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Sample records for n-terminal truncated fragment

  1. Absence of adynamic bone disease in African-Americans with CKD stage 5 after 3 years of vitamin D therapy guided by iPTH and the PTH-(1-84)/N-terminally truncated PTH fragments ratio.

    PubMed

    Fehmi, H; Osman, Y; Bhat, S; Nguyen, K; Daramola, O; Cantor, T; Monier-Faugere, M-C; Yee, J; Malluche, H H

    2009-03-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The goal of treatment is to achieve circulating levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) associated without oversuppression of bone turnover. This is commonly achieved by treatment with vitamin D analogs. Doses of vitamin D compounds are usually monitored by measurement of circulating levels of PTH. To prospectively assess the effects on bone histology of two different protocols for dosing vitamin D. African-American patients from the same geographic area, managed by the same team of physicians in three dialysis clinics were studied. Patients were treated with vitamin D for 3 years and underwent bone biopsies for assessment of bone turnover. Dosing of vitamin D during the 3 years prior to the biopsy was done following two different guidelines. One group was treated following K/DOQI guidelines adapted to the bio-intact PTH assay (Protocol A), the other group was managed (Protocol B) following K/DOQI guidelines for intact PTH and/or the ratio of PTH-(1-84)/N-terminally truncated fragments (PTH ratio). Levels of circulating PTH and/or PTH ratio. Prevalence of low bone turnover. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of bone histology after tetracycline labeling. 7 out of 22 patients managed following Protocol A were found to have low bone turnover (32%) by bone histology. None of the 21 patients managed by Protocol B for guidance of vitamin D therapy, had low bone turnover. Lack of bone biopsy at the beginning of study. This report indicates that the additional information provided by the PTH ratio represents a distinct advantage in avoiding low bone turnover over the use of a single PTH assay to guide vitamin D dosing in African-American patients with CKD Stage 5 on dialysis.

  2. An N-terminal Domain of Adenovirus Protein VI Fragments Membranes By Inducing Positive Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oana; Galan, Debra L.; Wodrich, Harald; Wiethoff, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) membrane penetration during cell entry is poorly understood. Here we show that antibodies which neutralize the membrane lytic activity of the Ad capsid protein VI interfere with Ad endosomal membrane penetration. In vitro studies using a peptide corresponding to an N-terminal amphipathic α-helix of protein VI (VI-Φ), as well as other truncated forms of protein VI suggest that VI-Φ is largely responsible for protein VI binding to and lysing of membranes. Additional studies suggest that VI-Φ lies nearly parallel to the membrane surface. Protein VI fragments membranes and induces highly curved structures. Further studies suggest that Protein VI induces positive membrane curvature. These data support a model in which protein VI binds membranes, inducing positive curvature strain which ultimately leads to membrane fragmentation. These results agree with previous observations of Ad membrane permeabilization during cell entry and provide an initial mechanistic description of a nonenveloped virus membrane lytic protein. PMID:20409568

  3. N-terminal or signal peptide sequence engineering prevents truncation of human monoclonal antibody light chains.

    PubMed

    Gibson, S J; Bond, N J; Milne, S; Lewis, A; Sheriff, A; Pettman, G; Pradhan, R; Higazi, D R; Hatton, D

    2017-03-28

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) contain short N-terminal signal peptides on each individual polypeptide that comprises the mature antibody, targeting them for export from the cell in which they are produced. The signal peptide is cleaved from each heavy chain (Hc) and light chain (Lc) polypeptide after translocation to the ER and prior to secretion. This process is generally highly efficient, producing a high proportion of correctly cleaved Hc and Lc polypeptides. However, mis-cleavage of the signal peptide can occur, resulting in truncation or elongation at the N-terminus of the Hc or Lc. This is undesirable for antibody manufacturing as it can impact efficacy and can result in product heterogeneity. Here, we describe a truncated variant of the Lc that was detected during a routine developability assessment of the recombinant human IgG1 MEDI8490 in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that the truncation of the Lc was caused due to the use of the murine Hc signal peptide together with a lambda Lc containing an SYE amino acid motif at the N-terminus. This truncation was not caused by mis-processing of the mRNA encoding the Lc and was not dependent on expression platform (transient or stable), the scale of the fed-batch culture or clonal lineage. We further show that using alternative signal peptides or engineering the Lc SYE N-terminal motif prevented the truncation and that this strategy will improve Lc homogeneity of other SYE lambda Lc-containing mAbs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Study of Oligomer Formation by N-Terminally Truncated Amyloid β-Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meral, Derya; Urbanc, Brigita

    2013-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), amyloid β-protein (Aβ) self–assembles into toxic oligomers. Of the two predominant Aβ alloforms, Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42, the latter is particularly strongly linked to AD. N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamated Aβ peptides were recently shown to seed Aβ aggregation and contribute significantly to Aβ–mediated toxicity, yet their folding and assembly were not explored computationally. Discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) approach previously captured in vitro–derived distinct Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 oligomer size distributions and predicted that the more toxic Aβ1–42 oligomers had more flexible and solvent exposed N-termini than Aβ1–40 oligomers. Here, we examined oligomer formation of Aβ3–40, Aβ3–42, Aβ11–40, and Aβ11–42 by the DMD approach. The four N-terminally truncated peptides showed increased oligomerization propensity relative to the full–length peptides, consistent with in vitro findings. Conformations formed by Aβ3–40/42 had significantly more flexible and solvent–exposed N-termini than Aβ1–40/42 conformations. In contrast, in Aβ11–40/42 conformations the N-termini formed more contacts and were less accessible to the solvent. The compactness of the Aβ11–40/42 conformations was in part facilitated by Val12. Two single amino acid substitutions that reduced and abolished hydrophobicity at position 12, respectively, resulted in a proportionally increased structural variability. Our results suggest that Aβ11–40 and Aβ11–42 oligomers might be less toxic than Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 oligomers and offer a plausible explanation for the experimentally–observed increased toxicity of Aβ3–40 and Aβ3–42 and their pyroglutamated forms. PMID:23500806

  5. GPR37 Surface Expression Enhancement via N-Terminal Truncation or Protein-Protein Interactions1

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Garcia, Erin L.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    GPR37, also known as the parkin-associated endothelin-like receptor (Pael-R), is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that exhibits poor plasma membrane expression when expressed in most cell types. We sought to find ways to enhance GPR37 trafficking to the cell surface in order to facilitate studies of GPR37 functional activity in heterologous cells. In truncation studies, we found that removing the GPR37 N-terminus (NT) dramatically enhanced the receptor’s plasma membrane insertion. Further studies on sequential NT truncations revealed that removal of the first 210 amino acids increased surface expression nearly as much as removal of the entire NT. In studies examining the effects of co-expression of GPR37 with a variety of other GPCRs, we observed significant increases in GPR37 surface expression when the receptor was co-expressed with the adenosine receptor A2AR or the dopamine receptor D2R. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that full-length GPR37 and, to a greater extent, the truncated GPR37 were capable of robustly associating with D2R, resulting in modestly-altered D2R affinity for both agonists and antagonists. In studies examining potential interactions of GPR37 with PDZ scaffolds, we observed a specific interaction between GPR37 and syntenin-1, which resulted in a dramatic increase in GPR37 surface expression in HEK-293 cells. These findings reveal three independent approaches – N-terminal truncation, co-expression with other receptors and co-expression with syntenin-1 – by which GPR37 surface trafficking in heterologous cells can be greatly enhanced to facilitate functional studies on this orphan receptor. PMID:19799451

  6. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-08-20

    The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  7. Nested N-terminal megalin fragments induce high-titer autoantibody and attenuated Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Tramontano, Alfonso; Knight, Thomas; Vizzuso, Domenica; Makker, Sudesh P

    2006-07-01

    It was shown previously that an N-terminal fragment (nM60) that encompasses amino acid residues 1 to 563 of megalin could induce active Heymann nephritis (AHN) as efficiently as the native protein. For delineation of a minimal structure within this fragment that is sufficient to induce AHN, smaller protein fragments that encompass residues 1 to 236 (L6), 1 to 195 (L5), 1 to 156 (L4), and 1 to 120 (L3), representing successive C-terminal truncations within ligand-binding repeats of nM60, were cloned and produced in a baculovirus insect cell expression system. Protein fragments L4, L5, and L6 clearly were glycosylated. All four fragments stimulated proliferation of megalin-sensitized lymph node cells and induced high-titer anti-megalin autoantibodies in Lewis rats. A full-blown disease, as assessed by severity of proteinuria, was observed in rats that were immunized with L6 and L5, whereas animals that were immunized with L4 and L3 developed only mild disease. The proteinuria levels correlated with staining for complement (C3, C5b-9) and IgG1 isotype in glomerular immune deposits. The results suggest that one or more molecular determinants on the region that comprises amino acid residues 157 to 236 contribute to the induction of a full-blown form of AHN. Study of the structure, conformation, and posttranslational modifications of these determinants could provide greater insight into the molecular correlates of immunopathogenesis in this disease model.

  8. Acute effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens P; Hansen, Carsten P; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2017-03-01

    We previously identified an N-terminal fragment of progastrin in human antrum and plasma, where it circulates in high concentrations. In this study, we examined the effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion by infusion in healthy individuals. Increasing doses of progastrin fragment 1-35 were infused intravenously during constant gastric acid stimulation by gastrin-17. In addition, the effects of progastrin fragment 1-35, fragment 6-35, and fragment 1-19 on gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion were tested. The gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion decreased 30% after administration of a high dose of progastrin fragment 1-35 (P < 0.05). In extension, a 1-h infusion of fragment 1-35 also decreased gastric acid output. In contrast, fragment 6-35 did not affect acid secretion, and a single infusion of gastrin-17 alone did not reveal fading of gastric acid output during the time course of the experiments. The results show that N-terminal fragments of progastrin may acutely affect gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in vivo. Structure-function analysis suggests that the N-terminal pentapeptide of progastrin is required for the effect.

  9. N-Terminal Truncated UCH-L1 Prevents Parkinson's Disease Associated Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Jae-Eun; Baek, Jeong Yeob; Jeong, Jaeho; Kim, Sun; Kim, Young-Mee; Kim, Youhwa; Nam, Jin Han; Huh, Sue Hee; Seo, Jawon; Jin, Byung Kwan; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has been proposed as one of the Parkinson's disease (PD) related genes, but the possible molecular connection between UCH-L1 and PD is not well understood. In this study, we discovered an N-terminal 11 amino acid truncated variant UCH-L1 that we called NT-UCH-L1, in mouse brain tissue as well as in NCI-H157 lung cancer and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines. In vivo experiments and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS) studies showed that NT-UCH-L1 is readily aggregated and degraded, and has more flexible structure than UCH-L1. Post-translational modifications including monoubiquitination and disulfide crosslinking regulate the stability and cellular localization of NT-UCH-L1, as confirmed by mutational and proteomic studies. Stable expression of NT-UCH-L1 decreases cellular ROS levels and protects cells from H2O2, rotenone and CCCP-induced cell death. NT-UCH-L1-expressing transgenic mice are less susceptible to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons seen in the MPTP mouse model of PD, in comparison to control animals. These results suggest that NT-UCH-L1 may have the potential to prevent neural damage in diseases like PD. PMID:24959670

  10. N-terminal truncated carboxypeptidase E expression is associated with poor prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Meng, Dawei; Li, Li; Tian, Xin; Jia, Yunji; Wang, Hongyue; Yu, Huihui; Sun, Tiemin; Qu, Aibing; Shen, Hui; Bao, Jimin; Zhang, Guirong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a malignant tumor with high morbidity and mortality rates. To date, no suitable molecular diagnostic tool to predict disease recurrence and metastasis has been identified. The current study aimed to evaluate the potential of N-terminal truncated carboxypeptidase E (CPEΔN) to predict the recurrence and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma. Western blotting revealed the co-expression of CPE and CPEΔN in the surgically collected pathological and pericarcinoma tissues tissues of 62.1% (59/95) lung adenocarcinoma patients. The full length CPE protein was predominantly expressed in pericarcinoma tissues and CPEΔN expression was identified in the pericarcinoma normal tissues of only 5.26% (5/95) patients. The 3-year postoperative recurrence and metastasis rates were significantly higher in patients with positive CPEΔN expression than in patients with negative CPEΔN expression (P=0.009). Furthermore, the overall survival rate of patients with predominant nuclear CPE expression was lower than that of patients with predominant cytoplasmic CPE expression (46.3 vs. 64.7%); however, no statistically significant difference was identified (P=0.125). Thus, the results of the current study indicated that CPEΔN may present a novel molecular biomarker for predicting recurrence and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma, which may aid with stratifying patients by risk and thus, may facilitate individualized therapy. PMID:28101219

  11. Vasoinhibins: a family of N-terminal prolactin fragments that inhibit angiogenesis and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Carmen; González, Carmen; Macotela, Yazmín; Aranda, Jorge; Rivera, José C; García, Celina; Guzmán, Jessica; Zamorano, Miriam; Vega, Claudia; Martín, Cecilia; Jeziorski, Michael C; de la Escalera, Gonzalo Martínez

    2006-01-01

    Antiangiogenic molecules derived from prolactin (PRL) are not a single entity, but rather a family of peptides with different molecular masses, all containing the N-terminal region of PRL. Cleavage of PRL by cathepsin-D or by matrix metalloproteases generates N-terminal fragments that act on endothelial cells to suppress vasodilation and angiogenesis and promote vascular regression. N-terminal PRL fragments have been identified in cartilage and retina, where angiogenesis is highly restricted. In vivo experiments demonstrate that these PRL fragments exert a tonic and essential suppression of retinal blood vessel growth and dilation. Similar PRL fragments have been detected in the pituitary gland, a highly vascularized organ where the control of vascular growth may differ from that in tissues where angiogenesis is highly restricted. We have previously proposed the name vasoinhibins to describe the collection of N-terminal PRL fragments having blood vessel-blocking activity, and here we discuss their promise as factors to control vascular function in health and disease.

  12. Functional characterization of an N-terminally-truncated mitochondrial porin expressed in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Shuvo, Sabbir R; Kovaltchouk, Uliana; Zubaer, Abdullah; Kumar, Ayush; Summers, William A T; Donald, Lynda J; Hausner, Georg; Court, Deborah A

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial porin, which forms voltage-dependent anion-selective channels (VDAC) in the outer membrane, can be folded into a 19-β-stranded barrel. The N terminus of the protein is external to the barrel and contains α-helical structure. Targeted modifications of the N-terminal region have been assessed in artificial membranes, leading to different models for gating in vitro. However, the in vivo requirements for gating and the N-terminal segment of porin are less well-understood. Using Neurospora crassa porin as a model, the effects of a partial deletion of the N-terminal segment were investigated. The protein, ΔN2-12porin, is assembled into the outer membrane, albeit at lower levels than the wild-type protein. The resulting strain displays electron transport chain deficiencies, concomitant expression of alternative oxidase, and decreased growth rates. Nonetheless, its mitochondrial genome does not contain any significant mutations. Most of the genes that are expressed in high levels in porin-less N. crassa are expressed at levels similar to that of wild type or are slightly increased in ΔN2-12porin strains. Thus, although the N-terminal segment of VDAC is required for complete function in vivo, low levels of a protein lacking part of the N terminus are able to rescue some of the defects associated with the absence of porin.

  13. [Chemical synthesis of lactococcin B and functional evaluation of the N-terminal domain using a truncated synthetic analogue].

    PubMed

    Lasta, S; Fajloun, Z; Mansuelle, P; Sabatier, J M; Boudabous, A; Sampieri, F

    2008-01-01

    The lactococcin B (LnB) is a hydrophobic, positively charged bacteriocin, produced by Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris 9B4. It consists of a peptidic chain made up of 47 amino acid residues, and inhibits Lactococcus exclusively. In order to study its biological activity a synthetic lactococcin B (LnBs) was obtained by solid-phase chemical synthesis using a Fmoc strategy. LnBs was shown to be indistinguishable from the natural peptide. In addition, a synthetic (7-47) LnBst analogue was obtained by withdrawal of peptidyl-resin after the 41 cycle of LnBs peptide chain assembly. The synthetic N-terminal truncated (7-47) LnBst analogue was found to be inactive on indicator strains. Our results strongly suggest that the first six N-terminal amino acid residues are involved in the bactericidal activity of LnB.

  14. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator.

  15. Evidence of Molecular Interactions of Aβ1-42 with N-Terminal Truncated Beta Amyloids by NMR.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, Simona; Pagano, Katiuscia; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2017-02-06

    Aβ peptides, the main protein components of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques, derive from a proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Due to heterogeneous cleavage sites, a series of Aβ peptides, including the major and widely studied species Aβ1-40 (Aβ40) and Aβ1-42 (Aβ42), are produced. In addition to the C-terminal heterogeneity of Aβ peptides, significant amounts of N-terminal truncated (Aβ3-42) and pyroglutamate-modified amyloid-β peptides (AβpE3-42) have been identified in AD affected brains and shown to be more cytotoxic than unmodified Aβ peptides. Little is known about the properties of their mixtures with Aβ42. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is here employed to investigate the interaction of N-truncated peptides with Aβ42 at different molar ratios. We highlight the critical concentration of N-truncated forms influencing the aggregation kinetics of Aβ42. We provide evidence, at residue level, that the C-terminal region of Aβ42 is the locus of transient specific interactions with highly aggregation prone N-truncated alloforms.

  16. Truncation of N-terminal regions of Digitalis lanata progesterone 5β-reductase alters catalytic efficiency and substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Kristin; Bauer, Peter; Schmid, Benedikt; Mueller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    N-Terminal truncated forms of progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) were synthesized taking a full-length cDNA encoding for Digitalis lanata P5βR with a hexa-histidine tag attached at the C-terminus (rDlP5βRc) as the starting point. Four pETite-c-His/DlP5βR constructs coding for P5βR derivatives truncated in the N-terminal region, termed rDlP5βRcn-10, rDlP5βRcn-20, rDlP5βRcn-30, and rDlP5βRcn-40 were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The cDNAs coding for full-length rDlP5βRc, rDlP5βRcn-10 and rDlP5βRcn-20 were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and the respective enzymes were soluble and catalytically active (progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates). GST-tagged recombinant DlP5βR (rDlP5βR-GST) and rDlP5βR-GSTr, with the GST-tag removed by protease treatment were produced as well and served as controls. The Km values and substrate preferences considerably differed between the various DlP5βR derivatives. As for the C-terminal His-tagged rDlP5βR the catalytic efficiency for progesterone was highest for the full-length rDlP5βRc whereas the N-terminal truncated forms preferred 2-cyclohexen-1-one as the substrate. Affinity tags and artifacts resulting from the cloning strategy used may alter substrate specificity. Therefore enzyme properties determined with recombinant proteins should not be used to infer in vivo scenarios and should be considered for each particular case. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. N-Terminal Prolactin-Derived Fragments, Vasoinhibins, Are Proapoptoptic and Antiproliferative in the Anterior Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Jimena; Radl, Daniela Betiana; Zárate, Sandra; Jaita, Gabriela; Eijo, Guadalupe; Zaldivar, Verónica; Clapp, Carmen; Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The anterior pituitary is under a constant cell turnover modulated by gonadal steroids. In the rat, an increase in the rate of apoptosis occurs at proestrus whereas a peak of proliferation takes place at estrus. At proestrus, concomitant with the maximum rate of apoptosis, a peak in circulating levels of prolactin is observed. Prolactin can be cleaved to different N-terminal fragments, vasoinhibins, which are proapoptotic and antiproliferative factors for endothelial cells. It was reported that a 16 kDa vasoinhibin is produced in the rat anterior pituitary by cathepsin D. In the present study we investigated the anterior pituitary production of N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments along the estrous cycle and the involvement of estrogens in this process. In addition, we studied the effects of a recombinant vasoinhibin, 16 kDa prolactin, on anterior pituitary apoptosis and proliferation. We observed by Western Blot that N-terminal prolactin-derived fragments production in the anterior pituitary was higher at proestrus with respect to diestrus and that the content and release of these prolactin forms from anterior pituitary cells in culture were increased by estradiol. A recombinant preparation of 16 kDa prolactin induced apoptosis (determined by TUNEL assay and flow cytometry) of cultured anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes from ovariectomized rats only in the presence of estradiol, as previously reported for other proapoptotic factors in the anterior pituitary. In addition, 16 kDa prolactin decreased forskolin-induced proliferation (evaluated by BrdU incorporation) of rat total anterior pituitary cells and lactotropes in culture and decreased the proportion of cells in S-phase of the cell cycle (determined by flow cytometry). In conclusion, our study indicates that the anterior pituitary production of 16 kDa prolactin is variable along the estrous cycle and increased by estrogens. The antiproliferative and estradiol-dependent proapoptotic actions of this

  18. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; )

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  19. N-Terminal Fragments of Huntingtin Longer than Residue 170 form Visible Aggregates Independently to Polyglutamine Expansion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Moore Z; Mok, Sue-Ann; Ormsby, Angelique R; Muchowski, Paul J; Hatters, Danny M

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of Huntington's disease is the progressive aggregation of full length and N-terminal fragments of polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded Huntingtin (Htt) into intracellular inclusions. The production of N-terminal fragments appears important for enabling pathology and aggregation; and hence the direct expression of a variety of N-terminal fragments are commonly used to model HD in animal and cellular models. It remains unclear how the length of the N-terminal fragments relates to polyQ - mediated aggregation. We investigated the fundamental intracellular aggregation process of eight different-length N-terminal fragments of Htt in both short (25Q) and long polyQ (97Q). N-terminal fragments were fused to fluorescent proteins and transiently expressed in mammalian cell culture models. These included the classic exon 1 fragment (90 amino acids) and longer forms of 105, 117, 171, 513, 536, 552, and 586 amino acids based on wild-type Htt (of 23Q) sequence length nomenclature. N-terminal fragments of less than 171 amino acids only formed inclusions in polyQ-expanded form. By contrast the longer fragments formed inclusions irrespective of Q-length, with Q-length playing a negligible role in extent of aggregation. The inclusions could be classified into 3 distinct morphological categories. One type (Type A) was universally associated with polyQ expansions whereas the other two types (Types B and C) formed independently of polyQ length expansion. PolyQ-expansion was only required for fragments of less than 171 amino acids to aggregate. Longer fragments aggregated predominately through a non-polyQ mechanism, involving at least one, and probably more distinct clustering mechanisms.

  20. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging of Filamentous Aggregates from an N-Terminal Peptide Fragment of Barnase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata-Seki, Teiko; Masai, Junji; Yoshida, Kenji; Sato, Kazuki; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports the atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of filamentous aggregates derived from an N-terminal peptide fragment of barnase, a ribonuclease from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The sample was deposited on a freshly cleaved mica surface and observed in ambient conditions. The overall shapes of the filamentous structures imaged with two different kinds of AFMs were similar to those obtained with a transmission electron microscope (TEM), except that the filaments in AFM images were broader than those in TEM images. This broadening phenomenon characteristic of AFM images was explained in terms of the convolution-type distortion of the specimen diameter by the scanning-tip apex.

  1. 5'UTR point substitutions and N-terminal truncating mutations of ANKRD26 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Caterina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bozzi, Valeria; Pippucci, Tommaso; Simonetti, Giorgia; Melazzini, Federica; Angori, Silvia; Martinelli, Giovanni; Saglio, Giuseppe; Torti, Mauro; Pastan, Ira; Seri, Marco; Pecci, Alessandro

    2017-01-18

    Thrombocytopenia 2 (THC2) is an inherited disorder caused by monoallelic single nucleotide substitutions in the 5'UTR of the ANKRD26 gene. Patients have thrombocytopenia and increased risk of myeloid malignancies, in particular, acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Given the association of variants in the ANKRD26 5'UTR with myeloid neoplasms, we investigated whether, and to what extent, mutations in this region contribute to apparently sporadic AML. To this end, we studied 250 consecutive, non-familial, adult AML patients and screened the first exon of ANKRD26 including the 5'UTR. We found variants in four patients. One patient had the c.-125T>G substitution in the 5'UTR, while three patients carried two different variants in the 5' end of the ANKRD26 coding region (c.3G>A or c.105C>G). Review of medical history showed that the patient carrying the c.-125T>G was actually affected by typical but unrecognized THC2, highlighting that some apparently sporadic AML cases represent the evolution of a well-characterized familial predisposition disorder. As regards the c.3G>A and the c.105C>G, we found that both variants result in the synthesis of N-terminal truncated ANKRD26 isoforms, which are stable and functional in cells, in particular, have a strong ability to activate the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Moreover, investigation of one patient with the c.3G>A showed that mutation was associated with strong ANKRD26 overexpression in vivo, which is the proposed mechanism for predisposition to AML in THC2 patients. These data provide evidence that N-terminal ANKRD26 truncating mutations play a potential pathogenetic role in AML. Recognition of AML patients with germline ANKRD26 pathogenetic variants is mandatory for selection of donors for bone marrow transplantation.

  2. Specific N-terminal CGRP fragments mitigate chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xin; Wimalawansa, Sunil J; Keith, Ingegerd M

    2003-01-31

    Chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure (P(PA)), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular remodeling, pulmonary edema and polycythemia. Currently, there is no safe and effective treatment for HPH. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is the most potent peptide vasodilator discovered thus far. We previously demonstrated that exogenous CGRP reversed HPH in rats. However, the CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37) and smaller inhibitory C-terminal CGRP fragments that can be formed by enzymatic cleavage in vivo may compromise the beneficial effects of endogenous or exogenous CGRP. We here examine the agonistic efficacy of N-terminal rat alpha-CGRP peptides containing the disulfide bridge (Cys(2)-Cys(7)) with amidated C-terminal in prevention of HPH. Chronic infusion of CGRP(1-8), CGRP(1-13), or CGRP(1-14) at 7 nmol/h/rat via the right jugular vein during 14 days of hypobaric hypoxia (10% inspired O(2)) significantly decreased the P(PA), RVH and pulmonary arterial medial thickness in comparison with controls, suggesting that these CGRP sequences can mitigate chronic HPH in rats. Systemic pressure was unchanged by infused peptides indicating no carry-over effect. In conclusion, N-terminal CGRP fragments (CGRP(1-8), CGRP(1-13) and CGRP(1-14)) may have a protective role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Heparin promotes fibril formation by the N-terminal fragment of amyloidogenic apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed

    Mikawa, Shiho; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Sakashita, Naomi; Otaka, Akira; Akaji, Kenichi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are known to be associated with extracellular amyloid deposits of various amyloidogenic proteins. In this study, we found that the glycosaminoglycan heparin greatly accelerates the elongation step in fibril formation by the N-terminal 1-83 fragment of human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), especially in the amyloidogenic W50R variant. Using fragment peptides, we demonstrate that heparin significantly promotes β-transition and fibril formation of the highly amyloidogenic region spanning residues 44-65 and colocalizes with fibrils formed by the W50R variant. These results suggest the possible role of glycosaminoglycans in fibril formation by amyloidogenic apoA-I variants. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. N-terminal helix reorients in recombinant C-fragment of Clostridium botulinum type B.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Ahmed, S Ashraf; Smith, Leonard A; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2005-04-29

    Botulinum neurotoxins comprise seven distinct serotypes (A-G) produced by Clostridium botulinum. The crystal structure of the binding domain of the botulinum neurotoxin type B (BBHc) has been determined to 2A resolution. The overall structure of BBHc is well ordered and similar to that of the binding domain of the holotoxin. However, significant structural changes occur at what would be the interface of translocation and binding domains of the holotoxin. The loop 911-924 shows a maximum displacement of 14.8A at the farthest point. The N-terminal helix reorients and moves by 19.5A from its original position. BBHc is compared with the binding domain of the holotoxin of botulinum type A and B, and the tetanus C-fragment to characterize the heavy chain-carbohydrate interactions. The probable reasons for different binding affinity of botulinum and tetanus toxins are discussed.

  5. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  6. Membrane effects of N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I: a fluorescent probe study.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Sood, Rohit; Kinnunen, Paavo; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The binding of monomeric and aggregated variants of 1-83 N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with substitution mutations G26R, G26R/W@8, G26R/W@50 and G26R/W@72 to the model lipid membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and its mixture with cholesterol has been investigated using fluorescent probes pyrene and Laurdan. Examination of pyrene spectral behavior did not reveal any marked influence of apoA-I mutants on the hydrocarbon region of lipid bilayer. In contrast, probing the membrane effects by Laurdan revealed decrease in the probe generalized polarization in the presence of aggregated proteins. suggesting that oligomeric and fibrillar apoA-I species induce increase in hydration degree and reduction of lipid packing density in the membrane interfacial region. These findings may shed light on molecular details of amyloid cytotoxicity.

  7. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Rasulova, Fatima S.; Melnikov, Edward E.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Rotanova, Tatyana V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The medium-resolution structure of the N-terminal fragment of E. coli Lon protease shows that this part of the enzyme consists of two compact domains and a very long α-helix. The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1–245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 Å resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal α-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1–117), which consists mostly of β-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  8. Expressed truncated N-terminal variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) of Trypanosoma evansi in E. coli exhibits immuno-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P P; Balumahendiran, M; Balamurugan, V; Rudramurthy, G R; Prabhudas, K

    2012-06-08

    The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of trypanosome is an important part of its body surface coat, which is expressed in early, middle and late stages of infection contributing a major diagnostic value. In the present study, the 5' end of the partial VSG gene sequences (681 bp) encoding N-terminal protein of RoTat 1.2 VSG (227 amino acid) was amplified, cloned into pET32a vector, and expressed in prokaryotic system. The fused His-tagged expressed VSG protein (43 kDa) of the Trypanosoma evansi was characterized in SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using hyperimmune/immune sera raised against buffalo, dog, lion and leopard isolates of T. evansi. The expressed protein remained immunoreactive with all the sera combinations. The animals immunized with whole cell lysate or recombinant protein showed similar antibody reactions in ELISA and CATT (Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis). This study suggests the expressed recombinant truncated VSG is having its importance for its possible use in sero-diagnosis of surra.

  9. Soluble N-terminal fragment of mutant Huntingtin protein impairs mitochondrial axonal transport in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Yan, Ya-Ping; Zhou, Rui; Lou, Hui-Fang; Rong, Ye; Zhang, Bao-Rong

    2014-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder caused by an unstable expansion of CAG repeats (>35 repeats) within exon 1 of the interesting transcript 15 (IT15) gene. This gene encodes a protein called Huntingtin (Htt), and mutation of the gene results in a polyglutamine (polyQ) near the N-terminus of Htt. The N-terminal fragments of mutant Htt (mHtt), which tend to aggregate, are sufficient to cause HD. Whether these aggregates are causal or protective for HD remains hotly debated. Dysfunctional mitochondrial axonal transport is associated with HD. It remains unknown whether the soluble or aggregated form of mHtt is the primary cause of the impaired mitochondrial axonal transport in HD pathology. Here, we investigated the impact of soluble and aggregated N-terminal fragments of mHtt on mitochondrial axonal transport in cultured hippocampal neurons. We found that the N-terminal fragment of mHtt formed aggregates in almost half of the transfected neurons. Overexpression of the N-terminal fragment of mHtt decreased the velocity of mitochondrial axonal transport and mitochondrial mobility in neurons regardless of whether aggregates were formed. However, the impairment of mitochondrial axonal transport in neurons expressing the soluble and aggregated N-terminal fragments of mHtt did not differ. Our findings indicate that both the soluble and aggregated N-terminal fragments of mHtt impair mitochondrial axonal transport in cultured hippocampal neurons. We predict that dysfunction of mitochondrial axonal transport is an early-stage event in the progression of HD, even before mHtt aggregates are formed.

  10. The N-terminal fragment of Reelin is generated after endocytosis and released through the pathway regulated by Rab11.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Terumasa; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2009-04-17

    Reelin is a large secreted glycoprotein essential for brain formation, but its trafficking and function at the molecular level remain incompletely understood. After binding to its receptor, Reelin is internalized by endocytosis. Here we show that internalized Reelin is subject to specific proteolysis within the cell and its N-terminal fragment is re-secreted. This re-secretion is inhibited by bafilomycin A(1) or by expression of a mutant of Rab11, a regulator of the recycling pathway. As the N-terminal fragment does not bind to Reelin receptor but has homology to F-spondin, its recycling may be involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix.

  11. Structure of a tropomyosin N-terminal fragment at 0.98 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Krieger, Inna; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2011-09-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of the short nonmuscle α-tropomyosin has been determined at a resolution of 0.98 Å. Tropomyosin (TM) is an elongated two-chain protein that binds along actin filaments. Important binding sites are localized in the N-terminus of tropomyosin. The structure of the N-terminus of the long muscle α-TM has been solved by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. Only the NMR structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM is available. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM (αTm1bZip) at a resolution of 0.98 Å is reported, which was solved from crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = b = 33.00, c = 52.03 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The first five N-terminal residues are flexible and residues 6–35 form an α-helical coiled coil. The overall fold and the secondary structure of the crystal structure of αTM1bZip are highly similar to the NMR structure and the atomic coordinates of the corresponding C{sup α} atoms between the two structures superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.60 Å. The crystal structure validates the NMR structure, with the positions of the side chains being determined precisely in our structure.

  12. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-12-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a “bottom-up” strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.1 We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and *95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.2 In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify *300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases.

  13. N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins are convenient translation enhancers in a human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tominari; Machida, Kodai; Masutani, Mamiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Imataka, Hiroaki

    2010-07-01

    Human cell-derived in vitro protein synthesis systems are useful for the production of recombinant proteins. Productivity can be increased by supplementation with GADD34, a protein that is difficult to express in and purify from E. coli. Deletion of the N-terminal 120 or 240 amino acids of GADD34 improves recovery of this protein from E. coli without compromising its ability to boost protein synthesis in an in vitro protein synthesis system. The use of N-terminally truncated GADD34 proteins in place of full-length GADD34 should improve the utility of human cell-based cell-free protein synthesis systems.

  14. Novel intracellular N-terminal truncated matrix metalloproteinase-2 isoform in skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sunil K; Lee, Lawrence; Lovett, David H; Kang, Heejae; Kim, Hubert T; Delgado, Cynthia; Liu, Xuhui

    2016-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) occurs when blood returns to tissues following a period of ischemia. Reintroduction of blood flow results in the production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species that damage cells. Skeletal muscle IRI is commonly seen in orthopedic trauma patients. Experimental studies in other organ systems have elucidated the importance of extracellular and intracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) isoforms in regulating tissue damage in the setting of oxidant stress resulting from IRI. Although the extracellular full-length isoform of MMP-2 (FL-MMP-2) has been previously studied in the setting of skeletal muscle IRI, studies investigating the role of the N-terminal truncated isoform (NTT-MMP-2) in this setting are lacking. In this study, we first demonstrated significant increases in FL- and NTT-MMP-2 gene expression in C2C12 myoblast cells responding to re-oxygenation following hypoxia in vitro. We then evaluated the expression of FL- and NTT-MMP-2 in modulating skeletal muscle IRI using a previously validated murine model. NTT-MMP-2, but not FL-MMP-2 expression was significantly increased in skeletal muscle following IRI. Moreover, the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) -2 and -4, IL-6, OAS-1A, and CXCL1 was also significantly up-regulated following IRI. Treatment with the potent anti-oxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) significantly suppressed NTT-MMP-2, but not FL-MMP-2 expression and improved muscle viability following IRI. This data suggests that NTT-MMP-2, but not FL-MMP-2, is the major isoform of MMP-2 involved in skeletal muscle IRI.

  15. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Rasulova, Fatima S.; Melnikov, Edward E.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Rotanova, Tatyana V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-10-22

    The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1-245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal {alpha}-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1-117), which consists mostly of {beta}-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  16. The localization of a vitamin K-induced modification in an N-terminal fragment of human prothrombin

    PubMed Central

    Skotland, Tore; Holm, Turid; Østerud, Bjarne; Flengsrud, Ragnar; Prydz, Hans

    1974-01-01

    1. The N-terminal fragment (PF-I) split off from prothrombin during coagulation was purified to homogeneity from human serum. 2. The apparent molecular weight is 27000±2000 in sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, whereas a value of about 19600 is obtained by calculation based on amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. The N-terminal sequence is an Ala-Asx bond. The fragment contains about 16% carbohydrate, binds phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+ and is adsorbed to BaSO4. The pKa of its BaSO4-binding group(s) is 3.1–3.5. 3. By CNBr cleavage of fragment PF-I two peptides (C-1 and C-2) were obtained with molecular weights of about 5900 (C-2) and 12400 (C-1) on the basis of amino acid and carbohydrate analyses. Only the smaller (N-terminal) peptide is adsorbed to BaSO4 and, since the ability of the whole protein to bind to BaSO4 is known to be absent in samples obtained from patients treated with vitamin K antagonists, this peptide probably contains the site of a modification to the structure of the protein which occurs during biosynthesis and depends on vitamin K. This peptide does not contain hexosamine or sialic acid. ImagesFig. 2. PMID:4219283

  17. Yeast strains with N-terminally truncated ribosomal protein S5: implications for the evolution, structure and function of the Rps5/Rps7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Lumsden, Thomas; Bentley, Amber A; Beutler, William; Ghosh, Arnab; Galkin, Oleksandr; Komar, Anton A

    2010-03-01

    Ribosomal protein (rp)S5 belongs to the family of the highly conserved rp's that contains rpS7 from prokaryotes and rpS5 from eukaryotes. Alignment of rpS5/rpS7 from metazoans (Homo sapiens), fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli) shows that the proteins contain a conserved central/C-terminal core region and possess variable N-terminal regions. Yeast rpS5 is 69 amino acids (aa) longer than the E. coli rpS7 protein; and human rpS5 is 48 aa longer than the rpS7, respectively. To investigate the function of the yeast rpS5 and in particular the role of its N-terminal region, we obtained and characterized yeast strains in which the wild-type yeast rpS5 was replaced by its truncated variants, lacking 13, 24, 30 and 46 N-terminal amino acids, respectively. All mutant yeast strains were viable and displayed only moderately reduced growth rates, with the exception of the strain lacking 46 N-terminal amino acids, which had a doubling time of about 3 h. Biochemical analysis of the mutant yeast strains suggests that the N-terminal part of the eukaryotic and, in particular, yeast rpS5 may impact the ability of 40S subunits to function properly in translation and affect the efficiency of initiation, specifically the recruitment of initiation factors eIF3 and eIF2.

  18. Establishment of a highly sensitive sandwich ELISA for the N-terminal fragment of titin in urine

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Asai, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Chiaki; Inada, Akari; Kawauchi, Takeshi; Miyashita, Kazuya; Maeda, Masahiro; Matsuo, Masafumi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Muscle damage and loss of muscle mass are triggered by immobilization, loss of appetite, dystrophies and chronic wasting diseases. In addition, physical exercise causes muscle damage. In damaged muscle, the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of titin, a giant sarcomere protein, are cleaved by calpain-3, and the resulting fragments are excreted into the urine via glomerular filtration. Therefore, we considered titin fragments as promising candidates for reliable and non-invasive biomarkers of muscle injury. Here, we established a sandwich ELISA that can measure the titin N-terminal fragment over a biologically relevant range of concentrations, including those in urine samples from older, non-ambulatory Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and from healthy donors under everyday life conditions and after exercise. Our results indicate that the established ELISA could be a useful tool for the screening of muscular dystrophies and also for monitoring the progression of muscle disease, evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic approaches, and investigating exercise-related sarcomeric disruption and repair processes. PMID:27991570

  19. Sepp1(UF) forms are N-terminal selenoprotein P truncations that have peroxidase activity when coupled with thioredoxin reductase-1.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Suguru; Eriksson, Sofi; Rose, Kristie L; Wu, Sen; Motley, Amy K; Hill, Salisha; Winfrey, Virginia P; McDonald, W Hayes; Capecchi, Mario R; Atkins, John F; Arnér, Elias S J; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2014-04-01

    Mouse selenoprotein P (Sepp1) consists of an N-terminal domain (residues 1-239) that contains one selenocysteine (U) as residue 40 in a proposed redox-active motif (-UYLC-) and a C-terminal domain (residues 240-361) that contains nine selenocysteines. Sepp1 transports selenium from the liver to other tissues by receptor-mediated endocytosis. It also reduces oxidative stress in vivo by an unknown mechanism. A previously uncharacterized plasma form of Sepp1 is filtered in the glomerulus and taken up by renal proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) cells via megalin-mediated endocytosis. We purified Sepp1 forms from the urine of megalin(-/-) mice using a monoclonal antibody to the N-terminal domain. Mass spectrometry revealed that the purified urinary Sepp1 consisted of N-terminal fragments terminating at 11 sites between residues 183 and 208. They were therefore designated Sepp1(UF). Because the N-terminal domain of Sepp1 has a thioredoxin fold, Sepp1(UF) were compared with full-length Sepp1, Sepp1(Δ240-361), and Sepp1(U40S) as a substrate of thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1). All forms of Sepp1 except Sepp1(U40S), which contains serine in place of the selenocysteine, were TrxR1 substrates, catalyzing NADPH oxidation when coupled with H2O2 or tert-butylhydroperoxide as the terminal electron acceptor. These results are compatible with proteolytic cleavage freeing Sepp1(UF) from full-length Sepp1, the form that has the role of selenium transport, allowing Sepp1(UF) to function by itself as a peroxidase. Ultimately, plasma Sepp1(UF) and small selenium-containing proteins are filtered by the glomerulus and taken up by PCT cells via megalin-mediated endocytosis, preventing loss of selenium in the urine and providing selenium for the synthesis of glutathione peroxidase-3. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of post-mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in human control and Huntington disease brain lysates.

    PubMed

    Schut, Menno H; Patassini, Stefano; Kim, Eric H; Bullock, Jocelyn; Waldvogel, Henry J; Faull, Richard L M; Pepers, Barry A; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease is associated with elongation of a CAG repeat in the HTT gene that results in a mutant huntingtin protein. Several studies have implicated N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in Huntington disease pathogenesis. Ideally, these fragments are studied in human brain tissue. However, the use of human brain tissue comes with certain unavoidable variables such as post mortem delay, artefacts from freeze-thaw cycles and subject-to-subject variation. Knowledge on how these variables might affect N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments in post mortem human brain is important for a proper interpretation of study results. The effect of post mortem delay on protein in human brain is known to vary depending on the protein of interest. In the present study, we have assessed the effect of post mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments using western blot. We mimicked post mortem delay in one individual control case and one individual Huntington disease case with low initial post mortem delay. The influence of subject-to-subject variation on N-terminal huntingtin fragments was assessed in human cortex and human striatum using two cohorts of control and Huntington disease subjects. Our results show that effects of post mortem delay on N-terminal huntingtin protein fragments are minor in our individual subjects. Additionally, one freeze-thaw cycle decreases the huntingtin western blot signal intensity in the cortex control subject, but does not introduce additional N-terminal huntingtin fragments. Our results suggest that subject-to-subject variation contributes more to variability in N-terminal huntingtin fragments than post mortem delay.

  1. Effect of N-terminal truncation on antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and membrane perturbation activity of Cc-CATH3.

    PubMed

    Jittikoon, Jiraphun; Ngamsaithong, Narumon; Pimthon, Jutarat; Vajragupta, Opa

    2015-10-01

    A series of amino-terminal truncated analogues of quail antimicrobial peptide Cc-CATH3(1-29) were created and examined antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, cytotoxicity against mouse fibroblast cell line, and membrane perturbation activity against various membrane models. Parent peptide Cc-CATH3(1-29) and the first four-residue truncated peptide Cc-CATH3(5-29) were active in all tested experiments. In contrast, the eight- and twelve-residue truncated variants Cc-CATH3(9-29) and Cc-CATH3(13-29) appeared to have lost activities. Cc-CATH3(1-29) and Cc-CATH3(5-29) possessed antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 2-4 and 1-2 µM, respectively. For cytotoxicity, Cc-CATH3(1-29) and Cc-CATH3(5-29) displayed cytotoxicity with the IC50 values of 9.33 and 4.93 μM, respectively. Cc-CATH3(5-29) induced greater liposome membranes disruption than Cc-CATH3(1-29) regardless of lipid type and composition. The leakage results of Cc-CATH3(1-29) share a similar trend with that in Cc-CATH3(5-29); they exhibit no preferential binding to anionic phospholipids. In conclusion, the results suggested that the first four residues at the N-terminus "RVRR" is not essential for presenting all test activities. In contrast, residues five to eight of "FWPL" are necessary as the exclusion of this short motif in Cc-CATH3(9-29) and Cc-CATH3(13-29) leads to a loss of activities. This study will be beneficial for further design and development of Cc-CATH3 to be novel antibiotic.

  2. Gas-phase Structure and Fragmentation Pathways of Singly Protonated Peptides with N-terminal Arginine

    PubMed Central

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Csonka, István P.; Suhai, Sándor; Barofsky, Douglas F.; Paizs, Béla

    2010-01-01

    The gas-phase structures and fragmentation pathways of the singly protonated peptide arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) are investigated by means of collision-induced-dissociation (CID) and detailed molecular mechanics and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that despite the ionizing proton being strongly sequestered at the guanidine group, protonated RGD can easily be fragmented on charge directed fragmentation pathways. This is due to facile mobilization of the C-terminal or aspartic acid COOH protons thereby generating salt-bridge (SB) stabilized structures. These SB intermediates can directly fragment to generate b2 ions or facilely rearrange to form anhydrides from which both b2 and b2+H2O fragments can be formed. The salt-bridge stabilized and anhydride transition structures (TSs) necessary to form b2 and b2+H2O are much lower in energy than their traditional charge solvated counterparts. These mechanisms provide compelling evidence of the role of SB and anhydride structures in protonated peptide fragmentation which complements and supports our recent findings for tryptic systems (Bythell, B. J.; Suhai, S.; Somogyi, A.; Paizs, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 14057–14065.). In addition to these findings we also report on the mechanisms for the formation of the b1 ion, neutral loss (H2O, NH3, guanidine) fragment ions and the d3 ion. PMID:20973555

  3. Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis-Based Proteomic Analysis Reveals N-terminal Truncation of the Hsc70 Protein in Cotton Fibers In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Chengcheng; Jin, Xiang; Zhu, Liping; Li, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    On two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, six protein spots from cotton ovules and fibers were identified as heat shock cognate 70 kD protein (Hsc70). Three spots corresponded to an experimental molecular weight (MW) of 70 kD (spots 1, 2 and 3), and the remaining three spots corresponded to an experimental MW slightly greater than 45 kD (spots 4, 5 and 6). Protein spots 1, 2 and 3 were abundant on gels of 0-day (the day of anthesis) wild-type (WT) ovules, 0-day fuzzless-lintless mutant ovules and 10-day WT ovules but absent from gels of 10-day WT fibers. Three individual transcripts encoding these six protein spots were obtained by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Edman degradation and western blotting confirmed that the three 45 kD Hsc70 protein spots had the same N-terminal, which started from the T271 amino acid in the intact Hsc70 protein. Furthermore, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis identified a methylation modification on the arginine at position 475 for protein spots 4 and 5. Our data demonstrate that site-specific in vivo N-terminal truncation of the Hsc70 protein was particularly prevalent in cotton fibers, indicating that post-translational regulation might play an important role in cotton fiber development. PMID:27833127

  4. Characterization of an invertase with pH tolerance and truncation of its N-terminal to shift optimum activity toward neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Du, Liqin; Pang, Hao; Wang, Zilong; Lu, Jian; Wei, Yutuo; Huang, Ribo

    2013-01-01

    Most invertases identified to date have optimal activity at acidic pH, and are intolerant to neutral or alkaline environments. Here, an acid invertase named uninv2 is described. Uninv2 contained 586 amino acids, with a 100 amino acids N-terminal domain, a catalytic domain and a C-terminal domain. With sucrose as the substrate, uninv2 activity was optimal at pH 4.5 and at 45°C. Removal of N-terminal domain of uninv2 has shifted the optimum pH to 6.0 while retaining its optimum temperaure at 45°C. Both uninv2 and the truncated enzyme retained highly stable at neutral pH at 37°C, and they were stable at their optimum pH at 4°C for as long as 30 days. These characteristics make them far superior to invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is mostly used as industrial enzyme.

  5. Pyroglutamyl-N-terminal prion protein fragments in sheep brain following the development of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Gielbert, Adriana; Thorne, Jemma K.; Hope, James

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding, protein aggregation and disruption to cellular proteostasis are key processes in the propagation of disease and, in some progressive neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system, the misfolded protein can act as a self-replicating template or prion converting its normal isoform into a misfolded copy of itself. We have investigated the sheep transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie, and developed a multiple selected reaction monitoring (mSRM) mass spectrometry assay to quantify brain peptides representing the “ragged” N-terminus and the core of ovine prion protein (PrPSc) by using Q-Tof mass spectrometry. This allowed us to identify pyroglutamylated N-terminal fragments of PrPSc at residues 86, 95 and 101, and establish that these fragments were likely to be the result of in vivo processes. We found that the ratios of pyroglutamylated PrPSc fragments were different in sheep of different breeds and geographical origin, and our expanded ovine PrPSc assay was able to determine the ratio and allotypes of PrP accumulating in diseased brain of PrP heterozygous sheep; it also revealed significant differences between N-terminal amino acid profiles (N-TAAPs) in other types of ovine prion disease, CH1641 scrapie and ovine BSE. Variable rates of PrP misfolding, aggregation and degradation are the likely basis for phenotypic (or strain) differences in prion-affected animals and our mass spectrometry-based approach allows the simultaneous investigation of factors such as post-translational modification (pyroglutamyl formation), conformation (by N-TAAP analysis) and amino-acid polymorphisms (allotype ratio) which affect the kinetics of these proteostatic processes. PMID:25988175

  6. Interaction of thioflavin T with amyloid fibrils of apolipoprotein A-I N-terminal fragment: resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Nagao, Kohjiro; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Akaji, Kenichi; Lund-Katz, Sissel; Phillips, Michael C; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I is amenable to a number of specific mutations associated with hereditary systemic amyloidoses. Amyloidogenic properties of apoA-I are determined mainly by its N-terminal fragment. In the present study Förster resonance energy transfer between tryptophan as a donor and Thioflavin T as an acceptor was employed to obtain structural information on the amyloid fibrils formed by apoA-I variant 1-83/G26R/W@8. Analysis of the dye-fibril binding data provided evidence for the presence of two types of ThT binding sites with similar stoichiometries (bound dye to monomeric protein molar ratio ∼10), but different association constants (∼6 and 0.1μM(-1)) and ThT quantum yields in fibril-associated state (0.08 and 0.05, respectively). A β-strand-loop-β-strand structural model of 1-83/G26R/W@8 apoA-I fibrils has been proposed, with potential ThT binding sites located in the solvent-exposed grooves of the N-terminal β-sheet layer. Reasoning from the expanded FRET analysis allowing for heterogeneity of ThT binding centers and fibril polymorphism, the most probable locations of high- and low-affinity ThT binding sites were attributed to the grooves T16_Y18 and D20_L22, respectively.

  7. Identification of N-terminally truncated pyroglutamate amyloid-β in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit and AD brain.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Morales, Miguel Angel; Luna-Muñoz, José; Mena, Raul; Nava-Catorce, Miriam; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2014-01-01

    The main amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) variants detected in the human brain are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42; however, a significant proportion of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain also consists of N-terminal truncated/modified species. AβN3(pE), Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 3, has been demonstrated to be a major N-truncated/modified constituent of intracellular, extracellular, and vascular Aβ deposits in AD and Down syndrome brain tissue. It has been previously demonstrated that rabbits fed a diet enriched in cholesterol and given water containing trace copper levels developed AD-like pathology including intraneuronal and extracellular Aβ accumulation, tau hyperphosphorylation, vascular inflammation, astrocytosis, microgliosis, reduced levels of acetylcholine, as well as learning deficits and thus, may be used as a non-transgenic animal model of sporadic AD. In the present study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of AβN3(pE) in blood vessels in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit brain. In addition, we detected AβN3(pE) immunoreactivity in all postmortem AD brain samples studied. We believe that our results are potentially important for evaluation of novel therapeutic molecules/strategies targeting Aβ peptides in a suitable non-transgenic animal model.

  8. N-terminally truncated FOXP1 protein expression and alternate internal FOXP1 promoter usage in normal and malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip J.; Gascoyne, Duncan M.; Lyne, Linden; Spearman, Hayley; Felce, Suet Ling; McFadden, Nora; Chakravarty, Probir; Barrans, Sharon; Lynham, Steven; Calado, Dinis P.; Ward, Malcolm; Banham, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Strong FOXP1 protein expression is a poor risk factor in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and has been linked to an activated B-cell-like subtype, which preferentially expresses short FOXP1 (FOXP1S) proteins. However, both short isoform generation and function are incompletely understood. Here we prove by mass spectrometry and N-terminal antibody staining that FOXP1S proteins in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are N-terminally truncated. Furthermore, a rare strongly FOXP1-expressing population of normal germinal center B cells lacking the N-terminus of the regular long protein (FOXP1L) was identified. Exon-targeted silencing and transcript analyses identified three alternate 5′ non-coding exons [FOXP1-Ex6b(s), FOXP1-Ex7b and FOXP1-Ex7c], downstream of at least two predicted promoters, giving rise to FOXP1S proteins. These were differentially controlled by B-cell activation and methylation, conserved in murine lymphoma cells, and significantly correlated with FOXP1S protein expression in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. Alternatively spliced isoforms lacking exon 9 (e.g. isoform 3) did not encode FOXP1S, and an alternate long human FOXP1 protein (FOXP1AL) likely generated from a FOXP1-Ex6b(L) transcript was detected. The ratio of FOXP1L:FOXP1S isoforms correlated with differential expression of plasmacytic differentiation markers in U-2932 subpopulations, and altering this ratio was sufficient to modulate CD19 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Thus, the activity of multiple alternate FOXP1 promoters to produce multiple protein isoforms is likely to regulate B-cell maturation. PMID:27056922

  9. Copper complex species within a fragment of the N-terminal repeat region in opossum PrP protein.

    PubMed

    Vagliasindi, Laura I; Arena, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tabbì, Giovanni

    2011-03-21

    A spectroscopic (UV-Vis, CD and EPR), thermodynamic and voltammetric study of the copper(ii) complexes with the Ac-PHPGGSNWGQ-NH(2) polypeptide (L), a fragment of the opossum PrP protein N-terminal four-repeat region, was carried out in aqueous solution. It suggests the formation of a highly distorted [Cu(L)H(-2)] complex species in the neutral region, the stereochemistry of which is ascribable to a square base pyramid and a CuN(3)O(2) chromophore, resulting from the coordination of a histidine imidazole and two peptide nitrogen atoms and probably oxygen atoms from water molecules. At basic pH values a [Cu(L)H(-3)](-) species with a pseudo-octahedral geometry was also obtained, with four nitrogen donor atoms in its equatorial plane, coming from the histidine residue and from peptidic nitrogen atoms. Interestingly, at pH values relatively higher than the neutrality, the coordination sphere of the copper complex in the [Cu(L)H(-2)] species changes its stereochemistry towards a pseudo-octahedron, as suggested by the change in the parallel copper hyperfine coupling constant of the EPR spectra at low temperature. A slight difference in the redox potentials between this two-faced [Cu(L)H(-2)] complex species seems to confirm this behaviour. Both potentiometric and spectroscopic data were compared with the analogous species obtained with the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH(2) peptide, belonging to the octarepeat domain of the human prion protein (hPrP) N-terminal region. The [Cu(L)H(-2)] species formed by the Ac-PHPGGSNWGQ-NH(2) decapeptide, having a slightly lower stability, turned out to be less abundant and to exist within a narrow pH range.

  10. Enzymatic characterization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase fused with N-terminally truncated forms of Bacillus sp. TS-23 α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui-Yu; Yang, Jia-Ci; Chen, Jiau-Hua; Chi, Meng-Chun; Lin, Long-Liu

    2012-07-15

    Bacillus licheniformis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (BlGGT) was fused at its C-terminal end with N-terminally truncated forms of Bacillus sp. TS-23 α-amylase. BlGGT and six fusion enzymes, BlGGT/SBD, BlGGT/AMYΔN476, BlGGT/AMYΔN443, BlGGT/AMYΔN376, BlGGT/AMYΔN195, and BlGGT/AMYΔN34, were over-expressed in Escherichia coli M15 cells and purified to apparent homogeneity by metal-affinity chromatography. The fusion constructions had no significant effect on the autocatalytic processing of BlGGT. Progressive decrease in the GGT activity of fusion proteins was associated with an increasing level of truncation, and only BlGGT/AMYΔN34 reserved the amylolytic activity. The protein fusions did not alter the optimal temperature and pH of BlGGT. However, as compared with the parental BlGGT, a significant change in circular dichorism and fluorescence spectra was observed in the fusion enzymes. Thermal unfolding of BlGGT, BlGGT/AMYΔN476, BlGGT/AMYΔN443, and BlGGT/AMYΔN376 followed the two-state unfolding process with a transition point (T(m)) of 61.3-63.1 °C, whereas BlGGT/AMYΔN195 and BlGGT/AMYΔN34 displayed two temperature transitions at 40.6 and 46.7 °C as well as at 62.8 and 62.9 °C, respectively. All of the fusion enzymes exhibited the raw-starch-binding ability, and the adsorbed proteins could be eluted from the adsorbent by 50mM Tris-HCl (pH 9.0) containing 2% soluble starch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Truncation of the unique N-terminal domain improved the thermos-stability and specific activity of alkaline α-amylase Amy703.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenghui; Wang, Qinhong; Jiang, Sijing; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-03-01

    High pH condition is of special interest for the potential applications of alkaline α-amylase in textile and detergent industries. Thus, there is a continuous demand to improve the amylase's properties to meet the requirements set by specific applications. Here we reported the systematic study of modular domain engineering to improve the specific activity and stability of the alkaline α-amylase from Bacillus pseudofirmus 703. The specific activity of the N-terminal domain truncated mutant (N-Amy) increased by ~35-fold with a significantly improved thermo-stability. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the Kcat and Kcat/Kmof N-Amy were enhanced by 1300-fold and 425.7-fold, respectively, representing the largest catalytic activity improvement of the engineered α-amylases through the methods of domain deletion, fusion or swapping. In addition, different from the wild-type Amy703, no exogenous Ca(2+) were required for N-Amy to maintain its full catalytic activity, implying its superior potential for many industrial processes. Circular dichroism analysis and structure modeling revealed that the increased compactness and α-helical content were the main contributors for the improved thermo-stability of N-Amy, while the improved catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed by the increased conformational flexibility around the active center.

  12. Truncation of the unique N-terminal domain improved the thermos-stability and specific activity of alkaline α-amylase Amy703

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenghui; Wang, Qinhong; Jiang, Sijing; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    High pH condition is of special interest for the potential applications of alkaline α-amylase in textile and detergent industries. Thus, there is a continuous demand to improve the amylase’s properties to meet the requirements set by specific applications. Here we reported the systematic study of modular domain engineering to improve the specific activity and stability of the alkaline α-amylase from Bacillus pseudofirmus 703. The specific activity of the N-terminal domain truncated mutant (N-Amy) increased by ~35-fold with a significantly improved thermo-stability. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the Kcat and Kcat/Kmof N-Amy were enhanced by 1300-fold and 425.7-fold, respectively, representing the largest catalytic activity improvement of the engineered α-amylases through the methods of domain deletion, fusion or swapping. In addition, different from the wild-type Amy703, no exogenous Ca2+ were required for N-Amy to maintain its full catalytic activity, implying its superior potential for many industrial processes. Circular dichroism analysis and structure modeling revealed that the increased compactness and α-helical content were the main contributors for the improved thermo-stability of N-Amy, while the improved catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed by the increased conformational flexibility around the active center. PMID:26926401

  13. The N-terminal fragment of chromogranin A, vasostatin-1 protects mice from acute or chronic colitis upon oral administration.

    PubMed

    Rumio, Cristiano; Dusio, Giuseppina F; Colombo, Barbara; Gasparri, Anna; Cardani, Diego; Marcucci, Fabrizio; Corti, Angelo

    2012-05-01

    Vasostatin-1 (VS-1), the N-terminal fragment of chromogranin A (CgA), decreases the permeability of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated whether a similar effect could be observed also on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in vitro and whether VS-1 could have favorable effects on animal models of acute or chronic colitis, which are characterized by increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium. In vitro, VS-1 was tested on IEC monolayers showing increased permeability, on mechanically injured IEC monolayers, and on the production of the chemokine IL-8/KC by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated IECs. In vivo, VS-1 was tested in animal models of dextran sodium salt (DSS)-induced acute or chronic colitis. In vitro, VS-1 inhibited increased permeability of IECs induced by interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, VS-1 promoted healing of mechanically injured IEC monolayers, most likely through stimulation of cell migration, rather than cell proliferation. Eventually, VS-1 inhibited LPS-induced production of IL-8. In vivo, VS-1 exerted protective effects in animal models of acute or chronic colitis upon oral, but not systemic administration. VS-1 is therapeutically active in animal models of acute or chronic, DSS-induced colitis. The mechanisms underlying this effect are likely to be multiple, and may include inhibition of enhanced intestinal permeability, repair of injured intestinal mucosae, and inhibition of the production of IL-8/KC and possibly other inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Diagnosis of invasive candidiasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the N-terminal fragment of Candida albicans hyphal wall protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Laín, Ana; Elguezabal, Natalia; Brena, Sonia; García-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; del Palacio, Amalia; Moragues, María D; Pontón, José

    2007-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of invasive candidiasis is difficult because there are no specific clinical manifestations of the disease and colonization and infection are difficult to distinguish. In the last decade, much effort has been made to develop reliable tests for rapid diagnosis of invasive candidiasis, but none of them have found widespread clinical use. Results Antibodies against a recombinant N-terminal fragment of the Candida albicans germ tube-specific antigen hyphal wall protein 1 (Hwp1) generated in Escherichia coli were detected by both immunoblotting and ELISA tests in a group of 36 hematological or Intensive Care Unit patients with invasive candidiasis and in a group of 45 control patients at high risk for the mycosis who did not have clinical or microbiological data to document invasive candidiasis. Results were compared with an immunofluorescence test to detect antibodies to C. albicans germ tubes (CAGT). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of a diagnostic test based on the detection of antibodies against the N-terminal fragment of Hwp1 by immunoblotting were 27.8 %, 95.6 %, 83.3 % and 62.3 %, respectively. Detection of antibodies to the N-terminal fragment of Hwp1 by ELISA increased the sensitivity (88.9 %) and the negative predictive value (90.2 %) but slightly decreased the specificity (82.6 %) and positive predictive values (80 %). The kinetics of antibody response to the N-terminal fragment of Hwp1 by ELISA was very similar to that observed by detecting antibodies to CAGT. Conclusion An ELISA test to detect antibodies against a recombinant N-terminal fragment of the C. albicans germ tube cell wall antigen Hwp1 allows the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis with similar results to those obtained by detecting antibodies to CAGT but without the need of treating the sera to adsorb the antibodies against the cell wall surface of the blastospore. PMID:17448251

  15. Transgenic mice expressing caspase-6-derived N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin develop neurologic abnormalities with predominant cytoplasmic inclusion pathology composed largely of a smaller proteolytic derivative

    PubMed Central

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T.N.; Green, Cameron; Xu, Guilian; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M.; Rising, Aaron C.; Fromholt, Susan E.; Brown, Hilda H.; Swing, Debbie; Mandel, Ronald J.; Tessarollo, Lino; Borchelt, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated an N-terminal caspase-6 cleavage product of mutant huntingtin (htt) as an important mediator of toxicity in Huntington's disease (HD). To directly assess the consequences of such fragments on neurologic function, we produced transgenic mice that express a caspase-6 length N-terminal fragment of mutant htt (N586) with both normal (23Q) and disease (82Q) length glutamine repeats. In contrast to mice expressing N586-23Q, mice expressing N586-82Q accumulate large cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that can be visualized with antibodies to epitopes throughout the N586 protein. However, biochemical analyses of aggregated mutant huntingtin in these mice demonstrated that the inclusion bodies are composed largely of a much smaller htt fragment (terminating before residue 115), with lesser amounts of full-length N586-82Q fragments. Mice expressing the N586-82Q fragment show symptoms typical of previously generated mice expressing mutant huntingtin fragments, including failure to maintain weight, small brain weight and reductions in specific mRNAs in the striatum. Uniquely, these N586-82Q mice develop a progressive movement disorder that includes dramatic deficits in motor performance on the rotarod and ataxia. Our findings suggest that caspase-6-derived fragments of mutant htt are capable of inducing novel HD-related phenotypes, but these fragments are not terminal cleavage products as they are subject to further proteolysis. In this scenario, mutant htt fragments derived from caspase 6, or possibly other proteases, could mediate HD pathogenesis via a ‘hit and run' type of mechanism in which caspase-6, or other larger N-terminal fragments, mediate a neurotoxic process before being cleaved to a smaller fragment that accumulates pathologically. PMID:21515588

  16. Effect of truncation of the N-terminal region of the viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) P protein on viral replication.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Kim, Min Sun; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kang, Yue Jai; Kim, Ki Hong

    2015-11-01

    The phosphoprotein (P) of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) plays an essential role in viral replication by interconnecting the L protein and the N protein-RNA complex. In this study, to investigate the role of the N-terminal region of the P protein in viral replication, we mutated the first or the first and second or the first, second, and third ATG codon into TGA stop codons. The respective mutants were named P1, P2, and P3. Recombinant VHSVs containing each mutated P gene (rVHSV-P1, -P2, and -P3) were successfully generated by supplying the intact P protein in trans. The rVHSV-P2 and -P3 were not generated from cells expressing truncated P proteins (P1, P2 or P3 protein), but the rVHSV-P1 produced infectious viruses, even in cells without any P-protein-expressing plasmids. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the P gene of rVHSV-P1 showed that a mutation had occurred that resulted in the fourth amino acid (isoleucine, ATT) being changed to methionine (ATG) without a frameshift (P0.5), suggesting that strong selection pressure might facilitate mutations that are advantageous or essential for virus replication. Infectious rVHSV-P2 and -P3 were produced in cells expressing the P0.5 protein, suggesting that the first three amino acids of the P protein of VHSV are dispensable for viral replication. Furthermore, although the P1 protein was shorter than the P0.5 protein by only two amino acid residues, no viruses were produced when the P1 protein was supplied indicating that the fourth and the fifth amino acid residues are indispensable for normal P protein functions involved in viral replication.

  17. Kinetic studies on aminopeptidase M-mediated degradation of human hemorphin LVV-H7 and its N-terminally truncated products.

    PubMed

    John, Harald; John, Stefanie; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg

    2008-07-01

    The human hemorphin LVV-H7 belongs to the class of micro-opiod receptor-binding peptides, which also exhibits significant affinity to insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) thereby affecting IRAP inhibition. The inhibitory potency towards IRAP is of pharmaceutical interest for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Consecutive N-terminal cleavage of the first two amino acid residues of LVV-H7 affects a drastic increase of the binding affinity (V-H7) but ultimately leads to its complete abolition after cleavage of the next amino acid residue (H7). Therefore, we investigated LVV-H7 truncation by aminopeptidase M (AP-M) identified as a LVV-H7 degrading enzyme potentially regulating hemorphin activity towards IRAP in vivo. Using a selective quantitative multi-component capillary zone electrophoretic method (CZE-UV), we analyzed the AP-M-mediated subsequent proteolysis of the hemorphins LVV-H7 (L32-F41), VV-H7 (V33-F41), and V-H7 (V34-F41) in vitro. Incubations were carried out with synthetic hemorphins applied as single substrates or in combination. Maximum velocities (V(max)), catalytic constants (turnover numbers, kcat), and specific enzyme activities (EA) were calculated. L32 cleavage from LVV-H7 happens more than two-times faster (kcat: 140 min(-1) +/- 9%, EA: 1.0 U/mg +/- 9%) than V33 cleavage from VV-H7 (kcat: 61 min(-1) +/- 10%, EA: 0.43 U/mg +/- 10%) or V32 deletion from V-H7 (kcat: 62 min(-1) +/- 8%, EA: 0.46 U/mg +/- 8%). In contrast, we showed that H7 (Y35-F41) was neither degraded by porcine AP-M nor did it act as an inhibitor for this enzyme. Determined turnover numbers were in the same dimension as those reported for dynorphin degradation. This is the first time that AP-M-mediated truncation of natural underivatized LVV-H7 and its physiological metabolites was analyzed to determine kinetic parameters useful for understanding hemorphin processing and designing hemorphin-derived drug candidates. Copyright (c) 2008 European Peptide Society and John Wiley

  18. Atomistic mechanisms of huntingtin N-terminal fragment insertion on a phospholipid bilayer revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Côté, Sébastien; Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-07-01

    The huntingtin protein is characterized by a segment of consecutive glutamines (Q(N)) that is responsible for its fibrillation. As with other amyloid proteins, misfolding of huntingtin is related to Huntington's disease through pathways that can involve interactions with phospholipid membranes. Experimental results suggest that the N-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (htt(NT)) positioned just before the Q(N) region is important for the binding of huntingtin to membranes. Through all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, we unveil the structure and dynamics of the htt(NT)Q(N) fragment on a phospholipid membrane at the atomic level. We observe that the insertion dynamics of this peptide can be described by four main steps-approach, reorganization, anchoring, and insertion-that are very diverse at the atomic level. On the membrane, the htt(NT) peptide forms a stable α-helix essentially parallel to the membrane with its nonpolar side-chains-mainly Leu-4, Leu-7, Phe-11 and Leu-14-positioned in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Salt-bridges involving Glu-5, Glu-12, Lys-6, and Lys-15, as well as hydrogen bonds involving Thr-3 and Ser-13 with the phospholipids also stabilize the structure and orientation of the htt(NT) peptide. These observations do not significantly change upon adding the Q(N) region whose role is rather to provide, through its hydrogen bonds with the phospholipids' head group, a stable scaffold facilitating the partitioning of the htt(NT) region in the membrane. Moreover, by staying accessible to the solvent, the amyloidogenic Q(N) region could also play a key role for the oligomerization of htt(NT)Q(N) on phospholipid membranes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of the yeast prion-remodeling factor Hsp104

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T. F.

    2007-09-01

    An N-terminal fragment of S. cerevisiae Hsp104 has been crystallized. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones. A 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 was crystallized in two different crystal forms. Native 1 diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, b = 75.8, c = 235.7 Å. Native 2 diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 179.1, b = 179.1, c = 69.7 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones.

  20. N-terminal fragment of probrain natriuretic peptide is associated with diabetes microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Kumiko; Nakadaira, Ikue; Suzuki, Jun; Gonai, Megumi

    2014-01-01

    Circulating levels of N-terminal fragment of probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are established as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with diabetes, as well as in the general population. We sought to examine the possibility of NT-proBNP as a biomarker of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. In total, 277 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were consecutively enrolled as a hospital cohort. Two hundred and seventeen of these patients (132 males; mean age, 63.4 years) were designated as cases with any of the diabetic complications (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, ischemic heart disease, strokes, peripheral artery disease), and 60 (42 males; mean age, 54.1 years) were set as controls without clinical evidence of diabetic complications. Diabetic complications were evaluated by medical record and routine laboratory examinations. NT-proBNP was measured and investigated with regard to the associations with diabetic complications. Mean NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients with any of the diabetic complications (59 versus 33 pg/mL; P<0.0001). In logistic regression analysis, NT-proBNP levels >79 pg/mL, which was the highest tertile, were independently associated with a 5.04 fold increased risk of all complications (P<0.0051) compared to the lowest tertile (NT-proBNP levels <31 pg/mL). Odd ratios of cardiovascular disease and nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy were 9.33, 6.23, 6.6 and 13.78 respectively, in patients with NT-proBNP values in the highest tertile (>79 pg/mL), independently of age, sex, duration of diabetes or other risk factors, such as body mass index or hemoglobin A1c. In addition, NT-proBNP levels were associated with surrogate markers of atherosclerosis, such as brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (r=0.449, P<0.0001) and left ventricular hypertrophy (r=0.212, P<0.001). In this hospital-based cohort of type 2 diabetes, the NT-proBNP levels were associated with systemic

  1. A Role for Galanin N-Terminal Fragment (1–15) in Anxiety- and Depression-Related Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Millón, Carmelo; Flores-Burgess, Antonio; Narváez, Manuel; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Santín, Luis; Parrado, Concepción; Narváez, José Angel; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galanin (GAL) plays a role in mood regulation. In this study we analyzed the action of the active N-terminal fragment [GAL(1–15)] in anxiety- and depression-related behavioral tests in rats. Methods: The effect of GAL(1–15) was analyzed in the forced swimming test, tail suspension test, open field test, and light/dark test. The proximity of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors was examined with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). We tested the GAL receptors involved in GAL(1–15) effects with the GAL2 receptor antagonist M871 and with an in vivo model of siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown or siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats. The effects of GAL(1–15) were also studied in the cell line RN33B. Results: GAL(1–15) induced strong depression-like and anxiogenic-like effects in all the tests. These effects were stronger than the ones induced by GAL. The involvement of the GAL2 receptor was demonstrated with M871 and with the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats. The PLA indicated the possible existence of GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal hippocampus and especially in the dorsal raphe nucleus. In the siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats the behavioral actions of GAL(1–15) disappeared, and in the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats the reductions of the behavioral actions of GAL(1–15) was linked to a disappearance of PLA. In the cell line RN33B, GAL(1–15) decreased 5-HT immunoreactivity more strongly than GAL. Conclusions: Our results indicate that GAL(1–15) exerts strong depression-related and anxiogenic-like effects and may give the basis for the development of drugs targeting GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the raphe-limbic system for the treatment of depression and anxiety. PMID:25522404

  2. Analysis of proteolytic processes and enzymatic activities in the generation of huntingtin n-terminal fragments in an HEK293 cell model.

    PubMed

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T N; Crosby, Keith W; Siemienski, Zoe B; Brown, Hilda H; Golde, Todd E; Borchelt, David R

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin (htt) that terminate between residues 90-115, termed cleavage product A or 1 (cp-A/1), form intracellular and intranuclear inclusion bodies in the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD). These fragments appear to be proteolytic products of the full-length protein. Here, we use an HEK293 cell culture model to investigate huntingtin proteolytic processing; previous studies of these cells have demonstrated cleavage of htt to cp-A/1 like htt fragments. Recombinant N-terminal htt fragments, terminating at residue 171 (also referred to as cp-B/2 like), were efficiently cleaved to produce cp-A/1 whereas fragments representing endogenous caspase, calpain, and metalloproteinase cleavage products, terminating between residues 400-600, were inefficiently cleaved. Using cysteine-labeling techniques and antibody binding mapping, we localized the C-terminus of the cp-A/1 fragments produced by HEK293 cells to sequences minimally limited by cysteine 105 and an antibody epitope composed of residues 115-124. A combination of genetic and pharmacologic approaches to inhibit potential proteases, including γ-secretase and calpain, proved ineffective in preventing production of cp-A/1. Our findings indicate that HEK293 cells express a protease that is capable of efficiently cleaving cp-B/2 like fragments of htt with normal or expanded glutamine repeats. For reasons that remain unclear, this protease cleaves longer htt fragments, with normal or expanded glutamine expansions, much less efficiently. The protease in HEK293 cells that is capable of generating a cp-A/1 like htt fragment may be a novel protease with a high preference for a cp-B/2-like htt fragment as substrate.

  3. N-Terminal Truncation of an Isolated Human IgG1 CH2 Domain Significantly Increases its Stability and Aggregation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Rui; Wang, Yanping; Ying, Tianlei; Feng, Yang; Streaker, Emily; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated human immunoglobulin G (IgG) CH2 domains are promising scaffolds for novel candidate therapeutics. Unlike other human IgG domains, CH2 is not involved in strong interchain interactions and isolated CH2 is relatively stable. However, isolated single CH2 is prone to aggregation. In native IgG and Fc molecules, the N-terminal residues of CH2 from the two heavy chains interact with each other and form hinge regions. By contrast, the N-terminal residues are highly disordered in isolated CH2. We have hypothesized that removal of the CH2 N-terminal residues may not only increase its stability but also its aggregation resistance. To test this hypothesis we constructed a shortened variant of IgG1 CH2 (CH2s) where the first seven residues of the N-terminus were deleted. We found that the thermal stability of CH2s was increased by 5°C compared to CH2. Importantly, we demonstrated that CH2s is significantly less prone to aggregation than CH2 as measured by Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, turbidity and light scattering. We also found that the CH2s exhibited pH-dependent binding to a soluble single-chain human neonatal Fc receptor (shFcRn) which was significantly stronger than the very weak shFcRn binding to CH2 as measured by flow cytometry. Computer modeling suggested a possible mode of CH2 aggregation involving its N-terminal residues. Therefore, deletion of the N-terminal residues could increase drugability of CH2-based therapeutic candidates. This strategy to increase stability and aggregation resistance could also be applicable to other Ig-related proteins. PMID:23641816

  4. Opposing actions of intact and N-terminal fragments of the human prolactin/growth hormone family members on angiogenesis: An efficient mechanism for the regulation of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Struman, Ingrid; Bentzien, Frauke; Lee, Hsinyu; Mainfroid, Véronique; D’Angelo, Gisela; Goffin, Vincent; Weiner, Richard I.; Martial, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the process of development of a new microvasculature, is regulated by a balance of positive and negative factors. We show both in vivo and in vitro that the members of the human prolactin/growth hormone family, i.e., human prolactin, human growth hormone, human placental lactogen, and human growth hormone variant are angiogenic whereas their respective 16-kDa N-terminal fragments are antiangiogenic. The opposite actions are regulated in part via activation or inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In addition, the N-terminal fragments stimulate expression of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor whereas the intact molecules have no effect, an observation consistent with the fragments acting via separate receptors. The concept that a single molecule encodes both angiogenic and antiangiogenic peptides represents an efficient model for regulating the balance of positive and negative factors controlling angiogenesis. This hypothesis has potential physiological importance for the control of the vascular connection between the fetal and maternal circulations in the placenta, where human prolactin, human placental lactogen, and human growth hormone variant are expressed. PMID:9990009

  5. A candidate molecule for the matrix assembly receptor to the N-terminal 29-kDa fragment of fibronectin in chick myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Moon, K Y; Shin, K S; Song, W K; Chung, C H; Ha, D B; Kang, M S

    1994-03-11

    Myoblast surface proteins with binding activity toward the N-terminal 29-kDa fragment of fibronectin were identified by two different experimental techniques: one involves radioiodination of the cell surface proteins, followed by solubilization with Triton X-100 and affinity purification on a Sepharose column conjugated with the 29-kDa fragment, and the other involves cross-linking of the 29-kDa fragment to the cells metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine, followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-29-kDa IgG. Both approaches revealed that primary cultures of chick myoblasts contain the 66- and 48-kDa proteins that bind to the 29-kDa fragment. These binding proteins were then purified to apparent homogeneity by two successive chromatographies of the solubilized extracts of 12-day-old embryonic muscle on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and 29-kDa fragment-Sepharose columns. However, the 48-kDa protein was found to be derived from contaminating fibroblasts upon immunoblot analysis of the myogenic cell lines, rat L8E63 and mouse C2A3, and cultured fibroblasts using the antibody raised against the 66-kDa protein. Anti-66-kDa IgG inhibited the binding of the 125I-29-kDa protein to the primary culture of myoblasts in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, the same antibody showed little or no effect on the initial binding of 125I-fibronectin to the cell surface, but dramatically inhibited its incorporation into deoxycholate-insoluble matrices. Furthermore, Fab fragments of anti-66-kDa IgG completely blocked the incorporation of fluoresceinated fibronectin into matrices but not its binding to the cell surface. These results suggest that fibronectin matrix assembly is mediated at least in part by the interaction of the 66-kDa protein with the N-terminal type I domain of fibronectin.

  6. Overexpression of the Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) Receptor (Met) and Presence of a Truncated and Activated Intracellular HGF Receptor Fragment in Locally Aggressive/Malignant Human Musculoskeletal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wallenius, Ville; Hisaoka, Masanori; Helou, Khalil; Levan, Göran; Mandahl, Nils; Meis-Kindblom, Jeanne M.; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Jansson, John-Olov

    2000-01-01

    Enhanced hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor (Met) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in the development and progression of various epithelial and nonepithelial tumors. N-terminally truncated forms of the HGF receptor have been shown to be constitutively activated and tumorigenic in animal experiments. In the present study, 102 benign and malignant human musculoskeletal tumors were examined for expression of the HGF receptor by Western blotting and/or immunohistochemistry. A clear predominance of HGF receptor expression was seen in malignant as compared to benign tumors (Western blotting, P < 0.001; immunohistochemistry, P < 0.02). For the first time we show HGF receptor expression in the following four tumor types: dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, clear cell sarcoma of tendons, malignant primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and benign fibrous histiocytoma. In three cases of sarcoma with high HGF receptor expression by Western blotting, we found indications of a short 85-kd N-terminally truncated HGF receptor that was tyrosine phosphorylated and located in the cytoplasm. Although fragments of this length were seen in 18 of 65 tumors, most were not tyrosine-phosphorylated. Northern blotting revealed only the 7.5-kb full-length HGF receptor transcript, suggesting that the 85-kd fragment is generated by an alternative initiation of translation or by proteolytic cleavage. Southern blotting detected no amplification of the Hgfr/Met gene in the 35 tumors examined, in contrast to our recent report of Hgfr/Met gene amplification in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat sarcomas. The present data suggest that the locally aggressive and malignant properties of human mesenchymal tumors maybe related, in part, to high levels of full-length HGF receptors, and in some cases to the occurrence of N-terminally truncated HGF receptors, activated independently of HGF. PMID:10702398

  7. Structural studies of the N-terminal fragments of the WW domain: Insights into co-translational folding of a beta-sheet protein

    PubMed Central

    Hanazono, Yuya; Takeda, Kazuki; Miki, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    Nascent proteins fold co-translationally because the folding speed and folding pathways are limited by the rate of ribosome biosynthesis in the living cell. In addition, though full-length proteins can fold all their residues during the folding process, nascent proteins initially fold only with the N-terminal residues. However, the transient structure and the co-translational folding pathway are not well understood. Here we report the atomic structures of a series of N-terminal fragments of the WW domain with increasing amino acid length. Unexpectedly, the structures indicate that the intermediate-length fragments take helical conformations even though the full-length protein has no helical regions. The circular dichroism spectra and theoretical calculations also support the crystallographic results. This suggests that the short-range interactions are more decisive in the structure formation than the long-range interactions for short nascent proteins. In the course of the peptide extension, the helical structure change to the structure mediated by the long-range interactions at a particular polypeptide length. Our results will provide unique information for elucidating the nature of co-translational folding. PMID:27698466

  8. Overexpression of C-terminally but not N-terminally truncated Myb induces fibrosarcomas: a novel nonhematopoietic target cell for the myb oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Press, R D; Reddy, E P; Ewert, D L

    1994-01-01

    The myb oncogene encodes a DNA-binding transcriptional transactivator which can become a hematopoietic cell-transforming protein following the deletion of amino acid sequences from either its amino or carboxyl terminus. Although a number of hematopoietic tumors express terminally deleted variants of Myb, the involvement of truncated Myb in nonhematopoietic tumors has not been adequately investigated. To assess the full spectrum of Myb's oncogenic capability, a replication-competent retroviral vector (RCAMV) was used to express a full-length protein (C-Myb), an amino-terminally truncated protein (VCC- or delta N-Myb), a carboxyl-terminally truncated protein (T-Myb), or a doubly truncated protein (VCT-Myb) in vivo. These viruses were injected intravenously into 10-day chicken embryos, and the infected chicks were monitored for tumors. Approximately 4 to 8 weeks after hatching, the majority (30 of 39 [77%]) of animals infected with the T-Myb retrovirus (without 214 carboxyl-terminal residues) developed nodular muscle tumors which could be identified by both morphologic and immunohistochemical criteria as fibrosarcomas. Identically appearing tumors could also be found in the kidney of some T-Myb-infected animals. The T-Myb-induced fibrosarcomas expressed the appropriately sized T-Myb protein, contained an unaltered proviral T-myb gene, and showed clonal proviral integration sites. In comparison, no sarcomas were observed in any of the animals infected with the amino-terminally truncated (VCC- and delta N-Myb) or doubly truncated (VCT-Myb) viruses. A loss of carboxyl-terminal but not amino-terminal sequences can thus convert Myb into a potent in vivo transforming protein for nonhematopoietic mesenchymal cells. In comparison, a truncation of either or both ends of the protein can activate Myb into a hematopoietic cell-transforming protein. Images PMID:8139533

  9. Evidence that an N-terminal S-layer protein fragment triggers the release of a cell-associated high-molecular-weight amylase in Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980.

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, E M; Schocher, I; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    1996-01-01

    During growth on starch medium, the S-layer-carrying Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and an S-layer-deficient variant each secreted three amylases, with identical molecular weights of 58,000, 122,000, and 184,000, into the culture fluid. Only the high-molecular-weight amylase (hmwA) was also identified as cell associated. Extraction and reassociation experiments showed that the hmwA had a high-level affinity to the peptidoglycan-containing layer and to the S-layer surface, but the interactions with the peptidoglycan-containing layer were stronger than those with the S-layer surface. For the S-layer-deficient variant, no changes in the amount of cell-associated and free hmwA could be observed during growth on starch medium, while for the S-layer-carrying strain, cell association of the hmwA strongly depended on the growth phase of the cells. The maximum amount of cell-associated hmwA was observed 3 h after inoculation, which corresponded to early exponential growth. The steady decrease in cell-associated hmwA during continued growth correlated with the appearance and the increasing intensity of a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 60,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This protein had a high-level affinity to the peptidoglycan-containing layer and was identified as an N-terminal S-layer protein fragment which did not result from proteolytic cleavage of the whole S-layer protein but seems to be a truncated copy of the S-layer protein which is coexpressed with the hmwA under certain culture conditions. During growth on starch medium, the N-terminal S-layer protein fragment was integrated into the S-layer lattice, which led to the loss of its regular structure over a wide range and to the loss of amylase binding sites. Results obtained in the present study provide evidence that the N-terminal part of the S-layer protein is responsible for the anchoring of the subunits to the peptidoglycan-containing layer, while the surface-located C-terminal half

  10. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Truncated Fragments of the Receptor-Binding Domains of C. difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jui-Hsin; Shen, Zhe-Qing; Lien, Shu-Pei; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chang; Siu, Leung-Kei; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen responsible for opportunistic infections in hospitals worldwide and is the main cause of antibiotic-associated pseudo-membranous colitis and diarrhea in humans. Clostridial toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB) specifically bind to unknown glycoprotein(s) on the surface of epithelial cells in the host intestine, disrupting the intestinal barrier and ultimately leading to acute inflammation and diarrhea. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) of TcdA, which is responsible for the initial binding of the toxin to host glycoproteins, has been predicted to contain 7 potential oligosaccharide-binding sites. To study the specific roles and functions of these 7 putative lectin-like binding regions, a consensus sequence of TcdA RBD derived from different C. difficile strains deposited in the NCBI protein database and three truncated fragments corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 1–411), middle (residues 296–701), and C-terminal portions (residues 524–911) of the RBD (F1, F2 and F3, respectively) were designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. In this study, the recombinant RBD (rRBD) and its truncated fragments were purified, characterized biologically and found to have the following similar properties: (a) are capable of binding to the cell surface of both Vero and Caco-2 cells; (b) possess Toll-like receptor agonist-like adjuvant activities that can activate dendritic cell maturation and increase the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; and (c) function as potent adjuvants in the intramuscular immunization route to enhance immune responses against weak immunogens. Although F1, F2 and F3 have similar repetitive amino acid sequences and putative oligosaccharide-binding domains, they do not possess the same biological and immunological properties: (i) TcdA rRBD and its fragments bind to the cell surface, but only TcdA rRBD and F3 internalize into Vero cells within 15 min; (ii) the fragments exhibit various levels

  11. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of a 40 kDa N-Terminal Fragment of the Yeast Prion-Remodeling Factor Hsp104

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Tsai, F.

    2007-01-01

    A 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 was crystallized in two different crystal forms. Native 1 diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, b = 75.8, c = 235.7 {angstrom}. Native 2 diffracted to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 179.1, b = 179.1, c = 69.7 {angstrom}. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones.

  12. Characterizations of myosin essential light chain's N-terminal truncation mutant Δ43 in transgenic mouse papillary muscles by using tension transients in response to sinusoidal length alterations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Muthu, Priya; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Kawai, Masataka

    2013-05-01

    Cross-bridge kinetics were studied at 20 °C in cardiac muscle strips from transgenic (Tg) mice expressing N-terminal 43 amino acid truncation mutation (Δ43) of myosin essential light chain (ELC), and the results were compared to those from Tg-wild type (WT) mice. Sinusoidal length changes were applied to activated skinned papillary muscle strips to induce tension transients, from which two exponential processes were deduced to characterize the cross-bridge kinetics. Their two rate constants were studied as functions of ATP, phosphate (Pi), ADP, and Ca(2+) concentrations to characterize elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle consisting of six states. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the cross-bridge kinetics of Δ43 are accelerated owing to an acceleration of the rate constant k 2 of the cross-bridge detachment step, and that the number of strongly attached cross-bridges are decreased because of a reduction of the equilibrium constant K 4 of the force generation step. The isometric tension and stiffness of Δ43 are diminished compared to WT, but the force per cross-bridge is not changed. Stiffness measurement during rigor induction demonstrates a reduction in the stiffness in Δ43, indicating that the N-terminal extension of ELC forms an extra linkage between the myosin cross-bridge and actin. The tension-pCa study demonstrates that there is no Ca(2+) sensitivity change with Δ43, but the cooperativity is diminished. These results demonstrate the importance of the N-terminal extension of ELC in maintaining the myosin motor function during force generation and optimal cardiac performance.

  13. Coordination Environment of Cu(II) Ions Bound to N-Terminal Peptide Fragments of Angiogenin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Magrì, Antonio; Munzone, Alessia; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Hansson, Orjan; Satriano, Cristina; Rizzarelli, Enrico; La Mendola, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenin (Ang) is a potent angiogenic factor, strongly overexpressed in patients affected by different types of cancers. The specific Ang cellular receptors have not been identified, but it is known that Ang–actin interaction induces changes both in the cell cytoskeleton and in the extracellular matrix. Most in vitro studies use the recombinant form (r-Ang) instead of the form that is normally present in vivo (“wild-type”, wt-Ang). The first residue of r-Ang is a methionine, with a free amino group, whereas wt-Ang has a glutamic acid, whose amino group spontaneously cyclizes in the pyro-glutamate form. The Ang biological activity is influenced by copper ions. To elucidate the role of such a free amino group on the protein–copper binding, we scrutinized the copper(II) complexes with the peptide fragments Ang(1–17) and AcAng(1–17), which encompass the sequence 1–17 of angiogenin (QDNSRYTHFLTQHYDAK-NH2), with free amino and acetylated N-terminus, respectively. Potentiometric, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) studies demonstrate that the two peptides show a different metal coordination environment. Confocal microscopy imaging of neuroblastoma cells with the actin staining supports the spectroscopic results, with the finding of different responses in the cytoskeleton organization upon the interaction, in the presence or not of copper ions, with the free amino and the acetylated N-terminus peptides. PMID:27490533

  14. Vasoinhibin, an N-terminal Prolactin Fragment, Directly Inhibits Cardiac Angiogenesis in Three-dimensional Heart Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ryojun; Nakamura, Eri; Harigaya, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Vasoinhibins (Vi) are fragments of the growth hormone/prolactin (PRL) family and have antiangiogenic functions in many species. It is considered that Vi derived from PRL are involved in the pathogenesis of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). However, the pathogenic mechanism of PPCM, as well as heart angiogenesis, is not yet clear. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to clarify whether Vi act directly on angiogenesis inhibition in heart blood vessels. Endothelial cell viability was decreased by Vi treatment in a culture experiment. Furthermore, expression of proangiogenic genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and VE-cadherin, were decreased. On the other hand, apoptotic factor gene, caspase 3, and inflammatory factor genes, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 6, were increased by Vi treatment. In three-dimensional left ventricular wall angiogenesis assay in mice, Vi treatment also inhibited cell migration, neovessel sprouting, and growth toward collagen gel. These data demonstrate that Vi treatment directly suppresses angiogenesis of the heart and support the hypothesis that Vi induce PPCM. PMID:28163696

  15. An N-terminal fragment of titin coupled to green fluorescent protein localizes to the Z-bands in living muscle cells: overexpression leads to myofibril disassembly.

    PubMed

    Turnacioglu, K K; Mittal, B; Dabiri, G A; Sanger, J M; Sanger, J W

    1997-04-01

    Cultures of nonmuscle cells, skeletal myotubes, and cardiomyocytes were transfected with a fusion construct (Z1.1GFP) consisting of a 1.1-kb cDNA (Z1.1) fragment from the Z-band region of titin linked to the cDNA for green fluorescent protein (GFP). The Z1.1 cDNA encodes only 362 amino acids of the approximately 2000 amino acids that make up the Z-band region of titin; nevertheless, the Z1.1GFP fusion protein targets the alpha-actinin-rich Z-bands of contracting myofibrils in vivo. This fluorescent fusion protein also localizes in the nascent and premyofibrils at the edges of spreading cardiomyocytes. Similarly, in transfected nonmuscle cells, the Z1.1GFP fusion protein localizes to the alpha-actinin-containing dense bodies of the stress fibers in vivo. A dominant negative phenotype was also observed in living cells expressing high levels of this Z1.1GFP fusion protein, with myofibril disassembly occurring as titin-GFP fragments accumulated. These data indicate that the Z-band region of titin plays an important role in maintaining and organizing the structure of the myofibril. The Z1.1 cDNA was derived from a chicken cardiac lambda gt11 expression library, screened with a zeugmatin antibody. Recent work has suggested that zeugmatin is actually part of the N-terminal region of the 81-kb titin cDNA. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using a primer from the distal end (5' end) of the Z1.1 zeugmatin cDNA and a primer from the nearest known proximal (3' end) chicken titin (also called connectin) cDNA resulted in a predicted 0.3-kb polymerase chain reaction product linking the two known chicken titin cDNAs to each other. The linking region had a 79% identity at the amino acid level to human cardiac titin. This result and a Southern blot analysis of chicken genomic DNA hybridized with Z1.1 add further support to our original suggestion that zeugmatin is a proteolytic fragment from the N-terminal region of titin.

  16. The serine proteinase chain of human complement component C1s. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and N-terminal sequences of the fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, P E; Dunbar, B; Fothergill, J E

    1983-01-01

    Human complement component C1s was purified from fresh blood by conventional methods of precipitation and chromatography. The single-chain zymogen form was activated by treatment with C1r. Reduction and carboxymethylation then allowed the light chain and heavy chain to be separated on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B in 8 M-urea. Liquid-phase sequencing of the light chain determined 50 residues from the N-terminus. CNBr-cleavage fragments of the light chain were separated by high-pressure liquid chromatography on gel-permeation and reverse-phase columns. N-Terminal sequencing of these fragments determined the order of a further 138 residues, giving a total of 188 residues or about 75% of the light chain. Seven of these eight sequences could be readily aligned with the amino acid sequences of other serine proteinases. The typical serine proteinase active-site residues are clearly conserved in C1s, and the specificity-related side chain of the substrate-binding pocket is aspartic acid, as in trypsin, consistent with the proteolytic action of C1s on C4 at an arginine residue. Somewhat surprisingly, when the C1s sequence is compared with that of complement subcomponent C1r, the percentage difference (59%) is approximately the same as that found between the other mammalian serine proteinases (56-71%). PMID:6362661

  17. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  18. Massive CA1/2 Neuronal Loss with Intraneuronal and N-Terminal Truncated Aβ42 Accumulation in a Novel Alzheimer Transgenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Caty; Sergeant, Nicolas; Itier, Jean-Michel; Blanchard, Véronique; Wirths, Oliver; van der Kolk, Nicolien; Vingtdeux, Valérie; van de Steeg, Evita; Ret, Gwenaëlle; Canton, Thierry; Drobecq, Hervé; Clark, Allan; Bonici, Bruno; Delacourte, André; Benavides, Jesús; Schmitz, Christoph; Tremp, Günter; Bayer, Thomas A.; Benoit, Patrick; Pradier, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a substantial degeneration of pyramidal neurons and the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse model, APPSLPS1KI that closely mimics the development of AD-related neuropathological features including a significant hippocampal neuronal loss. This transgenic mouse model carries M233T/L235P knocked-in mutations in presenilin-1 and overexpresses mutated human β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein. Aβx-42 is the major form of Aβ species present in this model with progressive development of a complex pattern of N-truncated variants and dimers, similar to those observed in AD brain. At 10 months of age, an extensive neuronal loss (>50%) is present in the CA1/2 hippocampal pyramidal cell layer that correlates with strong accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ and thioflavine-S-positive intracellular material but not with extracellular Aβ deposits. A strong reactive astrogliosis develops together with the neuronal loss. This loss is already detectable at 6 months of age and is PS1KI gene dosage-dependent. Thus, APPSLPS1KI mice further confirm the critical role of intraneuronal Aβ42 in neuronal loss and provide an excellent tool to investigate therapeutic strategies designed to prevent AD neurodegeneration. PMID:15466394

  19. Copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes of the N-terminal nonapeptide fragment of amyloid-β and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Grenács, Ágnes; Sóvágó, Imre

    2014-10-01

    Copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes of the nonapeptide fragment of amyloid-β Aβ(1-9) (NH2-DAEFRHDSG-NH2) and its two derivatives: NH2-DAAAAHAAA-NH2 and NH2-DAAAAAHAA-NH2 have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible and CD spectroscopic methods. The results reveal the primary role of the amino terminus of peptides in copper(II) and nickel(II) binding. The formation of dinuclear complexes was also possible in the copper(II) containing systems but only the first six amino acids from the amino terminus were involved in metal binding in the physiologically relevant pH range. The coordination chemistry of the two alanine mutated peptides is almost the same as that of the native nonapeptide, but the thermodynamic stability of the copper(II) complexes of the mutants is significantly reduced. This difference probably comes from the secondary interactions of the polar side chains of Asp, Glu, Ser and Arg residues present in the native peptide. Moreover, this difference reveals that the amino acid sequence of the N-terminal domains of amyloid peptides is especially well suited for the complexation with copper(II) ions.

  20. Crystal structure of the human CD4 N-terminal two-domain fragment complexed to a class II MHC molecule.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-H.; Meijers, R.; Xiong, Y.; Liu, J.-H.; Sakihama, T.; Zhang, R.-G.; Joachimiak, A.; Reinherz, E. L.; Biosciences Division; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Harvard Medical School

    2001-09-11

    The structural basis of the interaction between the CD4 coreceptor and a class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is described. The crystal structure of a complex containing the human CD4 N-terminal two-domain fragment and the murine I-A{sup k }class II MHC molecule with associated peptide (pMHCII) shows that only the 'top corner' of the CD4 molecule directly contacts pMHCII. The CD4 Phe-43 side chain extends into a hydrophobic concavity formed by MHC residues from both {alpha}2 and {beta}2 domains. A ternary model of the CD4-pMHCII-T-cell receptor (TCR) reveals that the complex appears V-shaped with the membrane-proximal pMHCII at the apex. This configuration excludes a direct TCR-CD4 interaction and suggests how TCR and CD4 signaling is coordinated around the antigenic pMHCII complex. Human CD4 binds to HIV gp120 in a manner strikingly similar to the way in which CD4 interacts with pMHCII. Additional contacts between gp120 and CD4 give the CD4-gp120 complex a greater affinity. Thus, ligation of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 occludes the pMHCII-binding site on CD4, contributing to immunodeficiency.

  1. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B.

    2011-07-15

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution.

  2. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus.

  3. Soluble Prion Protein and Its N-terminal Fragment Prevent Impairment of Synaptic Plasticity by Aβ Oligomers: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Strategy in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Kyu; Ruffin, Vernon A.; Salameh, Ahlam I.; Nieznanski, Krzysztof; Costa, Alberto C.S.; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) appears to be closely linked to the neurotoxic action of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers. Recent studies have shown that these oligomers bind with high affinity to the membrane-anchored cellular prion protein (PrPC). It has also been proposed that this binding might mediate some of the toxic effects of the oligomers. Here, we show that the soluble (membrane anchor-free) recombinant human prion protein (rPrP) and its N-terminal fragment N1 block Aβ oligomers-induced inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal slices, an important surrogate marker of cognitive deficit associated with AD. rPrP and N1 are also strikingly potent inhibitors of Aβ cytotoxicity in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, experiments using hippocampal slices and neurons from wild-type and PrPC null mice (as well as rat neurons in which PrPC expression was greatly reduced by gene silencing) indicate that, in contrast to the impairment of synaptic plasticity by Aβ oligomers, the cytotoxic effects of these oligomers, and the inhibition of these effects by rPrP and N1, are independent of the presence of endogenous PrPC. This suggests fundamentally different mechanisms by which soluble rPrP and its fragments inhibit these two toxic responses to Aβ. Overall, these findings provide strong support to recent suggestions that PrP-based compounds may offer new avenues for pharmacological intervention in AD. PMID:26949218

  4. Myocardial infarction-induced N-terminal fragment of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) impairs myofilament function in human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Witayavanitkul, Namthip; Ait Mou, Younss; Kuster, Diederik W D; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Sarkey, Jason; Govindan, Suresh; Chen, Xin; Ge, Ying; Rajan, Sudarsan; Wieczorek, David F; Irving, Thomas; Westfall, Margaret V; de Tombe, Pieter P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2014-03-28

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with depressed cardiac contractile function and progression to heart failure. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C, a cardiac-specific myofilament protein, is proteolyzed post-MI in humans, which results in an N-terminal fragment, C0-C1f. The presence of C0-C1f in cultured cardiomyocytes results in decreased Ca(2+) transients and cell shortening, abnormalities sufficient for the induction of heart failure in a mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigate the association between C0-C1f and altered contractility in human cardiac myofilaments in vitro. To accomplish this, we generated recombinant human C0-C1f (hC0C1f) and incorporated it into permeabilized human left ventricular myocardium. Mechanical properties were studied at short (2 μm) and long (2.3 μm) sarcomere length (SL). Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere had the greatest effect at short, but not long, SL, decreasing maximal force and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Moreover, hC0C1f led to increased cooperative activation, cross-bridge cycling kinetics, and tension cost, with greater effects at short SL. We further established that the effects of hC0C1f occur through direct interaction with actin and α-tropomyosin. Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere is sufficient to induce depressed myofilament function and Ca(2+) sensitivity in otherwise healthy human donor myocardium. Decreased cardiac function post-MI may result, in part, from the ability of hC0C1f to bind actin and α-tropomyosin, suggesting that cleaved C0-C1f could act as a poison polypeptide and disrupt the interaction of native cardiac myosin-binding protein C with the thin filament.

  5. Interaction of N-terminal fragments of fibronectin with synthetic and recombinant D motifs from its binding protein on Staphylococcus aureus studied using fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Huff, S; Matsuka, Y V; McGavin, M J; Ingham, K C

    1994-06-03

    The N-terminal 29-kDa fragment of fibronectin (Fn29K) contains five type I "finger" modules. It binds to heparin, fibrin, and bacteria and is involved in fibronectin (Fn) matrix assembly. Binding to Staphylococcus aureus involves a cell wall-associated protein that contains approximately three repeats of a 38-residue D motif (Signäs, C., Raucci, G., Jönsson, K., Lindgren, P.-E., Anantharamaiah, G.M., Höök, M., and Lindberg, M. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 699-703). Synthetic peptides representing D1, D2, and D3, when labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), exhibited increases in fluorescence anisotropy upon addition of Fn29K but not other Fn fragments. The response could be reversed by titration with unlabeled peptides to yield inhibition constants that agreed with the dissociation constants obtained by fitting the initial response. Values of Kd ranged between 2 and 12 microM, with D3 having the highest affinity. Specificity of D3 for Fn29K was further illustrated by the fact that its C-terminal half (D3b, Lys801 to Lys821), when immobilized, selectively adsorbed Fn29K from a thermolysin digest of fibronectin. The binding site in Fn was further localized within Fn29K by analyzing smaller proteolytic or recombinant subfragments. Those containing fingers, F3-5 and F4-5, were purified on D3b-Sepharose and bound FITC-D3b with Kd values of 4-6 microM. Subfragments containing pairs of fingers 1-2, 2-3, or single fingers 1, 4, or 5 were inactive. Whole D1-3, expressed in Escherichia coli and labeled with fluorescein, bound 1.9 mol/mol of Fn29K with Kd = 1.5 nM. F4-5 and F2-3 bound with respective Kd values of 0.35 and 4.4 microM. These and other results indicate that binding of the individual D region peptides is mediated through their C-terminal halves, primarily to fingers 4 and 5 of fibronectin. The possible basis of the much higher affinity of D1-3 is discussed.

  6. Primary structure of the A chain of human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r. N-terminal sequences and alignment of autolytic fragments and CNBr-cleavage peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, J; Arlaud, G J

    1985-01-01

    Activated human complement-classical-pathway enzyme C1r has previously been shown to undergo autolytic cleavages occurring in the A chain [Arlaud, Villiers, Chesne & Colomb (1980) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 616, 116-129]. Chemical analysis of the autolytic products confirms that the A chain undergoes two major cleavages, generating three fragments, which have now been isolated and characterized. The N-terminal alpha fragment (approx. 210 residues long) has a blocked N-terminus, as does the whole A chain, whereas N-terminal sequences of fragments beta and gamma (approx. 66 and 176 residues long respectively) do not, and their N-terminal sequences were determined. Fragments alpha, beta and gamma, which are not interconnected by disulphide bridges, are located in this order within C1r A chain. Fragment gamma is disulphide-linked to the B chain of C1r, which is C-terminal in the single polypeptide chain of precursor C1r. CNBr cleavage of C1r A chain yields seven major peptides, CN1b, CN4a, CN2a, CN1a, CN3, CN4b and CN2b, which were positioned in that order, on the basis of N-terminal sequences of the methionine-containing peptides generated from tryptic cleavage of the succinylated (3-carboxypropionylated) C1r A chain. About 60% of the sequence of C1r A chain (440-460 residues long) was determined, including the complete sequence of the C-terminal 95 residues. This region shows homology with the corresponding parts of plasminogen and chymotrypsinogen and, more surprisingly, with the alpha 1 chain of human haptoglobin 1-1, a serine proteinase homologue. PMID:2983658

  7. The Truncated C-terminal Fragment of Mutant ATXN3 Disrupts Mitochondria Dynamics in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Models

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jung-Yu; Jhang, Yu-Ling; Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Chang, Yu-Fan; Mao, Su-Han; Yang, Han-In; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), known as Machado-Joseph disease, is an autosomal dominant disease caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine in ATXN3 gene, leading to neurodegeneration in SCA3 patients. Similar to other neurodegenerative diseases, the dysfunction of mitochondria is observed to cause neuronal death in SCA3 patients. Based on previous studies, proteolytic cleavage of mutant ATXN3 is found to produce truncated C-terminal fragments in SCA3 models. However, whether these truncated mutant fragments disturb mitochondrial functions and result in pathological death is still unclear. Here, we used neuroblastoma cell and transgenic mouse models to examine the effects of truncated mutant ATXN3 on mitochondria functions. In different models, we observed truncated mutant ATXN3 accelerated the formation of aggregates, which translocated into the nucleus to form intranuclear aggregates. In addition, truncated mutant ATXN3 caused more mitochondrial fission, and decreased the expression of mitochondrial fusion markers, including Mfn-1 and Mfn-2. Furthermore, truncated mutant ATXN3 decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species and finally increased cell death rate. In transgenic mouse models, truncated mutant ATXN3 also led to more mitochondrial dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cell death in the cerebellums. This study supports the toxic fragment hypothesis in SCA3, and also provides evidence that truncated mutant ATXN3 is severer than full-length mutant one in vitro and in vivo. PMID:28676741

  8. The Truncated C-terminal Fragment of Mutant ATXN3 Disrupts Mitochondria Dynamics in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 3 Models.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jung-Yu; Jhang, Yu-Ling; Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Chang, Yu-Fan; Mao, Su-Han; Yang, Han-In; Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), known as Machado-Joseph disease, is an autosomal dominant disease caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine in ATXN3 gene, leading to neurodegeneration in SCA3 patients. Similar to other neurodegenerative diseases, the dysfunction of mitochondria is observed to cause neuronal death in SCA3 patients. Based on previous studies, proteolytic cleavage of mutant ATXN3 is found to produce truncated C-terminal fragments in SCA3 models. However, whether these truncated mutant fragments disturb mitochondrial functions and result in pathological death is still unclear. Here, we used neuroblastoma cell and transgenic mouse models to examine the effects of truncated mutant ATXN3 on mitochondria functions. In different models, we observed truncated mutant ATXN3 accelerated the formation of aggregates, which translocated into the nucleus to form intranuclear aggregates. In addition, truncated mutant ATXN3 caused more mitochondrial fission, and decreased the expression of mitochondrial fusion markers, including Mfn-1 and Mfn-2. Furthermore, truncated mutant ATXN3 decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species and finally increased cell death rate. In transgenic mouse models, truncated mutant ATXN3 also led to more mitochondrial dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cell death in the cerebellums. This study supports the toxic fragment hypothesis in SCA3, and also provides evidence that truncated mutant ATXN3 is severer than full-length mutant one in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of the active matrix metalloproteinase-2: positioning of the N-terminal fragment and binding of a small peptide substrate.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2008-07-01

    Herein we use different computational methods to study the structure and energetic stability of the catalytic domain of the active MMP-2 enzyme considering two different orientations of its N-terminal coil. The first orientation is largely solvent accessible and corresponds to that observed in the 1CK7 crystal structure of the proenzyme. In the second orientation, the N-terminal coil is packed against the Omega-loop and the alpha3-helix of the MMP-2 enzyme likewise in the so-called "superactivated" form of other MMPs. Binding to the MMP-2 catalytic domain of a short peptide substrate, which mimics the sequence of the alpha1 chain of collagen type I, is also examined considering again the two configurations of the N-terminal coil. All these MMP-2 models are subject to 20 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by MM-PBSA (Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area) calculations. The positioning of the N-terminal coil in the "superactivated" form is found to be energetically favored for the MMP-2 enzyme. Moreover, this configuration of the N-terminal moiety can facilitate the binding of peptide substrates. Globally, the results obtained in this study could be relevant for the structural-based design of specific MMP inhibitors.

  10. Influence of in situ progressive N-terminal is still controversial truncation of glycogen branching enzyme in Escherichia coli DH5α on glycogen structure, accumulation, and bacterial viability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Regina, Ahmed; Butardo, Vito M; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Larroque, Oscar; Kahler, Charlene M; Wise, Michael J

    2015-05-07

    Glycogen average chain length (ACL) has been linked with bacterial durability, but this was on the basis of observations across different species. We therefore wished to investigate the relationship between bacterial durability and glycogen ACL by varying glycogen average chain length in a single species. It has been shown that progressive shortening of the N-terminus of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) leads to a lengthening of oligosaccharide inter-α-1,6-glycosidic chain lengths, so we sought to harness this to create a set of Escherichia coli DH5α strains with a range of glycogen average chain lengths, and assess these strains for durability related attributes, such as starvation, cold and desiccation stress resistance, and biofilm formation. A series of Escherichia coli DH5α mutants were created with glgB genes that were in situ progressively N-terminus truncated. N-terminal truncation shifted the distribution of glycogen chain lengths from 5-11 DP toward 13-50 DP, but the relationship between glgB length and glycogen ACL was not linear. Surprisingly, removal of the first 270 nucleotides of glgB (glgBΔ270) resulted in comparatively high glycogen accumulation, with the glycogen having short ACL. Complete knockout of glgB led to the formation of amylose-like glycogen containing long, linear α1,4-glucan chains with significantly reduced branching frequency. Physiologically, the set of mutant strains had reduced bacterial starvation resistance, while minimally increasing bacterial desiccation resistance. Finally, although there were no obvious changes in cold stress resistance or biofilm forming ability, one strain (glgBΔ180) had significantly increased biofilm formation in favourable media. Despite glgB being the first gene of an operon, it is clear that in situ mutation is a viable means to create more biologically relevant mutant strains. Secondly, there was the suggestion in the data that impairments of starvation, cold and desiccation resistance were

  11. Dynorphin 1-17 and Its N-Terminal Biotransformation Fragments Modulate Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Nuclear Factor-kappa B Nuclear Translocation, Interleukin-1beta and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha in Differentiated THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dynorphin 1–17, (DYN 1–17) opioid peptide produces antinociception following binding to the kappa-opioid peptide (KOP) receptor. Upon synthesis and release in inflamed tissues by immune cells, DYN 1–17 undergoes rapid biotransformation and yields a unique set of opioid and non-opioid fragments. Some of these major fragments possess a role in immunomodulation, suggesting that opioid-targeted therapeutics may be effective in diminishing the severity of inflammatory disorders. This study aimed to examine the immunomodulatory effects of DYN 1–17 and major N-terminal fragments found in the inflammatory environment on nuclear factor-kappaB/p65 (NF-κB/p65) nuclear translocation and the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated, differentiated THP-1 cells. The results demonstrate that NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation was significantly attenuated following treatment with DYN 1–17 and a specific range of fragments, with the greatest reduction observed with DYN 1–7 at a low concentration (10 nM). Antagonism with a selective KOP receptor antagonist, ML-190, significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of DYN 1–17, DYN 1–6, DYN 1–7 and DYN 1–9, but not other DYN 1–17 N-terminal fragments (DYN 1–10 and 1–11) on NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation. DYN 1–17 and selected fragments demonstrated differential modulation on the release of IL-1β and TNF-α with significant inhibition observed with DYN 1–7 at low concentrations (1 nM and 10 pM). These effects were blocked by ML-190, suggesting a KOP receptor-mediated pathway. The results demonstrate that DYN 1–17 and certain N-terminal fragments, produced in an inflamed environment, play an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting NF-κB/p65 translocation and the subsequent cytokine release through KOP receptor-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:27055013

  12. An N-terminal fragment of yeast ribosomal protein L3 inhibits the cytotoxicity of pokeweed antiviral protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Di, Rong; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2014-04-11

    We have previously shown that ribosomal protein L3 is required for pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a type I ribosome inactivating protein, to bind to ribosomes and depurinate the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) in yeast. Co-expression of the N-terminal 99 amino acids of yeast L3 (L3Δ99) with PAP in transgenic tobacco plants completely abolished the toxicity of PAP. In this study, we investigated the interaction between PAP and L3Δ99 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast cells co-transformed with PAP and L3Δ99 showed markedly reduced growth inhibition and reduced rRNA depurination by PAP, compared to cells transformed with PAP alone. Co-transformation of yeast with PAP and L3Δ21 corresponding to the highly conserved N-terminal 21 amino acids of L3Δ99, reduced the cytotoxicity of PAP. PAP mRNA and protein levels were elevated and L3Δ99 or L3Δ21 mRNA and protein levels were reduced in yeast co-transformed with PAP and L3Δ99 or with PAP and L3Δ21, respectively. PAP interacted with L3Δ21 in yeast cells in vivo and by Biacore analysis in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between L3Δ21 and PAP may inhibit PAP-mediated depurination of the SRL, leading to a reduction in the cytotoxicity of PAP.

  13. Spatial structure of oligopeptide PAP(248-261), the N-terminal fragment of the HIV enhancer prostatic acid phosphatase peptide PAP(248-286), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is an enzyme that facilitates infection of cells by HIV. Its peptide fragment PAP(248-286) forms amyloid fibrils known as SEVI, which enhance attachment of the virus by viral adhesion to the host cell prior to receptor-specific binding via reducing the electrostatic repulsion between the membranes of the virus and the target cell. The secondary structure of PAP(248-286) in aqueous and SDS solutions can be divided into an N-terminal disordered region, an α-helical central part and an α/310-helical C-terminal region (Nanga et al., 2009). In this work, we used NMR spectroscopy to study the spatial structure of the isolated N-terminal fragment of PAP(248-286), PAP(248-261) (GIHKQKEKSRLQGG), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions. Formation of a PAP(248-261)-SDS complex was confirmed by chemical shift alterations in the 1H NMR spectra of the peptide, as well as by the signs and values of Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE). In addition, the PAP(248-261) peptide does not form any specified secondary structure in either aqueous or SDS solutions.

  14. Progesterone signals through membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) in MDA-MB-468 and mPR-transfected MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells which lack full-length and N-terminally truncated isoforms of the nuclear progesterone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yefei; Thomas, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The functional characteristics of membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) have been investigated using recombinant mPR proteins over-expressed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Although these cells do not express the full-length progesterone receptor (PR), it is not known whether they express N-terminally truncated PR isoforms which could possibly account for some progesterone receptor functions attributed to mPRs. In the present study, the presence of N-terminally truncated PR isoforms was investigated in untransfected and mPR-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells, and in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. PCR products were detected in PR-positive T47D Yb breast cancer cells using two sets of C-terminus PR primers, but not in untransfected and mPR-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells, nor in MDA-MB-468 cells. Western blot analysis using a C-terminal PR antibody, 2C11F1, showed the same distribution pattern for PR in these cell lines. Another C-terminal PR antibody, C-19, detected immunoreactive bands in all the cell lines, but also recognized α-actinin, indicating that the antibody is not specific for PR. High affinity progesterone receptor binding was identified on plasma membranes of MDA-MB-468 cells which was significantly decreased after treatment with siRNAs for mPRα and mPRβ. Plasma membranes of MDA-MB-468 cells showed very low binding affinity for the PR agonist, R5020, ≤1% that of progesterone, which is characteristic of mPRs. Progesterone treatment caused G protein activation and decreased production of cAMP in MDA-MB-468 cells, which is also characteristic of mPRs. The results indicate that the progestin receptor functions in these cell lines are mediated through mPRs and do not involve any N-terminally truncated PR isoforms. PMID:21291899

  15. Plasma Levels of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1, n-Terminal Fragment of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcidiol Are Independently Associated with the Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Reyes, Roberto; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Pello, Ana María; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Martínez-Milla, Juan; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Piñero, Antonio; Navarro, Felipe; Egido, Jesús; Tuñón, José

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We investigated the relationship of the Syntax Score (SS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC), with plasma levels of biomarkers related to cardiovascular damage and mineral metabolism, as there is sparse information in this field. Methods We studied 270 patients with coronary disease that had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) six months before. Calcidiol, fibroblast growth factor-23, parathormone, phosphate and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, galectin-3, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP] levels, among other biomarkers, were determined. CAC was assessed by coronary angiogram as low-grade (0–1) and high-grade (2–3) calcification, measured with a semiquantitative scale ranging from 0 (none) to 3 (severe). For the SS study patients were divided in SS<14 and SS≥14. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results MCP-1 predicted independently the SS (RC = 1.73 [95%CI = 0.08–3.39]; p = 0.040), along with NT-proBNP (RC = 0.17 [95%CI = 0.05–0.28]; p = 0.004), male sex (RC = 4.15 [95%CI = 1.47–6.83]; p = 0.003), age (RC = 0.13 [95%CI = 0.02–0.24]; p = 0.020), hypertension (RC = 3.64, [95%CI = 0.77–6.50]; p = 0.013), hyperlipidemia (RC = 2.78, [95%CI = 0.28–5.29]; p = 0.030), and statins (RC = 6.12 [95%CI = 1.28–10.96]; p = 0.013). Low calcidiol predicted high-grade calcification independently (OR = 0.57 [95% CI = 0.36–0.90]; p = 0.013) along with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR = 0.38 [95%CI = 0.19–0.78]; p = 0.006), diabetes (OR = 2.35 [95%CI = 1.11–4.98]; p = 0.028) and age (OR = 1.37 [95%CI = 1.18–1.59]; p<0.001). During follow-up (1.79 [0.94–2.86] years), 27 patients developed ACS, stroke, or transient ischemic attack. A combined score using SS and CAC predicted independently the development of the outcome. Conclusions MCP-1 and NT-proBNP are independent predictors of SS, while low calcidiol plasma levels

  16. The N-terminal half of membrane CD14 is a functional cellular lipopolysaccharide receptor.

    PubMed

    Viriyakosol, S; Kirkland, T N

    1996-02-01

    CD14, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein on the surface of monocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, is a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was recently reported that an N-terminal 152-amino-acid fragment of soluble CD14 was an active soluble lipopolysaccharide receptor (T. S. -C. Juan, M. J. Kelley, D. A. Johnson, L. A. Busse, E. Hailman, S. D. Wright, and H. S. Lichenstein, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1382-1387, 1995). To determine whether the N-terminal half of the membrane CD14 was a functional LPS receptor on the cell membrane, we engineered a chimeric gene coding for amino acids 1 to 151 of CD14 fused to the C-terminal region of decay-accelerating factor and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and 70Z/3 cells. We found that the chimeric, truncated CD14 is a fully functional LPS receptor in both cell lines.

  17. Dscam1 Forms a Complex with Robo1 and the N-Terminal Fragment of Slit to Promote the Growth of Longitudinal Axons

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Maryam; Song, Minmin; Gillis, Taylor; Bousum, Adam; Miller, Amanda; Kidd, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Slit protein is a major midline repellent for central nervous system (CNS) axons. In vivo, Slit is proteolytically cleaved into N- and C-terminal fragments, but the biological significance of this is unknown. Analysis in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord of a slit allele (slit-UC) that cannot be cleaved revealed that midline repulsion is still present but longitudinal axon guidance is disrupted, particularly across segment boundaries. Double mutants for the Slit receptors Dscam1 and robo1 strongly resemble the slit-UC phenotype, suggesting they cooperate in longitudinal axon guidance, and through biochemical approaches, we found that Dscam1 and Robo1 form a complex dependent on Slit-N. In contrast, Robo1 binding alone shows a preference for full-length Slit, whereas Dscam1 only binds Slit-N. Using a variety of transgenes, we demonstrated that Dscam1 appears to modify the output of Robo/Slit complexes so that signaling is no longer repulsive. Our data suggest that the complex is promoting longitudinal axon growth across the segment boundary. The ability of Dscam1 to modify the output of other receptors in a ligand-dependent fashion may be a general principle for Dscam proteins. PMID:27654876

  18. Direct analysis of tau from PSP brain identifies new phosphorylation sites and a major fragment of N-terminally cleaved tau containing four microtubule-binding repeats.

    PubMed

    Wray, Selina; Saxton, Malcolm; Anderton, Brian H; Hanger, Diane P

    2008-06-01

    Tangles containing hyperphosphorylated aggregates of insoluble tau are a pathological hallmark of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Several phosphorylation sites on tau in PSP have been identified using phospho-specific antibodies, but no sites have been determined by direct sequencing due to the difficulty in enriching insoluble tau from PSP brain. We describe a new method to enrich insoluble PSP-tau and report eight phosphorylation sites [Ser46, Thr181, Ser202, Thr217, Thr231, Ser235, Ser396/Ser400 (one site) and Thr403/Ser404 (one site)] identified by mass spectrometry. We also describe a 35 kDa C-terminal tau fragment (tau35), lacking the N-terminus of tau but containing four microtubule-binding repeats (4R), that is present only in neurodegenerative disorders in which 4R tau is over-represented. Tau35 was readily detectable in PSP, corticobasal degeneration and 4R forms of fronto-temporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, but was absent from control, Alzheimer's disease and Pick's disease brain. Our findings suggest the aggregatory characteristics of PSP-tau differ from those of insoluble tau in Alzheimer's disease brain and this might be related to the presence of a C-terminal cleavage product of tau.

  19. Evaluation of the Naturally Acquired Antibody Immune Response to the Pv200L N-terminal Fragment of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1 in Four Areas of the Amazon Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Storti-Melo, Luciane M.; Souza-Neiras, Wanessa C.; Cassiano, Gustavo C.; Taveira, Leonardo C.; Cordeiro, Antônio J.; Couto, Vanja S. C. A.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Cunha, Maristela G.; Echeverry, Diana M.; Rossit, Andréa R. B.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Machado, Ricardo L. D.

    2011-01-01

    Frequency and levels of IgG antibodies to an N-terminal fragment of the Plasmodium vivax MSP-1 (Pv200L) protein, in individuals naturally exposed to malaria in four endemic areas of Brazil, were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma samples of 261 P. vivax-infected individuals from communities of Macapá, Novo Repartimento, Porto Velho, and Plácido de Castro in the Amazonian region with different malaria transmission intensities. A high mean number of studied individuals (89.3%) presented with antibodies to the Pv200L that correlated with the number of previous malaria infections; there were significant differences in the frequency of the responders (71.9–98.7) and in the antibody levels (1:200–1:51,200) among the four study areas. Results of this study provide evidence that Pv200L is a naturally immunogenic fragment of the PvMSP-1 and is associated with the degree of exposure to parasites. The fine specificity of antibodies to Pv200L is currently being assessed. PMID:21292879

  20. Protection efficacy of the Brucella abortus ghost vaccine candidate lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36) in murine models

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Ae Jeong; MOON, Ja Young; KIM, Won Kyong; KIM, Suk; HUR, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus cells were lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36). Next, the protection efficacy of the lysed fragment as a vaccine candidate was evaluated. Group A mice were immunized with sterile PBS, group B mice were intraperitoneally (ip) immunized with 3 × 108 colony-forming units (CFUs) of B. abortus strain RB51, group C mice were immunized ip with 3 × 108 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate, and group D mice were orally immunized with 3 × 109 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate. Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific serum IgG titers were considerably higher in groups C and D than in group A. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were significantly higher in groups B–D than in group A. After an ip challenge with B. abortus 544, only group C mice showed a significant level of protection as compared to group A. Overall, these results show that ip immunization with a vaccine candidate lysed by GI24 can effectively protect mice from systemic infection with virulent B. abortus. PMID:27349900

  1. The N-Terminal Fragment of a PB2 Subunit from the Influenza A Virus (A/Hong Kong/156/1997 H5N1) Effectively Inhibits RNP Activity and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Takahito; Hara, Koyu; Nakazono, Yoko; Uemura, Yusaku; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus has a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) that is composed of three subunits (PB1, PB2 and PA subunit), which assemble with nucleoproteins (NP) and a viral RNA (vRNA) to form a RNP complex in the host nucleus. Recently, we demonstrated that the combination of influenza ribonucleoprotein (RNP) components is important for both its assembly and activity. Therefore, we questioned whether the inhibition of the RNP combination via an incompatible component in the RNP complex could become a methodology for an anti-influenza drug. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that a H5N1 PB2 subunit efficiently inhibits H1N1 RNP assembly and activity. Moreover, we determined the domains and important amino acids on the N-terminus of the PB2 subunit that are required for a strong inhibitory effect. The NP binding site of the PB2 subunit is important for the inhibition of RNP activity by another strain. A plaque assay also confirmed that a fragment of the PB2 subunit could inhibit viral replication. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the N-terminal fragment of a PB2 subunit becomes an inhibitor that targets influenza RNP activity that is different from that targeted by current drugs such as M2 and NA inhibitors. PMID:25460916

  2. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  3. Overexpression of an N-terminally truncated isoform of the nuclear receptor coactivator amplified in breast cancer 1 leads to altered proliferation of mammary epithelial cells in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Reiter, Ronald; Oh, Annabell S; Henke, Ralf T; McDonnell, Kevin; Gallicano, G Ian; Furth, Priscilla A; Riegel, Anna Tate

    2005-03-01

    Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1, also known as ACTR, SRC-3, RAC-3, TRAM-1, p/CIP) is a member of the p160 nuclear receptor coactivator family involved in transcriptional regulation of genes activated through steroid receptors, such as estrogen receptor alpha (ER(alpha)). The AIB1 gene and a more active N-terminally deleted isoform (AIB1-Delta3) are overexpressed in breast cancer. To determine the role of AIB1-Delta3 in breast cancer pathogenesis, we generated transgenic mice with human cytomegalovirus immediate early gene 1 (hCMVIE1) promoter-driven over-expression of human AIB1/ACTR-Delta3 (CMVAIB1/ACTR-Delta3 mice). AIB1/ACTR-Delta3 transgene mRNA expression was confirmed in CMV-AIB1/ACTR-Delta3 mammary glands by in situ hybridization. These mice demonstrated significantly increased mammary epithelial cell proliferation (P < 0.003), cyclin D1 expression (P = 0.002), IGF-I receptor protein expression (P = 0.026), mammary gland mass (P < 0.05), and altered expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein isoforms (P = 0.029). At 13 months of age, mammary ductal ectasia was found in CMV-AIB1/ACTR-Delta3 mice, but secondary and tertiary branching patterns were normal. There were no changes in the expression patterns of either ER(alpha) or Stat5a, a downstream mediator of prolactin signaling. Serum IGF-I levels were not altered in the transgenic mice. These data indicate that overexpression of the AIB1/ACTR-Delta3 isoform resulted in altered mammary epithelial cell growth. The observed changes in cell proliferation and gene expression are consistent with alterations in growth factor signaling that are thought to contribute to either initiation or progression of breast cancer. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminally deleted isoform of AIB1 can play a role in breast cancer development and/or progression.

  4. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  5. Modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) responses of spinal nociceptive neurons by a N-terminal fragment of substance P.

    PubMed

    Budai, D; Wilcox, G L; Larson, A A

    1992-06-17

    The effects of an N-terminal fragment of substance P, substance P-(1-7) [SP-(1-7)], on the responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and (R,S)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) were tested by combined single-unit extracellular recordings/microiontophoresis. While SP-(1-7) had no effects when applied by itself, it was a potent and long-lasting modulator of both NMDA- and AMPA-mediated excitation of spinal dorsal horn nociceptive neurons. NMDA responses were transiently decreased (by an average of 36% of control at minimum) by SP-(1-7) followed by a more sustained increase (by 76% at maximum). In contrast, AMP responses were only increased by SP-(1-7) (by 81% at maximum). It is hypothesized that the actions of SP-(1-7) on excitatory amino acid (EAA) responses of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons reflect a novel mechanism by which SP and EAAs interact to modulate pain transmission.

  6. The N-terminal fragment of the β-amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease (N-APP) binds to phosphoinositide-rich domains on the surface of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Edgar; Gasperini, Robert; Hu, Yanling; Cui, Hao; Vincent, Adele J; Bolós, Marta; Young, Kaylene M; Foa, Lisa; Small, David H

    2014-11-01

    The function of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. The secreted ectodomain fragment of APP (sAPPα) can be readily cleaved to produce a small N-terminal fragment (N-APP) that contains heparin-binding and metal-binding domains and that has been found to have biological activity. In the present study, we examined whether N-APP can bind to lipids. We found that N-APP binds selectively to phosphoinositides (PIPs) but poorly to most other lipids. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2 )-rich microdomains were identified on the extracellular surface of neurons and glia in primary hippocampal cultures. N-APP bound to neurons and colocalized with PIPs on the cell surface. Furthermore, the binding of N-APP to neurons increased the level of cell-surface PI(4,5)P2 and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate. However, PIPs were not the principal cell-surface binding site for N-APP, because N-APP binding to neurons was not inhibited by a short-acyl-chain PIP analogue, and N-APP did not bind to glial cells which also possessed PI(4,5)P2 on the cell surface. The data are explained by a model in which N-APP binds to two distinct components on neurons, one of which is an unidentified receptor and the second of which is a PIP lipid, which binds more weakly to a distinct site within N-APP. Our data provide further support for the idea that N-APP may be an important mediator of APP's biological activity. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Strength of relationships of the pulse wave velocity and central hemodynamic indices with the serum N-terminal fragment B-type natriuretic peptide levels in men: a worksite cohort study.

    PubMed

    Odaira, Mari; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Chisa; Yoshida, Masanobu; Shiina, Kazuki; Nagata, Mikio; Yamashina, Akira

    2012-01-01

    It has not been fully clarified as to which marker related to arterial stiffness or central hemodynamics might be most closely associated with the blood natriuretic peptide levels. The present cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the strength of the relationships of the arterial stiffness and central hemodynamic indices with the serum N-terminal fragment B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) levels. In a total of 2,657 male employees of a company (46±9 years old), the first and second peaks of the radial systolic pressure waveform (SBP1 and SBP2, respectively), the radial augmentation index (rAI), the PP2 (SBP2 minus the diastolic blood pressure), the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and the serum NT-pro BNP levels were measured. Even after adjustments for confounding variables, the SBP1, SBP2, PP2, rAI and baPWV showed a significant positive association with the serum NT-pro BNP levels. A stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated that among these variables, only PP2 contributed significantly to the serum NT-pro BNP levels (β=0.176, partial R-square=0.017, P<0.001). In middle-aged Japanese men, among the parameters related to arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics, PP2 showed the closest relationship with the serum NT-pro BNP levels. Therefore, elevation of the serum NT-pro BNP levels appears to reflect, at least in part, the pathophysiological abnormalities related to increased central pulse pressure.

  8. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1-208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD.

  9. Immunogenicity of a truncated enterovirus 71 VP1 protein fused to a Newcastle disease virus nucleocapsid protein fragment in mice.

    PubMed

    Ch'ng, W C; Saw, W T; Yusoff, K; Shafee, N

    2011-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the viruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease. Its viral capsid protein 1 (VP1), which contains many neutralization epitopes, is an ideal target for vaccine development. Recently, we reported the induction of a strong immune response in rabbits to a truncated VP1 fragment (Nt-VP1t) displayed on a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) capsid protein. Protective efficacy of this vaccine, however, can only be tested in mice, since all EV71 animal models thus far were developed in mouse systems. In this study, we evaluated the type of immune responses against the protein developed by adult BALB/c mice. Nt-VP1t protein induced high levels of VP1 IgG antibody production in mice. Purified VP1 antigen stimulated activation, proliferation and differentiation of splenocytes harvested from these mice. They also produced significant levels of IFN-γ, a Th1-related cytokine. Taken together, Nt-VP1t protein is a potent immunogen in adult mice and our findings provide the data needed for testing of its protective efficacy in mouse models of EV71 infections.

  10. I-TASSER-MR: automated molecular replacement for distant-homology proteins using iterative fragment assembly and progressive sequence truncation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Virtanen, Jouko; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2017-05-02

    Molecular replacement (MR) is one of the most common techniques used for solving the phase problem in X-ray crystal diffraction. The success rate of MR however drops quickly when the sequence identity between query and templates is reduced, while the I-TASSER-MR server is designed to solve the phase problem for proteins that lack close homologous templates. Starting from a sequence, it first generates full-length models using I-TASSER by iterative structural fragment reassembly. A progressive sequence truncation procedure is then used for editing the models based on local variations of the structural assembly simulations. Next, the edited models are submitted to MR-REX to search for optimal placements in the crystal unit-cells through replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations, with the phasing results used by CNS for final atomic model refinement and selection. The I-TASSER-MR algorithm was tested in large-scale benchmark datasets and solved 36% more targets compared to using the best threading templates. The server takes primary sequence and raw crystal diffraction data as input, with output containing annotated phase information and refined structure models. It also allows users to choose between different methods for setting B-factors and the number of models used for phasing. The online server is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/I-TASSER-MR. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. N-Terminal Hypothesis for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Murray, Brian; Sharma, Bhanushee; Belfort, Georges

    2017-03-15

    Although the amyloid (abeta peptide, Aβ) hypothesis is 25 years old, is the dominant model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, and guides the development of potential treatments, it is still controversial. One possible reason is a lack of a mechanistic path from the cleavage products of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) such as soluble Aβ monomer and soluble molecular fragments to the deleterious effects on synaptic form and function. From a review of the recent literature and our own published work including aggregation kinetics and structural morphology, Aβ clearance, molecular simulations, long-term potentiation measurements with inhibition binding, and the binding of a commercial monoclonal antibody, aducanumab, we hypothesize that the N-terminal domains of neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are implicated in causing the disease.

  12. N-Terminal Methionine Processing.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2017-04-03

    Protein synthesis is initiated by methionine in eukaryotes and by formylmethionine in prokaryotes. N-terminal methionine can be co-translationally cleaved by the enzyme methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). When recombinant proteins are expressed in bacterial and mammalian expression systems, there is a simple universal rule that predicts whether the initiating methionine will be processed by MAP based on the size of the residue adjacent (penultimate) to the N-methionine. In general, if the side chains of the penultimate residues have a radius of gyration of 1.29 Å or less, methionine is cleaved. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. The proximal N-terminal amino acid residues are required for the coupling activity of the bovine heart mitochondrial factor B.

    PubMed

    Belogrudov, Grigory I

    2008-05-01

    Treatment of the recombinant bovine factor B with trypsin yielded a fragment (amino acid residues 62-175) devoid of coupling activity. Removal of the N-terminal Trp2-Gly3-Trp4 peptide resulted in a significant loss of coupling activity in the FB(DeltaW)(2)(-W)(4) deletion mutant. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation demonstrated co-sedimentation of recombinant factor B with the ADP/ATP carrier, which is present in preparations of H(+)-translocating F(0)F(1)-ATPase, but not in preparations of complex V. The N-terminally truncated factor B mutant FB(DeltaW)(2)(-W)(4) did not co-sediment with the ADP/ATP carrier. Recombinant factor B co-sedimented with partially purified membrane sector F(0), extracted from F(1)-stripped bovine submitochondrial particles with n-dodecyl-beta-d-maltoside. Factor B inhibited the passive proton conductance catalyzed by F(0) reconstituted into asolectin liposomes. A factor B mutant, bearing a photoreactive unnatural amino acid pbenzoyl-l-phenylalanine (pBpa) substituted for Trp2, cross-linked with F(0) subunits e and g as well as the ADP/ATP carrier. These results suggest that the N-terminal domain and, in particular, the proximal N-terminal amino acids are important for the coupling activity and protein-protein interactions of bovine factor B.

  14. Pathogenic properties of the N-terminal region of cardiac myosin binding protein-C in vitro.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Suresh; Sarkey, Jason; Ji, Xiang; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Gupta, Mahesh P; de Tombe, Pieter P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) plays a role in sarcomeric structure and stability, as well as modulating heart muscle contraction. The 150 kDa full-length (FL) cMyBP-C has been shown to undergo proteolytic cleavage during ischemia-reperfusion injury, producing an N-terminal 40 kDa fragment (mass 29 kDa) that is predominantly associated with post-ischemic contractile dysfunction. Thus far, the pathogenic properties of such truncated cMyBP-C proteins have not been elucidated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the presence of these 40 kDa fragments is toxic to cardiomyocytes, compared to the 110 kDa C-terminal fragment and FL cMyBP-C. To test this hypothesis, we infected neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes and adult rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes with adenoviruses expressing the FL, 110 and 40 kDa fragments of cMyBP-C, and measured cytotoxicity, Ca(2+) transients, contractility, and protein-protein interactions. Here we show that expression of 40 kDa fragments in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes significantly increases LDH release and caspase 3 activity, significantly reduces cell viability, and impairs Ca(2+) handling. Adult cardiomyocytes expressing 40 kDa fragments exhibited similar impairment of Ca(2+) handling along with a significant reduction of sarcomere length shortening, relaxation velocity, and contraction velocity. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that the 40 kDa fragment binds significantly to sarcomeric actin, comparable to C0-C2 domains. In addition, we discovered several acetylation sites within the 40 kDa fragment that could potentially affect actomyosin function. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the 40 kDa cleavage fragments of cMyBP-C are toxic to cardiomyocytes and significantly impair contractility and Ca(2+) handling via inhibition of actomyosin function. By elucidating the deleterious effects of endogenously expressed cMyBP-C N-terminal fragments on sarcomere function, these data

  15. Molecular analysis of laminin N-terminal domains mediating self-interactions.

    PubMed

    Odenthal, Uwe; Haehn, Sebastian; Tunggal, Patrick; Merkl, Barbara; Schomburg, Dietmar; Frie, Christian; Paulsson, Mats; Smyth, Neil

    2004-10-22

    The ability of laminins to self-polymerize is crucial for the formation of basement membranes. Development of this polymerized network has profound effects upon tissue architecture as well as on the intracellular organization and differentiation of neighboring cells. The laminin N-terminal (LN) domains have been shown to mediate this interaction and studies using proteolytic fragments derived from laminin-1 led to the theory that network assembly depends on the formation of a heterotrimeric complex between LN domains derived from alpha, beta, and gamma chains in different laminin molecules with homologous interactions being insignificant. The laminin family consists of 15 known isoforms formed from five alpha, three beta, and three gamma chains, of which some are truncated and lack the N-terminal LN domain. To address whether the model of heterotrimeric complex formation is applicable to laminin isoforms other than laminin-1, eight LN domains found in the laminin protein family were recombinantly expressed and tested in three different assays for homologous and heterologous interactions. The results showed that the lack of homologous interactions is an exception, with such interactions being seen for LN domains derived from all alpha chains and from the beta2 and beta3 subunits. The gamma chain-derived LN domains showed a far more limited binding repertoire, particularly in the case of the gamma3 chain, which is found present in a range of non-basement membrane locations. Further, whereas the interactions depended upon Ca2+ ions, with EDTA reversibly abrogating binding, EDTA-induced conformational changes were not reversible. Together these results demonstrate that the assembly model proposed on the basis of laminin-1 may be a simplification, with the assembly of naturally occurring laminin networks being far more complex and highly dependent upon which laminin isoforms are present.

  16. Biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC: loss of CNBr fragments from the carboxy terminus of truncated, secreted gC molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, G E; Coligan, J E; Holland, T C; Levine, M; Glorioso, J C; Nairn, R

    1984-01-01

    A biochemical characterization of peptides from herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gC was carried out. We utilized simple micromethods, based on immunological isolation of biosynthetically radiolabeled gC, to obtain gC in pure form for biochemical study. CNBr fragments of gC were prepared, isolated, and characterized. These CNBr fragments were resolved into six peaks by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride. Only three of the CNBr fragments contained carbohydrate side chains, as judged from the incorporation of [14C]glucosamine. Radiochemical microsequence analyses were carried out on the gC molecule and on each of the CNBr fragments of gC. A comparison of this amino acid sequence data with the amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence of the gC gene showed that the first 25 residues of the predicted sequence are not present in the gC molecule isolated from infected cells and allowed alignment of the CNBr fragments in the gC molecule. Glycoprotein gC was also examined from three gC mutants, synLD70, gC-8, and gC-49. These mutants lack an immunoreactive envelope form of gC but produce a secreted, truncated gC gene product. Glycoprotein gC from cells infected with any of these gC- mutants was shown to have lost more than one CNBr fragment present in the wild-type gC molecule. The missing fragments included the one containing the putative transmembrane anchor sequence. Glycoprotein gC from the gC-8 mutant was also shown, by tryptic peptide map analysis, to have lost more than five major arginine-labeled tryptic peptides arginine-labeled tryptic peptides present in the wild-type gC molecule and to have gained a lysine-labeled tryptic peptide not present in wild-type gC. Images PMID:6092712

  17. truncated species: Implications for brain clearance mechanisms and amyloid plaque deposition.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Erwin; Mathews, Paul; Mezhericher, Emiliya; Beach, Thomas G; Deng, Jingjing; Neubert, Thomas A; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2017-07-12

    Extensive parenchymal and vascular Aβ deposits are pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Besides classic full-length peptides, biochemical analyses of brain deposits have revealed high degree of Aβ heterogeneity likely resulting from the action of multiple proteolytic enzymes. In spite of the numerous studies focusing in Aβ, the relevance of N- and C-terminal truncated species for AD pathogenesis remains largely understudied. In the present work, using novel antibodies specifically recognizing Aβ species N-terminally truncated at position 4 or C-terminally truncated at position 34, we provide a clear assessment of the differential topographic localization of these species in AD brains and transgenic models. Based on their distinct solubility, brain N- and C-terminal truncated species were extracted by differential fractionation and identified via immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry analysis. Biochemical/biophysical studies with synthetic homologues further confirmed the different solubility properties and contrasting fibrillogenic characteristics of the truncated species composing the brain Aβ peptidome. Aβ C-terminal degradation leads to the production of more soluble fragments likely to be more easily eliminated from the brain. On the contrary, N-terminal truncation at position 4 favors the formation of poorly soluble, aggregation prone peptides with high amyloidogenic propensity and the potential to exacerbate the fibrillar deposits, self-perpetuating the amyloidogenic loop. Detailed assessment of the molecular diversity of Aβ species composing interstitial fluid and amyloid deposits at different disease stages, as well as the evaluation of the truncation profile during various pharmacologic approaches will provide a comprehensive understanding of the still undefined contribution of Aβ truncations to the disease pathogenesis and their potential as novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. N-Terminal Peptide Detection with Optimized Peptide-Spectrum Matching and Streamlined Sequence Libraries.

    PubMed

    Lycette, Brynne E; Glickman, Jacob W; Roth, Samuel J; Cram, Abigail E; Kim, Tae Hee; Krizanc, Danny; Weir, Michael P

    2016-09-02

    We identified tryptic peptides in yeast cell lysates that map to translation initiation sites downstream of the annotated start sites using the peptide-spectrum matching algorithms OMSSA and Mascot. To increase the accuracy of peptide-spectrum matching, both algorithms were run using several standardized parameter sets, and Mascot was run utilizing a, b, and y ions from collision-induced dissociation. A large fraction (22%) of the detected N-terminal peptides mapped to translation initiation downstream of the annotated initiation sites. Expression of several truncated proteins from downstream initiation in the same reading frame as the full-length protein (frame 1) was verified by western analysis. To facilitate analysis of the larger proteome of Drosophila, we created a streamlined sequence library from which all duplicated trypsin fragments had been removed. OMSSA assessment using this "stripped" library revealed 171 peptides that map to downstream translation initiation sites, 76% of which are in the same reading frame as the full-length annotated proteins, although some are in different reading frames creating new protein sequences not in the annotated proteome. Sequences surrounding implicated downstream AUG start codons are associated with nucleotide preferences with a pronounced three-base periodicity N1^G2^A3.

  19. N-terminal domain of complexin independently activates calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ying; Choi, Ucheor B.; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Minglei; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Wang, Austin L.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2016-01-01

    Complexin activates Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release and regulates spontaneous release in the presynaptic terminal by cooperating with the neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and the Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin. The N-terminal domain of complexin is important for activation, but its molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here, we observed that a split pair of N-terminal and central domain fragments of complexin is sufficient to activate Ca2+-triggered release using a reconstituted single-vesicle fusion assay, suggesting that the N-terminal domain acts as an independent module within the synaptic fusion machinery. The N-terminal domain can also interact independently with membranes, which is enhanced by a cooperative interaction with the neuronal SNARE complex. We show by mutagenesis that membrane binding of the N-terminal domain is essential for activation of Ca2+-triggered fusion. Consistent with the membrane-binding property, the N-terminal domain can be substituted by the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide, and this chimera also activates Ca2+-triggered fusion. Membrane binding of the N-terminal domain of complexin therefore cooperates with the other fusogenic elements of the synaptic fusion machinery during Ca2+-triggered release. PMID:27444020

  20. Folding and stability studies on C-PE and its natural N-terminal truncant.

    PubMed

    Anwer, Khalid; Parmar, Asha; Rahman, Safikur; Kaushal, Avani; Madamwar, Datta; Islam, Asimul; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan

    2014-03-01

    The conformational and functional state of biliproteins can be determined by optical properties of the covalently linked chromophores. α-Subunit of most of the phycoerythrin contains 164 residues. Recently determined crystal structure of the naturally truncated form of α-subunit of cyanobacterial phycoerythrin (Tr-αC-PE) lacks 31 N-terminal residues present in its full length form (FL-αC-PE). This provides an opportunity to investigate the structure-function relationship between these two natural forms. We measured guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denaturation curves of FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE proteins, followed by observing changes in absorbance at 565nm, fluorescence at 350 and 573nm, and circular dichroism at 222nm. The denaturation curve of each protein was analyzed for ΔGD(∘), the value of Gibbs free energy change on denaturation (ΔGD) in the absence of GdmCl. The main conclusions of the this study are: (i) GdmCl-induced denaturation (native state↔denatured state) of FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE is reversible and follows a two-state mechanism, (ii) FL-αC-PE is 1.4kcalmol(-1) more stable than Tr-αC-PE, (iii) truncation of 31-residue long fragment that contains two α-helices, does not alter the 3-D structure of the remaining protein polypeptide chain, protein-chromophore interaction, and (iv) amino acid sequence of Tr-αC-PE determines the functional structure of the phycoerythrin.

  1. Regulation of TRPP3 Channel Function by N-terminal Domain Palmitoylation and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wang; Yang, JungWoo; Beauchamp, Erwan; Cai, Ruiqi; Hussein, Shaimaa; Hofmann, Laura; Li, Qiang; Flockerzi, Veit; Berthiaume, Luc G; Tang, Jingfeng; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2016-12-02

    Transient receptor potential polycystin-3 (TRPP3) is a cation channel activated by calcium and proton and is involved in hedgehog signaling, intestinal development, and sour tasting. How TRPP3 channel function is regulated remains poorly understood. By N-terminal truncation mutations, electrophysiology, and Xenopus oocyte expression, we first identified fragment Asp-21-Ser-42 to be functionally important. We then found that deletion mutant Δ1-36 (TRPP3 missing fragment Met-1-Arg-36) has a similar function as wild-type TRPP3, whereas Δ1-38 is functionally dead, suggesting the importance of Val-37 or Cys-38. Further studies found that Cys-38, but not Val-37, is functionally critical. Cys-38 is a predicted site of palmitoylation, and indeed TRPP3 channel activity was inhibited by palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate and rescued by palmitoylation substrate palmitic acid. The TRPP3 N terminus (TRPP3NT, Met-1-Leu-95) localized along the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells but stayed in the cytoplasm with 2-bromopalmitate treatment or C38A mutation, indicating that TRPP3NT anchors to the surface membrane through palmitoylation at Cys-38. By acyl-biotin exchange assays, we showed that TRPP3, but not mutant C38A, is indeed palmitoylated. When putative phosphorylation sites near Cys-38 were mutated to Asp or Glu to mimic phosphorylation, only T39D and T39E reduced TRPP3 function. Furthermore, TRPP3NT displayed double bands in which the upper band was abolished by λ phosphatase treatment or T39A mutation. However, palmitoylation at Cys-38 and phosphorylation at Thr-39 independently regulated TRPP3 channel function, in contrast to previous reports about correlated palmitoylation with a proximate phosphorylation. Palmitoylation at Cys-38 represents a novel mechanism of functional regulation for TRPP3. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. N-terminal α-helix-independent membrane interactions facilitate adenovirus protein VI induction of membrane tubule formation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oana; Wiethoff, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Adenovirus disrupts endosomal membranes during cell entry. The membrane lytic capsid protein VI (pVI) facilitates entry by fragmenting membranes. Although an N-terminal amphipathic α-helix (VI-Φ) possesses similar membrane affinity as pVI, truncated protein lacking VI-Φ, (VIΔ54) still possesses moderate membrane affinity. We demonstrate that incorporation of nickel-NTA lipids in membranes enhances increases the membrane affinity and the membrane lytic activity of VIΔ54. We also demonstrate that 3 predicted pVI α-helices within residues 54–114 associate with membranes, sitting roughly parallel to the membrane surface. His-tagged VIΔ54 is capable of fragmenting membranes similar to pVI and the VI-Φ peptide. Interestingly, neither VI-Φ nor His-tagged VIΔ54 can induce tubule formation in giant lipid vesicles as observed for pVI. These data suggest cooperativity between the amphipathic α-helix and residues in VIΔ54 to induce positive membrane curvature and tubule formation. These results provide additional details regarding the mechanism of nonenveloped virus membrane penetration. PMID:20869737

  3. Synthetic Antibodies Inhibit Bcl-2-associated X Protein (BAX) through Blockade of the N-terminal Activation Site.

    PubMed

    Uchime, Onyinyechukwu; Dai, Zhou; Biris, Nikolaos; Lee, David; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Li, Sheng; Lai, Jonathan R; Gavathiotis, Evripidis

    2016-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family plays a critical role in regulating cellular commitment to mitochondrial apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) is an executioner protein of the BCL-2 family that represents the gateway to mitochondrial apoptosis. Following cellular stresses that induce apoptosis, cytosolic BAX is activated and translocates to the mitochondria, where it inserts into the mitochondrial outer membrane to form a toxic pore. How the BAX activation pathway proceeds and how this may be inhibited is not yet completely understood. Here we describe synthetic antibody fragments (Fabs) as structural and biochemical probes to investigate the potential mechanisms of BAX regulation. These synthetic Fabs bind with high affinity to BAX and inhibit its activation by the BH3-only protein tBID (truncated Bcl2 interacting protein) in assays using liposomal membranes. Inhibition of BAX by a representative Fab, 3G11, prevented mitochondrial translocation of BAX and BAX-mediated cytochrome c release. Using NMR and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we showed that 3G11 forms a stoichiometric and stable complex without inducing a significant conformational change on monomeric and inactive BAX. We identified that the Fab-binding site on BAX involves residues of helices α1/α6 and the α1-α2 loop. Therefore, the inhibitory binding surface of 3G11 overlaps with the N-terminal activation site of BAX, suggesting a novel mechanism of BAX inhibition through direct binding to the BAX N-terminal activation site. The synthetic Fabs reported here reveal, as probes, novel mechanistic insights into BAX inhibition and provide a blueprint for developing inhibitors of BAX activation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Synthetic Antibodies Inhibit Bcl-2-associated X Protein (BAX) through Blockade of the N-terminal Activation Site*

    PubMed Central

    Uchime, Onyinyechukwu; Dai, Zhou; Biris, Nikolaos; Lee, David; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Li, Sheng; Lai, Jonathan R.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis

    2016-01-01

    The BCL-2 protein family plays a critical role in regulating cellular commitment to mitochondrial apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) is an executioner protein of the BCL-2 family that represents the gateway to mitochondrial apoptosis. Following cellular stresses that induce apoptosis, cytosolic BAX is activated and translocates to the mitochondria, where it inserts into the mitochondrial outer membrane to form a toxic pore. How the BAX activation pathway proceeds and how this may be inhibited is not yet completely understood. Here we describe synthetic antibody fragments (Fabs) as structural and biochemical probes to investigate the potential mechanisms of BAX regulation. These synthetic Fabs bind with high affinity to BAX and inhibit its activation by the BH3-only protein tBID (truncated Bcl2 interacting protein) in assays using liposomal membranes. Inhibition of BAX by a representative Fab, 3G11, prevented mitochondrial translocation of BAX and BAX-mediated cytochrome c release. Using NMR and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, we showed that 3G11 forms a stoichiometric and stable complex without inducing a significant conformational change on monomeric and inactive BAX. We identified that the Fab-binding site on BAX involves residues of helices α1/α6 and the α1-α2 loop. Therefore, the inhibitory binding surface of 3G11 overlaps with the N-terminal activation site of BAX, suggesting a novel mechanism of BAX inhibition through direct binding to the BAX N-terminal activation site. The synthetic Fabs reported here reveal, as probes, novel mechanistic insights into BAX inhibition and provide a blueprint for developing inhibitors of BAX activation. PMID:26565029

  5. Oxidation of the N-terminal methionine of lens alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Horwitz, J.; Emmons, T.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum against the N-terminal peptide of bovine alpha-A crystallin has been used to monitor purification of two different seropositive peptides (i.e. T1a and T1b) from a tryptic digest of bovine lens proteins. Both these peptides have similar amino acid compositions, but peptide T1b has a molecular weight 16 atomic mass units larger than T1a, suggesting posttranslational modification. Analysis of ionization fragments of the T1b peptide by mass spectrometry demonstrates that this difference in molecular weight is due to the in vivo oxidation of the N-terminal met residue of the alpha-A crystallin molecule.

  6. Molecular properties of the N-terminal extension of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7.

    PubMed

    Edamatsu, M

    2016-02-11

    Kinesin-5 plays an essential role in spindle formation and function, and serves as a potential target for anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular properties of the N-terminal extension of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe kinesin-5, Cut7. This extension is rich in charged amino acids and predicted to be intrinsically disordered. In S. pombe cells, a Cut7 construct lacking half the N-terminal extension failed to localize along the spindle microtubules and formed a monopolar spindle. However, a construct lacking the entire N-terminal extension exhibited normal localization and formed a typical bipolar spindle. In addition, in vitro analyses revealed that the truncated Cut7 constructs demonstrated similar motile velocities and directionalities as the wild-type motor protein, but the microtubule landing rates were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that the N-terminal extension is not required for normal Cut7 intracellular localization or function, but alters the microtubule-binding properties of this protein in vitro.

  7. The prognostic value of pre-operative and post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodseth, Reitze N; Biccard, Bruce M; Le Manach, Yannick; Sessler, Daniel I; Lurati Buse, Giovana A; Thabane, Lehana; Schutt, Robert C; Bolliger, Daniel; Cagini, Lucio; Cardinale, Daniela; Chong, Carol P W; Chu, Rong; Cnotliwy, Miłosław; Di Somma, Salvatore; Fahrner, René; Lim, Wen Kwang; Mahla, Elisabeth; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Puma, Francesco; Pyun, Wook B; Radović, Milan; Rajagopalan, Sriram; Suttie, Stuart; Vanniyasingam, Thuvaraha; van Gaal, William J; Waliszek, Marek; Devereaux, P J

    2014-01-21

    The objective of this study was to determine whether measuring post-operative B-type natriuretic peptides (NPs) (i.e., B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and N-terminal fragment of proBNP [NT-proBNP]) enhances risk stratification in adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, in whom a pre-operative NP has been measured. Pre-operative NP concentrations are powerful independent predictors of perioperative cardiovascular complications, but recent studies have reported that elevated post-operative NP concentrations are independently associated with these complications. It is not clear whether there is value in measuring post-operative NP when a pre-operative measurement has been done. We conducted a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis to determine whether the addition of post-operative NP levels enhanced the prediction of the composite of death and nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 and ≥180 days after surgery. Eighteen eligible studies provided individual patient data (n = 2,179). Adding post-operative NP to a risk prediction model containing pre-operative NP improved model fit and risk classification at both 30 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,280 to 1,204; net reclassification index: 20%; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (corrected quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion: 1,320 to 1,300; net reclassification index: 11%; p = 0.003). Elevated post-operative NP was the strongest independent predictor of the primary outcome at 30 days (odds ratio: 3.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.2 to 6.2; p < 0.001) and ≥180 days (odds ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.9 to 2.7; p < 0.001) after surgery. Additional post-operative NP measurement enhanced risk stratification for the composite outcomes of death or nonfatal myocardial infarction at 30 days and ≥180 days after noncardiac surgery compared with a pre-operative NP measurement alone. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology

  8. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein.

  9. Autolysis of bovine enteropeptidase heavy chain: evidence of fragment 118-465 involvement in trypsinogen activation.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, A G; Rumsh, L D

    1999-01-15

    Variations in bovine enteropeptidase (EP) activity were shown to result from autolysis caused by the loss of calcium ions; the cleavage sites were determined. The native enzyme preferred its natural substrate, trypsinogen (KM=2.4 microM), to the peptide and fusion protein substrates (KM=200 and 125 microM, respectively). On the other hand, the truncated enzyme composed of the C-terminal fragment 466-800 of EP heavy chain and intact light chain did not distinguish these substrates. The results suggest that the N-terminal fragment 118-465 of the enteropeptidase heavy chain contains a secondary substrate-binding site that interacts directly with trypsinogen.

  10. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control.

    PubMed

    Guillier, Maude; Allemand, Frédéric; Graffe, Monique; Raibaud, Sophie; Dardel, Frédéric; Springer, Mathias; Chiaruttini, Claude

    2005-05-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control.

  11. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2015-01-01

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  12. Protease Substrate Profiling by N-Terminal COFRADIC.

    PubMed

    Staes, An; Van Damme, Petra; Timmerman, Evy; Ruttens, Bart; Stes, Elisabeth; Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Detection of (neo-)N-terminal peptides is essential for identifying protease cleavage sites . We here present an update of a well-established and efficient selection method for enriching N-terminal peptides out of peptide mixtures: N-terminal COFRADIC (COmbined FRActional DIagonal Chromatography). This method is based on the old concept of diagonal chromatography, which involves a peptide modification step in between otherwise identical chromatographic separations, with this modification step finally allowing for the isolation of N-terminal peptides by longer retention of non-N-terminal peptides on the resin. N-terminal COFRADIC has been successfully applied in many protease-centric studies, as well as for studies on protein alpha-N-acetylation and on characterizing alternative translation initiation events.

  13. Synthesis of full length and truncated microcin B17 analogues as DNA gyrase poisons.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robert E; Collin, Frédéric; Maxwell, Anthony; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Payne, Richard J

    2014-03-14

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a post-translationally modified peptide containing thiazole and oxazole heterocycles that interrupt the peptide backbone. MccB17 is capable of poisoning DNA gyrase through stabilization of the gyrase-DNA cleavage complex and has therefore attracted significant attention. Using a combination of Fmoc-strategy solid-phase peptide synthesis and solution-phase fragment assembly we have prepared a library of full-length and truncated MccB17 analogues to investigate key structural requirements for gyrase-poisoning activity. Synthetic peptides lacking the glycine-rich N-terminal portion of the full-length sequence showed strong stabilization of the gyrase-DNA cleavage complex with increased potency relative to the full-length sequences. This truncation, however, led to a decrease in antibacterial activity of these analogues relative to their full-length counterparts indicating a potential role of the N-terminal region of the natural product for cellular uptake.

  14. HIV blocking antibodies following immunisation with chimaeric peptides coding a short N-terminal sequence of the CCR5 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benjamin M.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Gardener, Michelle; Tsang, Jhen; Wright, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is required for cellular entry by many strains of HIV, and provides a potential target for molecules, including antibodies, designed to block HIV transmission. This study investigates a novel approach to stimulate antibodies to CCR5. Rabbits were immunised with chimaeric peptides which encode a short fragment of the N-terminal sequence of CCR5, as well as an unrelated T cell epitope from Tetanus toxoid. Immunisation with these chimaeric peptides generates a strong antibody response which is highly focused on the N-terminal CCR5 sequence. The antibody to the chimaeric peptide containing an N-terminal methionine also recognises the full length CCR5 receptor on the cell surface, albeit at higher concentrations. Further comparison of binding to intact CCR5 with binding to CCR5 peptide suggest that the receptor specific antibody generated represents a very small fragment of the total anti-peptide antibody. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal peptide in the context of the intact receptor has a different structure to that of the synthetic peptide. Finally, the antibody was able to block HIV infection of macrophages in vitro. Thus results of this study suggest that N-terminal fragments of CCR5 may provide potential immunogens with which to generate blocking antibodies to this receptor, while avoiding the dangers of including T cell auto-epitopes. PMID:18765264

  15. SAXS Structural Studies of Dps from Deinococcus radiodurans Highlights the Conformation of the Mobile N-Terminal Extensions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra P; Cuypers, Maxime G; Round, Adam; Finet, Stephanie; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Mitchell, Edward P; Romão, Célia V

    2017-03-10

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains two DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps): Dps1 (DR2263) and Dps2 (DRB0092). These are suggested to play a role in DNA interaction and manganese and iron storage. The proteins assemble as a conserved dodecameric structure with structurally uncharacterised N-terminal extensions. In the case of DrDps1, these extensions have been proposed to be involved in DNA interactions, while in DrDps2, their function has yet to be established. The reported data reveal the relative position of the N-terminal extensions to the dodecameric sphere in solution for both Dps. The low-resolution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) results show that the N-terminal extensions protrude from the spherical shell of both proteins. The SAXS envelope of a truncated form of DrDps1 without the N-terminal extensions appears as a dodecameric sphere, contrasting strongly with the protrusions observed in the full-length models. The effect of iron incorporation into DrDps2 was investigated by static and stopped-flow SAXS measurements, revealing dynamic structural changes upon iron binding and core formation, as reflected by a quick alteration of its radius of gyration. The truncated and full-length versions of DrDps were also compared on the basis of their interaction with DNA to analyse functional roles of the N-terminal extensions. DrDps1 N-terminal protrusions appear to be directly involved with DNA, whilst those from DrDps2 are indirectly associated with DNA binding. Furthermore, detection of DrDps2 in the D. radiodurans membrane fraction suggests that the N-terminus of the protein interacts with the membrane.

  16. Protein N-terminal Acetyltransferases Act as N-terminal Propionyltransferases In Vitro and In Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Foyn, Håvard; Van Damme, Petra; Støve, Svein I.; Glomnes, Nina; Evjenth, Rune; Gevaert, Kris; Arnesen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) is a highly abundant protein modification in eukaryotes catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), which transfer an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to the alpha amino group of a nascent polypeptide. Nt-acetylation has emerged as an important protein modifier, steering protein degradation, protein complex formation and protein localization. Very recently, it was reported that some human proteins could carry a propionyl group at their N-terminus. Here, we investigated the generality of N-terminal propionylation by analyzing its proteome-wide occurrence in yeast and we identified 10 unique in vivo Nt-propionylated N-termini. Furthermore, by performing differential N-terminome analysis of a control yeast strain (yNatA), a yeast NatA deletion strain (yNatAΔ) or a yeast NatA deletion strain expressing human NatA (hNatA), we were able to demonstrate that in vivo Nt-propionylation of several proteins, displaying a NatA type substrate specificity profile, depended on the presence of either yeast or human NatA. Furthermore, in vitro Nt-propionylation assays using synthetic peptides, propionyl coenzyme A, and either purified human NATs or immunoprecipitated human NatA, clearly demonstrated that NATs are Nt-propionyltransferases (NPTs) per se. We here demonstrate for the first time that Nt-propionylation can occur in yeast and thus is an evolutionarily conserved process, and that the NATs are multifunctional enzymes acting as NPTs in vivo and in vitro, in addition to their main role as NATs, and their potential function as lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and noncatalytic regulators. PMID:23043182

  17. Cytoplasmic c-Jun N-terminal immunoreactivity: a hallmark of retinal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Luciana B; de Freitas, Fabíola G; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Tolkovsky, Aviva; Linden, Rafael

    2002-12-01

    1. We investigated the association of c-Jun with apoptosis within retinal tissue. Explants of the retina of neonatal rats were subject to a variety of procedures that cause apoptosis of specific classes of retinal cells at distinct stages of differentiation. The expression of c-Jun was detected by Western Blot, and immunohistochemistry was done with antibodies made for either N-terminal or C-terminal domains of c-Jun, and correlated with apoptosis detected either by chromatin condensation or by in situ nick end labeling of fragmented DNA. 2. c-Jun protein content was increased in retinal tissue subject to induction of both photoreceptor and ganglion cell death. 3. c-Jun N-terminal immunoreactivity was found mainly in the cytoplasm of apoptotic cells regardless of cell type, of the stage of differentiation, including proliferating cells, or of the means of induction of apoptosis. 4. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that c-Jun is involved in the control of cell death in retinal tissue, but other proteins that cross-react with c-Jun N-terminal antibodies may also be major markers of retinal apoptosis. 5. Antibodies directed to c-Jun N-terminal (aa 91-105) are useful tools to follow apoptotic changes in retinal tissue.

  18. Functional dissection of the N-terminal sequence of Clostridium sp. G0005 glucoamylase: identification of components critical for folding the catalytic domain and for constructing the active site structure.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Matsushima, Yudai; Nagamine, Yusuke; Matsuhashi, Tomoki; Honda, Shotaro; Okuda, Shoi; Ohno, Misa; Sugahara, Yasusato; Shin, Yongchol; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium sp. G0005 glucoamylase (CGA) is composed of a β-sandwich domain (BD), a linker, and a catalytic domain (CD). In the present study, CGA was expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies when the N-terminal region (39 amino acid residues) of the BD was truncated. To further elucidate the role of the N-terminal region of the BD, we constructed N-terminally truncated proteins (Δ19, Δ24, Δ29, and Δ34) and assessed their solubility and activity. Although all evaluated proteins were soluble, their hydrolytic activities toward maltotriose as a substrate varied: Δ19 and Δ24 were almost as active as CGA, but the activity of Δ29 was substantially lower, and Δ34 exhibited little hydrolytic activity. Subsequent truncation analysis of the N-terminal region sequence between residues 25 and 28 revealed that truncation of less than 26 residues did not affect CGA activity, whereas truncation of 26 or more residues resulted in a substantial loss of activity. Based on further site-directed mutagenesis and N-terminal sequence analysis, we concluded that the 26XaaXaaTrp28 sequence of CGA is important in exhibiting CGA activity. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of the BD in bacterial GAs may function not only in folding the protein into the correct structure but also in constructing a competent active site for catalyzing the hydrolytic reaction.

  19. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 remodels HORMA domains through N-terminal engagement and unfolding.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Kim, Dong Hyun; Dereli, Ihsan; Rosenberg, Scott C; Hagemann, Goetz; Herzog, Franz; Tóth, Attila; Cleveland, Don W; Corbett, Kevin D

    2017-08-15

    Proteins of the conserved HORMA domain family, including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein MAD2 and the meiotic HORMADs, assemble into signaling complexes by binding short peptides termed "closure motifs". The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 regulates both MAD2 and meiotic HORMADs by disassembling these HORMA domain-closure motif complexes, but its mechanisms of substrate recognition and remodeling are unknown. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and crosslinking mass spectrometry to outline how TRIP13 recognizes MAD2 with the help of the adapter protein p31(comet) We show that p31(comet) binding to the TRIP13 N-terminal domain positions the disordered MAD2 N-terminus for engagement by the TRIP13 "pore loops", which then unfold MAD2 in the presence of ATP N-terminal truncation of MAD2 renders it refractory to TRIP13 action in vitro, and in cells causes spindle assembly checkpoint defects consistent with loss of TRIP13 function. Similar truncation of HORMAD1 in mouse spermatocytes compromises its TRIP13-mediated removal from meiotic chromosomes, highlighting a conserved mechanism for recognition and disassembly of HORMA domain-closure motif complexes by TRIP13. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Crystal structure of a major fragment of the salt-tolerant glutaminase from Micrococcus luteus K-3

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki . E-mail: k.yoshimune@aist.go.jp; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Shiratori, Aya; Wakayama, Mamoru; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki

    2006-08-11

    Glutaminase of Micrococcus luteus K-3 (intact glutaminase; 48 kDa) is digested to a C-terminally truncated fragment (glutaminase fragment; 42 kDa) that shows higher salt tolerance than that of the intact glutaminase. The crystal structure of the glutaminase fragment was determined at 2.4 A resolution using multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD). The glutaminase fragment is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains, and a putative catalytic serine-lysine dyad (S64 and K67) is located in a cleft of the N-terminal domain. Mutations of the S64 or K67 residues abolished the enzyme activity. The N-terminal domain has abundant glutamic acid residues on its surface, which may explain its salt-tolerant mechanism. A diffraction analysis of the intact glutaminase crystals (a twinning fraction of 0.43) located the glutaminase fragment in the unit cell but failed to turn up clear densities for the missing C-terminal portion of the molecule.

  1. Crystal structure of a major fragment of the salt-tolerant glutaminase from Micrococcus luteus K-3.

    PubMed

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Shiratori, Aya; Wakayama, Mamoru; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki

    2006-08-11

    Glutaminase of Micrococcus luteus K-3 (intact glutaminase; 48kDa) is digested to a C-terminally truncated fragment (glutaminase fragment; 42kDa) that shows higher salt tolerance than that of the intact glutaminase. The crystal structure of the glutaminase fragment was determined at 2.4A resolution using multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD). The glutaminase fragment is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains, and a putative catalytic serine-lysine dyad (S64 and K67) is located in a cleft of the N-terminal domain. Mutations of the S64 or K67 residues abolished the enzyme activity. The N-terminal domain has abundant glutamic acid residues on its surface, which may explain its salt-tolerant mechanism. A diffraction analysis of the intact glutaminase crystals (a twinning fraction of 0.43) located the glutaminase fragment in the unit cell but failed to turn up clear densities for the missing C-terminal portion of the molecule.

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of the N-terminal extension of calf skin type III procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, A; Glanville, R W; Hörlein, D; Bruckner, P; Timpl, R; Fietzek, P P; Kühn, K

    1984-01-01

    The N-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen, isolated from foetal-calf skin, contains 130 amino acid residues. To determine its amino acid sequence, the peptide was reduced and carboxymethylated or aminoethylated and fragmented with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and bacterial collagenase. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase was used to deblock the N-terminal collagenase fragment to enable amino acid sequencing. The type III collagen extension peptide is homologous to that of the alpha 1 chain of type I procollagen with respect to a three-domain structure. The N-terminal 79 amino acids, which contain ten of the 12 cysteine residues, form a compact globular domain. The next 39 amino acids are in a collagenase triplet sequence (Gly- Xaa - Yaa )n with a high hydroxyproline content. Finally, another short non-collagenous domain of 12 amino acids ends at the cleavage site for procollagen aminopeptidase, which cleaves a proline-glutamine bond. In contrast with type I procollagen, the type III procollagen extension peptides contain interchain disulphide bridges located at the C-terminus of the triple-helical domain. PMID:6331392

  3. Expression in Escherichia coli of active human alcohol dehydrogenase lacking N-terminal acetylation.

    PubMed

    Höög, J O; Weis, M; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H; von Bahr-Lindström, H

    1987-12-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, beta beta isozyme of class I) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized regarding N-terminal processing. The expression system was obtained by ligation of a cDNA fragment corresponding to the beta-subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase into the vector pKK 223-3 containing the tac promoter. The enzyme, detected by Western-blot analysis and ethanol oxidizing activity, constituted up to 3% of the total amount of protein. Recombinant ADH was separated from E. coli ADH by ion-exchange chromatography and the isolated enzyme was essentially pure as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. The N-terminal sequence was identical to that of the authentic beta-subunit except that the N-terminus was non-acetylated, indicating a correct removal of the initiator methionine, but lack of further processing.

  4. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    PubMed

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect.

  5. A domain in the N-terminal part of Hsp26 is essential for chaperone function and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, Martin; Ignatiou, Athanasios; Saibil, Helen; Helmich, Sonja; Frenzl, Elke; Stromer, Thusnelda; Buchner, Johannes

    2004-10-15

    Small heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are ubiquitous molecular chaperones which prevent the unspecific aggregation of non-native proteins. For Hsp26, a cytosolic sHsp from of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been shown that, at elevated temperatures, the 24 subunit complex dissociates into dimers. This dissociation is required for the efficient interaction with non-native proteins. Deletion analysis of the protein showed that the N-terminal half of Hsp26 (amino acid residues 1-95) is required for the assembly of the oligomer. Limited proteolysis in combination with mass spectrometry suggested that this region can be divided in two parts, an N-terminal segment including amino acid residues 1-30 and a second part ranging from residues 31-95. To analyze the structure and function of the N-terminal part of Hsp26 we created a deletion mutant lacking amino acid residues 1-30. We show that the oligomeric state and the structure, as determined by size exclusion chromatography and electron microscopy, corresponds to that of the Hsp26 wild-type protein. Furthermore, this truncated version of Hsp26 is active as a chaperone. However, in contrast to full length Hsp26, the truncated version dissociates at lower temperatures and complexes with non-native proteins are less stable than those found with wild-type Hsp26. Our results suggest that the N-terminal segment of Hsp26 is involved in both, oligomerization and chaperone function and that the second part of the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 31-95) is essential for both functions.

  6. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  7. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  8. N-terminal extension of N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase is required for turnover in hypoxanthine excision reaction.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Sanjay; Uren, Aykut; Roy, Rabindra

    2007-10-12

    N-Methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) initiates base excision repair in DNA by removing a wide variety of alkylated, deaminated, and lipid peroxidation-induced purine adducts. In this study we tested the role of N-terminal extension on MPG hypoxanthine (Hx) cleavage activity. Our results showed that MPG lacking N-terminal extension excises hypoxanthine with significantly reduced efficiency, one-third of that exhibited by full-length MPG under similar conditions. Steady-state kinetics showed full-length MPG has higher V(max) and lower K(m) than NDelta100 MPG. Real time binding experiments by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy suggested that truncation can substantially increase the equilibrium binding constant of MPG toward Hx, but under single-turnover conditions there is apparently no effect on catalytic chemistry; however, the truncation of the N-terminal tail affected the turnover of the enzyme significantly under multiple turnover conditions. Real time binding experiments by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy further showed that NDelta100 MPG binds approximately six times more tightly toward its product apurinic/apyrimidinic site than the substrate, whereas full-length MPG similarly binds to both the substrate and the product. We thereby conclude that the N-terminal tail in MPG plays a critical role in overcoming the product inhibition, which is achieved by reducing the differences of MPG binding affinity toward Hx and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites and thus is essential for the Hx cleavage reaction of MPG. The results from this study also affirm the need for reinvestigation of full-length MPG for its enzymatic and structural properties, which are currently available mostly for the truncated protein.

  9. Antigenic characteristics of the complete and truncated capsid protein VP1 of enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Dong, Min; Jiang, Bingfu; Dai, Xing; Meng, Jihong

    2012-08-01

    The complete VP1 protein of enterovirus 71 (EV71) and a series of truncations were expressed in Escherichia coli and their antigenic characteristics were studied. Immunoblot analysis showed the major immunoreactive region of the VP1 protein was located in the N-terminal portion at position of amino acid (aa) 1-100. The complete VP1 possessed strong cross-reactivity with antisera against coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) and echovirus 6 (Echo6), while the truncated fragment at position 1-100 aa only had weak cross-reactivity. Moreover, an EV71-specific linear epitope at position 94-105 aa was identified using two EV71-specific mAbs (2B9 and 5B7) with indirect ELISA, but could not be recognized by antibodies against EV71 virus particles. The complete and all of truncated VP1 proteins except His-VP1(202-297) and GST-VP1(202-248) failed to elicit a significant neutralizing antibody response in mice. His-VP1(202-297) and GST-VP1(202-248) containing neutralizing epitope(s) could be recognized only by anti-EV71 mouse sera but not rabbit or human sera. These findings may contribute to a further understanding of antigenic characteristics of the capsid protein VP1 and may be helpful to the development of diagnostic reagents and vaccines.

  10. Size does matter: 18 amino acids at the N-terminal tip of an amino acid transporter in Leishmania determine substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schlisselberg, Doreen; Mazarib, Eldar; Inbar, Ehud; Rentsch, Doris; Myler, Peter J.; Zilberstein, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Long N-terminal tails of amino acid transporters are known to act as sensors of the internal pool of amino acids and as positive regulators of substrate flux rate. In this study we establish that N-termini of amino acid transporters can also determine substrate specificity. We show that due to alternative trans splicing, the human pathogen Leishmania naturally expresses two variants of the proline/alanine transporter, one 18 amino acid shorter than the other. We demonstrate that the longer variant (LdAAP24) translocates both proline and alanine, whereas the shorter variant (∆18LdAAP24) translocates just proline. Remarkably, co-expressing the hydrophilic N-terminal peptide of the long variant with ∆18LdAAP24 was found to recover alanine transport. This restoration of alanine transport could be mediated by a truncated N-terminal tail, though truncations exceeding half of the tail length were no longer functional. Taken together, the data indicate that the first 18 amino acids of the negatively charged N-terminal LdAAP24 tail are required for alanine transport and may facilitate the electrostatic interactions of the entire negatively charged N-terminal tail with the positively charged internal loops in the transmembrane domain, as this mechanism has been shown to underlie regulation of substrate flux rate for other transporters. PMID:26549185

  11. Bepridil opens the regulatory N-terminal lobe of cardiac troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Love, Michael L.; Putkey, John A.; Cohen, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium-dependent switch for contraction in heart muscle and a potential target for drugs in the therapy of congestive heart failure. This calmodulin-like protein consists of two lobes connected by a central linker; each lobe contains two EF-hand domains. The regulatory N-terminal lobe of cTnC, unlike that of skeletal troponin C (sTnC), contains only one functional EF-hand and does not open fully upon the binding of Ca2+. We have determined the crystal structure of cTnC, with three bound Ca2+ ions, complexed with the calcium-sensitizer bepridil, to 2.15-Å resolution. In contrast to apo- and 3Ca2+-cTnC, the drug-bound complex displays a fully open N-terminal lobe similar to the N-terminal lobes of 4Ca2+-sTnC and cTnC bound to a C-terminal fragment of cardiac troponin I (residues 147–163). The closing of the lobe is sterically hindered by one of the three bound bepridils. Our results provide a structural basis for the Ca2+-sensitizing effect of bepridil and reveal the details of a distinctive two-stage mechanism for Ca2+ regulation by troponin C in cardiac muscle. PMID:10792039

  12. N-terminal chemical protein labeling using the naturally split GOS-TerL intein.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Anne-Lena; Mootz, Henning D

    2017-03-23

    Chemoselective and regioselective chemical protein labeling is of great importance, yet no current technique is sufficiently general and simple to perform. Protein trans-splicing by split inteins can be used to ligate short tags with chemical labels to either the N or the C terminus of a protein. The CysTag approach exploits split intein fragments without a cysteine fused with such a short tag containing a single cysteine that is easily amenable to selective modification using classical cysteine bioconjugation. Labeling of the protein of interest is achieved through transfer of the pre-labeled tag by protein trans-splicing. This protocol keeps other cysteines unmodified. While split inteins for C-terminal CysTag labeling were previously reported, no high-yielding and naturally split intein for N-terminal labeling has been available. In this work, the recently discovered GOS-TerL intein was explored as the only known naturally split intein that both lacks a cysteine in its N-terminal fragment and is active under ambient conditions. Thioredoxin as a model protein and a camelid nanobody were labeled with a synthetic fluorophore by transferring the pre-labeling CysTag in the protein trans-splicing reaction with yields of about 50 to 90%. The short N-terminal intein fragment was also chemically synthesized with a tag to enable protein labeling by semi-synthetic protein trans-splicing. Our results expand the scope of the CysTag labeling strategy, which achieves selective chemical modification without the requirement for sophisticated biorthogonal functional groups and rather builds on the plethora of commercially available reagents directed at the thiol side chain of cysteine. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Altering the N-terminal arms of the polymerase manager protein UmuD modulates protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Murison, David A; Ollivierre, Jaylene N; Huang, Qiuying; Budil, David E; Beuning, Penny J

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells that are exposed to DNA damaging agents invoke the SOS response that involves expression of the umuD gene products, along with more than 50 other genes. Full-length UmuD is expressed as a 139-amino-acid protein, which eventually cleaves its N-terminal 24 amino acids to form UmuD'. The N-terminal arms of UmuD are dynamic and contain recognition sites for multiple partner proteins. Cleavage of UmuD to UmuD' dramatically affects the function of the protein and activates UmuC for translesion synthesis (TLS) by forming DNA Polymerase V. To probe the roles of the N-terminal arms in the cellular functions of the umuD gene products, we constructed additional N-terminal truncated versions of UmuD: UmuD 8 (UmuD Δ1-7) and UmuD 18 (UmuD Δ1-17). We found that the loss of just the N-terminal seven (7) amino acids of UmuD results in changes in conformation of the N-terminal arms, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling. UmuD 8 is cleaved as efficiently as full-length UmuD in vitro and in vivo, but expression of a plasmid-borne non-cleavable variant of UmuD 8 causes hypersensitivity to UV irradiation, which we determined is the result of a copy-number effect. UmuD 18 does not cleave to form UmuD', but confers resistance to UV radiation. Moreover, removal of the N-terminal seven residues of UmuD maintained its interactions with the alpha polymerase subunit of DNA polymerase III as well as its ability to disrupt interactions between alpha and the beta processivity clamp, whereas deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues resulted in decreases in binding to alpha and in the ability to disrupt the alpha-beta interaction. We find that UmuD 8 mimics full-length UmuD in many respects, whereas UmuD 18 lacks a number of functions characteristic of UmuD.

  14. Altering the N-terminal arms of the polymerase manager protein UmuD modulates protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiuying; Budil, David E.

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells that are exposed to DNA damaging agents invoke the SOS response that involves expression of the umuD gene products, along with more than 50 other genes. Full-length UmuD is expressed as a 139-amino-acid protein, which eventually cleaves its N-terminal 24 amino acids to form UmuD′. The N-terminal arms of UmuD are dynamic and contain recognition sites for multiple partner proteins. Cleavage of UmuD to UmuD′ dramatically affects the function of the protein and activates UmuC for translesion synthesis (TLS) by forming DNA Polymerase V. To probe the roles of the N-terminal arms in the cellular functions of the umuD gene products, we constructed additional N-terminal truncated versions of UmuD: UmuD 8 (UmuD Δ1–7) and UmuD 18 (UmuD Δ1–17). We found that the loss of just the N-terminal seven (7) amino acids of UmuD results in changes in conformation of the N-terminal arms, as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling. UmuD 8 is cleaved as efficiently as full-length UmuD in vitro and in vivo, but expression of a plasmid-borne non-cleavable variant of UmuD 8 causes hypersensitivity to UV irradiation, which we determined is the result of a copy-number effect. UmuD 18 does not cleave to form UmuDʹ, but confers resistance to UV radiation. Moreover, removal of the N-terminal seven residues of UmuD maintained its interactions with the alpha polymerase subunit of DNA polymerase III as well as its ability to disrupt interactions between alpha and the beta processivity clamp, whereas deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues resulted in decreases in binding to alpha and in the ability to disrupt the alpha-beta interaction. We find that UmuD 8 mimics full-length UmuD in many respects, whereas UmuD 18 lacks a number of functions characteristic of UmuD. PMID:28273172

  15. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del; Wall, Jonathan S.; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L.; Pérez Carreón, Julio I.; and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  16. PURIFICATION AND N-TERMINAL ANALYSES OF ALGAL BILIPROTEINS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    R-, B- and C-phycoerythrins and R- and C- phycocyanins were isolated and purified on a preparative scale by calcium phosphate chromatography, ammonium...of C-phycoerythrin (mol.wt. 226 000). Threonine (1 residue) is N-terminal in C- phycocyanin (mol.wt. 138 000), and both threonine (about 1.3 residues...and methionine (5 residues) are N-terminal in R- phycocyanin (mol.wt. 273 000). Results suggest that the apoproteins of the various phycoerythrins are

  17. The proteolytic YB-1 fragment interacts with DNA repair machinery and enhances survival during DNA damaging stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ekaterina R; Selyutina, Anastasia A; Buldakov, Ilya A; Evdokimova, Valentina; Ovchinnikov, Lev P; Sorokin, Alexey V

    2013-01-01

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein whose regulatory effect on many DNA and RNA-dependent events is determined by its localization in the cell. We have shown previously that YB-1 is cleaved by 20S proteasome between E219 and G220, and the truncated N-terminal YB-1 fragment accumulates in the nuclei of cells treated with DNA damaging drugs. We proposed that appearance of truncated YB-1 in the nucleus may predict multiple drug resistance. Here, we compared functional activities of the full-length and truncated YB-1 proteins and showed that the truncated form was more efficient in protecting cells against doxorubicin treatment. Both forms of YB-1 induced changes in expression of various genes without affecting those responsible for drug resistance. Interestingly, although YB-1 cleavage did not significantly affect its DNA binding properties, truncated YB-1 was detected in complexes with Mre11 and Rad50 under genotoxic stress conditions. We conclude that both full-length and truncated YB-1 are capable of protecting cells against DNA damaging agents, and the truncated form may have an additional function in DNA repair. PMID:24107631

  18. Bioinformatics analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae N-terminal proteome provides evidence of alternative translation initiation and post-translational N-terminal acetylation.

    PubMed

    Helsens, Kenny; Van Damme, Petra; Degroeve, Sven; Martens, Lennart; Arnesen, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2011-08-05

    Initiation of protein translation is a well-studied fundamental process, albeit high-throughput and more comprehensive determination of the exact translation initiation sites (TIS) was only recently made possible following the introduction of positional proteomics techniques that target protein N-termini. Precise translation initiation is of crucial importance, as truncated or extended proteins might fold, function, and locate erroneously. Still, as already shown for some proteins, alternative translation initiation can also serve as a regulatory mechanism. By applying N-terminal COFRADIC (combined fractional diagonal chromatography), we here isolated N-terminal peptides of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome and analyzed both annotated and alternative TIS. We analyzed this N-terminome of S. cerevisiae which resulted in the identification of 650 unique N-terminal peptides corresponding to database annotated TIS. Furthermore, 56 unique N(α)-acetylated peptides were identified that suggest alternative TIS (MS/MS-based), while MS-based evidence of N(α)-acetylation led to an additional 33 such peptides. To improve the overall sensitivity of the analysis, we also included the 5' UTR (untranslated region) in-frame translations together with the yeast protein sequences in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. To ensure the quality of the individual peptide identifications, peptide-to-spectrum matches were only accepted at a 99% probability threshold and were subsequently analyzed in detail by the Peptizer tool to automatically ascertain their compliance with several expert criteria. Furthermore, we have also identified 60 MS/MS-based and 117 MS-based N(α)-acetylated peptides that point to N(α)-acetylation as a post-translational modification since these peptides did not start nor were preceded (in their corresponding protein sequence) by a methionine residue. Next, we evaluated consensus sequence features of nucleic acids and amino acids across each of these groups of peptides and

  19. N-terminal modification of proteins with o-aminophenols.

    PubMed

    Obermeyer, Allie C; Jarman, John B; Francis, Matthew B

    2014-07-09

    The synthetic modification of proteins plays an important role in chemical biology and biomaterials science. These fields provide a constant need for chemical tools that can introduce new functionality in specific locations on protein surfaces. In this work, an oxidative strategy is demonstrated for the efficient modification of N-terminal residues on peptides and N-terminal proline residues on proteins. The strategy uses o-aminophenols or o-catechols that are oxidized to active coupling species in situ using potassium ferricyanide. Peptide screening results have revealed that many N-terminal amino acids can participate in this reaction, and that proline residues are particularly reactive. When applied to protein substrates, the reaction shows a stronger requirement for the proline group. Key advantages of the reaction include its fast second-order kinetics and ability to achieve site-selective modification in a single step using low concentrations of reagent. Although free cysteines are also modified by the coupling reaction, they can be protected through disulfide formation and then liberated after N-terminal coupling is complete. This allows access to doubly functionalized bioconjugates that can be difficult to access using other methods.

  20. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Wall, Jonathan S; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L; Pérez Carreón, Julio I; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián; Fernández-Velasco, D Alejandro

    2014-01-10

    It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V(L)) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V(L) protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  1. Recombinant N-Terminal Slit2 Inhibits TGF-β-Induced Fibroblast Activation and Renal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Darren A; Huang, Yi-Wei; Liu, Guang-Ying; Patel, Sajedabanu; Fang, Fei; Zhou, Joyce; Thai, Kerri; Sidiqi, Ahmad; Szeto, Stephen G; Chan, Lauren; Lu, Mingliang; He, Xiaolin; John, Rohan; Gilbert, Richard E; Scholey, James W; Robinson, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Fibrosis and inflammation are closely intertwined injury pathways present in nearly all forms of CKD for which few safe and effective therapies exist. Slit glycoproteins signaling through Roundabout (Robo) receptors have been described to have anti-inflammatory effects through regulation of leukocyte cytoskeletal organization. Notably, cytoskeletal reorganization is also required for fibroblast responses to TGF-β Here, we examined whether Slit2 also controls TGF-β-induced renal fibrosis. In cultured renal fibroblasts, which we found to express Slit2 and Robo-1, the bioactive N-terminal fragment of Slit2 inhibited TGF-β-induced collagen synthesis, actin cytoskeletal reorganization, and Smad2/3 transcriptional activity, but the inactive C-terminal fragment of Slit2 did not. In mouse models of postischemic renal fibrosis and obstructive uropathy, treatment with N-terminal Slit2 before or after injury inhibited the development of renal fibrosis and preserved renal function, whereas the C-terminal Slit2 had no effect. Our data suggest that administration of recombinant Slit2 may be a new treatment strategy to arrest chronic injury progression after ischemic and obstructive renal insults by not only attenuating inflammation but also, directly inhibiting renal fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  3. Membrane permeabilization of the African horse sickness virus VP5 protein is mediated by two N-terminal amphipathic α-helices.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Liesel; Huismans, Henk; Theron, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    The VP5 outer capsid protein of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is cytotoxic when expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells. Secondary structure analysis of the VP5 amino acid sequence of AHSV-9 identified two N-terminal amphipathic α-helices within the first 43 amino acids. Baculovirus expression of N- and C-terminal truncated VP5 proteins in Sf-9 cells indicated that the N-terminal 43 amino acids correlated with low levels of protein expression and with increased membrane permeabilization and cytotoxicity. Exogenous addition of chemically synthesized VP5 peptides indicated that both N-terminal amphipathic α-helices are required for membrane permeabilization of Sf-9 cells. These findings suggest that AHSV VP5 is a membrane-destabilizing protein.

  4. Functional characterization of a special thermophilic multifunctional amylase OPMA-N and its N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Zhu, Xuejun; Li, Yanfei; Cao, Hao; Zhang, Yingjiu

    2011-04-01

    A gene encoding a special thermophilic multifunctional amylase OPMA-N was cloned from Bacillus sp. ZW2531-1. OPMA-N has an additional 124-residue N-terminal domain compared with typical amylases and forms a relatively independent domain with a β-pleated sheet and random coil structure. Here we reported an unusual substrate and product specificities of OPMA-N and the impact of the additional N-terminal domain (1-124 aa) on the function and properties of OPMA-N. Both OPMA-N (12.82 U/mg) and its N-terminal domain-truncated ΔOPMA-N (12.55 U/mg) only degraded starch to produce oligosaccharides including maltose, maltotriose, isomaltotriose, and isomaltotetraose, but not to produce glucose. Therefore, the N-terminal domain did not determine its substrate and product specificities that were probably regulated by its C-terminal β-pleated sheet structure. However, the N-terminal domain of OPMA-N seemed to modulate its catalytic feature, leading to the production of more isomaltotriose and less maltose, and it seemed to contribute to OPMA-N's thermostability since OPMA-N showed higher activity than ΔOPMA-N in a temperature range from 40 to 80°C and the half-life (t(1/2)) was 5 h for OPMA-N and 2 h for ΔOPMA-N at 60°C. Both OPMA-N and ΔOPMA-N were Ca(2+)-independent, but their activities could be influenced by Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), EDTA, SDS (1 mM), or Triton-X100 (1%). Kinetic analysis and starch-adsorption assay indicated that the N-terminal domain of OPMA-N could increase the OPMA-N-starch binding and subsequently increase the catalytic efficiency of OPMA-N for starch. In particular, the N-terminal domain of OPMA-N did not determine its oligomerization, because both OPMA-N and ΔOPMA-N could exist in the forms of monomer, homodimer, and homooligomer at the same time.

  5. Oxidative stress-mediated N-terminal protein modifications and MS-based approaches for N-terminal proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2016-02-01

    The N-termini of peptides and proteins can be subjected to highly diverse modifications, including acetylation, myristoylation, pyroglutamylation, and epimerization. These modifications affect protein stability, localization, and activity as well as alter the chemical properties of the N-terminus. Oxidative stress is known to induce the direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and peptide backbones in proteins. Alternatively, polyunsaturated fatty acids can be oxidized to lipid hydroperoxides, which further decompose to form highly reactive aldehydes such as 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE) and 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE). ONE and HNE modify various amino acid residues and induce protein cross-linking. However, there have been few studies on oxidative stress-mediated N-terminal modifications and the resulting functional changes. Our recent studies have reported several novel N-terminal modifications that result in the formation of α-ketoamide, transamination, cyclization, and epimerization. These novel N-terminal modifications are the focus of this review. We also outline recent advances in approaches for N-terminal analysis, which have been developed over the last several decades. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glycosylations and truncations of functional cereal phytases expressed and secreted by Pichia pastoris documented by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Giuseppe; Jørgensen, Malene; Welinder, Karen Gjesing; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2012-03-01

    Cereal purple acid phosphatase-type phytases, PAPhy, play an essential role in making phosphate accessible to mammalian digestion and reducing the environmental impact of manure. Studying the potential of PAPhy requires easy access to the enzymes. For that purpose wheat and barley isophytases have been expressed in Pichia pastoris from constructs encoding the alpha-mating factor at the N-termini and a His₆ tag before the stop codon in all constructs. A protein chemical study of a C-terminally truncated recombinant wheat phytase, r-TaPAPhy_b2, was carried out to clarifying the posttranslational processing of proteins secreted from P. pastoris. Extensive mass spectrometric sequencing of tryptic, chymotryptic and AspN derived peptides of both the native and endoH deglycosylated forms showed: (i) All mating factor derived sequence had been removed and further unspecific proteolysis left highly heterogeneous N-terminal variant forms of r-TaPAPhy; (ii) The His₆ tag had been retained or slightly truncated; (iii) All seven potential N-glycan sites were glycosylated except for two sites which were partially glycosylated by ca. 90% and 30%; (iv) Among the nine cysteine residues of this phytase, the most N-terminal residue is free, whereas the remaining eight appear to be disulfide bonded. It is noteworthy that already the first step in ESI-MS/MS sequencing had fragmented the hyper glycosylated peptides into free Z, Y and X mass spectrometric glycan fragments attached to the peptide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The N-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A signals to nuclear localization of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Gomes, Marcelo D.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2007-10-19

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a ubiquitous protein of eukaryotic and archaeal organisms which undergoes hypusination, a unique post-translational modification. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against murine eIF5A, which in immunocytochemical assays in B16-F10 cells revealed that the endogenous protein is preferentially localized to the nuclear region. We therefore analyzed possible structural features present in eIF5A proteins that could be responsible for that characteristic. Multiple sequence alignment analysis of eIF5A proteins from different eukaryotic and archaeal organisms showed that the former sequences have an extended N-terminal segment. We have then performed in silico prediction analyses and constructed different truncated forms of murine eIF5A to verify any possible role that the N-terminal extension might have in determining the subcellular localization of the eIF5A in eukaryotic organisms. Our results indicate that the N-terminal extension of the eukaryotic eIF5A contributes in signaling this protein to nuclear localization, despite of bearing no structural similarity with classical nuclear localization signals.

  8. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186

  9. Miro's N-terminal GTPase domain is required for transport of mitochondria into axons and dendrites.

    PubMed

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J; Wellington, Andrea J; Sangston, Ryan M; Gonzalez, Migdalia; Zinsmaier, Konrad E

    2015-04-08

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state.

  10. Feeding truncated heat shock protein 70s protect Artemia franciscana against virulent Vibrio campbellii challenge.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Shihao, Li; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are highly conserved in evolution, leading to striking similarities in structure and composition between eukaryotic Hsp70s and their homologs in prokaryotes. The eukaryotic Hsp70 like the DnaK (Escherichia coli equivalent Hsp70) protein, consist of three functionally distinct domains: an N-terminal 44-kDa ATPase portion, an 18-kDa peptide-binding domain and a C-terminal 10-kDa fragment. Previously, the amino acid sequence of eukaryotic (the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana) Hsp70 and DnaK proteins were shown to share a high degree of homology, particularly in the peptide-binding domain (59.6%, the putative innate immunity-activating portion) compared to the N-terminal ATPase (48.8%) and the C-terminal lid domains (19.4%). Next to this remarkable conservation, these proteins have been shown to generate protective immunity in Artemia against pathogenic Vibrio campbellii. This study, aimed to unravel the Vibrio-protective domain of Hsp70s in vivo, demonstrated that gnotobiotically cultured Artemia fed with recombinant C-terminal fragment (containing the conserved peptide binding domain) of Artemia Hsp70 or DnaK protein were well protected against subsequent Vibrio challenge. In addition, the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system, at both mRNA and protein activity levels, was also markedly induced by these truncated proteins, suggesting epitope(s) responsible for priming the proPO system and presumably other immune-related genes, consequently boosting Artemia survival upon challenge with V. campbellii, might be located within this conserved region of the peptide binding domain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  12. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  13. A noncanonical PWI domain in the N-terminal helicase-associated region of the spliceosomal Brr2 protein.

    PubMed

    Absmeier, Eva; Rosenberger, Leonie; Apelt, Luise; Becke, Christian; Santos, Karine F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-04-01

    The spliceosomal RNA helicase Brr2 is required for the assembly of a catalytically active spliceosome on a messenger RNA precursor. Brr2 exhibits an unusual organization with tandem helicase units, each comprising dual RecA-like domains and a Sec63 homology unit, preceded by a more than 400-residue N-terminal helicase-associated region. Whereas recent crystal structures have provided insights into the molecular architecture and regulation of the Brr2 helicase region, little is known about the structural organization and function of its N-terminal part. Here, a near-atomic resolution crystal structure of a PWI-like domain that resides in the N-terminal region of Chaetomium thermophilum Brr2 is presented. CD spectroscopic studies suggested that this domain is conserved in the yeast and human Brr2 orthologues. Although canonical PWI domains act as low-specificity nucleic acid-binding domains, no significant affinity of the unusual PWI domain of Brr2 for a broad spectrum of DNAs and RNAs was detected in band-shift assays. Consistently, the C. thermophilum Brr2 PWI-like domain, in the conformation seen in the present crystal structure, lacks an expanded positively charged surface patch as observed in at least one canonical, nucleic acid-binding PWI domain. Instead, in a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screen against human spliceosomal proteins, fragments of the N-terminal region of human Brr2 were found to interact with several other spliceosomal proteins. At least one of these interactions, with the Prp19 complex protein SPF27, depended on the presence of the PWI-like domain. The results suggest that the N-terminal region of Brr2 serves as a versatile protein-protein interaction platform in the spliceosome and that some interactions require or are reinforced by the PWI-like domain.

  14. Regulation of limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 in tumor via acetylation and its role in cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bhakat, Kishor K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Adeniyi, Victor F.; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Bellot, Larry J.; Feng, Dan; Mantha, Anil K.; Sinha, Mala; Qiu, Suimin; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1), a ubiquitous and multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the repair of both endogenous and drug-induced DNA damages in the genome. Unlike its E.coli counterpart Xth, mammalian APE1 has a unique N-terminal domain and possesses both DNA damage repair and transcriptional regulatory functions. Although the overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and the association of APE1 expression with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis are well documented, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that alter APE1 functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show the presence of full-length APE1 and N-terminal truncated isoforms of APE1 in tumor tissue samples of various cancer types. However, primary tumor tissue has higher levels of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) as well as full-length APE1 compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue. We found that APE1 is proteolytically cleaved by an unknown serine protease at its N-terminus following residue lysine (Lys) Lys6 and/or Lys7 and after Lys27 and Lys31 or Lys32. Acetylation of these Lys residues in APE1 prevents this proteolysis. The N-terminal domain of APE1 and its acetylation are required for modulation of the expression of hundreds of genes. Importantly, we found that AcAPE1 is essential for sustained cell proliferation. Together, our study demonstrates that increased acetylation levels of APE1 in tumor cells inhibit the limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 and thereby maintain the functions of APE1 to promote tumor cells' sustained proliferation and survival. PMID:26981776

  15. Functional Interrogation of the N-Terminal Lid of MDMX in p53 Binding via Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xishan; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-01-01

    The homologous proteins MDM2 and MDMX negatively regulate the tumor suppressor protein p53 by antagonizing p53 transactivation activity and targeting p53 for degradation. MDM2 and MDMX bind to p53 via N-terminal p53-binding domains to control the level of p53. The N-terminal regions of MDM2 and MDMX are modified in vivo under stressed conditions, suggesting that modifications to MDM2/MDMX also may affect the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction. Ample evidence suggests that the MDM2 lid (residues 1-24) is partially structured and significantly reduces its binding affinity with p53 several fold. Since MDM2 and MDMX possess very similar p53-binding domains but different lids, however, the function of the N-terminal lid of MDMX still remains poorly understood. Using a native chemical ligation technique, the p53-binding domain of MDMX, (1-108)MDMX, and its N-terminal lid (residues 1-23) truncated analogue (24-108)MDMX were chemically synthesized. We comparatively characterized their structures by circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and measured their binding affinities with a panel of p53-derived peptide ligands by fluorescence polarization and surface plasmon resonance assays. Our results indicate that, as opposed to the lid of MDM2, the lid of MDMX has little effect on p53-binding, adopts no structural conformation, and has rare auto-inhibitory function. Different lid modifications of MDM2 and MDMX are functionally different with respect to p53 binding, which should be considered when designing dual specific inhibitors of MDM2 and MDMX.

  16. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Ksiazek, Dorota; Brandstetter, Hans; Israel, Lars; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Katchalova, Galina; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Bartunik, Hans D; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2003-09-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are widely distributed and highly conserved proteins that regulate actin remodeling in response to cellular signals. The N termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C termini bind to G-actin and thereby alter the dynamic rearrangements of the microfilament system. We report here the X-ray structure of the core of the N-terminal domain of the CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum, which comprises residues 51-226, determined by a combination of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS). The overall structure of this fragment is an alpha helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices. Results from gel filtration and crosslinking experiments for CAP(1-226), CAP(255-464), and the full-length protein, together with the CAP N-terminal domain structure and the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, provide evidence that the functional structure of CAP is multimeric.

  17. 157 nm photodissociation of dipeptide ions containing N-terminal arginine.

    PubMed

    Webber, Nathaniel; He, Yi; Reilly, James P

    2014-02-01

    Twenty singly-charged dipeptide ions with N-terminal arginine were photodissociated using 157 nm light in both a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer and a MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometer. Analogous to previous work on dipeptides containing C-terminal arginine, this set of samples enabled insights into the photofragmentation propensities associated with individual residues. In addition to familiar products such as a-, d-, and immonium ions, m2 and m2+13 ions were also observed. Certain side chains tended to cleave between their β and γ carbons without necessarily forming d- or w-type ions, and a few other ions were produced by the high-energy fragmentation of multiple bonds.

  18. Transglutaminase 5 is acetylated at the N-terminal end.

    PubMed

    Rufini, A; Vilbois, F; Paradisi, A; Oddi, S; Tartaglione, R; Leta, A; Bagetta, G; Guerrieri, P; Finazzi-Agro', A; Melino, G; Candi, E

    2004-07-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) are calcium-dependent enzymes that catalyse cross-linking between proteins by acyl transfer reaction; they are involved in many biological processes including coagulation, differentiation, and tissue repair. Transglutaminase 5 was originally cloned from keratinocytes, and a partial biochemical characterisation showed its involvement in skin differentiation, in parallel to TGase 1 and TGase 3. Here, we demonstrate, by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry that TGase 5 is acetylated at the N-terminal end. Moreover, in situ measurement of TGase activity shows that endogenous TGase 5 is active upon treatment with phorbol acetate, and the enzyme co-localises with vimentin intermediate filaments.

  19. Micellar environments induce structuring of the N-terminal tail of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Renner, Christian; Fiori, Stella; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Landgraf, Dirk; Deluca, Dominga; Mentler, Matthias; Grantner, Klaus; Parak, Fritz G; Kretzschmar, Hans; Moroder, Luis

    2004-03-01

    In the physiological form, the prion protein is a glycoprotein tethered to the cell surface via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, consisting of a largely alpha-helical globular C-terminal domain and an unstructured N-terminal portion. This unstructured part of the protein contains four successive octapeptide repeats, which were shown to bind up to four Cu(2+) ions in a cooperative manner. To mimic the location of the protein on the cell membrane and to analyze possible structuring effects of the lipid/water interface, the conformational preferences of a single octapeptide repeat and its tetrameric form, as well of the fragment 92-113, proposed as an additional copper binding site, were comparatively analyzed in aqueous and dodecylphosphocholine micellar solution as a membrane mimetic. While for the downstream fragment 92-113 no conformational effects were detectable in the presence of DPC micelles by CD and NMR, both the single octapeptide repeat and, in an even more pronounced manner, its tetrameric form are restricted into well-defined conformations. Because of the repetitive character of the rigid structural subdomain in the tetrarepeat molecule, the spatial arrangement of these identical motifs could not be resolved by NMR analysis. However, the polyvalent nature of the repetitive subunits leads to a remarkably enhanced interaction with the micelles, which is not detectably affected by copper complexation. These results strongly suggest interactions of the cellular form of PrP (PrP(c)) N-terminal tail with the cell membrane surface at least in the octapeptide repeat region with preorganization of these sequence portions for copper complexation. There are sufficient experimental facts known that support a physiological role of copper complexation by the octapeptide repeat region of PrP(c) such as a copper-buffering role of the PrP(c) protein on the extracellular surface. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Extended Transmembrane Orai1 N-terminal (ETON) Region Combines Binding Interface and Gate for Orai1 Activation by STIM1*♦

    PubMed Central

    Derler, Isabella; Plenk, Peter; Fahrner, Marc; Muik, Martin; Jardin, Isaac; Schindl, Rainer; Gruber, Hermann J.; Groschner, Klaus; Romanin, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    STIM1 and Orai1 represent the two molecular key components of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels. Their activation involves STIM1 C terminus coupling to both the N terminus and the C terminus of Orai. Here we focused on the extended transmembrane Orai1 N-terminal (ETON, aa73–90) region, conserved among the Orai family forming an elongated helix of TM1 as recently shown by x-ray crystallography. To identify “hot spot” residues in the ETON binding interface for STIM1 interaction, numerous Orai1 constructs with N-terminal truncations or point mutations within the ETON region were generated. N-terminal truncations of the first four residues of the ETON region or beyond completely abolished STIM1-dependent Orai1 function. Loss of Orai1 function resulted from neither an impairment of plasma membrane targeting nor pore damage, but from a disruption of STIM1 interaction. In a complementary approach, we monitored STIM1-Orai interaction via Orai1 V102A by determining restored Ca2+ selectivity as a consequence of STIM1 coupling. Orai1 N-terminal truncations that led to a loss of function consistently failed to restore Ca2+ selectivity of Orai1 V102A in the presence of STIM1, demonstrating impairment of STIM1 binding. Hence, the major portion of the ETON region (aa76–90) is essential for STIM1 binding and Orai1 activation. Mutagenesis within the ETON region revealed several hydrophobic and basic hot spot residues that appear to control STIM1 coupling to Orai1 in a concerted manner. Moreover, we identified two basic residues, which protrude into the elongated pore to redound to Orai1 gating. We suggest that several hot spot residues in the ETON region contribute in aggregate to the binding of STIM1, which in turn is coupled to a conformational reorientation of the gate. PMID:23943619

  1. N-terminal sequence analysis of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Reim, D F; Speicher, D W

    2001-05-01

    Amino-terminal (N-terminal) sequence analysis is used to identify the order of amino acids of proteins or peptides, starting at their N-terminal end. This unit describes the sequence analysis of protein or peptide samples in solution or bound to PVDF membranes using a Perkin-Elmer Procise Sequencer. Sequence analysis of protein or peptide samples in solution or bound to PVDF membranes using a Hewlett-Packard Model G1005A sequencer is also described. Methods are provided for optimizing separation of PTH amino acid derivatives on Perkin-Elmer instruments and for increasing the proportion of sample injected onto the PTH analyzer on older Perkin-Elmer instruments by installing a modified sample loop. The amount of data obtained from a single sequencer run is substantial, and careful interpretation of this data by an experienced scientist familiar with the current operation performance of the instrument used for this analysis is critically important. A discussion of data interpretation is therefore provided. Finally, discussion of optimization of sequencer performance as well as possible solutions to frequently encountered problems is included.

  2. A Truncated Cauchy Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadarajah, Saralees; Kotz, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    A truncated version of the Cauchy distribution is introduced. Unlike the Cauchy distribution, this possesses finite moments of all orders and could therefore be a better model for certain practical situations. One such situation in finance is discussed. Explicit expressions for the moments of the truncated distribution are also derived.

  3. Serum Amyloid A Truncations in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Hussein N.; Trenchevska, Olgica; He, Huijuan; Borges, Chad R.; Nedelkov, Dobrin; Mack, Wendy; Kono, Naoko; Koska, Juraj; Reaven, Peter D.; Nelson, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    Serum Amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase protein complex consisting of several abundant isoforms. The N- terminus of SAA is critical to its function in amyloid formation. SAA is frequently truncated, either missing an arginine or an arginine-serine dipeptide, resulting in isoforms that may influence the capacity to form amyloid. However, the relative abundance of truncated SAA in diabetes and chronic kidney disease is not known. Methods Using mass spectrometric immunoassay, the abundance of SAA truncations relative to the native variants was examined in plasma of 91 participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease and 69 participants without diabetes. Results The ratio of SAA 1.1 (missing N-terminal arginine) to native SAA 1.1 was lower in diabetics compared to non-diabetics (p = 0.004), and in males compared to females (p<0.001). This ratio was negatively correlated with glycated hemoglobin (r = −0.32, p<0.001) and triglyceride concentrations (r = −0.37, p<0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.32, p<0.001). Conclusion The relative abundance of the N-terminal arginine truncation of SAA1.1 is significantly decreased in diabetes and negatively correlates with measures of glycemic and lipid control. PMID:25607823

  4. N-terminal Half of Transportin SR2 Interacts with HIV Integrase.

    PubMed

    Tsirkone, Vicky G; Blokken, Jolien; De Wit, Flore; Breemans, Jolien; De Houwer, Stéphanie; Debyser, Zeger; Christ, Frauke; Strelkov, Sergei V

    2017-03-29

    The karyopherin transportin SR2 (TRN-SR2, TNPO3) is responsible for shuttling specific cargoes such as serine/arginine-rich splicing factors from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. This protein plays a key role in HIV infection by facilitating the nuclear import of the pre-integration complex (PIC) which contains the viral DNA as well as several cellular and HIV proteins including the integrase. The process of nuclear import is considered to be the bottleneck of the viral replication cycle and therefore represents a promising target for anti-HIV drug design. Previous studies have demonstrated that the direct interaction between TRN-SR2 and HIV integrase predominantly involves the catalytic core domain (CCD) and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the latter. We aimed at providing a detailed molecular view of this interaction through a biochemical characterization of the respective protein complex. Size-exclusion chromatography was used to characterize the interaction of TRN-SR2 with a truncated variant of HIV-1 integrase including both the CCD and CTD. These experiments indicate that one TRN-SR2 molecule can specifically bind one CCD-CTD dimer. Next, the regions of the solenoid-like TRN-SR2 molecule that are involved in the interaction with integrase were identified using AlphaScreen binding assays, revealing that the integrase interacts with the N-terminal half of TRN-SR2 principally through the HEAT repeats 4, 10 and 11. Combining these results with small-angle X-ray scattering data for the complex of TRN-SR2 with truncated integrase we propose a molecular model of the complex. We speculate that nuclear import of the PIC may proceed concurrently with the normal nuclear transport.

  5. UNIT 11.10 N-Terminal Sequence Analysis of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Kaye D.; Gorman, Nicole; Speicher, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Automated N-terminal sequence analysis involves a series of chemical reactions that derivatize and remove one amino acid at a time from the N-terminal of purified peptides or intact proteins. At least several pmoles of a purified protein or 10 to 20 pmoles of a purified peptide with an unmodified N-terminal is required in order to obtain useful sequence information. In recent years the demand for N-terminal sequencing has decreased substantially as some applications for protein identification and characterization can now be more effectively performed using mass spectrometry. However, N-terminal sequencing remains the method of choice for verifying the N-terminal boundary of recombinant proteins, determining the N-terminal of protease-resistant domains, identifying proteins isolated from species where most of the genome has not yet been sequenced, and mapping modified or crosslinked sites in proteins that prove to be refractory to analysis by mass spectrometry. PMID:18429102

  6. N-terminal domain of PB1-F2 protein of influenza A virus can fold into amyloid-like oligomers and damage cholesterol and cardiolipid containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Ajjaji, Dalila; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Mazerat, Sandra; Chevalier, Christophe; Vidic, Jasmina

    2016-08-12

    PB1-F2 protein is a factor of virulence of influenza A viruses which increases the mortality and morbidity associated with infection. Most seasonal H1N1 Influenza A viruses express nowadays a truncated version of PB1-F2. Here we show that truncation of PB1-F2 modified supramolecular organization of the protein in a membrane-mimicking environment. In addition, full-length PB1-F2(1-90) and C-terminal PB1-F2 domain (53-90), efficiently permeabilized various anionic liposomes while N-terminal domain PB1-F2(1-52) only lysed cholesterol and cardiolipin containing lipid bilayers. These findings suggest that the truncation of PB1-F2 may impact the pathogenicity of a given virus strain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-02-02

    X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

  8. The N-Terminal Residues 43 to 60 Form the Interface for Dopamine Mediated α-Synuclein Dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Su Ling; Hinds, Mark G.; Connor, Andrea R.; Smith, David P.; Illes-Toth, Eva; Pham, Chi L. L.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is a major component of the intracellular inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are a key pathological feature in the brains of Parkinson’s disease patients. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) inhibits the fibrillisation of α-syn into amyloid, and promotes α-syn aggregation into SDS-stable soluble oligomers. While this inhibition of amyloid formation requires the oxidation of both DA and the methionines in α-syn, the molecular basis for these processes is still unclear. This study sought to define the protein sequences required for the generation of oligomers. We tested N- (α-syn residues 43–140) and C-terminally (1–95) truncated α-syn, and found that similar to full-length protein both truncated species formed soluble DA:α-syn oligomers, albeit 1–95 had a different profile. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and the N-terminally truncated α-syn 43–140 protein, we analysed the structural characteristics of the DA:α-syn 43–140 dimer and α-syn 43–140 monomer and found the dimerisation interface encompassed residues 43 to 60. Narrowing the interface to this small region will help define the mechanism by which DA mediates the formation of SDS-stable soluble DA:α-syn oligomers. PMID:25679387

  9. Structure of the Tropomyosin Overlap Complex from Chicken Smooth Muscle: Insight into the Diversity of N-Terminal Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Jeremiah; Klenchin, Vadim A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2010-09-08

    Tropomyosin is a stereotypical {alpha}-helical coiled coil that polymerizes to form a filamentous macromolecular assembly that lies on the surface of F-actin. The interaction between the C-terminal and N-terminal segments on adjacent molecules is known as the overlap region. We report here two X-ray structures of the chicken smooth muscle tropomyosin overlap complex. A novel approach was used to stabilize the C-terminal and N-terminal fragments. Globular domains from both the human DNA ligase binding protein XRCC4 and bacteriophage {phi}29 scaffolding protein Gp7 were fused to 37 and 28 C-terminal amino acid residues of tropomyosin, respectively, whereas the 29 N-terminal amino acids of tropomyosin were fused to the C-terminal helix bundle of microtubule binding protein EB1. The structures of both the XRCC4 and Gp7 fusion proteins complexed with the N-terminal EB1 fusion contain a very similar helix bundle in the overlap region that encompasses {approx}15 residues. The C-terminal coiled coil opens to allow formation of the helix bundle, which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These structures are similar to that observed in the NMR structure of the rat skeletal overlap complex [Greenfield, N. J., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 364, 80-96]. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal coiled coils of smooth muscle tropomyosin show significant curvature, which differs somewhat between the two structures and implies flexibility in the overlap complex, at least in solution. This is likely an important attribute that allows tropomyosin to assemble around the actin filaments. These structures provide a molecular explanation for the role of N-acetylation in the assembly of native tropomyosin.

  10. Crystallized N-terminal domain of influenza virus matrix protein M1 and method of determining and using same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Ming (Inventor); Sha, Bingdong (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix protein, M1, of influenza virus strain A/PR/8/34 has been purified from virions and crystallized. The crystals consist of a stable fragment (18 Kd) of the M1 protein. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the crystals have a space group of P3.sub.t 21 or P3.sub.2 21. Vm calculations showed that there are two monomers in an asymmetric unit. A crystallized N-terminal domain of M1, wherein the N-terminal domain of M1 is crystallized such that the three dimensional structure of the crystallized N-terminal domain of M1 can be determined to a resolution of about 2.1 .ANG. or better, and wherein the three dimensional structure of the uncrystallized N-terminal domain of M1 cannot be determined to a resolution of about 2.1 .ANG. or better. A method of purifying M1 and a method of crystallizing M1. A method of using the three-dimensional crystal structure of M1 to screen for antiviral, influenza virus treating or preventing compounds. A method of using the three-dimensional crystal structure of M1 to screen for improved binding to or inhibition of influenza virus M1. The use of the three-dimensional crystal structure of the M1 protein of influenza virus in the manufacture of an inhibitor of influenza virus M1. The use of the three-dimensional crystal structure of the M1 protein of influenza virus in the screening of candidates for inhibition of influenza virus M1.

  11. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  12. Discovery and mechanistic studies of facile N-terminal Cα-C bond cleavages in the dissociation of tyrosine-containing peptide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoyan; Song, Tao; Xu, Minjie; Lai, Cheuk-Kuen; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia; Chu, Ivan K

    2014-04-24

    Fascinating N-terminal Cα-C bond cleavages in a series of nonbasic tyrosine-containing peptide radical cations have been observed under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), leading to the generation of rarely observed x-type radical fragments, with significant abundances. CID experiments of the radical cations of the alanyltyrosylglycine tripeptide and its analogues suggested that the N-terminal Cα-C bond cleavage, yielding its [x2 + H](•+) radical cation, does not involve an N-terminal α-carbon-centered radical. Theoretical examination of a prototypical radical cation of the alanyltyrosine dipeptide, using density functional theory calculations, suggested that direct N-terminal Cα-C bond cleavage could produce an ion-molecule complex formed between the incipient a1(+) and x1(•) fragments. Subsequent proton transfer from the iminium nitrogen atom in a1(+) to the acyl carbon atom in x1(•) results in the observable [x1 + H](•+). The barriers against this novel Cα-C bond cleavage and the competitive N-Cα bond cleavage, forming the complementary [c1 + 2H](+)/[z1 - H](•+) ion pair, are similar (ca. 16 kcal mol(-1)). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus modeling revealed that [x1 + H](•+) and [c1 + 2H](+) species are formed with comparable rates, in agreement with energy-resolved CID experiments for [AY](•+).

  13. Proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide increases kinesin's velocity both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larráyoz, Ignacio M; Martínez, Alfredo

    2012-04-01

    Intracellular cargo transport relies on microtubules and motor proteins such as kinesins and dyneins. Currently we have ample knowledge of the mechanisms by which motor proteins propel themselves along the microtubules, but little is known about intracellular factors that regulate motor speed. Here we show that proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) increases kinesin velocity and ATP consumption in a dose-dependent manner, using a variety of human kinesins. Structure-activity studies found that the terminal amide of PAMP is required for modulating kinesin activity and that the smallest peptide fragment retaining this role is PAMP₁₂₋₂₀. On the other hand, peptide fragments as small as PAMP₁₈₋₂₀ maintained the ability of delaying tubulin polymerization, another function previously described for PAMP, indicating that these two activities depend on different regions of the molecule. To demonstrate that these observations are also relevant in vivo, hippocampal neurons were isolated from mice lacking the gene coding for PAMP and from wild type littermates. Intravital stains followed by time-lapse microscopy analysis revealed that mitochondrial speed inside neurons lacking PAMP was significantly slower than in cells expressing the peptide. External addition of synthetic PAMP reversed this phenotype in PAMP-null neurons. Besides the obvious implications for better understanding cell biology, these results may be also relevant for the rapidly evolving discipline of nanotechnology because PAMP may be used as an accelerator of nanodevices based on microtubules and motor proteins.

  14. Proteolytic cleavage of ostrich and turkey pancreatic lipases: production of an active N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Fendri, Ahmed; Gargouri, Youssef; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Miled, Nabil

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to check some biochemical and structural properties of ostrich and turkey pancreatic lipases (OPL and TPL, respectively). Limited proteolysis of OPL and TPL was performed in conditions similar to those reported for porcine pancreatic lipase. In the absence of bile salts and colipase, OPL failed to catalyze the hydrolysis of pure tributyrin or efficiently hydrolyze olive oil emulsion. When bile salts and colipase were preincubated with the substrate, the OPL kinetic behavior remained linear for more than 30 minutes. The enzyme presented a penetration power value into an egg phosphatidylcholine monomolecular film that was comparable to that of HPL and lower than that of TPL. Chymotrypsin, trypsin, and thermolysin were able to hydrolyze OPL and TPL in different ways. In both cases, only N-terminal fragments accumulated during the hydrolysis, whereas no C-terminal fragment was obtained in either case. Tryptic cleavage of OPL and TPL completely degraded the enzymes. Nevertheless, chymotryptic attack generated 35-kd and 43-kd forms for TPL and OPL, respectively. Interestingly, the OPL 43-kd form was inactive, whereas the TPL 35-kd protein conserved its lipolytic activity. OPL, TPL, and mammal pancreatic lipases share a high amino acid sequence homology. Further investigations are, however, needed to identify key residues involved in substrate recognition responsible for biochemical differences between the 2 classes of lipases.

  15. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities.

    PubMed

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in I h activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of I h to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  16. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K.; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F.; Meuth, Sven G.; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in Ih activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of Ih to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats. PMID:26578877

  17. Dissecting the Functional Role of the N-Terminal Domain of the Human Small Heat Shock Protein HSPB6

    PubMed Central

    Heirbaut, Michelle; Beelen, Steven; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Weeks, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    HSPB6 is a member of the human small heat shock protein (sHSP) family, a conserved group of molecular chaperones that bind partially unfolded proteins and prevent them from aggregating. In vertebrate sHSPs the poorly structured N-terminal domain has been implicated in both chaperone activity and the formation of higher-order oligomers. These two functionally important properties are likely intertwined at the sequence level, complicating attempts to delineate the regions that define them. Differing from the prototypical α-crystallins human HSPB6 has been shown to only form dimers in solution making it more amendable to explore the determinants of chaperoning activity alone. Using a systematic and iterative deletion strategy, we have extensively investigated the role of the N-terminal domain on the chaperone activity of this sHSP. As determined by size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, most mutants had a dimeric structure closely resembling that of wild-type HSPB6. The chaperone-like activity was tested using three different substrates, whereby no single truncation, except for complete removal of the N-terminal domain, showed full loss of activity, pointing to the presence of multiple sites for binding unfolding proteins. Intriguingly, we found that the stretch encompassing residues 31 to 35, which is nearly fully conserved across vertebrate sHSPs, acts as a negative regulator of activity, as its deletion greatly enhanced chaperoning capability. Further single point mutational analysis revealed an interplay between the highly conserved residues Q31 and F33 in fine-tuning its function. PMID:25157403

  18. A unique glycine-rich motif at the N-terminal region of Bamboo mosaic virus coat protein is required for symptom expression.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ping; Yeh, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Chih-Wei; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2010-07-01

    The coat proteins (CP) of many plant viruses are multifunctional proteins. We used N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis to identify a truncated form of the Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) CP missing the N-terminal 35 amino acids (N35). The N35 region is unique in the potexviruses by its containing a glycine-rich motif (GRM) not present in databases but highly conserved among BaMV isolates. Results from site-directed mutagenesis and deletion mutational analysis showed that loss of this region converted necrotic local lesions to chlorotic local lesions on Chenopodium quinoa leaves. Furthermore, this region is required for successful development of mosaic symptoms on Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but is dispensable for BaMV replication and cell-to-cell and long-distance movement as well as virion assembly. This unique GRM-containing region of BaMV CP may be a symptom determinant in specific hosts.

  19. Identification of an antigenic domain in the N-terminal region of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein that is not common to swine and human HEVs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Lihong; Widén, Frederik; Hsu, Walter H; Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-12-01

    The antigenic domains located in the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein have been characterized. This region shares common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. However, epitopes in the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues have never been reported. In this study, an antigenic domain located between amino acids 23 and 85 was identified by indirect ELISA using the truncated recombinant capsid proteins as coating antigens and anti-avian HEV chicken sera as primary antibodies. In addition, this domain did not react with anti-swine and human HEV sera. These results indicated that the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues of avian HEV capsid protein do not share common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. This finding is important for our understanding of the antigenicity of the avian HEV capsid protein. Furthermore, it has important implications in the selection of viral antigens for serological diagnosis.

  20. N-terminal acetylome analyses and functional insights of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatB

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Petra; Lasa, Marta; Polevoda, Bogdan; Gazquez, Cristina; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Kim, Duk Soo; De Juan-Pardo, Elena; Demeyer, Kimberly; Hole, Kristine; Larrea, Esther; Timmerman, Evy; Prieto, Jesus; Arnesen, Thomas; Sherman, Fred; Gevaert, Kris; Aldabe, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (Nt-acetylation) is an important mediator of protein function, stability, sorting, and localization. Although the responsible enzymes are thought to be fairly well characterized, the lack of identified in vivo substrates, the occurrence of Nt-acetylation substrates displaying yet uncharacterized N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) specificities, and emerging evidence of posttranslational Nt-acetylation, necessitate the use of genetic models and quantitative proteomics. NatB, which targets Met-Glu-, Met-Asp-, and Met-Asn-starting protein N termini, is presumed to Nt-acetylate 15% of all yeast and 18% of all human proteins. We here report on the evolutionary traits of NatB from yeast to human and demonstrate that ectopically expressed hNatB in a yNatB-Δ yeast strain partially complements the natB-Δ phenotypes and partially restores the yNatB Nt-acetylome. Overall, combining quantitative N-terminomics with yeast studies and knockdown of hNatB in human cell lines, led to the unambiguous identification of 180 human and 110 yeast NatB substrates. Interestingly, these substrates included Met-Gln- N-termini, which are thus now classified as in vivo NatB substrates. We also demonstrate the requirement of hNatB activity for maintaining the structure and function of actomyosin fibers and for proper cellular migration. In addition, expression of tropomyosin-1 restored the altered focal adhesions and cellular migration defects observed in hNatB-depleted HeLa cells, indicative for the conserved link between NatB, tropomyosin, and actin cable function from yeast to human. PMID:22814378

  1. N-Terminal Tau Fragments as Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease and Neurotrauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    findings that tau can be released to the CSF at least partly via the exosome pathway (3) and that tau overexpression in neuroblastoma cultures...recruitment of downregulated, AD-associated proteins to exosomes in tau-overexpressing neuroblastoma cells (23). Damage to axon-specific localization

  2. N-terminal structure of maize ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase determines recruitment into different thylakoid membrane complexes.

    PubMed

    Twachtmann, Manuel; Altmann, Bianca; Muraki, Norifumi; Voss, Ingo; Okutani, Satoshi; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu; Hanke, Guy T

    2012-07-01

    To adapt to different light intensities, photosynthetic organisms manipulate the flow of electrons through several alternative pathways at the thylakoid membrane. The enzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) reductase (FNR) has the potential to regulate this electron partitioning because it is integral to most of these electron cascades and can associate with several different membrane complexes. However, the factors controlling relative localization of FNR to different membrane complexes have not yet been established. Maize (Zea mays) contains three chloroplast FNR proteins with totally different membrane association, and we found that these proteins have variable distribution between cells conducting predominantly cyclic electron transport (bundle sheath) and linear electron transport (mesophyll). Here, the crystal structures of all three enzymes were solved, revealing major structural differences at the N-terminal domain and dimer interface. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of maize FNRs as chimeras and truncated proteins showed the N-terminal determines recruitment of FNR to different membrane complexes. In addition, the different maize FNR proteins localized to different thylakoid membrane complexes on expression in Arabidopsis, and analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosystem I absorbance demonstrates the impact of FNR location on photosynthetic electron flow.

  3. N-Terminal Structure of Maize Ferredoxin:NADP+ Reductase Determines Recruitment into Different Thylakoid Membrane Complexes[W

    PubMed Central

    Twachtmann, Manuel; Altmann, Bianca; Muraki, Norifumi; Voss, Ingo; Okutani, Satoshi; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu; Hanke, Guy T.

    2012-01-01

    To adapt to different light intensities, photosynthetic organisms manipulate the flow of electrons through several alternative pathways at the thylakoid membrane. The enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase (FNR) has the potential to regulate this electron partitioning because it is integral to most of these electron cascades and can associate with several different membrane complexes. However, the factors controlling relative localization of FNR to different membrane complexes have not yet been established. Maize (Zea mays) contains three chloroplast FNR proteins with totally different membrane association, and we found that these proteins have variable distribution between cells conducting predominantly cyclic electron transport (bundle sheath) and linear electron transport (mesophyll). Here, the crystal structures of all three enzymes were solved, revealing major structural differences at the N-terminal domain and dimer interface. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of maize FNRs as chimeras and truncated proteins showed the N-terminal determines recruitment of FNR to different membrane complexes. In addition, the different maize FNR proteins localized to different thylakoid membrane complexes on expression in Arabidopsis, and analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence and photosystem I absorbance demonstrates the impact of FNR location on photosynthetic electron flow. PMID:22805436

  4. The two PAN ATPases from Halobacterium display N-terminal heterogeneity and form labile complexes with the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Chamieh, Hala; Guetta, Dorian; Franzetti, Bruno

    2008-04-15

    The PAN (proteasome-activating nucleotidase) proteins from archaea represent homologues of the eukaryotic 26S proteasome regulatory ATPases. In vitro the PAN complex has been previously shown to have a stimulatory effect on the peptidase activities of the 20S core. By using gradient ultracentrifugation we found that, in cellular extracts, the two PAN proteins from Halobacterium do not form stable high-molecular-mass complexes. Only PAN B was found to associate transiently with the 20S proteasome, thus suggesting that the two PAN proteins are not functionally redundant. The PAN B-20S proteasome complexes associate in an ATP-dependent manner and are stabilized upon nucleotide binding. The two PAN proteins were immunodetected in cellular extracts as N-terminal-truncated polypeptides. RNA-mapping experiments and sequence analysis indicated that this process involved transcript heterogeneities and dual translational initiation mechanisms. Taken together, our results suggest that PAN N-terminal modifications and their intracellular dynamics of assembly/association may constitute important determinants of proteolysis regulation.

  5. Amino-Terminal Oriented Mass Spectrometry of Substrates (ATOMS) N-terminal sequencing of proteins and proteolytic cleavage sites by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Alain; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Edman degradation is a long-established technique for N-terminal sequencing of proteins and cleavage fragments. However, for accurate data analysis and amino acid assignments, Edman sequencing proceeds on samples of single proteins only and so lacks high-throughput capabilities. We describe a new method for the high-throughput determination of N-terminal sequences of multiple protein fragments in solution. Proteolytic processing can change the activity of bioactive proteins and also reveal cryptic binding sites and generate proteins with new functions (neoproteins) not found in the parent molecule. For example, extracellular matrix (ECM) protein processing often produces multiple proteolytic fragments with the generation of cryptic binding sites and neoproteins by ECM protein processing being well documented. The exact proteolytic cleavage sites need to be identified to fully understand the functions of the cleavage fragments and biological roles of proteases in vivo. However, the identification of cleavage sites in complex high molecular proteins such as those composing the ECM is not trivial. N-terminal microsequencing of proteolytic fragments is the usual method employed, but it suffers from poor resolution of sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and is inefficient at identifying multiple cleavages, requiring preparation of numerous gels or membrane slices for analysis. We recently developed Amino-Terminal Oriented Mass spectrometry of Substrates (ATOMS) to overcome these limitations as a complement for N-terminal sequencing. ATOMS employs isotopic labeling and quantitative tandem mass spectrometry to identify cleavage sites in a fast and accurate manner. We successfully used ATOMS to identify nearly 100 cleavage sites in the ECM proteins laminin and fibronectin. Presented herein is the detailed step-by-step protocol for ATOMS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The N-terminal zinc finger domain of Tgf2 transposase contributes to DNA binding and to transposition activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia-Yun; Hou, Fei; Shen, Xiao-Dan; Du, Xue-Di; Xu, Hai-Li; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Active Hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposable elements are rarely found in vertebrates. Previously, goldfish Tgf2 was found to be an autonomously active vertebrate transposon that is efficient at gene-transfer in teleost fish. However, little is known about Tgf2 functional domains required for transposition. To explore this, we first predicted in silico a zinc finger domain in the N-terminus of full length Tgf2 transposase (L-Tgf2TPase). Two truncated recombinant Tgf2 transposases with deletions in the N-terminal zinc finger domain, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPase, were expressed in bacteria from goldfish cDNAs. Both truncated Tgf2TPases lost their DNA-binding ability in vitro, specifically at the ends of Tgf2 transposon than native L-Tgf2TPase. Consequently, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPases mediated gene transfer in the zebrafish genome in vivo at a significantly (p < 0.01) lower efficiency (21%–25%), in comparison with L-Tgf2TPase (56% efficiency). Compared to L-Tgf2TPase, truncated Tgf2TPases catalyzed imprecise excisions with partial deletion of TE ends and/or plasmid backbone insertion/deletion. The gene integration into the zebrafish genome mediated by truncated Tgf2TPases was imperfect, creating incomplete 8-bp target site duplications at the insertion sites. These results indicate that the zinc finger domain in Tgf2 transposase is involved in binding to Tgf2 terminal sequences, and loss of those domains has effects on TE transposition. PMID:27251101

  7. Structural basis for substrate recognition by the human N-terminal methyltransferase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Cheng; Mao, Yunfei; Tempel, Wolfram; Qin, Su; Li, Li; Loppnau, Peter; Huang, Rong; Min, Jinrong

    2015-11-05

    α-N-terminal methylation represents a highly conserved and prevalent post-translational modification, yet its biological function has remained largely speculative. The recent discovery of α-N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) and its physiological substrates propels the elucidation of a general role of α-N-terminal methylation in mediating DNA-binding ability of the modified proteins. The phenotypes, observed from both NTMT1 knockdown in breast cancer cell lines and knockout mouse models, suggest the potential involvement of α-N-terminal methylation in DNA damage response and cancer development. In this study, we report the first crystal structures of human NTMT1 in complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) and six substrate peptides, respectively, and reveal that NTMT1 contains two characteristic structural elements (a β hairpin and an N-terminal extension) that contribute to its substrate specificity. Our complex structures, coupled with mutagenesis, binding, and enzymatic studies, also present the key elements involved in locking the consensus substrate motif XPK (X indicates any residue type other than D/E) into the catalytic pocket for α-N-terminal methylation and explain why NTMT1 prefers an XPK sequence motif. We propose a catalytic mechanism for α-N-terminal methylation. Overall, this study gives us the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism of α-N-terminal methylation and potentially contributes to the advent of therapeutic agents for human diseases associated with deregulated α-N-terminal methylation.

  8. Kinetic mechanism of protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stacie L; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L; Huang, Rong

    2015-05-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  10. Kinetic Mechanism of Protein N-terminal Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stacie L.; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L.; Huang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  11. Jun N-terminal kinase signaling makes a face

    PubMed Central

    Hursh, Deborah A.; Stultz, Brian G.; Park, Sung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT decapentaplegic (dpp), the Drosophila ortholog of BMP 2/4, directs ventral adult head morphogenesis through expression in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc. This dpp expressing domain exerts effects both on the peripodial epithelium, and the underlying disc proper epithelium. We have uncovered a role for the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway in dpp-mediated ventral head development. JNK activity is required for dpp's action on the disc proper, but in the absence of dpp expression, excessive JNK activity is produced, leading to specific loss of maxillary palps. In this review we outline our hypotheses on how dpp acts by both short range and longer range mechanisms to direct head morphogenesis and speculate on the dual role of JNK signaling in this process. Finally, we describe the regulatory control of dpp expression in the eye-antennal disc, and pose the problem of how the various expression domains of a secreted protein can be targeted to their specific functions. PMID:27384866

  12. Influence of N-terminal residue composition on the structure of proline-containing b2+ ions.

    PubMed

    Gucinski, Ashley C; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Steinmetz, Vincent; Somogyi, Árpád; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2013-02-14

    To probe the structural implications of the proline residue on its characteristic peptide fragmentation patterns, in particular its unusual cleavage at its C-terminus in formation of a b(2) ion in XxxProZzz sequences, the structures of a series of proline-containing b(2)(+) ions were studied by using action infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and fragment ion hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX). Five different Xxx-Pro b(2)(+) ions were studied, with glycine, alanine, isoleucine, valine, or histidine in the N-terminal position. The residues selected feature different sizes, chain lengths, and gas phase basicities to explore whether the structure of the N-terminal residue influences the Xxx-Pro b(2)(+) ion structure. In proteins, the proline side chain-to-backbone attachment causes its peptide bonds to be in the cis conformation more than any other amino acid, although trans is still favored over cis. However, HP is the only b(2)(+) ion studied here that forms the diketopiperazine exclusively. The GP, AP, IP, and VP b(2)(+) ions formed from protonated tripeptide precursors predominantly featured oxazolone structures with small diketopiperazine contributions. In contrast to the b(2)(+) ions generated from tripeptides, synthetic cyclic dipeptides VP and HP were confirmed to have exclusive diketopiperazine structures.

  13. Raman optical activity demonstrates poly(L-proline) II helix in the N-terminal region of the ovine prion protein: implications for function and misfunction.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Ewan W; Gill, Andrew C; Rhie, Alexandre G O; Hope, James; Hecht, Lutz; Nielsen, Kurt; Barron, Laurence D

    2004-10-15

    The aqueous solution structure of the full-length recombinant ovine prion protein PrP(25-233), together with that of the N-terminal truncated version PrP(94-233), have been studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) and ultraviolet circular dichroism (UVCD). A sharp positive band at approximately 1315 cm(-1) characteristic of poly(L-proline) II (PPII) helix that is present in the ROA spectrum of the full-length protein is absent from that of the truncated protein, together with bands characteristic of beta-turns. Although it is not possible similarly to identify PPII helix in the full-length protein directly from its UVCD spectrum, subtraction of the UVCD spectrum of PrP(94-233) from that of PrP(25-233) yields a difference UVCD spectrum also characteristic of PPII structure and very similar to the UVCD spectrum of murine PrP(25-113). These results provide confirmation that a major conformational element in the N-terminal region is PPII helix, but in addition show that the PPII structure is interspersed with beta-turns and that little PPII structure is present in PrP(94-233). A principal component analysis of the ROA data indicates that the alpha-helix and beta-sheet content, located in the structured C-terminal domain, of the full-length and truncated proteins are similar. The flexibility imparted by the high PPII content of the N-terminal domain region may be an essential factor in the function and possibly also the misfunction of prion proteins.

  14. The N-terminal region of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) plays an essential role in regulating its plasma membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se-Eun; Thakkar, Nilay; Oh, Yunseok; Park, Ji Eun; Han, Songhee; Ryoo, Gongmi; Hahn, Hyunggu; Maeng, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young-Ran; Han, Byung Woo; Lee, Wooin

    2017-05-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3) is a major influx transporter mediating the hepatic uptake of various endogenous substrates as well as clinically important drugs such as statins and anticancer drugs. However, molecular mechanisms controlling the membrane trafficking of OATP1B3 have been largely unknown. Several reports recently indicated the presence of a distinct, cancer-type OATP1B3 variant lacking the N-terminal 28 amino acids compared to OATP1B3 expressed in non-malignant hepatocytes. Interestingly, the cancer-type OATP1B3 variant is located predominantly in the cytoplasm, implicating the involvement of the N-terminal region of OATP1B3 in its membrane trafficking. In the current study, we set out to experimentally validate the importance of the N-terminal region of OATP1B3 and to identify responsible sequence motif(s) in that region. A number of truncation or point mutants of OATP1B3 were transiently expressed in HEK293T, HCT-8 or MDCK II cells and their expression in cytoplasmic and surface membrane fractions were analyzed by immunoblotting. Our results indicated that the N-terminal sequence of OATP1B3, in particular, at the amino acid positions between 12 and 28, may be indispensable in its membrane trafficking. Moreover, our results using a fusion construct indicated that the first 50 amino acids of OATP1B3 are sufficient for its membrane localization. The importance of the N-terminal region in membranous localization was shared among the other OATP1B subfamily members, OATP1B1 and rat Oatp1b2. Our efforts to identify the responsible amino acid(s) or structure motif(s) in the N-terminal region did not pinpoint individual amino acids or motifs with putative secondary structures. Our current findings however demonstrate that the N-terminal region is important for the membrane localization of the OATP1B subfamily members and should facilitate future investigations of the mechanisms involved in the regulation and membrane trafficking of

  15. Superalgebraic truncations in supergravities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C. ); Park, Y.; Kim, K.Y.; Kim, Y. ); l'Yi, W.S. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland )

    1991-11-15

    We study {ital D}=5 and {ital D}=8 supergravities in the context of superalgebra. These are analyzed in SU(4/2) superalgebra and its branching patterns in terms of Kac-Dynkin weight techniques. Consistent truncations can be easily realized as subalgebra chains of SU(4/2) superalgebras.

  16. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Ogataea polymorpha telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Polshakov, Vladimir I; Petrova, Olga A; Parfenova, Yulia Yu; Efimov, Sergey V; Klochkov, Vladimir V; Zvereva, Maria I; Dontsova, Olga A

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds telomeric DNA fragments to the ends of chromosomes. This enzyme is the focus of substantial attention, both because its structure and mechanism of action are still poorly studied, and because of its pivotal roles in aging and cellular proliferation. The use of telomerase as a potential target for the design of new anticancer drugs is also of great interest. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase (TERT) contains an N-terminal domain (TEN) that is essential for activity and processivity. Elucidation of the structure and dynamics of TEN in solution is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of telomerase activity and for the design of new telomerase inhibitors. To approach this problem, in this study we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of TEN from Ogataea polymorpha. Analysis of the assigned chemical shifts allowed us to identify secondary structures and protein regions potentially involved in interaction with other participants of the telomerase catalytic cycle.

  17. Peptide scrambling during collision-induced dissociation is influenced by N-terminal residue basicity.

    PubMed

    Chawner, Ross; Holman, Stephen W; Gaskell, Simon J; Eyers, Claire E

    2014-11-01

    'Bottom up' proteomic studies typically use tandem mass spectrometry data to infer peptide ion sequence, enabling identification of the protein whence they derive. The majority of such studies employ collision-induced dissociation (CID) to induce fragmentation of the peptide structure giving diagnostic b-, y-, and a- ions. Recently, rearrangement processes that result in scrambling of the original peptide sequence during CID have been reported for these ions. Such processes have the potential to adversely affect ion accounting (and thus scores from automated search algorithms) in tandem mass spectra, and in extreme cases could lead to false peptide identification. Here, analysis of peptide species produced by Lys-N proteolysis of standard proteins is performed and sequences that exhibit such rearrangement processes identified. The effect of increasing the gas-phase basicity of the N-terminal lysine residue through derivatization to homoarginine toward such sequence scrambling is then assessed. The presence of a highly basic homoarginine (or arginine) residue at the N-terminus is found to disfavor/inhibit sequence scrambling with a coincident increase in the formation of b(n-1)+H(2)O product ions. Finally, further analysis of a sequence produced by Lys-C proteolysis provides evidence toward a potential mechanism for the apparent inhibition of sequence scrambling during resonance excitation CID.

  18. N-Terminal Region of GbIspH1, Ginkgo biloba IspH Type 1, May Be Involved in the pH-Dependent Regulation of Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bok-Kyu; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Han, Jaehong

    2015-01-01

    GbIspH1, IspH type 1 in Ginkgo biloba chloroplast, is the Fe/S enzyme catalyzing the reductive dehydroxylation of HMBPP to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) at the final step of methylerythritol phosphate pathway in chloroplast. Compared to the bacterial IspH, plant IspH, including GbIspH1, has an additional polypeptide chain at the N-terminus. Here, biochemical function of the N-terminal region of GbIspH1 was investigated with the N-terminal truncated GbIspH1 (GbIspH1-truncated). Both wild type GbIspH1 (GbIspH1-full) and GbIspH1-truncated were catalytically active and produced IPP and DMAPP in a ratio of 15 : 1. Kinetic parameters of K M (17.3 ± 1.9 and 14.9 ± 2.3 µM) and k cat (369 ± 10 and 347 ± 12 min−1) at pH 8.0 were obtained for GbIspH1-full and GbIspH1-truncated, respectively. Interestingly, GbIspH1-full and GbIspH1-truncated showed significantly different pH-dependent activities, and the maximum enzyme activities were obtained at pH 8.0 and 7.5, respectively. However, catalytic activation energies (E a) of GbIspH1-full and GbIspH1-truncated were almost the same with 36.5 ± 1.6 and 35.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol, respectively. It was suggested that the N-terminal region of GbIspH1 is involved in the pH-dependent regulation of enzyme activity during photosynthesis. PMID:25892986

  19. N-Terminal Acetylation Acts as an Avidity Enhancer Within an Interconnected Multiprotein Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Daniel C.; Monda, Julie K.; Bennett, Eric J.; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-10-25

    Although many eukaryotic proteins are amino (N)-terminally acetylated, structural mechanisms by which N-terminal acetylation mediates protein interactions are largely unknown. Here, we found that N-terminal acetylation of the E2 enzyme, Ubc12, dictates distinctive E3-dependent ligation of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8 to Cul1. Structural, biochemical, biophysical, and genetic analyses revealed how complete burial of Ubc12's N-acetyl-methionine in a hydrophobic pocket in the E3, Dcn1, promotes cullin neddylation. The results suggest that the N-terminal acetyl both directs Ubc12's interactions with Dcn1 and prevents repulsion of a charged N terminus. Our data provide a link between acetylation and ubiquitin-like protein conjugation and define a mechanism for N-terminal acetylation-dependent recognition.

  20. Analysis of Metal-Binding Features of the Wild Type and Two Domain-Truncated Mutant Variants of Littorina littorea Metallothionein Reveals Its Cd-Specific Character

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Òscar; Gil-Moreno, Selene; Zerbe, Oliver; Atrian, Sílvia; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    After the resolution of the 3D structure of the Cd9-aggregate of the Littorina littorea metallothionein (MT), we report here a detailed analysis of the metal binding capabilities of the wild type MT, LlwtMT, and of two truncated mutants lacking either the N-terminal domain, Lltr2MT, or both the N-terminal domain, plus four extra flanking residues (SSVF), Lltr1MT. The recombinant synthesis and in vitro studies of these three proteins revealed that LlwtMT forms unique M9-LlwtMT complexes with Zn(II) and Cd(II), while yielding a complex mixture of heteronuclear Zn,Cu-LlwtMT species with Cu(I). As expected, the truncated mutants gave rise to unique M6-LltrMT complexes and Zn,Cu-LltrMT mixtures of lower stoichiometry with respect to LlwtMT, with the SSVF fragment having an influence on their metal binding performance. Our results also revealed a major specificity, and therefore a better metal-coordinating performance of the three proteins for Cd(II) than for Zn(II), although the analysis of the Zn(II)/Cd(II) displacement reaction clearly demonstrates a lack of any type of cooperativity in Cd(II) binding. Contrarily, the analysis of their Cu(I) binding abilities revealed that every LlMT domain is prone to build Cu4-aggregates, the whole MT working by modules analogously to, as previously described, certain fungal MTs, like those of C. neoformans and T. mesenterica. It is concluded that the Littorina littorea MT is a Cd-specific protein that (beyond its extended binding capacity through an additional Cd-binding domain) confers to Littorina littorea a particular adaptive advantage in its changeable marine habitat. PMID:28684668

  1. Mature bovine articular cartilage contains abundant aggrecan that is C-terminally truncated at Ala719-Ala720, a site which is readily cleaved by m-calpain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Extracts of normal mature articular cartilage contain aggrecan molecules which bear the G1 domain (the N-terminal globular domain of aggrecan) and are C-terminally truncated by proteolysis at a number of sites. A proportion of these molecules are generated by an aggrecanase and/or matrix-metalloproteinase-mediated cleavage in the IGD (interglobular domain between the G1 and G2 domains of aggrecan). However, the proteinase(s) responsible for formation of the majority of the larger G1-G2 and glycosaminoglycan-bearing truncated species is (are) unknown. N-terminal sequencing of aggrecan core fragments generated by m-calpain digestion of bovine aggrecan has identified four novel cleavage sites: one within the CS (chondroitin sulphate)-1 domain (at one or more of the bonds Ser1229–Val1230, Ser1249–Val1250, Ser1287–Val1288, Gly1307–Val1308 and Ser1346–Val1347), two within the IGD (at bonds Ala474–Ala475 and Gly365–Gly366) and one within the KS (keratan sulphate) domain (at Ala719–Ala720). A new monoclonal antibody (SK-28) to the C-terminal neoepitope at M710VTQVGPGVA719 showed that aggrecan products generated by this cleavage are present in high abundance in mature bovine articular cartilage extracts. We conclude that m-calpain, or an unidentified proteinase with the capacity to cleave at the same site, is active during aggrecan biosynthesis/secretion by mature chondrocytes or in the matrix of mature bovine articular cartilage in vivo. PMID:15175011

  2. Functional analysis of the N-terminal basic motif of a eukaryotic satellite RNA virus capsid protein in replication and packaging

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Garmann, Rees; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya; Rao, A. L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient replication and assembly of virus particles are integral to the establishment of infection. In addition to the primary role of the capsid protein (CP) in encapsidating the RNA progeny, experimental evidence on positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses suggests that the CP also regulates RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that replication of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is controlled by the cooperative interaction between STMV CP and the helper virus (HV) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase. We identified that the STMV CP-HV replicase interaction requires a positively charged residue at the third position (3R) in the N-terminal 13 amino acid (aa) motif. Far-Northwestern blotting showed that STMV CP promotes binding between HV-replicase and STMV RNA. An STMV CP variant having an arginine to alanine substitution at position 3 in the N-terminal 13aa motif abolished replicase-CP binding. The N-terminal 13aa motif of the CP bearing alanine substitutions for positively charged residues located at positions 5, 7, 10 and 11 are defective in packaging full-length STMV, but can package a truncated STMV RNA lacking the 3′ terminal 150 nt region. These findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of STMV replication and packaging. PMID:27193742

  3. Cooperation of the N-terminal Helicase and C-terminal endonuclease activities of Archaeal Hef protein in processing stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kayoko; Hidaka, Masumi; Horiuchi, Takashi; Fujikane, Ryosuke; Shinagawa, Hideo; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2004-12-17

    Blockage of replication fork progression often occurs during DNA replication, and repairing and restarting stalled replication forks are essential events in all organisms for the maintenance of genome integrity. The repair system employs processing enzymes to restore the stalled fork. In Archaea Hef is a well conserved protein that specifically cleaves nicked, flapped, and fork-structured DNAs. This enzyme contains two distinct domains that are similar to the DEAH helicase family and XPF nuclease superfamily proteins. Analyses of truncated mutant proteins consisting of each domain revealed that the C-terminal nuclease domain independently recognized and incised fork-structured DNA. The N-terminal helicase domain also specifically unwound fork-structured DNA and Holliday junction DNA in the presence of ATP. Moreover, the endonuclease activity of the whole Hef protein was clearly stimulated by ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the N-terminal domain. These enzymatic properties suggest that Hef efficiently resolves stalled replication forks by two steps, which are branch point transfer to the 5'-end of the nascent lagging strand by the N-terminal helicase followed by template strand incision for leading strand synthesis by the C-terminal endonuclease.

  4. Functional analysis of the N-terminal basic motif of a eukaryotic satellite RNA virus capsid protein in replication and packaging.

    PubMed

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Garmann, Rees; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya; Rao, A L N

    2016-05-19

    Efficient replication and assembly of virus particles are integral to the establishment of infection. In addition to the primary role of the capsid protein (CP) in encapsidating the RNA progeny, experimental evidence on positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses suggests that the CP also regulates RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that replication of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is controlled by the cooperative interaction between STMV CP and the helper virus (HV) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase. We identified that the STMV CP-HV replicase interaction requires a positively charged residue at the third position (3R) in the N-terminal 13 amino acid (aa) motif. Far-Northwestern blotting showed that STMV CP promotes binding between HV-replicase and STMV RNA. An STMV CP variant having an arginine to alanine substitution at position 3 in the N-terminal 13aa motif abolished replicase-CP binding. The N-terminal 13aa motif of the CP bearing alanine substitutions for positively charged residues located at positions 5, 7, 10 and 11 are defective in packaging full-length STMV, but can package a truncated STMV RNA lacking the 3' terminal 150 nt region. These findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of STMV replication and packaging.

  5. New roles for old modifications: emerging roles of N-terminal post-translational modifications in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Tooley, John G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2014-12-01

    The importance of internal post-translational modification (PTM) in protein signaling and function has long been known and appreciated. However, the significance of the same PTMs on the alpha amino group of N-terminal amino acids has been comparatively understudied. Historically considered static regulators of protein stability, additional functional roles for N-terminal PTMs are now beginning to be elucidated. New findings show that N-terminal methylation, along with N-terminal acetylation, is an important regulatory modification with significant roles in development and disease progression. There are also emerging studies on the enzymology and functional roles of N-terminal ubiquitylation and N-terminal propionylation. Here, will discuss the recent advances in the functional studies of N-terminal PTMs, recount the new N-terminal PTMs being identified, and briefly examine the possibility of dynamic N-terminal PTM exchange.

  6. New roles for old modifications: Emerging roles of N-terminal post-translational modifications in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, John G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    The importance of internal post-translational modification (PTM) in protein signaling and function has long been known and appreciated. However, the significance of the same PTMs on the alpha amino group of N-terminal amino acids has been comparatively understudied. Historically considered static regulators of protein stability, additional functional roles for N-terminal PTMs are now beginning to be elucidated. New findings show that N-terminal methylation, along with N-terminal acetylation, is an important regulatory modification with significant roles in development and disease progression. There are also emerging studies on the enzymology and functional roles of N-terminal ubiquitylation and N-terminal propionylation. Here, will discuss the recent advances in the functional studies of N-terminal PTMs, recount the new N-terminal PTMs being identified, and briefly examine the possibility of dynamic N-terminal PTM exchange. PMID:25209108

  7. A rapid and easy protein N-terminal profiling strategy using (N-Succinimidyloxycarbonylmethyl)tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) labeling and StageTip.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanchang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Jie; Wu, Feilin; Ji, Jianguo; Hong, Xuechuan; Deng, Zixin; He, Simin; Xu, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Protein N-terminal profiling is crucial when characterizing biological functions and provides proteomic evidences for genome reannotations. However, most of the current N-terminal enrichment approaches involve multiple chemical derivatizations and chromatographic separation processes which are time consuming and can contribute to N-terminal peptide losses. In this study, a fast, one-step approach utilizing (N-Succinimidyloxycarbonylmethyl)tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium bromide (TMPP) derivatization and StageTip separation was developed to enhance N-terminal peptide enrichment and analysis. Based on the characteristics of TMPP-derivatized samples, such as a higher hydrophobicity and increased likelihood to produce a and b ions in collision-induced dissociation or HCD fragmentation modes, first the SDS-PAGE was optimized to increase protein loading and gel entry and to remove unbound TMPP. Then, this process was combined with a simplified StageTip separation and a new scoring criterion (considering a, b and y ions) to identify more TMPP-modified N-terminal spectra. When utilizing a low amount of starting material (∼20 μg protein), a total of 581 yeast N-terminal peptides were identified, with 485 of them being TMPP modified, in only about one third of the general experimental time. It is hoped that the workflow constructed herein will provide a fast and practical strategy for N-terminomic studies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Removal of the N-terminal hexapeptide from human beta2-microglobulin facilitates protein aggregation and fibril formation.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, G.; Michelutti, R.; Verdone, G.; Viglino, P.; Hernández, H.; Robinson, C. V.; Amoresano, A.; Dal Piaz, F.; Monti, M.; Pucci, P.; Mangione, P.; Stoppini, M.; Merlini, G.; Ferri, G.; Bellotti, V.

    2000-01-01

    The solution structure and stability of N-terminally truncated beta2-microglobulin (deltaN6beta2-m), the major modification in ex vivo fibrils, have been investigated by a variety of biophysical techniques. The results show that deltaN6beta2-m has a free energy of stabilization that is reduced by 2.5 kcal/mol compared to the intact protein. Hydrogen exchange of a mixture of the truncated and full-length proteins at microM concentrations at pH 6.5 monitored by electrospray mass spectrometry reveals that deltaN6beta2-m is significantly less protected than its wild-type counterpart. Analysis of deltaN6beta2-m by NMR shows that this loss of protection occurs in beta strands I, III, and part of II. At mM concentration gel filtration analysis shows that deltaN6beta2-m forms a series of oligomers, including trimers and tetramers, and NMR analysis indicates that strand V is involved in intermolecular interactions that stabilize this association. The truncated species of beta2-microglobulin was found to have a higher tendency to self-associate than the intact molecule, and unlike wild-type protein, is able to form amyloid fibrils at physiological pH. Limited proteolysis experiments and analysis by mass spectrometry support the conformational modifications identified by NMR and suggest that deltaN6beta2-m could be a key intermediate of a proteolytic pathway of beta2-microglobulin. Overall, the data suggest that removal of the six residues from the N-terminus of beta2-microglobulin has a major effect on the stability of the overall fold. Part of the tertiary structure is preserved substantially by the disulfide bridge between Cys25 and Cys80, but the pairing between beta-strands far removed from this constrain is greatly perturbed. PMID:10850793

  9. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  10. Iron-binding fragments from the carboxyl-terminal region of hen ovotransferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J

    1975-01-01

    1. When iron-saturated hen ovotransferrin was treated with subtilisin the N-terminal half was digested at a faster rate than the C-terminal half, allowing the latter to be isolated as a single-chain fragment of mol.wt 35000. 2. In mildly acid conditions iron-ovotransferrin loses iron preferentially from its N-terminal binding site. Trypsin digestion of the resulting monoferric ovotransferrin also gave rise to a C-terminal fragment. 3. Comparison of the N-terminal fragment with the C-terminal fragments shows differences in composition, peptide 'maps', CNBr-cleavage patterns and antigenic structures. The C-terminal fragments carry the carbohydrate group of ovotransferrin. 4. Both N-terminal and C-terminal fragments donate their bound iron to rabbit reticulocytes. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:811217

  11. Depletion of the human N-terminal acetyltransferase hNaa30 disrupts Golgi integrity and ARFRP1-localization.

    PubMed

    Kobbenes Starheim, Kristian; Kalvik, Thomas Vikestad; Bjørkøy, Geir; Arnesen, Thomas

    2017-03-29

    The organization of the Golgi apparatus is tightly regulated. Golgi stack scattering is observed in cellular processes such as apoptosis and mitosis, and has also been associated with disruption of cellular lipid metabolism, and neurodegenerative diseases. Our studies show that depletion of the human N-α-acetyltransferase 30 (hNaa30) induces fragmentation of the Golgi stack in HeLa and CAL-62 cell lines. The Golgi apparatus-associated GTPase ARFRP1 was previously shown to require N-terminal acetylation for membrane association, and based on its N-terminal sequence it is likely to be a substrate of hNaa30. ARFRP1 is involved in endosome-to- trans- Golgi Network traffic. We observed that ARFRP1 shifted from a predominantly cis- Golgi and trans- Golgi Network localization to localizing both to the Golgi and to non-Golgi vesicular structures in hNaa30-depleted cells. However, we did not observe loss of membrane association of ARFRP1. We conclude that hNaa30-depletion induces Golgi-scattering, and induces aberrant ARFRP1 Golgi-localization.

  12. Studies on the structure and function of the N-terminal domain of the pneumococcal murein hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Sanz, J M; Díaz, E; García, J L

    1992-04-01

    The structures of the choline-dependent pneumococcal murein hydrolases, LYTA amidase and CPL1 lysozyme, and the choline-independent CPL7 lysozyme were analysed by controlled proteolytic digestions. The trypsin cleavage of the CPL1 and CPL7 lysozymes produced two resistant polypeptides, F1 and F7 respectively, corresponding to the N-terminal domain of the enzymes, whereas the amidase LYTA was completely hydrolysed by the protease. Interestingly, the F1 and F7 fragments showed a low, but significant, choline-independent lysozyme activity. Choline reduced the rate of proteolytic hydrolysis of choline-dependent enzymes, suggesting that the C-terminal choline-binding domain adopts a more resistant conformation in the presence of the ligand. On the other hand, the regions encoding the N-terminal domains of the three enzymes have been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, showing that these domains adopt an active conformation even in the absence of their C-terminal domains. The lower activity shown by the catalytic domains when compared with that of the complete enzymes suggests that the acquisition of a substrate-binding domain represents a noticeable evolutionary advantage for enzymes that interact with polymeric substrates, allowing them to achieve a higher catalytic efficiency. These results strongly reinforce the hypothesis that the pneumococcal murein hydrolases have been originated by fusion of two structural and functional independent domains, and provide new experimental support to the theory of modular evolution of proteins.

  13. Three N-terminal domains of beta-1,3-glucanase A1 are involved in binding to insoluble beta-1,3-glucan.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, T; Kasahara, N; Aida, K; Tanaka, H

    1992-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of beta-1,3-glucanase A1 by three different proteases, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and papain, gave three major active fragments. The sizes of the three major fragments generated by each protease treatment were identical to those of beta-1,3-glucanase A2, A3, and A4 detected in both the culture supernatant of Bacillus circulans WL-12 and the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli carrying a cloned glcA gene. These results indicate a four-domain structure for the enzyme. At the N terminus of the glucanase, duplicated segments of approximately 100 amino acids were observed. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the active fragments with sizes corresponding to those of A2 and A3 lack the first segment (domain) and both duplicated segments (domains), respectively. The fragment corresponding to A4 lacks both duplicated segments and the following ca. 120-amino-acid region. By losing the first, second, and third (corresponding to the segment of 120 amino acids) domains, beta-1,3-glucanase progressively lost the ability to bind to pachyman, beta-1,3-glucan. An active fragment which did not have the three N-terminal domains did not show significant binding to pachyman. Thus, all three N-terminal domains contribute to binding to beta-1,3-glucan, and the presence of three domains confers the highest binding activity on the glucanase. The loss of these binding domains remarkably decreased pachyman-hydrolyzing activity, indicating that the binding activity is essential for the efficient hydrolysis of insoluble beta-1,3-glucan. Images PMID:1729208

  14. Substrate specificity of mammalian N-terminal α-amino methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Petkowski, Janusz J.; Schaner Tooley, Christine E.; Anderson, Lissa C.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Minor, Wladek; Macara, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal methylation of free α-amino-groups is a post-translational modification of proteins that has been known for 30 years but has been very little studied. In this modification, the initiating M residue is cleaved and the exposed α-amino group is mono- di- or trimethylated by NRMT, a recently identified N-terminal methyltransferase. Currently, all known eukaryotic α-aminomethylated proteins have a unique N-terminal motif, M-X-P-K, where X is A, P, or S. NRMT can also methylate artificial substrates in vitro in which X is G, F, Y, C, M, K, R, N, Q or H. Methylation efficiencies of N-terminal amino acids are variable with respect to the identity of X. Here we use in vitro peptide methylation assays and substrate immunoprecipitations to show that the canonical M-X-P-K methylation motif is not the only one recognized by NRMT. We predict that N-terminal methylation is a widespread post-translational modification, and that there is interplay between N-terminal acetylation and N-terminal methylation. We also use isothermal calorimetry experiments to demonstrate that NRMT can efficiently recognize and bind to its fully methylated products. PMID:22769851

  15. Alzheimer’s amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Wei; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chang, Yu-Jen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N) mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT) Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD. PMID:28362827

  16. Alzheimer's amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Wei; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chang, Yu-Jen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N) mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT) Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD.

  17. Functional analysis of the extended N-terminal region in PLC-δ1 (MlPLC-δ1) from the mud loach, Misgurnus mizolepis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Young; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Moo-Sang; Seo, Jung Soo; Jung, Se Hwan; Park, Sung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Ho; Chung, Joon Ki

    2014-01-01

    Mud loach phospholipase C-δ1 (MlPLC-δ1) contains all the characteristic domains found in mammalian PLC-δ isozymes (pleckstrin homology domain, EF-hands, X–Y catalytic region, and C2 domain) as well as an extended 26-amino acid (aa)-long N-terminal region that is an alternative splice form of PLC-δ1 and is novel to vertebrate PLC-δ. In the present structure-function analysis, deletion of the extended N-terminal region caused complete loss of phosphatidylinositol (PI)- and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-hydrolyzing activity in MlPLC-δ1. Additionally, recombinant full-length MlPLC-δ1 PLC activity was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by coincubation with the 26-aa protein fragment. Using a protein-lipid overlay assay, both full-length MlPLC-δ1 and the 26-aa protein fragment had substantial affinity for PIP2, whereas deletion of the 26-aa region from MlPLC-δ1 (MlPLC-δ1-deletion) resulted in lower affinity for PIP2. These results suggest that the novel N-terminal exon of MlPLC-δ1 could play an important role in the regulation of PLC-δ1.

  18. The N-terminal domain of enterococcal surface protein, Esp, is sufficient for Esp-mediated biofilm enhancement in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Tendolkar, Preeti M; Baghdayan, Arto S; Shankar, Nathan

    2005-09-01

    Enterococci have emerged as one of the leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream, surgical site, and urinary tract infections. More recently, enterococci have been associated with biofilms, which are bacterial communities attached to a surface and encased in an extracellular polymeric matrix. The enterococcal cell surface-associated protein, Esp, enhances biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis in a glucose-dependent manner. Mature Esp consists of a nonrepeat N-terminal domain and a central region made up of two types of tandem repeats followed by a C-terminal membrane-spanning and anchor domain. This study was undertaken to localize the specific domain(s) of Esp that plays a role in Esp-mediated biofilm enhancement. To achieve this objective, we constructed in-frame deletion mutants expressing truncated forms of Esp in an isogenic background. By comparing strains expressing the mutant forms of Esp to those expressing wild-type Esp, we found that the strain expressing Esp lacking the N-terminal domain formed biofilms that were quantitatively less in biovolume than the strain expressing wild-type Esp. Furthermore, an E. faecalis strain expressing only the N-terminal domain of Esp fused to a heterologous protein anchor formed biofilms that were quantitatively similar to those formed by a strain expressing full-length Esp. This suggested that the minimal region contributing to Esp-mediated biofilm enhancement in E. faecalis was confined to the nonrepeat N-terminal domain. Expression of full-length E. faecalis Esp in heterologous host systems of esp-deficient Lactococcus lactis and Enterococcus faecium did not enhance biofilm formation as was observed for E. faecalis. These results suggest that Esp may require interaction with an additional E. faecalis-specific factor(s) to result in biofilm enhancement.

  19. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-08

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity.

  20. Structural basis for substrate recognition by the human N-terminal methyltransferase 1

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Cheng; Mao, Yunfei; Tempel, Wolfram; ...

    2015-11-05

    α-N-terminal methylation represents a highly conserved and prevalent post-translational modification, yet its biological function has remained largely speculative. The recent discovery of α-N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) and its physiological substrates propels the elucidation of a general role of α-N-terminal methylation in mediating DNA-binding ability of the modified proteins. The phenotypes, observed from both NTMT1 knockdown in breast cancer cell lines and knockout mouse models, suggest the potential involvement of α-N-terminal methylation in DNA damage response and cancer development. In this study, we report the first crystal structures of human NTMT1 in complex with cofactor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) and six substrate peptides,more » respectively, and reveal that NTMT1 contains two characteristic structural elements (a β hairpin and an N-terminal extension) that contribute to its substrate specificity. Our complex structures, coupled with mutagenesis, binding, and enzymatic studies, also present the key elements involved in locking the consensus substrate motif XPK (X indicates any residue type other than D/E) into the catalytic pocket for α-N-terminal methylation and explain why NTMT1 prefers an XPK sequence motif. We propose a catalytic mechanism for α-N-terminal methylation. Overall, this study gives us the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism of α-N-terminal methylation and potentially contributes to the advent of therapeutic agents for human diseases associated with deregulated α-N-terminal methylation.« less

  1. Impairment of Mitochondria in Adult Mouse Brain Overexpressing Predominantly Full-Length, N-Terminally Acetylated Human α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Sarafian, Theodore A.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Souda, Puneet; Masliah, Eliezer; Kar, Upendra K.; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Watson, Joseph B.

    2013-01-01

    While most forms of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) are sporadic in nature, a small percentage of PD have genetic causes as first described for dominant, single base pair changes as well as duplication and triplication in the α-synuclein gene. The α-synuclein gene encodes a 140 amino acid residue protein that interacts with a variety of organelles including synaptic vesicles, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi vesicles and, reported more recently, mitochondria. Here we examined the structural and functional interactions of human α-synuclein with brain mitochondria obtained from an early, pre-manifest mouse model for PD over-expressing human α-synuclein (ASOTg). The membrane potential in ASOTg brain mitochondria was decreased relative to wildtype (WT) mitochondria, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) were elevated in ASOTg brain mitochondria. No selective interaction of human α-synuclein with mitochondrial electron transport complexes cI-cV was detected. Monomeric human α-synuclein plus carboxyl terminally truncated forms were the predominant isoforms detected in ASOTg brain mitochondria by 2-dimensional PAGE (Native/SDS) and immunoblotting. Oligomers or fibrils were not detected with amyloid conformational antibodies. Mass spectrometry of human α-synuclein in both ASOTg brain mitochondria and homogenates from surgically resected human cortex demonstrated that the protein was full-length and postranslationally modified by N-terminal acetylation. Overall the study showed that accumulation of full-length, N-terminally acetylated human α-synuclein was sufficient to disrupt brain mitochondrial function in adult mice. PMID:23667637

  2. Stability of the heme Fe-N-terminal amino group coordination bond in denatured cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Tai, Hulin; Munegumi, Toratane; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-05

    In the denatured states of Hydrogenobacter thermophilus cytochrome c(552) (HT) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c(551) (PA), and their mutants, the N-terminal amino group of the polypeptide chain is coordinated to heme Fe in place of the axial Met, the His-N(term) form being formed. The coordination of the N-terminal amino group to heme Fe leads to loop formation by the N-terminal stretch preceding the first Cys residue bound to the heme, and the N-terminal stretches of HT and PA are different from each other in terms of both the sequence and the number of constituent amino acid residues. The His-N(term) form was shown to be rather stable, and hence it can influence the stability of the denatured state. We have investigated the heme Fe coordination structures and stabilities of the His-N(term) forms emerging upon guanidine hydrochloric acid-induced unfolding of the oxidized forms of the proteins. The Fe-N(term) coordination bond in the His-N(term) form with a 9-residue N-terminal stretch of HT proteins was found to be tilted to some extent away from the heme normal, as reflected by the great heme methyl proton shift spread. On the other hand, the small heme methyl proton shift spread of the His-N(term) form with an 11-residue stretch of PA proteins indicated that its Fe-N(term) bond is nearly parallel with the heme normal. The stability of the His-N(term) form was found to be affected by the structural properties of the N-terminal stretch, such as its length and the N-terminal residue. With a given N-terminal residue, the stability of the His-N(term) form is higher for a 9-residue N-terminal stretch than an 11-residue one. In addition, with a given length of the N-terminal stretch, the His-N(term) form with an N-terminal Glu is stabilized by a few kJ mol(-1) relative to that with an N-terminal Asn. These results provide a novel insight into the stabilizing interactions in the denatured cyts c that will facilitate elucidation of the folding/unfolding mechanisms

  3. Preparation of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling proteomes for identifying metacaspase substrates by N-terminal COFRADIC.

    PubMed

    Tsiatsiani, Liana; Stael, Simon; Van Damme, Petra; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Proteome-wide discovery of in vivo metacaspase substrates can be obtained by positional proteomics approaches such as N-terminal COFRADIC, for example by comparing the N-terminal proteomes (or N-terminomes) of wild-type plants to transgenic plants not expressing a given metacaspase. In this chapter we describe a protocol for the preparation of plant tissue proteomes, including differential isotopic labelling allowing for a comparison of in vivo N-terminomes that serves as the starting point for N-terminal COFRADIC studies.

  4. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  5. Conformational changes of the N-terminal part of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus p12 protein during multimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Knejzlik, Zdenek; Ulbrich, Pavel; Strohalm, Martin; Lastuvkova, Hana; Kodicek, Milan; Sakalian, Michael; Ruml, Tomas

    2009-10-10

    The Mason-Pfizer monkey virus is a prototype Betaretrovirus with the defining characteristic that it assembles spherical immature particles from Gag-related polyprotein precursors within the cytoplasm of the infected cell. It was shown previously that the N-terminal part of the Gag p12 domain (wt-Np12) is required for efficient assembly. However, the precise role for p12 in mediating Gag-Gag interaction is still poorly understood. In this study we employed detailed circular dichroism spectroscopy, electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation analyses of recombinant wt-Np12 prepared by in vitro transcription and translation. The wt-Np12 domain fragment forms fibrillar structures in a concentration-dependent manner. Assembly into fibers is linked to a conformational transition from unfolded or another non-periodical state to alpha-helix during multimerization.

  6. N-terminal protein characterization by mass spectrometry after cyanogen bromide cleavage using combined microscale liquid- and solid-phase derivatization.

    PubMed

    Nika, Heinz; Hawke, David H; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2014-04-01

    A sample preparation method for protein N-terminal peptide isolation from cyanogen bromide (CNBr) protein digests has been developed. In this strategy, the CNBr cleavage was preceded by protein α- and ε-amine acetylation and carboxyamidomethylation in a one-pot reaction scheme. The peptide mixture was adsorbed on ZipTipC18 pipette tips for reaction of the newly generated N-termini with sulfosuccinimidyl-2-(biotinamido) ethyl-1, 3-dithiopropionate. In the subsequent steps, the peptides were exposed in situ to hydroxylamine for reversal of potential hydroxyl group acylation, followed by reductive release of the disulfide-linked biotinamido moiety from the derivatives. The selectively thiol group-functionalized internal and C-terminal peptides were reversibly captured by covalent chromatography on activated thiol-sepharose, leaving the N-terminal fragment in the flow-through fraction. The use of the reversed-phase support as a venue for postcleavage serial modification proved instrumental to ensure throughput and completeness of derivatization. By this sequence of solid-phase reactions, the N-terminal peptide could be recognized uniquely in the MALDI-mass spectra of unfractionated digests by its unaltered mass signature. The use of the sample preparation method was demonstrated with low-picomole amounts of model protein. The N-terminal CNBr fragments were retrieved selectively from the affinity support. The sample preparation method provides for robustness and simplicity of operation using standard equipment available in most biological laboratories and is anticipated to be readily expanded to gel-separated proteins.

  7. Truncated Gaussians as tolerance sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cozman, Fabio; Krotkov, Eric

    1994-01-01

    This work focuses on the use of truncated Gaussian distributions as models for bounded data measurements that are constrained to appear between fixed limits. The authors prove that the truncated Gaussian can be viewed as a maximum entropy distribution for truncated bounded data, when mean and covariance are given. The characteristic function for the truncated Gaussian is presented; from this, algorithms are derived for calculation of mean, variance, summation, application of Bayes rule and filtering with truncated Gaussians. As an example of the power of their methods, a derivation of the disparity constraint (used in computer vision) from their models is described. The authors' approach complements results in Statistics, but their proposal is not only to use the truncated Gaussian as a model for selected data; they propose to model measurements as fundamentally in terms of truncated Gaussians.

  8. Functional role of the flexible N-terminal extension of FKBP38 in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Congbao; Ye, Hong; Chia, Joel; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Simon, Bernd; Schütz, Ulrike; Sattler, Michael; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2013-10-22

    FKBP38 regulates apoptosis through unique interactions with multiple regulators including Bcl-2. Interestingly, the peptidylprolyl isomerase activity of FKBP38 is only detectable when it binds to calcium-saturated calmodulin (CaM/Ca(2+)). This, in turn, permits the formation of a complex with Bcl-2. FKBP38 thereby provides an important link between isomerase activity and apoptotic pathways. Here, we show that the N-terminal extension (residues 1-32) preceding the catalytic domain of FKBP38 has an autoinhibitory activity. The core isomerase activity of FKBP38 is inhibited by transient interactions involving the flexible N-terminal extension that precedes the catalytic domain. Notably, CaM/Ca(2+) binds to this N-terminal extension and thereby releases the autoinhibitory contacts between the N-terminal extension and the catalytic domain, thus potentiating the isomerase activity of FKBP38. Our data demonstrate how CaM/Ca(2+) modulates the catalytic activity of FKBP38.

  9. Functional role of the flexible N-terminal extension of FKBP38 in catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Congbao; Ye, Hong; Chia, Joel; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Simon, Bernd; Schütz, Ulrike; Sattler, Michael; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2013-10-01

    FKBP38 regulates apoptosis through unique interactions with multiple regulators including Bcl-2. Interestingly, the peptidylprolyl isomerase activity of FKBP38 is only detectable when it binds to calcium-saturated calmodulin (CaM/Ca2+). This, in turn, permits the formation of a complex with Bcl-2. FKBP38 thereby provides an important link between isomerase activity and apoptotic pathways. Here, we show that the N-terminal extension (residues 1-32) preceding the catalytic domain of FKBP38 has an autoinhibitory activity. The core isomerase activity of FKBP38 is inhibited by transient interactions involving the flexible N-terminal extension that precedes the catalytic domain. Notably, CaM/Ca2+ binds to this N-terminal extension and thereby releases the autoinhibitory contacts between the N-terminal extension and the catalytic domain, thus potentiating the isomerase activity of FKBP38. Our data demonstrate how CaM/Ca2+ modulates the catalytic activity of FKBP38.

  10. Identification of the sequence determinants of protein N-terminal acetylation through a decision tree approach.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazunori D; Omori, Satoshi; Nishi, Hafumi; Miyagi, Masaru

    2017-06-02

    N-terminal acetylation is one of the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and occurs co-translationally when the N-terminus of the nascent polypeptide is still attached to the ribosome. This modification has been shown to be involved in a wide range of biological phenomena such as protein half-life regulation, protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions, and protein subcellular localization. Thus, accurately predicting which proteins receive an acetyl group based on their protein sequence is expected to facilitate the functional study of this modification. As the occurrence of N-terminal acetylation strongly depends on the context of protein sequences, attempts to understand the sequence determinants of N-terminal acetylation were conducted initially by simply examining the N-terminal sequences of many acetylated and unacetylated proteins and more recently by machine learning approaches. However, a complete understanding of the sequence determinants of this modification remains to be elucidated. We obtained curated N-terminally acetylated and unacetylated sequences from the UniProt database and employed a decision tree algorithm to identify the sequence determinants of N-terminal acetylation for proteins whose initiator methionine ((i)Met) residues have been removed. The results suggested that the main determinants of N-terminal acetylation are contained within the first five residues following (i)Met and that the first and second positions are the most important discriminator for the occurrence of this phenomenon. The results also indicated the existence of position-specific preferred and inhibitory residues that determine the occurrence of N-terminal acetylation. The developed predictor software, termed NT-AcPredictor, accurately predicted the N-terminal acetylation, with an overall performance comparable or superior to those of preceding predictors incorporating machine learning algorithms. Our machine learning approach based on a decision tree

  11. N-Terminal Derivatization with Structures Having High Proton Affinity for Discrimination between Leu and Ile Residues in Peptides by High-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Kitanaka, Atsushi; Miyashita, Masahiro; Kubo, Ayumi; Satoh, Takaya; Toyoda, Michisato; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    De novo sequencing is still essential in the identification of peptides and proteins from unexplored organisms whose sequence information is not available. One of the remaining problems in de novo sequencing is discrimination between Leu and Ile residues. The discrimination is possible based on differences in side chain fragmentation between Leu and Ile under high-energy collision-induced dissociation (HE-CID) conditions. However, this is observed only when basic residues, such as Arg and Lys, are present near the N- or C-terminal end. It has been shown that the charge derivatization at the N-terminal end by a quarternary ammonium or phosphonium moiety facilitates the side chain fragmentation by HE-CID. However, the effective backbone fragmentation by low-energy CID (LE-CID) is often hampered in those derivatives with a fixed charge. Previously, we demonstrated that the N-terminal charge derivatization with the structures having high proton affinity induced the preferential formation of b-ions under LE-CID conditions, allowing straightforward interpretation of product ion spectra. In the present study, we further investigated whether the same derivatization approach is also effective for discrimination between Leu and Ile under HE-CID conditions. Consequently, the side chain fragmentation of Leu and Ile residues was most effectively enhanced by the N-terminal derivatization with 4-(guanidinomethyl)benzoic acid among the tested structures. This derivatization approach, which is compatible with both HE- and LE-CID analysis, offers a straightforward and unambiguous de novo peptide sequencing method. PMID:27900234

  12. N-Terminal Derivatization with Structures Having High Proton Affinity for Discrimination between Leu and Ile Residues in Peptides by High-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Atsushi; Miyashita, Masahiro; Kubo, Ayumi; Satoh, Takaya; Toyoda, Michisato; Miyagawa, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    De novo sequencing is still essential in the identification of peptides and proteins from unexplored organisms whose sequence information is not available. One of the remaining problems in de novo sequencing is discrimination between Leu and Ile residues. The discrimination is possible based on differences in side chain fragmentation between Leu and Ile under high-energy collision-induced dissociation (HE-CID) conditions. However, this is observed only when basic residues, such as Arg and Lys, are present near the N- or C-terminal end. It has been shown that the charge derivatization at the N-terminal end by a quarternary ammonium or phosphonium moiety facilitates the side chain fragmentation by HE-CID. However, the effective backbone fragmentation by low-energy CID (LE-CID) is often hampered in those derivatives with a fixed charge. Previously, we demonstrated that the N-terminal charge derivatization with the structures having high proton affinity induced the preferential formation of b-ions under LE-CID conditions, allowing straightforward interpretation of product ion spectra. In the present study, we further investigated whether the same derivatization approach is also effective for discrimination between Leu and Ile under HE-CID conditions. Consequently, the side chain fragmentation of Leu and Ile residues was most effectively enhanced by the N-terminal derivatization with 4-(guanidinomethyl)benzoic acid among the tested structures. This derivatization approach, which is compatible with both HE- and LE-CID analysis, offers a straightforward and unambiguous de novo peptide sequencing method.

  13. The N-Terminal Methionine of Cellular Proteins as a Degradation Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heon-Ki; Kim, Ryu-Ryun; Oh, Jang-Hyun; Cho, Hanna; Varshavsky, Alexander; Hwang, Cheol-Sang

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The Arg/N-end rule pathway targets for degradation proteins that bear specific unacetylated N-terminal residues while the Ac/N-end rule pathway targets proteins through their Nα-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) residues. Here we show that Ubr1, the ubiquitin ligase of the Arg/N-end rule pathway, recognizes unacetylated N-terminal methionine if it is followed by a hydrophobic residue. This capability of Ubr1 expands the range of substrates that can be targeted for degradation by the Arg/N-end rule pathway, because virtually all nascent cellular proteins bear N-terminal methionine. We identified Msn4, Sry1, Arl3, and Pre5 as examples of normal or misfolded proteins that can be destroyed through the recognition of their unacetylated N-terminal methionine. Inasmuch as proteins bearing the Nt-acetylated N-terminal methionine residue are substrates of the Ac/N-end rule pathway, the resulting complementarity of the Arg/N-end rule and Ac/N-end rule pathways enables the elimination of protein substrates regardless of acetylation state of N-terminal methionine in these substrates. PMID:24361105

  14. Antagonistic roles of the N-terminal domain of prion protein to doppel.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2008-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP)-like molecule, doppel (Dpl), is neurotoxic in mice, causing Purkinje cell degeneration. In contrast, PrP antagonizes Dpl in trans, rescuing mice from Purkinje cell death. We have previously shown that PrP with deletion of the N-terminal residues 23-88 failed to neutralize Dpl in mice, indicating that the N-terminal region, particularly that including residues 23-88, may have trans-protective activity against Dpl. Interestingly, PrP with deletion elongated to residues 121 or 134 in the N-terminal region was shown to be similarly neurotoxic to Dpl, indicating that the PrP C-terminal region may have toxicity which is normally prevented by the N-terminal domain in cis. We recently investigated further roles for the N-terminal region of PrP in antagonistic interactions with Dpl by producing three different types of transgenic mice. These mice expressed PrP with deletion of residues 25-50 or 51-90, or a fusion protein of the N-terminal region of PrP with Dpl. Here, we discuss a possible model for the antagonistic interaction between PrP and Dpl.

  15. Inhibition of polyglutamine aggregation by SIMILAR huntingtin N-terminal sequences: Prospective molecules for preclinical evaluation in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Burra, Gunasekhar; Thakur, Ashwani Kumar

    2017-04-12

    The mutant huntingtin protein (mHtt) fragments with expanded polyglutamine sequence forms microscopically visible aggregates in neurons, a hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD). The aggregation process and aggregates are possible targets of therapeutic intervention in HD. Due to lack of treatment and cure, the patients die within 15-20 years after the disease onset. Therefore, discovering therapeutic molecules that may either inhibit the aggregation mechanism or downregulate the toxic effects of mhtt are highly needed. The present study demonstrates the design and use of peptide inhibitors based on the role played by the N-terminal seventeen amino acid sequence (NT17 ) of huntingtin fragment in its aggregation. Fug-NT17 (Fugu), Xen-NT17 (Xenopus), Dro-NT17 (Drosophila), Aib-NT17 , and Pro-NT17 sequences were tested for their ability to inhibit aggregation. Among them, the first three are the sequence variants of human NT17 from evolutionarily distant organisms and the latter two are the analogs of human NT17 containing aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) and proline (Pro). Four out of five inhibited the aggregation of huntingtin fragment, NT17 Q35 P10 K2 polypeptide. Data indicates that the physicochemical properties of the inhibitors play a crucial role in exhibiting the inhibitory effect. These inhibitors can be tested in cell and animal models for the preclinical evaluation in the treating of HD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification and Functional Characterization of N-Terminally Acetylated Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, Bertran; Roschitzki, Bernd; Mohanty, Sonali; Niederer, Eva M.; Laczko, Endre; Timmerman, Evy; Lange, Vinzenz; Hafen, Ernst; Aebersold, Ruedi; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Basler, Konrad; Ahrens, Christian H.; Gevaert, Kris; Brunner, Erich

    2009-01-01

    Protein modifications play a major role for most biological processes in living organisms. Amino-terminal acetylation of proteins is a common modification found throughout the tree of life: the N-terminus of a nascent polypeptide chain becomes co-translationally acetylated, often after the removal of the initiating methionine residue. While the enzymes and protein complexes involved in these processes have been extensively studied, only little is known about the biological function of such N-terminal modification events. To identify common principles of N-terminal acetylation, we analyzed the amino-terminal peptides from proteins extracted from Drosophila Kc167 cells. We detected more than 1,200 mature protein N-termini and could show that N-terminal acetylation occurs in insects with a similar frequency as in humans. As the sole true determinant for N-terminal acetylation we could extract the (X)PX rule that indicates the prevention of acetylation under all circumstances. We could show that this rule can be used to genetically engineer a protein to study the biological relevance of the presence or absence of an acetyl group, thereby generating a generic assay to probe the functional importance of N-terminal acetylation. We applied the assay by expressing mutated proteins as transgenes in cell lines and in flies. Here, we present a straightforward strategy to systematically study the functional relevance of N-terminal acetylations in cells and whole organisms. Since the (X)PX rule seems to be of general validity in lower as well as higher eukaryotes, we propose that it can be used to study the function of N-terminal acetylation in all species. PMID:19885390

  17. N-terminal transmembrane domain of the SUR controls trafficking and gating of Kir6 channel subunits

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kim W.; Zhang, Hailin; Logothetis, Diomedes E.

    2003-01-01

    The sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein, assembles with a potassium channel subunit (Kir6) to form the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) complex. Although SUR is an important regulator of Kir6, the specific SUR domain that associates with Kir6 is still unknown. All functional ABC proteins contain two transmembrane domains but some, including SUR and MRP1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), contain an extra N-terminal transmembrane domain called TMD0. The functions of any TMD0s are largely unclear. Using Xenopus oocytes to coexpress truncated SUR constructs with Kir6, we demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, single-oocyte chemiluminescence and electrophysiological measurements that the TMD0 of SUR1 strongly associated with Kir6.2 and modulated its trafficking and gating. Two TMD0 mutations, A116P and V187D, previously correlated with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, were found to disrupt the association between TMD0 and Kir6.2. These results underscore the importance of TMD0 in KATP channel function, explaining how specific mutations within this domain result in disease, and suggest how an ABC protein has evolved to regulate a potassium channel. PMID:12881418

  18. Purification and characterization of recombinant sugarcane sucrose phosphate synthase expressed in E. coli and insect Sf9 cells: an importance of the N-terminal domain for an allosteric regulatory property.

    PubMed

    Sawitri, Widhi Dyah; Narita, Hirotaka; Ishizaka-Ikeda, Etsuko; Sugiharto, Bambang; Hase, Toshiharu; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses the transfer of glycosyl group of uridine diphosphate glucose to fructose-6-phosphate to form sucrose-6-phosphate. Plant SPS plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon metabolisms, which activity is modulated by an allosteric activator glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). We produced recombinant sugarcane SPS using Escherichia coli and Sf9 insect cells to investigate its structure-function relationship. When expressed in E. coli, two forms of SPS with different sizes appeared; the larger was comparable in size with the authentic plant enzyme and the shorter was trimmed the N-terminal 20 kDa region off. In the insect cells, only enzyme with the authentic size was produced. We purified the trimmed SPS and the full size enzyme from insect cells and found their enzymatic properties differed significantly; the full size enzyme was activated allosterically by G6P, while the trimmed one showed a high activity even without G6P. We further introduced a series of N-terminal truncations up to 171 residue and found G6P-independent activity was enhanced by the truncation. These combined results indicated that the N-terminal region of sugarcane SPS is crucial for the allosteric regulation by G6P and may function like a suppressor domain for the enzyme activity. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. An improved stable isotope N-terminal labeling approach with light/heavy TMPP to automate proteogenomics data validation: dN-TOP.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Diego; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine

    2013-06-07

    In silico gene prediction has proven to be prone to errors, especially regarding precise localization of start codons that spread in subsequent biological studies. Therefore, the high throughput characterization of protein N-termini is becoming an emerging challenge in the proteomics and especially proteogenomics fields. The trimethoxyphenyl phosphonium (TMPP) labeling approach (N-TOP) is an efficient N-terminomic approach that allows the characterization of both N-terminal and internal peptides in a single experiment. Due to its permanent positive charge, TMPP labeling strongly affects MS/MS fragmentation resulting in unadapted scoring of TMPP-derivatized peptide spectra by classical search engines. This behavior has led to difficulties in validating TMPP-derivatized peptide identifications with usual score filtering and thus to low/underestimated numbers of identified N-termini. We present herein a new strategy (dN-TOP) that overwhelmed the previous limitation allowing a confident and automated N-terminal peptide validation thanks to a combined labeling with light and heavy TMPP reagents. We show how this double labeling allows increasing the number of validated N-terminal peptides. This strategy represents a considerable improvement to the well-established N-TOP method with an enhanced and accelerated data processing making it now fully compatible with high-throughput proteogenomics studies.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum Rab5B Is an N-Terminally Myristoylated Rab GTPase That Is Targeted to the Parasite's Plasma and Food Vacuole Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ezougou, Carinne Ndjembo; Ben-Rached, Fathia; Moss, David K.; Lin, Jing-wen; Black, Sally; Knuepfer, Ellen; Green, Judith L.; Khan, Shahid M.; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha; Janse, Chris J.; Coppens, Isabelle; Yera, Hélène; Holder, Anthony A.; Langsley, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) has a family of 11 Rab GTPases to regulate its vesicular transport. However, PfRab5B is unique in lacking a C-terminal geranyl-geranylation motif, while having N-terminal palmitoylation and myristoylation motifs. We show that the N-terminal glycine is required for PfRab5B myristoylation in vitro and when an N-terminal PfRab5B fragment possessing both acylation motifs is fused to GFP and expressed in transgenic P. falciparum parasites, the chimeric PfRab5B protein localizes to the plasma membrane. Upon substitution of the modified glycine by alanine the staining becomes diffuse and GFP is found in soluble subcellular fractions. Immuno-electron microscopy shows endogenous PfRab5B decorating the parasite's plasma and food vacuole membranes. Using reverse genetics rab5b couldn't be deleted from the haploid genome of asexual blood stage P. berghei parasites. The failure of PbRab5A or PbRab5C to complement for loss of PbRab5B function indicates non-overlapping roles for the three Plasmodium Rab5s, with PfRab5B involved in trafficking MSP1 to the food vacuole membrane and CK1 to the plasma membrane. We discuss similarities between Plasmodium Rab5B and Arabidopsis thaliana ARA6, a similarly unusual Rab5-like GTPase of plants. PMID:24498355

  1. Electrophoretic characterization of species of fibronectin bearing sequences from the N-terminal heparin-binding domain in synovial fluid samples from patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, John H; Carsons, Steven; Yoshida, Mika; Ko, Fred; McDougall, Skye; Loredo, Grace A; Hahn, Theodore J

    2003-01-01

    Fragments of fibronectin (FN) corresponding to the N-terminal heparin-binding domain have been observed to promote catabolic chondrocytic gene expression and chondrolysis. We therefore characterized FN species that include sequences from this domain in samples of arthritic synovial fluid using one-and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) Western blot analysis. We detected similar assortments of species, ranging from ~47 to greater than 200 kDa, in samples obtained from patients with osteoarthritis (n = 9) versus rheumatoid arthritis (n = 10). One of the predominant forms, with an apparent molecular weight of ~170 kDa, typically resolved in 2D electrophoresis into a cluster of subspecies. These exhibited reduced binding to gelatin in comparison with a more prevalent species of ~200+ kDa and were also recognized by a monoclonal antibody to the central cell-binding domain (CBD). When considered together with our previous analyses of synovial fluid FN species containing the alternatively spliced EIIIA segment, these observations indicate that the ~170-kDa species includes sequences from four FN domains that have previously, in isolation, been observed to promote catabolic responses by chondrocytes in vitro: the N-terminal heparin-binding domain, the gelatin-binding domain, the central CBD, and the EIIIA segment. The ~170-kDa N-terminal species of FN may therefore be both a participant in joint destructive processes and a biomarker with which to gauge activity of the arthritic process. PMID:14680507

  2. The N-Terminal Peptides of the Three Human Isoforms of the Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Have Different Helical Propensities.

    PubMed

    Guardiani, Carlo; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Grdadolnik, Joze; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Casu, Mariano

    2015-09-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main mitochondrial porin allowing the exchange of ions and metabolites between the cytosol and the mitochondrion. In addition, VDAC was found to actively interact with proteins playing a fundamental role in the regulation of apoptosis and being of central interest in cancer research. VDAC is a large transmembrane β-barrel channel, whose N-terminal helical fragment adheres to the channel interior, partially closing the pore. This fragment is considered to play a key role in protein stability and function as well as in the interaction with apoptosis-related proteins. Three VDAC isoforms are differently expressed in higher eukaryotes, for which distinct and complementary roles are proposed. In this work, the folding propensity of their N-terminal fragments has been compared. By using multiple spectroscopic techniques, and complementing the experimental results with theoretical computer-assisted approaches, we have characterized their conformational equilibrium. Significant differences were found in the intrinsic helical propensity of the three peptides, decreasing in the following order: hVDAC2 > hVDAC3 > hVDAC1. In light of the models proposed in the literature to explain voltage gating, selectivity, and permeability, as well as interactions with functionally related proteins, our results suggest that the different chemicophysical properties of the N-terminal domain are possibly correlated to different functions for the three isoforms. The overall emerging picture is that a similar transmembrane water accessible conduit has been equipped with not identical domains, whose differences can modulate the functional roles of the three VDAC isoforms.

  3. Deletion of the N-terminal region of the AREA protein is correlated with a derepressed phenotype with respect to nitrogen metabolite repression.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, H K; Dodds, A L; Swatman, D R; Cairns, E; Hawkins, A R

    1997-01-01

    The entire areA gene and a truncated version lacking the sequence encoding the N-terminal 389 amino acids were expressed from the qutE promoter and terminator in an Aspergillus nidulans strain with the endogenous areA gene deleted. This expression system was used to decouple the effects of transcription regulation and mRNA stability mediated by the native promoter and terminator from any posttranslational modulation of AREA activity. Both the full-length AREA protein and the truncated form were able to function in the deletion strain, conferring the ability to use alternate nitrogen sources. Transformants containing the entire areA gene had a repressible phenotype with respect to nitrogen metabolite repression, whereas those containing the truncated form of the areA gene had a derepressed phenotype. The truncated areA gene was expressed in an A. nidulans strain containing a normally regulated wild-type areA gene, and transformants displayed a quinate-inducible nitrogen metabolite derepressed phenotype. Northern blot analysis of transformed strains showed that areA-specific mRNAs of the expected sizes were being produced. The truncated AREA protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and purified to homogeneity by a single-step immobilized metal affinity chromatography, and the purified protein was shown to bind specifically to the niaD promoter. Revised sequences of the 5' region of the areA gene and the entire meaB gene are reported. PMID:9352912

  4. Oncogenic truncation of the first repeat of c-Myb decreases DNA binding in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dini, P W; Lipsick, J S

    1993-01-01

    Oncogenic activation of c-Myb in both avian and murine systems often involves N-terminal truncation. In particular, the first of three DNA-binding repeats in c-Myb has been largely deleted during the genesis of the v-myb oncogenes of avian myeloblastosis virus and E26 avian leukemia virus. This finding suggests that the first DNA-binding repeat may have an important role in cell growth control. We demonstrate that truncation of the first DNA-binding repeat of c-Myb is sufficient for myeloid transformation in culture, but deletion of the N-terminal phosphorylation site and adjacent acidic region is not. Truncation of the first repeat decreases the ability of a Myb-VP16 fusion protein to trans activate the promoter of a Myb-inducible gene (mim-1) involved in differentiation. Moreover, truncation of the first repeat decreases the ability of the Myb protein to bind DNA both in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that N-terminal mutants of c-Myb may transform by regulating only a subset of those genes normally regulated by c-Myb. Images PMID:8246954

  5. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation-dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel C; Hammill, Jared T; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C; Goktug, Asli N; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A; Cannon, Joe R; Shelat, Anang A; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R; Alpi, Arno F; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Harper, J Wade; Schulman, Brenda A; Guy, R Kip

    2017-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ∼80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation-dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide-binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2-E3 ligases.

  6. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  7. Oligomerization of the microtubule-associated protein tau is mediated by its N-terminal sequences: implications for normal and pathological tau action.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, H Eric; Benbow, Sarah J; LaPointe, Nichole E; Patel, Nirav; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Do, Thanh D; Gaylord, Michelle R; Huskey, Noelle E; Dressler, Nicolette; Korff, Megan; Quon, Brady; Cantrell, Kristi Lazar; Bowers, Michael T; Lal, Ratnesh; Feinstein, Stuart C

    2016-06-01

    Despite extensive structure-function analyses, the molecular mechanisms of normal and pathological tau action remain poorly understood. How does the C-terminal microtubule-binding region regulate microtubule dynamics and bundling? In what biophysical form does tau transfer trans-synaptically from one neuron to another, promoting neurodegeneration and dementia? Previous biochemical/biophysical work led to the hypothesis that tau can dimerize via electrostatic interactions between two N-terminal 'projection domains' aligned in an anti-parallel fashion, generating a multivalent complex capable of interacting with multiple tubulin subunits. We sought to test this dimerization model directly. Native gel analyses of full-length tau and deletion constructs demonstrate that the N-terminal region leads to multiple bands, consistent with oligomerization. Ferguson analyses of native gels indicate that an N-terminal fragment (tau(45-230) ) assembles into heptamers/octamers. Ferguson analyses of denaturing gels demonstrates that tau(45-230) can dimerize even in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Atomic force microscopy reveals multiple levels of oligomerization by both full-length tau and tau(45-230) . Finally, ion mobility-mass spectrometric analyses of tau(106-144) , a small peptide containing the core of the hypothesized dimerization region, also demonstrate oligomerization. Thus, multiple independent strategies demonstrate that the N-terminal region of tau can mediate higher order oligomerization, which may have important implications for both normal and pathological tau action. The microtubule-associated protein tau is essential for neuronal development and maintenance, but is also central to Alzheimer's and related dementias. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms underlying normal and pathological tau action remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that tau can homo-oligomerize, providing novel mechanistic models for normal tau action (promoting microtubule growth and

  8. Surface Accessibility and Conformational Changes in the N-terminal Domain of Type I Inositol Trisphosphate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Anyatonwu, Georgia; Joseph, Suresh K.

    2009-01-01

    To identify surface-accessible residues and monitor conformational changes of the type I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor protein in membranes, we have introduced 10 cysteine substitutions into the N-terminal ligand-binding domain. The reactivity of these mutants with progressively larger maleimide-polyethylene glycol derivatives (MPEG) was measured using a gel shift assay of tryptic fragments. The results indicate that the mutations fall into four categories as follows: sites that are highly accessible based on reactivity with the largest 20-kDa MPEG (S2C); sites that are moderately accessible based on reactivity only with 5-kDa MPEG (S6C, S7C, A189C, and S277C); sites whose accessibility is markedly enhanced by Ca2+ (S171C, S277C, and A575C); and sites that are inaccessible irrespective of incubation conditions (S217C, A245C, and S436C). The stimulation of accessibility induced by Ca2+ at the S277C site occurred with an EC50 of 0.8 μm and was mimicked by Sr2+ but not Ba2+. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate alone did not affect reactivity of any of the mutants in the presence or absence of Ca2+. The data are interpreted using crystal structures and EM reconstructions of the receptor. Our data identify N-terminal regions of the protein that become exposed upon Ca2+ binding and suggest possible orientations of the suppressor and ligand-binding domains that have implications for the mechanism of gating of the channel. PMID:19141613

  9. Characterization of the HIV N-terminal fusion peptide-containing region in context of key gp41 fusion conformations.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Kelly; Wexler-Cohen, Yael; Shai, Yechiel

    2006-08-04

    Central to our understanding of human immunodeficiency virus-induced fusion is the high resolution structure of fragments of the gp41 fusion protein folded in a low energy core conformation. However, regions fundamental to fusion, like the fusion peptide (FP), have yet to be characterized in the context of the cognate protein regardless of its conformation. Based on conformation-specific monoclonal antibody recognition, we identified the polar region consecutive to the N36 fragment as a stabilizer of trimeric coiled-coil assembly, thereby enhancing inhibitory potency. This tertiary organization is retained in the context of the hydrophobic FP (N70 fragment). Our data indicate that the N70 fragment recapitulates the expected organization of this region in the viral fusion intermediate (N-terminal half of the pre-hairpin intermediate (N-PHI)), which happens to be the prime target for fusion inhibitors. Regarding the low energy conformation, we show for the first time core formation in the context of the FP (N70 core). The alpha-helical and coiled-coil stabilizing polar region confers substantial thermal stability to the core, whereas the hydrophobic FP does not add further stability. For the two key fusion conformations, N-PHI and N70 core, we find that the FP adopts a nonhelical structure and directs higher order assembly (assembly of coiled coils in N-PHI and assembly of bundles in the N70 core). This supra-molecular organization of coiled coils or folded cores is seen only in the context of the FP. This study is the first to characterize the FP region in the context of the folded core and provides a basic understanding of the role of the elusive FP for key gp41 fusion conformations.

  10. Doublet N-Terminal Oriented Proteomics for N-Terminomics and Proteolytic Processing Identification.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benoit; Jacome, Alvaro Sebastian Vaca; Rompais, Magali; Carapito, Christine; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The study of the N-terminome and the precise identification of proteolytic processing events are key in biology. Dedicated methodologies have been developed as the comprehensive characterization of the N-terminome can hardly be achieved by standard proteomics methods. In this context, we have set up a trimethoxyphenyl phosphonium (TMPP) labeling approach that allows the characterization of both N-terminal and internal digestion peptides in a single experiment. This latter point is a major advantage of our strategy as most N-terminomics methods rely on the enrichment of N-terminal peptides and thus exclude internal peptides.We have implemented a double heavy/light TMPP labeling and an automated data validation workflow that make our doublet N-terminal oriented proteomics (dN-TOP) strategy efficient for high-throughput N-terminome analysis.

  11. Role of the N-terminal starch-binding domains in the kinetic properties of starch synthase III from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Hugo A; Busi, Maria V; Wayllace, Nahuel Z; Parisi, Gustavo; Ugalde, Rodolfo A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F

    2008-03-04

    Starch synthase III (SSIII), one of the SS isoforms involved in plant starch synthesis, has been reported to play a regulatory role in the synthesis of transient starch. SSIII from Arabidopsis thaliana contains 1025 amino acid residues and has an N-terminal transit peptide for chloroplast localization which is followed by three repeated starch-binding domains (SBDs; SSIII residues 22-591) and a C-terminal catalytic domain (residues 592-1025) similar to bacterial glycogen synthase. In this work, we constructed recombinant full-length and truncated isoforms of SSIII, lacking one, two, or three SBDs, and recombinant proteins, containing three, two, or one SBD, to investigate the role of these domains in enzyme activity. Results revealed that SSIII uses preferentially ADPGlc, although UDPGlc can also be used as a sugar donor substrate. When ADPGlc was used, the presence of the SBDs confers particular properties to each isoform, increasing the apparent affinity and the V max for the oligosaccharide acceptor substrate. However, no substantial changes in the kinetic parameters for glycogen were observed when UDPGlc was the donor substrate. Under glycogen saturating conditions, the presence of SBDs increases progressively the apparent affinity and V max for ADPGlc but not for UDPGlc. Adsorption assays showed that the N-terminal region of SSIII, containing three, two, or one SBD module have increased capacity to bind starch depending on the number of SBD modules, with the D23 protein (containing the second and third SBD module) being the one that makes the greatest contribution to binding. The results presented here suggest that the N-terminal SBDs have a regulatory role, showing a starch binding capacity and modulating the catalytic properties of SSIII.

  12. A quantitative analysis of spontaneous isoaspartate formation from N-terminal asparaginyl and aspartyl residues.

    PubMed

    Güttler, Bert H-O; Cynis, Holger; Seifert, Franziska; Ludwig, Hans-Henning; Porzel, Andrea; Schilling, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    The formation of isoaspartate (isoAsp) from asparaginyl or aspartyl residues is a spontaneous post-translational modification of peptides and proteins. Due to isopeptide bond formation, the structure and possibly function of peptides and proteins is altered. IsoAsp modifications within the peptide chain have been reported for many cytosolic proteins. Amyloid peptides (Aβ) deposited in Alzheimer's disease may carry an N-terminal isoAsp-modification. Here, we describe a quantitative investigation of isoAsp-formation from N-terminal Asn and Asp using model peptides similar to the Aβ N-terminus. The study is based on a newly developed separation of peptides using capillary electrophoresis (CE). 1H NMR was employed to validate the basic finding of N-terminal isoAsp-formation from Asp and Asn. Thereby, the isomerization of Asn at neutral pH (0.6 day(-1), peptide NGEF) is approximately six times faster than that within the peptide chain (AANGEF). The difference in velocity between Asn and Asp isomerization is approximately 50-fold. In contrast to N-terminal Asn, Asp isomerization is significantly accelerated at acidic pH. The kinetic solvent isotope (kD2O/kH2O) effect of 2.46 suggests a rate-limiting proton transfer in isoAsp-formation. The proton inventory is consistent with transfer of one proton in the transition state, supporting the previous notion of rate-limiting deprotonation of the peptide backbone amide during succinimide-intermediate formation. The study provides evidence for a spontaneous N-terminal isoAsp-formation within peptides and might explain the accumulation of N-terminal isoAsp in amyloid deposits.

  13. Engineered recombinant enteropeptidase catalytic subunit: effect of N-terminal modification.

    PubMed

    Song, Hye-Won; Choi, Sung-Il; Seong, Baik L

    2002-04-01

    Enteropeptidase (enterokinase) is a serine protease highly specific for recognition and cleavage of the target sequence of Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys (D4K). The three-dimensional structure of the enteropeptidase shows that the N-terminal amino acid is buried inside the protein providing molecular interactions necessary to maintain the conformation of the active site. To determine the influence of the N-terminal amino acid of enteropeptidase light chain (EK(L)) on the enzymatic activity, we constructed various mutants including 17 different single amino acid substitutions and three different extensions at the N-terminal end. The mutants of recombinant enteropeptidase (rEK(L)) were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and secreted into culture medium. Among 20 different mutants tested, the only mutant with the Ile --> Val substitution exhibited significant activity. The kinetic properties of the mutant protein were very similar to those of the wild-type rEK(L). Based on the three-dimensional structure where the N-terminal Ile is oriented into hydrophobic pocket, the results suggest that Val could substitute Ile without affecting the active conformation of the enzyme. The results also explain why all trypsin-like serine proteases carry either Ile or Val at the N-termini and none other amino acid residues are found. Moreover, this finding provides a mental framework for expressing the N-terminally engineered enteropeptidase in Escherichia coli, utilizing the known property of the methionine aminopeptidase that exhibits poor activity toward the N-terminal Met-Ile bond, but offers efficient cleavage of the Met-Val bond.

  14. Functional stabilization of an RNA recognition motif by a noncanonical N-terminal expansion.

    PubMed

    Netter, Catharina; Weber, Gert; Benecke, Heike; Wahl, Markus C

    2009-07-01

    RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) constitute versatile macromolecular interaction platforms. They are found in many components of spliceosomes, in which they mediate RNA and protein interactions by diverse molecular strategies. The human U11/U12-65K protein of the minor spliceosome employs a C-terminal RRM to bind hairpin III of the U12 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). This interaction comprises one side of a molecular bridge between the U11 and U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) and is reminiscent of the binding of the N-terminal RRMs in the major spliceosomal U1A and U2B'' proteins to hairpins in their cognate snRNAs. Here we show by mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that the beta-sheet surface and a neighboring loop of 65K C-terminal RRM are involved in RNA binding, as previously seen in canonical RRMs like the N-terminal RRMs of the U1A and U2B'' proteins. However, unlike U1A and U2B'', some 30 residues N-terminal of the 65K C-terminal RRM core are additionally required for stable U12 snRNA binding. The crystal structure of the expanded 65K C-terminal RRM revealed that the N-terminal tail adopts an alpha-helical conformation and wraps around the protein toward the face opposite the RNA-binding platform. Point mutations in this part of the protein had only minor effects on RNA affinity. Removal of the N-terminal extension significantly decreased the thermal stability of the 65K C-terminal RRM. These results demonstrate that the 65K C-terminal RRM is augmented by an N-terminal element that confers stability to the domain, and thereby facilitates stable RNA binding.

  15. C-Jun N-terminal Kinase and Apoptotic Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    hydrogen peroxide (H20 2) to induce JNK activation varied in different cell types. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), a presumed antioxidant (13,14...Down-regulation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphatase M3/6 and activation of JNK by hydrogen peroxide and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate...and Tan, T.-H. (2001) Down-regulation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphatase M3/6 and activation of JNK by hydrogen peroxide and pyrrolidine

  16. Classic phenotype of Coffin-Lowry syndrome in a female with stimulus-induced drop episodes and a genotype with preserved N-terminal kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Jones, Julie R; Basehore, Monica J; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2014-02-01

    An adolescent female presented with intellectual disability, stimulus-induced drop episodes (SIDEs), facial characteristics that include wide set eyes, short nose with wide columella, full and everted lips with wide mouth and progressive skeletal changes: scoliosis, spondylolisthesis and pectus excavatum. These findings were suggestive of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS), and this was confirmed by the identification of a novel mutation in RPS6KA3, a heterozygous one basepair duplication at nucleotide 1570 (c.1570dupA). This mutation occurs within the C-terminal kinase domain of the protein, and, therefore contradicts the previous report that SIDEs is only associated with premature truncation of the protein in the N-terminal kinase domain or upstream of this domain. As CLS is X-linked, it is unusual for a female to have such a classic phenotype.

  17. The preferential heterodimerization of human small heat shock proteins HSPB1 and HSPB6 is dictated by the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Heirbaut, Michelle; Lermyte, Frederik; Martin, Esther M; Beelen, Steven; Verschueren, Tim; Sobott, Frank; Strelkov, Sergei V; Weeks, Stephen D

    2016-11-15

    Small heat shock proteins are ATP-independent molecular chaperones. Their function is to bind partially unfolded proteins under stress conditions. In vivo, members of this chaperone family are known to preferentially assemble together forming large, polydisperse heterooligomers. The exact molecular mechanisms that drive specific heteroassociation are currently unknown. Here we study the oligomers formed between human HSPB1 and HSPB6. Using small-angle X-ray scattering we could characterize two distinct heterooligomeric species present in solution. By employing native mass spectrometry we show that such assemblies are formed purely from heterodimeric building blocks, in line with earlier cross-linking studies. Crucially, a detailed analysis of truncation variants reveals that the preferential association between these two sHSPs is solely mediated by their disordered N-terminal domains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of atom- and group-based truncations on biomolecules simulated with reaction-field electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Boris

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the reaction-field method of electrostatics is tested in molecular dynamics simulations of protein human interleukin-4 and a short DNA fragment in explicit solvent. Two truncation schemes are considered: one based on the position of atomic charges in water molecules and the other on the position of groups of charges. The group-based truncation leads to the melting of the DNA double helix. In contrast, the atom-based truncation maintains the helical structure intact. Similarly for the protein, the group-based truncation leads to an unfolding at pH 2 while the atom-based truncation produces stable trajectories at low and normal pH, in agreement with experiment. Artificial repulsion between charged residues associated with the group-based truncation is identified as the microscopic reason behind unfolding of the protein. Implications of different truncation schemes in reaction-field simulations of biomolecules are discussed. PMID:21311933

  19. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  20. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  1. Identification of specific antigenic epitope at N-terminal segment of enterovirus 71 (EV-71) VP1 protein and characterization of its use in recombinant form for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Bingfu; Xu, Mingjie; Dai, Xing; Purdy, Michael A.; Meng, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiologic agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). We sought to identify EV-71 specific antigens and develop serologic assays for acute-phase EV-71 infection. A series of truncated proteins within the N-terminal 100 amino acids (aa) of EV-71 VP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Western blot (WB) analysis showed that positions around 11–21 aa contain EV-71-specific antigenic sites, whereas positions 1–5 and 51–100 contain epitopes shared with human coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and human echovirus 6 (E-6). The N-terminal truncated protein of VP1, VP16–43, exhibited good stability and was recognized by anti-EV-71 specific rabbit sera. Alignment analysis showed that VP16–43 is highly conserved among EV-71 strains from different genotypes but was heterologous among other enteroviruses. When the GST-VP16–43 fusion protein was incorporated as antibody-capture agent in a WB assay and an ELISA for detecting anti-EV-71 IgM in human sera, sensitivities of 91.7% and 77.8% were achieved, respectively, with 100% specificity for both. The characterized EV-71 VP1 protein truncated to positions 6–43 aa has potential as an antigen for detection of anti-EV-71 IgM for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection in a WB format. PMID:24952304

  2. How Truncating Are 'Truncating Languages'? Evidence from Russian and German.

    PubMed

    Rathcke, Tamara V

    Russian and German have pr eviously been described as 'truncating', or cutting off target frequencies of the phrase-final pitch trajectories when the time available for voicing is compromised. However, supporting evidence is rare and limited to only a few pitch categories. This paper reports a production study conducted to document pitch adjustments to linguistic materials, in which the amount of voicing available for the realization of a pitch pattern varies from relatively long to extremely short. Productions of nuclear H+L*, H* and L*+H pitch accents followed by a low boundary tone were investigated in the two languages. The results of the study show that speakers of both 'truncating languages' do not utilize truncation exclusively when accommodating to different segmental environments. On the contrary, they employ several strategies - among them is truncation but also compression and temporal re-alignment - to produce the target pitch categories under increasing time pressure. Given that speakers can systematically apply all three adjustment strategies to produce some pitch patterns (H* L% in German and Russian) while not using truncation in others (H+L* L% particularly in Russian), we question the effectiveness of the typological classification of these two languages as 'truncating'. Moreover, the phonetic detail of truncation varies considerably, both across and within the two languages, indicating that truncation cannot be easily modeled as a unified phenomenon. The results further suggest that the phrase-final pitch adjustments are sensitive to the phonological composition of the tonal string and the status of a particular tonal event (associated vs. boundary tone), and do not apply to falling vs. rising pitch contours across the board, as previously put forward for German. Implications for the intonational phonology and prosodic typology are addressed in the discussion. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Palladium Mediated Rapid Deprotection of N-Terminal Cysteine under Native Chemical Ligation Conditions for the Efficient Preparation of Synthetically Challenging Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jbara, Muhammad; Maity, Suman Kumar; Seenaiah, Mallikanti; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-04-20

    Facilitating the process of chemical protein synthesis is an important goal in order to enable the efficient preparation of large and novel protein analogues. Native chemical ligation, which is widely used in the synthesis and semisynthesis of proteins, has been going through several developments to expedite the synthetic process and to obtain the target protein in high yield. A key aspect of this approach is the utilization of protecting groups for the N-terminal Cys in the middle fragments, which bear simultaneously the two reactive groups, i.e., N-terminal Cys and C-terminal thioester. Despite important progress in this area, as has been demonstrated in the use of thiazolidine protecting group in the synthesis of over 100 proteins, finding optimal protecting group(s) remains a challenge. For example, the thiazolidine removal step is very slow (>8 h), and in some cases the applied conditions lead to undesired side reactions. Here we show that water-soluble palladium(II) complexes are excellent reagents for the effective unmasking of thiazolidine, enabling its complete removal within 15 min under native chemical ligation conditions. Moreover, palladium is also able to rapidly remove propargyloxycarbonyl-protecting group from the N-terminal Cys in a similar efficiency. The utility of the new removal conditions for both protecting groups is exemplified in the rapid and efficient synthesis of Lys34-ubiquitinated H2B and for the first time neddlyated peptides derived from cullin1. The current approach expands the use of palladium in protein chemistry and should significantly facilitate the chemical and semisynthesis of synthetically challenging proteins from multiple fragments.

  4. Effects of N- and C-terminal fragments of substance P on ATPase and monoamine oxidase activities in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak, R; Turska, E; Lachowicz, L; Koziołkiewicz, W

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro influence of substance P (SP) C- and N-terminal fragments on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase and Ca2+,Mg2(+)-ATPase and monoamine oxidase (MAO) from synaptosomal membrane and extra-synaptosomal mitochondria were studied. The obtained results indicate: 1. C-terminal fragment of SP (SP6-11) in 10 microM concentration stimulates the Ca2+,Mg2(+)-ATPase activities from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Na+,K(+)-ATPase from cerebral cortex is hardly sensitive to the action of this fragment. 2. N-terminal fragment of SP (SP1-5) in 10 microM concentration increases Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. 3. N-terminal tetrapeptide (SP1-4) exerts no influence on ATPases independently from their brain localization. 4. The activity of monoamine oxidase after use of C- and N-terminal fragments is unchanged.

  5. Identification of the N-terminal region of TjZNT2, a Zrt/Irt-like protein family metal transporter, as a novel functional region involved in metal ion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sho; Morinaga, Yasuhiro; Obata, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2011-03-01

    The Zrt/Irt-like protein (ZIP) family of transporter proteins is involved in the uptake of essential metal elements in plants. Two homologous ZIP genes from Thlaspi japonicum, TjZNT1 and TjZNT2, encode products that share high amino acid sequence similarity except at the N-terminus and the cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane domains III and IV, and that have been shown to be Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) transporters, respectively. To identify the region that determines the ion selectivity of these transporters, we constructed a series of TjZNT1 and TjZNT2 chimeric genes and assayed for the Zn(2+) uptake of yeast cells expressing them. As a result, the extracellular N-terminal ends were identified as regions involved in Zn(2+) selectivity. TjZNT2 possesses a 36 amino acid hydrophilic extension at its N-terminus that is absent in native TjZNT1, and a mutant TjZNT2 lacking the N-terminal extension was shown to possess Zn(2+) uptake activity. This suggests that the extended N-terminal region inhibits Zn(2+) transport by TjZNT2. Further studies showed that it is the first 25 amino acid region of the N-terminus that is important for the inhibition of Zn(2+) transport. Furthermore, the N-terminal truncated TjZNT2 lacked Mn(2+) uptake activity. These findings suggest that the N-terminal region is a novel substrate selector in the ZIP family of transporters. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  6. Cloning and truncation modification of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene from Selaginella pulvinata.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Fu, Feng-Ling; Gou, Lin; Wang, Han-Guang; He, Gang; Li, Wan-Chen

    2013-01-10

    A homologous sequence was amplified from resurrection plant Selaginella pulvinta by RACE technique, proved to be the full-length cDNA of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase gene by homologous alignment and yeast complementation assay, and nominated as SpTPS1 gene. The open reading frame of this gene was truncated 225bp at the 5'-end, resulting the N-terminal truncation modification of 75 amino acids for its encoding protein. The TPS1 deletion mutant strain YSH290 of the brewer's yeast transformed by the truncated gene SpTPS1Δ and its original full-length version restored growth on the medium with glucose as a sole carbon source and displayed growth curves with no significant difference, indicating their encoding proteins functioning as TPS enzyme. The TPS activity of the mutant strain transformed by the truncated gene SpTPS1Δ was about six fold higher than that transformed by its original version, reasoning that the extra N-terminal extension of the full-length amino acid sequence acts as an inhibitory domain to trehalose synthesis. However, the trehalose accumulation of the mutant strain transformed by the truncated gene SpTPS1Δ was only 8% higher than that transformed by its original version. This result is explained by the feedback balance of trehalose content coordinated by the comparative activities between trehalose synthase and trehalase. The truncated gene SpTPS1Δ is suggested to be used in transgenic operation, together with the inhibition of trehalase activity by the application of validamycin A or genetic deficiency of the endogenous trehalase gene, for the enhancement of trehalose accumulation and improvement of abiotic tolerance in transgenic plants.

  7. Determining the N-terminal orientations of recombinant transmembrane proteins in the Escherichia coli plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Hsien; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Hsu, Min-Feng; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2015-01-01

    In silico algorithms have been the common approach for transmembrane (TM) protein topology prediction. However, computational tools may produce questionable results and experimental validation has proven difficult. Although biochemical strategies are available to determine the C-terminal orientation of TM proteins, experimental strategies to determine the N-terminal orientation are still limited but needed because the N-terminal end is essential for membrane targeting. Here, we describe a new and easy method to effectively determine the N-terminal orientation of the target TM proteins in Escherichia coli plasma membrane environment. D94N, the mutant of bacteriorhodopsin from Haloarcula marismortui, can be a fusion partner to increase the production of the target TM proteins if their N-termini are in cytoplasm (Nin orientation). To create a suitable linker for orientating the target TM proteins with the periplasmic N-termini (Nout orientation) correctly, we designed a three-TM-helix linker fused at the C-terminus of D94N fusion partner (termed D94N-3TM) and found that D94N-3TM can specifically improve the production of the Nout target TM proteins. In conclusion, D94N and D94N-3TM fusion partners can be applied to determine the N-terminal end of the target TM proteins oriented either Nin or Nout by evaluating the net expression of the fusion proteins. PMID:26462555

  8. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor.

    PubMed

    Monlezun, Laura; Phan, Gilles; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Enguéné, Véronique Y N; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In Gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved outer membrane factor (OMF) protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional PTM could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In Escherichia coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any modification. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X-ray structure at 3.8 Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitoylated cysteine.

  9. NRMT2 is an N-terminal monomethylase that primes for its homologue NRMT1.

    PubMed

    Petkowski, Janusz J; Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Tooley, John G; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L; Macara, Ian G; Schaner Tooley, Christine E

    2013-12-15

    NRMT (N-terminal regulator of chromatin condensation 1 methyltransferase) was the first eukaryotic methyltransferase identified to specifically methylate the free α-amino group of proteins. Since the discovery of this N-terminal methyltransferase, many new substrates have been identified and the modification itself has been shown to regulate DNA-protein interactions. Sequence analysis predicts one close human homologue of NRMT, METTL11B (methyltransferase-like protein 11B, now renamed NRMT2). We show in the present paper for the first time that NRMT2 also has N-terminal methylation activity and recognizes the same N-terminal consensus sequences as NRMT (now NRMT1). Both enzymes have similar tissue expression and cellular localization patterns. However, enzyme assays and MS experiments indicate that they differ in their specific catalytic functions. Although NRMT1 is a distributive methyltransferase that can mono-, di- and tri-methylate its substrates, NRMT2 is primarily a monomethylase. Concurrent expression of NRMT1 and NRMT2 accelerates the production of trimethylation, and we propose that NRMT2 activates NRMT1 by priming its substrates for trimethylation.

  10. NRMT2 is an N-terminal monomethylase that primes for its homolog NRMT1

    PubMed Central

    Petkowski, Janusz J.; Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Tooley, John G.; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Macara, Ian G.; Schaner Tooley, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal RCC1 methyltransferase (NRMT) was the first eukaryotic methyltransferase identified to specifically methylate the free α-amino group of proteins. Since the discovery of this N-terminal methyltransferase, many new substrates have been identified and the modification itself has been shown to regulate DNA-protein interactions. Sequence analysis predicts one close human homolog of NRMT, Methyltransferase-like protein 11B (METTL11B, now renamed NRMT2). We show here for the first time that NRMT2 also has N-terminal methylation activity and recognizes the same N-terminal consensus sequences as NRMT (now NRMT1). Both enzymes have similar tissue expression and cellular localization patterns. However, enzyme assays and mass spectrometry experiments indicate they differ in their specific catalytic functions. While NRMT1 is a distributive methyltransferase that can mono-, di-, and trimethylate its substrates, NRMT2 is primarily a monomethylase. Concurrent expression of NRMT1 and NRMT2 accelerates the production of trimethylation, and we propose that NRMT2 activates NRMT1 by priming its substrates for trimethylation. PMID:24090352

  11. Thermal unfolding of the N-terminal region of p53 monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Leasha J; Campbell, James C; Whitten, Steven T

    2012-11-01

    It has been estimated that 30% of eukaryotic protein and 70% of transcription factors are intrinsically disordered (ID). The biochemical significance of proteins that lack stable tertiary structure, however, is not clearly understood, largely owing to an inability to assign well-defined structures to specific biological tasks. In an attempt to investigate the structural character of ID protein, we have measured the circular dichroism spectrum of the N-terminal region of p53 over a range of temperatures and solution conditions. p53 is a well-studied transcription factor that has a proline-rich N-terminal ID region containing two activation domains. High proline content is a property commonly associated with ID, and thus p53 may be a good model system for investigating the biochemical importance of ID. The spectra presented here suggest that the N-terminal region of p53 may adopt an ordered structure under physiological conditions and that this structure can be thermally unfolded in an apparent two-state manner. The midpoint temperature for this thermal unfolding of the N-terminal region of p53 was at the near-physiological temperature of 39°C, suggesting the possibility of a physiological role for the observed structural equilibrium.

  12. Ascorbate as a pro-oxidant: mild N-terminal modification with vinylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Ball, Zachary T

    2017-02-04

    We describe divergent reactivity of vinylboronic acids for protein modification. In addition to previously reported copper-catalyzed backbone N-H modification, ascorbate in air mediates N-terminal functionalization with the same vinylboronate reagents. This mild and selective aqueous reactivity enables selective single-modification of the B chain of human insulin.

  13. The N-terminal acetyltransferase Naa10 is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Rasmus; Myklebust, Line M.; Thiel, Puja; Foyn, Håvard; Fladmark, Kari E.; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation, catalysed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and involves the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the α-amino group of the first amino acid. Functions of N-terminal acetylation include protein degradation and sub-cellular targeting. Recent findings in humans indicate that a dysfunctional Nα-acetyltransferase (Naa) 10, the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major NAT, is associated with lethality during infancy. In the present study, we identified the Danio rerio orthologue zebrafish Naa 10 (zNaa10). In vitro N-terminal acetylation assays revealed that zNaa10 has NAT activity with substrate specificity highly similar to that of human Naa10. Spatiotemporal expression pattern was determined by in situ hybridization, showing ubiquitous expression with especially strong staining in brain and eye. By morpholino-mediated knockdown, we demonstrated that naa10 morphants displayed increased lethality, growth retardation and developmental abnormalities like bent axis, abnormal eyes and bent tails. In conclusion, we identified the zebrafish Naa10 orthologue and revealed that it is essential for normal development and viability of zebrafish. PMID:26251455

  14. Selecting protein N-terminal peptides by combined fractional diagonal chromatography.

    PubMed

    Staes, An; Impens, Francis; Van Damme, Petra; Ruttens, Bart; Goethals, Marc; Demol, Hans; Timmerman, Evy; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris

    2011-07-14

    In recent years, procedures for selecting the N-terminal peptides of proteins with analysis by mass spectrometry have been established to characterize protease-mediated cleavage and protein α-N-acetylation on a proteomic level. As a pioneering technology, N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) has been used in numerous studies in which these protein modifications were investigated. Derivatization of primary amines--which can include stable isotope labeling--occurs before trypsin digestion so that cleavage occurs after arginine residues. Strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography results in the removal of most of the internal peptides. Diagonal, reversed-phase peptide chromatography, in which the two runs are separated by reaction with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid, results in the removal of the C-terminal peptides and remaining internal peptides and the fractionation of the sample. We describe here the fully matured N-terminal COFRADIC protocol as it is currently routinely used, including the most substantial improvements (including treatment with glutamine cyclotransferase and pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase to remove pyroglutamate before SCX, and a sample pooling scheme to reduce the overall number of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses) that were made since its original publication. Completion of the N-terminal COFRADIC procedure takes ~5 d.

  15. Alzheimer therapy with an antibody against N-terminal Abeta 4-X and pyroglutamate Abeta 3-X

    PubMed Central

    Antonios, Gregory; Borgers, Henning; Richard, Bernhard C.; Brauß, Andreas; Meißner, Julius; Weggen, Sascha; Pena, Vladimir; Pillot, Thierry; Davies, Sarah L.; Bakrania, Preeti; Matthews, David; Brownlees, Janet; Bouter, Yvonne; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Full-length Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40, N-truncated pyroglutamate Aβ3-42 and Aβ4-42 are major variants in the Alzheimer brain. Aβ4-42 has not been considered as a therapeutic target yet. We demonstrate that the antibody NT4X and its Fab fragment reacting with both the free N-terminus of Aβ4-x and pyroglutamate Aβ3-X mitigated neuron loss in Tg4-42 mice expressing Aβ4-42 and completely rescued spatial reference memory deficits after passive immunization. NT4X and its Fab fragment also rescued working memory deficits in wild type mice induced by intraventricular injection of Aβ4-42. NT4X reduced pyroglutamate Aβ3-x, Aβx-40 and Thioflavin-S positive plaque load after passive immunization of 5XFAD mice. Aβ1-x and Aβx-42 plaque deposits were unchanged. Importantly, for the first time, we demonstrate that passive immunization using the antibody NT4X is therapeutically beneficial in Alzheimer mouse models showing that N-truncated Aβ starting with position four in addition to pyroglutamate Aβ3-x is a relevant target to fight Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26626428

  16. Alzheimer therapy with an antibody against N-terminal Abeta 4-X and pyroglutamate Abeta 3-X.

    PubMed

    Antonios, Gregory; Borgers, Henning; Richard, Bernhard C; Brauß, Andreas; Meißner, Julius; Weggen, Sascha; Pena, Vladimir; Pillot, Thierry; Davies, Sarah L; Bakrania, Preeti; Matthews, David; Brownlees, Janet; Bouter, Yvonne; Bayer, Thomas A

    2015-12-02

    Full-length Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40, N-truncated pyroglutamate Aβ3-42 and Aβ4-42 are major variants in the Alzheimer brain. Aβ4-42 has not been considered as a therapeutic target yet. We demonstrate that the antibody NT4X and its Fab fragment reacting with both the free N-terminus of Aβ4-x and pyroglutamate Aβ3-X mitigated neuron loss in Tg4-42 mice expressing Aβ4-42 and completely rescued spatial reference memory deficits after passive immunization. NT4X and its Fab fragment also rescued working memory deficits in wild type mice induced by intraventricular injection of Aβ4-42. NT4X reduced pyroglutamate Aβ3-x, Aβx-40 and Thioflavin-S positive plaque load after passive immunization of 5XFAD mice. Aβ1-x and Aβx-42 plaque deposits were unchanged. Importantly, for the first time, we demonstrate that passive immunization using the antibody NT4X is therapeutically beneficial in Alzheimer mouse models showing that N-truncated Aβ starting with position four in addition to pyroglutamate Aβ3-x is a relevant target to fight Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Proteasome-mediated degradation of the C-terminus of the Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid protein precursor: effect of C-terminal truncation on production of beta-amyloid protein.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Janelle; Williamson, Nicholas A; Hill, Andrew F; Sernee, M Fleur; Masters, Colin L; Small, David H

    2003-11-01

    The beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) is derived by proteolytic processing of the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Cleavage of APP by beta-secretase generates a C-terminal fragment (APP-CTFbeta), which is subsequently cleaved by gamma-secretase to produce Abeta. Our previous studies have shown that the proteasome can cleave the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of APP. To identify proteasome cleavage sites in APP, two peptides homologous to the C-terminus of APP were incubated with recombinant 20S proteasome. Cleavage of the peptides was monitored by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Proteasome cleaved the APP C-terminal peptides at several sites, including a region around the sequence YENPTY that interacts with several APP-binding proteins. To examine the effect of this cleavage on Abeta production, APP-CTFbeta and mutant forms of APP-CTFbeta terminating on either side of the YENPTY sequence were expressed in CHO cells. Truncation of APP-CTFbeta on the N-terminal side of the YENPTY sequence at residue 677 significantly decreased the amount of Abeta produced, whereas truncation on the C-terminal side of residue 690 had little effect. The results suggest that proteasomal cleavage of the cytosolic domain of APP at the YENPTY sequence decreases gamma-secretase processing, and consequently inhibits Abeta production. Therefore, the proteasome-dependent trafficking pathway of APP may be a valid therapeutic target for altering Abeta production in the Alzheimer's disease brain.

  18. Subjective contours along truncated letters.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Barbara; Vecellio, Elia

    2012-01-01

    The truncation of upper-case words can result in a subjective contour along the truncated ends of the letters. We explored this effect in two experiments designed to tease apart the processes responsible: in particular, the possible role of letter recognition. Such a role would indicate an unprecedented involvement of "high-level vision" in the genesis of subjective contours. In experiment 1, we confirmed the basic effect of word truncation in eliciting a subjective contour, using only letters where truncation does not eliminate any critical features. In experiment 2, we showed that the effect is not confined to words/letters but is equally strong for controlled non-letter stimuli that, like words, have many forms that have an inflection or an intersection near the centre. Truncation at one end then introduces proportional imbalance between upper and lower sections of the figures. We conclude from the two experiments that part of the effect is due to vertical shortening per se and the rest to the proportional imbalance introduced by the truncation. The effect of proportional imbalance, a novel determinant of subjective contours, may result from experience with letters, although the effect is not "high level" in requiring the recognition of specific letters.

  19. Removal of the Cardiac Troponin I N-terminal Extension Improves Cardiac Function in Aged Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Yuan, Chao; Jin, Jian-Ping; de Tombe, Pieter P.; Solaro, R. John

    2010-01-01

    The cardiac troponin I (cTnI) isoform contains a unique N-terminal extension that functions to modulate activation of cardiac myofilaments. During cardiac remodeling restricted proteolysis of cTnI removes this cardiac specific N-terminal modulatory extension to alter myofilament regulation. We have demonstrated expression of the N-terminal-deleted cTnI (cTnI-ND) in the heart decreased the development of the cardiomyopathy like phenotype in a β-adrenergic-deficient transgenic mouse model. To investigate the potential beneficial effects of cTnI-ND on the development of naturally occurring cardiac dysfunction, we measured the hemodynamic and biochemical effects of cTnI-ND transgenic expression in the aged heart. Echocardiographic measurements demonstrate cTnI-ND transgenic mice exhibit increased systolic and diastolic functions at 16 months of age compared with age-matched controls. This improvement likely results from decreased Ca2+ sensitivity and increased cross-bridge kinetics as observed in skinned papillary bundles from young transgenic mice prior to the effects of aging. Hearts of cTnI-ND transgenic mice further exhibited decreased β myosin heavy chain expression compared to age matched non-transgenic mice as well as altered cTnI phosphorylation. Finally, we demonstrated cTnI-ND expressed in the heart is not phosphorylated indicating the cTnI N-terminal is necessary for the higher level phosphorylation of cTnI. Taken together, our data suggest the regulated proteolysis of cTnI during cardiac stress to remove the unique cardiac N-terminal extension functions to improve cardiac contractility at the myofilament level and improve overall cardiac function. PMID:20410305

  20. Clinical correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and angiographic coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Demóstenes G L; Silva, Ricardo P; Barboza, Daniella R M M; Lima-Júnior, Roberto C P; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical correlation between angiographic coronary atherosclerosis and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide along with other known correlated factors. In total, 153 patients with a diagnostic hypothesis of stable angina, unstable angina or acute myocardial infarction were classified as group A (patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries) or group B (patients with angiographic coronary atherosclerosis). The two groups were analyzed with respect to the following factors: gender, age, body mass index, abdominal circumference, smoking, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, early family history of atherosclerosis, statin use, the presence of metabolic syndrome, clinical presentation and biochemical factors, including cholesterol, creatinine and fibrinogen plasma concentrations, monocyte counts and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. Univariate analyses comparing the two groups revealed that group B patients more frequently had diabetes, used statins and had systolic dysfunction, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels ≥ 250 pg/mL, fibrinogen levels >500 mg/dL and ≥ 501 monocytes/mm3 compared with group A patients (p<0.05). Nevertheless, multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the independent predictors of angiographic coronary atherosclerosis were an N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level ≥ 250 pg/mL, diabetes mellitus and increased monocyte numbers and fibrinogen plasma concentration, regardless of the creatinine level or the presence of systolic dysfunction. An N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide plasma concentration of ≥ 250 pg/mL is an independent predictor of angiographic coronary atherosclerosis.

  1. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  2. Absence of some truncated genes in the amphidiploid Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Jamet, E; Durr, A; Fleck, J

    1987-01-01

    As an initial step towards understanding how a multigene family evolves after an interspecific hybridization and subsequent chromosomal doubling, genomic Southern blots of three related species were compared: Nicotiana tabacum (the progeny), and Nicotiana sylvestris and Nicotiana tomentosiformis (the progenitors). Genomic restriction fragments generated by two endonucleases were hybridized with a cDNA of the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from N. sylvestris. The restriction pattern of the DNA of the progenitors revealed considerable polymorphism of restriction-fragment lengths. All the fragments in N. tabacum, except one, have a corresponding fragment in one of the progenitors. Some fragments present in the parents were absent from the progeny: they may correspond to truncated genes consisting of only part of the 3' portion of the gene.

  3. Antigenic and immunogenic properties of truncated VP28 protein of white spot syndrome virus in Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Du, Hua-Hua; Hou, Chong-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Guo; Xie, Rong-hui; Wang, Yi-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies identify VP28 envelope protein of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) as its main antigenic protein. Although implicated in viral infectivity, its functional role remains unclear. In the current study, we described the production of polyclonal antibodies to recombinant truncated VP28 proteins including deleted N-terminal (rVP28ΔN), C-terminal (rVP28ΔC) and middle (rVP28ΔM). In antigenicity assays, antibodies developed from VP28 truncations lacking the N-terminal or middle regions showed significantly lowered neutralization of WSSV in crayfish, Procambarus clarkii. Further immunogenicity analysis showed reduced relative percent survival (RPS) in crayfish vaccinating with these truncations before challenge with WSSV. These results indicated that N-terminal (residues 1-27) and middle region (residues 35-95) were essential to maintain the neutralizing linear epitopes of VP28 and responsible in eliciting immune response. Thus, it is most likely that these regions are exposed on VP28, and will be useful for rational design of effective vaccines targeting VP28 of WSSV.

  4. N-Terminal Domain of Feline Calicivirus (FCV) Proteinase-Polymerase Contributes to the Inhibition of Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongxia; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Yongxiang; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    Feline Calicivirus (FCV) infection results in the inhibition of host protein synthesis, known as “shut-off”. However, the precise mechanism of shut-off remains unknown. Here, we found that the FCV strain 2280 proteinase-polymerase (PP) protein can suppress luciferase reporter gene expression driven by endogenous and exogenous promoters. Furthermore, we found that the N-terminal 263 aa of PP (PPN-263) determined its shut-off activity using the expression of truncated proteins. However, the same domain of the FCV strain F9 PP protein failed to inhibit gene expression. A comparison between strains 2280 and F9 indicated that Val27, Ala96 and Ala98 were key sites for the inhibition of host gene expression by strain 2280 PPN-263, and PPN-263 exhibited the ability to shut off host gene expression as long as it contained any two of the three amino acids. Because the N-terminus of the PP protein is required for its proteinase and shut-off activities, we investigated the ability of norovirus 3C-like proteins (3CLP) from the GII.4-1987 and -2012 isolates to interfere with host gene expression. The results showed that 3CLP from both isolates was able to shut off host gene expression, but 3CLP from GII.4-2012 had a stronger inhibitory activity than that from GII.4-1987. Finally, we found that 2280 PP and 3CLP significantly repressed reporter gene transcription but did not affect mRNA translation. Our results provide new insight into the mechanism of the FCV-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. PMID:27447663

  5. Identification and Functional Assessment of Age-Dependent Truncations to Cx46 and Cx50 in the Human Lens

    PubMed Central

    Slavi, Nefeli; Wang, Zhen; Harvey, Lucas; Schey, Kevin L.; Srinivas, Miduturu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many proteins in the lens undergo extensive posttranslational modifications (PTMs) with age, leading to alterations in their function. The extent to which lens gap junction proteins, Cx46 and Cx50, accumulate PTMs with aging is not known. In this study, we identified truncations in Cx46 and Cx50 in the human lens using mass spectrometry. We also examined the effect of truncations on channel function using electrophysiological measurements. Methods Human lenses were dissected into cortex, outer nucleus, and nucleus regions, and fiber cell membranes were subjected to trypsin digestion. Tryptic peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC)–electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI/MS/MS). Effects of truncations on channel conductance, permeability, and gating were assessed in transfected cells. Results Cleavage sites were identified in the C-terminus, the cytoplasmic loop, and the N-terminus of Cx46 and Cx50. Levels of C-terminal truncations, which were found at residues 238 to 251 in Cx46 and at residues 238 to 253 and 274 to 284 in Cx50, were similar in different lens regions. In contrast, levels of truncations in cytoplasmic loop and N-terminal domains of Cx46 and Cx50 increased dramatically from outer cortex to nucleus. Most of the C-terminally truncated proteins were functional, whereas truncations in the cytoplasmic loop did not result in the formation of functional channels. Conclusions Accumulation of cytoplasmic loop and N-terminal truncations in the core might lead to decreases in coupling with age. This reduction is expected to lead to an increase in intracellular calcium and a decrease in levels of glutathione in the nucleus. These changes may ultimately lead to age-related nuclear cataracts. PMID:27787559

  6. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  7. Temperature effects on the hydrodynamic radius of the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Timothy D; Tarver, Micheal J; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often characterized in terms of the hydrodynamic radius, Rh . The Rh of IDPs are known to depend on fractional proline content and net charge, where increased numbers of proline residues and increased net charge cause larger Rh . Though sequence and charge effects on the Rh of IDPs have been studied, the temperature sensitivity has been noted only briefly. Reported here are Rh measurements in the temperature range of 5-75°C for the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein, p53(1-93). Of note, the Rh of this protein fragment was highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing from 35 Å at 5°C to 26 Å at 75°C. Computer generated simulations of conformationally dynamic and disordered polypeptide chains were performed to provide a hypothesis for the heat-induced compaction of p53(1-93) structure, which was opposite to the heat-induced increase in Rh observed for a model folded protein. The simulations demonstrated that heat caused Rh to trend toward statistical coil values for both proteins, indicating that the effects of heat on p53(1-93) structure could be interpreted as thermal denaturation. The simulation data also predicted that proline content contributed minimally to the native Rh of p53(1-93), which was confirmed by measuring Rh for a substitution variant that had all 22 proline residues changed for glycine.

  8. The N-terminal octapeptide acts as a dimerization inhibitor of SARS coronavirus 3C-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ping; Fan, Keqiang; Chen, Hao; Ma, Liang; Huang, Changkang; Tan, Lei; Xi, Dong; Li, Chunmei; Liu, Ying; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2006-01-20

    The 3C-like proteinase of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been proposed to be a key target for structural-based drug design against SARS. Accurate determination of the dimer dissociation constant and the role of the N-finger (residues 1-7) will provide more insights into the enzyme catalytic mechanism of SARS 3CL proteinase. The dimer dissociation constant of the wild-type protein was determined to be 14.0microM by analytical ultracentrifugation method. The N-finger fragment of the enzyme plays an important role in enzyme dimerization as shown in the crystal structure. Key residues in the N-finger have been studied by site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme assay, and analytical ultracentrifugation. A single mutation of M6A was found to be critical to maintain the dimer structure of the enzyme. The N-terminal octapeptide N8 and its mutants were also synthesized and tested for their potency as dimerization inhibitors. Peptide cleavage assay confirms that peptide N8 is a dimerization inhibitor with a K(i) of 2.20mM. The comparison of the inhibitory activities of N8 and its mutants indicates that the hydrophobic interaction of Met-6 and the electrostatic interaction of Arg-4 contribute most for inhibitor binding. This study describes the first example of inhibitors targeting the dimeric interface of SARS 3CL proteinase, providing a novel strategy for drug design against SARS and other coronaviruses.

  9. Inhibition of N-Terminal Lysines Acetylation and Transcription Factor Assembly by Epirubicin Induced Deranged Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahper N.; Danishuddin, Mohd; Varshney, Bhavna; Lal, Sunil K.; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    Epirubicin (EPI), an anthracycline antitumour antibiotic, is a known intercalating and DNA damaging agent. Here, we study the molecular interaction of EPI with histones and other cellular targets. EPI binding with histone core protein was predicted with spectroscopic and computational techniques. The molecular distance r, between donor (histone H3) and acceptor (EPI) was estimated using Förster’s theory of non-radiation energy transfer and the detailed binding phenomenon is expounded. Interestingly, the concentration dependent reduction in the acetylated states of histone H3 K9/K14 was observed suggesting more repressed chromatin state on EPI treatment. Its binding site near N-terminal lysines is further characterized by thermodynamic determinants and molecular docking studies. Specific DNA binding and inhibition of transcription factor (Tf)-DNA complex formation implicates EPI induced transcriptional inhibition. EPI also showed significant cell cycle arrest in drug treated cells. Chromatin fragmentation and loss of membrane integrity in EPI treated cells is suggestive of their commitment to cell death. This study provides an analysis of nucleosome dynamics during EPI treatment and provides a novel insight into its action. PMID:23251640

  10. A new family of growth and differentiation factors derived from the N-terminal domain of proopiomelanocortin (N-POMC).

    PubMed

    Denef, C; Van Bael, A

    1998-06-01

    There is a large body of in vitro evidence that pituitary function is not only dependent on hormonal signals from the brain but also on paracrine signals produced in the tissue itself. These signals appear to be involved in the control of pituitary hormone secretion as well as in pituitary cell differentiation and development (for review see Denef C. Paracrine mechanisms in the pituitary. In: Imura H, editor. The pituitary gland, 2nd ed. Raven Press, 1994: 351-378; Denef C. Autocrine/paracrine intermediates in hormone action and modulation of cellular responses to hormones. In: Conn M, editor. Handbook of Physiology. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998 (in press)). The paracrine factors which have been identified in the pituitary belong to diverse biological molecules such as neuropeptides, acetylcholine, growth factors, cytokines and posttranslationally modified derivatives of pituitary hormone such as cleaved prolactin (PRL) and the gonadotropin alpha-subunit. Recently, we have identified several N-terminal fragments of the polypeptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC) as a novel family of growth and differentiation factors in the rat anterior pituitary.

  11. Fragment based discovery of Arginine isosteres through REPLACE: towards non-ATP competitive CDK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Liu, Shu; Perkins, Tracy; Abbott, Jennifer; Anderson, Erin; McInnes, Campbell

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop non-ATP competitive CDK2/cyclin A inhibitors, the REPLACE strategy has been applied to generate fragment alternatives for the N-terminal tetrapeptide of the cyclin binding motif (HAKRRLIF) involved in substrate recruitment prior to phosphotransfer. The docking approach used for the prediction of small molecule mimics for peptide determinants was validated through reproduction of experimental binding modes of known inhibitors and provides useful information for evaluating binding to protein-protein interaction sites. Further to this, potential arginine isosteres predicted using the validated LigandFit docking method were ligated to the truncated C-terminal peptide, RLIF using solid phase synthesis and evaluated in a competitive binding assay. After testing, identified fragments were shown to represent not only appropriate mimics for a critical arginine residue but also to interact effectively with a minor hydrophobic pocket present in the binding groove. Further evaluation of binding modes was undertaken to optimize the potency of these compounds. Through further application of the REPLACE strategy in this study, peptide-small molecule hybrid CDK2 inhibitors were identified that are more drug-like and suitable for further optimization as anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:24286762

  12. Plasmodium falciparum Werner homologue is a nuclear protein and its biochemical activities reside in the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Farhana; Tarique, Mohammed; Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2016-01-01

    RecQ helicases, also addressed as a gatekeeper of genome, are an inevitable family of genome scrutiny proteins conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and play a vital role in DNA metabolism. The deficiencies of three RecQ proteins out of five are involved in genetic abnormalities like Bloom syndrome (BS), Werner syndrome (WS), and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS). It is noteworthy that Plasmodium falciparum contains only two members of the RecQ family as opposed to five members present in the host Homo sapiens. In the present study, we report the biochemical characterization of the homologue of Werner (Wrn) helicase from P. falciparum 3D7 strain. Although there are significant sequence conservations between Wrn helicases of both H. sapiens and P. falciparum as well as among all the other Plasmodium species, they contain some peculiar differences also. In silico studies reveal that PfWrn is evolutionarily close to the bacterial RecQ protein. The N-terminal fragment (PfWrnN) contains all the helicase motifs along with all the functional domains and the predicted structure resembles with the human RecQ1 protein, whereas the C-terminal fragment (PfWrnC) contains no significant domain. Biochemical characterization further revealed that purified recombinant PfWrnN shows ATPase and DNA helicase activity in 3' to 5' direction, but PfWrnC lacks the ATPase and helicase activities. Immunofluorescence study shows that PfWrn is expressed in all the stages of intraerythrocytic development of the P. falciparum 3D7 strain and localizes distinctly in the nucleus. This study can be used for further characterization of RecQ helicases that will aid in understanding the physiological significance of these helicases in the malaria parasite.

  13. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex.

  14. Expression of a truncated form of ribosomal protein L3 confers resistance to pokeweed antiviral protein and the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Di, Rong; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2005-08-01

    The contamination of important agricultural products such as wheat, barley, or maize with the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) due to infection with Fusarium species is a worldwide problem. Trichothecenes inhibit protein synthesis by targeting ribosomal protein L3. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a ribosome-inactivating protein binds to L3 to depurinate the alpha-sarcin/loop of the large rRNA. Plants transformed with the wild-type PAP show lesions and express very low levels of PAP because PAP autoregulates its expression by destabilizing its own mRNA. We show here that transgenic tobacco plants expressing both the wild-type PAP and a truncated form of yeast L3 (L3delta) are phenotypically normal. PAP mRNA and protein levels are very high in these plants, indicating that L3delta suppresses the autoregulation of PAP mRNA expression. Ribosomes are not depurinated in the transgenic plants expressing PAP and L3delta, even though PAP is associated with ribosomes. The expression of the endogenous tobacco ribosomal protein L3 is up-regulated in these plants and they are resistant to the Fusarium mycotoxin DON. These results demonstrate that expression of an N-terminal fragment of yeast L3 leads to trans-dominant resistance to PAP and the trichothecene mycotoxin DON, providing evidence that both toxins target L3 by a common mechanism.

  15. Absence of N-terminal acetyltransferase diversification during evolution of eukaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Om Singh; Faustino, Alexandra; Prudêncio, Pedro; Van Damme, Petra; Cox, Cymon J; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2016-02-10

    Protein N-terminal acetylation is an ancient and ubiquitous co-translational modification catalyzed by a highly conserved family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Prokaryotes have at least 3 NATs, whereas humans have six distinct but highly conserved NATs, suggesting an increase in regulatory complexity of this modification during eukaryotic evolution. Despite this, and against our initial expectations, we determined that NAT diversification did not occur in the eukaryotes, as all six major human NATs were most likely present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA). Furthermore, we also observed that some NATs were actually secondarily lost during evolution of major eukaryotic lineages; therefore, the increased complexity of the higher eukaryotic proteome occurred without a concomitant diversification of NAT complexes.

  16. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    PubMed

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  17. Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin binds to target cells via the N-terminal 30 amino acids.

    PubMed

    Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Ohnishi, Shinya; Kamitani, Shigeki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2011-03-01

    Bordetella dermonecrotic toxin (DNT) affects the biological function of host cells by activating intracellular Rho GTPases. The toxin binds to unidentified receptor(s) via 54 N-terminal amino acids, undergoes intramolecular cleavage on the C-terminal side of Arg(44) by furin or furin-like protease, and eventually enters the cytoplasm where the Rho GTPases reside. The binding to the receptor(s) and intramolecular cleavage are essential for DNT to intoxicate cells, and the 54 amino-acid binding domain encompasses the cleavage site, however, it is unclear whether these two events are related. In this study, we could narrow down the cell-binding domain to the N-terminal amino acids 2-30. The region does not contain the furin-recognition site, indicating that the cell binding and the intramolecular cleavage are independent events.

  18. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Marcianò, G; Huang, D T

    2016-02-01

    The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  19. The N-terminal domains of spider silk proteins assemble ultrafast and protected from charge screening.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Simone; Zwettler, Fabian U; Johnson, Christopher M; Neuweiler, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Web spiders assemble spidroin monomers into silk fibres of unrivalled tensile strength at remarkably high spinning speeds of up to 1 m s(-1). The spidroin N-terminal domain contains a charge-driven, pH-sensitive relay that controls self-association by an elusive mechanism. The underlying kinetics have not yet been reported. Here we engineer a fluorescence switch into the isolated N-terminal domain from spidroin 1 of the major ampullate gland of the nursery web spider E. australis that monitors dimerization. We observe ultrafast association that is surprisingly insensitive to salt, contrasting the classical screening effects in accelerated, charged protein interfaces. To gain deeper mechanistic insight, we mutate each of the protonatable residue side chains and probe their contributions. Two vicinal aspartic acids are critically involved in an unusual process of accelerated protein association that is protected from screening by electrolytes, potentially facilitating the rapid synthesis of silk fibres by web spiders.

  20. Involvement of the N-terminal region in alpha-crystallin-lens membrane recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifeanyi, F.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that alpha-crystallin binds specifically, in a saturable manner, to lens membrane. To determine the region of the alpha-crystallin molecule that might be involved in this binding, native alpha-crystallin from the bovine lens has been treated by limited digestion with trypsin, to produce alpha-A molecules with an intact C-terminal region, and a nicked N-terminal region. Compared to intact alpha-crystallin, trypsin-treated alpha-crystallin binds less avidly to lens membrane, suggesting that the N-terminal region of the alpha-A molecule may play a key role in the recognition between lens membrane and crystallin.

  1. Absence of N-terminal acetyltransferase diversification during evolution of eukaryotic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Om Singh; Faustino, Alexandra; Prudêncio, Pedro; Van Damme, Petra; Cox, Cymon J.; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation is an ancient and ubiquitous co-translational modification catalyzed by a highly conserved family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Prokaryotes have at least 3 NATs, whereas humans have six distinct but highly conserved NATs, suggesting an increase in regulatory complexity of this modification during eukaryotic evolution. Despite this, and against our initial expectations, we determined that NAT diversification did not occur in the eukaryotes, as all six major human NATs were most likely present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA). Furthermore, we also observed that some NATs were actually secondarily lost during evolution of major eukaryotic lineages; therefore, the increased complexity of the higher eukaryotic proteome occurred without a concomitant diversification of NAT complexes. PMID:26861501

  2. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O’Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-01-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics. PMID:26678960

  3. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Baker, Scott E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-06-17

    Proteolytic processing is a ubiquitous, irreversible posttranslational modification that plays an important role in cellular regulation in all living organisms. Herein we report a resin-assisted positive selection method for specifically enriching protein N-terminal peptides to facilitate the characterization of proteolytic processing events by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this approach, proteins are initially reduced and alkylated and their lysine residues are converted to homoarginines. Then, protein N-termini are selectively converted to reactive thiol groups. We demonstrate that these sequential reactions were achieved with nearly quantitative efficiencies. Thiol-containing N-terminal peptides are then captured (>98% efficiency) by a thiol-affinity resin, a significant improvement over the traditional avidin/biotin enrichment. Application to cell lysates of Aspergillus niger, a filamentous fungus of interest for biomass degradation, enabled the identification of 1672 unique protein N-termini and proteolytic cleavage sites from 690 unique proteins.

  4. N-terminal-prolonged vinyl ester-based peptides as selective proteasome beta1 subunit inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Destro, Federica; Vertuani, Gianni; Marastoni, Mauro; Gavioli, Riccardo; Tomatis, Roberto

    2009-08-01

    The synthesis and biological properties of vinyl ester peptide-based molecules bearing linear N-terminal amino acids are reported. Compounds were tested in vitro for their capacity to inhibit the chymotryptic-, tryptic-like, and post-acidic activities of the proteasome. Some analogues showed selective inhibition of post-acidic (PGPH) activity, which is attributed to the beta1 subunit. Interestingly, active compounds demonstrated higher inhibitory activity toward 'standard' proteasomes than toward immunoproteasomes. The inhibitory potency was found to be related to the amino acidic sequence and to the length of the N-terminal residues. The new inhibitors demonstrated resistance to plasmatic proteases and a good capacity to permeate the cell membrane.

  5. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-12-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics.

  6. The S-Layer Proteins of Two Bacillus stearothermophilus Wild-Type Strains Are Bound via Their N-Terminal Region to a Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Identical Chemical Composition

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, Eva Maria; Leitner, Karl; Jarosch, Marina; Hotzy, Christoph; Zayni, Sonja; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1998-01-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1γ chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  7. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract: XXX aminopyrazoles, a new class of c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors, have been synthesized and the biochemical IC50 has been...have also been generated as backups. XXX compounds from the pyridopyrimidinone class have been synthesized and tested in biochemical and cell based...assays, and XXX compounds from the amino acid transporter analog class have been made and tested in biochemical assays. The goal of this work is to

  8. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    PubMed Central

    Monlezun, Laura; Phan, Gilles; Benabdelhak, Houssain; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Enguéné, Véronique Y. N.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In Gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved outer membrane factor (OMF) protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional PTM could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In Escherichia coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any modification. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X-ray structure at 3.8 Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitoylated cysteine. PMID:26191054

  9. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Philip LoGrasso CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Scripps Research... Lateral Sclerosis ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0431 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0431 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Philip...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30September2012-29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic

  10. Multicanonical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the N-terminal Domain of Protein L9

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Fatih; Jiang, Ping; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe multicanonical molecular dynamic simulations of the N-terminal domain of the protein L9. Analyzing free energy landscapes and thermal ordering, we propose a possible folding mechanism for the protein. By comparing our results with that of molecular dynamics runs of the protein at constant temperature, we find that multicanonical molecular dynamics leads to orders of magnitude higher sampling of folding transitions. PMID:25253918

  11. Thermodynamics of the protonation equilibria of two fragments of N-terminal β-hairpin of FPB28 WW domain.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2012-01-12

    The pK(a) values of two peptides derived from the formin-binding protein 28 WW domain [Ac-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-NH(2) (D7), Ac-Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH(2) (D9)] were determined by potentiometric titration in the temperature range from 25 to 60 °C, and their heat capacities were determined, by differential scanning calorimetry, in the temperature range from 10 to 90 °C. For both peptides, heat capacity has a maximum at t ≈ 50 °C, with height about 0.1 kcal/(mol × deg), suggesting that a modest unfolding transition occurs. The first two pK(a)'s are low at temperatures below 50 °C, suggesting that the two lysine residues are close to each other and the peptides have bent shapes at lower temperatures; this effect is greater for D7 compared with D9. With increasing temperature beyond 50 °C (i.e., that of the thermodynamic unfolding transition), pK(a1) and pK(a2) increase rapidly for D9, whereas their temperature variation is less significant for D7. This observation, and the fact that the enthalpies and entropies of the dissociation of the two first protons (determined from the temperature dependence of the respective pK(a)'s) decrease significantly near the transition temperature, suggest that the peptide undergoes a transition from a bent to an amorphous shape and that the presence of charged lysine residues stabilizes the folded state.

  12. Disease mutations in the ryanodine receptor N-terminal region couple to a mobile intersubunit interface.

    PubMed

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Lau, Kelvin; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors are large channels that release Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Hundreds of RyR mutations can cause cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders, yet detailed mechanisms explaining their effects have been lacking. Here we compare pseudo-atomic models and propose that channel opening coincides with widening of a cytoplasmic vestibule formed by the N-terminal region, thus altering an interface targeted by 20 disease mutations. We solve crystal structures of several disease mutants that affect intrasubunit domain-domain interfaces. Mutations affecting intrasubunit ionic pairs alter relative domain orientations, and thus couple to surrounding interfaces. Buried disease mutations cause structural changes that also connect to the intersubunit contact area. These results suggest that the intersubunit contact region between N-terminal domains is a prime target for disease mutations, direct or indirect, and we present a model whereby ryanodine receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors are activated by altering domain arrangements in the N-terminal region.

  13. Structure and Function of the Sterol Carrier Protein-2 N-Terminal Presequence†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Hostetler, Heather A.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Tichy, Shane E.; Williams, Brad J.; Russell, David H.; Berg, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Thomas A.; Ball, Judith; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) is encoded as a precursor protein (proSCP-2), little is known regarding the structure and function of the 20-amino acid N-terminal presequence. As shown herein, the presequence contains significant secondary structure and alters SCP-2: (i) secondary structure (CD), (ii) tertiary structure (aqueous exposure of Trp shown by UV absorbance, fluorescence, fluorescence quenching), (iii) ligand binding site [Trp response to ligands, peptide cross-linked by photoactivatable free cholesterol (FCBP)], (iv) selectivity for interaction with anionic phospholipid-rich membranes, (v) interaction with a peroxisomal import protein [FRET studies of Pex5p(C) binding], the N-terminal presequence increased SCP-2’s affinity for Pex5p(C) by 10-fold, and (vi) intracellular targeting in living and fixed cells (confocal microscopy). Nearly 5-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae (AF488-CTB), 2.8-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with a mitochondrial marker (Mitotracker), but nearly 2-fold less SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with peroxisomes (AF488-antibody to PMP70). These data indicate the importance of the N-terminal presequence in regulating SCP-2 structure, cholesterol localization within the ligand binding site, membrane association, and, potentially, intracellular targeting. PMID:18465878

  14. Human antibody response to Campylobacter jejuni flagellin protein and a synthetic N-terminal flagellin peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Nachamkin, I; Yang, X H

    1989-01-01

    We measured isotype-specific human antibodies directed against Campylobacter jejuni native flagellin and a synthetic peptide derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein by using a microdilution enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum samples from patients with gastrointestinal infection caused by C. jejuni (n = 20) and control samples (number from normal subjects = 20; number from patients with diarrhea other than campylobacter = 20) were tested in this assay. Serum specimens from patients with campylobacter infection showed statistically significant higher isotype-specific antiflagellin antibody titers than control samples did. Detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies was less specific (70%) than detection of either IgA or IgM antibodies in infected patients (95%). The sensitivity of testing for any of the isotypes ranged from 64 to 100% in acute-phase serum specimens and 85 to 95% in convalescent-phase serum specimens. An ELISA with an N-terminal synthetic peptide derived from the flagellin protein as antigen was not sensitive (60%) for detecting campylobacter infection but was very specific (97.5%). In conclusion, detection of serum IgA or IgM against C. jejuni flagellin may be a useful marker of infection. Although the N-terminal synthetic peptide was antigenic in a few patients with infection and showed good specificity in the ELISA, additional amino acid sequences with better sensitivity for detecting infection need to be identified. PMID:2584372

  15. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-03-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region.

  16. Expanding the Phenotype Associated with NAA10-Related N-Terminal Acetylation Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Chloé; Støve, Svein Isungset; Popp, Bernt; Gérard, Bénédicte; Blenski, Marina; AhMew, Nicholas; de Bie, Charlotte; Goldenberg, Paula; Isidor, Bertrand; Keren, Boris; Leheup, Bruno; Lampert, Laetitia; Mignot, Cyril; Tezcan, Kamer; Mancini, Grazia M S; Nava, Caroline; Wasserstein, Melissa; Bruel, Ange-Line; Thevenon, Julien; Masurel, Alice; Duffourd, Yannis; Kuentz, Paul; Huet, Frédéric; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Faivre, Laurence; Piton, Amélie; Reis, André; Arnesen, Thomas; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Zweier, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a common protein modification in eukaryotes associated with numerous cellular processes. Inherited mutations in NAA10, encoding the catalytic subunit of the major N-terminal acetylation complex NatA have been associated with diverse, syndromic X-linked recessive disorders, whereas de novo missense mutations have been reported in one male and one female individual with severe intellectual disability but otherwise unspecific phenotypes. Thus, the full genetic and clinical spectrum of NAA10 deficiency is yet to be delineated. We identified three different novel and one known missense mutation in NAA10, de novo in 11 females, and due to maternal germ line mosaicism in another girl and her more severely affected and deceased brother. In vitro enzymatic assays for the novel, recurrent mutations p.(Arg83Cys) and p.(Phe128Leu) revealed reduced catalytic activity. X-inactivation was random in five females. The core phenotype of X-linked NAA10-related N-terminal-acetyltransferase deficiency in both males and females includes developmental delay, severe intellectual disability, postnatal growth failure with severe microcephaly, and skeletal or cardiac anomalies. Genotype-phenotype correlations within and between both genders are complex and may include various factors such as location and nature of mutations, enzymatic stability and activity, and X-inactivation in females.

  17. Proline-directed phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on N-terminal serines and unidentified threonines occurs concomitantly with PKC- and substrate-induced alterations in transporter activity, subcellular distribution, and dopamine efflux, but the residues phosphorylated and identities of protein kinases and phosphatases involved are not known. As one approach to investigating these issues we recombinantly expressed the N-terminal tail of rat DAT (NDAT) and examined its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation properties in vitro. We found that NDAT could be phosphorylated to significant levels by PKCα, PKA, PKG, and CaMKII, which catalyzed serine phosphorylation, and ERK1, JNK, and p38, which catalyzed threonine phosphorylation. We identified Thr53, present in a membrane proximal proline-directed kinase motif as the NDAT site phosphorylated in vitro by ERK1, JNK and p38, and confirmed by peptide mapping and mutagenesis that Thr53 is phosphorylated in vivo. Dephosphorylation studies showed that protein phosphatase 1 catalyzed near-complete in vitro dephosphorylation of PKCα-phosphorylated NDAT, similar to its in vivo and in vitro effects on native DAT. These findings demonstrate the ability of multiple enzymes to directly recognize the DAT N-terminal domain and for kinases to act at multiple distinct sites. The strong correspondence between NDAT and rDAT phosphorylation characteristics suggests the potential for the enzymes that are active on NDAT in vitro to act on DAT in vivo and indicates the usefulness of NDAT for guiding future DAT phosphorylation analyses. PMID:19146407

  18. Mechanism of N-terminal modulation of activity at the melanocortin-4 receptor GPCR

    PubMed Central

    Ersoy, Baran A; Pardo, Leonardo; Zhang, Sumei; Thompson, Darren A; Millhauser, Glenn; Govaerts, Cedric; Vaisse, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Most of our understanding of G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) activation has been focused on the direct interaction between diffusible ligands and their seven-transmembrane domains. However, a number of these receptors depend on their extracellular N-terminal domain for ligand recognition and activation. To dissect the molecular interactions underlying both modes of activation at a single receptor, we used the unique properties of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R), a GPCR that shows constitutive activity maintained by its N-terminal domain and is physiologically activated by the peptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (αMSH). We find that activation by the N-terminal domain and αMSH relies on different key residues in the transmembrane region. We also demonstrate that agouti-related protein, a physiological antagonist of MC4R, acts as an inverse agonist by inhibiting N terminus–mediated activation, leading to the speculation that a number of constitutively active orphan GPCRs could have physiological inverse agonists as sole regulators. PMID:22729149

  19. Critical roles of CTP synthase N-terminal in cytoophidium assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Jin-Jun; Ghosh, Sanjay; Liu, Ji-Long

    2017-03-22

    Several metabolic enzymes assemble into distinct intracellular structures in prokaryotes and eukaryotes suggesting an important functional role in cell physiology. The CTP-generating enzyme CTP synthase forms long filamentous structures termed cytoophidia in bacteria, yeast, fruit flies and human cells independent of its catalytic activity. However, the amino acid determinants for protein-protein interaction necessary for polymerisation remained unknown. In this study, we systematically analysed the role of the conserved N-terminal of Drosophila CTP synthase in cytoophidium assembly. Our mutational analyses identified three key amino acid residues within this region that play an instructive role in organisation of CTP synthase into a filamentous structure. Co-transfection assays demonstrated formation of heteromeric CTP synthase filaments which is disrupted by protein carrying a mutated N-terminal alanine residue thus revealing a dominant-negative activity. Interestingly, the dominant-negative activity is supressed by the CTP synthase inhibitor DON. Furthermore, we found that the amino acids at the corresponding position in the human protein exhibit similar properties suggesting conservation of their function through evolution. Our data suggest that cytoophidium assembly is a multi-step process involving N-terminal-dependent sequential interactions between correctly folded structural units and provide insights into the assembly of these enigmatic structures.

  20. Molecular Basis of Substrate Specific Acetylation by N-Terminal Acetyltransferase NatB.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiyan; Cai, Yongfei; Zhang, Shijun; Ding, Hongyan; Wang, Haitao; Han, Aidong

    2017-04-04

    The NatB N-terminal acetyltransferase specifically acetylates the N-terminal group of substrate protein peptides starting with Met-Asp/Glu/Asn/Gln. How NatB recognizes and acetylates these substrates remains unknown. Here, we report crystal structures of a NatB holoenzyme from Candida albicans in the presence of its co-factor CoA and substrate peptides. The auxiliary subunit Naa25 of NatB forms a horseshoe-like deck to hold specifically its catalytic subunit Naa20. The first two amino acids Met and Asp of a substrate peptide mediate the major interactions with the active site in the Naa20 subunit. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate Asp and pocket residues of Naa20 are essential to determine the NatB substrate specificity. Moreover, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the substrate Met and a carbonyl group in the Naa20 active site directly anchors the substrate toward acetyl-CoA. Together, these structures define a unique molecular mechanism of specific N-terminal acetylation acted by NatB.

  1. N-Terminal Deletion of Peptide:N-Glycanase Results in Enhanced Deglycosylation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengjun; Xin, Fengxue; Liu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Yuxiao; An, Zhenyi; Qi, Qingsheng; Wang, Peng George

    2009-01-01

    Peptide:N-glycanase catalyzes the detachment of N-linked glycan chains from glycopeptides or glycoproteins by hydrolyzing the β-aspartylglucosaminyl bond. Peptide:N-glycanase in yeast binds to Rad23p through its N-terminus. In this study, the complex formed between Peptide:N-glycanase and Rad23p was found to exhibit enhanced deglycosylation activity, which suggests an important role for this enzyme in the misfolded glycoprotein degradation pathway in vivo. To investigate the role of this enzyme in this pathway, we made stepwise deletions of the N-terminal helices of peptide:N-glycanase. Enzymatic analysis of the deletion mutants showed that deletion of the N-terminal H1 helix (Png1p-ΔH1) enhanced the deglycosylation activity of N-glycanase towards denatured glycoproteins. In addition, this mutant exhibited high deglycosylation activity towards native glycoproteins. Dynamic simulations of the wild type and N-terminal H1 deletion mutant implied that Png1p-ΔH1 is more flexible than wild type Png1p. The efficient deglycosylation of Png1p-ΔH1 towards native and non-native glycoproteins offers a potential biotechnological application. PMID:20016784

  2. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T.

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  3. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region

    PubMed Central

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2015-01-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region. PMID:26691840

  4. Epitope tags beside the N-terminal cytoplasmic tail of human BST-2 alter its intracellular trafficking and HIV-1 restriction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mingyu; Wang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingyao; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhu, Yingzi; Zuo, Tao; Liu, Donglai; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Zhao, Xinghong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    BST-2 blocks the particle release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1, and this antiviral activity is dependent on the topological arrangement of its four structural domains. Several functions of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BST-2 have been previously discussed, but the exact role of this domain remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncation and commonly-used tags addition into the CT region of human BST-2 on its intracellular trafficking and signaling as well as its anti-HIV-1 function. The CT-truncated BST-2 exhibited potent inhibition on Vpu-defective HIV-1 and even wild-type HIV-1. However, the N-terminal HA-tagged CT-truncated BST-2 retained little antiviral activity and dramatically differed from its original protein in the cell surface level and intracellular localization. Further, we showed that the replacement of the CT domain with a hydrophobic tag altered BST-2 function possibly by preventing its normal vesicular trafficking. Notably, we demonstrated that a positive charged motif "KRXK" in the conjunctive region between the cytotail and the transmembrane domain which is conserved in primate BST-2 is important for the protein trafficking and the antiviral function. These results suggest that although the CT of BST-2 is not essential for its antiviral activity, the composition of residues in this region may play important roles in its normal trafficking which subsequently affected its function. These observations provide additional implications for the structure-function model of BST-2.

  5. Epitope Tags beside the N-Terminal Cytoplasmic Tail of Human BST-2 Alter Its Intracellular Trafficking and HIV-1 Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyao; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhu, Yingzi; Zuo, Tao; Liu, Donglai; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Yu, Bin; Wu, Hui; Zhao, Xinghong; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui

    2014-01-01

    BST-2 blocks the particle release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1, and this antiviral activity is dependent on the topological arrangement of its four structural domains. Several functions of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BST-2 have been previously discussed, but the exact role of this domain remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we investigated the impact of truncation and commonly-used tags addition into the CT region of human BST-2 on its intracellular trafficking and signaling as well as its anti-HIV-1 function. The CT-truncated BST-2 exhibited potent inhibition on Vpu-defective HIV-1 and even wild-type HIV-1. However, the N-terminal HA-tagged CT-truncated BST-2 retained little antiviral activity and dramatically differed from its original protein in the cell surface level and intracellular localization. Further, we showed that the replacement of the CT domain with a hydrophobic tag altered BST-2 function possibly by preventing its normal vesicular trafficking. Notably, we demonstrated that a positive charged motif “KRXK” in the conjunctive region between the cytotail and the transmembrane domain which is conserved in primate BST-2 is important for the protein trafficking and the antiviral function. These results suggest that although the CT of BST-2 is not essential for its antiviral activity, the composition of residues in this region may play important roles in its normal trafficking which subsequently affected its function. These observations provide additional implications for the structure-function model of BST-2. PMID:25347789

  6. Identification and characterization of an 18.4kDa antimicrobial truncation from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei hemocyanin upon Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ying; Zhan, Shixiong; Huang, He; Zhong, Mingqi; Chen, Jiehui; You, Cuihong; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Yueling

    2016-09-01

    Hemocyanin (HMC) is a multifunctional protein which plays many essential roles in invertebrate organism. Recently more and more immune-related functions have been discovered on this protein. Here the shrimp was infected with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and the shrimp sera were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Totally 15 spots were identified as significantly up-regulated spots and further analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Four of them were identified as HMC derived truncations (HMCS1, HMCS3, HMCS4 and HMCS5). The HMCS4 primary sequence was further determined via Edman N terminal sequencing, MALDI-TOF MS and amino acid sequence alignment. The result indicated that the HMCS4 was a 165aa fragment from shrimp HMC small subunit C-terminal. The HMCS4 immunological activities were further analyzed by agglutination experiment and antibacterial assay in vitro. The results showed that the recombinant HMCS4 (rHMCS4) had strong agglutination and antibacterial activities against pathogenic bacteria at the optimum bacteriostasis concentration. In addition, the HMCS4 immunological activities were explored via mortality assay in vivo. The shrimp was challenged with V. parahaemolyticus and rHMCS4 V. parahaemolyticus mixture separately. The shrimp mortality rate was significantly decreased at 96 h post-infection with rHMCS4 injection. Our data showed that shrimp HMC truncation generation upon infection was an effective immune response against invaded pathogens. Moreover, these findings may have some potential applications in shrimp industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Signaling by the Engulfment Receptor Draper: A Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Implicates Cytoskeletal Regulators, Jun N-Terminal Kinase, and Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Fullard, John F.; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Draper, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the Ced-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, is a cell-surface receptor required for the recognition and engulfment of apoptotic cells, glial clearance of axon fragments and dendritic pruning, and salivary gland autophagy. To further elucidate mechanisms of Draper signaling, we screened chromosomal deficiencies to identify loci that dominantly modify the phenotype of overexpression of Draper isoform II (suppressed differentiation of the posterior crossvein in the wing). We found evidence for 43 genetic modifiers of Draper II. Twenty-four of the 37 suppressor loci and 3 of the 6 enhancer loci were identified. An additional 5 suppressors and 2 enhancers were identified among mutations in functionally related genes. These studies reveal positive contributions to Drpr signaling for the Jun N-terminal Kinase pathway, supported by genetic interactions with hemipterous, basket, jun, and puckered, and for cytoskeleton regulation as indicated by genetic interactions with rac1, rac2, RhoA, myoblast city, Wiskcott–Aldrich syndrome protein, and the formin CG32138, and for yorkie and expanded. These findings indicate that Jun N-terminal Kinase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling collaborate in Draper signaling. Relationships between Draper signaling and Decapentaplegic signaling, insulin signaling, Salvador/Warts/Hippo signaling, apical-basal cell polarity, and cellular responses to mechanical forces are also discussed. PMID:25395664

  8. N-Terminal Prodomain of Pfs230 Synthesized Using a Cell-Free System Is Sufficient To Induce Complement-Dependent Malaria Transmission-Blocking Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum. PMID:21715579

  9. An internal promoter underlies the difference in disease severity between N- and C-terminal truncation mutations of Titin in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Tran, Diana; Baalbaki, Mai; Tang, Ling Fung; Poon, Annie; Pelonero, Angelo; Titus, Erron W; Yuan, Christiana; Shi, Chenxu; Patchava, Shruthi; Halper, Elizabeth; Garg, Jasmine; Movsesyan, Irina; Yin, Chaoying; Wu, Roland; Wilsbacher, Lisa D; Liu, Jiandong; Hager, Ronald L; Coughlin, Shaun R; Jinek, Martin; Pullinger, Clive R; Kane, John P; Hart, Daniel O; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Deo, Rahul C

    2015-01-01

    Truncating mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein Titin result in dilated cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy. The most severely affected dilated cardiomyopathy patients harbor Titin truncations in the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein, suggesting that mutation position might influence disease mechanism. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated six zebrafish lines with Titin truncations in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Although all exons were constitutive, C-terminal mutations caused severe myopathy whereas N-terminal mutations demonstrated mild phenotypes. Surprisingly, neither mutation type acted as a dominant negative. Instead, we found a conserved internal promoter at the precise position where divergence in disease severity occurs, with the resulting protein product partially rescuing N-terminal truncations. In addition to its clinical implications, our work may shed light on a long-standing mystery regarding the architecture of the sarcomere. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09406.001 PMID:26473617

  10. Endogenous proteolytic cleavage of disease-associated prion protein to produce C2 fragments is strongly cell- and tissue-dependent.

    PubMed

    Dron, Michel; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Salamat, Muhammad Khalid Farooq; Bernard, Julie; Cronier, Sabrina; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2010-04-02

    The abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulating in nervous and lymphoid tissues of prion-infected individuals can be naturally cleaved to generate a N-terminal-truncated fragment called C2. Information about the identity of the cellular proteases involved in this process and its possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. We investigated PrP(Sc) N-terminal trimming in different cell lines and primary cultured nerve cells, and in the brain and spleen tissue from transgenic mice infected by ovine and mouse prions. We found the following: (i) the full-length to C2 ratio varies considerably depending on the infected cell or tissue. Thus, in primary neurons and brain tissue, PrP(Sc) accumulated predominantly as untrimmed species, whereas efficient trimming occurred in Rov and MovS cells, and in spleen tissue. (ii) Although C2 is generally considered to be the counterpart of the PrP(Sc) proteinase K-resistant core, the N termini of the fragments cleaved in vivo and in vitro can actually differ, as evidenced by a different reactivity toward the Pc248 anti-octarepeat antibody. (iii) In lysosome-impaired cells, the ratio of full-length versus C2 species dramatically increased, yet efficient prion propagation could occur. Moreover, cathepsin but not calpain inhibitors markedly inhibited C2 formation, and in vitro cleavage by cathepsins B and L produced PrP(Sc) fragments lacking the Pc248 epitope, strongly arguing for the primary involvement of acidic hydrolases of the endolysosomal compartment. These findings have implications on the molecular analysis of PrP(Sc) and cell pathogenesis of prion infection.

  11. Premature death and neurologic abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing a mutant huntingtin exon-2 fragment

    PubMed Central

    Tebbenkamp, Andrew T.N.; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Borchelt, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized pathologically by aggregates composed of N-terminal fragments of the mutant form of the protein huntingtin (htt). The role of these N-terminal fragments in disease pathogenesis has been questioned based in part on studies in transgenic mice. In one important example, mice that express an N-terminal fragment of mutant htt terminating at the C-terminus of exon 2 (termed the Shortstop mouse) were reported to develop robust inclusion pathology without developing phenotypic abnormalities seen in the R6/2 or N171-82Q models of HD, which are also based on expression of mutant N-terminal htt fragments. To further explore the capacity of mutant exon-2 htt fragments to produce neurologic abnormalities (N-terminal 118 amino acids; N118), we generated transgenic mice expressing cDNA that encodes htt N118-82Q with the mouse prion promoter vector. In mice generated in this manner, we demonstrate robust inclusion pathology accompanied by early death and failure to gain weight. These phenotypes are the most robust abnormalities identified in the R6/2 and N171-82Q models. We conclude that the lack of an overt phenotype in the initial Shortstop mice cannot be completely explained by the properties of mutant htt N118 fragments. PMID:21307087

  12. Large-scale identification of N-terminal peptides in the halophilic archaea Halobacterium salinarum and Natronomonas pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Aivaliotis, Michalis; Gevaert, Kris; Falb, Michaela; Tebbe, Andreas; Konstantinidis, Kosta; Bisle, Birgit; Klein, Christian; Martens, Lennart; Staes, An; Timmerman, Evy; Van Damme, Jozef; Siedler, Frank; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2007-06-01

    Characterization of protein N-terminal peptides supports the quality assessment of data derived from genomic sequences (e.g., the correct assignment of start codons) and hints to in vivo N-terminal modifications such as N-terminal acetylation and removal of the initiator methionine. The current work represents the first large-scale identification of N-terminal peptides from prokaryotes, of the two halophilic euryarchaeota Halobacterium salinarum and Natronomonas pharaonis. Two methods were used that specifically allow the characterization of protein N-terminal peptides: combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) and strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), both known to enrich for N-terminally blocked peptides. In addition to these specific methods, N-terminal peptide identifications were extracted from our previous genome-wide proteomic data. Combining all data, 606 N-terminal peptides from Hbt. salinarum and 328 from Nmn. pharaonis were reliably identified. These results constitute the largest available dataset holding identified and characterized protein N-termini for prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria). They allowed the validation/improvement of start codon assignments as automatic gene finders tend to misassign start codons for GC-rich genomes. In addition, the dataset allowed unravelling N-terminal protein maturation in archaea, showing that 60% of the proteins undergo methionine cleavage and that-in contrast to current knowledge-Nalpha-acetylation is common in the archaeal domain of life with 13-18% of the proteins being Nalpha-acetylated. The protein sets described in this paper are available by FTP and might be used as reference sets to test the performance of new gene finders.

  13. N-Terminal pyroglutamate formation of Aβ38 and Aβ40 enforces oligomer formation and potency to disrupt hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Schlenzig, Dagmar; Rönicke, Raik; Cynis, Holger; Ludwig, Hans-Henning; Scheel, Eike; Reymann, Klaus; Saido, Takaomi; Hause, Gerd; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    Pyroglutamate (pGlu)-modified amyloid peptides have been identified in sporadic and familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the inherited disorders familial British and Danish Dementia (FBD and FDD). In this study, we characterized the aggregation of amyloid-β protein Aβ37, Aβ38, Aβ40, Aβ42 and ADan species in vitro, which were modified by N-terminal pGlu (pGlu-Aβ3-x, pGlu-ADan) or possess the intact N-terminus (Aβ1-x, ADan). The pGlu-modification confers rapid formation of oligomers and short fibrillar aggregates. In accordance with these observations, the pGlu-modified Aβ38, Αβ40 and Αβ42 species inhibit hippocampal long term potentiation of synaptic response, but pGlu-Aβ3-42 showing the highest effect. Among the unmodified Aβ peptides, only Aβ1-42 exhibites such propensity, which was similar to pGlu-Aβ3-38 and pGlu-Aβ3-40. Likewise, the amyloidogenic peptide pGlu-ADan impaired synaptic potentiation more pronounced than N-terminal unmodified ADan. The results were validated using conditioned media from cultivated HEK293 cells, which express APP variants favoring the formation of Aβ1-x, Aβ3-x or N-truncated pGlu-Aβ3-x species. Hence, we show that the ability of different amyloid peptides to impair synaptic function apparently correlates to their potential to form oligomers as a common mechanism. The pGlu-modification is apparently mediating a higher surface hydrophobicity, as shown by 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulfonate fluorescence, which enforces potential to interfere with neuronal physiology.

  14. Identification of a chitinase-modifying protein from Fusarium verticillioides: truncation of a host resistance protein by a fungalysin metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Todd A; Wicklow, Donald T; Price, Neil P J

    2011-10-14

    Chitinase-modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases secreted by fungal pathogens that truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. Here, we report that cmps are secreted by multiple species from the genus Fusarium, that cmp from Fusarium verticillioides (Fv-cmp) is a fungalysin metalloprotease, and that it cleaves within a sequence that is conserved in class IV chitinases. Protein extracts from Fusarium cultures were found to truncate ChitA and ChitB in vitro. Based on this activity, Fv-cmp was purified from F. verticillioides. N-terminal sequencing of truncated ChitA and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of reaction products showed that Fv-cmp is an endoprotease that cleaves a peptide bond on the C-terminal side of the lectin domain. The N-terminal sequence of purified Fv-cmp was determined and compared with a set of predicted proteins, resulting in its identification as a zinc metalloprotease of the fungalysin family. Recombinant Fv-cmp also truncated ChitA, confirming its identity, but had reduced activity, suggesting that the recombinant protease did not mature efficiently from its propeptide-containing precursor. This is the first report of a fungalysin that targets a nonstructural host protein and the first to implicate this class of virulence-related proteases in plant disease.

  15. Enhancement of cardenolide and phytosterol levels by expression of an N-terminally truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase in Transgenic digitalis minor.

    PubMed

    Sales, Ester; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Pathway engineering in medicinal plants attains a special significance in Digitalis species, the main industrial source of cardiac glycosides, steroidal metabolites derived from mevalonic acid via the triterpenoid pathway. In this work, the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, coding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the MVA pathway, was expressed in the cardenolide-producing plant Digitalis minor. Transgenic plants were morphologically indistinguishable from control wild plants and displayed the same developmental pattern. Constitutive expression of HMG1 resulted in an increased sterol and cardenolide production in both in vitro- and greenhouse-grown plants. This work demonstrates that transgenic D. minor plants are a valuable system to study and achieve metabolic engineering of the cardenolide pathway and in consequence for the genetic improvement of Digitalis species.

  16. Characterization of the fundamental properties of the N-terminal truncation (Δ exon 1) variant of estrogen receptor α in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yujiro; Ishii, Hirotaka; Morita, Akio; Sakuma, Yasuo; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-10-15

    The estrogen receptor α (ERα) directs transactivation of target genes, and splice variants have been shown to exhibit altered activation properties. We previously documented the complicated alternative promoter usage and splicing patterns of the rat ERα gene; however, the information was restricted to a few specific organs. Therefore, we re-examined the rat mRNA profiles of ERα, including the generation of the exon 1-skipping, ERα46 transcript in a wider variety of rat organs and further characterized the fundamental functional properties of rat ERα46 variants. With the use of RT-PCR, we discovered unique distribution and splicing patterns for promoter-specific ERα isoforms, as well as the extensive expression of the Δ exon 1 variant in the rat. Similar to wild-type ERα, an immunocytochemical analysis showed a predominant localization of ERα46 proteins in the nuclei of transfected cells. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that ERα46 variants stimulated the transcriptional activity of an estrogen response element-driven promoter in response to estrogen. In addition, the variants exhibited distinct transactivation and reactivity to 4-hydroxytamoxifen in different cell types. Although the alternative splicing patterns are species-specific, the profiles of the alternative use of promoters, and the fundamental properties of the rat ERα46 variant are similar to those of human and mouse homologs. Therefore, the present study provides fundamental and useful information for further research into the regulation and functions of ERα gene variants.

  17. Studies on the interactions of SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S) with its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-01-01

    SAP-1 is a 113 amino acid long single-chain protein which belongs to the type 2 cystatin gene family. In our previous study, we have purified SAP-1 from human seminal plasma and observed its cross-class inhibitory property. At this time, we report the interaction of SAP-1 with diverse proteases and its binding partners by CD-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. The circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the conformation of SAP-1 is changed after its complexation with proteases, and the alterations in protein secondary structure are quantitatively calculated with increase of α-helices and reduction of β-strand content. To get insight into the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases, we make an effort to model the three-dimensional structure of SAP-1 by molecular modeling and verify its stability and viability through molecular dynamics simulations and finally complexed with different proteases using ClusPro 2.0 Server. A high degree of shape complementarity is examined within the complexes, stabilized by a number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions. Using HB analyses in different protein complexes, we have identified a series of key residues that may be involved in the interactions between SAP-1 and proteases. These findings will assist to understand the mechanism of inhibition of SAP-1 for different proteases and provide intimation for further research.

  18. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species.

  19. Analysis of a eukaryotic beta-galactosidase gene: the N-terminal end of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis protein shows homology to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Dahlems, U; Das, S; Hollenberg, C P

    1984-01-01

    The LAC4 gene of Kluyveromyces lactis, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase was mapped on a cloned DNA fragment and the sequence of the 5' end was determined. This sequence includes the 5' regulatory region involved in the induction by lactose and the N-terminal end of the protein coding region. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of this eukaryotic enzyme with the N-terminal end of the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase revealed substantial homology. Two major RNA initiation sites were mapped at -115 and -105. A number of structural peculiarities of the 5'non-coding region are discussed as in comparison to Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes. Images PMID:6324114

  20. Molecular Determinants of the N-Terminal Acetyltransferase Naa60 Anchoring to the Golgi Membrane.

    PubMed

    Aksnes, Henriette; Goris, Marianne; Strømland, Øyvind; Drazic, Adrian; Waheed, Qaiser; Reuter, Nathalie; Arnesen, Thomas

    2017-02-14

    Nα-acetyltransferase 60 (Naa60 or NatF) was recently identified as an unconventional N-terminal acetyltransferase (NAT) since it localizes to organelles, in particular the Golgi apparatus, and has a preference for acetylating N-termini of transmembrane proteins. This knowledge challenged the prevailing view of N-terminal acetylation as a co-translational ribosome-associated process and suggested a new mechanistic functioning for the enzymes responsible for this increasingly recognized protein modification. Crystallography studies on Naa60 were unable to resolve the C-terminal tail of Naa60, which is responsible for the organellar localization. Here, we combined modeling, in vitro assays, and cellular localization studies to study secondary structure and membrane interacting capacity of Naa60. The results show that Naa60 is a peripheral membrane protein. Two amphipathic helices within the Naa60 C-terminus bind the membrane directly in a parallel position relative to the lipid bilayer via hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. A peptide corresponding to the C-terminus is unstructured in solution and only folds into an α-helical conformation in the presence of liposomes. Computational modeling and cellular mutational analysis revealed the hydrophobic face of two α-helices to be critical for membranous localization. Furthermore, we found a strong and specific binding preference of Naa60 towards membranes containing the phosphatidylinositol PI4P, thus possibly explaining the primary residency of Naa60 at the PI4P-rich Golgi. In conclusion, we have defined the mode of cytosolic Naa60 anchoring to the Golgi apparatus, most likely occurring post-translationally and specifically facilitating post-translational N-terminal acetylation of many transmembrane proteins.

  1. Human lysozyme possesses novel antimicrobial peptides within its N-terminal domain that target bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Imazato, Kenta; Ono, Hajime

    2011-09-28

    Human milk lysozyme is thought to be a key defense factor in protecting the gastrointestinal tract of newborns against bacterial infection. Recently, evidence was found that pepsin, under conditions relevant to the newborn stomach, cleaves chicken lysozyme (cLZ) at specific loops to generate five antimicrobial peptide motifs. This study explores the antimicrobial role of the corresponding peptides of human lysozyme (hLZ), the actual protein in breast milk. Five peptide motifs of hLZ, one helix-loop-helix (HLH), its two helices (H1 and H2), and two helix-sheet motifs, H2-β-strands 1-2 (H2-S12) or H2-β-strands 1-3 (H2-S13), were synthesized and examined for antimicrobial action. The five peptides of hLZ exhibit microbicidal activity to various degrees against several bacterial strains. The HLH peptide and its N-terminal helix (H1) were significantly the most potent bactericidal to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans . Outer and inner membrane permeabilization studies, as well as measurements of transmembrane electrochemical potentials, provided evidence that HLH peptide and its N-terminal helix (H1) kill bacteria by crossing the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria via self-promoted uptake and are able to dissipate the membrane potential-dependent respiration of Gram-positive bacteria. This finding is the first to describe that hLZ possesses multiple antimicrobial peptide motifs within its N-terminal domain, providing insight into new classes of antibiotic peptides with potential use in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  2. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clara Jana-Lui; Vogt, Alexander; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-07-13

    Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena.

  3. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence of dextranicin 24, a bacteriocin of Leuconostoc sp.

    PubMed

    Revol-Junelles, A M; Lefebvre, G

    1996-08-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum strain J24 synthesized a bacteriocin named Dextranicin 24 (Dex-24), which inhibited only other Leuconostoc sp. strains. It was purified by a two-step procedure from the fraction of the bacteriocin bound to the producer cells at the end of the growth: desorption form the cells at acidic pH, followed by reserve phase HPLC. The N-terminal sequence of Dex-24 was the following: NH2(-) K G V L G W L S M A S S A L T G P Q Q . . .

  4. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Taggart, David J; Dayeh, Daniel M; Fredrickson, Saul W; Suo, Zucai

    2014-10-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5'-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate lyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or an 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated -1 or -2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of -2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of -1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase within the non

  5. Dissecting functions of the N-terminal domain and GAS-site recognition in STAT3 nuclear trafficking.

    PubMed

    Martincuks, Antons; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Haan, Serge; Herrmann, Andreas; Küster, Andrea; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation and cancer progression. Cytokine-induced gene transcription greatly depends on tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 on a single tyrosine residue with subsequent nuclear accumulation and specific DNA sequence (GAS) recognition. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the conserved STAT3 N-terminal domain (NTD) and GAS-element binding ability of STAT3 in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Our results demonstrate the nonessential role of GAS-element recognition for both cytokine-induced and basal nuclear import of STAT3. Substitution of five key amino acids within the DNA-binding domain rendered STAT3 unable to bind to GAS-elements while still maintaining the ability for nuclear localization. In turn, deletion of the NTD markedly decreased nuclear accumulation upon IL-6 treatment resulting in a prolonged accumulation of phosphorylated dimers in the cytoplasm, at the same time preserving specific DNA recognition ability of the truncation mutant. Observed defect in nuclear localization could not be explained by flawed importin-α binding, since both wild-type and NTD deletion mutant of STAT3 could precipitate both full-length and autoinhibitory domain (∆IBB) deletion mutants of importin-α5, as well as ∆IBB-α3 and ∆IBB-α7 isoforms independently of IL-6 stimulation. Despite its inability to translocate to the nucleus upon IL-6 stimulation, the NTD lacking mutant still showed nuclear accumulation in resting cells similar to wild-type upon inhibition of nuclear export by leptomycin B. At the same time, blocking the nuclear export pathway could not rescue cytoplasmic trapping of phosphorylated STAT3 molecules without NTD. Moreover, STAT3 mutant with dysfunctional SH2 domain (R609Q) also localized in the nucleus of unstimulated cells after nuclear export blocking, while upon cytokine treatment the

  6. Role of Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling in the wound healing and regeneration of a Drosophila melanogaster wing imaginal disc.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Jaakko; Omelyanchuk, Leonid; Kyttälä, Satu; Turunen, Heikki; Nokkala, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    When a fragment of a Drosophila imaginal disc is cultured in growth permissive conditions, it either regenerates the missing structures or duplicates the pattern present in the fragment. This kind of pattern regulation is known to be epimorphic, i.e. the new pattern is generated by proliferation in a specialized tissue called the blastema. Pattern regulation is accompanied by the healing of the cut surfaces restoring the continuous epithelia. Wound healing has been considered to be the inductive signal to commence regenerative cell divisions. Although the general outlines of the proliferation dynamics in a regenerating imaginal disc blastema have been well studied, little is known about the mechanisms driving cells into the regenerative cell cycles. In this study, we have investigated the role of Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling in the wound healing and regeneration of a Drosophila wing imaginal disc. By utilizing in vivo and in vitro culturing of incised and fragmented discs, we have been able to visualize the dynamics in cellular architecture and gene expression involved in the healing and regeneration process. Our results directly show that homotypic wound healing is not a prerequisite for regenerative cell divisions. We also show that JNK signaling participates in imaginal disc wound healing and is regulated by the physical dynamics of the process, as well as in recruiting cells into the regenerative cell cycles. A model describing the determination of blastema size is discussed.

  7. Membrane binding and self-association of the epsin N-terminal homology domain.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Jao, Christine C; Lyman, Edward; Gallop, Jennifer L; Peter, Brian J; McMahon, Harvey T; Langen, Ralf; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-11-09

    Epsin possesses a conserved epsin N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain that acts as a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-lipid-targeting and membrane-curvature-generating element. Upon binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, the N-terminal helix (H(0)) of the ENTH domain becomes structured and aids in the aggregation of ENTH domains, which results in extensive membrane remodeling. In this article, atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate the structure and the stability of ENTH domain aggregates on lipid bilayers. EPR experiments are also reported for systems composed of different ENTH-bound membrane morphologies, including membrane vesicles as well as preformed membrane tubules. The EPR data are used to help develop a molecular model of ENTH domain aggregates on preformed lipid tubules that are then studied by CG MD simulation. The combined computational and experimental approach suggests that ENTH domains exist predominantly as monomers on vesiculated structures, while ENTH domains self-associate into dimeric structures and even higher-order oligomers on the membrane tubes. The results emphasize that the arrangement of ENTH domain aggregates depends strongly on whether the local membrane curvature is isotropic or anisotropic. The molecular mechanism of ENTH-domain-induced membrane vesiculation and tubulation and the implications of the epsin's role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis resulting from the interplay between ENTH domain membrane binding and ENTH domain self-association are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An N-terminal glycine-rich sequence contributes to retrovirus trimer of hairpins stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kirilee A.; Maerz, Anne L.; Baer, Severine; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis . E-mail: apoumbourios@burnet.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain a glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide and coiled coil core. Previously, we reported that the glycine-rich segment (Met-326-Ser-337) of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, is a determinant of membrane fusion function [K.A. Wilson, S. Baer, A.L. Maerz, M. Alizon, P. Poumbourios, The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function, J. Virol. 79 (2005) 4533-4539]. Here we show that the reduced fusion activity of an I334A mutant correlated with a decrease in stability of the gp21 trimer of hairpins conformation, in the context of a maltose-binding protein-gp21 chimera. The stabilizing influence of Ile-334 required the C-terminal membrane-proximal sequence Trp-431-Ser-436. Proline substitution of four of five Gly residues altered gp21 trimer of hairpins stability. Our data indicate that flexibility within and hydrophobic interactions mediated by this region are determinants of gp21 stability and membrane fusion function.

  9. The N-terminal dimerization is required for TDP-43 splicing activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei-Lei; Xue, Wei; Hong, Jun-Ye; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Li, Min-Jun; Yu, Shao-Ning; He, Jian-Hua; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2017-07-21

    TDP-43 is a nuclear factor that functions in promoting pre-mRNA splicing. Deletion of the N-terminal domain (NTD) and nuclear localization signal (NLS) (i.e., TDP-35) results in mislocalization to cytoplasm and formation of inclusions. However, how the NTD functions in TDP-43 activity and proteinopathy remains largely unknown. Here, we studied the structure and function of the NTD in inclusion formation and pre-mRNA splicing of TDP-43 by using biochemical and biophysical approaches. We found that TDP-43 NTD forms a homodimer in solution in a concentration-dependent manner, and formation of intermolecular disulfide results in further tetramerization. Based on the NMR structure of TDP-43 NTD, the dimerization interface centered on Leu71 and Val72 around the β7-strand was defined by mutagenesis and size-exclusion chromatography. Cell experiments revealed that the N-terminal dimerization plays roles in protecting TDP-43 against formation of cytoplasmic inclusions and enhancing pre-mRNA splicing activity of TDP-43 in nucleus. This study may provide mechanistic insights into the physiological function of TDP-43 and its related proteinopathies.

  10. Evidence for N-Terminal Myristoylation of Tetrahymena Arginine Kinase Using Peptide Mass Fingerprinting Analysis.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Shou; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we confirmed N-terminal myristoylation of Tetrahymena pyriformis arginine kinase (AK1) by identifying a myristoylation signal sequence at the N-terminus. A sufficient amount of modified enzyme was synthesized using an insect cell-free protein synthesis system that contains all of the elements necessary for post-transcriptional modification by fatty acids. Subsequent peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analyses were performed after digestion with trypsin. The PMF data covered 39 % (143 residues) of internal peptides. The target N-myristoylated peptide had a theoretical mass of 832.4477 and was clearly observed with an experimental mass (m/z-H(+)) of 832.4747. The difference between the two masses was 0.0271, supporting the accuracy of identification and indicating that the synthesized T. pyriformis AK1 is myristoylated. The fixed specimens of T. pyriformis were reacted with an anti-AK1 peptide antibody followed by a secondary antibody with a fluorescent chromophore and were observed using immunofluorescence microscope. In agreement with previous western blotting analyses, microscopic observations suggested that AK1 is localized in the cilia. The present PMF and microscopic analyses indicate that T. pyriformis AK1 may be localized and anchored to ciliary membranes via N-terminal myristoyl groups.

  11. Supramolecular properties of the proline-rich gamma-Zein N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Marcelo J; Dalcol, Ionara; Gorostiza, Pau; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Pons, Ramon; Pons, Miquel; Sanz, Fausto; Giralt, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Zeins are maize storages proteins that accumulate inside large vesicles called protein bodies. gamma-Zein lines the inner face of the protein body membrane, and its N-terminal proline-rich repetitive domain with the sequence (VHLPPP)(8) appears to be necessary for the accumulation of the protein within the organelle. Synthetic (VHLPPP)(8) adopts an amphipathic polyproline II conformation. In a preliminary recent work we used atomic force microscopy to study the surface organization of the octamer and transmission electron microscopy to visualize aggregates of the peptide from aqueous solution. We previously envisioned two self-assembly models (i.e., the geometric and the micellar) that take into account the observed features. In the present work we studied in detail the self-assembly of the peptide in solution and found that the peptide is able to form cylindrical micelles. Fibrils formed on graphite are generated by assembly of solution micelles. Based on the results of these studies, we focused exclusively on the micellar model. To our knowledge we have characterized for the first time supramolecular aggregates of polyproline structures other than collagen. The spontaneous arrangement of (VHLPPP)(8) suggests a role for the N-terminal domain of gamma-zein in the process of the whole protein deposition in protein bodies. PMID:12124299

  12. A peptide N-terminal protection strategy for comprehensive glycoproteome analysis using hydrazide chemistry based method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Guang; Mao, Jiawei; Cheng, Kai; Zhang, Zhang; Wan, Hao; Yao, Yating; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Fangjun; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-05-11

    Enrichment of glycopeptides by hydrazide chemistry (HC) is a popular method for glycoproteomics analysis. However, possible side reactions of peptide backbones during the glycan oxidation in this method have not been comprehensively studied. Here, we developed a proteomics approach to locate such side reactions and found several types of the side reactions that could seriously compromise the performance of glycoproteomics analysis. Particularly, the HC method failed to identify N-terminal Ser/Thr glycopeptides because the oxidation of vicinal amino alcohol on these peptides generates aldehyde groups and after they are covalently coupled to HC beads, these peptides cannot be released by PNGase F for identification. To overcome this drawback, we apply a peptide N-terminal protection strategy in which primary amine groups on peptides are chemically blocked via dimethyl labeling, thus the vicinal amino alcohols on peptide N-termini are eliminated. Our results showed that this strategy successfully prevented the oxidation of peptide N-termini and significantly improved the coverage of glycoproteome.

  13. Supramolecular properties of the proline-rich gamma-Zein N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Marcelo J; Dalcol, Ionara; Gorostiza, Pau; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Pons, Ramon; Pons, Miquel; Sanz, Fausto; Giralt, Ernest

    2002-08-01

    Zeins are maize storages proteins that accumulate inside large vesicles called protein bodies. gamma-Zein lines the inner face of the protein body membrane, and its N-terminal proline-rich repetitive domain with the sequence (VHLPPP)(8) appears to be necessary for the accumulation of the protein within the organelle. Synthetic (VHLPPP)(8) adopts an amphipathic polyproline II conformation. In a preliminary recent work we used atomic force microscopy to study the surface organization of the octamer and transmission electron microscopy to visualize aggregates of the peptide from aqueous solution. We previously envisioned two self-assembly models (i.e., the geometric and the micellar) that take into account the observed features. In the present work we studied in detail the self-assembly of the peptide in solution and found that the peptide is able to form cylindrical micelles. Fibrils formed on graphite are generated by assembly of solution micelles. Based on the results of these studies, we focused exclusively on the micellar model. To our knowledge we have characterized for the first time supramolecular aggregates of polyproline structures other than collagen. The spontaneous arrangement of (VHLPPP)(8) suggests a role for the N-terminal domain of gamma-zein in the process of the whole protein deposition in protein bodies.

  14. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-04

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile.

  15. N-terminal palmitoylation is required for Toxoplasma gondii HSP20 inner membrane complex localization

    PubMed Central

    De Napoli, MG; de Miguel, N; Lebrun, M; Moreno, SNJ; Angel, SO; Corvi, MM

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Protein palmitoylation is known to play roles in signal transduction and in enhancing the hydrophobicity of proteins thus contributing to their membrane association. Global inhibition of protein palmitoylation has been shown to affect T. gondii physiology and invasion of the host cell. However, the proteins affected by this modification have been understudied. This paper shows that the small heat shock protein 20 from T. gondii (TgHSP20) is synthesized as a mature protein in the cytosol and is palmitoylated in three cysteine residues. However, its localization at the inner membrane complex (IMC) is dependent only on N-terminal palmitoylation. Absence or incomplete N-terminal palmitoylation causes TgHSP20 to partially accumulate in a membranous structure. Interestingly, TgHSP20 palmitoylation is not responsible for its interaction with the daughter cells IMCs. Together, our data describe the importance of palmitoylation in protein targeting to the IMC in T. gondii. PMID:23485398

  16. In silico identification and characterization of N-Terminal acetyltransferase genes of poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hang-Yong; Li, Chun-Ming; Wang, Li-Feng; Bai, Hui; Li, Yan-Ping; Yu, Wen-Xi; Xia, De-An; Liu, Chang-Cai

    2014-01-27

    N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats) complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation), which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS) and auxiliary subunits (AS) have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A-F), being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  17. Specific N-terminal cleavage of ribosomal protein L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Erin A.; Caufield, J. Harry; Lyons, Charles E.; Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Christie, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ribosomal protein L27 is a component of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit that has been shown to play a critical role in substrate stabilization during protein synthesis. This function is mediated by the L27 N-terminus, which protrudes into the peptidyl transferase center. In this report we demonstrate that L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and other Firmicutes is encoded with an N-terminal extension that is not present in most Gram-negative organisms, and is absent from mature ribosomes. We have identified a cysteine protease, conserved among bacteria containing the L27 N-terminal extension, which performs post-translational cleavage of L27. Ribosomal biology in eubacteria has largely been studied in the Gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli; our findings indicate that there are aspects of the basic biology of the ribosome in S. aureus and other related bacteria that differ substantially from that of the E. coli ribosome. This research lays the foundation for the development of new therapeutic approaches that target this novel pathway. PMID:25388641

  18. Identification of eukaryotic peptide deformylases reveals universality of N-terminal protein processing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giglione, C; Serero, A; Pierre, M; Boisson, B; Meinnel, T

    2000-11-01

    The N-terminal protein processing pathway is an essential mechanism found in all organisms. However, it is widely believed that deformylase, a key enzyme involved in this process in bacteria, does not exist in eukaryotes, thus making it a target for antibacterial agents such as actinonin. In an attempt to define this process in higher eukaryotes we have used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism. Two deformylase cDNAs, the first identified in any eukaryotic system, and six distinct methionine aminopeptidase cDNAs were cloned. The corresponding proteins were characterized in vivo and in vitro. Methionine aminopeptidases were found in the cytoplasm and in the organelles, while deformylases were localized in the organelles only. Our work shows that higher plants have a much more complex machinery for methionine removal than previously suspected. We were also able to identify deformylase homologues from several animals and clone the corresponding cDNA from human cells. Our data provide the first evidence that lower and higher eukaryotes, as well as bacteria, share a similar N-terminal protein processing machinery, indicating universality of this system.

  19. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Developmental regulation of N-terminal H2B methylation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Garea, Ana; Forne, Ignasi; Vetter, Irene; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Thomae, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications play an important role in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression in vivo. Extensive studies investigated the post-translational modifications of the core histones H3 and H4 or the linker histone H1. Much less is known on the regulation of H2A and H2B modifications. Here, we show that a major modification of H2B in Drosophila melanogaster is the methylation of the N-terminal proline, which increases during fly development. Experiments performed in cultured cells revealed higher levels of H2B methylation when cells are dense, regardless of their cell cycle distribution. We identified dNTMT (CG1675) as the enzyme responsible for H2B methylation. We also found that the level of N-terminal methylation is regulated by dART8, an arginine methyltransferase that physically interacts with dNTMT and asymmetrically methylates H3R2. Our results demonstrate the existence of a complex containing two methyltransferases enzymes, which negatively influence each other’s activity. PMID:22053083

  1. Structure of the N-terminal domain of GRP94. Basis for ligand specificity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Soldano, Karen L; Jivan, Arif; Nicchitta, Christopher V; Gewirth, Daniel T

    2003-11-28

    GRP94, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) paralog of the chaperone Hsp90, plays an essential role in the structural maturation or secretion of a subset of proteins destined for transport to the cell surface, such as the Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and IgG, respectively. GRP94 differs from cytoplasmic Hsp90 by exhibiting very weak ATP binding and hydrolysis activity. GRP94 also binds selectively to a series of substituted adenosine analogs. The high resolution crystal structures at 1.75-2.1 A of the N-terminal and adjacent charged domains of GRP94 in complex with N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, radicicol, and 2-chlorodideoxyadenosine reveals a structural mechanism for ligand discrimination among hsp90 family members. The structures also identify a putative subdomain that may act as a ligand-responsive switch. The residues of the charged region fold into a disordered loop whose termini are ordered and continue the twisted beta sheet that forms the structural core of the N-domain. This continuation of the beta sheet past the charged domain suggests a structural basis for the association of the N-terminal and middle domains of the full-length chaperone.

  2. Concerted regulation of ISWI by an autoinhibitory domain and the H4 N-terminal tail

    PubMed Central

    Ludwigsen, Johanna; Pfennig, Sabrina; Singh, Ashish K; Schindler, Christina; Harrer, Nadine; Forné, Ignasi; Zacharias, Martin; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2017-01-01

    ISWI-family nucleosome remodeling enzymes need the histone H4 N-terminal tail to mobilize nucleosomes. Here we mapped the H4-tail binding pocket of ISWI. Surprisingly the binding site was adjacent to but not overlapping with the docking site of an auto-regulatory motif, AutoN, in the N-terminal region (NTR) of ISWI, indicating that AutoN does not act as a simple pseudosubstrate as suggested previously. Rather, AutoN cooperated with a hitherto uncharacterized motif, termed AcidicN, to confer H4-tail sensitivity and discriminate between DNA and nucleosomes. A third motif in the NTR, ppHSA, was functionally required in vivo and provided structural stability by clamping the NTR to Lobe 2 of the ATPase domain. This configuration is reminiscent of Chd1 even though Chd1 contains an unrelated NTR. Our results shed light on the intricate structural and functional regulation of ISWI by the NTR and uncover surprising parallels with Chd1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21477.001 PMID:28109157

  3. N-Terminal region is responsible for chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder IL-8.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Osamu; Wada, Shinpei; Matsuyama, Tomomasa; Sakai, Takamitsu; Takano, Tomokazu

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to locate the functional region responsible for the chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder interleukin 8 (IL-8), which lacks the glutamic acid-leucine-arginine (ELR) motif essential for the induction of neutrophil migration by mammalian IL-8. Using a human cell line, we produced a secretory recombinant protein of flounder IL-8, and analyzed its chemotaxis-inducing activity on leukocytes collected from the flounder kidney. The recombinant IL-8 induced significant migration in neutrophils, which were morphologically and functionally characterized. Using the Edman degradation method, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of rIL-8 was identified as VSLRSLGV. To examine the significance of the N-terminal region for the bioactivity of flounder IL-8, we prepared several recombinant proteins that containing mutations at the N-terminus. Modification of three residues (residues 9-11: serine-leucine-histidine) corresponding in position to the ELR motif in mammalian IL-8 did not reduce its chemotaxis-inducing activity. However, deletion of the first six or more residues significantly reduced its chemotaxis-inducing activity. We propose that residue 6 (leucine) at the N-terminus is important for the chemotaxis-inducing activity of flounder IL-8.

  4. Proteolytic interconversion and N-terminal sequences of the Citrobacter diversus major beta-lactamases.

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, N; Amicosante, G; Perilli, M; Maccarrone, M; Oratore, A; van Beeumen, J; Frère, J M

    1991-01-01

    The N-terminal sequences of the two major beta-lactamases produced by Citrobacter diversus differed only by the absence of the first residue in form II and the loss of five amino acid residues at the C-terminal end. Limited proteolysis of the homogeneous form I protein yielded a variety of enzymatically active products. In the major product obtained after the action of papain, the first three N-terminal residues of form I had been cleaved, whereas at the C-terminal end the treated enzyme lacked five residues. However, this cannot explain the different behaviours of form I, form II and papain digestion product upon chromatofocusing. Form I, which was sequenced up to position 56, exhibited a very high degree of similarity with a Klebsiella oxytoca beta-lactamase. The determined sequence, which contained the active serine residue, demonstrated that the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of Citrobacter diversus belong to class A. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2039443

  5. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  6. Preparation of protein samples for mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of protein samples for mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing is a key step in successfully identifying proteins. Mass spectrometry is a very sensitive technique, and as such, samples must be prepared carefully since they can be subject to contamination of the sample (e.g., due to incomplete subcellular fractionation or purification of a multiprotein complex), overwhelming of the sample by highly abundant proteins, and contamination from skin or hair (keratin can be a very common hit). One goal of sample preparation for mass spec is to reduce the complexity of the sample - in the example presented here, mitochondria are purified, solubilized, and fractionated by sucrose density gradient sedimentation prior to preparative 1D SDS-PAGE. It is important to verify the purity and integrity of the sample so that you can have confidence in the hits obtained. More protein is needed for N-terminal sequencing and ideally it should be purified to a single band when run on an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. The example presented here involves stably expressing a tagged protein in HEK293 cells and then isolating the protein by affinity purification and SDS-PAGE.

  7. Dual Role of Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activity in Bone Morphogenetic Protein-Mediated Drosophila Ventral Head Development.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Yeon; Stultz, Brian G; Hursh, Deborah A

    2015-12-01

    The Drosophila bone morphogenetic protein encoded by decapentaplegic (dpp) controls ventral head morphogenesis by expression in the head primordia, eye-antennal imaginal discs. These are epithelial sacs made of two layers: columnar disc proper cells and squamous cells of the peripodial epithelium. dpp expression related to head formation occurs in the peripodial epithelium; cis-regulatory mutations disrupting this expression display defects in sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, gena, and maxillary palps. Here we document that disruption of this dpp expression causes apoptosis in peripodial cells and underlying disc proper cells. We further show that peripodial Dpp acts directly on the disc proper, indicating that Dpp must cross the disc lumen to act. We demonstrate that palp defects are mechanistically separable from the other mutant phenotypes; both are affected by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway but in opposite ways. Slight reduction of both Jun N-terminal kinase and Dpp activity in peripodial cells causes stronger vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects than Dpp alone; additionally, strong reduction of Jun N-terminal kinase activity alone causes identical defects. A more severe reduction of dpp results in similar vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects, but also causes mutant maxillary palps. This latter defect is correlated with increased peripodial Jun N-terminal kinase activity and can be caused solely by ectopic activation of Jun N-terminal kinase. We conclude that formation of sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena tissue in head morphogenesis requires the action of Jun N-terminal kinase in peripodial cells, while excessive Jun N-terminal kinase signaling in these same cells inhibits the formation of maxillary palps. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Dual Role of Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activity in Bone Morphogenetic Protein-Mediated Drosophila Ventral Head Development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Yeon; Stultz, Brian G.; Hursh, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila bone morphogenetic protein encoded by decapentaplegic (dpp) controls ventral head morphogenesis by expression in the head primordia, eye-antennal imaginal discs. These are epithelial sacs made of two layers: columnar disc proper cells and squamous cells of the peripodial epithelium. dpp expression related to head formation occurs in the peripodial epithelium; cis-regulatory mutations disrupting this expression display defects in sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, gena, and maxillary palps. Here we document that disruption of this dpp expression causes apoptosis in peripodial cells and underlying disc proper cells. We further show that peripodial Dpp acts directly on the disc proper, indicating that Dpp must cross the disc lumen to act. We demonstrate that palp defects are mechanistically separable from the other mutant phenotypes; both are affected by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway but in opposite ways. Slight reduction of both Jun N-terminal kinase and Dpp activity in peripodial cells causes stronger vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects than Dpp alone; additionally, strong reduction of Jun N-terminal kinase activity alone causes identical defects. A more severe reduction of dpp results in similar vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena defects, but also causes mutant maxillary palps. This latter defect is correlated with increased peripodial Jun N-terminal kinase activity and can be caused solely by ectopic activation of Jun N-terminal kinase. We conclude that formation of sensory vibrissae, rostral membrane, and gena tissue in head morphogenesis requires the action of Jun N-terminal kinase in peripodial cells, while excessive Jun N-terminal kinase signaling in these same cells inhibits the formation of maxillary palps. PMID:26500262

  9. Human TRPA1 is intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive with and without its N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain

    PubMed Central

    Moparthi, Lavanya; Survery, Sabeen; Kreir, Mohamed; Simonsen, Charlotte; Kjellbom, Per; Högestätt, Edward D.; Johanson, Urban; Zygmunt, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    We have purified and reconstituted human transient receptor potential (TRP) subtype A1 (hTRPA1) into lipid bilayers and recorded single-channel currents to understand its inherent thermo- and chemosensory properties as well as the role of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the N terminus in channel behavior. We report that hTRPA1 with and without its N-terminal ARD (Δ1–688 hTRPA1) is intrinsically cold-sensitive, and thus, cold-sensing properties of hTRPA1 reside outside the N-terminal ARD. We show activation of hTRPA1 by the thiol oxidant 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA-biotin) and that electrophilic compounds activate hTRPA1 in the presence and absence of the N-terminal ARD. The nonelectrophilic compounds menthol and the cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabiorcol (C16) directly activate hTRPA1 at different sites independent of the N-terminal ARD. The TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 inhibited cold and chemical activation of hTRPA1 and Δ1–688 hTRPA1, supporting a direct interaction with hTRPA1 outside the N-terminal ARD. These findings show that hTRPA1 is an intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive ion channel. Thus, second messengers, including Ca2+, or accessory proteins are not needed for hTRPA1 responses to cold or chemical activators. We suggest that conformational changes outside the N-terminal ARD by cold, electrophiles, and nonelectrophiles are important in hTRPA1 channel gating and that targeting chemical interaction sites outside the N-terminal ARD provides possibilities to fine tune TRPA1-based drug therapies (e.g., for treatment of pain associated with cold hypersensitivity and cardiovascular disease). PMID:25389312

  10. HABP1/p32/gC1qR induces aberrant growth and morphology in Schizosaccharomyces pombe through its N-terminal {alpha} helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, Jaideep; Datta, Kasturi . E-mail: kdatta@mail.jnu.ac.in

    2005-10-01

    Hyaluronan binding protein (HABP1), located on human chromosome 17p13.3, was identified and characterized as being involved in cellular signaling from our laboratory. Here, we demonstrate that HABP1 expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe induces growth inhibition, morphological abnormalities like elongation, multinucleation and aberrant cell septum formation in several strains of S. pombe, implicating its role in cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. This argument is further strengthened by an observed delay in the maximal expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins like CDC 2 and CDC 25 coupled to the direct interaction of HABP1 with CDC 25. In order to pinpoint the interacting domain of HABP1, its N- and C-terminal truncated variants ({delta}N.HABP1 and {delta}C.HABP1, respectively) were utilized which revealed that while expression of the former did not alter the phenotype, the latter generated morphological changes similar to those imparted upon HABP1 expression. It was also noted that along with HABP1, {delta}C.HABP1 too directly interacts with CDC 25 while {delta}N.HABP1 does not. Taken together, these data suggest that HABP1 induces morphological changes and modulates the cell cycle by interacting with proteins like CDC 25 through its N-terminal {alpha}-helix.

  11. Identification of a human ABCC10 orthologue in Catharanthus roseus reveals a U12-type intron determinant for the N-terminal domain feature.

    PubMed

    El-Guizani, Taissir; Guibert, Clotilde; Triki, Saida; St-Pierre, Benoit; Ducos, Eric

    2014-04-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters are members of a large superfamily of proteins that utilize ATP hydrolysis to translocate a wide range of substrates across biological membranes. In general, members of C subfamily (ABCC) are structurally characterized by an additional (N-terminal) transmembrane domain (TMD0). Phylogenetic analysis of plant ABCCs separates their protein sequences into three distinct clusters: I and II are plant specific whereas cluster III contains both human and plant ABCCs. Screening of the Plant Medicinal Genomics Resource database allowed us to identify 16 ABCCs partial sequences in Catharanthus roseus; two of which belong to the unique CrABCC1 transcript that we identified in cluster III. Genomic organization of CrABCC1 TMD0 coding sequence displays an AT-AC U12-type intron that is conserved in higher plant orthologues. We showed that CrABCC1, like its human orthologue ABCC10, produces alternative transcripts that encode protein sequences with a truncated form of TMD0 without the first transmembrane span (TM1). Subcellular localization of CrABCC1 TMD0 variants using yellow fluorescent protein fusions reveals that the TM1 is required for a correct routing of the TMD0 to the tonoplast. Finally, the specific repartition of CrABCC1 orthologues in some species suggests that this gene was lost several times during evolution and that its physiological function may, rely on a common feature of multicellular eukaryotes.

  12. Identification and Analysis of a Novel Dimerization Domain Shared by Various Members of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Scaffold Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Katsenelson, Ksenya; Wasserman, Tanya; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Rabner, Alona; Glaser, Fabian; Aronheim, Ami

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) form a kinase tier module in which MAPK, MAP2K, and MAP3K are held by scaffold proteins. The scaffold proteins serve as a protein platform for selective and spatial kinase activation. The precise mechanism by which the scaffold proteins function has not yet been fully explained. WDR62 is a novel scaffold protein of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. Recessive mutations within WDR62 result in severe cerebral cortical malformations. One of the WDR62 mutant proteins found in a patient with microcephaly encodes a C-terminal truncated protein that fails to associate efficiently with JNK and MKK7β1. The present article shows that the WDR62 C-terminal region harbors a novel dimerization domain composed of a putative loop-helix domain that is necessary and sufficient for WDR62 dimerization and is critical for its scaffolding function. The loop-helix domain is highly conserved between orthologues and is also shared by the JNK scaffold protein, JNKBP1/MAPKBP1. Based on the high sequence conservation of the loop-helix domain, our article shows that MAPKBP1 homodimerizes and heterodimerizes with WDR62. Endogenous WDR62 and MAPKBP1 co-localize to stress granules following arsenite treatment, but not during mitosis. This study proposes another layer of complexity, in which coordinated activation of signaling pathways is mediated by the association between the different JNK scaffold proteins depending on their biological function. PMID:23341463

  13. Recombinