E) 15.5 and E21.5 in fetal rat lungs. NMDAR antagonist MK-801's influence on intrauterine hypoxia-induced retardation of fetal lung development was tested in vivo, and NMDA's direct effect on fetal lung development was observed using fetal lung organ culture in vitro. Results. All seven NMDARs are expressed in fetal rat lungs. Intrauterine hypoxia upregulated NMDARs expression in fetal lungs and decreased fetal body weight, lung weight, lung-weight-to-body-weight ratio, and radial alveolar count, whereas MK-801 alleviated this damage in vivo. In vitro experiments showed that NMDA decreased saccular circumference and area per unit and downregulated thyroid transcription factor-1 and surfactant protein-C mRNA expression. Conclusions. The excessive activation of NMDARs contributed to hypoxia-induced fetal lung development retardation and appropriate blockade of NMDAR might be a novel therapeutic strategy for minimizing the negative outcomes of prenatal hypoxia on lung development. PMID:27478831

  13. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A New Challenging Entity for Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist

    PubMed Central

    Maccaferri, GE; Rossetti, AO; Dalmau, J; Berney, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a relatively newly identified autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder that predominantly affects children and young adults. Although psychiatric symptoms are highly prevalent and frequently severe, it has mainly been reported in neurological, but not psychiatric, literature. Understanding this form of encephalitis, its quick diagnosis and which treatment to provide are of utmost importance for consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatrists. The aim of this paper was to describe a case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis with severe psychiatric manifestations, who showed impressive recovery but required intensive involvement of the C-L psychiatry team. We emphasise the behavioural aspects, psychiatric symptoms and challenges faced by the CL consultant across the different phases of the treatment. Methods We report the different treatment phases for a young woman with anti-NMDAR encephalitis who developed severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, with a focus on the role and challenges faced by the C-L psychiatrist. The literature is reviewed for each of these challenges. Results This case illustrated that even extremely severely affected patients may show impressive recovery, but require long lasting psychiatric care. C-L psychiatrists are faced with numerous challenges where only little literature is available. Conclusion C-L psychiatrists play a pivotal role throughout the multidisciplinary care of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and should be informed about this entity. PMID:27468380

  14. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor's neglected subunit - GluN1 matters under normal and hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Bliznyuk, Alice; Aviner, Ben; Golan, Hava; Hollmann, Michael; Grossman, Yoram

    2015-10-01

    Professional deep-water divers exposed to hyperbaric pressure (HP) above 1.1 MPa develop high-pressure neurological syndrome, which is associated with central nervous system hyperexcitability. It was previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic responses, increases neuronal excitability, and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. In addition, we have reported that HP (10.1 MPa) differentially affects ionic currents, measured by the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, of eight specific NMDAR subtypes generated by the co-expression of GluN1-1a or GluN1-1b with one of the four GluN2(A-D) subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We now report that eight GluN1 splice variants, when co-expressed with GluN2A, mediate different ionic currents at normal and HP (5.1 MPa). These data, in conjunction with our previous results, indicate that both GluN1 and GluN2 subunits play a critical role in determining NMDAR currents under normal and HP conditions. These data, given the differential spatial distribution of the different NMDAR subtypes in the central nervous system, may offer a partial explanation for the mechanism governing the complex signs and symptoms of high-pressure neurological syndrome, and an explanation for the suspected long-term HP health decrement due to repetitive deep dives by professional divers.

  15. Raised cerebrospinal fluid BAFF and APRIL levels in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: Correlation with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Liu, Xiao-Ni; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Xiang; Quan, Chao; Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2017-04-15

    In this study, we aimed to assess the levels of B cell activating factor from the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis and determine their correlation with clinical outcome. BAFF and APRIL concentrations in CSF and serum from 40 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 20 controls were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with controls, the levels of both BAFF and APRIL in CSF were significantly increased in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis (p<0.001 and p<0.001). Patients with unfavorable outcome had higher levels of BAFF and APRIL in CSF than those who had favorable outcome (p<0.05 and p<0.05). BAFF and APRIL levels in CSF were elevated and associated with clinical outcome in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, indicating that they may be valuable biomarkers to this disease.

  16. Conformational Selection and Submillisecond Dynamics of the Ligand-binding Domain of the N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Dolino, Drew M.; Rezaei Adariani, Soheila; Shaikh, Sana A.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Sanabria, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are heteromeric non-selective cation channels that require the binding of glycine and glutamate for gating. Based on crystal structures, the mechanism of partial agonism at the glycine-binding site is thought to be mediated by a shift in the conformational equilibrium between an open clamshell and a closed clamshell-like structure of the bilobed ligand-binding domain (LBD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and multiparameter fluorescence detection, which allows us to study the conformational states and dynamics in the submillisecond time scale, we show that there are at least three conformational states explored by the LBD: the low FRET, medium FRET, and high FRET states. The distance of the medium and low FRET states corresponds to what has been observed in crystallography structures. We show that the high FRET state, which would represent a more closed clamshell conformation than that observed in the crystal structure, is most likely the state initiating activation, as evidenced by the fact that the fraction of the protein in this state correlates well with the extent of activation. Furthermore, full agonist bound LBDs show faster dynamic motions between the medium and high FRET states, whereas they show slower dynamics when bound to weaker agonists or to antagonists. PMID:27226581

  17. Kinetic Contributions to Gating by Interactions Unique to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Borschel, William F.; Cummings, Kirstie A.; Tindell, LeeAnn K.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2015-01-01

    Among glutamate-gated channels, NMDA receptors produce currents that subside with unusually slow kinetics, and this feature is essential to the physiology of central excitatory synapses. Relative to the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDA receptors have additional intersubunit contacts in the ligand binding domain that occur at both conserved and non-conserved sites. We examined GluN1/GluN2A single-channel currents with kinetic analyses and modeling to probe these class-specific intersubunit interactions for their role in glutamate binding and receptor gating. We found that substitutions that eliminate such interactions at non-conserved sites reduced stationary gating, accelerated deactivation, and imparted sensitivity to aniracetam, an AMPA receptor-selective positive modulator. Abolishing unique contacts at conserved sites also reduced stationary gating and accelerated deactivation. These results show that contacts specific to NMDA receptors, which brace the heterodimer interface within the ligand binding domain, stabilize actively gating receptor conformations and result in longer bursts and slower deactivations. They support the view that the strength of the heterodimer interface modulates gating in both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors and that unique interactions at this interface are responsible in part for basic differences between the kinetics of NMDA and non-NMDA currents at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26370091

  18. [Clinical diagnosis and treatment of anti-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recent clinical management of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is reviewed. This illness is required the management of the neurological emergency. Typical symptoms of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis develop in several stages that progresses from psychosis, memory deficits, seizures, and language disintegration into a state of unresponsiveness with catatonic features often associated with abnormal movements, and autonomic and respiratory instability. The diagnosis is depended on the detection of the NMDA receptor antibody in CSF or serum under the above characteristic symptoms of encephalitis. The disorder predominantly affects children and young adults, occurs with or without tumor association. The presence of a tumor (usually an ovarian teratoma) is dependent on age and sex, being more frequent in women older than 18 years. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis should be treated with tumor resection and immunotherapy (corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange) responded faster to treatment and less frequently needed second-line immunotherapy (cyclophosphamide or rituximab, or both).

  19. Identification of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in isolated nervous system mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Korde, Amit S; Maragos, William F

    2012-10-12

    NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors gate the cytoplasmic influx of calcium, which may, depending on the intensity of the stimulus, subserve either normal synaptic communication or cell death. We demonstrate that when isolated mitochondria are exposed to calcium and NMDA agonists, there is a significant increase in mitochondrial calcium levels. The agonist/antagonist response studies on purified mitochondria suggest the presence of a receptor on mitochondria with features similar to plasma membrane NMDA receptors. Immunogold electron microscopy of hippocampal tissue sections revealed extensive localization of NR2a subunit immunoreactivity on mitochondria. Transient transfection of neuronal GT1-7 cells with an NR1-NR2a NMDA receptor subunit cassette specifically targeting mitochondria resulted in a significant increase in mitochondrial calcium and neuroprotection against glutamate-induced cell death. Mitochondria prepared from GT1-7 cells in which the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors was silenced demonstrated a decrease in calcium uptake. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that mitochondria express a calcium transport protein that shares characteristics with the NMDA receptor and may play a neuroprotective role.

  20. Chronic intermittent ethanol treatment selectively alters N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit surface expression in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley D; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-07-01

    A chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure regimen consists of repeated episodes of ethanol intoxication and withdrawal. CIE treatment has been reported to result in a significant enhancement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in vivo, and trafficking of NMDA receptors is emerging a key regulatory mechanism that underlies the channel function. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of CIE on NMDA receptor subunit surface expression. Cultured cortical neurons were exposed to 75 mM ethanol for 14 h followed by 10 h of withdrawal, repeated this cycle five times, and followed by 2 or 5 days of withdrawal. Surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits and their endocytosis were measured by biotinylation and Western blots. CIE significantly increased NMDA receptor (NR) 1 and NR2B but not NR2A subunit surface expression after 5 days of treatment. However, CIE treatment did not reduce the NMDA receptor endocytosis. Quantification of immunocytochemistry confirmed CIE-induced increase in both the total number of NR1 and NR2B subunit clusters and their targeting to synaptic sites. It is noteworthy that this effect persisted even after ethanol withdrawal with a peak expression occurring between 0 and 2 days after withdrawal, and the expression on the plasma membrane was still at high levels after 5 days of withdrawal. In addition, this was accompanied by significant increases in postsynaptic density protein 95 clusters. Protein kinase A inhibitor completely reversed CIE-induced increase in NR1 and partially in NR2B surface level and a long-lasting effect. These changes may contribute to the development of ethanol-induced neurotoxicity and ethanol dependence.

  1. Protective effects of PF-4708671 against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ikumi; Aoki, Yuto; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Asano, Daiki; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), protects against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA)-induced retinal damage in rats. Rapamycin inhibits mTOR activity, thereby preventing the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, which is a downstream target of S6 kinase. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether PF-4708671, an inhibitor of S6 kinase, protects against NMDA-induced retinal injury. Intravitreal injection of NMDA (200 nmol/eye) caused cell loss in the ganglion cell layer and neuroinflammatory responses, such as an increase in the number of CD45-positive leukocytes and Iba1-positive microglia. Surprisingly, simultaneous injection of PF-4708671 (50 nmol/eye) with NMDA significantly attenuated these responses without affecting phosphorylated S6 levels. These results suggest that PF-4708671 and rapamycin likely protect against NMDA-induced retinal damage via distinct pathways. The neuroprotective effect of PF-4708671 is unlikely to be associated with inhibition of the S6 kinase, even though PF-4708671 is reported to be a S6 kinase inhibitor.

  2. NR2B-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors Contribute to Network Asynchrony and Loss of Long-Term Potentiation Following Mild Mechanical Injury In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-30

    REPORT NR2B -N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS CONTRIBUTE TO NETWORK ASYNCHRONY AND LOSS OF LONG-TERM POTENTIATION FOLLOWING MILD MECHANICAL INJURY IN...integrate-and-fire model of network activity, 2) simulated an injured network, 3) predicted an important role for the NR2B -NMDA receptor in mediating...ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS synchrony, NR2B -NMDA receptor, network

  3. Differential role of ventral tegmental area acetylcholine and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in cocaine-seeking.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Wojciech; Wickham, Robert J; Behrens, Shay; Wang, Jie; Zwerling, Blake; Mason, Graeme F; Addy, Nii A

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to drug-associated cues evokes drug-seeking behavior and is regarded as a major cause of relapse. Cues evoke burst firing of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons and phasic DA release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Cholinergic and glutamatergic input to the VTA is suggested to gate phasic DA activity. However, the role of VTA cholinergic and glutamatergic receptors in regulating phasic dopamine release and cue-induced drug-seeking in cocaine experienced subjects is not known. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, we found that VTA inactivation strongly inhibited, while VTA stimulation promoted, cocaine-seeking behavior during early withdrawal. Blockade of phasic activated D1 receptors in the NAc core also strongly inhibited cue-induced cocaine-seeking--suggesting an important role of phasic DA activity in the VTA to NAc core circuit. Next, we examined the role of VTA acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in regulating both NAc core phasic DA release and cue-induced cocaine-seeking. In cocaine naïve subjects, VTA infusion of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist mecamylamine, the muscarinic AChR antagonist scopolamine, or the NMDAR antagonist AP-5, led to robust attenuation of phasic DA release in the NAc core. During early cocaine withdrawal, VTA infusion of AP-5 had limited effects on NAc phasic DA release and cue-induced cocaine-seeking while VTA infusion of mecamylamine or scopolamine robustly inhibited both phasic DA release and cocaine-seeking. The results demonstrate that VTA AChRs, but not NMDARs, strongly regulate cue-induced cocaine-seeking and phasic DA release during early cocaine withdrawal.

  4. Adenosine A1 receptor activation modulates N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) preconditioning phenotype in the brain.

    PubMed

    Constantino, Leandra C; Pamplona, Fabrício A; Matheus, Filipe C; Ludka, Fabiana K; Gomez-Soler, Maricel; Ciruela, Francisco; Boeck, Carina R; Prediger, Rui D; Tasca, Carla I

    2015-04-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) preconditioning is induced by subtoxic doses of NMDA and it promotes a transient state of resistance against subsequent lethal insults. Interestingly, this mechanism of neuroprotection depends on adenosine A1 receptors (A1R), since blockade of A1R precludes this phenomenon. In this study we evaluated the consequences of NMDA preconditioning on the hippocampal A1R biology (i.e. expression, binding properties and functionality). Accordingly, we measured A1R expression in NMDA preconditioned mice (75mg/kg, i.p.; 24h) and showed that neither the total amount of receptor, nor the A1R levels in the synaptic fraction was altered. In addition, the A1R binding affinity to the antagonist [(3)H] DPCPX was slightly increased in total membrane extracts of hippocampus from preconditioned mice. Next, we evaluated the impact of NMDA preconditioning on A1R functioning by measuring the A1R-mediated regulation of glutamate uptake into hippocampal slices and on behavioral responses in the open field and hot plate tests. NMDA preconditioning increased glutamate uptake into hippocampal slices without altering the expression of glutamate transporter GLT-1. Interestingly, NMDA preconditioning also induced antinociception in the hot plate test and both effects were reversed by post-activation of A1R with the agonist CCPA (0.2mg/kg, i.p.). NMDA preconditioning or A1R modulation did not alter locomotor activity in the open field. Overall, the results described herein provide new evidence that post-activation of A1R modulates NMDA preconditioning-mediated responses, pointing to the importance of the cross-talk between glutamatergic and adenosinergic systems to neuroprotection.

  5. Gene profiling reveals hydrogen sulphide recruits death signaling via the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor identifying commonalities with excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghui Jessica; Peng, Zhao Feng; Manikandan, Jayapal; Melendez, Alirio J; Tan, Gek San; Chung, Ching Ming; Li, Qiu-Tian; Tan, Theresa M; Deng, Lih Wen; Whiteman, Matthew; Beart, Philip M; Moore, Phillip K; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2011-05-01

    Recently the role of hydrogen sulphide (H(2) S) as a gasotransmitter stimulated wide interest owing to its involvement in Alzheimer's disease and ischemic stroke. Previously we demonstrated the importance of functional ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) by neurons is critical for H(2) S-mediated dose- and time-dependent injury. Moreover N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists abolished the consequences of H(2) S-induced neuronal death. This study focuses on deciphering the downstream effects activation of NMDAR on H(2) S-mediated neuronal injury by analyzing the time-course of global gene profiling (5, 15, and 24 h) to provide a comprehensive description of the recruitment of NMDAR-mediated signaling. Microarray analyses were performed on RNA from cultured mouse primary cortical neurons treated with 200 µM sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) or NMDA over a time-course of 5-24 h. Data were validated via real-time PCR, western blotting, and global proteomic analysis. A substantial overlap of 1649 genes, accounting for over 80% of NMDA global gene profile present in that of H(2) S and over 50% vice versa, was observed. Within these commonly occurring genes, the percentage of transcriptional consistency at each time-point ranged from 81 to 97%. Gene families involved included those related to cell death, endoplasmic reticulum stress, calcium homeostasis, cell cycle, heat shock proteins, and chaperones. Examination of genes exclusive to H(2) S-mediated injury (43%) revealed extensive dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. These data form a foundation for the development of screening platforms and define targets for intervention in H(2) S neuropathologies where NMDAR-activated signaling cascades played a substantial role.

  6. Ketamine and other N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists in the treatment of depression: a perspective review

    PubMed Central

    Iadarola, Nicolas D.; Niciu, Mark J.; Richards, Erica M.; Vande Voort, Jennifer L.; Ballard, Elizabeth D.; Lundin, Nancy B.; Nugent, Allison C.; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar depression (BDep) have a distinct lag of onset that can generate great distress and impairment in patients. Furthermore, as demonstrated by several real-world effectiveness trials, their efficacy is limited. All approved antidepressant medications for MDD primarily act through monoaminergic mechanisms, agonists or antagonists with varying affinities for serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine. The glutamate system has received much attention in recent years as an avenue for developing novel therapeutics. A single subanesthetic dose infusion of the noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has been shown to have rapid and potent antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant MDD and BDep. In a reverse translational framework, ketamine’s clinical efficacy has inspired many preclinical studies to explore glutamatergic mechanisms of antidepressant action. These studies have revealed enhanced synaptic plasticity/synaptogenesis via numerous molecular and cellular mechanisms: release of local translational inhibition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and secretion from dendritic spines, mammalian target of rapamycin activation and glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition. Current efforts are focused on extending ketamine’s antidepressant efficacy, uncovering the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for ketamine’s antidepressant activity in biologically enriched subgroups, and identifying treatment response biomarkers to personalize antidepressant selection. Other NMDA receptor antagonists have been studied both preclinically and clinically, which have revealed relatively modest antidepressant effects compared with ketamine but potentially other favorable characteristics, for example, decreased dissociative or psychotomimetic effects; therefore, there is great interest in developing novel glutamatergic antidepressants with greater target specificity and

  7. Methionine choline reverses lead-induced cognitive and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1 deficits.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangqin; Feng, Chang; Wu, Fengyun; Ye, Weiwei; Lin, Fen; Wang, Chunhong; Yan, Ji; Zhu, Gaochun; Xiao, Yuanmei; Bi, Yongyi

    2010-06-04

    The principal effects of Pb(2+) exposure in children are attention, memory and learning deficits that persist into adulthood. The application of the conventional chelators in children is somewhat prohibited by adverse health effects and is not effective in reversing learning deficits once they have occurred. In this study, we applied the nutrients, methionine and choline, to prevent Pb(2+)-induced cognitive impairment. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups. Three groups of rats were exposed to Pb(2+) in drinking water containing 400mg/L Pb(2+) acetate, of which two groups were concurrently administered by oral gavage once a day, 6 days per week, with low or high doses of methionine and choline for 60 days. The normal control group received distilled water alone, and the reagent control received methionine choline chloride alone. Methionine choline treatment reversed long-term deficits in spatial learning and memory caused by Pb(2+) exposure in rats. Enhanced learning performance of Pb(2+)-exposed rats was associated with recovery of deficits in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit 1 (NR1) mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. The effect of methionine choline on NR1 gene and protein expression was somewhat specific to Pb(2+)-exposed rats and did not affect the NR2A and NR2B subunits of the NMDAR measured in the same animals. Moreover, methionine choline treatment did not lower brain Pb(2+) content in Pb(2+)-exposed rats, although it reduced blood and bone Pb(2+) content. Methionine and choline reversed cognitive and NR1 deficits induced by Pb(2+) exposure, a beneficial effect that has significant clinical implications for the treatment of childhood Pb(2+) intoxication.

  8. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors by L-glutamate in cells dissociated from adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, A J; Colquhoun, D

    1992-01-01

    1. Single channel recording techniques were used to study the ion channel openings resulting from activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by the agonist glutamate. Patches were from cells acutely dissociated from adult rat hippocampus (CA1). Channel activity was studied at low glutamate concentrations (20-100 nM) with 1 microM-glycine, in the absence of extracellular divalent cations. 2. Channel openings were to two main conductance levels corresponding to 50 pS and 40 pS openings in extracellular solution with 1 mM-Ca2+. Around 80% of openings were to the large conductance level. The single channel conductances increased as extracellular Ca2+ was reduced. 3. Distributions of channel open times were described by three exponential components of 87 microseconds, 0.91 ms and 4.72 ms (relative areas of 51, 31 and 18%). Most long openings were to the large conductance level. 4. The channel closed time distribution was complex, requiring five exponential components to describe it adequately. Of these five components, at least three, with time constants of 68 microseconds, 0.72 ms and 7.6 ms (relative areas of 38, 12 and 17%) represent gaps within single activations of the receptor. The presence of a component with a mean of 7.6 ms is notable because gaps of this length have not previously been identified as being within single NMDA receptor channel activations. 5. Channel activations were identified as including gaps underlying at least the first three closed time components. Activations consisted of clusters of channel openings. Distributions of the length of these clusters had mean time constants of 88 microseconds, 3.4 ms and 32 ms (relative areas of 45, 25 and 30%). Long clusters contained short, intermediate and long duration openings as well as subconductance openings. The open probability within clusters averaged 0.62. Three components were evident in distributions of the number of openings per cluster. These had mean values of 1.22, 3.2 and 11

  9. Corticosterone enhances N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor signaling to promote isolated ventral tegmental area activity in a reconstituted mesolimbic dopamine pathway

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Saunders, Meredith A.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda J.; Reynolds, Anna R.; Bardo, Michael T.; Pauly, James R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevations in circulating corticosteroids during periods of stress may influence activity of the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway by increasing glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression and/or function in a glucocorticoid receptor-dependent manner. The current study employed organotypic co-cultures of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) to examine the effects of corticosterone exposure on NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal viability. Co-cultures were pre-exposed to vehicle or corticosterone (CORT; 1 μM) for 5 days prior to a 24 hour co-exposure to NMDA (200 μM). Co-cultures pre-exposed to a non-toxic concentration of corticosterone and subsequently NMDA showed significant neurotoxicity in the VTA only. This was evidenced by increases in propidium iodide uptake as well as decreases in immunoreactivity of the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN). Co-exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 50 μM) or the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone (10 μM) attenuated neurotoxicity. In contrast, the combination of corticosterone and NMDA did not produce any significant effects on either measure within the NAcc. Cultures of the VTA and NAcc maintained without synaptic contact showed no response to CORT or NMDA. These results demonstrate the ability to functionally reconstitute key regions of the mesolimbic reward pathway ex vivo and to reveal a GR-dependent enhancement of NMDA receptor-dependent signaling in the VTA. PMID:26631585

  10. Endogenous Interleukin-1β in Neuropathic Rats Enhances Glutamate Release from the Primary Afferents in the Spinal Dorsal Horn through Coupling with Presynaptic N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid Receptors*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xisheng; Weng, Han-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Excessive activation of glutamate receptors and overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the spinal dorsal horn, are key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which endogenous IL-1β alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with neuropathic pain induced by ligation of the L5 spinal nerve. We demonstrated that endogenous IL-1β in neuropathic rats enhances glutamate release from the primary afferent terminals and non-NMDA glutamate receptor activities in postsynaptic neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is a mediator used by IL-1β to enhance non-NMDA glutamate receptor activities in postsynaptic neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Presynaptic NMDA receptors are effector receptors used by the endogenous IL-1β to enhance glutamate release from the primary afferents in neuropathic rats. This is further supported by the fact that NMDA currents recorded from small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion of normal rats are potentiated by exogenous IL-1β. Furthermore, we provided evidence that functional coupling between IL-1β receptors and presynaptic NMDA receptors at the primary afferent terminals is mediated by the neutral sphingomyelinase/ceramide signaling pathway. Hence, functional coupling between IL-1β receptors and presynaptic NMDA receptors at the primary afferent terminals is a crucial mechanism leading to enhanced glutamate release and activation of non-NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn neurons in neuropathic pain conditions. Interruption of such functional coupling could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:24003233

  11. Development of 2′-substituted (2S,1′R,2′S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine analogues as potent N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Risgaard, Rune; Nielsen, Simon D.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Jensen, Christina M.; Nielsen, Birgitte; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Clausen, Rasmus P.

    2013-01-01

    A series of 2′-substituted analogues of the selective NMDA receptor ligand (2S,1′R,2′S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine ((S)-CCG-IV) have been designed, synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. The design was based on a docking study hypothesizing that substituents in the 2′-position would protrude into a region where differences among the NMDA receptor GluN2 subunits exist. Various synthetic routes were explored, and two different routes provided a series of alkyl-substituted analogues. Pharmacological characterization revealed that these compounds are NMDA receptor agonists and that potency decreases with increasing size of the alkyl groups. Variations in agonist activity are observed at the different recombinant NMDA receptor subtypes. This study demonstrates that it is possible to introduce substituents in the 2′-position of (S)-CCG-IV while maintaining agonist activity and that variation among NMDA receptor subtypes may be achieved by probing this region of the receptor. PMID:23614571

  12. Protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism on VX-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yushan; Weiss, M Tracy; Yin, Junfei; Tenn, Catherine C; Nelson, Peggy D; Mikler, John R

    2008-01-01

    Exposure of the central nervous system to organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents induces seizures and neuronal cell death. Here we report that the OP nerve agent, VX, induces apoptotic-like cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. The VX effects on neurons were concentration-dependent, with an IC(50) of approximately 30 microM. Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) with 50 microM. D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) diminished 30 microM VX-induced total cell death, as assessed by alamarBlue assay and Hoechst staining. In contrast, neither antagonists of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) nor metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) had any effect on VX-induced neurotoxicity. VX-induced neuronal cell death could not be solely attributed to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, since neither the reversible pharmacological cholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, nor the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, affected VX-induced cell death. Importantly, APV was found to be therapeutically effective against VX-induced cell death up to 2 h post VX exposure. These results suggest that NMDARs, but not AMPARs or mGluRs, play important roles in VX-induced cell death in cultured rat cortical neurons. Based on their therapeutic effects, NMDAR antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of VX-induced neurotoxicities.

  13. Variations of movement disorders in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: A nationwide study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Duan, Bi-Chun; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wong, Lee Chin; Li, Sung-Tse; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Fan, Pi-Chaun; Lin, Ming-I; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Hung, Kun-Long; Lee, Wang-Tso

    2016-09-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is one of the most common autoimmune encephalitis that presents with a wide variety of movement disorders. The purpose of our study is to review the manifestations and duration of movement disorders in different ages with NMDAR encephalitis.A retrospective cohort of 28 patients (20 females and 8 males) with positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-NMDAR antibody in a 5-year period from major hospitals in Taiwan was enrolled. They were categorized into 3 age groups: 7 patients were ≤10 years, 14 patients were 10 to 18 years, and 7 patients were >18 years.Total 28 patients (20 females and 8 males) with age ranging from 8 months to 38 years were enrolled. Nearly all patients (n = 27/28, 96%) presented with at least 2 types of disorders, including orofacial-lingual dyskinesia (OFLD; n = 20), catatonia (n = 19), tremor (n = 11), bradykinesia (n = 11), dystonia (n = 11), choreoathethosis (n = 9), and ballism (n = 3). Only 1 patient below 10 years presented with isolated periodic choreoathethosis without other movement disorders. OFLD was common in all age groups. Choreoathetosis was most common in patients aged ≤10 years, while catatonia was most common in patients aged >10 years (P = 0.001 and 0.020, respectively). Bradykinesia was also more common in patients aged >10 years (P = 0.020). The clinical presentations of movement disorders were not significantly different in the age of 10 to 18 years and those >18 years. Neither patient ≤10 years old nor male patients had associated tumors. All patients' movement disorders were improved after treatment, while female patients with tumors had worse short-term outcome (P = 0.014). Compared with other disorders, choreoathetosis persisted significantly longer in patients ≤10 years (P = 0.038), while OFLD and catatonia last longer in patients >10 years (P = 0.047 and 0.002, respectively).Our study shows that

  14. Autoantibodies against the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Subunit NR1: Untangling Apparent Inconsistencies for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2017-01-01

    This viewpoint review provides an integrative picture of seemingly contradictory work published on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 1 (NMDAR1) autoantibodies (AB). Based on the present state of knowledge, it gives recommendations for the clinical decision process regarding immunosuppressive treatment. Brain antigen-directed AB in general and NMDAR1-AB in particular belong to a preexisting autoimmune repertoire of mammals including humans. Specific autoimmune reactive B cells may get repeatedly (perhaps transiently) boosted by various potential stimulants (e.g., microbiome, infections, or neoplasms) plus less efficiently suppressed over lifespan (gradual loss of tolerance), likely explaining the increasing seroprevalence upon aging (>20% NMDAR1-AB in 80-year-old humans). Pathophysiological significance emerges (I) when AB-specific plasma cells settle in the brain and produce large amounts of brain antigen-directed AB intrathecally and/or (II) in conditions of compromised blood–brain barrier (BBB), for instance, upon injury, infection, inflammation, or genetic predisposition (APOE4 haplotype), which then allows substantial access of circulating AB to the brain. Regarding NMDAR1-AB, functional effects on neurons in vitro and elicitation of brain symptoms in vivo have been demonstrated for immunoglobulin (Ig) classes, IgM, IgA, and IgG. Under conditions of brain inflammation, intrathecal production and class switch to IgG may provoke high NMDAR1-AB (and other brain antigen-directed AB) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum, causing the severe syndrome named “anti-NMDAR encephalitis,” which then requires immunosuppressive therapy on top of the causal encephalitis treatment (if available). However, negative CSF NMDAR1-AB results cannot exclude chronic effects of serum NMDAR1-AB on the central nervous system, since the brain acts as “immunoprecipitator,” particularly in situations of compromised BBB. In any case of suspected symptomatic consequences of

  15. Effect of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate-stimulated [3H]-noradrenaline release in rat hippocampal synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Clos, M. V.; Garcia Sanz, A.; Trullas, R.; Badia, A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACPC), a partial agonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex that exhibits neuroprotective, anxiolytic and antidepressant-like actions, was investigated in a functional assay for presynaptic NMDA receptors. 2. NMDA (100 microM) produced a 36% increase of tritium efflux above basal efflux in rat hippocampal synaptosomes preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA), reflecting a release of tritiated noradrenaline. This effect was prevented by 10 microM 7-chlorokynurenic acid, an antagonist of the glycine site of the NMDA receptor. 3. Glycine enhanced the effect of NMDA with Emax and EC50 values of 84 +/- 11% and 1.82 +/- 0.04 microM, respectively. ACPC potentiated the effect of NMDA on tritium overflow with a lower EC50 (43 +/- 6 nM) and a lower maximal effect (Emax = 40 +/- 9%) than glycine. Furthermore, ACPC (0.1 microM) shifted the EC50 of glycine from 1.82 microM to > or = 3 mM. 4. These results show that ACPC can reduce the potentiation by glycine of NMDA-evoked [3H]-NA release and hence, may act as an antagonist at the glycine site of presynaptic hippocampal NMDA receptors when the concentration of glycine is high. PMID:8799560

  16. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  17. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  18. Systems biology of synaptic plasticity: a review on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated biochemical pathways and related mathematical models.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Kulasiri, D; Samarasinghe, S

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity, an emergent property of synaptic networks, has shown strong correlation to one of the essential functions of the brain, memory formation. Through understanding synaptic plasticity, we hope to discover the modulators and mechanisms that trigger memory formation. In this paper, we first review the well understood modulators and mechanisms underlying N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor dependent synaptic plasticity, a major form of synaptic plasticity in hippocampus, and then comment on the key mathematical modelling approaches available in the literature to understand synaptic plasticity as the integration of the established functionalities of synaptic components.

  19. Pathologically activated neuroprotection via uncompetitive blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors with fast off-rate by novel multifunctional dimer bis(propyl)-cognitin.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jialie; Li, Wenming; Zhao, Yuming; Fu, Hongjun; Ma, Dik-Lung; Tang, Jing; Li, Chaoying; Peoples, Robert W; Li, Fushun; Wang, Qinwen; Huang, Pingbo; Xia, Jun; Pang, Yuanping; Han, Yifan

    2010-06-25

    Uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists with fast off-rate (UFO) may represent promising drug candidates for various neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we report that bis(propyl)-cognitin, a novel dimeric acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and gamma-aminobutyric acid subtype A receptor antagonist, is such an antagonist of NMDA receptors. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we demonstrated that bis(propyl)-cognitin voltage-dependently, selectively, and moderately inhibited NMDA-activated currents. The inhibitory effects of bis(propyl)-cognitin increased with the rise in NMDA and glycine concentrations. Kinetics analysis showed that the inhibition was of fast onset and offset with an off-rate time constant of 1.9 s. Molecular docking simulations showed moderate hydrophobic interaction between bis(propyl)-cognitin and the MK-801 binding region in the ion channel pore of the NMDA receptor. Bis(propyl)-cognitin was further found to compete with [(3)H]MK-801 with a K(i) value of 0.27 mum, and the mutation of NR1(N616R) significantly reduced its inhibitory potency. Under glutamate-mediated pathological conditions, bis(propyl)-cognitin, in contrast to bis(heptyl)-cognitin, prevented excitotoxicity with increasing effectiveness against escalating levels of glutamate and much more effectively protected against middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced brain damage than did memantine. More interestingly, under NMDA receptor-mediated physiological conditions, bis(propyl)-cognitin enhanced long-term potentiation in hippocampal slices, whereas MK-801 reduced and memantine did not alter this process. These results suggest that bis(propyl)-cognitin is a UFO antagonist of NMDA receptors with moderate affinity, which may provide a pathologically activated therapy for various neurodegenerative disorders associated with NMDA receptor dysregulation.

  20. Glycine decreases desensitization of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and is required for NMDA responses.

    PubMed

    Lerma, J; Zukin, R S; Bennett, M V

    1990-03-01

    In Xenopus oocytes injected with rat brain mRNA, as in neurons, glycine greatly potentiated responses of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of excitatory amino acid receptor. Injected oocytes generated a partially desensitizing inward current in response to NMDA with 30 nM added glycine. As the added glycine concentration was increased from 30 nM to 1 microM, the NMDA response was increased and exhibited less desensitization. The relationship between the NMDA peak response and added glycine concentration indicated a single component response with apparent affinity of 0.29 microM and a Hill coefficient of 0.77. The desensitized response was also fit by the Hill relation with a lower affinity but similar coefficient. The time course of desensitization at 500 microM NMDA was exponential with a time constant (350 msec) that was independent of glycine concentration between 0.03 and 0.3 microM. At higher glycine concentration a slower component of decay (tau = 1.4 sec) was observed. This component was enhanced by increasing the extracellular Ca2+. NMDA without added glycine evoked a small transient response. However this response was suppressed completely by prewashing with the glycine antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid, suggesting that it may have been due to glycine contamination. The dose-response relation for low concentrations of glycine indicated that the measured level of glycine contamination accounted for these responses. These results indicate that glycine has at least two actions at the NMDA receptor: it enables channel opening by the agonist and decreases desensitization.

  1. Hydroxyproline-induced Helical Disruption in Conantokin Rl-B Affects Subunit-selective Antagonistic Activities toward Ion Channels of N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kunda, Shailaja; Yuan, Yue; Balsara, Rashna D.; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Castellino, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Conantokins are ∼20-amino acid peptides present in predatory marine snail venoms that function as allosteric antagonists of ion channels of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). These peptides possess a high percentage of post-/co-translationally modified amino acids, particularly γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla). Appropriately spaced Gla residues allow binding of functional divalent cations, which induces end-to-end α-helices in many conantokins. A smaller number of these peptides additionally contain 4-hydroxyproline (Hyp). Hyp should prevent adoption of the metal ion-induced full α-helix, with unknown functional consequences. To address this disparity, as well as the role of Hyp in conantokins, we have solved the high resolution three-dimensional solution structure of a Gla/Hyp-containing 18-residue conantokin, conRl-B, by high field NMR spectroscopy. We show that Hyp10 disrupts only a small region of the α-helix of the Mn2+·peptide complex, which displays cation-induced α-helices on each terminus of the peptide. The function of conRl-B was examined by measuring its inhibition of NMDA/Gly-mediated current through NMDAR ion channels in mouse cortical neurons. The conRl-B displays high inhibitory selectivity for subclasses of NMDARs that contain the functionally important GluN2B subunit. Replacement of Hyp10 with N8Q results in a Mg2+-complexed end-to-end α-helix, accompanied by attenuation of NMDAR inhibitory activity. However, replacement of Hyp10 with Pro10 allowed the resulting peptide to retain its inhibitory property but diminished its GluN2B specificity. Thus, these modified amino acids, in specific peptide backbones, play critical roles in their subunit-selective inhibition of NMDAR ion channels, a finding that can be employed to design NMDAR antagonists that function at ion channels of distinct NMDAR subclasses. PMID:26048991

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 prevents apoptosis in rats that have undergone fetal spinal cord transplantation following spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Shao, Yang; Zhao, Changsong; Cai, Juan; Sun, Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is the main cause of paraplegia, but effective therapies for it are lacking. Embryonic spinal cord transplantation is able to repair spinal cord injury, albeit with a large amount of neuronal apoptosis remaining in the spinal cord. MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is able to reduce cell death by decreasing the concentration of excitatory amino acids and preventing extracellular calcium ion influx. In this study, the effect of MK-801 on the apoptosis of spinal cord neurons in rats that have received a fetal spinal cord (FSC) transplant following spinal hemisection was investigated. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Spinal cord hemisection injury with a combination of FSC transplantation and MK-801 treatment (group A); spinal cord hemisection injury with FSC transplantation (group B); and spinal cord injury with insertion of a Gelfoam pledget (group C). The rats were sacrificed 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after the surgery. Apoptosis in spinal slices from the injured spinal cord was examined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling reaction, and the expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) was measured by immunohistochemistry. The positive cells were quantitatively analyzed using a computer image analysis system. The rate of apoptosis and the positive expression of Bcl-2 protein in the spinal cord neurons in the three groups decreased in the following order: C>B>A (P<0.05) and A>B>C (P<0.05), respectively. This indicates that treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 prevents apoptosis in the spinal cord neurons of rats that have undergone FSC transplantation following spinal hemisection.

  3. Non-tumor-Associated Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Encephalitis in Chinese Girls With Positive Anti-thyroid Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenjuan; Fu, Zhenqiang; Zhang, Hui; Jing, Lijun; Lu, Jingjing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Hong; Teng, Junfang; Jia, Yanjie

    2015-10-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a new category of autoimmune encephalitis associated with anti-NMDA receptor antibodies. The disease was first described in 2007, and it predominantly affects young women with or without ovarian teratomas. Most patients typically present with seizures, a decreased consciousness level, dyskinesia, autonomic dysfunction, and psychiatric symptoms. The presence of anti-thyroid antibodies in non-tumor-associated anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis was first described in 2010. Additionally, anti-thyroid antibodies were found in teratoma-associated anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. We report the cases of 3 Chinese girls with non-tumor-associated anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with positive anti-thyroid antibodies. We followed up the details of their titers and suggest that anti-thyroid antibodies were an indicator of autoimmune predisposition in the development of non-tumor-associated anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

  4. Prazosin blocks the glutamatergic effects of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on lordosis behavior and luteinizing hormone secretion in the estrogen-primed female rat.

    PubMed

    Landa, A I; Cabrera, R J; Gargiulo, P A

    2006-03-01

    We have observed that intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of selective N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-type glutamatergic receptor antagonists inhibits lordosis in ovariectomized (OVX), estrogen-primed rats receiving progesterone or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH). When NMDA was injected into OVX estrogen-primed rats, it induced a significant increase in lordosis. The interaction between LHRH and glutamate was previously explored by us and another groups. The noradrenergic systems have a functional role in the regulation of LHRH release. The purpose of the present study was to explore the interaction between glutamatergic and noradrenergic transmission. The action of prazosin, an alpha1- and alpha2b-noradrenergic antagonist, was studied here by injecting it icv (1.75 and 3.5 microg/6 microL) prior to NMDA administration (1 microg/2 microL) in OVX estrogen-primed Sprague-Dawley rats (240-270 g). Rats manually restrained were injected over a period of 2 min, and tested 1.5 h later. The enhancing effect induced by NMDA on the lordosis/mount ratio at high doses (67.06 +/- 3.28, N = 28) when compared to saline controls (6 and 2 microL, 16.59 +/- 3.20, N = 27) was abolished by prazosin administration (17.04 +/- 5.52, N = 17, and 9.33 +/- 3.21, N = 20, P < 0.001 for both doses). Plasma LH levels decreased significantly only with the higher dose of prazosin (1.99 +/- 0.24 ng/mL, N = 18, compared to saline-NMDA effect, 5.96 +/- 2.01 ng/mL, N = 13, P < 0.05). Behavioral effects seem to be more sensitive to the alpha-blockade than hormonal effects. These findings strongly suggest that the facilitatory effects of NMDA on both lordosis and LH secretion in this model are mediated by alpha-noradrenergic transmission.

  5. Approach to the Management of Pediatric-Onset Anti-N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (Anti-NMDA) Receptor Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Kim, Joshua; Schwartz, Richard H

    2016-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a treatable cause of autoimmune encephalitis. It remains unclear if the natural history of this disease is altered by choice of acute therapy or the employment of chronic immunotherapy. Chart review was undertaken for pediatric patients diagnosed with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Data obtained included patient demographics, disease manifestations, treatment course, and clinical outcomes. Ten patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis were identified. All patients were treated with immunotherapy in the acute period, and all patients experienced good recovery. Neurologic relapse did not occur in any patient. All patients received varied forms of chronic immunosuppression to prevent relapses. Complications of chronic immunotherapy occurred in 50% of patients. The benefits of chronic immunotherapy and the duration of use should be carefully weighed against the risks. Complications from immunotherapy are not uncommon and can be serious. Clinical trials assessing the benefit of long-term immunotherapy in this population are needed.

  6. Large variability in synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor density on interneurons and a comparison with pyramidal-cell spines in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nyíri, G; Stephenson, F A; Freund, T F; Somogyi, P

    2003-01-01

    Pyramidal cells receive input from several types of GABA-releasing interneurons and innervate them reciprocally. Glutamatergic activation of interneurons involves both alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors expressed in type I synapses, mostly on their dendritic shafts. On average, the synaptic AMPA receptor content is several times higher on interneurons than in the spines of pyramidal cells. To compare the NMDA receptor content of synapses, we used a quantitative postembedding immunogold technique on serial electron microscopic sections, and analysed the synapses on interneuron dendrites and pyramidal cell spines in the CA1 area. Because all NMDA receptors contain the obligatory NR1 subunit, receptor localisation was carried out using antibodies recognising all splice variants of the NR1 subunit. Four populations of synapse were examined: i). on spines of pyramidal cells in stratum (str.) radiatum and str. oriens; ii). on parvalbumin-positive interneuronal dendritic shafts in str. radiatum; iii). on randomly found dendritic shafts in str. oriens and iv). on somatostatin-positive interneuronal dendritic shafts and somata in str. oriens. On average, the size of the synapses on spines was about half of those on interneurons. The four populations of synapse significantly differed in labelling for the NR1 subunit. The median density of NR1 subunit labelling was highest on pyramidal cell spines. It was lowest in the synapses on parvalbumin-positive dendrites in str. radiatum, where more than half of these synapses were immunonegative. In str. oriens, synapses on interneurons had a high variability of receptor content; some dendrites were similar to those in str. radiatum, including the proximal synapses of somatostatin-positive cells, whereas others had immunoreactivity for the NR1 subunit similar to or higher than synapses on pyramidal cell spines. These results show that synaptic NMDA

  7. From Toxoplasmosis to Schizophrenia via NMDA Dysfunction: Peptide Overlap between Toxoplasma gondii and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptors As a Potential Mechanistic Link

    PubMed Central

    Lucchese, Guglielmo

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims at investigating how Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection may be linked to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction in schizophrenia and related disorders and puts forward the hypothesis that immune responses against T. gondii may involve NMDARs. Indeed, the analysis of the protozoan proteome and NMDAR subunits for peptide commonalities shows a massive peptide overlap and supports the possibility that anti-T. gondii immune responses raised during active protozoan infection may cross-react with host NMDARs, determining disruption of neural circuits and cognitive deficits. In particular, the NMDA 2D subunit, which is mainly expressed in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, appears to be a hotspot for potential T. gondii-induced cross-reactive immune attacks. PMID:28360866

  8. From Toxoplasmosis to Schizophrenia via NMDA Dysfunction: Peptide Overlap between Toxoplasma gondii and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptors As a Potential Mechanistic Link.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Guglielmo

    2017-01-01

    The present work aims at investigating how Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection may be linked to N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction in schizophrenia and related disorders and puts forward the hypothesis that immune responses against T. gondii may involve NMDARs. Indeed, the analysis of the protozoan proteome and NMDAR subunits for peptide commonalities shows a massive peptide overlap and supports the possibility that anti-T. gondii immune responses raised during active protozoan infection may cross-react with host NMDARs, determining disruption of neural circuits and cognitive deficits. In particular, the NMDA 2D subunit, which is mainly expressed in parvalbumin-positive interneurons, appears to be a hotspot for potential T. gondii-induced cross-reactive immune attacks.

  9. Myosin IIb-dependent Regulation of Actin Dynamics Is Required for N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Trafficking during Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yunfei; Wang, Ning; Wang, Shaoli; Sheng, Tao; Tian, Tian; Chen, Linlin; Pan, Weiwei; Zhu, Minsheng; Luo, Jianhong; Lu, Wei

    2015-10-16

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic incorporation changes the number of NMDARs at synapses and is thus critical to various NMDAR-dependent brain functions. To date, the molecules involved in NMDAR trafficking and the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we report that myosin IIb is an essential molecule in NMDAR synaptic incorporation during PKC- or θ burst stimulation-induced synaptic plasticity. Moreover, we demonstrate that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent actin reorganization contributes to NMDAR trafficking. The findings from additional mutual occlusion experiments demonstrate that PKC and MLCK share a common signaling pathway in NMDAR-mediated synaptic regulation. Because myosin IIb is the primary substrate of MLCK and can regulate actin dynamics during synaptic plasticity, we propose that the MLCK- and myosin IIb-dependent regulation of actin dynamics is required for NMDAR trafficking during synaptic plasticity. This study provides important insights into a mechanical framework for understanding NMDAR trafficking associated with synaptic plasticity.

  10. A young woman presenting with psychotic and mood symptoms from anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis: an emerging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Neal; Glezer, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis, first characterized in 2005, is a neurological disease with prominent psychiatric features that frequently involves the consultation of psychiatrists. Since its discovery, the rate of diagnosis of new cases has increased rapidly and several epidemiological studies now confirm that NMDA-R encephalitis may be as common as many other prominent infectious etiologies of encephalitis. We describe a case of a young woman presenting initially with psychotic and mood symptoms who was found to have anti-NMDA-R encephalitis. We further provide details of her treatment and prolonged recovery process after hospital discharge with a review of the literature and discussion of the epidemiology, symptomology, diagnosis, and management of both the neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of this condition. Last, we contextualize the importance of anti-NMDA-R encephalitis for psychiatrists, highlighting the role for psychiatrists in establishing the initial diagnosis as well as in providing ongoing psychiatric care.

  11. Systematic screening for mutations in the human N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 gene in schizophrenic patients from the German population.

    PubMed

    Paus, Sebastian; Rietschel, Marcella; Schulze, Thomas G; Ohlraun, Stephanie; Diaconu, Carmen C; Van Den Bogaert, Ann; Maier, Wolfgang; Propping, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Evidence for a dysfunction of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type of ionotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenic patients, comes from neurochemical and clinical pharmacologic data. Therefore, the NMDAR1 gene can be regarded as an interesting candidate gene for schizophrenia. Several groups have tried to identify variants of this gene in schizophrenic patients in different, however not in German, populations. We sought to identify sequence changes of potential functional relevance in genomic DNA from 46 German unrelated schizophrenic patients by means of single-strand conformation analysis. No mutations of likely functional relevance were observed. We identified two synonymous coding Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (cSNPs) in exons 6 and 7, and two SNPs in exon-flanking intronic sequences. Genotype distribution of these four SNPs was not significantly different between schizophrenic patients and controls. Our results suggest that the NMDAR1 subunit is not frequently involved in the development of schizophrenia in the German population.

  12. Competitive antagonists and partial agonists at the glycine modulatory site of the mouse N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, G; Johnson, J W; Ascher, P

    1990-01-01

    1. Kynurenate (Kyn), 7-chlorokynurenate (7-Cl-Kyn), 3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one (HA-966) and D-cycloserine are known to bind to the glycine site that modulates the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) response of vertebrate central neurones. The effects of these compounds were investigated with patch-clamp and fast-perfusion techniques on mouse cortical neurones in primary culture in an effort to establish whether they act as antagonists, partial agonists and/or inverse agonists of glycine. A fast drug application method allowed the study of both steady-state and transient responses. 2. The analysis of steady-state responses indicates that the main effects of Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn are those expected from competitive antagonists of glycine, with a dissociation constant of 15 microM for Kyn, and of 0.3 microM for 7-Cl-Kyn. Concentration jumps indicate that at all concentrations of glycine, and in particular in the absence of added glycine, the blockade by Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn develops at a rate which is close to the rate of dissociation of glycine from its binding site and is independent of antagonist concentration. 3. The main effects of D-cycloserine and of HA-966 are those of partial agonists of high and low efficacy, respectively. In the absence of added glycine, D-cycloserine always produced a potentiation, while HA-966 produced either a potentiation or an inhibition. This can be explained by assuming the presence of a variable level of contaminating glycine. With both D-cycloserine and HA-966, concentration jumps produced biphasic relaxations in which the onset rate of the slow component was, here again, close to the rate of dissociation of glycine from its binding site. 4. These results can be interpreted by assuming that (1) Kyn and 7-Cl-Kyn are competitive antagonists of glycine, (2) HA-966 and D-cycloserine are partial agonists, (3) in the absence of added glycine some glycine is present in the extracellular solution and (4) the response in the total absence of glycine

  13. Pharmacological characterization of LY233053: A structurally novel tetrazole-substituted competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist with a short duration of action

    SciTech Connect

    Schoepp, D.D.; Ornstein, P.L.; Leander, J.D.; Lodge, D.; Salhoff, C.R.; Zeman, S.; Zimmerman, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    This study reports the activity of a structurally novel excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, LY233053 (cis-(+-)-4-((2H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl)piperidine-2-carboxylic acid), the first tetrazole-containing competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist. LY233053 potently inhibited NMDA receptor binding to rat brain membranes as shown by the in vitro displacement of (3H) CGS19755 (IC50 = 107 +/- 7 nM). No appreciable affinity in (3H)alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or (3H)kainate binding assays was observed (IC50 values greater than 10,000 nM). In vitro NMDA receptor antagonist activity was further demonstrated by selective inhibition of NMDA-induced depolarization in cortical wedges (IC50 = 4.2 +/- 0.4 microM vs. 40 microM NMDA). LY233053 was effective after in vivo systemic administration in a number of animal models. In neonatal rats, LY233053 selectively blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED50 = 14.5 mg/kg i.p.) with a relatively short duration of action (2-4 hr). In pigeons, LY233053 potently antagonized (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg i.m.) the behavioral suppressant effects of 10 mg/kg of NMDA. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg, i.m., was required to produce phencyclidine-like catalepsy in pigeons. In mice, LY233053 protected against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at lower doses (ED50 = 19.9 mg/kg i.p.) than those that impaired horizontal screen performance (ED50 = 40.9 mg/kg i.p.). Cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal degenerations after striatal infusion of NMDA were prevented by single or multiple i.p. doses of LY233053. In summary, the antagonist activity of LY233053 after systemic administration demonstrates potential therapeutic value in conditions of neuronal cell loss due to NMDA receptor excitotoxicity.

  14. Nonopioid motor effects of dynorphin A and related peptides: structure dependence and role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V K; Prasad, J A; Lemaire, S

    1997-11-01

    Dynorphin (Dyn) A and related opioid and nonopioid peptides were tested for their ability to produce motor effects in mice. Central (intracerebroventricular) administration of Dyn A in mice produced marked motor effects characterized by wild running, jumping, circling and/or barrel rolling with an ED50 value of 14.32 (95% confidence limits, 10.09-20.32) nmol/mouse. The order of potency of the various Dyn A-related peptides and fragments in producing motor effects was Dyn A approximately Dyn A-(1-13) > [Ala1]Dyn A-(1-13) approximately Dyn A-(2-13) > alpha-Neo-End > Dyn A-(1-8) approximately Dyn B approximately Dyn A-(2-8) > Dyn A-(3-8). Dyn A-(1- 5) (or Leu-Enk) and Dyn A-(6-10) displayed no motor effect at doses up to 100 nmol/mouse. The potencies of Dyn A and Dyn A-(2-13) were not affected by preadministration of naloxone (5 mg/kg s.c.), but the motor effects of Dyn A-(1-13) (20 nmol/mouse i.c.v.) were significantly reduced by coadministration of low doses (0.2-0.6 nmol/mouse) of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists dextrorphan, MK-801 and CPP. Dyn A was also a potent inhibitor of the binding of the phencyclidine receptor ligand, [3H]MK-801, to rat brain membranes, with a Ki value of 0.41 microM. However, the order of potency of the various Dyn A-related peptides and fragments in inhibiting [3H]MK-801 binding did not correlate with their ability to produce motor effects. On the other hand, Dyn A and related peptides produced a significant potentiation of the binding of the competitive NMDA antagonist [3H]CGP-39653 to rat brain membranes, an effect that correlated well (r = 0.91) with their potency in producing motor effects. These results indicate that the nonopioid motor effects of Dyn A and related peptides are structure dependent, with Dyn A-(2-8) being the minimal core peptide for motor activity. In addition, these effects most likely involve the participation of the excitatory amino acid binding domain on the NMDA receptor complex.

  15. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Modulation of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine Release by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Studies in Rat Brain Slices in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yavas, Ersin; Young, Andrew M J

    2017-02-15

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, phencyclidine, induces behavioral changes in rodents mimicking symptoms of schizophrenia, possibly mediated through dysregulation of glutamatergic control of mesolimbic dopamine release. We tested the hypothesis that NMDA receptor activation modulates accumbens dopamine release, and that phencyclidine pretreatment altered this modulation. NMDA caused a receptor-specific, dose-dependent decrease in electrically stimulated dopamine release in nucleus accumbens brain slices. This decrease was unaffected by picrotoxin, making it unlikely to be mediated through GABAergic neurones, but was decreased by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (RS)-α-methyl-4-sulfonophenylglycine, indicating that NMDA activates mechanisms controlled by these receptors to decrease stimulated dopamine release. The effect of NMDA was unchanged by in vivo pretreatment with phencyclidine (twice daily for 5 days), with a washout period of at least 7 days before experimentation, which supports the hypothesis that there is no enduring direct effect of PCP at NMDA receptors after this pretreatment procedure. We propose that NMDA depression of accumbal dopamine release is mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors located pre- or perisynaptically, and suggest that NMDA evoked increased extrasynaptic spillover of glutamate is sufficient to activate these receptors that, in turn, inhibit dopamine release. Furthermore, we suggest that enduring functional changes brought about by subchronic phencyclidine pretreatment, modeling deficits in schizophrenia, are downstream effects consequent on chronic blockade of NMDA receptors, rather than direct effects on NMDA receptors themselves.

  16. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kasper B; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara; Kurtkaya, Natalie L; Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M; Orr, Anna G; Kvist, Trine; Ogden, Kevin K; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Du, Yuhong; Qui, Min; Murphy, T J; Snyder, James P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal concentrations of glutamate and glycine to minimize detection of competitive antagonists. The assay is validated by successfully identifying known noncompetitive, but not competitive NMDA receptor antagonists among 1800 screened compounds from two small focused libraries, including the commercially available library of pharmacologically active compounds. Hits from the primary screen are validated through a secondary screen that used two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings on recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This strategy identified several novel modulators of NMDA receptor function, including the histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit, as well as the vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. These compounds are noncompetitive antagonists and the histamine H3 receptor ligand showed submicromolar potency at NR1/NR2B NMDA receptors, which raises the possibility that compounds can be developed that act with high potency on both glutamate and histamine receptor systems simultaneously. Furthermore, it is possible that some actions attributed to histamine H3 receptor inhibition in vivo may also involve NMDA receptor antagonism.

  17. Selective 5-HT7 Receptor Activation May Enhance Synaptic Plasticity Through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Activity in the Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kangjian; Zhao, Xuefei; Li, Youjun; Zheng, Liang; Wang, Jue; Li, Yan-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that modulates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity by binding to several different 5-HT receptor subtypes. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse slice preparations to test the role of 5-HT receptors in modulating the NMDA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the rat visual cortex. We found that the NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs could be potentiated by exogenously applied 5-HT. Similar results were obtained by exogenously applied 5-CT or 8-OH-DPAT (the 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor agonist). A specific antagonist for the 5-HT7 receptor, SB-269970, completely blocked the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-CT or 8- OH-DPAT. Moreover, the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, displayed no influence on the enhancement in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-CT or 8-OHDPAT. These results indicated that the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-HT in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the young rat visual cortex requires activation of 5-HT7 receptors, but not 5-HT1A receptors. These observations might be clinically relevant to schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), where enhancing NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is considered to be a promising strategy for treatment of these diseases.

  18. Quinazolin-4-one derivatives: A novel class of non-competitive NR2C/D subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Cara A.; Acker, Timothy M.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Andersen, Karen T.; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Liotta, Dennis C.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new class of subunit-selective antagonists of N-methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA)-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors that contain the (E)-3-phenyl-2-styrylquinazolin-4(3H)-one backbone. The inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor function induced by these quinazolin-4-one derivatives is non-competitive and voltage-independent, suggesting that this family of compounds does not exert action on the agonist binding site of the receptor or block the channel pore. The compounds described here resemble CP-465,022 ((S)-3-(2-chlorophenyl)-2-[2-(6-diethylaminomethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-vinyl]-6-fluoro-3H-quinazolin-4-one), a non-competitive antagonist of AMPA-selective glutamate receptors. However, modification of ring substituents resulted in analogues with greater than 100-fold selectivity for recombinant NMDA receptors over AMPA and kainate receptors. Furthermore, within this series of compounds, analogues were identified with 50-fold selectivity for recombinant NR2C/D-containing receptors over NR2A/B containing receptors. These compounds represent a new class of non-competitive subunit-selective NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:20684595

  19. Toluene exposure during brain growth spurt and adolescence produces differential effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated currents in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Ruu; Chan, Ming-Huan

    2011-09-10

    Toluene, an industrial organic solvent, is voluntarily inhaled as drug of abuse. Because inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is one of the possible mechanisms underlying developmental neurotoxicity of toluene, the purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of toluene exposure during two major neurodevelopmental stages, brain growth spurt and adolescence, on NMDA receptor-mediated current. Rats were administered with toluene (500 mg/kg, i.p.) or corn oil daily over postnatal days (PN) 4-9 (brain growth spurt) or PN 21-26 (early adolescence). Intracellular electrophysiological recordings employing in CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal slices were performed during PN 30-38. Toluene exposure during brain growth spurt enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by electrical stimulation, but impaired the paired-pulse facilitation and NMDA response by exogenous application of NMDA. Toluene exposure during adolescence resulted in an increase in NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs and a decrease in exogenous NMDA-induced currents, while lack of any effect on paired-pulse facilitation. These findings suggest that toluene exposure during brain growth spurt and adolescence might result in an increase in synaptic NMDA receptor responsiveness and a decrease in extrasynaptic NMDA receptor responsiveness, while only toluene exposure during brain growth spurt can produce presynaptic modulation in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The functional changes in NMDA receptor-mediated transmission underlying developmental toluene exposure may lead to the neurobehavioral disturbances.

  20. Fluoxetine reverses the behavioral despair induced by neurogenic stress in mice: role of N-methyl-d-aspartate and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Opioid and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate different effects of fluoxetine. We investigated whether opioid and NMDA receptors are involved in the protective effect of fluoxetine against the behavioral despair induced by acute physical stress in male mice. We used the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), and open-field test (OFT) for behavioral evaluation. We used fluoxetine, naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist), MK-801 (NMDA receptor antagonist), morphine (opioid receptor agonist), and NMDA (NMDA receptor agonist). Acute foot-shock stress (FSS) significantly induced behavioral despair (depressive-like) and anxiety-like behaviors in tests. Fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) reversed the depressant-like effect of FSS, but it did not alter the locomotion and anxiety-like behavior in animals. Acute administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.3 mg/kg) or MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine, while subeffective doses of morphine (1 mg/kg) and NMDA (75 mg/kg) abolished this effect of fluoxetine. Also, co-administration of subeffective doses of naltrexone (0.05 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.003 mg/kg) with fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) induced a significant decrease in the immobility time in FST and TST. Our results showed that opioid and NMDA receptors (alone or in combination) are involved in the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine against physical stress.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) depresses n-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated current in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via CRH receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Yanmin; Sun, Jihu; Gao, Lu; Ma, Bei; Lu, Jianqiang; Ni, Xin

    2008-03-01

    CRH, the primary regulator of the neuroendocrine responses to stress, has been shown to modulate synaptic efficacy and the process of learning and memory in hippocampus. However, effects of CRH on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, the key receptor for synaptic plasticity, remain unclear. In primary cultured hippocampal neurons, using the technique of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that CRH (1 pmol/liter to 10 nmol/liter) inhibited NMDA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by the CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) antagonist antalarmin but not by the CRHR2 antagonist astressin-2B, suggesting that CRHR1 mediated the inhibitory effect of CRH. Investigations on the signaling pathways of CRH showed that CRH dose-dependently induced phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-beta3 expression and increased intracellular cAMP content in these cells. Blocking PLC activity with U73122 prevented CRH-induced depression of NMDA current, whereas blocking protein kinase A (H89) and adenylate cyclase (SQ22536) failed to affect the CRH-induced depression of NMDA current. Application of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist, Ca(2+) chelators or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also mainly blocked CRH-induced depression of NMDA currents, suggesting involvement of PLC/IP(3)R/Ca(2+)and PLC/PKC signaling pathways in CRH down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that CRH may exert neuromodulatory actions on hippocampus through regulating NMDA receptor function.

  2. Differential Regulation of GABAB Receptor Trafficking by Different Modes of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Kantamneni, Sriharsha; Gonzàlez-Gonzàlez, Immaculada M.; Luo, Jia; Cimarosti, Helena; Jacobs, Susan C.; Jaafari, Nadia; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory GABAB receptors (GABABRs) can down-regulate most excitatory synapses in the CNS by reducing postsynaptic excitability. Functional GABABRs are heterodimers of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits and here we show that the trafficking and surface expression of GABABRs is differentially regulated by synaptic or pathophysiological activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic NMDARs using a chemLTP protocol increases GABABR recycling and surface expression. In contrast, excitotoxic global activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDARs by bath application of NMDA causes the loss of surface GABABRs. Intriguingly, exposing neurons to extreme metabolic stress using oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) increases GABAB1 but decreases GABAB2 surface expression. The increase in surface GABAB1 involves enhanced recycling and is blocked by the NMDAR antagonist AP5. The decrease in surface GABAB2 is also blocked by AP5 and by inhibiting degradation pathways. These results indicate that NMDAR activity is critical in GABABR trafficking and function and that the individual subunits can be separately controlled to regulate neuronal responsiveness and survival. PMID:24425870

  3. Genetic evidence for adenylyl cyclase 1 as a target for preventing neuronal excitotoxicity mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Gong, Bo; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Zhuo, Min

    2007-01-12

    The excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by glutamate results in neuronal excitotoxicity. cAMP is a key second messenger and contributes to NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity. Adenylyl cyclases 1 (AC1) and 8 (AC8) are the two major calcium-stimulated ACs in the central nervous system. Previous studies demonstrate AC1 and AC8 play important roles in synaptic plasticity, memory, and persistent pain. However, little is known about the possible roles of these two ACs in glutamate-induced neuronal excitotoxicity. Here, we report that genetic deletion of AC1 significantly attenuated neuronal death induced by glutamate in primary cultures of cortical neurons, whereas AC8 deletion did not produce a significant effect. AC1, but not AC8, contributes to intracellular cAMP production following NMDA receptor activation by glutamate in cultured cortical neurons. AC1 is involved in the dynamic modulation of cAMP-response element-binding protein activity in neuronal excitotoxicity. To explore the possible roles of AC1 in cell death in vivo, we studied neuronal excitotoxicity induced by an intracortical injection of NMDA. Cortical lesions induced by NMDA were significantly reduced in AC1 but not in AC8 knock-out mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that AC1 plays an important role in neuronal excitotoxicity and may serve as a therapeutic target for preventing excitotoxicity in stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Counteraction by repetitive daily exposure to static magnetism against sustained blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Taniura, Hideo; Goto, Yasuaki; Tamaki, Keisuke; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Kambe, Yuki; Ogura, Masato; Ohno, Yu; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2005-05-15

    In rat hippocampal neurons cultured with the antagonist for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors dizocilpine (MK-801) for 8 days in vitro (DIV), a significant decrease was seen in the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2) as well as mRNA for both brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), in addition to decreased viability. MK-801 not only decreased the expression of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors but also increased NR2A expression, without affecting NR2B expression. Repetitive daily exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT for 15 min led to a decrease in the expression of MAP-2, without significantly affecting cell viability or the expression of neuronal nuclei (NeuN) and GAP-43. However, the repetitive magnetism prevented decreases in both BDNF mRNA and MAP-2 and additionally increased the expression of NR2A subunit, without altering NR1 expression in neurons cultured in the presence of MK-801. Repetitive magnetism was also effective in preventing the decrease by MK-801 in the ability of NMDA to increase intracellular free Ca2+ ions, without affecting the decrease in the maximal response. These results suggest that repetitive magnetism may at least in part counteract the neurotoxicity of MK-801 through modulation of the expression of particular NMDA receptor subunits in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  5. Prenatal ethanol exposure persistently impairs N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the mouse dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Samudio-Ruiz, Sabrina L.; Allan, Andrea M.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Caldwell, Kevin K.

    2009-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) is the central input region to the hippocampus and is known to play an important role in learning and memory. Previous studies have shown that prenatal alcohol is associated with hippocampal-dependent learning deficits and a decreased ability to elicit long term potentiation (LTP) in the DG in adult animals. Given that activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling cascade by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is required for various forms of learning and memory, as well as LTP, in hippocampal regions, including the DG, we hypothesized that fetal alcohol-exposed (FAE) adult animals would have deficits in hippocampal NMDA receptor-dependent ERK1/2 activation. We used immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry techniques to detect NMDA-stimulated ERK1/2 activation in acute hippocampal slices prepared from adult FAE mice. We present the first evidence linking prenatal alcohol exposure to deficits in NMDA receptor-dependent ERK1/2 activation specifically in the DG of adult offspring. This deficit may account for the LTP deficits previously observed in the DG, as well as the life-long cognitive deficits, associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. PMID:19317851

  6. Mechanisms of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis and Prevention: The Brain, Neural Pathology, N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptors, Tau Protein and Other Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kocahan, Sayad; Doğan, Zumrut

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the appearance of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the intracellular environment, neuronal death and the loss of synapses, all of which contribute to cognitive decline in a progressive manner. A number of hypotheses have been advanced to explain AD. Abnormal tau phosphorylation may contribute to the formation of abnormal neurofibrillary structures. Many different structures are susceptible to AD, including the reticular formation, the nuclei in the brain stem (e.g., raphe nucleus), thalamus, hypothalamus, locus ceruleus, amygdala, substantia nigra, striatum, and claustrum. Excitotoxicity results from continuous, low-level activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Premature synaptotoxicity, changes in neurotransmitter expression, neurophils loss, accumulation of amyloid β-protein deposits (amyloid/senile plaques), and neuronal loss and brain atrophy are all associated with stages of AD progression. Several recent studies have examined the relationship between Aβ and NMDA receptors. Aβ-induced spine loss is associated with a decrease in glutamate receptors and is dependent upon the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, which has also been linked to long-term depression. PMID:28138104

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor 2B subunit in spinal cord contributes to remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia: the preventive effect of ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Experimental and clinical studies showed that intraoperative infusionof remifentanil has been associated with postoperative hyperalgesia. Previous reports suggested that spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may contribute to the development and maintenance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. In the present study, we used a rat model of postoperative pain to investigate the role of tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit in spinal cord in the postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil and the intervention of pretreatment with ketamine. Results Intraoperative infusion of remifentanil (0.04 mg/kg, subcutaneous) significantly enhanced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia induced by the plantar incision during the postoperative period (each lasting between 2 h and 48 h), which was attenuated by pretreatment with ketamine (10 mg/kg, subcutaneous). Correlated with the pain behavior changes, immunocytochemical and western blotting experiments in our study revealed that there was a marked increase in NR2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472 in the superficial dorsal horn after intraoperative infusion of remifentanil, which was attenuated by pretreatment with ketamine. Conclusions This study provides direct evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B at Tyr1472 in spinal dosal horn contributes to postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil and supports the potential therapeutic value of ketamine for improving postoperative hyperalgesia induced by remifentanil. PMID:20042082

  8. Targeting the D1-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex reduces L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Lu; Zhang, Zhanzhao; Hu, Rongguo; Cheng, Jie; Li, Lin; Fan, Qinyi; Wu, Na; Gan, Jing; Zhou, Mingzhu; Liu, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) remains the most effective therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), but its long-term administration is associated with the development of debilitating motor complications known as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). Enhanced function of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of LID. Given the existence of physical and functional interactions between D1R and NMDAR, we explored the effects of uncoupling D1R and NMDA GluN1 (GluN1) interaction on LID by using the Tat-conjugated interfering peptide (Tat-D1-t2). In this study, we demonstrated in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned PD rat model that intrastriatal injection of Tat-D1-t2 alleviated dyskinetic behaviors and downregulated the phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 induced by levodopa. Moreover, we also showed intrastriatal administration of Tat-D1-t2 elicited alterations in membranous GluN1 and D1R expression. These findings indicate that D1R/GluN1 complexes may be a molecular target with therapeutic potential for the treatment of dyskinesia in Parkinson's patients.

  9. The N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist MK-801 Prevents Thallium-Induced Behavioral and Biochemical Alterations in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Rico, Laura; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Santamaría, Abel; Königsberg, Mina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Thallium (Tl(+)) is a toxic heavy metal capable of increasing oxidative damage and disrupting antioxidant defense systems. Thallium invades the brain cells through potassium channels, increasing neuronal excitability, although until now the possible role of glutamatergic transmission in this event has not been investigated. Here, we explored the possible involvement of a glutamatergic component in the Tl(+)-induced toxicity through the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) in rats. The effects of MK-801 (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [ip]) on early (24 hours) motor alterations, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, and GSH peroxidase activity induced by Tl(+) acetate (32 mg/kg, ip) were evaluated in adult rats. MK-801 attenuated the Tl(+)-induced hyperactivity and lipid peroxidation in the rat striatum, hippocampus and midbrain, and produced mild effects on other end points. Our findings suggest that glutamatergic transmission via NMDA receptors might be involved in the Tl(+)-induced altered regional brain redox activity and motor performance in rats.

  10. Selective antinociceptive effects of a combination of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor peptide antagonist [Ser1]histogranin and morphine in rat models of pain

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Numerous rather than a few analgesic endogenous neuropeptides are likely to work in concert in vivo in ameliorating pain. Identification of effective neuropeptide combinations would also facilitate the development of gene or cell-based analgesics. In this study, opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and the peptide histogranin analogue [Ser1]histogranin (SHG), which possess activity as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, were intrathecally (i.t.) injected alone and in combination in rat models of acute and persistent pain. None of the peptides when injected alone altered hind paw responses of uninjured rats to acute noxious stimulation. EM-1 and EM-2 showed divergent efficacies in the persistent pain models. For example, EM-1 injected alone was antinociceptive in rats with neuropathic pain, whereas EM-2 demonstrated no efficacy. Demonstration of synergism was also divergent across the models. For example, while SHG combined with EM-1 did not alter the efficacy of EM-1 in rats with neuropathic pain, SHG significantly increased the efficacy of EM-1 in the formalin test. By contrast, the potency and efficacy of the peptides alone and combinations were much less than those of the reference analgesic morphine. Furthermore, morphine combined with the clinically used NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine showed synergism across a broad range of pain states. While the current set of neuropeptides could serve as a basis for analgesic therapeutics, there could be other neuropeptides with greater efficacy and potency and broader therapeutic application. PMID:25505581

  11. Improving solubility of NR2B amino-terminal domain of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, F.-M.; Soh Wanqin; Geballe, Matthew T.; Low, C.-M.

    2007-10-12

    The amino-terminal domains (ATDs) of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors contain binding sites for modulators and may serve as potential drug targets in neurological diseases. Here, three fusion tags (6xHis-, GST-, and MBP-) were fused to the ATD of NMDA receptor NR2B subunit (ATD2B) and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each tag's ability to confer enhanced solubility to ATD2B was assessed. Soluble ATD2B was successfully obtained as a MBP fusion protein. Dynamic light scattering revealed the protein (1 mg/ml) exists as monodispersed species at 25 {sup o}C. Functional studies using circular dichroism showed that the soluble MBP-ATD2B bound ifenprodil in a dose-dependent manner. The dissociation constants obtained for ifenprodil were similar in the absence (64 nM) and presence (116 nM) of saturating concentration of maltose. Moreover, the yield of soluble MBP-ATD2B is 18 times higher than the refolded 6xHis-ATD2B. We have reported a systematic comparison of three different affinity tagging strategies and identified a rapid and efficient method to obtain large amount of ATD2B recombinant protein for biochemical and structural studies.

  12. Red blood cells of sickle cell disease patients exhibit abnormally high abundance of N-methyl D-aspartate receptors mediating excessive calcium uptake.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Pascal; Makhro, Asya; Gassmann, Max; Schmugge, Markus; Goede, Jeroen S; Speer, Oliver; Bogdanova, Anna

    2014-10-01

    Recently we showed that N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are expressed in erythroid precursors (EPCs) and present in the circulating red blood cells (RBCs) of healthy humans, regulating intracellular Ca(2+) in these cells. This study focuses on investigating the possible role of NMDARs in abnormally high Ca(2+) permeability in the RBCs of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Protein levels of the NMDAR subunits in the EPCs of SCD patients did not differ from those in EPCs of healthy humans. However, the number and activity of the NMDARs in circulating SCD-RBCs was substantially up-regulated, being particularly high during haemolytic crises. The number of active NMDARs correlated negatively with haematocrit and haemoglobin levels in the blood of SCD patients. Calcium uptake via these non-selective cation channels was induced by RBC treatment with glycine, glutamate and homocysteine and was facilitated by de-oxygenation of SCD-RBCs. Oxidative stress and RBC dehydration followed receptor stimulation and Ca(2+) uptake. Inhibition of the NMDARs with an antagonist memantine caused re-hydration and largely prevented hypoxia-induced sickling. The EPCs of SCD patients showed higher tolerance to memantine than those of healthy subjects. Consequently, NMDARs in the RBCs of SCD patients appear to be an attractive target for pharmacological intervention.

  13. Role of Autoantibodies to N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor in Relapsing Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Retrospective, One-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Sutcu, Murat; Akturk, Hacer; Somer, Ayper; Tatli, Burak; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Yıldız, Edibe Pembegul; Şık, Guntulu; Citak, Agop; Agacfidan, Ali; Salman, Nuran

    2016-03-01

    Post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis relapses have been recently associated with autoimmunity driven by autoantibodies against N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Because it offers different treatment options, determination of this condition is important. Between 2011 and 2014, 7 children with proven diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis were identified in a university hospital of Istanbul. Two patients had neurologic relapse characterized mainly by movement disorders 2 to 3 weeks after initial encephalitis. The first patient received a second 14 days of acyclovir treatment together with antiepileptic drugs and left with severe neurologic sequelae. The second patient was found to be NMDA receptors antibody positive in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and prednisolone. She showed substantial improvement, gradually regaining lost neurologic abilities. Post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis relapses may frequently be immune-mediated rather than a viral reactivation, particularly in children displaying movement disorders like choreoathetosis. Immunotherapy may provide benefit for this potentially devastating condition, like the case described in this report.

  14. The effects of alanine-substituted conantokin-G and ifenprodil on the human spermine-activated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, V W-W; Dodd, P R; Lewis, R J

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of Ala-7-conantokin-G (Con-G(A7)) and ifenprodil on the modulation by spermine of [(3)H]MK801 binding to human cortical membranes. Human cortical tissue was obtained at autopsy and stored at -80 degrees C until assay. Both Con-G(A7) and ifenprodil inhibited [(3)H]MK801 binding, but spermine affected these inhibitions differently. Con-G(A7) IC(50) changed little with spermine concentration, indicative of a non-competitive interaction, whereas the rightward shift in ifenprodil IC(50) with increasing spermine concentration suggested partial competition. When the two agents were tested against the biphasic activation of [(3)H]MK801 binding by spermine, they again differed in their effects. In the activation phase Con-G(A7) was a non-competitive inhibitor of spermine activation, and may even enhance the spermine EC(50), while the ifenprodil data indicated a partially competitive interaction. Both agents were non-competitive in the inhibitory phase. Overall, the data suggest that Con-G(A7) and ifenprodil interact differently with the polyamine modulation of the glutamate-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

  15. Modulation of the activity of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors as a novel treatment option for depression: current clinical evidence and therapeutic potential of rapastinel (GLYX-13)

    PubMed Central

    Vasilescu, Andrei-Nicolae; Schweinfurth, Nina; Borgwardt, Stefan; Gass, Peter; Lang, Undine E; Inta, Dragos; Eckart, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Classical monoaminergic antidepressants show several disadvantages, such as protracted onset of therapeutic action. Conversely, the fast and sustained antidepressant effect of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine raises vast interest in understanding the role of the glutamate system in mood disorders. Indeed, numerous data support the existence of glutamatergic dysfunction in major depressive disorder (MDD). Drawback to this short-latency therapy is its side effect profile, especially the psychotomimetic action, which seriously hampers the common and widespread clinical use of ketamine. Therefore, there is a substantial need for alternative glutamatergic antidepressants with milder side effects. In this article, we review evidence that implicates NMDARs in the prospective treatment of MDD with focus on rapastinel (formerly known as GLYX-13), a novel synthetic NMDAR modulator with fast antidepressant effect, which acts by enhancing NMDAR function as opposed to blocking it. We summarize and discuss current clinical and animal studies regarding the therapeutic potential of rapastinel not only in MDD but also in other psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive–compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Additionally, we discuss current data concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effect of rapastinel, highlighting common aspects as well as differences to ketamine. In 2016, rapastinel received the Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment of MDD from the US Food and Drug Administration, representing one of the most promising alternative antidepressants under current investigation.

  16. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody could be a cause of catatonic symptoms in psychiatric patients: case reports and methods for detection

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Ko; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Takaki, Manabu; Omori, Yuki; Imai, Yumiko; Nishino, Seiji; Tanaka, Keiko; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    The symptoms of catatonia have been reported to be similar to the initial symptoms of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Subsequently, this autoimmune limbic encephalitis has been noticed by many psychiatrists. For a differential diagnosis of catatonic state, it is important to detect anti-NMDAR encephalitis. This encephalitis is expected to be in remission by early detection and treatment. We should be more cautious about catatonic symptoms of schizophrenia. When a patient is suspected of having encephalitis, we should screen for anti-NMDAR antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid samples using a cell-based assay. We describe the methods of NMDAR antibody detection and the etiology of this encephalitis with case reports. Two representative cases with catatonia and non-catatonia (brief psychotic disorder) were reported. Schizophrenia is a general, heterogeneous, and complicated disorder, and its pathophysiology is unknown. There is an established evidence of NMDAR hypofunction, which is the functional disconnection of the central component; this is one of the most recognized models for schizophrenia. Furthermore, it is said that autoimmune mechanisms have been involved, at least in subgroups of schizophrenia patients. Further study of anti-NMDAR antibody and its related encephalitis would give essential clues for the research of schizophrenia, catatonia, and atypical psychosis. PMID:28223808

  17. Periventricular anteroventral third ventricle lesions diminish the pressor response produced by systemic injection of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Beltz, T. G.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    This study examined whether electrolytic ablation of the periventricular anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) would affect the increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in conscious rats produced by systemic injection of the centrally acting N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor ion-channel blocker, (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5, 10-imine (MK-801; 250 microgram/kg, i.v.). MK-801 produced a smaller increase in MAP in rats with AV3V lesions than in sham-lesion rats (+36+/-2% vs. +52+/-5%, respectively, P<0.05). In contrast, MK-801 produced similar increases in HR in the AV3V- and sham-lesion rats (+28+/-3% vs. +22+/-4%, respectively, P>0.05). These findings demonstrate that the MK-801-induced pressor response is dependent upon the integrity of the AV3V region, whereas the MK-801-induced tachycardia is not. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Modulation of GluN3A expression in Huntington disease: a new n-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-based therapeutic approach?

    PubMed

    Wesseling, John F; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder with no cure or effective palliative treatment. An ideal therapy would arrest pathogenesis at early stages before neuronal damage occurs. However, although the genetic mutation that causes HD is known, the molecular chain of events that leads from the mutation to disease is not well understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that synaptic dysregulation may be involved, and the earliest known deficit is hyperfunction of glutamate-type N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in the selectively vulnerable medium spiny neurons of the striatum. A previous study found that the mutant Htt protein interferes with downregulation of juvenile NMDAR subtypes that contain GluN3A subunits by sequestering the endocytic adaptor PACSIN1 and preventing their removal from the cell surface. Loss of PACSIN1 and consequent gain of GluN3A function reactivate a synapse pruning mechanism that is important during development but harmful when active at later stages. Suppressing the GluN3A reactivation corrected the NMDAR hyperfunction and prevented the full range of HD signs and symptoms in mouse models, encouraging efforts to develop GluN3A-selective antagonists and/or explore alternative therapeutic approaches to block GluN3A expression.

  19. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody could be a cause of catatonic symptoms in psychiatric patients: case reports and methods for detection.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Ko; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Takaki, Manabu; Omori, Yuki; Imai, Yumiko; Nishino, Seiji; Tanaka, Keiko; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    The symptoms of catatonia have been reported to be similar to the initial symptoms of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Subsequently, this autoimmune limbic encephalitis has been noticed by many psychiatrists. For a differential diagnosis of catatonic state, it is important to detect anti-NMDAR encephalitis. This encephalitis is expected to be in remission by early detection and treatment. We should be more cautious about catatonic symptoms of schizophrenia. When a patient is suspected of having encephalitis, we should screen for anti-NMDAR antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid samples using a cell-based assay. We describe the methods of NMDAR antibody detection and the etiology of this encephalitis with case reports. Two representative cases with catatonia and non-catatonia (brief psychotic disorder) were reported. Schizophrenia is a general, heterogeneous, and complicated disorder, and its pathophysiology is unknown. There is an established evidence of NMDAR hypofunction, which is the functional disconnection of the central component; this is one of the most recognized models for schizophrenia. Furthermore, it is said that autoimmune mechanisms have been involved, at least in subgroups of schizophrenia patients. Further study of anti-NMDAR antibody and its related encephalitis would give essential clues for the research of schizophrenia, catatonia, and atypical psychosis.

  20. Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine alleviates neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia by downregulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Gu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Juan; Ma, Zhengliang

    2014-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a member of the small proline-directed serine/threonine kinase family. Cdk5 is not involved in cell cycle regulation, but is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of Cdk5 in neuropathic pain remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility that Cdk5 is involved in neuropathic pain in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We injected intrathecally Cdk5 inhibitor roscovitine in rat model of chronic compression of dorsal root ganglion and examined pain behaviors and the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2A (NR2A) but not NR2B or NR1 in DRG. We found that roscovitine alleviated neuropathic pain, causing decline in paw withdrawal mechanical threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency. Furthermore, roscovitine inhibited NR2A expression in DRG. These data suggest that Cdk5-NR2A pathway regulates neuropathic pain in DRG, and intrathecal injection of roscovitine could alleviate neuropathic pain. Our findings provide new insight into the analgesic effects of Roscovitine and identify Cdk5-NR2A pathway as a potential target for effective treatment of neuropathic pain.

  1. Influences of levodopa on expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-1-subunit in the visual cortex of monocular deprivation rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2012-01-01

    AIM Many studies have demonstrated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-1-subunit (NMDAR1) is associated with amblyopia. The effectiveness of levodopa in improving the visual function of the children with amblyopia has also been proved. But the mechanism is undefined. Our study was to explore the possible mechanism. METHODS Sixty 14-day-old healthy SD rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, including normal group, monocular deprivation group, levodopa group and normal saline group, 15 rats each. We sutured all the rats' unilateral eyelids except normal group to establish the monocular deprivation animal model and raise them in normal sunlight till 45-day-old. NMDAR1 was detected in the visual cortex with immunohistochemistry methods, Western Blot and Real time PCR. LD and NS groups were gavaged with levodopa (40mg/kg) and normal saline for 28 days respectively. NMDAR1 was also detected with the methods above. RESULTS NMDAR1 in the visual cortex of MD group was less than that of normal group. NMDAR1 in the visual cortex of LD group was more than that of NS group. CONCLUSION NMDAR1 is associated with the plasticity of visual development. Levodopa may influence the expression of NMDAR1 and improve visual function, and its target may lie in the visual cortex. PMID:22553754

  2. Separate Intramolecular Targets for Protein Kinase A Control N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Gating and Ca2+ Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Teresa K.; Maki, Bruce A.; Ruffino, Thomas J.; Kasperek, Eileen M.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) enhances synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system by increasing NMDA receptor current amplitude and Ca2+ flux in an isoform-dependent yet poorly understood manner. PKA phosphorylates multiple residues on GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B subunits in vivo, but the functional significance of this multiplicity is unknown. We examined gating and permeation properties of recombinant NMDA receptor isoforms and of receptors with altered C-terminal domain (CTDs) prior to and after pharmacological inhibition of PKA. We found that PKA inhibition decreased GluN1/GluN2B but not GluN1/GluN2A gating; this effect was due to slower rates for receptor activation and resensitization and was mediated exclusively by the GluN2B CTD. In contrast, PKA inhibition reduced NMDA receptor-relative Ca2+ permeability (PCa/PNa) regardless of the GluN2 isoform and required the GluN1 CTD; this effect was due primarily to decreased unitary Ca2+ conductance, because neither Na+ conductance nor Ca2+-dependent block was altered substantially. Finally, we show that both the gating and permeation effects can be reproduced by changing the phosphorylation state of a single residue: GluN2B Ser-1166 and GluN1 Ser-897, respectively. We conclude that PKA effects on NMDA receptor gating and Ca2+ permeability rely on distinct phosphorylation sites located on the CTD of GluN2B and GluN1 subunits. This separate control of NMDA receptor properties by PKA may account for the specific effects of PKA on plasticity during synaptic development and may lead to drugs targeted to alter NMDA receptor gating or Ca2+ permeability. PMID:24847051

  3. Control of N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Function by the NR2 Subunit Amino-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Hansen, Kasper B.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    NMDA receptors comprised of different NR2 subunits exhibit strikingly unique biophysical and pharmacological properties. Here we report that the extracellular amino-terminal domain (ATD) of the NR2 subunit controls pharmacological and kinetic properties of recombinant NMDA receptors, such as agonist potency, deactivation time course, open probability (POPEN), and mean open/shut duration. Using ATD deletion mutants of NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, NR2D and chimeras of NR2A and NR2D with interchanged ATD (NR2A-(2D-ATD) and NR2D-(2A-ATD)), we show that the ATD contributes to the low glutamate potency of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors and the high glutamate potency of NR2D-containing receptors. The ATD influences the deactivation time courses of NMDA receptors, as removal of the ATD from NR2A slows the deactivation rate, while removal of the ATD from NR2B, NR2C and NR2D accelerates the deactivation rate. Open probability also is influenced by the ATD. Removal of the ATD from NR2A or replacement of the NR2A-ATD with that of NR2D decreases POPEN in single channel recordings from outside-out patches of HEK 293 cells. By contrast, deletion of the ATD from NR2D or replacement of the NR2D ATD with that of NR2A increases POPEN and mean open duration. These data demonstrate the modular nature of NMDA receptors and show that the ATD of the different NR2 subunits plays an important role in fine-tuning the functional properties of the individual NMDA receptor subtypes. PMID:19793963

  4. Enhancement of N-methyl- D-aspartate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the neostriatum after methamphetamine sensitization. An in vitro slice study.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Watanabe, Shigenori; Kita, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    It has been suggested that behavioral methamphetamine sensitization involves changes in cortical excitatory synaptic inputs to neostriatal (Str) projection neurons. To test this, we performed blind whole-cell recording of medium spiny neurons in Str slice preparations. In Str neurons of naive rats, the amplitude of the subcortical white matter stimulation-induced N-methyl- D-aspartate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDA-EPSPs) was decreased upon hyperpolarization, owing to the voltage-dependent Mg(2+) blockade of NMDA receptor channels. In contrast, the amplitude of the NMDA-EPSPs in Str neurons of rats undergoing methamphetamine withdrawal (MW) did not show the Mg(2+) blockade and was nearly voltage independent over the membrane potential range of -70 to -110 mV. Application of the specific protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12, 13- DL-acetate, blocked the voltage-dependent Mg(2+) blockade of NMDA receptor channels in Str neurons of naive rats. Application of the specific activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), Sp-cAMPS-triethylamine salt, increased the amplitude of the NMDA receptor-mediated EPSPs at the rest but not at hyperpolarized potentials. Coapplication of the PKC and PKA activators yielded NMDA-EPSPs similar to those seen in Str neurons of MW rats. In Str slices of naive rats, tetanic subcortical white matter stimulation induced long-term depression of field potentials. In Str slices treated with the PKC and/or PKA, the same stimulation induced long-term potentiation of field potentials similar to those observed in slices obtained from MW rats. These results suggest that the enhancement of the NMDA receptor-mediated corticostriatal synaptic transmission plays an important role in behavioral methamphetamine sensitization. This enhancement is probably associated with phosphorylation of NMDA receptors mediated by the simultaneous activation of PKC and PKA.

  5. Parental Deprivation Induces N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Receptor Upregulation in Limbic Brain Areas of Octodon degus: Protective Role of the Maternal Call

    PubMed Central

    Ziabreva, Irina; Schnabel, Reinhild; Braun, Katharina

    2000-01-01

    An optimal coordination between parents and their offspring involves a sequence of reciprocal behaviors to ensure the adequate care of the young, which is critical for a healthy physical, emotional, and social development. Parental deprivation, particularly an impaired child-mother attachment, induces lasting changes in emotional as well as in cognitive capacities in later life. We assessed in the South American precocial species, Octodon degus, whether alterations of glutamatergic function of the limbic system induced by parental deprivation may be a neural correlate for such behavioral changes. Further, we analyzed whether the mother's voice can protect from separation-induced changes of brain function. Changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression were examined in the following three groups of 2-week-old Octodon degus pups: (I) control animals who remained undisturbed with the family; (II) animals who were repeatedly separated from the family and individually placed in an unfamiliar environment for behavioral analysis (open field); and (III) animals who were treated like the group described under (lI) but were presented with maternal vocalizations during separation. Relative to those in the control group I, the animals in group II showed an upregulation of NMDA receptor density in the (a)anterior cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic, and anterior insular cortices; (b)CA1/stratum radiatum; (c)CA1/stratum lacunosum moleculare and CA3/stratum radiatum; and (d)in the basomedial amygdaloid nucleus. Presentation of the maternal call during the separation period (group III) suppressed the separation-induced NMDA receptor upregulation in all regions. The results demonstrate that early life events can influence the expression of transmitter receptors and that maternal behavior, acting to control the pup's socio-emotional environment, is a key factor for regulating such developmental events. PMID:11486484

  6. Viscerosomatic Facilitation in a Subset of IBS Patients, an Effect Mediated by N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Verne, G. Nicholas; Price, Donald D; Callam, Christopher S.; Zhang, Buyi; Peck, Josh; Zhou, QiQi

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder in which the pathophysiological mechanisms of the pain and hypersensitivity are incompletely understood. IBS patients frequently complain of pain in body regions somatotopically distinct from the gut, suggesting involvement of central hyperalgesic mechanisms. We tested the role of tonic peripheral impulse input by using both repetitive thermal stimuli to the leg and repetitive stimuli to the rectum. Changes in thermal/visceral pain sensitivity after nociceptive thermal/visceral repetitive stimulation were determined. A subset of IBS patients showed enhanced rectal/thermal pain sensitivity after repetitive thermal/rectal stimulation respectively. IBS patients then received 60 mg dextromethorphan and placebo (Benadryl) in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial. The results showed: (1) a subset of IBS patients had increased visceral/cutaneous hypersensitivity following a series of repetitive nociceptive stimuli (2) This increased pain sensitivity was blocked by administration of dextromethorphan. This is the first human study that indicates repetitive stimulation enhances a bidirectional mechanism of secondary hyperalgesia due to viscerosomatic facilitation in IBS patients. These unique findings elucidate mechanisms of somatic hypersensitivity in IBS patients and support an etiologic basis for abnormal NMDA receptor mechanisms that may be the target of future therapies for IBS. PMID:22958874

  7. Glutamate transporter type 3 attenuates the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhiyi; Fang, Hongyu

    2005-06-01

    We studied the regulation of N-methy-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) current/activation by glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3), a neuronal EAAT in vivo, in the restricted extracellular space of a biological model. This model involved co-expressing EAAT3 and NMDAR (composed of NMDAR1-1a and NMDAR2A) in Xenopus oocytes. The NMDAR current was reduced in the co-expression oocytes but not in oocytes expressing NMDAR only when the flow of glutamate-containing superfusate was stopped. The degree of this current reduction was glutamate concentration-dependent. No reduction of NMDAR current was observed in Na+-free solution or when NMDA, a non-substrate for EAATs, was used as the agonist for NMDAR. In the continuous flow experiments, the dose-response curve of glutamate-induced current was shifted to the right-hand side in co-expression oocytes compared with oocytes expressing NMDAR alone. The degree of this shift depended on the abundance of EAAT3 in the co-expression oocytes. Thus, the glutamate concentrations sensed by NMDAR locally were lower than those in the superfusates. These results suggest that EAAT3 regulates the amplitude of NMDAR currents at pre-saturated concentrations of glutamate to EAAT3. Thus, EAATs, by rapidly regulating glutamate concentrations near NMDAR, modulate NMDAR current/activation.

  8. Neuroprotection Mediated through GluN2C-Containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors Following Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Connie; Marson, John D.; Zhang, Quan-Guang; Kim, Jimok; Wu, Wei-Hua; Brann, Darrell W.; Chen, Bo-Shiun

    2016-01-01

    Post-ischemic activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) has been linked to NMDAR subunit-specific signaling that mediates pro-survival or pro-death activity. Although extensive studies have been performed to characterize the role of GluN2A and GluN2B following ischemia, there is less understanding regarding the regulation of GluN2C. Here, we show that GluN2C expression is increased in acute hippocampal slices in response to ischemia. Strikingly, GluN2C knockout mice, following global cerebral ischemia, exhibit greater neuronal death in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and reduced spatial working memory compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, we find that GluN2C-expressing hippocampal neurons show marked resistance to NMDA-induced toxicity and reduced calcium influx. Using both in vivo and in vitro experimental models of ischemia, we demonstrate a neuroprotective role of GluN2C, suggesting a mechanism by which GluN2C is upregulated to promote neuronal survival following ischemia. These results may provide insights into development of NMDAR subunit-specific therapeutic strategies to protect neurons from excitotoxicity. PMID:27845401

  9. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit involved in depression-like behaviours in lithium chloride-pilocarpine chronic rat epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Feng; Ding, Jing; Li, Xin; Fan, Fan; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in patients with epilepsy with unclear mechanisms. This study is to explore the role of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits in epilepsy-associated depression. Lithium chloride (Licl)-pilocarpine chronic rat epilepsy model was established and rats were divided into epilepsy with depression (EWD) and epilepsy without depression (EWND) subgroups based on forced swim test. Expression of NMDA receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunits was measured by western blot and immunofluorescence methods. The immobility time (IMT) was significantly greater in Licl-pilocarpine model group than in Control group, which was also greater in EWD group than in EWND group. No differences of spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) counts over two weeks and latency were found between EWD and EWND groups. The number of NeuN positive cells was significantly less in Licl-pilocarpine model group than in Control group, but had no difference between EWD and EWND groups. The ratios of phosphorylated NR1 (p-NR1)/NR1 and p-NR2B/NR2B were significantly greater in the hippocampus in EWD group than in EWND group. Moreover, the expression of p-NR1 and p-NR2B in the CA1 subfield of hippocampus were both greater in Licl-pilocarpine model group than Control group. Selective blockage of NR2B subunit with ifenprodil could alleviate depression-like behaviours of Licl-pilocarpine rat epilepsy model. In conclusion, glutamate NMDA receptor NR2B subunit was involved in promoting depression-like behaviours in the Licl-pilocarpine chronic rat epilepsy model and might be a target for treating epilepsy-associated depression.

  10. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the ventral tegmental area are involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Maryam; Haeri-Rohani, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2007-10-01

    The interaction of opiate, cholinergic, glutamatergic and (possibly) dopaminergic inputs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) influencing a learned behavior is certainly a topic of great interest. In the present study, the effect of intra-VTA administration of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agents on nicotine's effect in morphine state-dependent learning was investigated. An inhibitory avoidance (IA) task was used for memory assessment in male Wistar rats. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of morphine (5 and 7.5mg/kg) immediately after training decreased IA response on the test day, which was reinstated by pre-test administration of the same doses of the opioid; this is known as state-dependency. Moreover, pre-test administration of nicotine (0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg, s.c.) also reversed the decrease in IA response because of post-training morphine (5mg/kg). Here, we also show that when infused into the VTA before testing, NMDA (0.01 and 0.1 microg/rat) reverse the post-training morphine effect on memory. In addition, the sub-effective doses of NMDA (0.0001 and 0.001 microg/rat) in combination with a low dose of nicotine (0.1mg/kg) which had no effects by themselves, synergistically improved retrieval of IA memory on the test day. In contrast, pre-test administration of a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (0.5, 1 and 2 microg/rat) which had no effect alone prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. Our data indicate that NMDA receptors in the VTA are involved in the reversing effect of nicotine on morphine induced state-dependency.

  11. N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Antagonists and Memantine Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease, Vascular Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, David; Deshpande, Varun K.; Shi, Ying; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Greig, Nigel H.; Rogers, Jack T.; Huang, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Memantine, a partial antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), approved for moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatment within the US and Europe under brand name Namenda (Forest), Axura and Akatinol (Merz), and Ebixa and Abixa (Lundbeck), may have potential in alleviating additional neurological conditions, such as vascular dementia (VD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). In various animal models, memantine has been reported to be a neuroprotective agent that positively impacts both neurodegenerative and vascular processes. While excessive levels of glutamate result in neurotoxicity, in part through the over-activation of NMDARs, memantine—as a partial NMDAR antagonist, blocks the NMDA glutamate receptors to normalize the glutamatergic system and ameliorate cognitive and memory deficits. The key to memantine’s therapeutic action lies in its uncompetitive binding to the NMDAR through which low affinity and rapid off-rate kinetics of memantine at the level of the NMDAR-channel preserves the physiological function of the receptor, underpinning memantine’s tolerability and low adverse event profile. As the biochemical pathways evoked by NMDAR antagonism also play a role in PD and since no other drug is sufficiently effective to substitute for the first-line treatment of L-dopa despite its side effects, memantine may be useful in PD treatment with possibly fewer side effects. In spite of the relative modest nature of its adverse effects, memantine has been shown to provide only a moderate decrease in clinical deterioration in AD and VD, and hence efforts are being undertaken in the design of new and more potent memantine-based drugs to hopefully provide greater efficacy. PMID:21875407

  12. Expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits in the bovine ovum: ova as a potential source of autoantigens causing anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Naoko; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Kametani, Fuyuki; Tanaka, Keiko; Une, Yumi; Komatsu, Yotaro; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune synaptic encephalitis is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against synaptic constituent receptors and manifests as neurological and psychiatric disorders. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is such an autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects young women. It is associated with antibodies against the extracellular region of the NR1 subunit of postsynaptic NMDAR. Each NMDAR functions as a heterotetrameric complex that is composed of four subunits, including NR1 and NR2A, NR2B, or NR2C. Importantly, ovarian teratoma is a typical complication of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in female patients and may contain antigenic neural tissue; however, antigenic sites remain unknown in female patients without ovarian teratoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of NMDARs in the ovum. We detected NR1 and NR2B immunoreactivity in protein fractions extracted from the bovine ovary and ova by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting analysis. Immunoprecipitates digested with trypsin were analyzed by reverse phase liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. We obtained the following five peptides: SPFGRFK and KNLQDR, which are consistent with partial sequences of human NR1, and GVEDALVSLK, QPTVAGAPK, and NEVMSSK, which correspond to those of NR2A, NR2B and NR2C, respectively. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the bovine ovum was stained with the immunoglobulin G purified from the serum of a patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Taken together, we propose that the normal ovum expresses NMDARs that have strong affinity for the disease-specific IgG. The presence of NMDARs in ova may help explain why young females without ovarian teratomas are also affected by anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  13. Prediction of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor GluN1-Ligand Binding Affinity by a Novel SVM-Pose/SVM-Score Combinatorial Ensemble Docking Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Max K.; Syu, Ren-Guei; Ding, Yi-Lung; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is a potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disorders. A novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme using ligand and protein conformation ensembles and customized support vector machine (SVM)-based models to select the docked pose and to predict the docking score was generated for predicting the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity. The predicted root mean square deviation (RMSD) values in pose by SVM-Pose models were found to be in good agreement with the observed values (n = 30, r2 = 0.928–0.988,  = 0.894–0.954, RMSE = 0.002–0.412, s = 0.001–0.214), and the predicted pKi values by SVM-Score were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for the training samples (n = 24, r2 = 0.967,  = 0.899, RMSE = 0.295, s = 0.170) and test samples (n = 13, q2 = 0.894, RMSE = 0.437, s = 0.202). When subjected to various statistical validations, the developed SVM-Pose and SVM-Score models consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test asserted the predictivity of this novel docking scheme. Collectively, this accurate novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme can be used to predict the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity for facilitating drug discovery.

  14. Induction of Memory Deficit in Mice with Chronic Exposure to Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongzhi; Tanaka, Keiko; Wang, Li; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Kato, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is now widely recognized and the patients with this disease show prominent psychiatric symptoms followed by seizures, respiratory failure, involuntary movement, autonomic instability, and amnesia. The anti-NMDAR antibody titer coincides with disease activity, and antibody-deprivation treatment ameliorates neurological symptoms. Previous studies have shown that clusters of NMDARs on the neuronal surface decrease in density upon incubation with the cerebrospinal fluid from patients (NMDAR-CSF), and that the induction of long-term potentiation, a cellular mechanism underlie learning and memory processes, was suppressed with NMDAR-CSF. In this study, we exposed mice to NMDAR-CSF in an attempt to reproduce the human symptoms in mice. CSF was continuously administered via a cannula placed in the lateral ventricle of the mouse that connected to an osmotic pump transplanted in the back of the mouse. From day 8-18, we evaluated the behavior of the mice using standardized tests that were performed serially. Mice exposed to NMDAR-CSF showed impaired spatial memory, as detected with the Morris water maze test. Brain tissue from mice with memory disturbances had decreased content of NMDAR protein in the hippocampal area shown by immunohistochemistry, which is consistent with the anti-NMDAR antibodies affect the expression and function of NMDARs, resulting in anti-NMDAR encephalitis-like symptoms. Also, the mice treated with the NMDAR-CSF did not show inflammatory cell infiltration or neuron loss in their brain tissue and this lack of nervous tissue destruction is encouraging as it is consistent with the idea that this disease can be treated through immunotherapy.

  15. Mice heterozygous for neurotrophin-3 display enhanced vulnerability to excitotoxicity in the striatum through increased expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Torres-Peraza, J; Pezzi, S; Canals, J M; Gavaldà, N; García-Martínez, J M; Pérez-Navarro, E; Alberch, J

    2007-01-19

    The striatum is one of the brain areas most vulnerable to excitotoxicity, a lesion that can be prevented by neurotrophins. In the present study, intrastriatal injection of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) agonist quinolinate (QUIN) was performed in mice heterozygous for neurotrophin-3 (NT3 +/-) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF +/-) to analyze the role of endogenous neurotrophins on the regulation of striatal neurons susceptibility to excitotoxic injury. QUIN injection induced a decrease in dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32) protein levels that was higher in NT-3 +/- than in BDNF+/- or wild type animals. This enhanced susceptibility was specific for enkephalin- and tachykinin-positive projection neurons, and also for parvalbumin-positive interneurons. However the excitotoxic damage in large interneurons was not modified in NT-3 +/- mice compared with wild type animals. This effect can be related to the regulation of NMDARs by endogenous NT-3. Thus, our results show that there is an age-dependent regulation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2A, but not NR2B, in NT-3 +/- mice. The deficit of endogenous NT-3 induced a decrease in NR1 and NR2A subunits at postnatal day (P) 0 and P3 mice respectively, whereas an upregulation was observed in 12 week old NT-3 +/- mice. This differential effect was also observed after administration of exogenous NT-3. In primary striatal cultures, NT-3 treatment induced an enhancement in NR2A, but not NR2B, protein levels. However, intrastriatal grafting of NT-3 secreting-cells in adult wild type mice produced a down-regulation of NR2A subunit. In conclusion, NT-3 regulates the expression of NMDAR subunits modifying striatal neuronal properties that confers the differential vulnerability to excitotoxicity in projection neurons and interneurons in the striatum.

  16. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Microscopy and Flow Cytometry in Evaluating N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibodies in Serum Using a Live Cell-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Peschl, Patrick; Schanda, Kathrin; Irschick, Regina; Höftberger, Romana; Deisenhammer, Florian; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas; Dalmau, Josep; Reindl, Markus

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune neurological disease, diagnosed by a specific autoantibody against NMDAR. Antibody testing using commercially available cell-based assays (CBA) or immunohistochemistry on rat brain tissue has proven high specificity and sensitivity. Here we compare an immunofluorescence live CBA to a flow cytometry (FACS) based assay to detect NMDAR antibodies by their binding to the surface of HEK293A cells functionally expressing NMDAR. Both assays were first established using a discovery group of 76 individuals and then validated in a group of 32 patients in a blinded manner. In the CBA, 23 of 23 patients with NMDAR encephalitis were positive for NMDAR antibodies and 0 of 85 controls (32 healthy controls and 53 patients with other neurological diseases), resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 85.1–100.0 and 95.7–100.0, respectively). The FACS based assay detected NMDAR antibodies in 20 of 23 patients and in 0 of 85 controls. Therefore, with an equally high specificity (95% CI 95.7–100.0) the sensitivity of the FACS based assay was 87% (95% CI 66.4–97.2). Comparing antibody titers from CBA with delta median fluorescence intensities from FACS showed a high concordance (kappa = 0.943, p<0.0001) and correlation (r = 0.697, p<0.0001). In conclusion, evaluation of the FACS based assay revealed a lower sensitivity and high inter-assay variation, making the CBA a more reliable detection method. PMID:25815887

  17. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of microscopy and flow cytometry in evaluating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in serum using a live cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Ramberger, Melanie; Peschl, Patrick; Schanda, Kathrin; Irschick, Regina; Höftberger, Romana; Deisenhammer, Florian; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas; Dalmau, Josep; Reindl, Markus

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune neurological disease, diagnosed by a specific autoantibody against NMDAR. Antibody testing using commercially available cell-based assays (CBA) or immunohistochemistry on rat brain tissue has proven high specificity and sensitivity. Here we compare an immunofluorescence live CBA to a flow cytometry (FACS) based assay to detect NMDAR antibodies by their binding to the surface of HEK293A cells functionally expressing NMDAR. Both assays were first established using a discovery group of 76 individuals and then validated in a group of 32 patients in a blinded manner. In the CBA, 23 of 23 patients with NMDAR encephalitis were positive for NMDAR antibodies and 0 of 85 controls (32 healthy controls and 53 patients with other neurological diseases), resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 85.1-100.0 and 95.7-100.0, respectively). The FACS based assay detected NMDAR antibodies in 20 of 23 patients and in 0 of 85 controls. Therefore, with an equally high specificity (95% CI 95.7-100.0) the sensitivity of the FACS based assay was 87% (95% CI 66.4-97.2). Comparing antibody titers from CBA with delta median fluorescence intensities from FACS showed a high concordance (kappa = 0.943, p<0.0001) and correlation (r = 0.697, p<0.0001). In conclusion, evaluation of the FACS based assay revealed a lower sensitivity and high inter-assay variation, making the CBA a more reliable detection method.

  18. Availability of N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Coagonists Affects Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference and Locomotor Sensitization: Implications for Comorbid Schizophrenia and Substance Abuse.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Matthew D; Berg, Alexandra R; Bechtholt, Anita J; Coyle, Joseph T

    2015-06-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with high prevalence of substance abuse. Recent research suggests that dysregulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function may play a role in the pathophysiology of both schizophrenia and drug addiction, and thus, may account for this high comorbidity. Our laboratory has developed two transgenic mouse lines that exhibit contrasting NMDAR activity based on the availability of the glycine modulatory site (GMS) agonists d-serine and glycine. Glycine transporter 1 knockdowns (GlyT1(+/-)) exhibit NMDAR hyperfunction, whereas serine racemase knockouts (SR(-/-)) exhibit NMDAR hypofunction. We characterized the behavior of these lines in a cocaine-induced (20 mg/kg) conditioned place preference (CPP) and locomotor sensitization paradigm. Compared with wild-type mice, GlyT1(+/-) mice displayed hastened extinction of CPP and robust cocaine-induced reinstatement. SR(-/-) mice appeared to immediately "forget" the learned preference, because they did not exhibit cocaine-induced reinstatement and also displayed attenuated locomotor sensitization. Treatment of GlyT1(+/-) mice with gavestinel (10 mg/kg on day 1; 5 mg/kg on days 2-17), a GMS antagonist, attenuated cocaine-induced CPP and caused them to immediately "forget" the learned preference. Treatment of SR(-/-) mice with d-serine (300 mg/kg on day 1; 150 mg/kg on days 2-17) to normalize brain levels caused them to avoid the cocaine-paired side of the chamber during extinction. These results highlight NMDAR dysfunction as a possible neural mechanism underlying comorbid schizophrenia and substance abuse. Also, these findings suggest drugs that directly or indirectly activate the NMDAR GMS could be an effective treatment of cocaine abuse.

  19. Prediction of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor GluN1-Ligand Binding Affinity by a Novel SVM-Pose/SVM-Score Combinatorial Ensemble Docking Scheme.

    PubMed

    Leong, Max K; Syu, Ren-Guei; Ding, Yi-Lung; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-06

    The glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is a potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disorders. A novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme using ligand and protein conformation ensembles and customized support vector machine (SVM)-based models to select the docked pose and to predict the docking score was generated for predicting the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity. The predicted root mean square deviation (RMSD) values in pose by SVM-Pose models were found to be in good agreement with the observed values (n = 30, r(2) = 0.928-0.988,  = 0.894-0.954, RMSE = 0.002-0.412, s = 0.001-0.214), and the predicted pKi values by SVM-Score were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for the training samples (n = 24, r(2) = 0.967,  = 0.899, RMSE = 0.295, s = 0.170) and test samples (n = 13, q(2) = 0.894, RMSE = 0.437, s = 0.202). When subjected to various statistical validations, the developed SVM-Pose and SVM-Score models consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test asserted the predictivity of this novel docking scheme. Collectively, this accurate novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme can be used to predict the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity for facilitating drug discovery.

  20. Prediction of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor GluN1-Ligand Binding Affinity by a Novel SVM-Pose/SVM-Score Combinatorial Ensemble Docking Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Max K.; Syu, Ren-Guei; Ding, Yi-Lung; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit GluN1 is a potential pharmacological target for neurodegenerative disorders. A novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme using ligand and protein conformation ensembles and customized support vector machine (SVM)-based models to select the docked pose and to predict the docking score was generated for predicting the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity. The predicted root mean square deviation (RMSD) values in pose by SVM-Pose models were found to be in good agreement with the observed values (n = 30, r2 = 0.928–0.988,  = 0.894–0.954, RMSE = 0.002–0.412, s = 0.001–0.214), and the predicted pKi values by SVM-Score were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for the training samples (n = 24, r2 = 0.967,  = 0.899, RMSE = 0.295, s = 0.170) and test samples (n = 13, q2 = 0.894, RMSE = 0.437, s = 0.202). When subjected to various statistical validations, the developed SVM-Pose and SVM-Score models consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test asserted the predictivity of this novel docking scheme. Collectively, this accurate novel combinatorial ensemble docking scheme can be used to predict the NMDAR GluN1-ligand binding affinity for facilitating drug discovery. PMID:28059133

  1. Role of antioxidant enzymes in redox regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function and memory in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Hua; Kumar, Ashok; Rani, Asha; Foster, Thomas C

    2014-06-01

    Overexpression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) in the hippocampus results in age-dependent impaired cognition and altered synaptic plasticity suggesting a possible model for examining the role of oxidative stress in senescent neurophysiology. However, it is unclear if SOD1 overexpression involves an altered redox environment and a decrease in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic function reported for aging animals. Viral vectors were used to express SOD1 and green fluorescent protein (SOD1 + GFP), SOD1 and catalase (SOD1 + CAT), or GFP alone in the hippocampus of middle-aged (17 months) male Fischer 344 rats. We confirm that SOD1 + GFP and SOD1 + CAT reduced lipid peroxidation indicating superoxide metabolites were primarily responsible for lipid peroxidation. SOD1 + GFP impaired learning, decreased glutathione peroxidase activity, decreased glutathione levels, decreased NMDAR-mediated synaptic responses, and impaired long-term potentiation. Co-expression of SOD1 + CAT rescued the effects of SOD1 expression on learning, redox measures, and synaptic function suggesting the effects were mediated by excess hydrogen peroxide. Application of the reducing agent dithiolthreitol to hippocampal slices increased the NMDAR-mediated component of the synaptic response in SOD1 + GFP animals relative to animals that overexpress SOD1 + CAT indicating that the effect of antioxidant enzyme expression on NMDAR function was because of a shift in the redox environment. The results suggest that overexpression of neuronal SOD1 and CAT in middle age may provide a model for examining the role of oxidative stress in senescent physiology and the progression of age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Subchronic treatment with phencyclidine in adolescence leads to impaired exploratory behavior in adult rats without altering social interaction or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding levels.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, A; Willems, R; Kooijman, E J M; Renjaän, V A; Klein, P J; Windhorst, A D; Donck, L Ver; Leysen, J E; Berckel, B N M van

    2014-11-01

    Although both the onset of schizophrenia and human phencyclidine (PCP) abuse typically present within the interval from adolescence to early adulthood, the majority of preclinical research employing the PCP model of schizophrenia has been conducted on neonatal or adult animals. The present study was designed to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence. Male 35-42-day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subcutaneously administered either saline (10 ml · kg(-1) ) or PCP hydrochloride (10 mg · kg(-1) ) once daily for a period of 14 days (n = 6/group). The animals were allowed to withdraw from treatment for 2 weeks, and their social and exploratory behaviors were subsequently assessed in adulthood by using the social interaction test. To examine the effects of adolescent PCP administration on the regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), quantitative autoradiography was performed on brain sections of adult, control and PCP-withdrawn rats by using 20 nM (3) H-MK-801. Prior subchronic exposure to PCP in adolescence had no enduring effects on the reciprocal contact and noncontact social behavior of adult rats. Spontaneous rearing in response to the novel testing arena and time spent investigating its walls and floor were reduced in PCP-withdrawn animals compared with control. The long-term behavioral effects of PCP occurred in the absence of persistent deficits in spontaneous locomotion or self-grooming activity and were not mediated by altered NMDAR density. Our results document differential effects of adolescent PCP administration on the social and exploratory behaviors of adult rats, suggesting that distinct neurobiological mechanisms are involved in mediating these behaviors.

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease: results of a UK-based surveillance study in children

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Sukhvir; Hacohen, Yael; Jacobson, Leslie; Agrawal, Shakti; Gupta, Rajat; Philip, Sunny; Smith, Martin; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody (NMDAR-Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognised clinico-immunological syndrome that presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms cognitive decline, movement disorder and seizures. This study reports the clinical features, management and neurological outcomes of paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease in the UK. Design A prospective surveillance study. Children with NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological diseases were voluntarily reported to the British Neurological Surveillance Unit (BPNSU) from November 2010 to December 2011. Initial and follow-up questionnaires were sent out to physicians. Results Thirty-one children fulfilled the criteria for the study. Eight presented during the study period giving an incidence of 0.85 per million children per year (95% CI 0.64 to 1.06); 23 cases were historical. Behavioural change and neuropsychiatric features were present in 90% of patients, and seizures and movement disorders both in 67%. Typical NMDAR-Ab encephalitis was reported in 24 children and partial phenotype without encephalopathy in seven, including predominantly psychiatric (four) and movement disorder (three). All patients received steroids, 22 (71%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, 9 (29%) received plasma exchange,and 10 (32%) received second-line immunotherapy. Of the 23 patients who were diagnosed early, 18 (78%) made a full recovery compared with only 1 of 8 (13%) of the late diagnosed patients (p=0.002, Fisher's exact test). Seven patients relapsed, with four needing additional second-line immunotherapy. Conclusions Paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease appears to be similar to adult NMDAR-Ab encephalitis, but some presented with a partial phenotype. Early treatment was associated with a quick and often full recovery. PMID:25637141

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and gamma-aminobutyric acid conductances govern the risk of epileptogenesis following febrile seizures in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ouardouz, Mohamed; Lema, Pablo; Awad, Patricia N; Di Cristo, Graziella; Carmant, Lionel

    2010-04-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common types of seizure in children, and are generally considered to be benign. However, febrile seizures in children with dysgenesis have been associated with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. We have previously shown in a rat model of dysgenesis (cortical freeze lesion) and hyperthermia-induced seizures that 86% of these animals developed recurrent seizures in adulthood. The cellular changes underlying the increased risk of epileptogenesis in this model are not known. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, we found a more pronounced increase in excitability in rats with both hyperthermic seizures and dysgenesis than in rats with hyperthermic seizures alone or dysgenesis alone. The change was found to be secondary to an increase in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Inversely, hyperpolarization-activated cation current was more pronounced in naïve rats with hyperthermic seizures than in rats with dysgenesis and hyperthermic seizures or with dysgenesis alone. The increase in GABAA-mediated inhibition observed was comparable in rats with or without dysgenesis after hyperthermic seizures, whereas no changes were observed in rats with dysgenesis alone. Our work indicates that in this two-hit model, changes in NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs may facilitate epileptogenesis following febrile seizures. Changes in the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents may represent a protective reaction and act by damping the NMDA receptor-mediated hyperexcitability, rather than converting inhibition into excitation. These findings provide a new hypothesis of cellular changes following hyperthermic seizures in predisposed individuals, and may help in the design of therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis following prolonged febrile seizures.

  5. Influence of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor mechanism on WIN55,212-2-induced amnesia in rat dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jamali-Raeufy, Nida; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of both N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) and MK-801 on WIN55,212-2(WIN)-induced amnesia in rats. Step-through inhibitory avoidance of memory was used to examine the retrieval of memory, 24 h after training. All drugs were injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) of rats. Pretraining and posttraining or pretesting administration of the nonselective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, WIN (0.5 µg/rat), decreased the step-through latency. However, amnesia induced by pretraining or posttraining injections of WIN was reversed by a pretest administration of WIN (0.25 and 0.5 µg/rat). Pretest microinjections of different doses of NMDA (0.1, 0.5, and 1 µg/rat) elicited no response, but NMDA (0.5 and 1 µg/rat) did induce full recovery from amnesia induced by WIN (0.5 µg/rat). The posttraining and pretest injection of a higher dose of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 (MK; 4 µg/rat), caused an impairment in the memory retrieval. However, amnesia induced by posttraining injections of MK (4 µg/rat) was reversed by a pretest administration of MK (4 µg/rat). In addition, pretest administration of different doses of the antagonist (2 and 4 µg/rat) induced full recovery of WIN-induced amnesia, but did not influence memory recovery in the subjects, which had received posttraining (0.5 µg/rat) and pretest WIN (0.25 and 0.5 µg/rat). Pretesting coadministration of ineffective doses of WIN (0.1 µg/rat) with NMDA (0.1 µg/rat), but not with MK (1 µg/rat), restored WIN-induced (0.5 µg/rat) amnesia. It can be concluded that the NMDA receptor mechanism located in the dorsal hippocampus may be involved in WIN-induced amnesia.

  6. Cardiac specific deletion of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 1 ameliorates mtMMP-9 mediated autophagy/mitophagy in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Vacek, Jonathan C; Givvimani, Srikanth; Sen, Utpal; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2010-04-01

    Autophagy is an important process in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases; however, the proximal triggers for mitochondrial autophagy were unknown. The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 1 (NMDA-R1) is a receptor for homocysteine (Hcy) and plays a key role in cardiac dysfunction. Cardiac-specific deletion of NMDA-R1 has been shown to ameliorate Hcy-induced myocyte contractility. Hcy activates mitochondrial matrix metalloproteinase-9 (mtMMP-9) and induces translocation of connexin-43 (Cxn-43) to the mitochondria (mtCxn-43). We sought to show cardiac-specific deletion of NMDA-R1 mitigates Hcy-induced mtCxn-43 translocation, mtMMP-9-mediated mtCxn-43 degradation, leading to mitophagy, in part, by decreasing mitochondrial permeability (MPT). Cardiac-specific knockout (KO) of NAMDA-R1 was generated using the cre/lox approach. The myocyte mitochondria were isolated from wild type (WT), WT + Hcy (1.8 g of DL-Hcy/L in the drinking water for 6 weeks), NMDA-R1 KO + Hcy, and NR1(fl/fl)/Cre (NR1(fl/fl)) genetic control mice. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity and MPT were measured by fluorescence-dye methods. The mitochondrial superoxide and peroxinitrite levels were detected by confocal microscopy using Mito-SOX and dihydrorhodamine-123. The mtMMP-9 activity and expression were detected by zymography and RT-PCR analyses. The mtCxn-43 translocation was detected by confocal microscopy. The degradation of mtCxn-43 and LC3-I/II (a marker of autophagy) were detected by Western blot. These results suggested that Hcy enhanced intramitochondrial nitrosative stress in myocytes. There was a robust increase in mtMMP-9 activity. An increase in translocation and degradation of mtCxn-43 was also noted. These increases led to mitophagy. The effects were ameliorated by cardiac-specific deletion of NMDA-R1. We concluded that HHcy increased mitochondrial nitrosative stress, thereby activating mtMMP-9 and inciting the degradation of mtCxn-43. This led to mitophagy, in part, by activating NMDA

  7. Sensitivity of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials and synaptic plasticity to TCN 201 and TCN 213 in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2015-02-01

    Whereas ifenprodil has been used as a selective GluN1/GluN2B (NR1/NR2B, B-type) receptor antagonist to distinguish between GluN2B (NR2B) and GluN2A (NR2A)-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), TCN 201 (3-chloro-4-fluoro-N-[4-[[2-(phenylcarbonyl)hydrazino]carbonyl]benzyl]benzenesulphonamide) and TCN 213 [N-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-[{5-[(phenylmethyl)amino]-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl}thio]acetamide] have been found to be selective GluN1/GluN2A (NR1/NR2A, A-type) antagonists. Based on the premise that A- and B-types are major synaptic NMDARs, we examined whether inhibition of NMDAR excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) by the TCN compounds and ifenprodil are complementary. Contrary to this prediction, inhibition of NMDAR EPSPs by the TCN compounds and ifenprodil were largely overlapping in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from 30-day-old rats. After partial inhibition by ifenprodil, TCN compounds produced little further suppression of NMDAR EPSPs. Similarly, after partial inhibition by TCN compounds ifenprodil failed to further suppress NMDAR EPSPs. However, low micromolar d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, a competitive NMDAR antagonist, which alone only partially inhibits NMDAR EPSPs, markedly suppresses residual NMDAR responses in the presence of ifenprodil or the TCNs, suggesting that low 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate antagonizes both ifenprodil- and TCN-insensitive synaptic NMDARs. These observations can be most readily interpreted if ifenprodil and TCNs act on a similar population of synaptic NMDARs. Recent lines of evidence suggest that the majority of hippocampal synaptic NMDARs are triheteromers. If so, modulation of GluN2A, and not just GluN2B NMDARs, could dampen long-term depression (LTD). Indeed, both TCNs, like ifenprodil, blocked LTD, suggesting the involvement of ifenprodil- and TCN-sensitive NMDARs in LTD induction. However, the TCNs plus ifenprodil failed to inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP), suggesting that neither ifenprodil- nor TCN

  8. Neuroprotective effects of inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, P2X receptors and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade: a quantitative analysis in organotypical hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rundén-Pran, E; Tansø, R; Haug, F M; Ottersen, O P; Ring, A

    2005-01-01

    Cell death was assessed by quantitative analysis of propidium iodide uptake in rat hippocampal slice cultures transiently exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an in vitro model of brain ischemia. The hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3, and fascia dentata were analyzed at different stages from 0 to 48 h after the insult. Cell death appeared at 3 h and increased steeply toward 12 h. Only a slight additional increase in propidium iodide uptake was seen at later intervals. The mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 were activated immediately after oxygen and glucose deprivation both in CA1 and in CA3/fascia dentata. Inhibition of the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase activator mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase by PD98059 or U0126 offered partial protection against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell damage. The non-selective P2X receptor antagonist suramin gave neuroprotection of the same magnitude as the N-methyl-D-aspartate channel blocker MK-801 (approximately 70%). Neuroprotection was also observed with the P2 receptor blocker PPADS. Immunogold data indicated that hippocampal slice cultures (like intact hippocampi) express several isoforms of P2X receptors at the synaptic level, consistent with the idea that the effects of suramin and PPADS are mediated by P2X receptors. Virtually complete neuroprotection was obtained by combined blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, P2X receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase. Both P2X receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate influx of calcium. Our results suggest that inhibition of P2X receptors has a neuroprotective potential similar to that of inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In contrast, our comparative analysis shows that only partial protection can be achieved by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, one of the

  9. Expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) GluR2/3 receptors in the developing rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Kaur, C; Sivakumar, V; Ling, E A

    2005-10-01

    The expression of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type glutamate (GluR2/3) receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype 1 (NMDAR1) was carried out by immunohistochemistry, double immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR analysis in the pineal glands of 1-day to 6-wk-old rats in the present study. GluR2/3 immunopositive cells were distributed throughout the pineal gland and showed branching processes in all age groups. The NMDAR1 immunoreactivity, however, was observed in fewer branched cells. A constitutive mRNA expression of NMDAR1, GluR2 and GluR3 was detected in the pineal glands of various ages and showed no significant difference between the age groups studied. Immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescence results showed that the GluR2/3 were mainly expressed and co-localized with OX-42-positive microglia/macrophages and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. Co-localization of NMDAR1 with OX-42- and GFAP-positive cells was much less. The expression of these receptors on the glial cells suggests that they may be involved in the development and growth of the pineal gland in the early postnatal period (1 day to 3 wk) and subsequently in the regulation of melatonin synthesis.

  10. Lithium stimulates glutamate "release" and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in monkey and mouse cerebral cortex slices.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J F; Los, G V; Hokin, L E

    1994-01-01

    Beginning at therapeutic concentrations (1-1.5 mM), the anti-manic-depressive drug lithium stimulated the release of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, in monkey cerebral cortex slices in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and this was associated with increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] accumulation. (+/-)-3-(2-Carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphoric acid (CPP), dizocilpine (MK-801), ketamine, and Mg(2+)-antagonists to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/channel complex selectively inhibited lithium-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. Antagonists to cholinergic-muscarinic, alpha 1-adrenergic, 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (serotoninergic), and H1 histaminergic receptors had no effect. Antagonists to non-NMDA glutamate receptors had no effect on lithium-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Similar results were obtained in mouse cerebral cortex slices. Carbetapentane, which inhibits glutamate release, inhibited lithium-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation in this model. It is concluded that the primary effect of lithium in the cerebral cortex slice model is stimulation of glutamate release, which, presumably via activation of the NMDA receptor, leads to Ca2+ entry. Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation increases due to the presumed increased influx of intracellular Ca2+, which activates phospholipase C. These effects may have relevance to the therapeutic action of lithium in the treatment of manic depression as well as its toxic effects, especially at lithium blood levels above 1.5 mM. Images PMID:8078888

  11. Forelimb dyskinesia mediated by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is linked to rapid activation of the NR2B subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Adrien; Melon, Christophe; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Salin, Pascal; Savasta, Marc; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique

    2010-08-01

    Dyskinesia is a major side-effect of chronic l-DOPA administration, the reference treatment for Parkinson's disease. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) alleviates parkinsonian motor symptoms and indirectly improves dyskinesia by decreasing the L-DOPA requirement. However, inappropriate stimulation can also trigger dyskinetic movements, in both human and rodents. We investigated whether STN-HFS-evoked forelimb dyskinesia involved changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission as previously reported for L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias, focusing on the role of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NR2B/NMDARs). We applied STN-HFS in normal rats at intensities above and below the threshold for triggering forelimb dyskinesia. Dyskinesiogenic STN-HFS induced the activation of NR2B (as assessed by immunodetection of the phosphorylated residue Tyr(1472)) in neurons of the subthalamic nucleus, entopeduncular nucleus, motor thalamus and forelimb motor cortex. The severity of STN-HFS-induced forelimb dyskinesia was decreased in a dose-dependent manner by systemic injections of CP-101,606, a selective blocker of NR2B/NMDARs, but was either unaffected or increased by the non-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801.

  12. Analysis of variations in the glutamate receptor, N-methyl D-aspartate 2A (GRIN2A) gene reveals their relative importance as genetic susceptibility factors for heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Zhu, Yongsheng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Hai-Min; Wang, Yun-Peng; Lai, Jiang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate receptor, N-methyl D-aspartate 2A (GRIN2A) gene that encodes the 2A subunit of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was recently shown to be involved in the development of opiate addiction. Genetic polymorphisms in GRIN2A have a plausible role in modulating the risk of heroin addiction. An association of GRIN2A single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with heroin addiction was found earlier in African Americans. To identify markers that contribute to the genetic susceptibility to heroin addiction, we examined the potential association between heroin addiction and forty polymorphisms of the GRIN2A gene using the MassARRAY system and GeneScan in this study. The frequency of the (GT)26 repeats (rs3219790) in the heroin addiction group was significantly higher than that in the control group (χ(2) = 5.360, P = 0.021). The allele frequencies of three polymorphisms (rs1102972, rs1650420, and rs3104703 in intron 3) were strongly associated with heroin addiction (P<0.001, 0.0002, and <0.001, after Bonferroni correction). Three additional SNPs from the same intron (rs1071502, rs6497730, and rs1070487) had nominally significant P values for association (P<0.05), but did not pass the threshold value. Haplotype analysis revealed that the G-C-T-C-C-T-A (block 6) and T-T (block 10) haplotypes of the GRIN2A gene displayed a protective effect (P = <0.001 and 0.003). These findings point to a role for GRIN2A polymorphisms in heroin addiction among the Han Chinese from Shaanxi province, and may be informative for future genetic or neurobiological studies on heroin addiction.

  13. Neuronal death enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Stefovska, Vanya; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate promotes neuronal survival during brain development and destroys neurons after injuries in the mature brain. Glutamate antagonists are in human clinical trials aiming to demonstrate limitation of neuronal injury after head trauma, which consists of both rapid and slowly progressing neurodegeneration. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists are considered for neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders with slowly progressing cell death only. Therefore, humans suffering from Huntington's disease, characterized by slowly progressing neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia, are subjected to trials with glutamate antagonists. Here we demonstrate that progressive neurodegeneration in the basal ganglia induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionate or in the hippocampus by traumatic brain injury is enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists but ameliorated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonists. These observations reveal that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may increase neurodestruction in mature brain undergoing slowly progressing neurodegeneration, whereas blockade of the action of glutamate at α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors may be neuroprotective. PMID:11058158

  14. Residues in the GluN1 C-terminal domain control kinetics and pharmacology of GluN1/GluN3A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Kirstie A; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K

    2017-03-29

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors assembled from GluN1 and GluN3 subunits are unique in that they form glycine-gated excitatory channels that are insensitive to glutamate and NMDA. Alternative splicing of the GluN1 subunit mRNA results in eight variants with regulated expression patterns and post-translational modifications. Here we investigate the role of residues in the GluN1 C-terminal alternatively spliced cassettes in receptor gating and modulation. We measured whole-cell currents from recombinant GluN1/GluN3A receptors expressed in HEK293 cells that differed in the sequence of their GluN1 C-terminal tail. We found that these residues controlled the level of steady-state activity and the degree to which activity was facilitated by zinc and protons. Further, we found that the phosphorylation status of sites specific to certain variants can also modulate channel activity. Based on these results we suggest that GluN1 C-terminal domain splicing may confer cell-specific and activity-dependent regulation onto the level and pharmacologic sensitivity of GluN1/GluN3A currents.

  15. A quantitative review of the postmortem evidence for decreased cortical N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression levels in schizophrenia: How can we link molecular abnormalities to mismatch negativity deficits?

    PubMed

    Catts, Vibeke S; Lai, Yan Ling; Weickert, Cyndi Shannon; Weickert, Thomas W; Catts, Stanley V

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests that anomalous mismatch negativity (MMN) in schizophrenia is related to glutamatergic abnormalities, possibly involving N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Decreased cortical expressions of NMDA receptor subunits have been observed in schizophrenia, though not consistently. To aid with integration and interpretation of previous work, we performed a meta-analysis of effect sizes of mRNA or protein levels of the obligatory NR1 subunit in prefrontal cortex from people with schizophrenia. In schizophrenia compared to unaffected controls the pooled effect size was -0.64 (95% confidence interval: -1.08 to -0.20) for NR1 mRNA reduction and -0.44 (95% confidence interval: -0.80 to -0.07) for NR1 protein reduction. These results represent the first step to a deeper understanding of the region-specific, cell-specific, and stage-specific NMDA receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia, which could be linked to mismatch negativity deficits via transgenic and pharmacological animal models.

  16. Crystal Structure and Pharmacological Characterization of a Novel N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Antagonist at the GluN1 Glycine Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Kvist, Trine; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Greenwood, Jeremy R.; Mehrzad Tabrizi, Fatemeh; Hansen, Kasper B.; Gajhede, Michael; Pickering, Darryl S.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. They are tetrameric complexes composed of glycine-binding GluN1 and GluN3 subunits together with glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. Subunit-selective antagonists that discriminate between the glycine sites of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits would be valuable pharmacological tools for studies on the function and physiological roles of NMDA receptor subtypes. In a virtual screening for antagonists that exploit differences in the orthosteric binding site of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits, we identified a novel glycine site antagonist, 1-thioxo-1,2-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-4(5H)-one (TK40). Here, we show by Schild analysis that TK40 is a potent competitive antagonist with Kb values of 21–63 nm at the GluN1 glycine-binding site of the four recombinant GluN1/N2A-D receptors. In addition, TK40 displayed >100-fold selectivity for GluN1/N2 NMDA receptors over GluN3A- and GluN3B-containing NMDA receptors and no appreciable effects at AMPA receptors. Binding experiments on rat brain membranes and the purified GluN1 ligand-binding domain using glycine site GluN1 radioligands further confirmed the competitive interaction and high potency. To delineate the binding mechanism, we have solved the crystal structure of the GluN1 ligand-binding domain in complex with TK40 and show that TK40 binds to the orthosteric binding site of the GluN1 subunit with a binding mode that was also predicted by virtual screening. Furthermore, the structure reveals that the imino acetamido group of TK40 acts as an α-amino acid bioisostere, which could be of importance in bioisosteric replacement strategies for future ligand design. PMID:24072709

  17. Cleavage of the NR2B subunit amino terminus of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by tissue plasminogen activator: identification of the cleavage site and characterization of ifenprodil and glycine affinities on truncated NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T-H; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-07-20

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg(67)). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ~4-kDa fragment (Arg(27)-Arg(67)) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg(67) to Ala(67) impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg(27)-Arg(67)-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln(29)-Arg(67) deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC(50) with no change in glutamate EC(50). Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a young male patient with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis and uncommon cerebellar involvement: A case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Splendiani, Alessandra; Felli, Valentina; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Gennarelli, Antonio; Patriarca, Lucia; Stratta, Paolo; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Rossi, Alessandro; Massimo, Gallucci

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old man presenting with new onset psychiatric symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy revealed some lesions in the right cerebellar hemisphere and ipsilateral cerebellar tonsil suggestive of encephalitis. An extensive workup was negative for both infectious and neoplastic diseases and he was afterward diagnosed with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis. This disorder is an autoimmune encephalitis, highly lethal but curable, predominantly found in young female with ovarian teratoma. He received methylprednisolone. His clinical findings gradually improve and he made a complete recovery. Accordingly, repeated brain MRI and proton MR spectroscopy showed a gradual reduction of the lesions; MRI taken six months after starting therapy showed complete resolution of the lesions. Our case shows that, although rare, anti-NMDAR encephalitis should be considered also in young men for whom a rapid onset of psychiatric neurological disorders cannot be explained by more frequent causes. Our report underlines also the usefulness of MRI and proton MR spectroscopic findings in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease.

  19. In utero exposure of mice to diesel exhaust particles affects spatial learning and memory with reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression in the hippocampus of male offspring.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Satoshi; Sato, Akira; Umezawa, Masakazu; Oshio, Shigeru; Takeda, Ken

    2015-09-01

    Diesel exhaust consists of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) and gaseous compounds. Previous studies reported that in utero exposure to diesel exhaust affects the central nervous system. However, there was no clear evidence that these effects were caused by diesel exhaust particles themselves, gaseous compounds, or both. Here, we explored the effects of in utero exposure to DEPs on learning and memory in male ICR mice. DEP solutions were administered subcutaneously to pregnant ICR mice at a dose of 0 or 200 μg/kg body weight on gestation days 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18. We examined learning and memory in 9-to-10-week-old male offspring using the Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Immediately after the behavioral tests, hippocampi were isolated. Hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NR) expression was also measured by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Mice exposed to DEPs in utero showed deficits in the Morris water maze test, but their performance was not significantly different from that of control mice in the passive avoidance test. In addition, DEP-exposed mice exhibited decreased hippocampal NR2A expression. The present results indicate that maternal DEP exposure disrupts learning and memory in male offspring, which is associated with reduced hippocampal NR2A expression.

  20. Slice orientation and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation determine the involvement of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subunit GluN2B in hippocampal area CA1 long-term depression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The contribution of different GluN2 subunits of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to the induction of bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity is a controversial topic. As both supporting and refuting evidence for the hypothesis of subunit specialization in opposing directions of plasticity has accumulated since it was first proposed a few years ago, we hypothesize that differences in experimental conditions may have in part contributed to some of the inconsistent results from these studies. Here we investigate the controversial hypothesis that long-term depression (LTD) is preferentially induced by GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in area CA1 of hippocampal slices. Results We find that brain slices from 2-3 week old rats prepared in the sagittal orientation have GluN2B-independent LTD whereas slices prepared in the coronal orientation have GluN2B-dependent LTD. There was no difference between the orientations in the fraction of the NMDAR EPSC sensitive to a GluN2B-selective antagonist, leading us to believe that the intracellular signaling properties of the NMDARs were different in the two preparations. Coronal slices had greater association of LTD-related intracellular signaling protein RasGRF1 with GluN2B relative to sagittal slices. Antagonism of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the sagittal slices returned LTD to a GluN2B-dependent form and increased the association of GluN2B with RasGRF1. Conclusions These results suggest a novel form of NMDAR modulation by mAChRs and clarify some disagreement in the literature. PMID:22082088

  1. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-stimulated noradrenaline (NA) release in rat brain cortex is modulated by presynaptic H3-receptors.

    PubMed

    Fink, K; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    1994-02-01

    In superfused rat brain cortex slices and synaptosomes preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline the effect of agonists or antagonists at presynaptic H3 receptors on NMDA-evoked [3H]noradrenaline release was investigated. In experiments on slices, histamine and the preferential H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited NMDA-evoked tritium overflow (IC20 values 0.27 mumol/l or 0.032 mumol/l, respectively); S-(+)-alpha-methylhistamine (up to 10 mumol/l) as well as the selective H1 receptor agonist (2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine and the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (each up to 10 mumol/l) were ineffective. The H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide abolished the inhibitory effect of histamine whereas the preferential H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene and the preferential H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine were ineffective. In experiments on synaptosomes, histamine and R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited NMDA-evoked tritium overflow, whereas 2-(2-thiazolyl)ethylamine or dimaprit had no effect. The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished by thioperamide. When tritium overflow was stimulated by NMDA in the presence of omega-conotoxin GVIA (which by itself decreased the response to NMDA by about 55%), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine did not inhibit NMDA-evoked overflow. It is concluded that NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release in the cerebral cortex can be modulated by inhibitory H3 receptors. NMDA receptors and H3 receptors are both located presynaptically and may interact at the same noradrenergic varicosity. An unimpaired function of the N-type voltage-sensitive calcium channel probably is a prerequisite for the inhibition of NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release by H3 receptor stimulation.

  2. Phosphorylation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor is increased in the nucleus accumbens during both acute and extended morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Turi; Kapernaros, Katherine; Neubert, John K.; Caudle, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid withdrawal causes a dysphoric state that can lead to complications in pain patients and can propagate use in drug abusers and addicts. Opioid withdrawal changes the activity of neurons in the nucleus accumbens, an area rich in both opioid-binding mu opioid receptors and glutamate-binding NMDA receptors. Because the accumbens is an area important for reward and aversion, plastic changes in this area during withdrawal could alter future behaviors in animals. We discovered an increase in phosphorylation of serine 897 in the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (pNR1) during acute morphine withdrawal. This serine can be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) and dephosphorylated by calcineurin. We next demonstrated that this increased pNR1 change is associated with an increase in NR1 surface expression. NR1 surface expression and pNR1 levels during acute withdrawal were both reduced by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate) and the PKA inhibitor H-89(N-[2-[[3-(4-bromophenyl)-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride hydrate). We also found that pNR1 levels remained high after an extended morphine withdrawal period of 2 months, correlated with reward-seeking behavior for palatable food, and were associated with a decrease in accumbal calcineurin levels. These data suggest that NR1 phosphorylation changes during the acute withdrawal phase can be long lasting and may reflect a permanent change in NMDA receptors in the accumbens. These altered NMDA receptors in the accumbens could play a role in long-lasting behaviors associated with reward and opioid use. PMID:26377910

  3. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis in a male adolescent with a large mediastinal teratoma.

    PubMed

    Sommeling, Charlotte; Santens, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    We present a case of a 16-year-old boy with Klinefelter syndrome who presented with a syndrome of impaired alertness, orofacial dyskinesias, choreiform movements, epileptic seizures, and autonomic instability, pointing to a diagnosis of anti-N-methyl-Daspartate (anti-NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis.

  4. Glutamate Binding to the GluN2B Subunit Controls Surface Trafficking of N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors*♦

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Ferreira, Joana S.; Carvalho, Ana Luisa; Craig, Ann Marie

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking of NMDA receptors to the surface of neurons and to synapses is critical for proper brain function and activity-dependent plasticity. Recent evidence suggests that surface trafficking of other ionotropic glutamate receptors requires ligand binding for exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we show that glutamate binding to GluN2 is required for trafficking of NMDA receptors to the cell surface. We expressed a panel of GluN2B ligand binding mutants in heterologous cells with GluN1 or in rat cultured neurons and found that surface expression correlates with glutamate efficacy. Such a correlation was found even in the presence of dominant negative dynamin to inhibit endocytosis and surface expression correlated with Golgi localization, indicating differences in forward trafficking. Co-expression of wild type GluN2B did not enhance surface expression of the mutants, suggesting that glutamate must bind to both GluN2 subunits in a tetramer and that surface expression is limited by the least avid of the two glutamate binding sites. Surface trafficking of a constitutively closed cleft GluN2B was indistinguishable from that of wild type, suggesting that glutamate concentrations are typically not limiting for forward trafficking. YFP-GluN2B expressed in hippocampal neurons from GluN2B−/− mice rescued synaptic accumulation at similar levels to wild type. Under these conditions, surface synaptic accumulation of YFP-GluN2B mutants also correlated with apparent glutamate affinity. Altogether, these results indicate that glutamate controls forward trafficking of NMDA receptors to the cell surface and to synapses and raise the intriguing idea that NMDA receptors may be functional at intracellular sites. PMID:22740692

  5. Inhibition of NR2B-Containing N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors (NMDARs) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, a Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Farjam, Mojtaba; Beigi Zarandi, Faegheh Baha'addini; Farjadian, Shirin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Nikseresht, Ali Reza; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the pathophysiological basis for permanent neurological disabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS); thus neuroprotection is emerging as a therapeutic approach in MS research. Modulation of excitotoxicity by inhibition of NMDARs has been suggested for neuroprotection, but selective antagonisation of the NR2B subtype of these receptors, a subtype believed to play a more pivotal role in neurodegeneration, has not been tested in MS. In this study inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDAR was evaluated on the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE induction was done using MOG in C57BL/6 mice. Therapeutic administration of different doses of highly selective NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibitor (RO25-6981) was compared with memantine (non-selective NMDAR antagonist) and vehicle. Neurological deficits in EAE animals were more efficiently decreased by selective inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Histological studies of the spinal cords also showed decreased inflammation, myelin degradation and neuro-axonal degeneration when RO25-6981was administered with higher doses. The effects were dose dependent. Regarding the role of NR2B-containing NMDARs in excitotoxicity, selective inhibition of these receptor subtypes seems to modulate the neurological disabilities and pathological changes in EAE. Further elucidation of the exact mechanism of action as well as more experimental studies can suggest NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibition as a potentially effective treatment strategy for slowing down the clinical deterioration of disability in MS. PMID:25237366

  6. Ligands Binding to Cell Surface Ganglioside GD2 Cause Src-Dependent Activation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Signaling and Changes in Cellular Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Martin; Saragovi, H. Uri

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a plasma membrane glycosphinogolipid. In healthy adults it is expressed at low levels, but it is over-expressed in many cancers. For cancer therapy, GD2 is targeted with anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and one adverse side effect is severe visceral pain. Pain is not neuropathic, cannot be blocked with morphine, and stops on discontinuation of mAb therapy. Here, we provide evidence that ligand binding to cell surface GD2 induces rapid and transient activation of Src-family kinases, followed by Src-dependent phosphorylation of NMDA-receptor NR2B subunits selectively, activation of Ca++ fluxes, production of cAMP, and changes in cellular morphology. These GD2-ligand activated signals differ in kinetics and in pharmacology from activation of the same signals in the same cells by BDNF, the growth factor agonist of the TrkB receptor, suggesting biological specificity. Hence, cell surface GD2 regulates pathways that can be associated with neoplasia and with morphine-intractable pain; and this can explain why expression of GD2 correlates with these two pathologies. PMID:26252487

  7. Inhibition of NR2B-Containing N-methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors (NMDARs) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, a Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Farjam, Mojtaba; Beigi Zarandi, Faegheh Baha'addini; Farjadian, Shirin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Nikseresht, Ali Reza; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the pathophysiological basis for permanent neurological disabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS); thus neuroprotection is emerging as a therapeutic approach in MS research. Modulation of excitotoxicity by inhibition of NMDARs has been suggested for neuroprotection, but selective antagonisation of the NR2B subtype of these receptors, a subtype believed to play a more pivotal role in neurodegeneration, has not been tested in MS. In this study inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDAR was evaluated on the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE induction was done using MOG in C57BL/6 mice. Therapeutic administration of different doses of highly selective NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibitor (RO25-6981) was compared with memantine (non-selective NMDAR antagonist) and vehicle. Neurological deficits in EAE animals were more efficiently decreased by selective inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Histological studies of the spinal cords also showed decreased inflammation, myelin degradation and neuro-axonal degeneration when RO25-6981was administered with higher doses. The effects were dose dependent. Regarding the role of NR2B-containing NMDARs in excitotoxicity, selective inhibition of these receptor subtypes seems to modulate the neurological disabilities and pathological changes in EAE. Further elucidation of the exact mechanism of action as well as more experimental studies can suggest NR2B-containing NMDAR inhibition as a potentially effective treatment strategy for slowing down the clinical deterioration of disability in MS.

  8. Comparison of the neuropsychological mechanisms of 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist against electroconvulsive therapy-induced learning and memory impairment in depressed rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GANG; LIU, CHAO; NING-ZHANG, XUE

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the neurophysiological mechanisms of the 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist against learning and memory impairment, induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A total of 48 adult depressed rats without olfactory bulbs were randomly divided into six experimental groups: i) saline; ii) 10 mg/kg MK-801; iii) 10 mg/kg MK-801 and a course of ECT; iv) 200 mg/kg 2,6-diisopropylphenol; v) 200 mg/kg 2,6-diisopropylphenol and a course of ECT; and vi) saline and a course of ECT. The learning and memory abilities of the rats were assessed using a Morris water maze 1 day after a course of ECT. The hippocampus was removed 1 day after assessment using the Morris water maze assessment. The content of glutamate in the hippocampus was detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression levels of p-AT8Ser202 and GSK-3β1H8 in the hippocampus were determined using immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the 2,6-diisopropylphenol NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 and ECT induced learning and memory impairment in the depressed rats. The glutamate content was significantly upregulated by ECT, reduced by 2,6-diisopropylphenol, and was unaffected by the NMDA receptor antagonist in the hippocampus of the depressed rats. Tau protein hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus was upregulated by ECT, but was reduced by 2,6-diisopropylphenol and the MK-801 NMDA receptor antagonist. It was also demonstrated that 2,6-diisopropylphenol prevented learning and memory impairment and reduced the hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, which was induced by eECT. GSK-3β was found to be the key protein involved in this signaling pathway. The ECT reduced the learning and memory impairment, caused by hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, in the depressed rats by upregulating the glutamate content. PMID:25998151

  9. Cold allodynia and hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain: the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine--a double-blind, cross-over comparison with alfentanil and placebo.

    PubMed

    Jørum, E; Warncke, T; Stubhaug, A

    2003-02-01

    Cold allodynia and hyperalgesia are frequent clinical findings in patients with neuropathic pain. While there have been several clinical studies showing the involvement of central sensitization mechanisms and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia and ongoing pain, the mechanisms of thermal allodynia and hyperalgesia have received less attention. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the NMDA-receptor antagonist ketamine on thermal allodynia/hyperalgesia, ongoing pain and mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia in patients with neuropathic pain (11 patients with post-traumatic neuralgia and one patient with post-herpetic neuralgia). All the patients were known to suffer from severe cold allodynia (cold pain detection threshold (CPDT): 23.8 degrees C, median value). The mu-opioid agonist alfentanil was used as an active control. The study design was double-blind and placebo-controlled and the drugs were administered i.v. (bolus dose and infusion). CPDT in the asymptomatic contralateral area was found to be significantly decreased (cold allodynia) compared to CPDT in site- and age-matched normal controls. Heat pain detection thresholds were found to be normal and no consistent heat hyperalgesia occurred. Alfentanil significantly reduced cold allodynia (by increasing CPDT) in symptomatic area (P=0.0076). Ketamine did not significantly increase the threshold. Significant and marked reductions of hyperalgesia to cold (visual analogue score at threshold value) were seen following both alfentanil (4.5 before, 1.4 after, median value) and ketamine (6.8 before, 0.4 after, median value). Alfentanil and ketamine also significantly reduced ongoing pain and mechanical hyperalgesia. It is concluded that NMDA-receptor mediated central sensitization is involved in cold hyperalgesia, but since CPDT remained unaltered, it is likely that other mechanisms are present.

  10. Postnatal expression of the plasticity-related nerve growth factor-induced gene A (NGFI-A) protein in the superficial layers of the rat superior colliculus: relation to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function.

    PubMed

    Giraldi-Guimarães, A; de Bittencourt-Navarrete, R E; Nascimento, I C C; Salazar, P R; Freitas-Campos, D; Mendez-Otero, R

    2004-01-01

    Immediate early gene expression in the CNS is induced by sensory stimulation and seems to be involved in long-term synaptic plasticity. We have used an immunohistochemical method to detect the nerve growth factor-induced gene A (NGFI-A) protein expression in the superficial layers of the rat superior colliculus during postnatal development. Our goal was to correlate the expression of this candidate plasticity protein with developmental events, especially the activity-dependent refinement of the retinocollicular and corticocollicular pathways. We have also investigated the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor dependence of the NGFI-A expression. Animals of various postnatal ages were used. Postnatal day (P) 12 and older animals were submitted to a protocol of dark adaptation followed by light stimulation. NGFI-A expression was never observed during the first 2 postnatal weeks. The first stained cells were observed at P15, 2 days after eye opening (P13). The highest number of stained cells was observed at the end of the third postnatal week (P22). Adult-like level of expression was reached at P30, since at this age, the number of stained cells was comparable to that found in adult rats (P90). Both P22 animals submitted to an acute treatment with MK-801 (i.p. injection) and adult animals submitted to chronic intracranial infusion of a MK-801 presented a clear decrease in the NGFI-A expression in response to light stimulation. These results suggest that the NGFI-A expression is dependent on the NMDA receptor activation, and the observed pattern of expression is in close agreement with previous descriptions of the changes in the NMDA receptor-mediated visual activity in the developing rat superior colliculus (SC). Our results suggest that the plasticity-related NGFI-A protein might play a role in the developmental plasticity of the superficial layers of the rat SC after eye opening.

  11. Cloning and characterization of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 gene from chum salmon, Oncorhynchus keta (Walbaum, 1792).

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong-Nam; Ham, Seung Hyub; Lee, Seung Il; Jin, Hyung-Joo; Ueda, Hiroshi; Jin, Deuk-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the information about molecular and expression characterization of NR1 gene in chum salmon for the first time. The complete NR1 subunit showed a large open-reading frame of 2844 bp in the total length of 3193 bp, and this cDNA contained a coding region encoding 948 amino acids and a stop codon. The organization of the NR1 subunit of chum salmon were similar of most other fishes, except C' terminal. The expression of NR1 subunit was to show higher in the natal river near to the hatchery than near to the coast. We expect that the information reported herein may facilitate further investigations on the relationship between memory factors of natal rivers and homing mechanisms in Salmonidae.

  12. Thermodynamics of binding of calcium, magnesium, and zinc to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ion channel peptidic inhibitors, conantokin-G and conantokin-T.

    PubMed

    Prorok, M; Castellino, F J

    1998-07-31

    The binding isotherms of the divalent metal cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+, to the synthetic gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing neuroactive peptides, conantokin-G (con-G) and conantokin-T (con-T), have been determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) at 25 degreesC and pH 6.5. We have previously shown by potentiometric measurements that con-G contains 2-3 equivalent Ca2+ sites with an average Kd value of 2800 microM. With Mg2+ as the ligand, two separate exothermic sites are obtained by ITC, one of Kd = 46 microM and another of Kd = 311 microM. Much tighter binding of Zn2+ is observed for these latter two sites (Kd values = 0.2 microM and 1.1 microM), and a third considerably weaker binding site is observed, characterized by a Kd value of 286 microM and an endothermic enthalpy of binding. con-T possesses a single exothermic tight binding site for Ca2+, Mg2+, and Zn2+, with Kd values of 428 microM, 10.2 microM, and 0.5 microM, respectively. Again, in the case of con-T, a weak (Kd = 410 microM) endothermic binding site is observed for Zn2+. The binding of these cations to con-G and con-T result in an increase in the alpha-helical content of the peptides. However, this helix is somewhat destabilized in both cases by binding of Zn2+ to its weakest site. Since the differences observed in binding affinities of these three cations to the peptides are substantially greater than their comparative Kd values to malonate, we conclude that the structure of the peptide and, most likely, the steric and geometric properties imposed on the cation site as a result of peptide folding greatly influence the strength of the interaction of cations with con-G and con-T. Further, since the Zn2+ concentrations released in the synaptic cleft during excitatory synaptic activity are sufficiently high relative to the Kd of Zn2+ for con-G and con-T, this cation along with Mg2+, are most likely the most significant metal ion ligands of these peptides in neuronal cells.

  13. Identification of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-related epitope, NR2B, in the normal human ovary: implication for the pathogenesis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Naoko; Kinoshita, Michiaki; Saito, Yuko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2013-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are one type of ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) and are heterotetrametric cation channels composed of NMDAR1 (NR1), NMDAR2 (NR2A, 2B, 2C or 2D) and NMDAR3 (NR3A or NR3B) subunits. The main subunits are NR1 and NR2 and their combinations are classified into several diverse forms including NR1/NR1/NR2A/NR2A, NR1/NR1/NR2B/NR2B and NR1/NR1/NR2A/NR2B. NMDARs are physiologically related to synapse development and synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis mainly affecting young women, with various manifestations including initial psychiatric symptoms, subsequent unresponsiveness, intractable generalized seizure, dysautonomia and orofacial dyskinesia. This disorder is often accompanied by ovarian teratoma that is originated from oocytes. Anti-neural antibody for the NR1/NR2 heteromer of NMDAR has been identified as a disease-specific hallmark. It has been emphasized that neural components in ovarian teratoma act as a trigger to produce anti-NMDAR antibodies, although about half of the patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis are not associated with ovarian teratoma. To identify NMDAR-related epitopes located outside of the brain, we performed immunohistochemical examinations of normal human ovary and testis using specific antibodies against NR1, NR2A and NR2B, respectively, and found expression of the NR2B epitope in the cytoplasm of oocytes. In contrast, the testis showed no immunohistochemical reactivity. Therefore, oocytes contain NMDAR-related epitopes including NR2B. The NMDAR-related epitopes in normal oocytes may cause an antigen-antibody reaction in certain pathological conditions. The presence of NR2B immunoreactivity in oocytes may account for the fact that anti-NMDAR encephalitis predominantly affects young females.

  14. Differential modulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by regulated interactions with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR2B subunits and alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Bartlett, Ryan K; Bass, Martha A; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-11-25

    Neuronal Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) interacts with several prominent dendritic spine proteins, which have been termed CaMKII-associated proteins. The NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor, densin-180, and alpha-actinin bind comparable, approximately stoichiometric amounts of Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKIIalpha, forming a ternary complex (Robison, A. J., Bass, M. A., Jiao, Y., Macmillan, L. B., Carmody, L. C., Bartlett, R. K., and Colbran, R. J. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 35329-35336), but their impacts on CaMKII function are poorly understood. Here we show that these interactions are differentially regulated and exert distinct effects on CaMKII activity. Nonphosphorylated and Thr(286)-autophosphorylated CaMKII bind to alpha-actinin with similar efficacy, but autophosphorylation at Thr(305/306) or Ca(2+)/calmodulin binding significantly reduce this binding. Moreover, alpha-actinin antagonizes CaMKII activation by Ca(2+)/calmodulin, as assessed by autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of a peptide substrate. CaMKII binding to densin (1247-1542) is partially independent of Thr(286) autophosphorylation and is unaffected by Ca(2+)-independent autophosphorylation or Ca(2+)/calmodulin. In addition, the CaMKII binding domain of densin-180 has little effect on CaMKII activity. In contrast, the interaction of CaMKIIalpha with NR2B requires either Thr(286) autophosphorylation or the binding of both Ca(2+)/calmodulin and adenine nucleotides. NR2B inhibits both the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent and autonomous activities of CaMKII by a mechanism that is competitive with autocamtide-2 substrate, non-competitive with syntide-2 substrate, and uncompetitive with respect to ATP. In combination, these data suggest that dynamically regulated interactions with CaMKII-associated proteins could play pleiotropic roles in finetuning CaMKII signaling in defined subcellular compartments.

  15. Succinate increases neuronal post-synaptic excitatory potentials in vitro and induces convulsive behavior through N-methyl-d-aspartate-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roehrs, C; Garrido-Sanabria, E R; Da Silva, A C; Faria, L C; Sinhorin, V D G; Marques, R H; Priel, M R; Rubin, M A; Cavalheiro, E A; Mello, C F

    2004-01-01

    Succinate is a dicarboxylic acid that accumulates due to succinate dehydrogenase inhibition by malonate and methylmalonate exposure. These neurotoxins cause increased excitability and excitotoxic damage, which can be prevented by administering high amounts of succinate. In the present study we investigated whether succinate alters hippocampal field excitatory post-synaptic potentials. Bath application of succinate at intermediate concentrations (0.3-1 mM) increased the slope of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials in hippocampal slices, and at high concentrations (above 1 mM) did not alter or decrease field excitatory post-synaptic potentials slope. Succinate-induced enhancement of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials slope was abolished by the addition of d-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) to the perfusate, supporting the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the excitatory effect of this organic acid. Accordingly, succinate (0.8-7.5 micromol) i.c.v. administration caused dose-dependent convulsive behavior in mice. The i.c.v. co-administration of MK-801 (7 nmol) fully prevented succinate-induced convulsions, further suggesting the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the convulsant action of succinate. Our data indicate that accumulation of moderate amounts of succinate may contribute to the excitotoxicity induced by succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors, through the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors.

  16. Chronic unpredictable stress before pregnancy reduce the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in hippocampus of offspring rats associated with impairment of memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuejun; Shi, Xuechuan; Xu, Hongwu; Yang, Hanhua; Chen, Tian; Chen, Sihong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the effect of stress before pregnancy on memory function and serum corticosterone (COR) levels, as well as the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) 2A (NR2A) and 2B (NR2B) receptors in the hippocampus of the offspring rats when they were 2 months postnatally. Adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided randomly into two groups: control group (n = 8) and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) group (n = 12). All rats were tested in the open field test and sucrose intake test before and after CUS. The memory function of their offspring were tested in the Morris water maze. Serum COR levels were determined by using a standard radioimmunoassay kit. The expression of BDNF, NR2A and NR2B in the hippocampus of the offspring rats were studied by immunoreactivity quantitative analysis and real-time RT-PCR. (1) Following CUS, reduced open field test activity and decreased sucrose consumption were observed relative to controls. (2) The Morris water maze task demonstrated increased escape latency in the offspring rats of CUS group relative to controls (P < 0.01). No-platform probe testing showed reduced crossings for offspring of CUS relative to controls (P < 0.05). (3) CUS induced a significant increase in serum COR levels of the offspring rats (P < 0.01), but no difference was observed in the body or brain weight between the offspring of the two groups. (4) Immunoreactivity quantitative analysis shows that BDNF and NR2B in the offspring of CUS group was decreased in the CA3 and DG regions of the hippocampus compared to the control group offspring, but NR2A levels were not altered between the offspring of the two groups. (5) Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that BDNF and NR2B mRNAs were significantly decreased in the offspring of the CUS group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). No significant difference in the levels of NR2A mRNA was detected between offspring of CUS and offspring of control groups. In our

  17. Single-dose infusion ketamine and non-ketamine N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists for unipolar and bipolar depression: a meta-analysis of efficacy, safety and time trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, T.; Chawla, J. M.; Hagi, K.; Zarate, C. A.; Kane, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Correll, C. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ketamine and non-ketamine N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists (NMDAR antagonists) recently demonstrated antidepressant efficacy for the treatment of refractory depression, but effect sizes, trajectories and possible class effects are unclear. Method We searched PubMed/PsycINFO/Web of Science/clinicaltrials.gov until 25 August 2015. Parallel-group or cross-over randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing single intravenous infusion of ketamine or a non-ketamine NMDAR antagonist v. placebo/pseudo-placebo in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and/or bipolar depression (BD) were included in the analyses. Hedges’ g and risk ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was depressive symptom change. Secondary outcomes included response, remission, all-cause discontinuation and adverse effects. Results A total of 14 RCTs (nine ketamine studies: n = 234; five non-ketamine NMDAR antagonist studies: n = 354; MDD = 554, BD = 34), lasting 10.0 ± 8.8 days, were meta-analysed. Ketamine reduced depression significantly more than placebo/pseudo-placebo beginning at 40 min, peaking at day 1 (Hedges’ g = −1.00, 95% CI −1.28 to −0.73, p < 0.001), and loosing superiority by days 10–12. Non-ketamine NMDAR antagonists were superior to placebo only on days 5–8 (Hedges’ g = −0.37, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.09, p = 0.01). Compared with placebo/pseudo-placebo, ketamine led to significantly greater response (40 min to day 7) and remission (80 min to days 3–5). Non-ketamine NMDAR antagonists achieved greater response at day 2 and days 3–5. All-cause discontinuation was similar between ketamine (p = 0.34) or non-ketamine NMDAR antagonists (p = 0.94) and placebo. Although some adverse effects were more common with ketamine/NMDAR antagonists than placebo, these were transient and clinically insignificant. Conclusions A single infusion of ketamine, but less so of non

  18. Centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate evokes the adrenal secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Okada, Shoshiro; Yamaguchi-Shima, Naoko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Arai, Junichi; Yorimitsu, Mieko; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2008-05-31

    Plasma adrenaline mainly originated from adrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla, while plasma noradrenaline reflects the release from sympathetic nerves in addition to the secretion from noradrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla. The present study was undertaken to characterize the source of plasma catecholamines induced by centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate with regard to the brain prostanoid, using urethane-anesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered N-methyl-d-aspartate (1.0, 5.0, 10.0 nmol/animal) dose-dependently elevated plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (5.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines was reduced by dizocilpine maleate (5 nmol/animal, i.c.v.), a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist. Indomethacin (0.6 and 1.2 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, dose-dependently reduced the N-methyl-d-aspartate (5.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines. The N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced response was dose-dependently attenuated by furegrelate (0.9 and 1.8 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthase. Furthermore, the acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced responses, indicating that the source of increase in plasma noradrenaline evoked by N-methyl-d-aspartate is due to secretion from the adrenal gland and not due to release from sympathetic nerve terminals. These results suggest that centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate induces the secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by the brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  19. Identification and characterization of 4-methylbenzyl 4-[(pyrimidin-2-ylamino)methyl]piperidine-1-carboxylate, an orally bioavailable, brain penetrant NR2B selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Liverton, Nigel J; Bednar, Rodney A; Bednar, Bohumil; Butcher, John W; Claiborne, Christopher F; Claremon, David A; Cunningham, Michael; DiLella, Anthony G; Gaul, Stanley L; Libby, Brian E; Lyle, Elizabeth A; Lynch, Joseph J; McCauley, John A; Mosser, Scott D; Nguyen, Kevin T; Stump, Gary L; Sun, Hong; Wang, Hao; Yergey, James; Koblan, Kenneth S

    2007-02-22

    The discovery of a novel series of NR2B subtype selective N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists is reported. Initial optimization of a high-throughput screening lead afforded an aminopyridine derivative 13 with significant NR2B antagonist potency but limited selectivity over hERG-channel and other off-target activities. Further structure-activity studies on the aminoheterocycle moiety and optimization of the carbamate led to the highly potent 2-aminopyrimidine derivative 20j with a significantly improved off-target activity profile and oral bioavailability in multiple species coupled with good brain penetration. Compound 20j demonstrated efficacy in in vivo rodent models of antinociception, allodynia, and Parkinson's disease.

  20. Opioid antinociception, tolerance and dependence: interactions with the N-methyl-D-aspartate system in mice.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Linda A; Fischer, Bradford D; Balter, Rebecca E; Henry, Fredrick E; Schmidt, Karl T; Miller, Laurence L

    2011-09-01

    This study explored the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the effects of μ-opioid agonists. A hot-plate procedure was used to assess antinociception and tolerance in mice in which the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor was reduced [knockdown (KD)] to approximately 10%, and in mice treated with the NMDA antagonist, (-)-6-phosphonomethyl-deca-hydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (LY235959). The μ opioid agonists, morphine, l-methadone and fentanyl, were approximately three-fold less potent in the NR1 KD mice than in wild-type (WT) controls; however, the development of morphine tolerance and dependence did not differ markedly in the NR1 KD and the WT mice. Acute administration of the NMDA antagonist, LY235959, produced dose-dependent, leftward shifts in the morphine dose-effect curve in the WT mice, but not in the NR1 KD mice. Chronic administration of LY235959 during the morphine tolerance regimen did not attenuate the development of tolerance in the NR1 KD or the WT mice. These results indicate that the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor does not play a prominent role in μ opioid tolerance.

  1. Proteomic analysis of the mice hippocampus after preconditioning induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA).

    PubMed

    do Amaral e Silva Müller, Gabrielle; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tavares, Carolina Pereira; Menegatti, Angela C O; Terenzi, Hernán; Tasca, Carla Inês; Severino, Patricia Cardoso

    2013-05-01

    Preconditioning induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) has been used as a therapeutic tool against later neuronal insults. NMDA preconditioning affords neuroprotection against convulsions and cellular damage induced by the NMDA receptor agonist, quinolinic acid (QA) with time-window dependence. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular alterations promoted by NMDA and to compare these alterations in different periods of time that are related to the presence or lack of neuroprotection. Putative mechanisms related to NMDA preconditioning were evaluated via a proteomic analysis by using a time-window study. After a subconvulsant and protective dose of NMDA administration mice, hippocampi were removed (1, 24 or 72 h) and total protein analyzed by 2DE gels and identified by MALDI-TOF. Differential protein expression among the time induction of NMDA preconditioning was observed. In the hippocampus of protected mice (24 h), four proteins: HSP70(B), aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein and creatine kinase were found to be up-regulated. Two other proteins, HSP70(A) and V-type proton ATPase were found down-regulated. Proteomic analysis showed that the neuroprotection induced by NMDA preconditioning altered signaling pathways, cell energy maintenance and protein synthesis and processing. These events may occur in a sense to attenuate the excitotoxicity process during the activation of neuroprotection promoted by NMDA preconditioning.

  2. Comparative Effects of LY3020371, a Potent and Selective Metabotropic Glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 Receptor Antagonist, and Ketamine, a Noncompetitive N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist in Rodents: Evidence Supporting the Use of mGlu2/3 Antagonists, for the Treatment of Depression.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Mitchell, S N; Wafford, K A; Carter, G; Gilmour, G; Li, J; Eastwood, B J; Overshiner, C; Li, X; Rorick-Kehn, L; Rasmussen, K; Anderson, W H; Nikolayev, A; Tolstikov, V V; Kuo, M-S; Catlow, J T; Li, R; Smith, S C; Mitch, C H; Ornstein, P L; Swanson, S; Monn, J A

    2017-04-01

    The ability of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine to alleviate symptoms in patients suffering from treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is well documented. In this paper, we directly compare in vivo biologic responses in rodents elicited by a recently discovered metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptor antagonist 2-amino-3-[(3,4-difluorophenyl)sulfanylmethyl]-4-hydroxy-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY3020371) with those produced by ketamine. Both LY3020371 and ketamine increased the number of spontaneously active dopamine cells in the ventral tegmental area of anesthetized rats, increased O2 in the anterior cingulate cortex, promoted wakefulness, enhanced the efflux of biogenic amines in the prefrontal cortex, and produced antidepressant-related behavioral effects in rodent models. The ability of LY3020371 to produce antidepressant-like effects in the forced-swim assay in rats was associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drug levels that matched concentrations required for functional antagonist activity in native rat brain tissue preparations. Metabolomic pathway analyses from analytes recovered from rat CSF and hippocampus demonstrated that both LY3020371 and ketamine activated common pathways involving GRIA2 and ADORA1. A diester analog of LY3020371 [bis(((isopropoxycarbonyl)oxy)-methyl) (1S,2R,3S,4S,5R,6R)-2-amino-3-(((3,4-difluorophenyl)thio)methyl)-4-hydroxy-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylate (LY3027788)] was an effective oral prodrug; when given orally, it recapitulated effects of intravenous doses of LY3020371 in the forced-swim and wake-promotion assays, and augmented the antidepressant-like effects of fluoxetine or citalopram without altering plasma or brain levels of these compounds. The broad overlap of biologic responses produced by LY3020371 and ketamine supports the hypothesis that mGlu2/3 receptor blockade might be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of TRD patients. LY3020371 and LY3027788 represent

  3. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist activity of alpha- and beta-sulfallorphans.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V K; Lemaire, S

    1997-01-01

    Resolved equatorial (alpha) and axial (beta) forms of S-allylmorphinans, alpha-sulfallorphan and beta-sulfallorphan, were tested for their ability to compete with the binding of phencyclidine and sigma receptor ligands to mouse brain membranes and to antagonize N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced convulsions in mice. alpha- and beta-sulfallorphans displayed distinct binding affinities for phencyclidine and sigma sites, inhibiting the binding of [3H]-(5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten++ +-5, 10-imine ([3H]MK-801) with Ki values of 2.32 and 0.13 microM and that of [3H](+)-pentazocine with Ki values of 1.97 and 1.61 microM, respectively. Intracerebroventricular administration of these compounds in mice caused dose-dependent inhibitions of NMDA-induced convulsions, but did not affect convulsions induced by (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA), kainic acid and bicuculline. alpha- and beta-sulfallorphans blocked the convulsive activity of NMDA (1 nmol/mouse; intracerebroventricular) with ED50 values of 0.48 and 0.015 nmol/mouse, as compared with 0.55, 0.039 and 0.013 nmol/mouse for dextrorphan, MK-801 and (+/-)3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4yl)propyl-1-proprionic acid, respectively. The structurally related compound, dextrallorphan, significantly but less potently blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED60, 2.68 nmol/mouse). At the protective doses, alpha- and beta-sulfallorphans markedly reduced NMDA- and AMPA-induced mortality without inducing locomotion and falling behavior. These results indicate that alpha- and beta-sulfallorphans are potent and selective NMDA antagonists devoid of motor side effects at protective doses.

  5. Study of the n-methyl-d-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A study of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs. PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV. 51(2/3) 249-253, 1995. Drugs that act at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex have the ability to terminate nerve agent-induced seizures and modulate the neuropathologic consequences of agent exposure. Drugs with mixed anticholinergic and anti-NMDA properties potentially provide an ideal class of compounds for development as anticonvulsant treatments for nerve agent casualties. The present experiment evaluated the potential NMDA antagonist activity of 11 anticholinergic drugs by determining whether pretreatment with the compound was capable of protecting mice from the lethal effects of NMDA. The following anticholinergic drugs antagonized NMDA lethality and are ranked according to their potency: mecamylamine > procyclidine = benactyzine > biperiden > tribexyphenidyl. The anticholinergics atropine, aprophen, azaprophen, benztropine, 3-quinudidinyl benzilate (QNB), and scopolamine failed to show NMDA antagonist properties. In addition, and unexpectedly, diazepam, ethanol, and pentobarbital were also shown to be capable of antagonizing NMDA lethality over a certain range of doses. The advantages and limitations of using antagonism of NMDA lethality in mice as a bioassay for determining the NMDA antagonist properties of drugs are also discussed.

  6. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers memantine, MRZ 2/579 and other amino-alkyl-cyclohexanes antagonise 5-HT(3) receptor currents in cultured HEK-293 and N1E-115 cell systems in a non-competitive manner.

    PubMed

    Rammes, G; Rupprecht, R; Ferrari, U; Zieglgänsberger, W; Parsons, C G

    2001-06-22

    The type 3 serotonin (5-HT(3)) receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel. In concentration-clamp experiments, we investigated the effects of the uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists memantine, amantadine and MRZ 2/579 on 5-HT receptors stabley expressed in HEK-293 cells and on native 5-HT(3) receptors in the N1E-115 cell line. All agents antagonized serotonin (10 microM)-induced inward currents with similar potency to that reported for NMDA receptors. This effect was characterized by inducing a pronounced receptor desensitization, and was probably non-competitive and voltage-independent. In contrast, (S)-ketamine was much weaker as an antagonist of 5-HT(3) receptors than NMDA receptors. Similar effects on 5-HT(3) receptors have been reported previously for a variety of anti-depressants and it is possible that the clinical anti-depressant effects reported for both memantine and amantadine are mediated, at least in part, by antagonistic effects at 5-HT(3) receptors.

  7. Characterisation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-specific [(3)H]Ifenprodil binding to recombinant human NR1a/NR2B receptors compared with native receptors in rodent brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Grimwood, S; Richards, P; Murray, F; Harrison, N; Wingrove, P B; Hutson, P H

    2000-12-01

    We have performed [(3)H]ifenprodil binding experiments under NMDA receptor-specific assay conditions to provide the first detailed characterisation of the pharmacology of the ifenprodil site on NMDA NR1/NR2B receptors, using recombinant human NR1a/NR2B receptors stably expressed in L(tk-) cells, in comparison with rat cortex/hippocampus membranes. [(3)H]Ifenprodil bound to a single, saturable site on both human recombinant NR1a/NR2B receptors and native rat receptors with B:(max) values of 1.83 and 2.45 pmol/mg of protein, respectively, and K:(D) values of 33.5 and 24.8 nM:, respectively. The affinity of various ifenprodil site ligands-eliprodil, (R:(*), R:(*))-4-hydroxy-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-pehnyl-1-pi per idineethanol [(+/-)-CP-101,606], cis-3-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-hydroxy-1-piperidinyl]-3, 4-dihydro-2H:-1-benzopyran-4,7-diol [(+/-)-CP-283,097], and (R:(*), S:(*))-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperid inepropanol [(+/-)-Ro 25-6981] was very similar for inhibition of [(3)H]ifenprodil binding to recombinant human NR1a/NR2B and native rat receptors, whereas allosteric inhibition of [(3)H]ifenprodil binding by polyamine site ligands (spermine, spermidine, and arcaine) showed approximately twofold lower affinity for recombinant receptors compared with native receptors. Glutamate site ligands were less effective at modulating [(3)H]ifenprodil binding to recombinant NR1a/NR2B receptors compared with native rat receptors. The NMDA receptor-specific [(3)H]ifenprodil binding conditions described were also applied to ex vivo experiments to determine the receptor occupancy of ifenprodil site ligands [ifenprodil, (+/-)-CP-101,606, (+/-)-CP-283,097, and (+/-)-Ro 25-6981] given systemically.

  8. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Modulates N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-dependent Intracellular Signaling and NMDA-induced Regulation of Postsynaptic Protein Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Chikako; Kulik, Akos; Frotscher, Michael; Herz, Joachim; Schäfer, Michael; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The lipoprotein receptor LRP1 is essential in neurons of the central nervous system, as was revealed by the analysis of conditional Lrp1-deficient mouse models. The molecular basis of its neuronal functions, however, is still incompletely understood. Here we show by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and postsynaptic density preparation that LRP1 is located postsynaptically. Basal and NMDA-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) as well as NMDA target gene transcription are reduced in LRP1-deficient neurons. In control neurons, NMDA promotes γ-secretase-dependent release of the LRP1 intracellular domain (LRP1-ICD). However, pull-down and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed no direct interaction between the LRP1-ICD and either CREB or target gene promoters. On the other hand, NMDA-induced degradation of the postsynaptic scaffold protein PSD-95 was impaired in the absence of LRP1, whereas its ubiquitination was increased, indicating that LRP1 influences the composition of postsynaptic protein complexes. Accordingly, NMDA-induced internalization of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 was impaired in LRP1-deficient neurons. These results show a role of LRP1 in the regulation and turnover of synaptic proteins, which may contribute to the reduced dendritic branching and to the neurological phenotype observed in the absence of LRP1. PMID:23760271

  9. Simultaneous quantification of D- vs. L-serine, taurine, kynurenate, phosphoethanolamine and diverse amino acids in frontocortical dialysates of freely-moving rats: differential modulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and other pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Alain; Rivet, Jean-Michel; Billiras, Rodolphe; Parsons, Francesca; Millan, Mark J

    2011-11-15

    This study describes a novel analytical method permitting simultaneous HPLC-fluorimetric quantification of multiple (15) D- and L-amino acids, kynurenate, taurine and phosphoethanolamine (a marker of membrane integrity) in microdialysates of prefrontal cortex of freely-moving rats. Levels of GABA were elevated by the transporter inhibitor, nipecotic acid, and by the transaminase inhibitor, vigabatrine.Supporting a neuronal origin, they were decreased by the GABAB autoreceptor agonist, baclofen,yet unaffected by fluoroacetate which disrupts glial metabolism. Glutamate levels were elevated by the transporter inhibitor, L-trans-PDC, and mainly neuronal since they were not decreased by fluoroacetate,yet reduced by baclofen (which recruits GABAB receptors on glutamatergic terminals) and elevated by the NMDA receptor antagonist, dizocilpine. By contrast, levels of glutamine were reduced by L-trans-PDC.Consistent with glial origin, they were unaffected by baclofen, yet reduced by fluoroacetate. Administration of D-serine selectively increased its levels over L-serine, and vice versa. D-serine modestly decreased levels of glycine, which were enhanced by administration of glycine itself and of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor, sarcosine. Kynurenate levels were increased by its precursor, kynurenine, an effect abolished by the amino-transferase inhibitor, amino-oxyacetate. Taurine and the energy drink, Red Bull®, selectively elevated levels of taurine, which were only slightly reduced by fluoroacetate. Finally, administration of NMDA increased levels of taurine, kynenurate and phosphoethanolamine, while reducing D-serine. These actions were abolished by the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, CPP, which was inactive alone. This broad-based dialysis system should prove instructive for exploring actions of psychotropic drugs, and for characterising animal models of CNS disorders.

  10. Inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated current by bis(7)-tacrine in HEK-293 cells expressing NR1/NR2A or NR1/NR2B receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Li, Chaoying

    2012-12-01

    In normal rat forebrain, the NR1/NR2A and NR1/NR2B dimmers are the main constitutional forms of NMDA receptors. The present study was carried out to determine the functional properties of the heteromeric NMDA receptor subunits and their inhibition by bis(7)-tacrine (B7T). Rat NR1, NR2A and NR2B cDNAs were transfected into human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK-293). The inhibition of NMDA-activated currents by B7T was detected in HEK-293 cell expressing NR1/NR2A or NR1/NR2B receptors by using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. The results showed that in HEK-293 cells expressing NR1/NR2A receptor, 1 μmol/L B7T inhibited 30 μmol/L NMDA- and 1000 μmol/L NMDA-activated steady-state currents by 46% and 40%, respectively (P>0.05; n=5), suggesting that the inhibition of B7T on NR1/NR2A receptor doesn't depend on NMDA concentration, which is consistent with a non-competitive mechanism of inhibition. But for the NR1/NR2B receptor, 1 μmol/L B7T inhibited 30 μmol/L NMDA- and 1000 μmol/L NMDA-activated steady-state currents by 61% and 13%, respectively (P<0.05; n=6), showing that B7T appears to be competitive with NMDA. In addition, simultaneous application of 1 μmol/L B7T and 1000 μmol/L NMDA produced a moderate inhibition of peak NMDA-activated current, followed by a gradual decline of the current to a steady state. However, the gradual onset of inhibition produced by B7T applied simultaneously with NMDA was eliminated when B7T was given 5 s before NMDA. These results suggested that B7T inhibition of NMDA current mediated by NR1/NR2B receptor was slow onset, and it did not depend on the presence of the agonist. With holding potentials ranging from -50 to +50 mV, the B7T inhibition rate of NMDA currents didn't change significantly, and neither did the reversal potential. We are led to conclude that the NR1/NR2B recombinant receptor can serve as a very useful model for studying the molecular mechanism of NMDA receptor inhibition by B7T.

  11. Synthesis and Structure Activity Relationship of Tetrahydroisoquinoline-based Potentiators of GluN2C and GluN2D Containing N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo Freel, Rose M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Strong, Katie L.; Khatri, Alpa; Chepiga, Kathryn M.; Jensen, Henrik S.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the synthesis and evaluation of a series of tetrahydroisoquinolines that show subunit-selective potentiation of NMDA receptors containing the GluN2C or GluN2D subunits. Bischler-Napieralski conditions were employed in the key step for the conversion of acyclic amides to the corresponding tetrahydroisoquinoline containing analogs. Compounds were evaluated using both two electrode voltage clamp recordings from Xenopus laevis oocytes and imaging of mammalian BHK cells loaded with Ca2+-sensitive dyes. The most potent analogues had EC50 values of 300 nM and showed over 2-fold potentiation of the response to maximally effective concentrations of glutamate and glycine, but had no effect on responses from NMDA receptors containing the GluN2A or GluN2B subunits, AMPA, kainate, GABA, or glycine receptors or a variety of other potential targets. These compounds represent a potent class of small molecule subunit-selective potentiators of NMDA receptors. PMID:23627311

  12. Involvement of the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits in synaptic and extrasynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function and neuronal excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xianju; Ding, Qi; Chen, Zhuoyou; Yun, Huifang; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-08-16

    GluN2A and GluN2B are the major subunits of functional NMDA receptors (NMDAR). Previous studies have suggested that GluN2A and GluN2B may differentially mediate NMDAR function at synaptic and extrasynaptic locations and play opposing roles in excitotoxicity, such as neurodegeneration triggered by ischemic stroke and brain injury. By using pharmacological and molecular approaches to suppress or enhance the function of GluN2A and GluN2B in cultured cortical neurons, we examined NMDAR-mediated, bidirectional regulation of prosurvival signaling (i.e. the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-Bdnf cascade) and cell death. Inhibition of GluN2A or GluN2B attenuated the up-regulation of prosurvival signaling triggered by the activation of either synaptic or extrasynaptic NMDAR. Inhibition of GluN2A or GluN2B also attenuated the down-regulation of prosurvival signaling triggered by the coactivation of synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. The effects of GluN2B on CREB-Bdnf signaling were larger than those of GluN2A. Consistently, compared with suppression of GluN2A, suppression of GluN2B resulted in more reduction of NMDA- and oxygen glucose deprivation-induced excitotoxicity as well as NMDAR-mediated elevation of intracellular calcium. Moreover, excitotoxicity and down-regulation of CREB were exaggerated in neurons overexpressing GluN2A or GluN2B. Together, we found that GluN2A and GluN2B are involved in the function of both synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDAR, demonstrating that they play similar rather than opposing roles in NMDAR-mediated bidirectional regulation of prosurvival signaling and neuronal death.

  13. Potentiation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced currents by the nootropic drug nefiracetam in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Marszalec, William; Zhao, Xilong; Yeh, Jay Z; Narahashi, Toshio

    2003-10-01

    Nefiracetam is a new pyrrolidone nootropic drug being developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's type and post-stroke vascular-type dementia. In the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, down-regulation of both cholinergic and glutamatergic systems has been found and is thought to play an important role in impairment of cognition, learning and memory. We have previously shown that the activity of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is potently augmented by nefiracetam. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of action of nefiracetam on glutamatergic receptors. Currents were recorded from rat cortical neurons in long-term primary culture using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique at a holding potential of -70 mV in Mg2+-free solutions. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked currents were greatly and reversibly potentiated by bath application of nefiracetam resulting in a bell-shaped dose-response curve. The minimum effective nefiracetam concentration was 1 nM, and the maximum potentiation to 170% of the control was produced at 10 nM. Nefiracetam potentiation occurred at high NMDA concentrations that evoked the saturated response, and in a manner independent of NMDA concentrations ranging from 3 to 1,000 microM. Glycine at 3 microM potentiated NMDA currents but this effect was attenuated with an increasing concentration of nefiracetam from 1 to 10,000 nM. 7-Chlorokynurenic acid at 1 microM prevented nefiracetam from potentiating NMDA currents. Nefiracetam at 10 nM shifted the dose-response relationship for the 7-chlorokynurenic acid inhibition of NMDA currents in the direction of higher concentrations. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid- and kainate-induced currents were not significantly affected by application of 10 nM nefiracetam. It was concluded that nefiracetam potentiated NMDA currents through interactions with the glycine binding site of the NMDA receptor.

  14. The fibrosis of ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor antagonist dose-dependent change in a ketamine-induced cystitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Song, Miho; Yu, Hwan Yeul; Chun, Ji-Youn; Shin, Dong-Myung; Song, Soo Hyun; Choo, Myung-Soo; Song, Yun Seob

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine abusers have greatly increased in number worldwide during recent years. The consumption of ketamine has increased, as have the number of published accounts of devastating urological sequelae. However, the mechanism of ketamine-associated urinary tract dysfunction remains unclear. This study was to evaluate the ketamine dose-dependency of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC) in a rat model. A total of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats (female, 10-week-old) were used. Each of the 7 KC rat models were induced by 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg ketamine intravenous injection for two weeks. For the sham group (n = 7), a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) vehicle was used rather than ketamine hydrochloride. The cystometric parameters, histological examinations, staining for Masson's trichome, cytokeratin, toluidine blue and quantitative PCR were measured at two weeks following the intervention. The voiding interval gradually decreased depending upon the ketamine dose of 1, 5, 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg, respectively, and was decreased compared with Sham. Bladder capacity was decreased as ketamine dose increased. In particular, the increase of fibrosis and submucosal apoptosis were found according to the increase of the ketamine dose. The bladder apoptosis in the KC rat model makes the fibrotic bladder change, and led us to hypothesize that fibrosis could contribute to the lower urinary-tract symptoms. We suggest that according to the pathophysiology evidence, fibrosis induced by apoptosis plays a key role in KC.

  15. Optic Neuropathy As the Initial Presenting Sign of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Mugavin, Mark; Mueller, Brett H; Desai, Masoom; Golnik, Karl C

    2017-04-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with painless vision loss for 3 months. She was in custody for allegedly robbing a bank and had recently been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. She had 20/100 VA OD, a 2+RAPD, and optic atrophy. Extensive diagnostic workup including MRI, Fluorescein Angiography, Infectious Disease Panel, lumbar puncture, and leptomeningeal biopsy were unrevealing. Vision in her right eye declined to NLP and her left eye declined to 20/200 VA. Anti N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Autoimmune Encephalitis was diagnosed based on CSF serology and clinical suspicion. Her clinical course improved as she was treated with corticosteroids and rituximab.

  16. Persistent pulsatile release of glutamate induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate in neonatal rat hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Cherubini, E; Ben-Ari, Y; Ito, S; Krnjević, K

    1991-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from CA3 hippocampal neurones in vitro, during the first ten days of postnatal life and in adulthood. 2. Repeated (three to six) applications of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1-3 microM) and K+ channel blockers (tetraethylammonium chloride or bromide (TEA), 10 mM, and Cs+, 2 mM; or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), 30-50 microM, and Cs+, 2 mM) induced in neonatal but not in adult neurones, periodic inward currents (PICs) which persisted for several hours after the last application of NMDA. 3. PICs which were due to non-specific cation currents had a frequency of 0.10 +/- 0.04 Hz, and an amplitude of 1.1 +/- 0.28 nA at holding potentials between -40 and -50 mV. The amplitude was a linear function of the membrane potential over the range -70 to +20 mV. They reversed polarity at 4.1 +/- 9.8 mV. 4. K+ channel blockers alone failed to induce PICs. Repeated (three to six) brief applications of high (12 mM) K+ medium also induced PICs. The frequency and amplitude of K(+)-induced PICs were however considerably reduced by concomitant applications of the NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-3-[( +/- )-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl-]propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 20 microM). PICs could be induced also by caffeine (1 mM) in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX, 200 microM), TTX, TEA and Cs+. 5. Intracellular injection of the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) did not prevent the induction of PICs by NMDA. However PICs were blocked by removal of the external calcium and by the calcium antagonists cobalt (2 mM) and cadmium (50 microM). 6. In spite of blockade of propagated synaptic activity by TTX, PICs were synchronous in a pair of intracellularly recorded cells. They were also synchronous with extracellular spikes recorded by electrodes located into stratum pyramidal or stratum radiatum. 7. Once established, PICs were unaffected by

  17. Two blocking sites of amino-adamantane derivatives in open N-methyl-D-aspartate channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sobolevsky, A; Koshelev, S

    1998-01-01

    Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques, we studied the blockade of open N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels by amino-adamantane derivatives (AADs) in rat hippocampal neurons acutely isolated by the vibrodissociation method. The rapid concentration-jump technique was used to replace superfusion solutions. A kinetic analysis of the interaction of AAD with open NMDA channels revealed fast and slow components of their blockade and recovery. Mathematical modeling showed that these kinetic components are evidence for two distinct blocking sites of AADs in open NMDA channels. A comparative analysis of different simplest models led us to conclude that these AAD blocking sites can be simultaneously occupied by two blocker molecules. The voltage dependence of the AAD block suggested that both sites were located deep in the channel pore. PMID:9512028

  18. Spermidine reverses arcaine's inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced hippocampal ( sup 3 H)norepinephrine release

    SciTech Connect

    Sacaan, A.I.; Johnson, K.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced ({sup 3}H)norepinephrine (({sup 3}H)NE) release by a putrescine analog was studied. We report that arcaine, diguanidinobutane, a putative competitive polyamine antagonist, completely and noncompetitively antagonized NMDA-induced ({sup 3}H)NE release from rat hippocampal minces with an IC50 value of 102 microM. Arcaine did not alter kainate- or potassium-induced ({sup 3}H)NE release suggesting a specific effect on NMDA-mediated responses. Spermidine did not alter NMDA-induced ({sup 3}H)NE release, nor did it reverse the effect of arcaine when introduced in a normal physiologic superfusion buffer. However, spermidine reversed the effect of arcaine when superfusing with buffer that contained 5% (v/v) of the organic solvent dimethylsulfoxide. This finding suggests that the polyamine site may be located at the intracellular surface of the cell membrane. Our results provide the first evidence for polyamine modulation of the NMDA receptor ionophore complex in a functional physiologic system.

  19. Higher free D-aspartate and N-methyl-D-aspartate levels prevent striatal depotentiation and anticipate L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Errico, Francesco; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Bagetta, Vincenza; Vitucci, Daniela; Romano, Rosaria; Zianni, Elisa; Napolitano, Francesco; Marinucci, Silvia; Di Luca, Monica; Calabresi, Paolo; Fisone, Gilberto; Carta, Manolo; Picconi, Barbara; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Usiello, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) progressive alteration of striatal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) signaling has emerged as a considerable factor for the onset of the adverse motor effects of long-term levodopa (l-DOPA) treatment. In this regard, the NMDAR channel blocker amantadine is so far the only drug available for clinical use that attenuates L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). In this study, we examined the influence of a basal corticostriatal hyper-glutamatergic transmission in the appearance of dyskinesia, using a genetic mouse model lacking D-Aspartate Oxidase (DDO) enzyme (Ddo(-/-) mice). We found that, in Ddo(-/-) mice, non-physiological, high levels of the endogenous free D-amino acids D-aspartate (D-Asp) and NMDA, known to stimulate NMDAR transmission, resulted in the loss of corticostriatal synaptic depotentiation and precocious expression of LID. Interestingly, the block of depotentiation precedes any change in dopaminergic transmission associated to 6-OHDA lesion and l-DOPA treatment. Indeed, lesioned mutant mice display physiological L-DOPA-dependent enhancement of striatal D1 receptor/PKA/protein phosphatase-1 and ERK signaling. Moreover, in line with synaptic rearrangements of NMDAR subunits occurring in dyskinetic animal models, a short L-DOPA treatment produces a dramatic and selective reduction of the NR2B subunit in the striatal post-synaptic fraction of Ddo(-/-) lesioned mutants but not in controls. These data indicate that a preexisting hyper-glutamatergic tone at NMDARs in Ddo(-/-) mice produce abnormal striatal synaptic changes that, in turn, facilitate the onset of LID.

  20. Development of dopamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate systems in rat brain: the effect of prenatal phencyclidine exposure.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Holson, R R; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Bowyer, J F

    1993-05-21

    Phencyclidine (PCP) inhibits the uptake of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), and blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-regulated ion channels. PCP also binds to sigma receptors in vivo and in vitro in rat brain. Prolonged exposure to PCP in adults has been observed to reduce the number of PCP binding sites in brain. We designed these experiments to evaluate whether prolonged prenatal exposure to PCP produces alterations in the development of DA and NMDA systems in brain. To do so, we characterized the normal course of development of basal and stimulated DA release in striatal slices, the ontogeny of striatal DA concentrations, and the development of NMDA receptor channels and associated glutamate binding sites in frontal cortex. We compared these developmental profiles to those in rats exposed to prenatal PCP, in an attempt to characterize the effect of prenatal PCP exposure on the pattern of brain development. Pregnant CD rats were injected s.c. with either 0, 10 or 20 mg/kg PCP daily on gestational days 8 through 20. On postnatal days (PND) 8, 21, 45, or 100, rats were sacrificed and brain tissues isolated for in vitro assessment. In vitro [3H]DA release from striatal slices evoked by either 40 microM glutamate or 15 mM K+ increased over 250% from PND 8 to PND 45, and glutamate-stimulated release was still significantly below adult levels at PND 45. In contrast, D-methamphetamine (D-METH)-evoked [3H]DA release, frontal cortical glutamate binding sites and NMDA channels developed early, reaching adult levels on or before PND 21.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Aloe-emodin metabolites protected N-methyl-d-aspartate-treated retinal ganglion cells by Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Fan, Seng-Sheen; Tsai, Yuhsin; Huang, Shiuan-Yi; Wan, Lei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2007-04-01

    A high concentration of glutamate in the eyes not only activates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, but also is toxic to the retina ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucomatous patients. Our previous study had found that aloe-emodin sulfates/glucuronides metabolites, an anthraquinone polyphenol, exerted a neuroprotective activity upon RGCs. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in this neuroprotective effect, this study aimed to determine the expressions of RNAs and proteins in various treatments. The proteins expressed in the control group, NMDA-treated group, and aloe-emodin metabolites-cotreated group were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Protein spots were excised from 2-DE and analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS (nano-liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry; tandem MS). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to investigate the RNA related to these proteins. There were 84 spots with significant differences in various treatments. Among the 84 spots, we identified 9 spots whose functions were closely related to regulate the apoptosis of cells. The results of Q-PCR were not completely unanimous with those of 2-DE. Our results suggested that aloe-emodin metabolites decreased NMDA-induced apoptosis of RGCs by preserving, and inducing, some proteins related to the antioxidation and regulation of cells' energy. Both the level of RNA and protein of superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn) were significantly elevated after aloe-emodin metabolites were added. The mechanisms of neuroprotection are complicated, and involve not only the transcription and stability of mRNA, but also post-translation protein modifications, degradation, and protein-protein interaction.

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate increases acetylcholine release from rat striatum and cortex: its effect is augmented by choline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulus, I. H.; Buyukuysal, R. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, and of glutamate itself, on acetylcholine (ACh) release from superfused rat striatal slices. In a Mg(++)-free medium, NMDA (32-1000 microM) as well as glutamate (1 mM) increased basal ACh release by 35 to 100% (all indicated differences, P less than .05), without altering tissue ACh or choline contents. This augmentation was blocked by Mg++ (1.2 mM) or by MK-801 (10 microM). Electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 75 mA) increased ACh release 9-fold (from 400 to 3660 pmol/mg of protein): this was enhanced (to 4850 pmol/mg of protein) by NMDA (100 microM). ACh levels in stimulated slices fell by 50 or 65% depending on the absence or presence of NMDA. The addition of choline (40 microM) increased ACh release both basally (570 pmol/mg of protein) and with electrical stimulation (6900 pmol/mg of protein). In stimulated slices choline acted synergistically with NMDA, raising ACh release to 10,520 pmol/mg of protein. The presence of choline also blocked the fall in tissue ACh. No treatment affected tissue phospholipid or protein levels. NMDA (32-320 microM) also augmented basal ACh release from cortical but not hippocampal slices. Choline efflux from striatal and cortical (but not hippocampal) slices decreased by 34 to 50% in Mg(++)-free medium. These data indicate that NMDA-like drugs may be useful, particularly in combination with choline, to enhance striatal and cortical cholinergic activity. ACh release from rat hippocampus apparently is not affected by NMDA receptors.

  3. Excitotoxicity in the Lung: N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Dependent, Pulmonary Edema is Attenuated by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and by Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Sami I.; Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah

    1996-05-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the ``adult respiratory distress syndrome,'' and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

  4. Synthesis and in vitro characterization of trans- and cis-[(18)F]-4-methylbenzyl 4-[(pyrimidin-2-ylamino)methyl]-3-fluoropiperidine-1-carboxylates as new potential PET radiotracer candidates for the NR2B subtype N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Koudih, Radouane; Gilbert, Gwénaëlle; Dhilly, Martine; Abbas, Ahmed; Barré, Louisa; Debruyne, Danièle; Sobrio, Franck

    2012-07-01

    Diastereoisomeric compounds [(18)F]cis- and [(18)F]trans-4-methylbenzyl 4-[(pyrimidin-2-ylamino)methyl]-3-fluoro-piperidine-1-carboxylates were successfully synthesized as new subtype-selective PET radiotracers for imaging the NR2B subunit containing NMDA receptors. Rat brain section autoradiographies demonstrated a high specific binding in NR2B/NMDA receptor rich regions for both radioligands. The measured logD(7.4) values as well as B(max)/K(d) ratios indicated that both radiotracers possess the adequate properties required for PET radiotracers.

  5. Effects of S-citalopram, citalopram, and R-citalopram on the firing patterns of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex and cognitive function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Schilström, Björn; Konradsson-Geuken, Asa; Ivanov, Vladimir; Gertow, Jens; Feltmann, Kristin; Marcus, Monica M; Jardemark, Kent; Svensson, Torgny H

    2011-05-01

    Escitalopram, the S-enantiomer of citalopram, possesses superior efficacy compared to other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of major depression. Escitalopram binds to an allosteric site on the serotonin transporter, which further enhances the blockade of serotonin reuptake, whereas R-citalopram antagonizes this positive allosteric modulation. Escitalopram's effects on neurotransmitters other than serotonin, for example, dopamine and glutamate, are not well studied. Therefore, we here studied the effects of escitalopram, citalopram, and R-citalopram on dopamine cell firing in the ventral tegmental area, using single-cell recording in vivo and on NMDA receptor-mediated currents in pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex using in vitro electrophysiology in rats. The cognitive effects of escitalopram and citalopram were also compared using the novel object recognition test. Escitalopram (40-640 μg/kg i.v.) increased both firing rate and burst firing of dopaminergic neurons, whereas citalopram (80-1280 μg/kg) had no effect on firing rate and only increased burst firing at high dosage. R-citalopram (40-640 μg/kg) had no significant effects. R-citalopram (320 μg/kg) antagonized the effects of escitalopram (320 μg/kg). A very low concentration of escitalopram (5 nM), but not citalopram (10 nM) or R-citalopram (5 nM), potentiated NMDA-induced currents in pyramidal neurons. Escitalopram's effect was antagonized by R-citalopram and blocked by the dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH23390. Escitalopram, but not citalopram, improved recognition memory. Our data suggest that the excitatory effect of escitalopram on dopaminergic and NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission may have bearing on its cognitive-enhancing effect and superior efficacy compared to other SSRIs in major depression.

  6. Rundown of N-methyl-D-aspartate channels during whole-cell recording in rat hippocampal neurons: role of Ca2+ and ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenmund, C; Westbrook, G L

    1993-01-01

    1. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channel activity was studied on cultured rat hippocampal neurons in whole-cell voltage-clamp mode. NMDA responses were evoked by rapid application of NMDA and the cytosol was modified using pipette dialysis and intracellular perfusion. 2. In the presence of 2 mM [Ca2+]o with 2.4 mM BAPTA (1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) and 0.4 mM Ca2+ in the whole-cell pipette, the response evoked by regular applications of 10 microM NMDA gradually decreased during prolonged whole-cell recording. After 25 min the peak current was reduced to 56 +/- 1.6% of control. Channel 'rundown' could be prevented by inclusion of an ATP regenerating solution in the pipette. 3. Rundown did not occur in Ca(2+)-free medium even in the absence of added ATP regenerating solution. Rundown was also prevented by increasing [BAPTA]i to 10 mM whereas raising [Ca2+]i by inhibiting the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger or by perfusing the patch pipette with high [Ca2+]i (15-1000 microM) reversibly inhibited the NMDA current. By contrast, the rundown of kainate responses was Ca(2+)-independent. 4. The rate and reversibility of rundown was use-dependent. Rundown did not occur with infrequent NMDA applications (0.2/min). Following channel rundown in Ca(2+)-containing medium, a 5 min pause in agonist applications or adding ATP regenerating solution by intracellular perfusion resulted in complete recovery. However, rundown did not recover following large currents evoked by 300 microM NMDA or when 10 mM EGTA was used as the intracellular buffer. Protease inhibitors did not prevent irreversible rundown. 5. ATP-gamma-S (4 mM) was less effective than the ATP regenerating solution in preventing rundown. Likewise, intracellular dialysis with alkaline phosphatase, phosphatase 1 or calcineurin did not induce rundown and addition of phosphatase inhibitors also did not block rundown. Thus receptor dephosphorylation did not appear to be primarily responsible for channel rundown

  7. The uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist memantine reduces binge-like eating, food-seeking behavior, and compulsive eating: role of the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen L; Rao, Rahul R; Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Valenza, Marta; Giuliano, Chiara; Everitt, Barry J; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2015-03-13

    Binge-eating disorder is characterized by excessive, uncontrollable consumption of palatable food within brief periods of time. The role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor system in hedonic feeding is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist memantine on palatable food-induced behavioral adaptations using a rat model, which mimics the characteristic symptomatology observed in binge-eating disorder. For this purpose, we allowed male Wistar rats to respond to obtain a highly palatable, sugary diet (Palatable group) or a regular chow diet (Chow control group), for 1 h a day, under a fixed-ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforcement. Upon stabilization of food responding, we tested the effects of memantine on the Chow and Palatable food groups' intake. Then, we tested the effects of memantine on food-seeking behavior, under a second-order schedule of reinforcement. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of memantine on the intake of food when it was offered in an aversive, bright compartment of a light/dark conflict test. Finally, we evaluated the effects of memantine on FR1 responding for food, when microinfused into the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) shell or core. Memantine dose-dependently decreased binge-like eating and fully blocked food-seeking behavior and compulsive eating, selectively in the Palatable food group. The drug treatment did not affect performance of the control Chow food group. Finally, intra-NAcc shell, but not core, microinfusion of memantine decreased binge-like eating. Together, these findings substantiate a role of memantine as a potential pharmacological treatment for binge-eating disorder.

  8. A comparison of N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked release of adenosine and ( sup 3 H)norepinephrine from rat cortical slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hoehn, K.; Craig, C.G.; White, T.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Tetrodotoxin reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked release of adenosine by 35% but virtually abolished (3H)norepinephrine release. Although (3H)norepinephrine release from rat cortical slices evoked by 500 microM NMDA was abolished by 1.2 mM Mg++, which produces a voltage-sensitive, uncompetitive block of NMDA-channels, adenosine release was increased in the presence of Mg++. Partial depolarization with 12 mM K+ relieved the Mg++ block of 500 microM NMDA-evoked (3H)norepinephrine release but did not affect adenosine release, indicating that a Mg++ requirement for the adenosine release process per se cannot account for this discrepancy. NMDA was 33 times more potent in releasing adenosine than (3H)norepinephrine. At submaximal concentrations of NMDA (10 and 20 microM), adenosine release was augmented in Mg+(+)-free medium. Although a high concentration of the uncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11,dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclohepten-5-10-imine maleate) (3 microM) blocked NMDA-evoked release of (3H)norepinephrine and adenosine, a lower concentration (300 nM) decreased NMDA-evoked (3H)norepinephrine release by 66% without affecting adenosine release. These findings suggest that maximal adenosine release occurs when relatively few NMDA receptors are activated, raising the possibility that spare receptors exist for NMDA-evoked adenosine release. Rather than acting as a protectant against excessive NMDA excitation, released adenosine might provide an inhibitory threshold which must be overcome for NMDA-mediated neurotransmission to proceed.

  9. NR2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472 in spinal dorsal horn contributed to N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced pain hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Cao, Jing; Yang, Xian; Suo, Zhan-Wei; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yan-Ni; Yang, Hong-Bin; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2011-11-01

    Calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-subtype glutamate receptors (NMDARs) regulates the intracellular trafficking of NMDARs, leading to long-lasting modification of NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission that is involved in development, learning, and synaptic plasticity. The present study investigated the contribution of such NMDAR-dependent synaptic trafficking in spinal dorsal horn to the induction of pain hypersensitivity. Our data showed that direct activation of NMDARs by intrathecal NMDA application elicited pronounced mechanical allodynia in intact mice, which was concurrent with a specific increase in the abundance of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B at the postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched fraction. Selective inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs (NR2BR) by ifenprodil dose dependently attenuated the mechanical allodynia in NMDA-injected mice, suggesting the importance of NR2BR synaptic accumulation in NMDA-induced pain sensitization. The NR2BR redistribution at synapses after NMDA challenge was associated with a significant increase in NR2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a catalytic site by Src family protein tyrosine kinases (SFKs) that has been shown to prevent NR2B endocytosis. Intrathecal injection of a specific SFKs inhibitor, PP2, to block NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation eliminated NMDA-induced NR2BR synaptic expression and also attenuated the mechanical allodynia. These data suggested that activation of spinal NMDARs was able to accumulate NR2BR at synapses via SFK signaling, which might exaggerate NMDAR-dependent nociceptive transmission and contribute to NMDA-induced nociceptive behavioral hyperresponsiveness.

  10. Tetramethylpyrazine nitrone protects retinal ganglion cells against N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaopeng; Yu, Yankun; Xiang, Zongqin; Wu, Huisu; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Wang, Yuqiang; So, Kwok-Fai; Zhang, Zaijun; Xu, Ying

    2017-02-03

    Adding a free radical-scavenging nitrone moiety on tetramethylpyrazine, we have previously synthesized a chemical named 2-[[(1,1-dimethylethyl)oxidoimino]-methyl]-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazine (tetramethylpyrazine nitrone, or TBN) and proved its neuroprotective effect but with limited understanding of its mechanism. Here we ask if TBN protects retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against excitotoxicity induced by NMDA and explore the underlying mechanism. NMDA was intravitreally injected to induce RGC injury in rats, followed by daily intraperitoneal administrations of TBN. Measurements of TBN concentration at different times after intraperitoneal administration showed that more than 200 μM TBN reached the aqueous humor quickly. Then RGCs' survival was evaluated by quantifying Brn3-positive cells, and retinal functions were examined by electroretinogram and visual behaviors. TBN significantly increased the survival of RGCs after NMDA insult, recovered the amplitude of photopic negative responses to flash, and restored the visual behavior. Furthermore, TBN inhibited the apoptotic process, as indicated by the elevated ratios of cleaved caspase-3/caspase-3 and of Bax/Bcl-2, and decreased the level of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, TBN reduced RGC's calcium overload induced by NMDA or by KCl. Whole-cell patch recording from RGCs further showed that TBN slightly but significantly inhibited L-type calcium channels, but had little effect on T-type calcium channel or NMDA-, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid(AMPA)-induced current. Thus our data indicate that TBN alleviates NMDA-elicited injury of rat RGCs both morphologically and functionally, possibly by inhibiting the L-type calcium channel thus reducing Ca(2+) overload and by directly scavenging free radicals. Therefore, TBN may be a novel candidate for treating excitotoxicity-related visual disorders such as glaucoma.

  11. Non-opioid antitussives potentiate some behavioural and EEG effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Diana, G; Scotti de Carolis, A; Popoli, P; Pezzola, A; Sagratella, S

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the non-opioid oral antitussives dextromethorphan (DM) and caramiphen (CP) were tested against the behavioural and EEG effects elicited by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists dizocilpine (MK 801) and phencyclidine (PCP) in rats and mice. PCP (1.25-10 mg/kg i.p.) induced a dose-dependent increase/decrease of the locomotor/exploratory activity of mice. DM (25-50 mg/kg i.p.) and MK 801 (0.125-0.250 mg/kg i.p.) induced an increase of the locomotor/exploratory activity of mice, while CP (25-50 mg/kg i.p.) did not produce such an effect. CP (12.5 mg/kg i.p.) and DM (12.5 mg/kg i.p.) significantly potentiated the effects of PCP (1.25 mg/kg i.p.) and MK 801 (0.062 mg/kg i.p.) in the open field test in mice. In rats, PCP (1.25-10 mg/kg i.p.) induced three dose-dependent EEG stages: 1) increase of the cortical desynchronization periods; 2) increase of the amplitude of cortical background activity; 3) appearance of cortical slow wave-spike complexes. Even though DM (up to 100 mg/kg i.p.) only induced PCP-like EEG stage 1 by itself, and CP (up to 50 mg/kg i.p.) did not affect basal cortical EEG activity, these drugs, at the doses of 30-50 mg/kg i.p., potentiated all the EEG effects induced by PCP. These data support the view of an interaction between non-opioid antitussives and non-competitive NMDA antagonists.

  12. Amygdala Infusions of an NR2B-Selective or an NR2A-Preferring NMDA Receptor Antagonist Differentially Influence Fear Conditioning and Expression in the Fear-Potentiated Startle Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David L.; Davis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Within the amygdala, most N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors consist of NR1 subunits in combination with either NR2A or NR2B subunits. Because the particular subunit composition greatly influences the receptors' properties, we investigated the contribution of both subtypes to fear conditioning and expression. To do so, we infused the…

  13. The effects of avermectin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jie; Sun, Bao-Hong; Cao, Ye; Yao, Hai-Dong; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of avermectin (AVM) on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors in the pigeon brain. Four groups two-month-old American king pigeons (n=20/group) were fed either a commercial diet or an AVM-supplemented diet (20mg/kg·diet, 40 mg/kg·diet, or 60 mg/kg·diet) for 30, 60, or 90 days. The contents of aspartic acid (ASP), glutamate (GLU), glycine (GLY), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues were determined using ultraviolet high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The expression levels of the GLU and GABA receptor genes were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicate that AVM exposure significantly enhances the contents of GABA, GLY, GLU, and ASP in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and optic lobe. In addition, AVM exposure increases the mRNA expression levels of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A), and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that the most damaged organ was the cerebrum, followed by the cerebellum, and then the optic lobe. These results show that the AVM-induced neurotoxicity may be associated with its effects on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors. The information presented in this study will help supplement the available data for future AVM toxicity studies.

  14. Modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) responses of spinal nociceptive neurons by a N-terminal fragment of substance P.

    PubMed

    Budai, D; Wilcox, G L; Larson, A A

    1992-06-17

    The effects of an N-terminal fragment of substance P, substance P-(1-7) [SP-(1-7)], on the responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) were tested by combined single-unit extracellular recordings/microiontophoresis. While SP-(1-7) had no effects when applied by itself, it was a potent and long-lasting modulator of both NMDA- and AMPA-mediated excitation of spinal dorsal horn nociceptive neurons. NMDA responses were transiently decreased (by an average of 36% of control at minimum) by SP-(1-7) followed by a more sustained increase (by 76% at maximum). In contrast, AMP responses were only increased by SP-(1-7) (by 81% at maximum). It is hypothesized that the actions of SP-(1-7) on excitatory amino acid (EAA) responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons reflect a novel mechanism by which SP and EAAs interact to modulate pain transmission.

  15. Synthesis of C5-tetrazole derivatives of 2-amino-adipic acid displaying NMDA glutamate receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Lenda, Fatimazohra; Crouzin, Nadine; Cavalier, Mélanie; Guiramand, Janique; Lanté, Fabien; Barbanel, Gérard; Cohen-Solal, Catherine; Martinez, Jean; Guenoun, Farhate; Lamaty, Frédéric; Vignes, Michel

    2011-03-01

    Five derivatives of 2-amino-adipic acid bearing a tetrazole-substituted in C5 position were synthesized. These compounds displayed selective antagonism towards N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptors compared with AMPA receptors, and they were devoid of any neurotoxicity. Among these five analogues, one exhibited a higher affinity for synaptic NMDA responses than the other four. Therefore, C5 tetrazole-substituted of 2-amino-adipic acid represent an interesting series of new NMDA receptor antagonists. This approach may be considered as a new strategy to develop ligands specifically targeted to synaptic or extra-synaptic NMDA receptors.

  16. Critical role of large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels in leptin-induced neuroprotection of N-methyl-d-aspartate-exposed cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Maria; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Gessner, Guido; Wissuwa, Bianka; Barrese, Vincenzo; Boscia, Francesca; Secondo, Agnese; Miceli, Francesco; Franco, Cristina; Ambrosino, Paolo; Canzoniero, Lorella Maria Teresa; Bauer, Michael; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of the adipokine leptin, and the molecular mechanism involved, have been studied in rat and mice cortical neurons exposed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, leptin elicited neuroprotective effects against NMDA-induced cell death, which were concentration-dependent (10-100 ng/ml) and largest when the adipokine was preincubated for 2h before the neurotoxic stimulus. In both rat and mouse cortical neurons, leptin-induced neuroprotection was fully antagonized by paxilline (Pax, 0.01-1 μM) and iberiotoxin (Ibtx, 1-100 nM), with EC50s of 38 ± 10 nM and 5 ± 2 nM for Pax and Ibtx, respectively, close to those reported for Pax- and Ibtx-induced Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channels (Slo1 BK channels) blockade; the BK channel opener NS1619 (1-30 μM) induced a concentration-dependent protection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, cortical neurons from mice lacking one or both alleles coding for Slo1 BK channel pore-forming subunits were insensitive to leptin-induced neuroprotection. Finally, leptin exposure dose-dependently (10-100 ng/ml) increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in rat cortical neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that Slo1 BK channel activation following increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels is a critical step for leptin-induced neuroprotection in NMDA-exposed cortical neurons in vitro, thus highlighting leptin-based intervention via BK channel activation as a potential strategy to counteract neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. CRITICAL ROLE OF LARGE CONDUCTANCE VOLTAGE- AND CALCIUM-ACTIVATED POTASSIUM CHANNELS IN LEPTIN-INDUCED NEUROPROTECTION OF N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE-EXPOSED CORTICAL NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Maria; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Gessner, Guido; Wissuwa, Bianka; Barrese, Vincenzo; Boscia, Francesca; Secondo, Agnese; Miceli, Francesco; Franco, Cristina; Ambrosino, Paolo; Canzoniero, Lorella MariaTeresa; Bauer, Michael; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the neuroprotective effects of the adipokine leptin, and the molecular mechanism involved, have been studied in rat and mice cortical neurons exposed to N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, leptin elicited neuroprotective effects against NMDA-induced cell death which were concentration-dependent (10–100 ng/ml) and largest when the adipokine was preincubated for 2 hours before the neurotoxic stimulus. In both rat and mouse cortical neurons, leptin-induced neuroprotection was fully antagonized by Paxilline (Pax, 0.01–1 μM) and Iberiotoxin (Ibtx, 1–100 nM), two blockers of Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channels (Slo1 BK channels), with EC50s (38±10 nM and 5±2 nM for Pax and Ibtx, respectively) close to those reported for Pax- and Ibtx-induced BK channel blockade; the BK channel opener NS1619 (1–30 μM) induced a concentration-dependent protection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Moreover, cortical neurons from mice lacking one or both alleles coding for Slo1 BK channel pore-forming subunits were insensitive to leptin-induced neuroprotection. Finally, leptin exposure dose-dependently (10–100 ng/ml) increased intracellular Ca2+ levels in rat cortical neurons. In conclusion, our results suggest that Slo1 BK channel activation following increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels is a critical step for leptin-induced neuroprotection in NMDA-exposed cortical neurons in vitro, thus highlighting leptin-based intervention via BK channel activation as a potential strategy to counteract neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24973659

  18. Molecular modeling of a phenyl-amidine class of NMDA receptor antagonists and the rational design of new triazolyl-amidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Paula A; Castro, Helena C; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Giongo, Viveca; Paixão, Izabel C N P; Santana, Marcos V; Ferreira, Jainne M; Caversan, Octavia M; Leão, Raquel A C; Marins, Luana M S; Henriques, André M; Farias, Florence M C; Albuquerque, Magaly G; Pinheiro, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    Recently, many efforts have been made to develop N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonists for treating different pathological conditions such as thrombo-embolic stroke, traumatic head injury, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's diseases). However, as side-effects limit the use of most antagonists, new drugs are still required. In this work, we performed a (quantitative) structure-activity relationship analysis of 17 phenyl-amidine derivatives (1a-1q), reported as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonists, and used this data to rationally design the triazolyl-amidines. The best (quantitative) structure-activity relationship model constructed by multiple linear regression analysis presented high data fitting (R = 0.914) was able to explain 83.6% of the biological data variance (R(2) = 0.836), presented a satisfactory internal predictive ability (Q(2) = 0.609) and contained the descriptors (E(HOMO), Ovality and cLogP). Our assays confirmed that glutamate promotes an extensive cell death in avian neurons (77%) and 2a and 2b protected the neurons from the glutamate effect (from 77% to 27% and 45%, respectively). The results of neurotoxicity and cytotoxicity on Vero cells suggested the favorable profile of 2a and 2b. Also, the molecular modeling used to predict the activity, the interaction with the receptor and the pharmacokinetic and toxicity of the triazolyl-amidines pointed them as a promising class for further exploration as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonists.

  19. Characterization of the quisqualate receptor linked to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in neurocortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Patel, J; Moore, W C; Thompson, C; Keith, R A; Salama, A I

    1990-05-01

    Activation of phosphoinositide metabolism is an early event in signal transduction for a number of neurotransmitters and hormones. In primary cultures of rat neurocortical cells, various excitatory amino acids stimulate inositol phosphate production with a rank order of potency of quisqualate greater than ibotenate greater than glutamate greater than kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate greater than alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate. This response to excitatory amino acids was insensitive to a variety of excitatory amino acid antagonists including 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, 3-3(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonate, and 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. The individual responses of quisqualate-, ibotenate-, and kainate-stimulated inositol phosphate production were not additive. These results suggest that phosphoinositide metabolism activated by excitatory amino acids is mediated by a unique quisqualate-preferring receptor that is not antagonized by known N-methyl-D-aspartate and non-N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists, and is relatively insensitive to alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate.

  20. Modulation of DL-. alpha. -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/quisqualate receptors by phospholipase A sub 2 : A necessary step in long-term potentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Massicotte, G.; Baudry, M. ); Vanderklish, P.; Lynch, G. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of kainate (KA)-induced epileptic seizures on the binding properites of hippocampal glutamate receptors, on the modulation of DL-{alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/quisqualate receptor by phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}), and on the formation of long-term potentiation (LTP) were studied in hippocampal membranes and hippocampal slices. Systemic administration of KA produced specific changes in the binding properties of the AMPA/quisqualate receptors and its regulation. Whereas the binding of various ligands to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors was not modified by KA treatment, there was a singificant decrease in the maximal number of binding sites for ({sup 3}H)AMPA. The loss of LTP was not due to changes in postsynaptic responses elicited by the bursts that trigger the potentiation effect, thus suggesting that KA treatment disrupts processes that follow N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. Systemic administration of KA was associated with calpain activation as the amount of spectrin breakdown products was increased severalfold in hippocampus but not in cerebellum. Pretreatment of telencephalic membranes with calpain greatly reduced the PLA{sub 2}-induced increase in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding. The results provide evidence in favor of an essential role of PLA{sub 2} in the development of LTP and suggest that the order of activation of different calcium-dependent processes is critical for producing the final changes underlying LTP.

  1. Structure-guided design of new indoles as negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) containing GluN2B subunit.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Maria Rosa; De Luca, Laura; Ferro, Stefania; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gitto, Rosaria

    2016-04-01

    Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of GluN2B-containing NMDARs provide pharmacological tools for the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Novel NAMs have been designed on the basis of computational studies focused on the 'hit compound' 3. This series of indoles has been tested in competition assay. Compounds 16 and 17 were the most active ligands (IC50 values of 83 nM and 71 nM, respectively) and they showed a potency close to that of reference compounds ifenprodil (1, IC50=47 nM) and 3 (IC50=25 nM). Furthermore, docking studies have been performed for active ligand 16 and the results were in a good agreement with biological data.

  2. The forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response involves histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Yalini; Droste, Susanne K; Arthur, J Simon C; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-05-01

    The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. Previously, we have shown that the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response after a forced swim experience is associated with chromatin modifications and transcriptional induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons. Given that both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 signalling pathway are involved in neuroplasticity processes underlying learning and memory, we investigated in rats and mice whether these signalling pathways regulate chromatin modifications and transcriptional events participating in the acquisition of the immobility response. We found that: (i) forced swimming evoked a transient increase in the number of phospho-acetylated histone H3-positive [P(Ser10)-Ac(Lys14)-H3(+)] neurons specifically in the middle and superficial aspects of the dentate gyrus granule cell layer; (ii) antagonism of NMDA receptors and inhibition of ERK1/2 signalling blocked forced swimming-induced histone H3 phospho-acetylation and the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response; (iii) double knockout (DKO) of the histone H3 kinase mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK) 1/2 in mice completely abolished the forced swimming-induced increases in histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate granule neurons and the behavioural immobility response; (iv) blocking mineralocorticoid receptors, known not to be involved in behavioural immobility in the forced swim test, did not affect forced swimming-evoked histone H3 phospho-acetylation in dentate neurons; and (v) the pharmacological manipulations and gene deletions did not affect behaviour in the initial forced swim test. We conclude that the forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response requires histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in distinct dentate granule neurons through recruitment of the NMDA/ERK/MSK 1/2 pathway.

  3. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Mobilization of dantrolene-sensitive intracellular calcium pools is involved in the cytotoxicity induced by quisqualate and N-methyl-D-aspartate but not by 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionate and kainate in cultured cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, A; Schousboe, A

    1992-01-01

    By using primary cultures of cerebral cortical neurons, it has been demonstrated that the antihyperthermia drug dantrolene protects against cytotoxicity induced by the excitatory amino acids quisqualate (QA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), whereas no effect was observed on cell damage mediated by kainate (KA) or 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionate (AMPA). In parallel it was shown that KA and AMPA increased the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) mainly by influx, whereas the increase in [Ca2+]i stimulated by NMDA and QA predominantly was caused by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, which for NMDA seemed to be mediated at least partly by Ca2+ influx. In accordance with the effects on cytotoxicity, dantrolene blocked the increase in [Ca2+]i elicited by QA and NMDA leaving the increase induced by KA and AMPA unaffected. The finding that 2-amino-3-[3-(carboxymethoxy)-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl]propionate, which regarding toxicity is a selective KA antagonist, only reduced the KA-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i by 30% may suggest that the elevation of [Ca2+]i is not the only element in KA-induced cytotoxicity. On the other hand, the present study underlines the importance of Ca2+ for cytotoxicity induced by some excitatory amino acids (glutamate, NMDA, and QA) and supports the current proposal that multiple mechanisms are operating, even concerning calcium homeostasis. Because excitatory amino acid-induced cytotoxicity is thought to be involved in neuropathological conditions such as ischemia, it is possible that dantrolene might be of therapeutic interest. PMID:1372982

  5. GABAB receptor stimulation by baclofen and taurine enhances excitatory amino acid induced phosphatidylinositol turnover in neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Smith, S S; Li, J

    1991-10-28

    Excitatory amino acid stimulation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis has been associated with development of the CNS. Normally minimally ineffective in stimulating PI hydrolysis in the neonatal rat cerebellum, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) increased levels of PI hydrolysis 82.3 +/- 5.5% above basal values in the presence of 1 microM baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptor agonist. This effect was observed at day 7 but not in adult cerebellum. The effect of baclofen could be mimicked by low dose GABA and taurine, actions which were blocked by prior application of a specific GABAB antagonist. Therefore, the ability of NMDA to stimulate PI hydrolysis in neonatal cerebellar tissue may be regulated by the degree of GABAB receptor stimulation.

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and NMDA-potentiating effects are blunted in the striatum of aged rats: a possible additional mechanism in striatal senescence.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Pintor, Annita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Gaudi, Simona; Grò, Maria Cristina; Passarelli, Francesca; Reggio, Rosaria; Galluzzo, Mariangela; Massotti, Marino; Popoli, Patrizia

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to verify whether an impairment of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated neurotransmission did occur in the aged striatum. To this end, the ability of the subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine, to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced effects in striatal slices from young (3 months) and aged (24 months) rats was compared. The ability of RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine to induce maximal phosphoinositide turnover and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate effects was significantly reduced in slices from old vs. young rats. These changes were associated with a significant reduction in the expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor protein (-28.8%) and phospholipase C-beta1 (-55.8%) in old striata, while receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression was unchanged. These results show that the signalling associated with subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors undergoes significant age-related changes and that a reduced expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors and, more importantly, phospholipase C-beta1 may account for the functional decline of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  7. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Gáspár; Herédi, Judit; Menyhárt, Ákos; Czinege, Zsolt; Nagy, Dávid; Fuzik, János; Kocsis, Kitti; Knapp, Levente; Krucsó, Erika; Gellért, Levente; Kis, Zsolt; Farkas, Tamás; Fülöp, Ferenc; Párdutz, Árpád; Tajti, János; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid). We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease the permeability of the BBB during CSD. These results suggest that KYNA itself or its derivatives may offer a new approach in the therapy of migraines. PMID:24068867

  8. Coantagonism of Glutamate Receptors and Nicotinic Acetylcholinergic Receptors Disrupts Fear Conditioning and Latent Inhibition of Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Thomas J.; Lewis, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors ([alpha]-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the…

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  10. Memantine and Kynurenic Acid: Current Neuropharmacological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Majláth, Zsófia; Török, Nóra; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2016-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission, of special importance in the human brain, is implicated in key brain functions such as synaptic plasticity and memory. The excessive activation of N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may result in excitotoxic neuronal damage; this process has been implicated in the pathomechanism of different neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Memantine is an uncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors with a favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and is therefore clinically well tolerated. Memantine is approved for the treatment of AD, but may additionally be beneficial for other dementia forms and pain conditions. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous antagonist of NMDA receptors which has been demonstrated under experimental conditions to be neuroprotective. The development of a well-tolerated NMDA antagonist may offer a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease and pain syndromes. KYNA may be a valuable candidate for future drug development. PMID:26564141

  11. The role of NMDA receptor and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of dextromethorphan in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Sakhaee, Ehsan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yousefi, Farbod; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Chamanara, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a devastating disorder which has a high impact on the wellbeing of overall society. As such, need for innovative therapeutic agents are always there. Most of the researchers focused on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor to explore the antidepressant like activity of new therapeutic agents. Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant agent with potential antidepressant activity reported in mouse force swimming test. Considering N-methyl-d-aspartate as a forefront in exploring antidepressant agents, here we focused to unpin the antidepressant mechanism of dextromethorphan targeting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor induced nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling. Dextromethorphan administered at a dose of 10 and 30mg/kg i.p significantly reduced the immobility time. Interestingly, this effect of drug (30mg/kg) was inhibited when the animals were pretreated either with N-methyl-d-aspartate (75mg/kg), or l-arginine (750mg/kg) as a nitric oxide precursor and/or sildenafil (5mg/kg) as a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor. However, the antidepressant effect of Dextromethorphan subeffective dose (3mg/kg) was augmented when the animals were administered with either L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (10mg/kg) non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-Nitroindazole (30mg/kg) specific neural nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist but not aminoguanidine (50mg/kg) which is specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor as compared to the drugs when administered alone. No remarkable effect on locomotor activity was observed during open field test when the drugs were administered at the above mentioned doses. Therefore, it is evident that the antidepressant like effect of Dextromethorphan is owed due to its inhibitory effect on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and NO- Cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway.

  12. Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (Review)

    PubMed Central

    TANG, XIAO-JUAN; XING, FENG

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is an important cause of brain injury in the newborn and may result in long-term devastating consequences. Excessive stimulation of glutamate receptors (GluRs) is a pivotal mechanism underlying ischemia-induced selective and delayed neuronal death. Although initial studies focused on N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors as critical mediators in HIE, subsequent studies supported a more central role for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs), particularly Ca2+-permeable AMPARs, in brain damage associated with hypoxia-ischemia. This study reviewed the important role of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs in HIE and the future potential neuroprotective strategies associated with Ca2+-permeable AMPARs. PMID:24649036

  13. GHB-Induced Cognitive Deficits During Adolescence and the Role of NMDA Receptor.

    PubMed

    Sircar, R; Wu, L-C; Reddy, K; Sircar, D; Basak, A K

    2011-03-01

    We have earlier reported that γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) disrupts the acquisition of spatial learning and memory in adolescent rats. GHB is known to interact with several neurotransmitter systems that have been implicated in cognitive functioning. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NR) -type of glutamate receptor is considered to be an important target for spatial learning and memory. Molecular mechanisms governing the neuroadptations following repeated GHB treatment in adolecent rats remain unknown. We examined the role of NMDA receptor in adolescent GHB-induced cognitive deficit. Adolescent rats were administered with GHB on 6 consecutive days, and surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits levels were measured. GHB significantly decreased NR1 levels in the frontal cortex. Adolescent GHB also significantly reduced cortical NR2A subunit levels. Our findings support the hypothesis that adolescent GHB-induced cogntive deficits are associated with neuroadaptations in glutamatergic transmission, particulaly NR functioning in the frontal cortex.

  14. GHB–Induced Cognitive Deficits During Adolescence and the Role of NMDA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, R; Wu, L-C; Reddy, K; Sircar, D; Basak, A.K

    2011-01-01

    We have earlier reported that γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) disrupts the acquisition of spatial learning and memory in adolescent rats. GHB is known to interact with several neurotransmitter systems that have been implicated in cognitive functioning. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NR) -type of glutamate receptor is considered to be an important target for spatial learning and memory. Molecular mechanisms governing the neuroadptations following repeated GHB treatment in adolecent rats remain unknown. We examined the role of NMDA receptor in adolescent GHB-induced cognitive deficit. Adolescent rats were administered with GHB on 6 consecutive days, and surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits levels were measured. GHB significantly decreased NR1 levels in the frontal cortex. Adolescent GHB also significantly reduced cortical NR2A subunit levels. Our findings support the hypothesis that adolescent GHB-induced cogntive deficits are associated with neuroadaptations in glutamatergic transmission, particulaly NR functioning in the frontal cortex. PMID:21886597

  15. Control of Proton Sensitivity of the NMDA Receptor by RNA Splicing and Polyamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traynelis, Stephen F.; Hartley, Melissa; Heinemann, Stephen F.

    1995-05-01

    The function of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-preferring glutamate receptor can be regulated by extracellular pH, a process that may be important during ischemia in the brain or during seizures. Protons inhibit NMDA receptor function by 50 percent at pH 7.3 through interactions with the NR1 subunit, and both polyamines and NR1 exon 5 potentiate receptor function through relief of the tonic proton inhibition present at physiological pH. A single amino acid (lysine 211) was identified that mediates the effects of exon 5 in the rat brain. Electroneutral substitutions at this position restored pH sensitivity and, consequently, polyamine relief of tonic inhibition. This effect, together with the structural similarities between polyamines and the surface loop encoded by exon 5, suggest that exon 5 may act as a tethered pH-sensitive constitutive modulator of NMDA receptor function.

  16. Effects of curcumin and tannic acid on the aluminum- and lead-induced oxidative neurotoxicity and alterations in NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Tüzmen, Münire Nalan; Yücel, Nilgün Candan; Kalburcu, Tülden; Demiryas, Nazan

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to aluminum (Al) and lead (Pb) can cause brain damage. Also, Pb and Al exposure alters N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunit expression. Polyphenols such as tannic acid and curcumin are very efficient chelator for metals. The effects of curcumin and tannic acid (polyphenols) on Al(3+)- and Pb(2+)-induced oxidative stress were examined by investigating lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, antioxidant enzyme activities, acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activity and also NMDA receptor subunits 2A and 2B concentrations in the brain tissue of rats sub-chronically. Rats were divided into seven groups as control, Al, Pb, aluminum-tannic acid treatment (AlT), aluminum-curcumin treatment (AlC), lead-tannic acid treatment (PbT) and lead-curcumin treatment (PbC). After 16 weeks of treatment, LPO levels in the brain and hippocampus were higher in Al(3+)-exposed rats than that of Pb(2+)-exposed group. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in brain tissue of Al- and Pb-exposed rats increased significantly compared with control, while catalase (CAT) and AChE activities decreased. It was observed that metal exposure affected NR2A concentrations more than NR2B concentrations and also that polyphenol treatments increased these receptor protein concentrations.

  17. Extranuclear Signaling Effects Mediated by the Estrogen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    inhibition of Pyk2 with salicylate disrupted the ability of E2 to induce the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting αCaMKII activity (data not...Identification of a phosphorylation site for calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the 13 NR2B subunit of the N- methyl -D-aspartate receptor. J Biol

  18. Molecular Characteristics of Membrane Glutamate Receptor-Ionophore Interaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-29

    Neurochemical - Research , 1984, 9, 29-44. Chang, H.H., Michaelis, E.K. & Roy, S. Functional characteristics of . -Z L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate...receptors in isolated brain synaptic membranes. Neurochemical Research , 1984, 9, 901-913. Michaelis, E. K., Galton, N. and Early, S. L. Spider venous

  19. Coexpression of striatal dopamine receptor subtypes and excitatory amino acid subunits.

    PubMed

    Ariano, M A; Larson, E R; Noblett, K L; Sibley, D R; Levine, M S

    1997-08-01

    The striatal cellular coexpression patterns for the D(1A) and D2 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and the ionotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-R1) and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) (GluR1 and GluR2/3) receptor subunits were examined morphologically. Their coincidence was assessed by visualization of mRNA transcripts, localization of encoded receptor proteins, and binding analysis using concurrently paired methods of fluorescence detection. The findings indicated that 1) mRNA transcripts for both receptor systems were detected in the medium-sized neuron population, and the distribution of receptor message closely reflected protein and binding patterns, with the exception of the GluR1 subunit; 2) both DA receptor mRNA transcripts were coexpressed with each ionotropic EAA receptor subunit examined and with each other, and NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits also showed coincident expression; 3) D(1A) DA receptor protein was detected in neurons which coexpressed EAA subunit proteins; and 4) GluR2/3 and NMDA-R1 subunit proteins were coexpressed in medium-sized neurons which also demonstrated D2 DA receptor binding sites. These findings suggest morphological receptor "promiscuity" since the coexpression patterns between DA and EAA receptors were found in all permutations. The results provide a spatial framework for physiological findings describing functional interactions between the two DA receptor types and between specific DA and EAA receptors in the striatum.

  20. Antidepressant effects of ketamine and the roles of AMPA glutamate receptors and other mechanisms beyond NMDA receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Lily R; Phillips, Anthony G; Wang, Yu Tian

    2017-01-31

    The molecular mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder remain poorly understood, and current antidepressant treatments have many shortcomings. The recent discovery that a single intravenous infusion of ketamine at a subanesthetic dose had robust, rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in individuals with treatment-resistant depression inspired tremendous interest in investigating the molecular mechanisms mediating ketamine's clinical efficacy as well as increased efforts to identify new targets for antidepressant action. We review the clinical utility of ketamine and recent insights into its mechanism of action as an antidepressant, including the roles of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor inhibition, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor upregulation, activation of downstream synaptogenic signalling pathways and the production of an active ketamine metabolite, hydroxynorketamine. Emerging knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying both ketamine's positive therapeutic and detrimental side effects will aid the development of a new generation of much-needed superior antidepressant agents.

  1. AMPA receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation in cingulate cortex in rats following esophageal acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    BANERJEE, B.; MEDDA, B. K.; POCHIRAJU, S.; KANNAMPALLI, P.; LANG, I. M.; SENGUPTA, J. N.; SHAKER, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently reported an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit expression and CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of NR2B in the rostral cingulate cortical (rCC) neurons following esophageal acid exposure in rats. As α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate the fast excitatory transmission and play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, in this study, we investigated the effect of esophageal acid exposure in rats on the expression of AMPA receptor subunits and the involvement of these molecular alterations in acid-induced sensitization of neurons in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and midcingulate (MCC) cortices. Methods In molecular study, we examined GluA1 and GluA2 expression and phosphorylation in membrane preparations and in the isolated postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from rats receiving acute esophageal exposure of either saline (control group) or 0.1 NHCl (experimental group). In electrophysiological study, the effect of selective AMPA receptor (Ca2+ permeable) antagonist IEM-1460 and CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 was tested on responses of cortical neurons during acid infusion to address the underlying molecular mechanism of acid-induced sensitization. Key Results The acid exposure significantly increased expression of GluA1, pGluA1Ser831, and phosphorylated CaMKIIThr286, in the cortical membrane preparations. In isolated PSDs, a significant increase in pGluA1Ser831 was observed in acid-treated rats compared with controls. Microinjection of IEM-1460 or KN-93 near the recording site significantly attenuated acid-induced sensitization of cortical neurons. Conclusions & Inferences The underlying mechanism of acid-induced cortical sensitization involves upregulation and CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1. These molecular changes of AMPA receptors subunit GluA1 in the cortical neurons might play an important role in acid-induced esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:24118589

  2. Piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid Derivatives as Dual Antagonists of NMDA and GluK1-Containing Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Mark W.; Costa, Blaise M.; Dlaboga, Daniel; Culley, Georgia; Hulse, Richard; Scholefield, Caroline L.; Atlason, Palmi; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard; Morley, Richard; Mayo-Martin, Maria B.; Amici, Mascia; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Donaldson, Lucy; Collingridge, Graham L.; Molnár, Elek; Monaghan, Daniel T.; Jane, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists bind to the GluN2 subunit, of which there are four types (GluN2A-D). We report that some N1-substituted derivatives of cis-piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid display improved relative affinity for GluN2C and GluN2D versus GluN2A and GluN2B. These derivatives also display subtype-selectivity among the more distantly related kainate receptor family. Compounds 18i and (−)-4 were the most potent kainate receptor antagonists and 18i was selective for GluK1 versus GluK2, GluK3 and AMPA receptors. Modeling studies revealed structural features required for activity at GluK1 subunits and suggested that S674 was vital for antagonist activity. Consistent with this hypothesis, replacing the equivalent residue in GluK3 (alanine) with a serine imparts 18i antagonist activity. Antagonists with dual GluN2D and GluK1 antagonist activity may have beneficial effects in various neurological disorders. Consistent with this idea, antagonist 18i (30 mg/Kg i.p.) showed antinociceptive effects in an animal model of mild nerve injury. PMID:22111545

  3. Interleukin-1beta but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha potentiates neuronal damage by quinolinic acid: protection by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stone, Trevor W; Behan, Wilhelmina M H

    2007-04-01

    Quinolinic acid is an agonist at glutamate receptors sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). It has been implicated in neural dysfunction associated with infections, trauma, and ischemia, although its neurotoxic potency is relatively low. This study was designed to examine the effects of a combination of quinolinic acid and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Compounds were administered to the hippocampus of anesthetized male rats, animals being allowed to recover for 7 days before histological analysis of the hippocampus for neuronal damage estimated by counting of intact, healthy neurons. A low dose of quinolinic acid or IL-1beta produced no damage by itself, but the two together induced a significant loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Higher doses produced almost total loss of pyramidal cells. Intrahippocampal TNF-alpha produced no effect alone but significantly reduced the neuronal loss produced by quinolinic acid. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM241385 reduced neuronal loss produced by the combinations of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta. The results suggest that simultaneous quinolinic acid and IL-1beta, both being induced by cerebral infection or injury, are synergistic in the production of neuronal damage and could together contribute substantially to traumatic, infective, or ischemic cerebral damage. Antagonism of adenosine A(2A) receptors protects neurons against the combination of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta.

  4. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  5. Impaired Discrimination Learning in Mice Lacking the NMDA Receptor NR2A Subunit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Feyder, Michael; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Mishina, Masayoshi; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) mediate certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. We used a touchscreen system to assess NR2A subunit knockout mice (KO) for (1) pairwise visual discrimination and reversal learning and (2) acquisition and extinction of an instrumental response requiring no pairwise discrimination. NR2A KO mice…

  6. Reconsolidation after Remembering an Odor-Reward Association Requires NMDA Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torras-Garcia, Meritxell; Tronel, Sophie; Sara, Susan J.; Lelong, Julien

    2005-01-01

    A rapidly learned odor discrimination task based on spontaneous foraging behavior of the rat was used to evaluate the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) in ongoing memory consolidation. Rats were trained in a single session to discriminate among three odors, one of which was associated with palatable food reward. Previous…

  7. Synthesis, structural activity-relationships, and biological evaluation of novel amide-based allosteric binding site antagonists in NR1A/NR2B N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors☆

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Cara A.; Myers, Scott J.; Murray, Ernest E.; Santangelo, Rose; Tahirovic, Yesim A.; Kurtkaya, Natalie; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Yuan, Hongjie; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Le, Phuong; Wilson, Lawrence J.; Yepes, Manuel; Dingledine, Ray; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis and structure–activity relationship analysis of a novel class of amide-based biaryl NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonists are presented. Some of the studied compounds are potent, selective, non-competitive, and voltage-independent antagonists of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. Like the founding member of this class of antagonists (ifenprodil), several interesting compounds of the series bind to the amino terminal domain of the NR2B subunit to inhibit function. Analogue potency is modu-lated by linker length, flexibility, and hydrogen bonding opportunities. However, unlike previously described classes of NR2B-selective NMDA antagonists that exhibit off-target activity at a variety of monoamine receptors, the compounds described herein show much diminished effects against the hERG channel and α1-adrenergic receptors. Selections of the compounds discussed have acceptable half-lives in vivo and are predicted to permeate the blood–brain barrier. These data together suggest that masking charged atoms on the linker region of NR2B-selective antagonists can decrease undesirable side effects while still maintaining on-target potency. PMID:19648014

  8. Pharmacological profile of hypericum extract. Effect on serotonin uptake by postsynaptic receptors.

    PubMed

    Perovic, S; Müller, W E

    1995-11-01

    In the present study is is reported that the methanolic Hypericum extract LI 160 (Jarsin 300) exerts no protective effect against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-) or gp120- (from the HIV virus) induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, it is established that Hypericum extract causes no activation of arachidonic acid release from neurons activated by gp120; hence it displays no sensitization effect on the NMDA receptor channel. The main outcome of this study is the finding that Hypericum extract causes a 50% inhibition (IC50 value) of serotonin uptake by rat synaptosomes at a concentration of 6.2 microglml. Therefore it is concluded that the antidepressant activity of Hypericum extract is due to an inhibition of serotonin uptake by postsynaptic receptors. Future studies might focus on the effect of Hypericum extract on serotonin binding to neurons, serotonin storage in granules, the rate of synthesis of serotonin, and on the activity of monoamine oxidase.

  9. The role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in depression: central mediators of pathophysiology and antidepressant activity?

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Florian; Celikel, Tansu; Reif, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Depression is a major psychiatric disorder affecting more than 120 million people worldwide every year. Changes in monoaminergic transmitter release are suggested to take part in the pathophysiology of depression. However, more recent experimental evidence suggests that glutamatergic mechanisms might play a more central role in the development of this disorder. The importance of the glutamatergic system in depression was particularly highlighted by the discovery that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists (particularly ketamine) exert relatively long-lasting antidepressant like effects with rapid onset. Importantly, the antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists, but also other antidepressants (both classical and novel), require activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Additionally, expression of AMPA receptors is altered in patients with depression. Moreover, preclinical evidence supports an important involvement of AMPA receptor-dependent signaling and plasticity in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Here we summarize work published on the involvement of AMPA receptors in depression and discuss a possible central role for AMPA receptors in the pathophysiology, course and treatment of depression.

  10. Selective involvement of kappa opioid and phencyclidine receptors in the analgesic and motor effects of dynorphin-A-(1-13)-Tyr-Leu-Phe-Asn-Gly-Pro.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V K; Bansinath, M; Dumont, M; Lemaire, S

    1992-09-18

    Dynorphin A-(1-13)-Tyr-Leu-Phe-Asn-Gly-Pro (Dyn Ia; 1-8 nmol) injected intracerebroventricularly in the mouse produces two independent behavioral effects: (1) a norbinaltorphimine (kappa opioid antagonist)-reversible analgesia in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and (2) motor dysfunction characterized by wild running, pop-corn jumping, hindlimb jerking and barrel rolling and antagonized by the irreversible phencyclidine (PCP) and sigma (sigma) receptor antagonist, metaphit and the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, dextromethorphan and ketamine. The specific involvement of the PCP receptor in the motor effects of Dyn Ia is supported by the direct competitive interaction of the peptide with the binding of [3H]MK-801 (Ki: 0.63 microM) and [3H]TCP (Ki: 4.6 microM) to mouse brain membrane preparations.

  11. Purification and biochemical characterization of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate-sensitive L-glutamate receptors of pig brain.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y C; Wu, T Y; Li, B F; Gao, L H; Liu, C I; Wu, C L

    1996-01-01

    Two preparations of glutamate receptors were purified from the synaptic junctions of pig brain by a combination of detergent solubilization, anion-exchange chromatography, wheat-germ agglutinin affinity chromatography and sedimentation through sucrose gradients. These preparations were enriched in specific L-[3H]glutamate binding activity (> 5000 pmol of glutamate binding sites/mg of protein), and the rank order of ligand affinity for binding to these preparations was: quisqualate > 6-cyano-7- nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione > alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4- isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) > L-glutamate > kainate > > N-methyl-D-aspartate approximately L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. SDS/PAGE analysis revealed that more than 80% of the protein in either of these preparations appeared as a single protein band of 106 kDa. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis further revealed that these 106 kDa proteins consisted of a series of acidic proteins which were recognized by antibodies against rat AMPA receptor subunits. These 106 kDa proteins were also recognized by wheatgerm agglutinin and concanavalin A; in addition, peptide N-glycosidase F treatment of these preparations decreased their size to 99 kDa. Our results suggest that the putative glutamate receptors isolated here are likely to belong to the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors in pig brain. Using the purification procedure reported here, 5 micrograms of AMPA receptor proteins can be isolated from 250 g of pig brain tissue. PMID:8870648

  12. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis presenting with catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome in patients with intellectual disability and autism.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Reza; Lawden, Mark; Eames, Penelope; Critchley, Peter; Bhaumik, Sabyasachi; Odedra, Sunita; Gumber, Rohit

    2015-02-01

    We report anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis in two patients with autism and intellectual disability presenting with neuropsychiatric symptoms of catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Case reports such as these help raise awareness of this clinical issue. By paving the way for earlier diagnoses they ultimately maximise the potential for curative treatments and prevention of long-term complications.

  13. Spatial Discrimination Reversal Learning in Weanling Rats Is Impaired by Striatal Administration of an NMDA-Receptor Antagonist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Deborah J.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    The striatum plays a major role in both motor control and learning and memory, including executive function and "behavioral flexibility." Lesion, temporary inactivation, and infusion of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist into the dorsomedial striatum (dmSTR) impair reversal learning in adult rats. Systemic administration of MK-801…

  14. The Effect of Glutamate Receptor Agonists on Mouse Retinal Astrocyte [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Blandford, Stephanie N.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging techniques were used to determine if mouse retinal astrocytes in situ respond to agonists of ionotropic (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, AMPA; N-methyl-D-aspartate, NMDA) and metabotropic (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, DHPG; trans-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid, ACPD) glutamate receptors. In most cases we found no evidence that retinal astrocyte intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) increased in response to these glutamate agonists. The one exception was AMPA that increased [Ca2+]i in some, but not all, mouse retinal astrocytes in situ. However, AMPA did not increase [Ca2+]i in mouse retinal astrocytes in vitro, suggesting that the effect of AMPA in situ may be indirect. PMID:27413752

  15. The Effect of Glutamate Receptor Agonists on Mouse Retinal Astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i.

    PubMed

    Blandford, Stephanie N; Baldridge, William H

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-imaging techniques were used to determine if mouse retinal astrocytes in situ respond to agonists of ionotropic (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, AMPA; N-methyl-D-aspartate, NMDA) and metabotropic (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, DHPG; trans-1-amino-1,3-cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid, ACPD) glutamate receptors. In most cases we found no evidence that retinal astrocyte intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increased in response to these glutamate agonists. The one exception was AMPA that increased [Ca(2+)]i in some, but not all, mouse retinal astrocytes in situ. However, AMPA did not increase [Ca(2+)]i in mouse retinal astrocytes in vitro, suggesting that the effect of AMPA in situ may be indirect.

  16. Genetic Inactivation of D-Amino Acid Oxidase Enhances Extinction and Reversal Learning in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrie, Viviane; Duffy, Steven; Wang, Wei; Barger, Steven W.; Baker, Glen B.; Roder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine site has been shown to accelerate adaptive forms of learning that may benefit psychopathologies involving cognitive and perseverative disturbances. In this study, the effects of increasing the brain levels of the endogenous NMDAR glycine site agonist D-serine, through the genetic…

  17. NR2A- and NR2B-Containing NMDA Receptors in the Prelimbic Medial Prefrontal Cortex Differentially Mediate Trace, Delay, and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmartin, Marieke R.; Kwapis, Janine L.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of "N"-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PL mPFC) is necessary for the acquisition of both trace and contextual fear memories, but it is not known how specific NR2 subunits support each association. The NR2B subunit confers unique properties to the NMDAR and may differentially…

  18. Influence of Pharmacological Manipulations of NMDA and Cholinergic Receptors on Working versus Reference Memory in a Dual Component Odor Span Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacQueen, David A.; Dalrymple, Savannah R.; Drobes, David J.; Diamond, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Developed as a tool to assess working memory capacity in rodents, the odor span task (OST) has significant potential to advance drug discovery in animal models of psychiatric disorders. Prior investigations indicate OST performance is impaired by systemic administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-r) antagonists and is sensitive to…

  19. NMDA receptors mediate heat shock protein induction in the mouse brain following administration of the ibotenic acid analogue AMAA.

    PubMed

    Planas, A M; Ferrer, I; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1995-11-27

    Expression of inducible heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and hsp-70 mRNA were studied in the adult mouse brain following systemic administration of the ibotenic acid analogue (+/-)-2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoleacetic acid (AMAA), which is a potent N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonist. At the dose of 20 mg/kg, AMAA produced excitatory behaviours in adult mice but overt convulsions were not seen. This treatment did not result in any detectable morphological brain damage at 4 days following administration. At 2.5 h and 5 h following treatment induction of hsp-70 mRNA expression was found in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1 and, to a lesser extent, CA3 fields of hippocampal Ammon's horn, amygdala, olfactory lobes, tenia tecta, hypothalamic nuclei and a superficial layer of cingulate, frontal and retrosplenial cortices. The presence of HSP-70 was detected by immunochemistry at 24 h following drug administration in those regions previously showing hsp-70 mRNA induction. AMAA-induced hsp-70 mRNA expression was prevented by pre-treatment with the non-competitive NMDA antagonist MK-801. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the stress response induced by AMAA.

  20. Genetic differences in the ethanol sensitivity of GABA sub A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wafford, K.A.; Burnett, D.M.; Dunwiddie, T.V.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-07-20

    Animal lines selected for differences in drug sensitivity can be used to help determine the molecular basis of drug action. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice differ markedly in their genetic sensitivity to ethanol. To investigate the molecular basis for this difference, mRNA from brains of LS and SS mice was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the ethanol sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A})- and N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) - activated ion channels was tested. Ethanol facilitated GABA responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from LS mice but antagonized responses in oocytes injected with mRNA from SS animals. Ethanol inhibited NMDA responses equally in the two lines. Thus, genes coding for the GABA{sub A} receptor or associated proteins may be critical determinants of individual differences in ethanol sensitivity.

  1. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate): Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides III; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress. PMID:24454986

  2. Modulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities by certain antiepileptic drugs (valproic acid, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate): evidence in humans and experimental models.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Romero-Toledo, Arantxa; Sampieri, Aristides; Ortega-Cuellar, Daniel; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity). This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA), oxcarbazepine (OXC), and topiramate (TPM) modulate oxidative stress.

  3. A genome-wide association study of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid: implications for psychosis and cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sellgren, C M; Kegel, M E; Bergen, S E; Ekman, C J; Olsson, S; Larsson, M; Vawter, M P; Backlund, L; Sullivan, P F; Sklar, P; Smoller, J W; Magnusson, P K E; Hultman, C M; Walther-Jallow, L; Svensson, C I; Lichtenstein, P; Schalling, M; Engberg, G; Erhardt, S; Landén, M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the glia-derived N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA) have consistently been implicated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study based on CSF KYNA in bipolar disorder and found support for an association with a common variant within 1p21.3. After replication in an independent cohort, we linked this genetic variant—associated with reduced SNX7 expression—to positive psychotic symptoms and executive function deficits in bipolar disorder. A series of post-mortem brain tissue and in vitro experiments suggested SNX7 downregulation to result in a caspase-8-driven activation of interleukin-1β and a subsequent induction of the brain kynurenine pathway. The current study demonstrates the potential of using biomarkers in genetic studies of psychiatric disorders, and may help to identify novel drug targets in bipolar disorder. PMID:26666201

  4. Felbamate displays in vitro antiepileptic effects as a broad spectrum excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Domenici, M R; Sagratella, S; Ongini, E; Longo, R; Scotti de Carolis, A

    1994-12-27

    The in vitro antiepileptic activity of the novel anticonvulsant drug felbamate was tested in rat hippocampal slices on the CA1 epileptiform bursting induced by different chemical epileptogenic agents. The effects of felbamate were compared with those of the anticonvulsant drugs diphenylhydantoin and pentobarbitone and with the effects of excitatory amino acid antagonists acting at both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Like the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), felbamate at a minimum effective concentration of 1 mM induced a significant (P < 0.01) reduction of the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting due to the K+ channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine, and the excitatory amino acids, kainate and quisqualate. Like the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, felbamate (1.6 mM) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting caused by 'Mg(2+)-free' solutions. Conversely, felbamate (1.6 mM), CNQX (100 microM) and ketamine (100 microM) failed to affect the epileptiform bursting induced by the GABA antagonist penicillin. Pentobarbitone (100 microM) significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the duration of the CA1 epileptiform bursting caused by 'Mg(2+)-free' solutions, 4-aminopyridine or penicillin, while diphenylhydantoin (up to concentrations of 100 microM) failed to have an effect. The results indicate that felbamate displays a unique profile of in vitro antiepileptic effects as a broad spectrum antagonist of excitatory amino acid transmission.

  5. Selective vulnerability of the CA1 region of hippocampus to the indirect excitotoxic effects of malonic acid.

    PubMed

    Davolio, C; Greenamyre, J T

    1995-06-02

    The CA1 region of hippocampus is selectively vulnerable to a variety of insults, including hypoxia-ischemia and Alzheimer's disease, but the basis of this regional susceptibility is poorly understood. We examined the regional hippocampal sensitivity to mitochondrial metabolic disruption induced by malonate, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. The CA1 region was exquisitely sensitive to malonate and the dentate gyrus was extremely resistant; the CA3 region had intermediate sensitivity. This pattern of vulnerability is reminiscent of hypoxic-ischemic damage. Malonate damage was blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist, MK-801, but regional susceptibility to malonate did not correlate with the density of NMDA receptors. Instead, malonate toxicity was inversely correlated with activity of succinate dehydrogenase. Our results suggest that regional metabolic capacity may help to determine sensitivity to metabolic/excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia.

  6. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents.

  7. Retinal NMDA receptor function and expression are altered in a mouse lacking d-amino acid oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Catherine W.; Tekmen, Merve; Sullivan, Steven J.; Esguerra, Manuel; Konno, Ryuichi; Miller, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    d-serine is present in the vertebrate retina and serves as a coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of ganglion cells. Although the enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO) has been implicated as a pathway for d-serine degradation, its role in the retina has not been established. In this study, we investigated the role of DAO in regulating d-serine levels using a mutant mouse line deficient in DAO (ddY/DAO−) and compared these results with their wild-type counterparts (ddY/DAO+). Our results show that DAO is functionally present in the mouse retina and normally serves to reduce the background levels of d-serine. The enzymatic activity of DAO was restricted to the inner plexiform layer as determined by histochemical analysis. Using capillary electrophoresis, we showed that mutant mice had much higher levels of d-serine. Whole cell recordings from identified retinal ganglion cells demonstrated that DAO-deficient animals had light-evoked synaptic activity strongly biased toward a high NMDA-to-AMPA receptor ratio. In contrast, recordings from wild-type ganglion cells showed a more balanced ratio between the two receptor subclasses. Immunostaining for AMPA and NMDA receptors was carried out to compare the two receptor ratios by quantitative immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the mutant mouse had a significantly higher representation of NMDA receptors compared with the wild-type controls. We conclude that 1) DAO is an important regulatory enzyme and normally functions to reduce d-serine levels in the retina, and 2) d-serine levels play a role in the expression of NMDA receptors and the NMDA-to-AMPA receptor ratio. PMID:24068757

  8. Excitatory amino acid receptors mediate asymmetry and lateralization in the descending cardiovascular pathways from the dorsomedial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Lima, Augusto Martins; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Vaz, Gisele; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) are anatomically and functionally connected. Both the DMH and PAG depend on glutamatergic inputs for activation. We recently reported that removal of GABA-ergic tone in the unilateral DMH produces: asymmetry, that is, a right- (R-) sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism, and lateralization, that is, a greater increase in ipsilateral renal sympathetic activity (RSNA). In the current study, we investigated whether excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the DMH-PAG pathway contribute to the functional interhemispheric difference. In urethane (1.2 to 1.4 g/kg, i.p.) anesthetized rats, we observed that: (i) nanoinjections of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA 100 pmol/100 nl) into the unilateral DMH produced the same right-sided predominance in the control of cardiac chronotropy, (ii) nanoinjections of NMDA into the ipsilateral DMH or PAG evoked lateralized RSNA responses, and (iii) blockade of EAA receptors in the unilateral DMH attenuated the cardiovascular responses evoked by injection of NMDA into either the R- or left- (L-) PAG. In awake rats, nanoinjection of kynurenic acid (1 nmol/100 nL) into the L-DMH or R- or L-PAG attenuated the tachycardia evoked by air stress. However, the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia was smallest when the EAA receptors of the R-DMH were blocked. We conclude that EAA receptors contribute to the right-sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism. This interhemispheric difference that involves EAA receptors was observed in the DMH but not in the PAG.

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors by non-receptor tyrosine kinases: roles in depression-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q.

    2016-01-01

    Several key members of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase (nRTK) family are abundantly present within excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. These neuron-enriched nRTKs interact with glutamate receptors and phosphorylate the receptors at tyrosine sites. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor is a direct substrate of nRTKs and has been extensively investigated in its phosphorylation responses to nRTKs. The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor is the other glutamate receptor subtype that is subject to nRTK-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation. Recently, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/5) were found to be sensitive to nRTKs. Robust tyrosine phosphorylation may occur in C-terminal tails of mGluR5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors is either constitutive or induced activity-dependently by changing cellular and/or synaptic input. Through inducing tyrosine phosphorylation, nRTKs regulate trafficking, subcellular distribution, and function of modified receptors. Available data show that nRTK-glutamate receptor interactions and tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptors undergo drastic adaptations in mood disorders such as major depressive disorder. The remodeling of the nRTK-glutamate receptor interplay contributes to the long-lasting pathophysiology and symptomology of depression. This review summarizes the recent progress in tyrosine phosphorylation of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of nRTKs in regulating glutamate receptors and depression-like behavior. PMID:26942227

  10. Anti-NMDA Receptor antibody encephalitis with concomitant detection of Varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Solís, Natalia; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    The typical presentation of anti-NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate) receptor encephalitis involves young women with psychiatric, neurologic and autonomic symptoms; it is often associated with mature ovarian teratomas. NMDA receptor encephalitis has been described following Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. This case describes a classic presentation of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with the concomitant presence of Varicella zoster virus in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  11. Excitotoxic death induced by released glutamate in depolarized primary cultures of mouse cerebellar granule cells is dependent on GABAA receptors and niflumic acid-sensitive chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Babot, Zoila; Cristòfol, Rosa; Suñol, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    Excitotoxic neuronal death has been linked to neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have sought to clarify the involvement of Cl(-) channels in neuronal excitotoxicity using either N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate/kainic acid agonists. In this work we induced excitotoxic death in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells by means of endogenously released glutamate. Excitotoxicity was provoked by exposure to high extracellular K(+) concentrations ([K(+)](o)) for 5 min. Under these conditions, a Ca(2+)-dependent release of glutamate was evoked. When extracellular glutamate concentration rose to between 2 and 4 microM, cell viability was significantly reduced by 30-40%. The NMDA receptor antagonists (MK-801 and D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid) prevented cell death. Exposure to high [K(+)](o) produced a (36)Cl(-) influx which was significantly reduced by picrotoxinin. In addition, the GABA(A) receptor antagonists (bicuculline, picrotoxinin and SR 95531) protected cells from high [K(+)](o)-triggered excitotoxicity and reduced extracellular glutamate concentration. The Cl(-) channel blockers niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid also exerted a neuroprotective effect and reduced extracellular glutamate concentration, even though they did not reduce high [K(+)](o)-induced (36)Cl(-) influx. Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells also contain a population of GABAergic neurons that released GABA in response to high [K(+)](o). Chronic treatment of primary cultures with kainic acid abolished GABA release and rendered granule cells insensitive to high [K(+)](o) exposure, even though NMDA receptors were functional. Altogether, these results demonstrate that, under conditions of membrane depolarization, low micromolar concentrations of extracellular glutamate might induce an excitotoxic process through both NMDA and GABA(A) receptors and niflumic acid-sensitive Cl

  12. Quinolinic acid induces neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells independently of NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Martinez, Juan-Manuel; Forrest, Caroline M; Darlington, L Gail; Smith, Robert A; Stone, Trevor W

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) ) have been implicated in neuronal development and several types of cancer. The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism includes quinolinic acid (QA) which is both a selective agonist at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and also a precursor for the formation of NAD(+) . The effect of QA on cell survival and differentiation has therefore been examined on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Retinoic acid (RA, 10 μm) induced differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells into a neuronal phenotype showing neurite growth. QA (50-150 nm) also caused a concentration-dependent increase in the neurite/soma ratio, indicating differentiation. Both RA and QA increased expression of the neuronal marker β3-tubulin in whole-cell homogenates and in the neuritic fraction assessed using a neurite outgrowth assay. Expression of the neuronal proliferation marker doublecortin revealed that, unlike RA, QA did not decrease the number of mitotic cells. QA-induced neuritogenesis coincided with an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species. Neuritogenesis was prevented by diphenylene-iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase) and superoxide dismutase, supporting the involvement of reactive oxygen species. NMDA itself did not promote neuritogenesis and the NMDA antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) did not prevent quinolinate-induced neuritogenesis, indicating that the effects of QA were independent of NMDA receptors. Nicotinamide caused a significant increase in the neurite/soma ratio and the expression of β3-tubulin in the neuritic fraction. Taken together, these results suggest that QA induces neuritogenesis by promoting oxidizing conditions and affecting the availability of NAD(+) , independently of NMDA receptors.

  13. 2-Methoxyestradiol Impacts on Amino Acids-mediated Metabolic Reprogramming in Osteosarcoma Cells by Interaction with NMDA Receptor.

    PubMed

    Gorska-Ponikowska, Magdalena; Perricone, Ugo; Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Lo Bosco, Giosue; Barone, Giampaolo

    2017-03-06

    Deregulation of serine and glycine metabolism, have been identified to function as metabolic regulators in supporting tumor cell growth. The role of serine and glycine in regulation of cancer cell proliferation is complicated, dependent on concentrations of amino acids and tissue-specific. D-serine and glycine are coagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit GRIN1. Importantly, NMDA receptors are widely expressed in cancer cells and play an important role in regulation of cell death, proliferation and metabolism of numerous malignancies. The aim of the present work was to associate the metabolism of glycine and D-serine with the anticancer activity of 2-methoxyestradiol. 2-methoxyestradiol is a potent anticancer agent but also a physiological 17β- estradiol metabolite. In the study we have chosen two malignant cell lines expressing functional GRIN1 receptors, i.e. osteosarcoma 143B and breast cancer MCF7. We used MTS assay, migration assay, flow cytometric analyses, western blotting and immunoprecipitation techniques as well as molecular modeling studies. We have demonstrated the extensive crosstalk between the deregulated metabolic network and cancer cell signaling. Herein, we observed an anticancer effect of high concentrations of glycine and D-serine in osteosarcoma cells. In contrast, the amino acids when used at low, physiological concentrations induced the proliferation and migration of osteosarcoma and breast cancer cells. Importantly, the pro-cancergogenic effects of both glycine and D-serine where abrogated by the usage of 2-methoxyestradiol at both physiological and pharmacological relevant concentrations. The obtained data confirmed that 2-methoxyestradiol may be a physiological anticancer molecule. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Abeta-afferents activate neurokinin-1 receptor in dorsal horn neurons after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Hong; Song, Xue-Jun

    2005-05-12

    We provide new evidence demonstrating that peripheral nerve injury produces profound alterations in synaptic input to dorsal horn neurons mediated by non-nociceptive sensory neurons, and activation of neurokinin-1 receptor may be involved in the enhanced synaptic response and thus contribute to the tactile allodynia. Our results show that Abeta-fiber-evoked field potential significantly increased in the first postoperative week and decreased thereafter while maximal mechanical allodynia was exhibited. The neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist L703,606 significantly reduced Abeta-fiber-evoked field potential in nerve-injured but not in sham-operated animals. The non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist CNQX inhibited Abeta-fiber-evoked field potential in both nerve-injured and sham-operated rats, while the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 did not affect Abeta-fiber-evoked field potential in either CCI or sham-operated animals.

  15. Glutamate regulates intracellular calcium and gene expression in oligodendrocyte progenitors through the activation of DL-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pende, M; Holtzclaw, L A; Curtis, J L; Russell, J T; Gallo, V

    1994-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes and their progenitors (O-2A) express functional kainate- and DL-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-preferring glutamate receptors. The physiological consequences of activation of these receptors were studied in purified rat cortical O-2A progenitors and in the primary oligodendrocyte cell line CG-4. Changes in the mRNA levels of a set of immediate early genes were studied and were correlated to intracellular Ca2+ concentration, as measured by fura-2 Ca2+ imaging. Both in CG-4 and in cortical O-2A progenitors, basal mRNA levels of NGFI-A were much higher than c-fos, c-jun, or jun-b. Glutamate, kainate, and AMPA greatly increased NGFI-A mRNA and protein by activation of membrane receptors in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. Agonists at non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors promoted transmembrane Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent channels as well as kainate and/or AMPA channels. The influx of Ca2+ ions occurring through glutamate-gated channels was sufficient by itself to increase the expression of NGFI-A mRNA. AMPA receptors were found to be directly involved in intracellular Ca2+ and NGFI-A mRNA regulation, because the effects of kainate were greatly enhanced by cyclothiazide, an allosteric modulator that selectively suppresses desensitization of AMPA but not kainate receptors. Our results indicate that glutamate acting at AMPA receptors regulates immediate early gene expression in cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage by increasing intracellular calcium. Consequently, modulation of these receptor channels may have immediate effects at the genomic level and regulate oligodendrocyte development at critical stages. Images PMID:8159727

  16. EM colocalization of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits at synapses in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kharazia, V N; Phend, K D; Rustioni, A; Weinberg, R J

    1996-05-24

    Electrophysiology and light microscopy suggest that a single excitatory synapse may use both amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we here provide direct evidence for colocalization at individual synapses in sensorimotor cortex of adult rats. Colocalization was most commonly observed on dendritic spines; subunits of the two classes of receptors seemed to be independently distributed within the synaptic active zone.

  17. Low nanomolar serotonin inhibits the glutamate receptor/nitric oxide/cyclic GMP pathway in slices from adult rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Maura, G; Guadagnin, A; Raiteri, M

    1995-09-01

    The function of serotonin afferents to the cerebellum has been investigated by monitoring the effects of serotoninergic drugs on the production of cyclic GMP elicited in cerebellar slices by activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Exposure of adult rat cerebellar slices to N-methyl-D-aspartate (1 nM to 1 microM) or to (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA; 1 nM to 10 microM) elicited concentration-dependent and saturable rises in the levels of cyclic GMP. These responses were blocked by selective antagonists at the N-methyl-D-aspartate or AMPA receptors and by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase, but were insensitive to tetrodotoxin. When tested between 0.1 and 10 nM, serotonin, the serotonin1A receptor agonist (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin and the serotonin2 receptor agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane inhibited, concentration-dependently, the cyclic GMP responses evoked by near-maximal (0.1 microM) concentrations of N-methyl-D-aspartate or AMPA. The EC50 values (concentrations causing half-maximal effect) ranged between 0.7 and 2.1 nM. The actions of serotonin were totally abolished by methiothepin, a mixed-type serotonin receptor antagonist. Thus, the serotonergic cerebellar afferents may exert a potent inhibitory control on the excitatory transmission mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate and AMPA receptors; the inhibition occurs through both serotonin1A and serotonin2 receptors. As the glutamate receptor-dependent cyclic GMP responses involve production of nitric oxide, a diffusible activator of guanylate cyclase, the above inhibitory serotonin receptors may have multiple localization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Kaitocephalin Antagonism of Glutamate Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kaitocephalin is the first discovered natural toxin with protective properties against excitotoxic death of cultured neurons induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)/kainic acid (kainate, KA) receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of kaitocephalin on the function of these receptors were unknown. In this work, we report some pharmacological properties of synthetic (−)-kaitocephalin on rat brain glutamate receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on the homomeric AMPA-type GluR3 and KA-type GluR6 receptors. Kaitocephalin was found to be a more potent antagonist of NMDA receptors (IC50 = 75 ± 9 nM) than of AMPA receptors from cerebral cortex (IC50 = 242 ± 37 nM) and from homomeric GluR3 subunits (IC50 = 502 ± 55 nM). Moreover, kaitocephalin is a weak antagonist of the KA-type receptor GluR6 (IC50 ∼ 100 μM) and of metabotropic (IC50 > 100 μM) glutamate receptors expressed by rat brain mRNA. PMID:20436943

  19. NMDA receptor gene variations as modifiers in Huntington disease: a replication study.

    PubMed

    Saft, Carsten; Epplen, Jörg T; Wieczorek, Stefan; Landwehrmeyer, G Bernhard; Roos, Raymund A C; de Yebenes, Justo Garcia; Dose, Matthias; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Craufurd, David; Arning, Larissa

    2011-10-04

    Several candidate modifier genes which, in addition to the pathogenic CAG repeat expansion, influence the age at onset (AO) in Huntington disease (HD) have already been described. The aim of this study was to replicate association of variations in the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype genes GRIN2A and GRIN2B in the "REGISTRY" cohort from the European Huntington Disease Network (EHDN). The analyses did replicate the association reported between the GRIN2A rs2650427 variation and AO in the entire cohort. Yet, when subjects were stratified by AO subtypes, we found nominally significant evidence for an association of the GRIN2A rs1969060 variation and the GRIN2B rs1806201 variation. These findings further implicate the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype genes as loci containing variation associated with AO in HD.

  20. The role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Cepeda, Carlos; Cui, Cai-Lian

    2009-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an impressive accumulation of evidence indicating that the excitatory amino acid glutamate and its receptors, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype, play an important role in drug addiction. Various lines of research using animal models of drug addiction have demonstrated that drug-induced craving is accompanied by significant upregulation of NR2B subunit expression. Furthermore, selective blockade of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the striatum, especially in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) can inhibit drug craving and reinstatement. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction. After a brief description of glutamatergic innervation and NMDA receptor subunit distribution in the striatum, we discuss potential mechanisms to explain the role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction by elucidating signaling cascades involved in the regulation of subunit expression and redistribution, phosphorylation of receptor subunits, as well as activation of intracellular signals triggered by drug experience. Understanding the mechanisms regulating striatal NMDA receptor changes in drug addiction will provide more specific and rational targets to counteract the deleterious effects of drug addiction.

  1. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  2. Structural insights into competitive antagonism in NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Annie; Tajima, Nami; Fernandez-Cuervo, Gabriela; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary There has been a great level of enthusiasm to down-regulate overactive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors to protect neurons from excitotoxicity. NMDA receptors play pivotal roles in basic brain development and functions as well as in neurological disorders and diseases. However, mechanistic understanding of antagonism in NMDA receptors is limited due to complete lack of antagonist-bound structures for the l-glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. Here we report the crystal structures of GluN1/GluN2A NMDA receptor ligand-binding domain (LBD) heterodimers in complex with GluN1- and GluN2-targeting antagonists. The crystal structures reveal that the antagonists, D-(−)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) and 1-(Phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (PPDA), have discrete binding modes and mechanisms for opening of the bilobed architecture of GluN2A LBD compared to the agonist-bound form. The current study shows distinct ways by which the conformations of NMDA receptor LBDs may be controlled and coupled to receptor inhibition and provides possible strategies to develop therapeutic compounds with higher subtype-specificity. PMID:24462099

  3. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. D-Amino Acids in the Nervous and Endocrine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kiriyama, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important components for peptides and proteins and act as signal transmitters. Only L-amino acids have been considered necessary in mammals, including humans. However, diverse D-amino acids, such as D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, and D-cysteine, are found in mammals. Physiological roles of these D-amino acids not only in the nervous system but also in the endocrine system are being gradually revealed. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with learning and memory. D-Serine, D-aspartate, and D-alanine can all bind to NMDA receptors. H2S generated from D-cysteine reduces disulfide bonds in receptors and potentiates their activity. Aberrant receptor activity is related to diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and schizophrenia. Furthermore, D-amino acids are detected in parts of the endocrine system, such as the pineal gland, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pancreas, adrenal gland, and testis. D-Aspartate is being investigated for the regulation of hormone release from various endocrine organs. Here we focused on recent findings regarding the synthesis and physiological functions of D-amino acids in the nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:28053803

  5. Localization of a gene for a glutamate binding subunit of a NMDA receptor (GRINA) to 8q24

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; DuPont, B.R.; Leach, R.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of a gene for a glutamate binding subunit of an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, called GRINA, to human chromosome 8q24 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and radiation hybridization mapping. This gene mapped outside the critical region for benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC), a rare form of epilepsy; however, GRINA could be the causative genetic factor inducing idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Further studies need to be conducted. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Expression pattern of NMDA receptors reveals antiepileptic potential of apigenin 8-C-glucoside and chlorogenic acid in pilocarpine induced epileptic mice.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Suryakala, U; Doulethunisha; Sundaram, S; Bose, P Chandra; Sivasudha, T

    2016-08-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of apigenin 8-C-glucoside (Vitexin) and chlorogenic acid on epileptic mice induced by pilocarpine and explored its possible mechanisms. Intraperitonial administration of pilocarpine (85mg/kg) induced seizure in mice was assessed by behavior observations, which is significantly (p>0.05) reduced by apigenin 8-C-glucoside (AP8CG) (10mg/kg) and chlorogenic acid (CA) (5mg/kg), similar to diazepam. Seizure was accompanied by an imbalance in the levels of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the pilocarpine administered group. Moreover, convulsion along with reduced acetylcholinesterase, increased monoamine oxidase and oxidative stress was observed in epileptic mice brain. AP8CG and CA significantly restored back to normal levels even at lower doses. Further, increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite content was also significantly attenuated by AP8CG and CA. However, CA was found to be more effective when compared to AP8CG. In addition, the mRNA expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), mGluR1 and mGlu5 was significantly (P≤0.05) inhibited by AP8CG and CA in a lower dose. The mRNA expression of GRIK1 did not differ significantly in any of the group and showed a similar pattern of expression. Our result shows that AP8CG and CA selectively inhibit NMDAR, mGluR1 and mGlu5 expression. Modification in the provoked NMDAR calcium response coupled with neuronal death. Hence, these findings underline that the polyphenolics, AP8CG and CA have exerted antiepileptic and neuroprotective activity by suppressing glutamate receptors.

  7. Neuroprotective effect of WIN55,212-2 against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity in the rat brain: involvement of CB1 and NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Maya-López, Marisol; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; de Lima, María Eduarda; Colpo-Ceolin, Ana; Rangel-López, Edgar; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Túnez, Isaac; Luna-López, Armando; Lazzarini-Lechuga, Roberto; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Posadas-Rodríguez, Pedro; Silva-Palacios, Alejandro; Königsberg, Mina; Santamaría, Abel

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS), and agonists acting on cannabinoid receptors (CBr), are known to regulate several physiological events in the brain, including modulatory actions on excitatory events probably through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activity. Actually, CBr agonists can be neuroprotective. The synthetic CBr agonist WIN55,212-2 acts mainly on CB1 receptor. In turn, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) produces striatal alterations in rats similar to those observed in the brain of Huntington’s disease patients. Herein, the effects of WIN55,212-2 were tested on different endpoints of the 3-NP-induced toxicity in rat brain synaptosomes and striatal tissue. Motor activity was also evaluated. The 3-NP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation was attenuated by WIN55,212-2 (1 µM) in synaptosomal fractions. The intrastriatal bilateral injection of 3-NP (500 nmol/µL) to rats increased lipid peroxidation and locomotor activity, augmented the rate of cell damage, and decreased the striatal density of neuronal cells. These alterations were accompanied by transcriptional changes in the NMDA (NR1 subunit) content. The administration of WIN55212-2 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) to rats for six consecutive days, before the 3-NP injection, exerted preventive effects on all alterations elicited by the toxin. The prevention of the 3-NP-induced NR1 transcriptional alterations by the CBr agonist together with the increase of CB1 content suggest an early reduction of the excitotoxic process via CBr activation. Our results demonstrate a protective role of WIN55,212-2 on the 3-NP-induced striatal neurotoxicity that could be partially related to the ECS stimulation and induction of NMDAr hypofunction, representing an effective therapeutic strategy at the experimental level for further studies. PMID:28337258

  8. Neuroprotective effect of WIN55,212-2 against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity in the rat brain: involvement of CB1 and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Maya-López, Marisol; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; de Lima, María Eduarda; Colpo-Ceolin, Ana; Rangel-López, Edgar; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Túnez, Isaac; Luna-López, Armando; Lazzarini-Lechuga, Roberto; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Posadas-Rodríguez, Pedro; Silva-Palacios, Alejandro; Königsberg, Mina; Santamaría, Abel

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS), and agonists acting on cannabinoid receptors (CBr), are known to regulate several physiological events in the brain, including modulatory actions on excitatory events probably through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activity. Actually, CBr agonists can be neuroprotective. The synthetic CBr agonist WIN55,212-2 acts mainly on CB1 receptor. In turn, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) produces striatal alterations in rats similar to those observed in the brain of Huntington's disease patients. Herein, the effects of WIN55,212-2 were tested on different endpoints of the 3-NP-induced toxicity in rat brain synaptosomes and striatal tissue. Motor activity was also evaluated. The 3-NP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation was attenuated by WIN55,212-2 (1 µM) in synaptosomal fractions. The intrastriatal bilateral injection of 3-NP (500 nmol/µL) to rats increased lipid peroxidation and locomotor activity, augmented the rate of cell damage, and decreased the striatal density of neuronal cells. These alterations were accompanied by transcriptional changes in the NMDA (NR1 subunit) content. The administration of WIN55212-2 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) to rats for six consecutive days, before the 3-NP injection, exerted preventive effects on all alterations elicited by the toxin. The prevention of the 3-NP-induced NR1 transcriptional alterations by the CBr agonist together with the increase of CB1 content suggest an early reduction of the excitotoxic process via CBr activation. Our results demonstrate a protective role of WIN55,212-2 on the 3-NP-induced striatal neurotoxicity that could be partially related to the ECS stimulation and induction of NMDAr hypofunction, representing an effective therapeutic strategy at the experimental level for further studies.

  9. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  10. DOPAMINE RECEPTOR ACTIVATION REVEALS A NOVEL, KYNURENATE-SENSITIVE COMPONENT OF STRIATAL NMDA NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Poeggeler, Burkhard; Rassoulpour, Arash; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Guidetti, Paolo; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Schwarcz, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors plays an important role in brain physiology, but excessive receptor stimulation results in seizures and excitotoxic nerve cell death. NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal excitation and injury can be prevented by high, non-physiological concentrations of the neuroinhibitory tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA). Here we report that endogenous KYNA, which is formed in and released from astrocytes, controls NMDA receptors in vivo. This was revealed with the aid of the dopaminergic drugs d-amphetamine and apomorphine, which cause rapid, transient decreases in striatal KYNA levels in rats. Intrastriatal injections of the excitotoxins NMDA or quinolinate (but not the non-NMDA receptor agonist kainate) at the time of maximal KYNA reduction resulted in 2-3-fold increases in excitotoxic lesion size. Pre-treatment with kynurenine 3-hydroxylase inhibitors or dopamine receptor antagonists, two classes of pharmacological agents that prevented the reduction in brain KYNA caused by dopaminergic stimulation, abolished the potentiation of neurotoxicity. Thus, the present study identifies a previously unappreciated role of KYNA as a functional link between dopamine receptor stimulation and NMDA neurotoxicity in the striatum. PMID:17629627

  11. Insights into the mechanisms of ifosfamide encephalopathy: drug metabolites have agonistic effects on alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chatton, J Y; Idle, J R; Vågbø, C B; Magistretti, P J

    2001-12-01

    Therapeutic value of the alkylating agent ifosfamide has been limited by major side effects including encephalopathy. Although the underlying biochemical processes of the neurotoxic side effects are still unclear, they could be attributed to metabolites rather than to ifosfamide itself. In the present study, the effects of selected ifosfamide metabolites on indices of neuronal activity have been investigated, in particular for S-carboxymethylcysteine (SCMC) and thiodiglycolic acid (TDGA). Because of structural similarities of SCMC with glutamate, the Ca(2+)(i) response of single mouse cortical neurons to SCMC and TDGA was investigated. SCMC, but not TDGA, evoked a robust increase in Ca(2+)(i) concentration that could be abolished by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), but only partly diminished by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 10,11-dihydro-5-methyl-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK=801). Cyclothiazide (CYZ), used to prevent AMPA/kainate receptor desensitization, potentiated the response to SCMC. Because activation of AMPA/kainate receptors is known to induce proton influx, the intracellular pH (pH(i)) response to SCMC was investigated. SCMC caused a concentration-dependent acidification that was amplified by CYZ. Since H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) activity leads to similar cellular acidification, we tested its potential involvement in the pH(i) response. Application of the lactate transport inhibitor quercetin diminished the pH(i) response to SCMC and TDGA by 43 and 51%, respectively, indicating that these compounds may be substrates of MCTs. Taken together, this study indicates that hitherto apparently inert ifosfamide metabolites, in particular SCMC, activate AMPA/kainate receptors and induce cellular acidification. Both processes could provide the biochemical basis of the observed ifosfamide-associated encephalopathy.

  12. Activation-induced structural change in the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Balasuriya, Dilshan; Takahashi, Hirohide; Srivats, Shyam; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • We studied the response of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor to activation. • GluN1 and GluN3A subunits interacted within transfected cells. • The GluN1/GluN3A receptor was functionally active. • Glycine or D-serine caused a ∼1 nm height reduction in bilayer-integrated receptors. • This height reduction was abolished by the glycine antagonist DCKA. - Abstract: Unlike GluN2-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which require both glycine and glutamate for activation, receptors composed of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits are activated by glycine alone. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging to examine the response to activation of the GluN1/GluN3A excitatory glycine receptor. GluN1 and GluN3A subunits were shown to interact intimately within transfected tsA 201 cells. Isolated GluN1/GluN3A receptors integrated into lipid bilayers responded to addition of either glycine or D-serine, but not glutamate, with a ∼1 nm reduction in height of the extracellular domain. The height reduction in response to glycine was abolished by the glycine antagonist 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid. Our results represent the first demonstration of the effect of activation on the conformation of this receptor.

  13. The effect of transient increases in kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid levels early in life on behavior in adulthood: Implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Iaccarino, Hannah F; Suckow, Raymond F; Xie, Shan; Bucci, David J

    2013-11-01

    Kynurenic acid is a tryptophan metabolite that is synthesized and released in the brain by astrocytes and acts as an antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors, both of which are critically involved in cognition as well as neural plasticity and brain development. The concentration of kynurenic acid is increased in the brains of persons with schizophrenia and this increase has been implicated in the cognitive and social impairments associated with the disease. In addition, growing evidence suggests that the increase in kynurenic acid may begin early in life. For example, exposure to influenza A virus during development results in a transient increase in kynurenic acid concentration that could disrupt normal brain development and lead to cognitive deficits later in life. Changes in kynurenic acid may thus provide a link between developmental exposure to viruses and the increased risk of subsequently developing schizophrenia. To test this, we mimicked the effects of influenza A exposure by treating rats with kynurenine, the precursor of kynurenic acid, on postnatal days 7-10. We observed a transient increase in both kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid during treatment. When rats were subsequently behaviorally tested as adults, those previously treated with kynurenine exhibited decreased social behavior and locomotor activity. In contrast, attentional function and fear conditioning were not affected. Together with other recent findings, these data have several implications for understanding how viral-induced changes in tryptophan metabolism during development may contribute to schizophrenia-related symptoms later in life.

  14. Effects of NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors in the medial preoptic area on body temperature in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Trina; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate when microinjected at the medial preoptic area (mPOA) influences brain temperature (Tbr) and body temperature (Tb) in rats. Glutamate and its various receptors are present at the mPOA. The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of each of the ionotropic glutamatergic receptors at the mPOA on changes in Tbr and Tb in freely moving rats. Adult male Wistar rats (n=40) were implanted with bilateral guide cannula with indwelling styli above the mPOA. A telemetric transmitter was implanted at the peritoneum to record Tb and locomotor activity (LMA). A precalibrated thermocouple wire implanted near the hypothalamus was used to assess Tbr. Specific agonist for each ionotropic glutamate receptor was microinjected into the mPOA and its effects on temperature and LMA were measured in the rats. The rats were also microinjected with the respective ionotropic receptor antagonists, 15min prior to the microinjection of each agonist. Amongst amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid, AMPA increased Tb and LMA when injected at the mPOA. Specific antagonists for AMPA receptors was able to attenuate this increase (p<0.005). Pharmacological blockade of NMDA was able to lower Tbr only. Microinjection of kainic acid and its antagonist had no effect on the variables. The finding of the study suggests that activation of the AMPA receptors at the mPOA, leads to the rise in body temperature.

  15. Local acamprosate modulates dopamine release in the rat nucleus accumbens through NMDA receptors: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Cano-Cebrián, M J; Zornoza-Sabina, T; Guerri, C; Polache, A; Granero, L

    2003-02-01

    The effects of acamprosate on the in vivo dopamine extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens and the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in these effects were investigated. Microdialysis in freely moving rats was used to assess dopamine levels before and during simultaneous perfusion of acamprosate and/or different agonists or antagonists of NMDA receptors. Perfusion with acamprosate at concentrations of 0.5 and 5 mM provoked a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The lowest concentration of acamprosate assayed (0.05 mM) had no effect on dopamine levels. Infusion of NMDA (25 and 500 microM) and the glutamate uptake blocker, L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxilic acid (PDC) (0.5 mM) into the NAc caused a significant increase in DA, whereas acamprosate (0.05 mM) co-infusion with these compounds blocked or attenuated the NMDA and PDC-induced increases in DA levels. Co-infusion of the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) (400 microM) with acamprosate (0.5 mM), did not reduce the increase of DA levels induced by acamprosate. These results demonstrate that acamprosate is able to modulate DA extracellular levels in NAc via NMDA receptors and suggest that acamprosate acts as an antagonist of NMDA receptors.

  16. Neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels encoded by mRNA from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Miledi, R

    1993-01-01

    The presence of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated channels in the adult human and bovine corpus callosum was investigated using Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the corpus callosum expressed functional receptors to glutamate, acetylcholine, and serotonin, and also voltage-operated Ca2+ channels, all with similar properties in the two species studied. Acetylcholine and serotonin elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate-Ca2+ receptor-channel coupling system. Glutamate and its analogs N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate, quisqualate, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) induced smooth currents. The non-NMDA responses showed a strong inward rectification at positive potentials and were potently blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, as observed for the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors GLUR1 and GLUR3. Furthermore, in situ hybridization experiments showed that GLUR1 and GLUR3 mRNAs are present in corpus callosum cells that were labeled with antiserum to glial fibrillary acid protein and that, in primary cell cultures, had the morphology of type 2 astrocytes. These results indicate that glial cells in the adult corpus callosum possess mRNA encoding functional neurotransmitter receptors and Ca2+ channels. These molecules may provide a mechanism for glial-neuronal interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7682696

  17. Disruption of glutamate receptors at Shank-postsynaptic platform in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuesong; Lippa, Carol F.; Zhu, Jinghua; Lin, Qishan; Rosso, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic loss underlies the memory deficit of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular mechanism is elusive; however, excitatory synapses organized by the postsynaptic density (PSD) have been used as targets for AD treatment. To identify pathological entities at the synapse in AD, synaptic proteins were screened by quantitative proteomic profiling. The critical proteins were then selected for immunoblot analysis. The glutamate receptors N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 1 and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor 2 (GluR2) were substantially lost; specifically, the loss of GluR2 was up to 40% at PSD in AD. Shank proteins, the organizers of these glutamate receptors at excitatory synapses, were dramatically altered in AD. The level of Shank2 was increased, whereas the protein level of Shank3 was decreased. Further, the Shank3 protein was modified by ubiquitin, indicating that abnormal activity of the ubiquitin–proteasome system may lead to Shank3 degradation in AD. Our findings suggest that disruption of glutamate receptors at the Shank-postsynaptic platform could contribute to destruction of the PSD which underlies the synaptic dysfunction and loss in AD. PMID:19635471

  18. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  19. Differential roles for NSF and GRIP/ABP in AMPA receptor cycling.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Steven P; Xia, Houhui; Malenka, Robert C

    2002-05-14

    alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) stability and movement at synapses are important factors controlling synaptic strength. Here, we study the roles of proteins [N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF), glutamate receptor AMPAR binding protein (ABP)-interacting protein (GRIP)/(ABP), and protein interacting with C-kinase-1 (PICK1) that interact with the GluR2 subunit in the control of the surface expression and cycling of AMPARs. Epitope-tagged GluR2 formed functional receptors that exhibited targeting to synaptic sites. Constructs in which binding to NSF, PDZ proteins (GRIP/ABP and PICK1), or GRIP/ABP alone was eliminated each exhibited normal surface targeting and constitutive cycling. The lack of NSF binding, however, resulted in receptors that were endocytosed to a greater extent than wild-type receptors in response to application of AMPA or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Conversely, the behavior of the GluR2 mutants incapable of binding to GRIP/ABP suggests that these PDZ proteins play a role in the stabilization of an intracellular pool of AMPARs that have been internalized on stimulation, thus inhibiting their recycling to the synaptic membrane. These results provide further evidence for distinct functional roles of GluR2-interacting proteins in AMPAR trafficking.

  20. NMDA receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus regulate methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and extracellular amino acid release in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenyan; Wang, Fangyang; Qi, Jia; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Lijia; Zhao, Siqi; Song, Ming; Wu, Chunfu; Yang, Jingyu

    2012-06-15

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the dorsal hippocampus (DHC) play significant roles in stimulant-induced neurobehavioral effects. Methamphetamine (MAP)-induced hyperactivity has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the glutamatergic system. The present study examined whether the glutamatergic and GABAergic systems in the mPFC and DHC were involved in MAP-induced hyperactivity in mice. A combined kainic acid (KA) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) lesion and microdialysis technique targeting both the mPFC and DHC were used. The results showed that both KA- and NMDA-induced lesions of the mPFC facilitated MAP-induced hyperactivity, while neither KA- nor NMDA-induced lesions of the DHC had a similar effect. MAP increased the extracellular glutamate (Glu) levels in the mPFC and reduced Glu levels in the DHC. GABA levels in both of these regions were reduced. A KA or NMDA lesion of the mPFC inhibited the Glu reduction in the DHC, and the same lesion of the DHC inhibited the Glu increase in the mPFC induced by MAP. A NMDA lesion of the mPFC blocked GABA reduction in the DHC, but a lesion of DHC enhanced the GABA decrease in the mPFC induced by MAP. Furthermore, a NMDA lesion of DHC increased the vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2) expression in the mPFC following MAP-administration. These findings indicate that glutamatergic as well as GABAergic systems in these two regions are involved in MAP-induced hyperactivity. Moreover, there may be an inhibitory role in these two regions, especially mediated by NMDA receptors, in MAP-induced abnormal behavior and neurotransmission responses.

  1. Overexpression of EphB2 in hippocampus rescues impaired NMDA receptors trafficking and cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rui; Wei, Pan; Jin, Lu; Zheng, Teng; Chen, Wen-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Hao, Jing-Ru; Sun, Nan; Gao, Can

    2017-03-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, which affects more and more people. But there is still no effective treatment for preventing or reversing the progression of the disease. Soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers, also known as Aβ-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs) play an important role in AD. Synaptic activity and cognition critically depend on the function of glutamate receptors. Targeting N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors trafficking and its regulation is a new strategy for AD early treatment. EphB2 is a key regulator of synaptic localization of NMDA receptors. Aβ oligomers could bind to the fibronectin repeats domain of EphB2 and trigger EphB2 degradation in the proteasome. Here we identified that overexpression of EphB2 with lentiviral vectors in dorsal hippocampus improved impaired memory deficits and anxiety or depression-like behaviors in APPswe/PS1-dE9 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice. Phosphorylation and surface expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors were also improved. Overexpression of EphB2 also rescued the ADDLs-induced depletion of the expression of EphB2 and GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors trafficking in cultured hippocampal neurons. These results suggest that improving the decreased expression of EphB2 and subsequent GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors trafficking in hippocampus may be a promising strategy for AD treatment.

  2. Role of glutamate receptors of central and basolateral amygdala nuclei on retrieval and reconsolidation of taste aversive memory.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Delatorre, Paola; Pérez-Sánchez, Consuelo; Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2014-05-01

    There are a number of experiments showing an important involvement of amygdala N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors on consolidation of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) memory. Interestingly, recent evidence has shown that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors are particularly involved in CTA retrieval. Memory reconsolidation has been proposed as a destabilization and re-stabilization process induced by memory reactivation. We have recently suggested that reconsolidation could be enabled in the absence of retrieval. Hence, we decided to analyze the participation of AMPA and NMDA receptors of the central (CeA) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) in CTA memory retrieval and reconsolidation. To do so, we tested whether administrations of an AMPA receptor blocker (NBQX) or an NMDA receptor blocker (APV) 15 min before a second acquisition trial could have effects on taste aversion. We found that administration of NBQX in the BLA blocked retrieval, whereas APV blocked reconsolidation in the BLA, and consolidation in the CeA. When we administered both NBQX and APV into the BLA before the second acquisition trial, results showed impairment of both retrieval and reconsolidation. These results further support the idea that reconsolidation is independent of retrieval, since retrieval blockade in the BLA did not impair memory reconsolidation. These results suggest that glutamate receptors have different participation on retrieval and reconsolidation of CTA and further support the hypothesis that these two processes could be independent.

  3. The effect of experimental ischaemia and excitatory amino acid agonists on the GABA and serotonin immunoreactivities in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N N; Herrera, A J

    1994-04-01

    The aim of the described experiments was to use immunohistochemistry to visualize the release of GABA from specific retinal amacrine cells following ischaemia and to establish the involvement of defined glutamatergic receptors. In initial experiments, rabbit retinas were exposed in vitro to excitatory amino acid agonists alone or in combination with a putative antagonist, or in physiological solution lacking oxygen and glucose, or in solution containing potassium cyanide for 45 min at 37 degrees C. The nature of the GABA immunoreactivity was then examined by immunohistochemistry. In other in vitro experiments, retinas were first allowed to accumulate exogenous serotonin before exposing the tissues to the combinations as described. These tissues were then processed immunohistochemically for the localization of serotonin. In yet other experiments, the intraocular pressure of a rabbit's eye was raised to about 110 mmHg for 60 min and a reperfusion time of 45 min allowed before dissecting the retina and processing for the localization of GABA immunoreactivity. The other eye served as a control. Of the excitatory amino acid agonists tested, only N-methyl-D-aspartate, kainate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid caused a change in the GABA immunoreactivity. The N-methyl-D-aspartate effect was specifically antagonized by dizocilpine maleate, dextromethorphan and memantine, and was characterized by a reduction in the number of GABA-immunoreactive perikarya. The GABA "staining" in the inner plexiform layer also appeared as four clear bands. The alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid- and kainate-induced effects were both antagonized by 6-cyano-2,3-dihydroxy-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione and partially by kynurenic acid at the concentrations used. Here, the amount of GABA-positive perikarya was greatly reduced and three immunoreactive bands appeared in the inner plexiform layer. However, for low concentrations of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy

  4. Endogenous excitatory amino acid neurotransmission regulates thyroid-stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone secretion in conscious freely moving male rats.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; Durán, R; Perez-Vences, D; Alfonso, M

    2002-04-01

    The role of neurotransmission of endogenous excitatory amino acid (EAA) on serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels was examined in conscious and freely moving adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were cannulated at the third ventricle 2 d before the experiments. Several glutamate receptor agonists, such as kainic acid and domoic acid, and antagonists, such as 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and dizocilpine (MK-801) were administered into the third ventricle. Serum TSH levels were assesed by radioimmunoassay, and serum thyroid hormone levels were assessed by enzyme immunoassay. The results showed that the administration of CNQX and MK-801 produced a decrease in serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. The administration of kainic acid and domoic acid increased TSH concentrations, whereas CNQX completely blocked the release of TSH induced by kainic acid and domoic acid. These results suggest the importance of endogenous EAA in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the role of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in the stimulatory effect of EAAs on the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  5. Regulation of GABAergic inputs to CA1 pyramidal neurons by nicotinic receptors and kynurenic acid.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Pereira, Edna F R; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2012-05-01

    Impaired α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function and GABAergic transmission in the hippocampus and elevated brain levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an astrocyte-derived metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, are key features of schizophrenia. KYNA acts as a noncompetitive antagonist with respect to agonists at both α7 nAChRs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in hippocampal slices tonically active α7 nAChRs control GABAergic transmission to CA1 pyramidal neurons and are sensitive to inhibition by rising levels of KYNA. The α7 nAChR-selective antagonist α-bungarotoxin (α-BGT; 100 nM) and methyllycaconitine (MLA; 10 nM), an antagonist at α7 and other nAChRs, reduced by 51.3 ± 1.3 and 65.2 ± 1.5%, respectively, the frequency of GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons. MLA had no effect on miniature GABAergic PSCs. Thus, GABAergic synaptic activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons is maintained, in part, by tonically active α7 nAChRs located on the preterminal region of axons and/or the somatodendritic region of interneurons that synapse onto the neurons under study. L-Kynurenine (20 or 200 μM) or KYNA (20-200 μM) suppressed concentration-dependently the frequency of GABAergic PSCs; the inhibitory effect of 20 μM L-kynurenine had an onset time of approximately 35 min and could not be detected in the presence of 100 nM α-BGT. These results suggest that KYNA levels generated from 20 μM kynurenine inhibit tonically active α7 nAChR-dependent GABAergic transmission to the pyramidal neurons. Disruption of nAChR-dependent GABAergic transmission by mildly elevated levels of KYNA can be an important determinant of the cognitive deficits presented by patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Tributyltin exposure influences predatory behavior, neurotransmitter content and receptor expression in Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ang; Wang, Xinli; Zuo, Zhenghong; Cai, Jiali; Wang, Chonggang

    2013-03-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a ubiquitous marine contaminant due to its extensive use as a biocide, fungicide and antifouling agent. However, the neurotoxic effect of TBT has not been extensively studied, especially in marine fish. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of TBT (10, 100 and 1000 ng/L) on the predatory behavior of Sebastiscus marmoratus and to look into the mechanism involved. The results showed that TBT exposure depressed predatory activity after 50 days exposure. Dopamine levels in the fish brains increased in a dose-dependent manner, while 5-hydroxytryptamine and norepinephrine levels decreased significantly in the TBT exposure group compared to the control. The mRNA levels of dopamine receptors, which have functions such as cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, mood, attention and learning, were significantly down-regulated by TBT exposure. Although the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters, including glutamate, did not show marked alteration, the expression of the glutamatergic signaling pathway such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor, calmodulin, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases-II and cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element binding protein, was significantly reduced by TBT exposure, which indicated that central nerve activities were in a state of depression, thus affecting the predatory activities of the fish.

  7. Atypical effect of dopamine in modulating the functional inhibition of NMDA receptors of cultured retina cells.

    PubMed

    Do Nascimento, J L; Kubrusly, R C; Reis, R A; De Mello, M C; De Mello, F G

    1998-02-05

    Cultured retina cells released accumulated [3H]GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) when stimulated by L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate. In the absence of Mg2+, dopamine at 200 microM (IC50 60 microM), inhibited in more than 50% the release of [3H]GABA induced by L-glutamate and NMDA, but not by kainate. This effect was not blocked by the D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist, R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl- -phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro- H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH 23390), neither by haloperidol nor spiroperidol (dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists). The dopamine D1-like receptor agonist R(+)-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,diol hydrochloride (SKF 38393) at 50 microM, but not its enantiomer, also inhibited the release of [3H]GABA induced by NMDA, but not by kainate; an effect that was not prevented by the antagonists mentioned above. (+/-)-6-Chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepin e hydrobromide (SKF 812497) had no effect. Neither 8BrcAMP (5 mM) nor forskolin (10 microM) inhibited the release of [3H]GABA. Our results suggest that dopamine and (+)-SKF 38393 inhibit the glutamate and NMDA-evoked [3H]GABA release through mechanisms that seem not to involve known dopaminergic receptor systems.

  8. The chemokine growth-related gene product β protects rat cerebellar granule cells from apoptotic cell death through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Limatola, Cristina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Mercanti, Delio; Vacca, Fabrizio; Ragozzino, Davide; Giovannelli, Aldo; Santoni, Angela; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    Cultured cerebellar granule neurons are widely used as a cellular model to study mechanisms of neuronal cell death because they undergo programmed cell death when switched from a culture medium containing 25 mM to one containing 5 mM K+. We have found that the growth-related gene product β (GROβ) partially prevents the K+-depletion-induced cell death, and that the neuroprotective action of GROβ on granule cells is mediated through the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) type of ionotropic glutamate receptors. GROβ-induced survival was suppressed by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, which is a specific antagonist of AMPA/kainate receptors; it was not affected by the inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, and was comparable to the survival of granule cells induced by AMPA (10 μM) treatment. Moreover, GROβ-induced neuroprotection was abolished when granule cells were treated with antisense oligonucleotides specific for the AMPA receptor subunits, which significantly reduced receptor expression, as verified by Western blot analysis with subunit-specific antibodies and by granule cell electrophysiological sensitivity to AMPA. Our data demonstrate that GROβ is neurotrophic for cerebellar granule cells, and that this activity depends on AMPA receptors. PMID:10811878

  9. NMDA but not AMPA glutamatergic receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP during the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an antidepressant-like activity for 3-[(methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]-pyridine (MTEP), a highly selective, non-competitive antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR(5)). This effect has been observed following both acute and chronic MTEP treatments in behavioral tests and experimental models of depression, such as the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and the olfactory bulbectomy model of depression. However, the mechanism of action for mGluR(5) antagonists remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the antidepressant-like action of MTEPis dependent on ionotropic glutamatergic receptors. Male Albino Swiss mice were used, and antidepressant-like activity was evaluated using the FST. The antidepressant-like effect of MTEP (0.3 mg/kg) was significantly antagonized by pre-treatment with the NMDA receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.). The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect the MTEP activity. Our results indicate that the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP in the FST involves NMDA but not AMPA receptors and suggest that the interaction between mGluR(5) and NMDA receptors plays an important role in the underlying antidepressant mechanism(s).

  10. NMDA receptor coagonist glycine site: evidence for a role in lateral hypothalamic stimulation of feeding.

    PubMed

    Stanley, B G; Butterfield, B S; Grewal, R S

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the role of the glycine coagonist binding site on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in feeding control, we injected the glycine site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK) into the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of satiated rats before LH injection of NMDA, 7-CK (10-44 nmol) blocked the 6- to 10-g eating response elicited by NMDA. This block was reversed by LH pretreatment with glycine, arguing for a specific action at the glycine site. In contrast to the suppression produced by high doses, 7-CK at 0.1 nmol enhanced NMDA-elicited eating. For examination of behavioral specificity, 7-CK was injected into the LH before kainic acid (KA) or DL-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA). 7-CK at a dose of 0.1 nmol suppressed feeding elicited by KA or AMPA, but at 10 nmol it suppressed eating elicited by AMPA while enhancing eating elicited by KA. Finally, bilateral LH injection of 7-CK effectively suppressed eating produced by fasting. These findings support a role for the NMDA receptor coagonist glycine site in LH regulation of eating behavior.

  11. PDI regulates seizure activity via NMDA receptor redox in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yang; Ko, Ah-Rhem; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Redox modulation of cysteine residues is one of the post-translational modifications of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, plays a crucial role in catalyzing disulfide bond formation, reduction, and isomerization. In the present study, we found that PDI bound to NMDAR in the normal hippocampus, and that this binding was increased in chronic epileptic rats. In vitro thiol reductase assay revealed that PDI increased the amount of thiols on full-length recombinant NR1 protein. PDI siRNA, 5–5′-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), bacitracin and PDI antibody reduced seizure susceptibility in response to pilocarpine. In addition, PDI knockdown effectively ameliorated spontaneous seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats. Anticonvulsive effects of PDI siRNA were correlated to the reduction of the amount of free- and nitrosothiols on NMDAR, accompanied by the inhibition of PDI activity. However, PDI knockdown did not lead to alteration in basal neurotransmission or ER stress under physiological condition. These findings provide mechanistic insight into sulfhydration of disulfide bonds on NMDAR by PDI, and suggest that PDI may represent a target of potential therapeutics for epilepsy, which avoids a possible side effect on physiological receptor functionality. PMID:28198441

  12. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seung Ha; Jung, Yu Ri; Park, Soon Won; Jung, Dae Soo

    2015-06-01

    Anti N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is one of the most common types of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis commonly occurs in young women with ovarian teratoma. It has variable clinical manifestations and treatment responses. Sometimes it is misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder or viral encephalitis. To the best of our knowledge, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a rare condition in pregnant women. We report a case of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in a pregnant woman who presented with abnormal behavior, epileptic seizure, and hypoventilation.

  13. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  14. Early continuous white noise exposure alters auditory spatial sensitivity and expression of GAD65 and GABAA receptor subunits in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Cai, Rui; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2010-04-01

    Sensory experiences have important roles in the functional development of the mammalian auditory cortex. Here, we show how early continuous noise rearing influences spatial sensitivity in the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) and its underlying mechanisms. By rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous, moderate level white noise, we found that noise rearing markedly attenuated the spatial sensitivity of A1 neurons. Compared with rats reared under normal conditions, spike counts of A1 neurons were more poorly modulated by changes in stimulus location, and their preferred locations were distributed over a larger area. We further show that early continuous noise rearing induced significant decreases in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor alpha1 subunit expression, and an increase in GABA(A) receptor alpha3 expression, which indicates a returned to the juvenile form of GABA(A) receptor, with no effect on the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. These observations indicate that noise rearing has powerful adverse effects on the maturation of cortical GABAergic inhibition, which might be responsible for the reduced spatial sensitivity.

  15. Subchronic glucocorticoid receptor inhibition rescues early episodic memory and synaptic plasticity deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lanté, Fabien; Chafai, Magda; Raymond, Elisabeth Fabienne; Pereira, Ana Rita Salgueiro; Mouska, Xavier; Kootar, Scherazad; Barik, Jacques; Bethus, Ingrid; Marie, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The early phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests that stress and dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, marked by the elevated circulating glucocorticoids, are risk factors for AD onset. How these changes contribute to early hippocampal dysfunction remains unclear. Using an elaborated version of the object recognition task, we carefully monitored alterations in key components of episodic memory, the first type of memory altered in AD patients, in early symptomatic Tg2576 AD mice. We also combined biochemical and ex vivo electrophysiological analyses to reveal novel cellular and molecular dysregulations underpinning the onset of the pathology. We show that HPA axis, circadian rhythm, and feedback mechanisms, as well as episodic memory, are compromised in this early symptomatic phase, reminiscent of human AD pathology. The cognitive decline could be rescued by subchronic in vivo treatment with RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These observed phenotypes were paralleled by a specific enhancement of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTD in CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas LTP and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent LTD remain unchanged. NMDAR transmission was also enhanced. Finally, we show that, as for the behavioral deficit, RU486 treatment rescues this abnormal synaptic phenotype. These preclinical results define glucocorticoid signaling as a contributing factor to both episodic memory loss and early synaptic failure in this AD mouse model, and suggest that glucocorticoid receptor targeting strategies could be beneficial to delay AD onset.

  16. Influence of cooling rate on activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors in brain slices at hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Mokrushin, Anatoly A; Pavlinova, Larisa I; Borovikov, Sergey E

    2014-08-01

    Hypothermia is a known approach in the treatment of neurological pathologies. Mild hypothermia enhances the therapeutic window for application of medicines, while deep hypothermia is often accompanied by complications, including problems in the recovery of brain functions. The purpose of present study was to investigate the functioning of glutamate ionotropic receptors in brain slices cooled with different rates during mild, moderate and deep hypothermia. Using a system of gradual cooling combined with electrophysiological recordings in slices, we have shown that synaptic activity mediated by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in rat olfactory cortex was strongly dependent on the rate of lowering the temperature. High cooling rate caused a progressive decrease in glutamate receptor activity in brain slices during gradual cooling from mild to deep hypothermia. On the contrary, low cooling rate slightly changed the synaptic responses in deep hypothermia. The short-term potentiation may be induced in slices by electric tetanization at 16 °C in this case. Hence, low cooling rate promoted preservation of neuronal activity and plasticity in the brain tissue.

  17. Pharmacological characterization of D-aminophosphonovaleric acid antagonism of amino acid and synaptically evoked excitations on frog motoneurones in vitro: an intracellular study.

    PubMed Central

    Corradetti, R.; King, A. E.; Nistri, A.; Rovira, C.; Sivilotti, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of D-aminophosphonovaleric acid (D-APV) on the depolarizations induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), glutamate, aspartate or quisqualate was studied with intracellular recordings from frog motoneurones in vitro. D-APV (0.5-10 microM) produced a slight hyperpolarization of the motoneuronal membrane without significant changes in input conductance. In control and tetrodotoxin-containing solutions the depolarizations induced by NMDA were strongly reduced by D-APV while quisqualate depolarizations were unaffected. Responses to glutamate and aspartate were antagonized to an intermediate level. The relatively small conductance increases evoked by excitatory amino acids were unaltered in solutions containing D-APV. The amplitude of monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps) was strongly depressed by D-APV. The amplitude of polysynaptic e.p.s.ps was little changed but their decay time was reduced. It is suggested that D-APV is a powerful and selective NMDA receptor antagonist and that an endogenous amino acid acting via NMDA receptors may be the transmitter of monosynaptic e.p.s.ps on frog motoneurones. PMID:2864968

  18. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wei, Li; Yu, Wenjing; Cui, Xia; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    Background Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD) is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS). The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and their receptors in a TS rat model. Materials and methods Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each). TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia) or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the mRNA expression, only Tia reduced the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, compared with the model group. Conclusion JPZDD could alleviate impairments in behavior and dysfunctional signaling by downregulating GABAAR in the striatum. We suggest that this acts to maintain the balance of Glu and GABA. PMID:27279743

  19. Effect of excitatory amino acids on serum TSH and thyroid hormone levels in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, M; Durán, R; Arufe, M C

    2000-01-01

    The actions of glutamate (L-Glu), and glutamate receptor agonists on serum thyroid hormones (T4 and T3) and TSH levels have been studied in conscious and freely moving adult male rats. The excitatory amino acids (EAA), L-Glu, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainic acid (KA) and domoic acid (Dom) were administered intraperitoneally. Blood samples were collected through a cannula implanted in the rats jugular 0--60 min after injection. Thyroid hormone concentrations were measured by enzyme immunoassay, and thyrotrophin (TSH) concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that L-Glu (20 and 25 mg/kg) and NMDA (25 mg/kg) increased serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and TSH concentrations. Serum thyroid hormone levels increased 30 min after treatment, while serum TSH levels increased 5 min after i.p. administration, in both cases serum levels remained elevated during one hour. Injection of the non-NMDA glutamatergic agonists KA (30 mg/kg) and Dom (1 mg/kg) produced an increase in serum thyroid hormones and TSH levels. These results suggest the importance of EAAs in the regulation of hormone secretion from the pituitary-thyroid axis, as well as the importance of the NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in this stimulatory effect.

  20. Experimental Evidence that 3-Methylglutaric Acid Disturbs Mitochondrial Function and Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain Synaptosomes: New Converging Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Paz-Loyola, Ariana Lizbeth; de Lima, María Eduarda; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Seminotti, Bianca; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Wajner, Moacir; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-10-01

    3-Methylglutaric acid (3MGA) is an organic acid that accumulates in various organic acidemias whose patients present neurodegeneration events in children coursing with metabolic acidurias. Limited evidence describes the toxic mechanisms elicited by 3MGA in the brain. Herein, we explored the effects of 3MGA on different toxic endpoints in synaptosomal and mitochondrial-enriched fractions of adult rat brains to provide novel information on early mechanisms evoked by this metabolite. At 1 and 5 mM concentration, 3MGA increased lipid peroxidation, but decreased mitochondrial function only at 5 mM concentration. Despite less intense effects were obtained at 1 mM concentration, its co-administration with the kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolite and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) agonist, quinolinic acid (QUIN, 50 and 100 µM), produced toxic synergism on markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function. The toxicity of 3MGA per se (5 mM) was prevented by the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 and the NMDAr antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA), suggesting cannabinoid and glutamatergic components in the 3MGA pattern of toxicity. The synergic model (3MGA + QUIN) was also sensitive to KYNA and the antioxidant S-allylcysteine, but not to the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-nitroarginine methyl ester. These findings suggest various underlying mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of 3MGA that may possibly contribute to the neurodegeneration observed in acidemias.

  1. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  2. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists.

    PubMed

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z

    2017-01-03

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca(2+) entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca(2+) influx. Extracellular Mg(2+) at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca(2+) influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI.

  3. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K.; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z.

    2017-01-01

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Mg2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI. PMID:28045032

  4. Alpha-conotoxin-ImI: a competitive antagonist at alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive neuronal nicotinic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E F; Alkondon, M; McIntosh, J M; Albuquerque, E X

    1996-09-01

    In the present study, the patch-clamp technique was applied to rat hippocampal neurons or myoballs in culture to study the actions of alpha-conotoxin-ImI on the native alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive, presumably alpha 7-bearing, neuronal nicotinic receptor and on other ligand-gated channels. Preexposure of the neurons for 5 min to alpha-conotoxin-ImI decreased the peak amplitude of alpha-BGT-sensitive currents (referred to as type IA currents) in a concentration-dependent fashion. Several lines of evidence revealed that the inhibitory effect of alpha-conotoxin-ImI was competitive with respect to the agonist (IC50 approximately 85 nM) and reversible by washing. At 300 nM, alpha-conotoxin-ImI decreased by only 15% the peak amplitude of ACh-evoked currents in rat myoballs, did not affect the activation of currents gated by gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine, N-methyl-D-aspartate, kainate, or quisqualate in hippocampal neurons, but reduced to approximately 60% the peak amplitude and shortened the decay phase of curare-sensitive, serotonin-gated currents in these neurons. The competitive and reversible nature of the alpha-conotoxin-ImI-induced inhibition of native alpha 7-bearing neuronal nicotinic receptors makes this peptide a valuable new tool for the functional and structural characterization of these receptors in the central nervous system.

  5. The influence of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands on anxiety-like effect of amphetamine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Koltunowska, D; Gibula-Bruzda, E; Kotlinska, J H

    2013-08-01

    Chronic amphetamine use results in anxiety-like states after drug cessation. The aim of the study was to determine a role of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands in amphetamine-evoked withdrawal anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. In our study memantine (8 and 12 mg/kg), a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist did not reduce amphetamine withdrawal anxiety. Acamprosate (NMDA and metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGluR5) antagonist) at the dose 200 and 400mg/kg showed anxiolytic-like effect, thus increasing the percent of time spent in open arms and a number of open arm entries. mGluR5 selective antagonist, MTEP (3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine hydrochloride) and mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 (1S,2S,5R,6S)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid), caused effects similar to acamprosate at doses 1.25-5mg/kg and 2.5-5mg/kg, respectively. None of the glutamate ligands influenced locomotor activity of rats when given to the saline-treated group. Taking into account the positive correlation between amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety and relapse to amphetamine taking, our results suggest that modulation of mGluRs may prevent relapse to amphetamine and might pose a new direction in amphetamine abuse therapy.

  6. Sigma ligands indirectly modulate the NMDA receptor-ion channel complex on intact neuronal cells via sigma 1 site.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, T; Sagi, N; Klenerová, V; Goji, K; Kawai, N; Baba, A; Takamori, E; Moroji, T

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the modulatory effects of sigma ligands on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-ion channel complex in vivo, we examined the intact cell binding of 3H-N-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine (3H-TCP) to cultured neuronal cells prepared from fetal rat telencephalon. The 3H-TCP binding was saturable, reversible, and inhibited by a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. MII-limolar Mg2+ inhibited 3H-TCP binding both in the absence and presence of L-glutamate. 5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK801) inhibited 3H-TCP intact cell binding in a competitive manner, while haloperidol inhibited it in a noncompetitive manner. The effect of the test drugs to inhibit 3H-TCP intact cell binding was in the order of dextromethorphan, haloperidol > (+/-)MK 801 > (+)pentazocine > (-)pentazocine > DTG > PCP > (+)-N-allylnormetazocine [(+)SKF 10047] > (+)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N- (1-propyl)piperidine [(+)3-PPP] > (-)SKF 10047 > (-)3-PPP. The IC50 values of the six sigma ligands for 3H-TCP binding were closely correlated with the Ki values of the corresponding drugs for DTG site 1 in the guinea pig brain reported by Rothman et al. (1991). These findings suggest that the sigma ligand indirectly modulates the NMDA receptor ion channel complex, presumably through sigma 1 sites in vivo as well as in vitro.

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin receptors modulate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Michel, S.; Clark, J. P.; Ding, J. M.; Colwell, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells. Previous work raised the possibility that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high-affinity tropomyosin-related receptor kinase may be important as modulators of this excitatory input into the SCN. In order to test this possibility, we used whole-cell patch-clamp methods to measure spontaneous excitatory currents in mouse SCN neurons. We found that the amplitude and frequency of these currents were increased by BDNF and decreased by the neurotrophin receptor inhibitor K252a. The neurotrophin also increased the magnitude of currents evoked by application of N-methyl-D-aspartate and amino-methyl proprionic acid. Next, we measured the rhythms in action potential discharge from the SCN brain slice preparation. We found that application of K252a dramatically reduced the magnitude of phase shifts of the electrical activity rhythm generated by the application of glutamate. By itself, BDNF caused phase shifts that resembled those produced by glutamate and were blocked by K252a. The results demonstrate that BDNF and neurotrophin receptors can enhance glutamatergic synaptic transmission within a subset of SCN neurons and potentiate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm of neural activity in the SCN. PMID:16930436

  8. ATP induces NO production in hippocampal neurons by P2X(7) receptor activation independent of glutamate signaling.

    PubMed

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2'(3')-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity.

  9. ATP Induces NO Production in Hippocampal Neurons by P2X7 Receptor Activation Independent of Glutamate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Codocedo, Juan Francisco; Godoy, Juan Alejandro; Poblete, Maria Ines; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    To assess the putative role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) upon nitric oxide (NO) production in the hippocampus, we used as a model both rat hippocampal slices and isolated hippocampal neurons in culture, lacking glial cells. In hippocampal slices, additions of exogenous ATP or 2′(3′)-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl) ATP (Bz-ATP) elicited concentration-dependent NO production, which increased linearly within the first 15 min and plateaued thereafter; agonist EC50 values were 50 and 15 µM, respectively. The NO increase evoked by ATP was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by Coomassie brilliant blue G (BBG) or by Nω-propyl-L-arginine, suggesting the involvement of P2X7Rs and neuronal NOS, respectively. The ATP induced NO production was independent of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor activity as effects were not alleviated by DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but antagonized by BBG. In sum, exogenous ATP elicited NO production in hippocampal neurons independently of NMDA receptor activity. PMID:23472093

  10. The Glycine Transport Inhibitor Sarcosine Is an Inhibitory Glycine Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Lyons-Warren, Ariel; Thio, Liu Lin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Sarcosine is an endogenous amino acid that is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter (GlyT1), an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) co-agonist, and an important intermediate in one-carbon metabolism. Its therapeutic potential for schizophrenia further underscores its clinical importance. The structural similarity between sarcosine and glycine and sarcosine's ability to serve as an NMDAR co-agonist led us to examine whether sarcosine is also an agonist at the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). We examined this possibility using whole-cell recordings from cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons and found that sarcosine evoked a dose-dependent, strychnine sensitive, Cl- current that cross-inhibited glycine currents. Sarcosine evoked this current with Li+ in the extracellular solution to block GlyT1, in neurons treated with the essentially irreversible GlyT1 inhibitor N[3-(4′-fluorophenyl)-3-(4′-phenylphenoxy)propyl]sarcosine (NFPS), and in neurons plated in the absence of glia. These results indicate that the sarcosine currents did not result from GlyT1 inhibition or heteroexchange. We conclude that sarcosine is a GlyR agonist. PMID:19619564

  11. Identification of novel allosteric modulator binding sites in NMDA receptors: A molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Kane, Lucas T; Costa, Blaise M

    2015-09-01

    The dysfunction of N-methyl-d-Aspartate receptors (NMDARs), a subtype of glutamate receptors, is correlated with schizophrenia, stroke, and many other neuropathological disorders. However, not all NMDAR subtypes equally contribute towards these disorders. Since NMDARs composed of different GluN2 subunits (GluN2A-D) confer varied physiological properties and have different distributions in the brain, pharmacological agents that target NMDARs with specific GluN2 subunits have significant potential for therapeutic applications. In our previous research, we have identified a family of novel allosteric modulators that differentially potentiate and/or inhibit NMDARs of differing GluN2 subunit composition. To further elucidate their molecular mechanisms, in the present study, we have identified four potential binding sites for novel allosteric modulators by performing molecular modeling, docking, and in silico mutations. The molecular determinants of the modulator binding sites (MBS), analysis of particular MBS electrostatics, and the specific loss or gain of binding after mutations have revealed modulators that have strong potential affinities for specific MBS on given subunits and the role of key amino acids in either promoting or obstructing modulator binding. These findings will help design higher affinity GluN2 subunit-selective pharmaceuticals, which are currently unavailable to treat psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  12. Post-anesthesia AMPA receptor potentiation prevents anesthesia-induced learning and synaptic deficits

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lianyan; Cichon, Joseph; Ninan, Ipe; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that repeated exposure to general anesthesia during critical stages of brain development results in long-lasting behavioral deficits later in life. To date, there has been no effective treatment to mitigate the neurotoxic effects of anesthesia on brain development. By performing calcium imaging in the mouse motor cortex, we show that ketamine anesthesia causes a marked and prolonged reduction in neuronal activity during the period of post-anesthesia recovery. Administration of the AMPAkine drug CX546 [1-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-ylcarbonyl)piperidine] to potentiate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor activity during emergence from anesthesia in mice enhances neuronal activity and prevents long-term motor learning deficits induced by repeated neonatal anesthesia. In addition, we show that CX546 administration also ameliorates various synaptic deficits induced by anesthesia, including reductions in synaptic expression of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and AMPA receptor subunits, motor training-evoked neuronal activity, and dendritic spine remodeling associated with motor learning. Together, our results indicate that pharmacologically enhancing neuronal activity during the post-anesthesia recovery period could effectively reduce the adverse effects of early-life anesthesia. PMID:27334260

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gladding, Clare M; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Molnár, Elek

    2009-12-01

    The ability to modify synaptic transmission between neurons is a fundamental process of the nervous system that is involved in development, learning, and disease. Thus, synaptic plasticity is the ability to bidirectionally modify transmission, where long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) represent the best characterized forms of plasticity. In the hippocampus, two main forms of LTD coexist that are mediated by activation of either N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Compared with NMDAR-LTD, mGluR-LTD is less well understood, but recent advances have started to delineate the underlying mechanisms. mGluR-LTD at CA3:CA1 synapses in the hippocampus can be induced either by synaptic stimulation or by bath application of the group I selective agonist (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. Multiple signaling mechanisms have been implicated in mGluR-LTD, illustrating the complexity of this form of plasticity. This review provides an overview of recent studies investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying hippocampal mGluR-LTD. It highlights the role of key molecular components and signaling pathways that are involved in the induction and expression of mGluR-LTD and considers how the different signaling pathways may work together to elicit a persistent reduction in synaptic transmission.

  14. Arrest of neuronal migration by excitatory amino acids in hamster developing brain.

    PubMed

    Marret, S; Gressens, P; Evrard, P

    1996-12-24

    The influence of the excitotoxic cascade on the developing brain was investigated using ibotenate, a glutamatergic agonist of both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ionotropic receptors and metabotropic receptors. Injected in the neopallium of the golden hamster at the time of production of neurons normally destined for layers IV, III, and II, ibotenate induces arrests of migrating neurons at different distances from the germinative zone within the radial migratory corridors. The resulting cytoarchitectonic patterns include periventricular nodular heterotopias, subcortical band heterotopias, and intracortical arrests of migrating neurons. The radial glial cells and the extracellular matrix are free of detectable damage that could suggest a defect in their guiding role. The migration disorders are prevented by coinjection of DL-2-amino-7-phosphoheptanoic acid, an NMDA ionotropic antagonist, but are not prevented by coinjection of L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid, a metabotropic antagonist. This implies that an excess of ionic influx through the NMDA channels of neurons alters the metabolic pathways supporting neuronal migration. Ibotenate, a unique molecular trigger of the excitotoxic cascade, produces a wide spectrum of abnormal neuronal migration patterns recognized in mammals, including the neocortical deviations encountered in the human brain.

  15. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  16. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Alan C.; Farnsworth, Jill; Lind, Genevieve E.; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Dang, Van; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Staubli, Ursula; Kavanaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1) and SLC1A5 (ASCT2) mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1) may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity. PMID:27272177

  17. L-theanine administration results in neuroprotection and prevents glutamate receptor agonist-mediated injury in the rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Zukhurova, Mavdzhuda; Prosvirnina, Maria; Daineko, Anastasia; Simanenkova, Anna; Petrishchev, Nikolay; Sonin, Dmitry; Galagudza, Michael; Shamtsyan, Mark; Juneja, Lekh R; Vlasov, Timur

    2013-09-01

    While the neuroprotective effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) might be explained by the presence of amino acid L-theanine in the tea leaves, it is not known whether postischemic administration of L-theanine could also provide neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of L-theanine (1 and 4 mg/kg) administered at 3, 12, and 24 h after reperfusion in the rat model of stroke. We also studied the effect of L-theanine on brain injury caused by exogenous administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate/kainate receptor agonists during reperfusion. Rats were subjected to 30-min middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 48-h reperfusion. Neurological deficit and infarct size were determined at the end of reperfusion. At 3 and 12 h, but not at 24 h of reperfusion, L-theanine substantially reduced the size of brain infarct. Neurological status was improved when L-theanine was administered 3, 12, and 24 h after reperfusion. Repeated intrastriatal injections of L-theanine at a total dose of 800 µg/kg during reperfusion prevented brain injury caused by glutamate receptor agonists. In conclusion, L-theanine at reperfusion exerts neuroprotective effect in the in vivo rat model of stroke. Local treatment with L-theanine at reperfusion prevents glutamate receptor agonist-mediated brain injury.

  18. Roles of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 but not GluA2 in synaptic potentiation and activation of ERK in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hiroki; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Ulzhöfer, Bettina; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Hui; Seeburg, Peter H; Sprengel, Rolf; Kuner, Rohini; Zhuo, Min

    2009-08-10

    Cortical areas including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are important for pain and pleasure. Recent studies using genetic and physiological approaches have demonstrated that the investigation of basic mechanism for long-term potentiation (LTP) in the ACC may reveal key cellular and molecular mechanisms for chronic pain in the cortex. Glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the ACC are critical for the induction of LTP, including both NR2A and NR2B subunits. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms for the expression of ACC LTP have been less investigated. Here, we report that the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit, GluA1 but not GluA2 contributes to LTP in the ACC using genetic manipulated mice lacking GluA1 or GluA2 gene. Furthermore, GluA1 knockout mice showed decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in the ACC in inflammatory pain models in vivo. Our results demonstrate that AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a key mechanism for the expression of ACC LTP and inflammation-induced long-term plastic changes in the ACC.

  19. Discovery of GluN2A-Selective NMDA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): Tuning Deactivation Kinetics via Structure-Based Design.

    PubMed

    Volgraf, Matthew; Sellers, Benjamin D; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Guosheng; Ly, Cuong Q; Villemure, Elisia; Pastor, Richard M; Yuen, Po-wai; Lu, Aijun; Luo, Xifeng; Liu, Mingcui; Zhang, Shun; Sun, Liang; Fu, Yuhong; Lupardus, Patrick J; Wallweber, Heidi J A; Liederer, Bianca M; Deshmukh, Gauri; Plise, Emile; Tay, Suzanne; Reynen, Paul; Herrington, James; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; Dirksen, Akim; Dietz, Matthias G A; Liu, Yanzhou; Wang, Tzu-Ming; Hanson, Jesse E; Hackos, David; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Schwarz, Jacob B

    2016-03-24

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is a Na(+) and Ca(2+) permeable ionotropic glutamate receptor that is activated by the coagonists glycine and glutamate. NMDARs are critical to synaptic signaling and plasticity, and their dysfunction has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Herein we describe the discovery of potent GluN2A-selective NMDAR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) starting from a high-throughput screening hit. Using structure-based design, we sought to increase potency at the GluN2A subtype, while improving selectivity against related α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs). The structure-activity relationship of channel deactivation kinetics was studied using a combination of electrophysiology and protein crystallography. Effective incorporation of these strategies resulted in the discovery of GNE-0723 (46), a highly potent and brain penetrant GluN2A-selective NMDAR PAM suitable for in vivo characterization.

  20. Lack of kainic acid-induced gamma oscillations predicts subsequent CA1 excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jinde, Seiichiro; Belforte, Juan E.; Yamamoto, Jun; Wilson, Matthew A.; Tonegawa, Susumu; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2009-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are a prominent feature of hippocampal network activity, but their functional role remains debated, ranging from mere epiphenomenon to crucial for information processing. Similarly, persistent gamma oscillations sometimes appear prior to epileptic discharges in patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. However, the significance of this activity in hippocampal excitotoxicity is unclear. We assessed the relationship between kainic acid (KA)-induced gamma oscillations and excitotoxicity in genetically-engineered mice in which N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor deletion was confined to CA3 pyramidal cells. Mutants showed reduced CA3 pyramidal cell firing and augmented sharp wave-ripple activity, resulting in higher susceptibility to KA-induced seizures, and leading to strikingly selective neurodegeneration in the CA1 subfield. Interestingly, the KA-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) level increases and persistent 30-50 Hz gamma oscillations observed in control mice prior to the first seizure discharge was abolished in the mutants. Consequently, on subsequent days, mutants manifested prolonged epileptiform activity and massive neurodegeneration of CA1 cells, including local GABAergic neurons. Remarkably, pretreatment with the potassium channel blocker α-dendrotoxin (DTX) increased GABA levels, restored gamma oscillations, and prevented CA1 degeneration in the mutants. These results demonstrate that emergence of low frequency gamma oscillations predicts increased resistance to KA-induced excitotoxicity, raising the possibility that gamma oscillations may have potential prognostic value for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:19735292

  1. Brain adaptation to stressful stimuli: a new perspective on potential therapeutic approaches based on BDNF and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Marini, Ann M; Popolo, Margherita; Pan, Hongna; Blondeau, Nicolas; Lipsky, Robert H

    2008-10-01

    A variety of sublethal or stressful stimuli induce a phenomenon in the brain known as tolerance, an adaptive response that protects the brain against the same stress, or against a different stress (cross-tolerance). Understanding the molecular mechanisms of brain preconditioning holds promise in developing innovative therapies to prevent and treat neurodegenerative disorders, particularly ischemic stroke. Many of the detailed steps involved in tolerance and cross-tolerance are unknown. It is also likely that different stressors differentially regulate sets of genes, transcription factors, and signal transduction pathways that depend upon the molecules that are released in response to the stressor, activation of particular receptors, and the surrounding milieu. The focus of this review is to highlight a few examples of stimuli that induce tolerance: 1) cortical spreading depression; 2) 3-nitropropionic acid; and 3) 2-deoxy-D-glucose. We will summarize by discussing one pathway where intracellular mediators may converge to upregulate intrinsic neuronal survival pathways to promote survival by resisting damage. This mechanism, activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and its integral relationship with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, may be a critical and general mechanism developed in brain to respond to stressful stimuli.

  2. Microinjection of l-glutamate into the nucleus ambiguus partially inhibits gastric motility through the NMDA receptor - nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Zhao; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Ai, Hong-Bin

    2014-06-01

    We have previously reported that both l-glutamate (l-Glu) and nitric oxide (NO) modulate gastric motility in the nucleus ambiguus (NA). The aim of this study is to explore the potential correlation between the l-Glu and NO. A latex balloon connected to a pressure transducer was inserted into the pylorus through the fundus of anesthetized male Wistar rats to continuously record changes in gastric smooth muscle contractile curves. Pretreatment with the NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methylester (l-NAME) did not completely abolish the inhibitory effect of l-Glu on gastric motility, but intravenous injection of the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium bromide (Hb) did. By using a specific N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, we blocked the inhibitory effect of the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on gastric motility. These results suggest that microinjections of l-Glu into the NA inhibits gastric motility by activating the cholinergic preganglionic neurons, partially through the NMDA receptor - NO pathway.

  3. Cannabinoid receptor agonists reduce the short-term mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress linked to excitotoxicity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rangel-López, E; Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Pinzón, E; Torres, I; Serratos, I N; Castellanos, P; Wajner, M; Souza, D O; Santamaría, A

    2015-01-29

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a considerable number of physiological processes in the Central Nervous System. Recently, a modulatory role of cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists on the reduction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation has been demonstrated. Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous analog of glutamate and excitotoxic metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway (KP), selectively activates NMDAr and has been shown to participate in different neurodegenerative disorders. Since the early pattern of toxicity exerted by this metabolite is relevant to explain the extent of damage that it can produce in the brain, in this work we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and other agonists (anandamide or AEA, and CP 55,940 or CP) on early markers of QUIN-induced toxicity in rat striatal cultured cells and rat brain synaptosomes. WIN, AEA and CP exerted protective effects on the QUIN-induced loss of cell viability. WIN also preserved the immunofluorescent signals for neurons and CBr labeling that were decreased by QUIN. The QUIN-induced early mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were also partially or completely prevented by WIN pretreatment, but not when this CBr agonist was added simultaneously with QUIN to brain synaptosomes. These findings support a neuroprotective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by agents inducing excitotoxic processes.

  4. Sustained NMDA receptor hypofunction induces compromised neural systems integration and schizophrenia-like alterations in functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Xiao, Xiaolin; McDonald, Martin; Higham, Desmond J; Morris, Brian J; Pratt, Judith A

    2014-02-01

    Compromised functional integration between cerebral subsystems and dysfunctional brain network organization may underlie the neurocognitive deficits seen in psychiatric disorders. Applying topological measures from network science to brain imaging data allows the quantification of complex brain network connectivity. While this approach has recently been used to further elucidate the nature of brain dysfunction in schizophrenia, the value of applying this approach in preclinical models of psychiatric disease has not been recognized. For the first time, we apply both established and recently derived algorithms from network science (graph theory) to functional brain imaging data from rats treated subchronically with the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP). We show that subchronic PCP treatment induces alterations in the global properties of functional brain networks akin to those reported in schizophrenia. Furthermore, we show that subchronic PCP treatment induces compromised functional integration between distributed neural systems, including between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, that have established roles in cognition through, in part, the promotion of thalamic dysconnectivity. We also show that subchronic PCP treatment promotes the functional disintegration of discrete cerebral subsystems and also alters the connectivity of neurotransmitter systems strongly implicated in schizophrenia. Therefore, we propose that sustained NMDA receptor hypofunction contributes to the pathophysiology of dysfunctional brain network organization in schizophrenia.

  5. On the early toxic effect of quinolinic acid: involvement of RAGE.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan; Newport, Glenn; Divine, Becky; Wu, Qiangen; Paule, Merle G; Tobón-Velasco, J César; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-04-26

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN)-induced toxicity is characterized by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors over-activation, excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. The characterization of toxic cascades produced by QUIN during the first hours after its striatal infusion is relevant for understanding toxic mechanisms. The role of the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) in the early toxic pattern induced by QUIN was evaluated. RAGE expression - assessed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence - was enhanced in the striata of QUIN-lesioned rats at 2h post-lesion. QUIN-induced RAGE up-regulation was accompanied by expression of a RAGE target molecule, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), and genes encoding for different enzymes. Other toxic markers linked to RAGE activation were increased by QUIN, including NO formation, premature glial response, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear condensation. Our results suggest that RAGE up-regulation may play a role in the early stages of QUIN toxicity.

  6. Prenatal ethanol exposure reduces the effects of excitatory amino acids in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion during pregnancy can lead to the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a disorder marked by learning disabilities. A rat model of FAS was used by introducing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to a liquid diet containing 35% ethanol-derived calories (E), while a second group was pair-fed an isocaloric liquid diet without ethanol (P). A third group of pregnant dams received ad libitum lab chow (C). At parturition, pups from the E and P groups were cross fostered by C mothers and all groups received lab chow. During adulthood, male offspring were sacrificed and hippocampal and prefrontal cortical slices were prelabeled with (3H)inositol. Phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H)inositol phosphates in the presence of LiCl in response to activation of various excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors. In hippocampal slices, ibotenate- and quisqualate-induced PI hydrolysis was reduced in E compared to P and C animals. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on carbachol-induced PI hydrolysis, evident in P and C animals, was completely abolished in the hippocampus of E animals. In contrast, in the prefrontal cerebral cortex, this inhibitory effect of NMDA prevailed even in the E animals. The evidence suggests that prenatal ethanol exposure alters the activity of EAA receptors in the hippocampal generation of 2nd messengers.

  7. Therapeutic Modulation of Glutamate Receptors in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jaso, Brittany A; Niciu, Mark J; Iadarola, Nicolas D; Lally, Niall; Richards, Erica M; Park, Minkyung; Ballard, Elizabeth D; Nugent, Allison C; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Zarate, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for major depressive disorder (MDD) have a distinct lag of onset that can prolong distress and impairment for patients, and realworld effectiveness trials further suggest that antidepressant efficacy is limited in many patients. All currently approved antidepressant medications for MDD act primarily through monoaminergic mechanisms, e.g., receptor/reuptake agonists or antagonists with varying affinities for serotonin, norepinephrine, or dopamine. Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and glutamate and its cognate receptors are implicated in the pathophysiology of MDD, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics for this disorder. Since the rapid and robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist ketamine were first observed in 2000, other NMDA receptor antagonists have been studied in MDD. These have been associated with relatively modest antidepressant effects compared to ketamine, but some have shown more favorable characteristics with increased potential in clinical practice (for instance, oral administration, decreased dissociative and/or psychotomimetic effects, and reduced abuse/diversion liability). This article reviews the clinical evidence supporting the use of glutamate receptor modulators with direct affinity for cognate receptors: 1) non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists (ketamine, memantine, dextromethorphan, AZD6765); 2) subunit (NR2B)-specific NMDA receptor antagonists (CP- 101,606/traxoprodil, MK-0657); 3) NMDA receptor glycine-site partial agonists (D-cycloserine, GLYX- 13); and 4) metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) modulators (AZD2066, RO4917523/basimglurant). Several other theoretical glutamate receptor targets with preclinical antidepressant-like efficacy, but that have yet to be studied clinically, are also briefly discussed; these include α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4- isoxazoleproprionic acid (AMPA) agonists, mGluR2/3 negative

  8. Dimerumic Acid and Deferricoprogen Activate Ak Mouse Strain Thymoma/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathways and Prevent Apoptotic Cell Death in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-03

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which can be modeled using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to generate oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effects of the antioxidants deferricoprogen (DFC) and dimerumic acid (DMA), produced by rice fermented with Monascus purpureus NTU 568, on 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and their potential protective mechanisms. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Molecular analysis demonstrated associated upregulation of the Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways along with inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways and altered homodimeric glycoprotein, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor gene expression. These results suggested that the neuroprotection elicited by DMA and DFC against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity was associated with the Akt, MAPK, and HO-1 pathways via regulating the gene expression of NMDA receptor, homodimeric glycoprotein, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor.

  9. NR2D-containing NMDA receptors mediate tissue plasminogen activator-promoted neuronal excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Baron, A; Montagne, A; Cassé, F; Launay, S; Maubert, E; Ali, C; Vivien, D

    2010-05-01

    Although the molecular bases of its actions remain debated, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a paradoxical brain protease, as it favours some learning/memory processes, but increases excitotoxic neuronal death. Here, we show that, in cultured cortical neurons, tPA selectively promotes NR2D-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent activation. We show that tPA-mediated signalling and neurotoxicity through the NMDAR are blocked by co-application of an NR2D antagonist (phenanthrene derivative (2S(*), 3R(*))-1-(phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, PPDA) or knockdown of neuronal NR2D expression. In sharp contrast with cortical neurons, hippocampal neurons do not exhibit NR2D both in vitro and in vivo and are consequently resistant to tPA-promoted NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity. Moreover, we have shown that activation of synaptic NMDAR prevents further tPA-dependent NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity and sensitivity to PPDA. This study shows that the earlier described pro-neurotoxic effect of tPA is mediated by NR2D-containing NMDAR-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, a deleterious effect prevented by synaptic pre-activation.

  10. Neonatal +-methamphetamine exposure in rats alters adult locomotor responses to dopamine D1 and D2 agonists and to a glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist, but not to serotonin agonists.

    PubMed

    Graham, Devon L; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Braun, Amanda A; Grace, Curtis E; Schaefer, Tori L; Skelton, Matthew R; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2013-03-01

    Neonatal exposure to (+)-methamphetamine (Meth) results in long-term behavioural abnormalities but its developmental mechanisms are unknown. In a series of experiments, rats were treated from post-natal days (PD) 11-20 (stage that approximates human development from the second to third trimester) with Meth or saline and assessed using locomotor activity as the readout following pharmacological challenge doses with dopamine, serotonin and glutamate agonists or antagonists during adulthood. Exposure to Meth early in life resulted in an exaggerated adult locomotor hyperactivity response to the dopamine D1 agonist SKF-82958 at multiple doses, a high dose only under-response activating effect of the D2 agonist quinpirole, and an exaggerated under-response to the activating effect of the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801. No change in locomotor response was seen following challenge with the 5-HT releaser p-chloroamphetamine or the 5-HT2/3 receptor agonist, quipazine. These are the first data to show that PD 11-20 Meth exposure induces long-lasting alterations to dopamine D1, D2 and glutamate NMDA receptor function and may suggest how developmental Meth exposure leads to many of its long-term adverse effects.

  11. Copper blocks quinolinic acid neurotoxicity in rats: contribution of antioxidant systems.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Abel; Flores-Escartín, Abigail; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Osorio, Laura; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Chaverrí, José Pedraza; Maldonado, Perla D; Medina-Campos, Omar N; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Ríos, Camilo

    2003-08-15

    Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress are involved in quinolinic acid (QUIN)-induced neurotoxicity. QUIN, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) agonist and prooxidant molecule, produces NMDAr overactivation, excitotoxic events, and direct reactive oxygen species formation. Copper is an essential metal exhibiting both modulatory effects on neuronal excitatory activity and antioxidant properties. To investigate whether this metal is able to counteract the neurotoxic and oxidative actions of QUIN, we administered copper (as CuSO(4)) intraperitoneally to rats (2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mg/kg) 30 min before the striatal infusion of 1 microliter of QUIN (240 nmol). A 5.0 mg/kg CuSO(4) dose significantly increased the copper content in the striatum, reduced the neurotoxicity measured both as circling behavior and striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) depletion, and blocked the oxidative injury evaluated as striatal lipid peroxidation (LP). In addition, copper reduced the QUIN-induced decreased striatal activity of Cu,Zn-dependent superoxide dismutase, and increased the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin in cerebrospinal fluid from QUIN-treated rats. However, copper also produced significant increases of plasma lactate dehydrogenase activity and mortality at the highest doses employed (7.5 and 10.0 mg/kg). These results show that at low doses, copper exerts a protective effect on in vivo QUIN neurotoxicity.

  12. Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 reduces subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced early brain injury in rats via calcineurin-mediated NMDAR and NFAT dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yibin; Tian, Xiaodi; Shen, Haitao; Dou, Yang; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-09-19

    Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 (TRPC1/4) are considered to be related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the roles of TRPC1/4 in the early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to oxyhemoglobin to mimic SAH in vitro. The protein levels of TRPC1/4 increased and peaked at 5 days after SAH in rats. Inhibition of TRPC1/4 by SKF96365 aggravated SAH-induced EBI, such as cortical cell death (by TUNEL staining) and degenerating (by FJB staining). In addition, TRPC1/4 overexpression could increase calcineurin activity, while increased calcineurin activity could promote the dephosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Calcineurin antagonist FK506 could weaken the neuroprotection and the dephosphorylation of NMDAR induced by TRPC1/4 overexpression. Contrarily, calcineurin agonist chlorogenic acid inhibited SAH-induced EBI, even when siRNA intervention of TRPC1/4 was performed. Moreover, calcineurin also could lead to the nuclear transfer of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is a transcription factor promoting the expressions of TRPC1/4. TRPC1/4 could inhibit SAH-induced EBI by supressing the phosphorylation of NMDAR via calcineurin. TRPC1/4-induced calcineurin activation also could promote the nuclear transfer of NFAT, suggesting a positive feedback regulation of TRPC1/4 expressions.

  13. Requirement of rapid Ca2+ entry and synaptic activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors for the induction of long-term depression in adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Satoru; Connor, John A

    1998-01-01

    During block of γ-aminobutyric acid-A-mediated inhibition, low-frequency stimulation (2 Hz, 900 pulses) to Schaffer collateral-CA1 neuron synapses of adult rat hippocampus induced an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-independent, postsynaptic Ca2+-dependent depression of synaptic strength (long-term depression; LTD). Ratio imaging with fura-2 revealed moderate dendritic [Ca2+] increases (≈500 nM) during only the initial ≈30 s of the 7.5 min stimulation period. Conditioning for 30 s was, however, insufficient to induce LTD. The [Ca2+] changes were insensitive to the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist (+)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). MCPG, however, completely blocked LTD when present during conditioning. The [Ca2+] changes were abolished by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (-110 mV at the soma). Hyperpolarizing neurons to -110 mV during conditioning significantly attenuated LTD induction. LTD induction was also blocked by the postsynaptic presence of the protein kinase C inhibitor peptide PKC(19-36). These results suggest that LTD induction in adult hippocampus by prolonged low-frequency stimulation depends on both a rapid Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive channels and synaptic stimulation of mGluRs which may be coupled to phospholipase C. PMID:9714858

  14. Glutamate and glycine modulation of 3H-MK801 binding to the NMDA receptor-ion channel complex in the vitamin B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors have previously shown that the concentrations of the neuroactive amino acids glutamate (GLU) and glycine (GLY) are significantly altered in the seizure-prone vitamin B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain. Recently, it has been shown that GLU and GLY modulate the binding of {sup 3}H-MK801 to the ion channel associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-glutamate receptor subtype. The present investigation was undertaken to determine if GLU or GLY modulation of {sup 3}H-MK801 binding was altered in B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain. Preparation of cortical membranes from control and deficient 14 day old rats and {sup 3}H-MK801 binding assay were done as described by Ransom and Stec. The results show a significant reduction in the potency and efficacy of GLU modulation of {sup 3}H-MK801 binding, as well as a reduction in the efficacy of GLY, in membrane preparations from deficient rats compared to controls. These results indicate a reduced ability of GLU and GLY to potentiate the binding of {sup 3}H-MK801 to the NMDA receptor-ion channel in the B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain.

  15. Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 reduces subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced early brain injury in rats via calcineurin-mediated NMDAR and NFAT dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yibin; Tian, Xiaodi; Shen, Haitao; Dou, Yang; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channel 1/4 (TRPC1/4) are considered to be related to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the roles of TRPC1/4 in the early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to oxyhemoglobin to mimic SAH in vitro. The protein levels of TRPC1/4 increased and peaked at 5 days after SAH in rats. Inhibition of TRPC1/4 by SKF96365 aggravated SAH-induced EBI, such as cortical cell death (by TUNEL staining) and degenerating (by FJB staining). In addition, TRPC1/4 overexpression could increase calcineurin activity, while increased calcineurin activity could promote the dephosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Calcineurin antagonist FK506 could weaken the neuroprotection and the dephosphorylation of NMDAR induced by TRPC1/4 overexpression. Contrarily, calcineurin agonist chlorogenic acid inhibited SAH-induced EBI, even when siRNA intervention of TRPC1/4 was performed. Moreover, calcineurin also could lead to the nuclear transfer of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is a transcription factor promoting the expressions of TRPC1/4. TRPC1/4 could inhibit SAH-induced EBI by supressing the phosphorylation of NMDAR via calcineurin. TRPC1/4-induced calcineurin activation also could promote the nuclear transfer of NFAT, suggesting a positive feedback regulation of TRPC1/4 expressions. PMID:27641617

  16. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  17. Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces apoptotic hair-cell death independent of afferent and efferent innervation

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of excess glutamate plays a central role in eliciting the pathological events that follow intensely loud noise exposures and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Glutamate excitotoxicity has been characterized in cochlear nerve terminals, but much less is known about whether excess glutamate signaling also contributes to pathological changes in sensory hair cells. I therefore examined whether glutamate excitotoxicity damages hair cells in zebrafish larvae exposed to drugs that mimic excitotoxic trauma. Exposure to ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) agonists, kainic acid (KA) or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), contributed to significant, progressive hair cell loss in zebrafish lateral-line organs. To examine whether hair-cell loss was a secondary effect of excitotoxic damage to innervating neurons, I exposed neurog1a morphants—fish whose hair-cell organs are devoid of afferent and efferent innervation—to KA or NMDA. Significant, dose-dependent hair-cell loss occurred in neurog1a morphants exposed to either agonist, and the loss was comparable to wild-type siblings. A survey of iGluR gene expression revealed AMPA-, Kainate-, and NMDA-type subunits are expressed in zebrafish hair cells. Finally, hair cells exposed to KA or NMDA appear to undergo apoptotic cell death. Cumulatively, these data reveal that excess glutamate signaling through iGluRs induces hair-cell death independent of damage to postsynaptic terminals. PMID:28112265

  18. Differential effects of early-life NMDA receptor antagonism on aspartame-impaired insulin tolerance and behavior.

    PubMed

    Collison, Kate S; Inglis, Angela; Shibin, Sherin; Andres, Bernard; Ubungen, Rosario; Thiam, Jennifer; Mata, Princess; Al-Mohanna, Futwan A

    2016-12-01

    We have previously showed that lifetime exposure to aspartame, commencing in utero via the mother's diet, may impair insulin tolerance and cause behavioral deficits in adulthood via mechanisms which are incompletely understood. The role of the CNS in regulating glucose homeostasis has been highlighted by recent delineation of the gut-brain axis, in which N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) are important in maintaining glucose homeostasis, in addition to regulating certain aspects of behavior. Since the gut-brain axis can be modulated by fetal programming, we hypothesized that early-life NMDAR antagonism may affect aspartame-induced glucose deregulation in adulthood, and may alter the aspartame behavioral phenotype. Accordingly, C57Bl/6J mice were chronically exposed to aspartame commencing in utero, in the presence and absence of maternal administration of the competitive NMDAR antagonist CGP 39551, from conception until weaning. Drug/diet interactions in adulthood glucocentric and behavioral parameters were assessed. Aspartame exposure elevated blood glucose and impaired insulin-induced glucose disposal during an insulin tolerance test, which could be normalized by NMDAR antagonism. The same effects were not observed in control diet mice, suggesting an early-life drug/diet interaction. Behavioral analysis of adult offspring indicated that NMDAR antagonism of control diet mice caused hyperlocomotion and impaired spatial navigation. Conversely hypolocomotion, reduced exploratory activity and increased anxiety-related behavior were apparent in aspartame diet mice with early-life NMDAR antagonism.

  19. Metaplastic LTP inhibition after LTD induction in CA1 hippocampal slices involves NMDA Receptor-mediated Neurosteroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; O'Dell, Kazuko A; Zorumski, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) induced by low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFS) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is a form of synaptic plasticity thought to contribute to learning and memory and to the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In naïve hippocampal slices from juvenile rats, we previously found that LTD induction can impair subsequent induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) via a form of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent metaplasticity, and have recently observed that pharmacologically induced NMDAR-dependent LTP inhibition involves 5α-reduced neurosteroids that augment the actions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, we found that both LFS-induced LTD and subsequent inhibition of LTP induction involve neurosteroid synthesis via NMDAR activation. Furthermore, the timing of 5α-reductase inhibition relative to LFS can dissociate effects on LTD and metaplastic LTP inhibition. These findings indicate that 5α-reduced neurosteroids play an important role in synaptic plasticity and synaptic modulation in the hippocampus. PMID:24303196

  20. A clinical and neurobiological case of IgM NMDA receptor antibody associated encephalitis mimicking bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Choe, Chi-Un; Karamatskos, Evangelos; Schattling, Benjamin; Leypoldt, Frank; Liuzzi, Gianpiero; Gerloff, Christian; Friese, Manuel A; Mulert, Christoph

    2013-07-30

    Autoimmune encephalitis associated with IgG antibodies to the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit NR1 (NMDAR) presents with neurological symptoms, such as seizures, and especially psychiatric symptoms, such as hallucinations, psychosis, agitation and anxiety. To date, however, the pathological relevance of IgM NMDAR antibodies remains elusive. Here, we describe clinical, neuroradiological and neurobiological findings of a 28-year-old male presenting with IgM NMDAR antibodies coincident with autoimmune encephalitis characterized by symptoms of bipolar disorder. After repeated steroid treatment, cognitive and psychiatric abnormalities improved and no NMDAR antibody was detectable. Using primary neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that patient's serum containing IgM NMDAR antibodies reduced the detection of NMDAR on neuronal cells and decreased cell survival. Although NMDAR encephalitis with IgG antibodies is increasingly recognized and diagnosed, atypical presentations with NMDAR antibodies with immunoglobulin subclasses other than IgG pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Further clinical and neurobiological studies are needed to study the pathophysiological relevance of IgM NMDAR antibodies.

  1. GABA and glycine receptors in the nucleus ambiguus mediate tachycardia elicited by chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2015-07-01

    We have previously reported that stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) elicits tachycardia, which is partially mediated via inhibition of vagal inputs to the heart. The neuronal pools and neurotransmitters in them mediating tachycardia elicited from the ARCN have not been identified. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardia elicited from the ARCN may be mediated by inhibitory neurotransmitters in the nucleus ambiguus (nAmb). Experiments were done in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In separate groups of rats, unilateral and bilateral microinjections of muscimol (1 mM), gabazine (0.01 mM), and strychnine (0.5 mM) into the nAmb significantly attenuated tachycardia elicited by unilateral microinjections of NMDA (10 mM) into the ARCN. Histological examination of the brains showed that the microinjections sites were within the targeted nuclei. Retrograde anatomic tracing from the nAmb revealed direct bilateral projections from the ARCN and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus to the nAmb. The results of the present study suggest that tachycardia elicited by stimulation of the ARCN by microinjections of NMDA is mediated via GABAA and glycine receptors located in the nAmb.

  2. Participation of NMDA receptors in the lateral hypothalamus in gastric erosion induced by cold-water restraint.

    PubMed

    Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated whether neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) play a role in the occurrence of gastric ulcerations induced by cold-water restraint. The first experiment indicated that bilateral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) lesions of the LH (20μg/1μl per side) reduced the amount of gastric ulceration induced by cold-water restraint. In the second experiment, the NMDA antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 2.5μg/0.5μl per side) or its vehicle was microinjected bilaterally into the LH prior to the cold-water restraint procedure. APV did not induce gastric ulcerations but reduced the amount of ulceration induced by cold-water restraint. These results indicate that NMDA receptors in the LH play an important role in the occurrence of gastric ulceration induced by cold-water restraint. The participation of the LH and possible neuronal circuitry involved in stress-induced ulceration are discussed.

  3. The effect of WIN 55,212-2 suggests a cannabinoid-sensitive component in the early toxicity induced by organic acids accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I and in related disorders of propionate metabolism in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Serratos, I N; Seminotti, B; Ribeiro, C A J; Leipnitz, G; Souza, D O; Wajner, M; Santamaría, A

    2015-12-03

    Several physiological processes in the CNS are regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists have been involved in the modulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation. Glutaric (GA), 3-hydroxyglutaric (3-OHGA), methylmalonic (MMA) and propionic (PA) acids are endogenous metabolites produced and accumulated in the brain of children affected by severe organic acidemias (OAs) with neurodegeneration. Oxidative stress and excitotoxicity have been involved in the toxic pattern exerted by these organic acids. Studying the early pattern of toxicity exerted by these metabolites is crucial to explain the extent of damage that they can produce in the brain. Herein, we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) on early markers of GA-, 3-OHGA-, MMA- and PA-induced toxicity in brain synaptosomes from adult (90-day-old) and adolescent (30-day-old) rats. As pre-treatment, WIN exerted protective effects on the GA- and MMA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and prevented the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation induced by all metabolites. Our findings support a protective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by toxic metabolites involved in OAs.

  4. The NMDA receptor ‘glycine modulatory site’ in schizophrenia: d-serine, glycine, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Darrick T; Coyle, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric illness that is characterized by reduced cortical connectivity, for which the underlying biological and genetic causes are not well understood. Although the currently approved antipsychotic drug treatments, which primarily modulate dopaminergic function, are effective at reducing positive symptoms (i.e. delusions and hallucinations), they do little to improve the disabling cognitive and negative (i.e. anhedonia) symptoms of patients with schizophrenia. This review details the recent genetic and neurobiological findings that link N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction to the etiology of schizophrenia. It also highlights potential treatment strategies that augment NMDA receptor function to treat the synaptic deficits and cognitive impairments. PMID:25540902

  5. EXTREME DELTA BRUSH EEG PATTERN IN A CASE WITH ANTI-NMDA RECEPTOR ENCEPHALITIS.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Elif; Güveli, Betül Tekin; Atakli, Dilek; Yatmazoğlu, Merve; Atay, Turan; Dayan, Cengiz

    2015-09-30

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NMDA-R encephalitis is caused by antibodies against the NMDA-R and characterized by a severe encephalopathy with psychosis, epileptic seizures and autonomic disturbances. This disorder is often accompanied with malignancies, especially ovarian teratoma. Some patients' EEGs show a different pattern similar to the waveforms of premature infants and this pattern is specifically named as extreme delta brush (EDB). We report a 24-year-old female having anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and EDB patern.

  6. Quinolinic Acid, an endogenous molecule combining excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and other toxic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD) etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS) has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity.

  7. Quinolinic Acid, an Endogenous Molecule Combining Excitotoxicity, Oxidative Stress and Other Toxic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Santamaría, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, is involved in several neurological disorders, including Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, HIV associated dementia (HAD) etc. QUIN toxicity involves several mechanisms which trigger various metabolic pathways and transcription factors. The primary mechanism exerted by this excitotoxin in the central nervous system (CNS) has been largely related with the overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, ATP exhaustion, free radical formation and oxidative damage. As a result, this toxic pattern is responsible for selective loss of middle size striatal spiny GABAergic neurons and motor alterations in lesioned animals. This toxin has recently gained attention in biomedical research as, in addition to its proven excitotoxic profile, a considerable amount of evidence suggests that oxidative stress and energetic disturbances are major constituents of its toxic pattern in the CNS. Hence, this profile has changed our perception of how QUIN-related disorders combine different toxic mechanisms resulting in brain damage. This review will focus on the description and integration of recent evidence supporting old and suggesting new mechanisms to explain QUIN toxicity. PMID:22408367

  8. 6-Hydroxydopamine injections into the nigrostriatal pathway attenuate striatal malonate and 3-nitropropionic acid lesions.

    PubMed

    Maragos, W F; Jakel, R J; Pang, Z; Geddes, J W

    1998-12-01

    The mitochondrial inhibitors malonate and 3-nitropropionic (3NP) acid are potent neurotoxins in vivo. Administration of these compounds results in neuronal loss similar to that seen in Huntington's disease. Although the mechanism of cell death produced by these compounds likely involves activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, it remains unclear why the striatum demonstrates regional susceptibility to the toxicity of these and other mitochondrial poisons. We hypothesized that dopamine, a weak neurotoxin that occurs in high concentrations in the striatum, may contribute to the neuronal damage caused by mitochondrial inhibition. We investigated whether depletion of striatal dopamine using the catecholaminergic toxin 6-hydroxydopamine would attenuate lesions induced by mitochondrial inhibition. We found that dopamine depletion reduced significantly the extent of histological damage in the striatum elicited by both intraparenchymal injections of 0.8 micromol malonate and 20 mg/kg systemic administration of 3NP. These data suggest that dopamine or one of its metabolites may contribute to mitochondrial toxin-induced cell death.

  9. Activation of γ-aminobutyric Acid (A) Receptor Protects Hippocampus from Intense Exercise-induced Synapses Damage and Apoptosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Xie, Lan; Chang, Cun-Qing; Chen, Zhi-Min; Ai, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our previous study has confirmed that one bout of exhaustion (Ex) can cause hippocampus neurocyte damage, excessive apoptosis, and dysfunction. Its initial reason is intracellular calcium overload in hippocampus triggered by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) over-activation. NMDAR activation can be suppressed by γ-aminobutyric acid (A) receptor (GABAAR). Whether GABAAR can prevent intense exercise-induced hippocampus apoptosis, damage, or dysfunction will be studied in this study. Methods: According to dose test, rats were randomly divided into control (Con), Ex, muscimol (MUS, 0.1 mg/kg) and bicuculline (BIC, 0.5 mg/kg) groups, then all rats underwent once swimming Ex except ones in Con group only underwent training. Intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured by Fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester; glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and synaptophysin (SYP) immunofluorescence were also performed; apoptosis were displayed by dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) stain; endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis pathway was detected by Western blotting analysis; Morris water maze was used to detect learning ability and spatial memory. Results: The appropriate dose was 0.1 mg/kg for MUS and 0.5 mg/kg for BIC. Ex group showed significantly increased [Ca2+]i and astrogliosis; TUNEL positive cells and levels of GFAP, B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, caspase-12 cleavage, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and p-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK) in Ex group also raised significantly compared to Con group, while SYP, synapse plasticity, and Bcl-2 levels in Ex group were significantly lower than those in Con group. These indexes were back to normal in MUS group. BIC group had the highest levels of [Ca2+]i, astrogliosis, TUNEL positive cell, GFAP, Bax, caspase-3, caspase-12 cleavage, CHOP, and p-JNK, it also gained the lowest SYP, synapse plasticity, and Bcl-2 levels among all groups

  10. Involvement of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic systems in thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced rat cerebellar cGMP formation.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hashimoto, T; Nagai, Y

    1996-12-05

    The increase in cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) caused by subcutaneous injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) tartrate was observed in a region-specific manner in the rat cerebellum. TRH tartrate (TRH-T) (2.8, 7.0 and 17 mg/kg as free TRH, s.c.) produced dose-dependent increases in cGMP levels markedly in the cerebellar superior and inferior vermis, and a smaller but still significant increase in the cerebellar hemispheres and brainstem but no significant increases in other brain regions. The TRH-induced increase in the cGMP level in the cerebellum was suppressed by pretreatment with muscimol, THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one) or MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and partially suppressed by atropine but was not suppressed by chlordiazepoxide, oxazepam, phentolamine, propranolol, cyproheptadine, haloperidol, baclofen or DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), suggesting the possible involvement of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(A)-ergic, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamatergic and cholinergic systems. These results suggest that excitatory amino acids may be involved in the cGMP formation caused by TRH in the cerebellar areas, and that cGMP formation is inhibited by enhancement of GABAA receptor function.

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in the spinal cord contributes to chronic visceral pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Qing; Cai, Qin-Yan; Chen, Yu; Guo, Li-Xia; Chen, Ai-Qin; Wu, Zhen-Quan; Lin, Chun

    2014-01-13

    The roles of spinal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor 2B (NR2B) subunit in central sensitization of chronic visceral pain were investigated. A rat model with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was established by colorectal distention (CRD) on post-natal days 8-14. Responses of the external oblique muscle of the abdomen to CRD were measured to evaluate the sensitivity of visceral pain in rats. The sensitivity of visceral pain significantly increased in IBS-like rats. Expressions of spinal NR2B subunit and phosphorylated NR2B subunit significantly increased by 50-55% in IBS-like rats when compared with those in control rats. Ro 25-6981, a selective antagonist of NR2B subunit, has a dose-dependent anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effect without causing motor dysfunction in IBS-like rats. Furthermore, the activation mechanism of the spinal NR2B subunit in chronic visceral pain was also investigated. Spinal administration of genistein, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, also decreased the visceral pain hypersensitivity of IBS-like rats in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of phosphorylated NR2B subunit was decreased after spinal administration of Ro 25-6981 or genistein in IBS-like rats. In conclusion, tyrosine kinase activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B subunit may play a crucial role in central sensitization of chronic visceral pain.

  12. NMDA receptors are essential for the acquisition, but not expression, of conditional fear and associative spike firing in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Goosens, Ki A; Maren, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    We examined the contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) to the acquisition and expression of amygdaloid plasticity and Pavlovian fear conditioning using single-unit recording techniques in behaving rats. We demonstrate that NMDARs are essential for the acquisition of both behavioral and neuronal correlates of conditional fear, but play a comparatively limited role in their expression. Administration of the competitive NMDAR antagonist +/--3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl) propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) prior to auditory fear conditioning completely abolished the acquisition of conditional freezing and conditional single-unit activity in the lateral amygdala (LA). In contrast, CPP given prior to extinction testing did not affect the expression of conditional single-unit activity in LA, despite producing deficits in conditional freezing. Administration of CPP also blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in the amygdala. Together, these data suggest that NMDARs are essential for the acquisition of conditioning-related plasticity in the amygdala, and that NMDARs are more critical for regulating synaptic plasticity and learning than routine synaptic transmission in the circuitry supporting fear conditioning.

  13. Acute intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid affects the expression of the coat protein AP-2 and its interaction with membranes.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Janina; Seltzer, Alicia; Sosa, Miguel Angel

    2009-10-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicle endocytosis is thought to be crucial for the maintenance of synaptic transmission and for the cell plasticity at the nervous system. In this study, we demonstrated that acute intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid (QUIN), an agonist of the N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor, induces a decrease of the coat protein AP-2 expression and affects their interaction with membranes. By western blot analysis we observed that at 24 h after QUIN intrastriatal injection, alpha1 subunit of AP-2 and alpha2, at lesser extent, were reduced in the striatal membranes. The decrease of both subunits expression was extended to 48 h after treatment, although the soluble proteins were mostly affected. Other areas of the brain were not affected by the treatment, except the cerebellum, where a significant increase of soluble AP-2 (both subunits) was observed at 48 h after injection. Another coat protein, as the phosphoprotein AP-180, was not affected by the injection of QUIN. We also confirmed that QUIN injection causes increasing loss of striatal neurons after the administration of the toxin. We concluded that QUIN may affect the endocytotic machinery of the striatum, by inducing changes in the AP-2 behaviour. Consequently, the internalization of NMDAR and/or AMPAR may be affected, by QUIN, contributing to the excitotoxic effect of the drug.

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the rat red nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Minbay, Zehra; Kocoglu, Sema Serter; Yurtseven, Duygu Gok; Eyigor, Ozhan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the presence as well as the diverse distribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA glutamate receptor subunits in the rat red nucleus. Using adult Sprague-Dawley rats as the experimental animals, immunohistochemistry was performed on 30 µm thick coronal brain sections with antibodies against α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (GluA1-4), kainate (GluK1, GluK2/3, and GluK5), and NMDA (GluN1 and GluN2A) receptor subunits. The results showed that all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in the red nucleus. Specific staining was localized in the neuron bodies and processes. However, the pattern of immunoreactivity and the number of labeled neurons changed depending on the type of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and the localization of neurons in the red nucleus. The neurons localized in the magnocellular part of the red nucleus were particularly immunopositive for GluA2, GluA4, GluK2/3, GluK5, GluN1, and GluN2A receptor proteins. In the parvocellular part of the red nucleus, ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit immunoreactivity of variable intensity (lightly to moderately stained) was detected in the neurons. These results suggest that red nucleus neurons in rat heterogeneously express ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits to form functional receptor channels. In addition, the likelihood of the coexpression of different subunits in the same subgroup of neurons suggests the formation of receptor channels with diverse structure by way of different subunit combination, and the possibility of various neuronal functions through these channels in the red nucleus. PMID:28027456

  15. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Beique, Jean-Claude; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Haughey, Norman; Malpica, Tanya; Mattson, Mark P.; Huganir, Richard; Conant, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response. These enzymes have been well studied in the context of cancer biology and inflammation. Recent studies, however, suggest that these enzymes also play roles in brain development and neurodegenerative disease. Select MMPs can target proteins critical to synaptic structure and neuronal survival, including integrins and cadherins. Here, we show that one member of the MMP family, MMP-7, which may be released from cells, including microglia, can target a protein critical to synaptic function. Through analysis of extracts from murine cortical slice preparations, we show that MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to generate an N-terminal fragment of ∼65 kDa. Moreover, studies with recombinant protein show that MMP-7-mediated cleavage of NR1 occurs at amino acid 517, which is extracellular and just distal to the first transmembrane domain. Data suggest that NR2A, which shares sequence homology with NR1, is also cleaved following treatment of slices with MMP-7, while select AMPA receptor subunits are not. Consistent with a potential effect of MMP-7 on ligand binding, additional experiments demonstrate that NMDA-mediated calcium flux is significantly diminished by MMP-7 pretreatment of cultures. In addition, the AMPA/NMDA ratio is increased by MMP-7 pretreatment. These data suggest that synaptic function may be altered in neurological conditions associated with increased levels of MMP-7.—Szklarczyk, A., Ewaleifoh, O., Beique, J.-C., Wang, Y., Knorr, D., Haughey, N., Malpica, T., Mattson, M. P., Huganir, R., Conant, K. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function. PMID:18644839

  16. Antecedent anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in two patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Baheerathan, A; Brownlee, W J; Chard, D T; Shields, K; Gregory, R; Trip, S A

    2017-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder characterised by psychiatric symptoms, movement disorder and seizures often evolving into a severe encephalopathy. An overlap has recently been recognised between anti-NMDAR encephalitis and inflammatory demyelinating disorders, particularly neuromyelitis optical spectrum disorder (NMOSD). In this case report, we describe two patients with an initial presentation consistent with anti-NMDAR encephalitis who have subsequently developed relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and discuss the literature pertaining to potential overlap between NMDAR encephalitis and inflammatory demyelinating disorders.

  17. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: an easily missed diagnosis in older patients.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Katie; Gholkar, Bethan; Cheesman, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an important, treatable cause of encephalitis which remains under-recognised despite a growing body of the literature [1]. It is an immune-mediated syndrome which presents with a variety of neurological symptoms including headache, fever, personality change and seizures. Most case reports to date are of young adults, it is much less frequently reported in older adults. The syndrome has been associated with ovarian teratomas. The prognosis is good with early recognition and treatment, though may relapse. We present a case of NMDA encephalitis in an elderly patient who responded well to immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. Expression pattern of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the striatum of rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; Manich, Gemma; Del Valle, Jaume; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè; Vilaplana, Jordi; Pelegrí, Carme

    2012-09-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a mitochondrial toxin used in the laboratory to replicate neurodegenerative conditions that are accompanied by degeneration of the caudate-putamen. 3-NPA induces depletion in ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, and secondary excitotoxicity mediated by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors that culminates in the triggering of cell death mechanisms, including apoptosis. We here examined by immunohistochemical methods whether cellular expression of phospho(Ser1981) -ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phospho(Ser15) -p53, phospho(Ser473) -Akt, and phospho(Ser9) -glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which are key signal molecules that play a critical role in regulating cellular processes related to cell survival and demise, were involved in the striatal neurodegeneration in the brains of rats treated with 3-NPA. Our results indicate that the toxin induced the activation of ATM and p53 only in astrocytes, and a role for these proteins in neuronal degeneration was ruled out. On the other hand, striatal neurons lost the active form of Akt as soon as they began to appear pyknotic, indicating impairment of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3 pathway in their degenerative process. The inactive form of GSK3β was detected extensively, mainly in the rim of the striatal lesions around degenerating neurons, which could be attributed to a cell death or cell survival response.

  19. Effects of nitric oxide availability on responses of spinal wide dynamic range neurons to excitatory amino acids.

    PubMed

    Budai, D; Wilcox, G L; Larson, A A

    1995-05-04

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in responses of spinal dorsal horn neurons to excitatory amino acids and to cutaneous mechanical stimuli was examined. Extracellular recordings were made from wide dynamic range neurons excited with iontophoretically applied excitatory amino acid agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or kainic acid. Nitric oxide availability was decreased by iontrophoretic application of NO synthase inhibitors, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or L-N5-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine (L-NIO), or elevated by the NO donating compound, S-nitroso-N-penicillamine (SNAP). When cells were excited with successive application of NMDA and non-NMDA excitatory amino acid receptor agonists, application of NO synthase inhibitors led to a decrease in responses to NMDA in 60% of neurons. In more than a third of the cells tested, inhibition of NO synthase caused reciprocal changes in responses to glutamate receptor agonists: NMDA-evoked responses were significantly decreased whereas responses to the non-NMDA receptor agonists (AMPA or kainic acid) were increased. Application of the NO donating compound, S-nitroso-N-penicillamine, revealed an opposite tendency, increasing responses to NMDA in more than half of the neurons tested. In approximately 40% of the cells, reciprocal changes in responses to excitatory amino acid receptor agonists of NMDA versus non-NMDA types were observed after application of S-nitroso-N-penicillamine, such that the increase in NMDA responses was accompanied by decreases in the responses to kainic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunctions: conceptual and psychiatric practice implications.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal-Simons, Ayelet; Durrant, Andrea R; Heresco-Levy, Uriel

    2013-12-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission is mediated via complex receptorial systems including N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolpropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptor subtypes and plays a critical role in the modulation of synaptic plasticity, mood, cognitive processes and motor behavior. Glutamatergic function deficits are hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, mood and movement disorders. Accumulating data are rapidly leading to the characterization of specific types of autoimmune encephalitis in which the receptors and proteins critically involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission, e.g., NMDA, AMPA receptors, are antigen targets. Characteristic of these syndromes, antibodies alter the structure and/or function of the corresponding neuronal antigen resulting in clinical pictures that resemble pharmacological disease models. Presently the best characterized autoimmune glutamatergic disorder is anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. This disorder manifests with intertwined psychiatric and neurological features, defines a new syndrome, reclassifies poorly defined clinical states and extends previous hypotheses, such as hypo-NMDA receptor function in schizophrenia. The characterization of autoimmune-induced glutamatergic receptor dysfunctions (AGRD) is likely to have a substantial conceptual impact upon our understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, affective and movement dysfunctions. Further definition of AGRD will provide additional guidelines for psychiatric diagnoses, identification of homogeneous patient subtypes within broad phenomenological classifications and will contribute to the development of personalized treatments. The body of knowledge already accumulated on anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis highlights the need for wide dissemination of these concepts among psychiatrists, and in suspected cases, for early recognition, prompt clinical

  1. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors.

  2. Novel receptor targets for production and action of allopregnanolone in the central nervous system: a focus on pregnane xenobiotic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Koonce, Carolyn J.; Walf, Alicia A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurosteroids are cholesterol-based hormones that can be produced in the brain, independent of secretion from peripheral endocrine glands, such as the gonads and adrenals. A focus in our laboratory for over 25 years has been how production of the pregnane neurosteroid, allopregnanolone, is regulated and the novel (i.e., non steroid receptor) targets for steroid action for behavior. One endpoint of interest has been lordosis, the mating posture of female rodents. Allopregnanolone is necessary and sufficient for lordosis, and the brain circuitry underlying it, such as actions in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA), has been well-characterized. Published and recent findings supporting a dynamic role of allopregnanolone are included in this review. First, contributions of ovarian and adrenal sources of precursors of allopregnanolone, and the requisite enzymatic actions for de novo production in the central nervous system will be discussed. Second, how allopregnanolone produced in the brain has actions on behavioral processes that are independent of binding to steroid receptors, but instead involve rapid modulatory actions via neurotransmitter targets (e.g., γ-amino butyric acid-GABA, N-methyl-D-aspartate- NMDA) will be reviewed. Third, a recent focus on characterizing the role of a promiscuous nuclear receptor, pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), involved in cholesterol metabolism and expressed in the VTA, as a target for allopregnanolone and how this relates to both actions and production of allopregnanolone will be addressed. For example, allopregnanolone can bind PXR and knocking down expression of PXR in the midbrain VTA attenuates actions of allopregnanolone via NMDA and/or GABAA for lordosis. Our understanding of allopregnanolone’s actions in the VTA for lordosis has been extended to reveal the role of allopregnanolone for broader, clinically-relevant questions, such as neurodevelopmental processes, neuropsychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and aging. PMID

  3. A role for protein kinase A and protein kinase M zeta in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-initiated persistent synaptic enhancement in rat hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J; Li, S; Anwyl, R; Rowan, M J

    2008-01-24

    Antagonists at presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptors increase endogenous acetylcholine (ACh) release and enhance cognition but little is known regarding their actions on plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. Here the mechanisms of the persistent enhancement of hippocampal excitatory transmission induced by the M2/M4 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist methoctramine were investigated in vivo. The persistent facilitatory effect of i.c.v. methoctramine in the CA1 region of urethane-anesthetized rats was mimicked by gallamine, an M2 receptor antagonist, supporting a role for this receptor subtype. Neither the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists D-(-)-2-amino phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) and memantine, nor the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1a antagonist (S)-(+)-alpha-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid (LY367385) significantly affected the methoctramine-induced persistent synaptic enhancement, indicating a lack of requirement for these glutamate receptors. The selective kinase inhibitors Rp-adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPS) and the myrostylated pseudosubstrate peptide, Myr-Ser-Ile-Tyr-Arg-Arg-Gly-Ala-Arg-Arg-Trp-Arg-Lys-Leu-OH (ZIP), were used to investigate the roles of protein kinase A (PKA) and the atypical protein kinase C, protein kinase Mzeta (PKM zeta), respectively. Remarkably, pretreatment with either agent prevented the induction of the persistent synaptic enhancement by methoctramine and post-methoctramine treatment with Rp-cAMPS transiently reversed the enhancement. These findings are strong evidence that antagonism of M2 muscarinic ACh receptors in vivo induces an NMDA receptor-independent persistent synaptic enhancement that requires activation of both PKA and PKM zeta.

  4. NMDA receptor antagonism in the basolateral but not central amygdala blocks the extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Joshua M; Maren, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Glutamate receptors in the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) are essential for the acquisition, expression and extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats. Recent work has revealed that glutamate receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) are also involved in the acquisition of conditional fear, but it is not known whether they play a role in fear extinction. Here we examine this issue by infusing glutamate receptor antagonists into the BLA or CEA prior to the extinction of fear to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) in rats. Infusion of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX), into either the CEA or BLA impaired the expression of conditioned freezing to the auditory CS, but did not impair the formation of a long-term extinction memory to that CS. In contrast, infusion of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), into the amygdala, spared the expression of fear to the CS during extinction training, but impaired the acquisition of a long-term extinction memory. Importantly, only APV infusions into the BLA impaired extinction memory. These results reveal that AMPA and NMDA receptors within the amygdala make dissociable contributions to the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, respectively. Moreover, they indicate that NMDA receptor-dependent processes involved in extinction learning are localized to the BLA. Together with previous work, these results reveal that NMDA receptors in the CEA have a selective role acquisition of fear memory.

  5. GABA-A receptors regulate neocortical neuronal migration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heck, Nicolas; Kilb, Werner; Reiprich, Petra; Kubota, Hisahiko; Furukawa, Tomonori; Fukuda, Atsuo; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2007-01-01

    The cortical migration process depends on a number of trophic factors and on the activation of different voltage- and ligand-gated channels. We investigated the role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors in the neuronal migration process of the newborn rat parietal cortex in vivo and in vitro. Local in vivo application of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or the agonist muscimol via cortical surface Elvax implants induced prominent alterations in the cortical architecture when compared with untreated or sham-operated controls. BMI- and muscimol-treated animals revealed heterotopic cell clusters in the upper layers and a complete loss of the cortical lamination in the region underlying the Elvax implant. Immunocytochemical staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and GABA demonstrated that heterotopia was not provoked by glial proliferation and confirmed the presence of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In organotypic neocortical slices from embryonic day 18-19 embryos, application of BMI and to a lesser extent also muscimol induced an increase in the migration speed and an accumulation of neurons in the upper cortical layers. Spontaneous intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations in neocortical slices from newborn rats were abolished by BMI (5 and 20 microM) and muscimol (1 and 10 microM), indicating that both compounds interfere with [Ca2+]i signaling required for normal neuronal migration. Electrophysiological recordings from migrating neurons in newborn rat neocortical slices indicate that long-term application of muscimol causes a pronounced reduction (1 microM muscimol) or blockade (10 microM) in the responsiveness of postsynaptic GABA-A receptors due to a pronounced receptor desensitization. Our results indicate that modulation of GABA-A receptors by compounds acting as agonists or antagonists may profoundly influence the neuronal migration process in the developing cerebral cortex.

  6. Involvement of pre- and postsynaptic NMDA receptors at local circuit interneuron connections in rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    De-May, C L; Ali, A B

    2013-01-03

    To investigate the involvement of N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in local neocortical synaptic transmission, dual whole-cell recordings - combined with biocytin labelling - were obtained from bitufted adapting, multipolar adapting or multipolar non-adapting interneurons and pyramidal cells in layers II-V of rat (postnatal days 17-22) sensorimotor cortex. The voltage dependency of the amplitude of Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) received by the three types of interneuron appeared to coincide with the interneuron subclass; upon depolarisation, EPSPs received by multipolar non-adapting interneurons either decreased in amplitude or appeared insensitive, multipolar adapting interneuron EPSP amplitudes increased or appeared insensitive, whereas bitufted interneuron EPSP amplitudes increased or decreased. Connections were challenged with the NMDA receptor antagonist d-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (d-AP5) (50μM) revealing NMDA receptors to contribute to EPSPs received by all cell types, this also abolished the non-conventional voltage dependency. Reciprocal connections were frequent between pyramidal cells and multipolar interneurons, and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) elicited in pyramidal cells by both multipolar adapting and multipolar non-adapting interneurons were sensitive to a significant reduction in amplitude by d-AP5. The involvement of presynaptic NMDA receptors was indicated by coefficient of variation analysis and an increase in the failures of transmission. Furthermore, by loading MK-801 into the pre- or postsynaptic neurons, we observed that a reduction in inhibition requires presynaptic and not postsynaptic NMDA receptors. These results suggest that NMDA receptors possess pre- and postsynaptic roles at selective neocortical synapses that are probably important in governing spike-timing and information flow.

  7. Glycine receptors mediate excitation of subplate neurons in neonatal rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Kilb, W; Hanganu, I L; Okabe, A; Sava, B A; Shimizu-Okabe, C; Fukuda, A; Luhmann, H J

    2008-08-01

    The development of the cerebral cortex depends on genetic factors and early electrical activity patterns that form immature neuronal networks. Subplate neurons (SPn) are involved in the construction of thalamocortical innervation, generation of oscillatory network activity, and in the proper formation of the cortical columnar architecture. Because glycine receptors play an important role during early corticogenesis, we analyzed the functional consequences of glycine receptor activation in visually identified SPn in neocortical slices from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P4 rats using whole cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings. In all SPn the glycinergic agonists glycine, beta-alanine, and taurine induced dose-dependent inward currents with the affinity for glycine being higher than that for beta-alanine and taurine. Glycine-induced responses were blocked by the glycinergic antagonist strychnine, but were unaffected by either the GABAergic antagonist gabazine, the N-methyl-d-aspartate-receptor antagonist d-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, or picrotoxin and cyanotriphenylborate, antagonists of alpha-homomeric and alpha1-subunit-containing glycine receptors, respectively. Under perforated-patch conditions, glycine induced membrane depolarizations that were sufficient to trigger action potentials (APs) in most cells. Furthermore, glycine and taurine decreased the injection currents as well as the synaptic stimulation strength required to elicit APs, indicating that glycine receptors have a consistent excitatory effect on SPn. Inhibition of taurine transport and application of hypoosmolar solutions induced strychnine-sensitive inward currents, suggesting that taurine can act as a possible endogenous agonist on SPn. In summary, these results demonstrate that SPn express glycine receptors that mediate robust excitatory membrane responses during early postnatal development.

  8. The action of antidepressants on the glutamate system: regulation of glutamate release and glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Treccani, Giulia; Mallei, Alessandra; Popoli, Maurizio

    2013-06-15

    Recent compelling evidence has suggested that the glutamate system is a primary mediator of psychiatric pathology and also a target for rapid-acting antidepressants. Clinical research in mood and anxiety disorders has shown alterations in levels, clearance, and metabolism of glutamate and consistent volumetric changes in brain areas where glutamate neurons predominate. In parallel, preclinical studies with rodent stress and depression models have found dendritic remodeling and synaptic spines reduction in corresponding areas, suggesting these as major factors in psychopathology. Enhancement of glutamate release/transmission, in turn induced by stress/glucocorticoids, seems crucial for structural/functional changes. Understanding mechanisms of maladaptive plasticity may allow identification of new targets for drugs and therapies. Interestingly, traditional monoaminergic-based antidepressants have been repeatedly shown to interfere with glutamate system function, starting with modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Subsequently, it has been shown that antidepressants reduce glutamate release and synaptic transmission; in particular, it was found antidepressants prevent the acute stress-induced enhancement of glutamate release. Additional studies have shown that antidepressants may partly reverse the maladaptive changes in synapses/circuitry in stress and depression models. Finally, a number of studies over the years have shown that these drugs regulate glutamate receptors, reducing the function of NMDA receptors, potentiating the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptors, and, more recently, exerting variable effects on different subtypes of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The development of NMDA receptor antagonists has opened new avenues for glutamatergic, rapid acting, antidepressants, while additional targets in the glutamate synapse await development of new compounds for better, faster antidepressant action.

  9. Failure of MK-801 to suppress D1 receptor-mediated induction of locomotor activity and striatal preprotachykinin mRNA expression in the dopamine-depleted rat.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B M; Kreipke, C W; Walker, P D

    2006-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism exerts suppressive influences over dopamine D1 receptor-mediated striatal gene expression and locomotor behavior in the intact rat. The present study examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 on locomotor activity and striatal preprotachykinin mRNA expression stimulated by the D1 agonist (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide in rats with bilateral dopamine lesions. Two months after neonatal dopamine lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine, rats were challenged with (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (1.0 mg/kg) 15 min after administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg). In the intact rat, MK-801 prevented the induction of striatal preprotachykinin mRNA by D1 agonism. Similarly, direct infusion of (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (3.0 microg) into the intact striatum produced an increase in locomotor activity that was suppressed by MK-801 (1.0 microg) co-infusion. In the dopamine-depleted rat, MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) administered prior to (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (1.0 mg/kg) increased, rather than suppressed, striatal preprotachykinin mRNA levels. Intrastriatal infusion of MK-801 (1.0 microg) failed to inhibit D1-mediated induction of motor activity in dopamine-depleted animals. Together, these data provide further support that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists lose their ability to block D1-mediated behavioral activation following dopamine depletion. The activation, rather than suppression, of tachykinin neurons of the direct striatonigral pathway may play a facilitatory role in this mechanism.

  10. Nicotinic modulation of glutamate receptor function at nerve terminal level: a fine-tuning of synaptic signals.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Mario; Grilli, Massimo; Pittaluga, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on a specific interaction occurring between the nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and the glutamatergic receptors (GluRs) at the nerve endings level. We have employed synaptosomes in superfusion and supplemented and integrated our findings with data obtained using techniques from molecular biology and immuno-cytochemistry, and the assessment of receptor trafficking. In particular, we characterize the following: (1) the direct and unequivocal localization of native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamatergic receptors on specific nerve terminals, (2) their pharmacological characterization and functional co-localization with nAChRs on the same nerve endings, and (3) the existence of synergistic or antagonistic interactions among them. Indeed, in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), the function of some AMPA and NMDA receptors present on the dopaminergic and glutamatergic nerve terminals can be regulated negatively or positively in response to a brief activation of nAChRs. This effect occurs rapidly and involves the trafficking of AMPA and NMDA receptors. The event takes place also at very low concentrations of nicotine and involves the activation of several nAChRs subtypes. This dynamic control by cholinergic nicotinic system of glutamatergic NMDA and AMPA receptors might therefore represent an important neuronal presynaptic adaptation associated with nicotine administration. The understanding of the role of these nicotine-induced functional changes might open new and interesting perspectives both in terms of explaining the mechanisms that underlie some of the effects of nicotine addiction and in the development of new drugs for smoking cessation.

  11. Ligand Binding and Calcium Influx Induce Distinct Ectodomain/γ-Secretase-processing Pathways of EphB2 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Litterst, Claudia; Georgakopoulos, Anastasios; Shioi, Junichi; Ghersi, Enrico; Wisniewski, Thomas; Wang, Rong; Ludwig, Andreas; Robakis, Nikolaos K.

    2007-01-01

    Binding of EphB receptors to ephrinB ligands on the surface of adjacent cells initiates signaling cascades that regulate angiogenesis, axonal guidance, and neuronal plasticity. These functions require processing of EphB receptors and removal of EphB-ephrinB complexes from the cell surface, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we show that the ectodomain of EphB2 receptor is released to extracellular space following cleavage after EphB2 residue 543. The remaining membrane-associated fragment is cleaved by the presenilin-dependent γ-secretase activity after EphB2 residue 569 releasing an intracellular peptide that contains the cytoplasmic domain of EphB2. This cleavage is inhibited by presenilin 1 familial Alzheimer disease mutations. Processing of EphB2 receptor depends on specific treatments: ephrinB ligand-induced processing requires endocytosis, and the ectodomain cleavage is sensitive to peptide inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-leucinal but insensitive to metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The ligand-induced processing takes place in endosomes and involves the rapid degradation of the extracellular EphB2. EphrinB ligand stimulates ubiquitination of EphB2 receptor. Calcium influx- and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced processing of EphB2 is inhibited by GM6001 and ADAM10 inhibitors but not by N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-leucinal. This processing requires no endocytosis and promotes rapid shedding of extracellular EphB2, indicating that it takes place at the plasma membrane. Our data identify novel cleavages and modifications of EphB2 receptor and indicate that specific conditions determine the proteolytic systems and subcellular sites involved in the processing of this receptor. PMID:17428795

  12. Evidence for the presence of glutamatergic receptors in adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Silva, Dayde Lane; Pessôa, Renata Fittipaldi; Noël, François

    2002-11-01

    Several studies have suggested that L-glutamate is a putative neurotransmitter in helminths. The present study investigated the presence of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) ionotropic receptors for glutamate in four subcellular fractions from adult male Schistosoma mansoni. Low-affinity (K(d)=221+/-80 nM) binding sites for [3H]kainic acid (KA) were detected in the heterogeneous (P(1)) fraction, which contains pieces of unbroken worm tissues, tegument, nuclei, and some vesicles. This binding was inhibited by classical glutamatergic ligands in the following order of potency: KA>L-glutamate>alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA)>quisqualate congruent with 6,7-dinitroquinoline-2,3-dione (DNQX). However, neither NMDA, a selective agonist for NMDA receptors, nor DL-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate (THA) and 1-trans-pyrollidine-2-dicarboxylic acid (PDC), inhibitors of high-affinity glutamate transporters, modified [3H]KA binding to the P(1) fraction. In addition, no specific binding for 10nM [3H]AMPA was detected in any subcellular fraction from S. mansoni. These results suggested the presence of KA receptors in adult male worms. This is supported by the evidence that direct application of 10 microM KA to whole worms produced a corkscrew-like coiling of their bodies, modifying the motility of the worms. The KA-induced response, measured as a decrease of the body area, was time-dependent and reversible. PDC was ineffective at blocking the KA effects, indicating that KA does not depend on high-affinity glutamate transporters to reach its site of action. On the other hand, DNQX, the non-NMDA antagonist, was able to partially inhibit KA-induced responses. As a whole, the present data support the presence of a glutamatergic signaling pathway in this parasite.

  13. Functional localization of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic inputs to mature neurons of the medial superior olive.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Kiri; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) code for the azimuthal location of low-frequency sound sources via a binaural coincidence detection system operating on microsecond time scales. These neurons are morphologically simple and stereotyped, and anatomical studies have indicated a functional segregation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs between cellular compartments. It is thought that this morphological arrangement holds important implications for the computational task of these cells. To date, however, there has been no functional investigation into synaptic input sites or functional receptor distributions on mature neurons of the MSO. Here, functional neurotransmitter receptor maps for amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), glycine (Gly), and ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors (Rs) were compared and complemented by their corresponding synaptic input map. We find in MSO neurons from postnatal day 20-35 gerbils that AMPARs and their excitatory inputs target the soma and dendrites. Functional GlyRs and their inhibitory inputs are predominantly refined to the somata, although a pool of functional GlyRs is present extrasynaptically on MSO dendrites. GABA(A)R responses are present throughout the cell but lack direct synaptic contact indicating an involvement in volume transmission. NMDARs are present both synaptically and extrasynaptically with an overall distribution similar to GlyRs. Interestingly, even at physiological temperatures these functional NMDARs can be potentiated by synaptically released Gly. The functional receptor and synaptic input maps produced here led to the identification of a cross talk between transmitter systems and raises the possibility that extrasynaptic receptors could be modulating leak conductances as a homeostatic mechanism.

  14. Inhibition of glutamate receptors reduces the homocysteine-induced whole blood platelet aggregation but does not affect superoxide anion generation or platelet membrane fluidization.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Kamil; Pieniazek, Anna; Watala, Cezary

    2017-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an excitotoxic amino acid. It is potentially possible to prevent Hcy-induced toxicity, including haemostatic impairments, by antagonizing glutaminergic receptors. Using impedance aggregometry with arachidonate and collagen as platelet agonists, we tested whether the blockade of platelet NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) and kainate receptors with their inhibitors: MK-801 (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate, [5R,10S]-[+]-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine), CNQX (7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile) and UBP-302 (2-{[3-[(2S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin 1(2H)-yl]methyl}benzoic acid) may hamper Hcy-dependent platelet aggregation. All the tested compounds significantly inhibited Hcy-augmented aggregation of blood platelets stimulated either with arachidonate or collagen. Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion in whole blood samples in a concentration-dependent manner; however, this process appeared as independent on ionotropic glutamate receptors, as well as on NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C, and was not apparently associated with the extent of either arachidonate- or collagen-dependent platelet aggregation. Moreover, Hcy acted as a significant fluidizer of surface (more hydrophilic) and inner (more hydrophobic) regions of platelet membrane lipid bilayer, when used at the concentration range from 10 to 50 µmol/l. However, this effect was independent on the Hcy action through glutamate ionotropic receptors, since there was no effects of MK-801, CNQX or UBP-302 on Hcy-mediated membrane fluidization. In conclusion, Hcy-induced changes in whole blood platelet aggregation are mediated through the ionotopic excitotoxic receptors, although the detailed mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated.

  15. mRNAs coding for neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated sodium channels in the adult rabbit visual cortex after monocular deafferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Matute, Carlos; Miledi, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    It has been postulated that, in the adult visual cortex, visual inputs modulate levels of mRNAs coding for neurotransmitter receptors in an activity-dependent manner. To investigate this possibility, we performed a monocular enucleation in adult rabbits and, 15 days later, collected their left and right visual cortices. Levels of mRNAs coding for voltage-activated sodium channels, and for receptors for kainate/α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine were semiquantitatively estimated in the visual cortices ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion by the Xenopus oocyte/voltage-clamp expression system. This technique also allowed us to study some of the pharmacological and physiological properties of the channels and receptors expressed in the oocytes. In cells injected with mRNA from left or right cortices of monocularly enucleated and control animals, the amplitudes of currents elicited by kainate or AMPA, which reflect the abundance of mRNAs coding for kainate and AMPA receptors, were similar. There was no difference in the sensitivity to kainate and in the voltage dependence of the kainate response. Responses mediated by NMDA, GABA, and glycine were unaffected by monocular enucleation. Sodium channel peak currents, activation, steady-state inactivation, and sensitivity to tetrodotoxin also remained unchanged after the enucleation. Our data show that mRNAs for major neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in the adult rabbit visual cortex are not obviously modified by monocular deafferentiation. Thus, our results do not support the idea of a widespread dynamic modulation of mRNAs coding for receptors and ion channels by visual activity in the rabbit visual system. PMID:9501250

  16. Involvement of anteroventral third ventricular AMPA/kainate receptors in both hyperosmotic and hypovolemic AVP secretion in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ken'ichi; Yamada, Takaho

    2006-12-11

    The area of the brain called the anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) includes three different subtypes of glutamate receptor, as well as neural circuits controlling fluid balance and cardiovascular and neuroendocrine functions. Although our previous data indicate the ability of AV3V N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and metabotropic receptors to provoke vasopressin (AVP)-releasing, pressor and hyperglycemic responses, the roles of non-NMDA receptors selective for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid and kainate have not been elucidated to date. To address this question, the effects of intracerebral infusion with FWD or NBQX (specific agonist and antagonist for non-NMDA receptors, respectively) on plasma AVP, glucose, osmolality, electrolytes and cardiovascular parameters were examined in conscious rats in the absence or presence of an osmotic or volemic stimulus. When applied topically to AV3V structures such as the median preoptic nucleus, FWD augmented plasma AVP, osmolality, glucose and arterial pressure in a dose-associated fashion. All responses of the variables were abolished by pre-administering NBQX, which exerted no conspicuous effect on any variable except arterial pressure. It was revealed that NBQX administration in AV3V structures such as the median preoptic nucleus and the periventricular nucleus inhibited the rise of plasma AVP in response to intravenous infusion with hypertonic saline or removal of systemic blood through the femoral artery. Elevation of plasma osmolality and sodium evoked by osmotic load, and elevation of plasma osmolality, glucose and angiotensin II and decrease of arterial pressure caused by bleeding, were not significantly affected by NBQX treatment. These results suggest that AV3V non-NMDA receptors, as well as NMDA receptors, may elicit AVP-releasing, pressor and hyperglycemic actions when stimulated in the basal state, and may facilitate AVP secretion under both hyperosmotic and hypovolemic conditions

  17. Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors dilates retinal arterioles by neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Someya, Eriko; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio; Nakahara, Tsutomu

    2017-03-21

    Opioids contribute to the regulation of cerebral vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of herkinorin, a non-opioid μ-opioid receptor agonist derived from salvinorin A, on blood vessels in the rat retina and to investigate the mechanism underlying the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilatory response. Ocular fundus images were captured using an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring the diameter of retinal arterioles in the fundus images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. Herkinorin increased the retinal arteriolar diameter without significantly changing mean blood pressure and heart rate. The retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin was almost completely prevented following treatment with naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist and H-D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist. N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonselective nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. In addition, N(ω)-propyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of neuronal NO synthase, diminished the herkinorin-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Seven days after an intravitreal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid, loss of inner retinal neurons and abolishment of the retinal vasodilator response to herkinorin were observed. These results suggest that herkinorin dilates rat retinal arterioles through stimulation of retinal μ-opioid receptors. The μ-opioid receptor-mediated retinal vasodilator response is likely mediated by NO generated by neuronal NO synthase. Retinal neurons play an important role in the retinal vasodilator mechanism involving μ-opioid receptors in rats.

  18. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade differentially influences excitotoxic mechanisms at pre- and postsynaptic sites in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Pintor, Annita; Frank, Claudio; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Martire, Alberto; Pepponi, Rita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Grieco, Rosa; Popoli, Patrizia

    2004-07-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists are being regarded as potential neuroprotective drugs, although the mechanisms underlying their effects need to be better studied. The aim of this work was to investigate further the mechanism of the neuroprotective action of A(2A) receptor antagonists in models of pre- and postsynaptic excitotoxicity. In microdialysis studies, the intrastriatal perfusion of the A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM 241385 (5 and 50 nM) significantly reduced, in an inversely dose-dependent way, the raise in glutamate outflow induced by 5 mM quinolinic acid (QA). In rat corticostriatal slices, ZM 241385 (30-100 nM) significantly reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-induced paired-pulse inhibition (PPI; an index of neurotransmitter release), whereas it worsened the depression of field potential amplitude elicited by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 12.5 and 50 microM). The A(2A) antagonist SCH 58261 (30 nM) mimicked the effects of ZM 241385, whereas the A(2A) agonist CGS 21680 (100 nM) showed a protective influence toward 50 microM NMDA. In rat striatal neurons, 50 nM ZM 241385 did not affect the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) or the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) induced by 100 and 300 microM NMDA, respectively. The ability of ZM 241385 to prevent QA-induced glutamate outflow and 4-AP-induced effects confirms that A(2A) receptor antagonists have inhibitory effects on neurotransmitter release, whereas the results obtained toward NMDA-induced effects suggest that A(2A) receptor blockade does not reduce, or even amplifies, excitotoxic mechanisms due to direct NMDA receptor stimulation. This indicates that the neuroprotective potential of A(2A) antagonists may be evident mainly in models of neurodegeneration in which presynaptic mechanisms play a major role.

  19. Ethanol affects NMDA receptor signaling at climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapses in mice and impairs cerebellar LTD.

    PubMed

    He, Qionger; Titley, Heather; Grasselli, Giorgio; Piochon, Claire; Hansel, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol profoundly influences cerebellar circuit function and motor control. It has recently been demonstrated that functional N-methyl-(D)-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are postsynaptically expressed at climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell synapses in the adult cerebellum. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse cerebellar slices, we examined whether ethanol can affect NMDA receptor signaling in mature Purkinje cells. NMDA receptor-mediated currents were isolated by bath application of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzol[f]quinoxaline (NBQX). The remaining (D)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid ((D)-APV)-sensitive current was reduced by ethanol at concentrations as low as 10 mM. At a concentration of 50 mM ethanol, the blockade of (D)-APV-sensitive CF-excitatory postsynaptic currents was significantly stronger. Ethanol also altered the waveform of CF-evoked complex spikes by reducing the afterdepolarization. This effect was not seen when NMDA receptors were blocked by (D)-APV before ethanol wash-in. In contrast to CF synaptic transmission, parallel fiber (PF) synaptic inputs were not affected by ethanol. Finally, ethanol (10 mM) impaired long-term depression (LTD) at PF to Purkinje cell synapses as induced under control conditions by paired PF and CF activity. However, LTD induced by pairing PF stimulation with depolarizing voltage steps (substituting for CF activation) was not blocked by ethanol. These observations suggest that the sensitivity of cerebellar circuit function and plasticity to low concentrations of ethanol may be caused by an ethanol-mediated impairment of NMDA receptor signaling at CF synapses onto cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  20. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment.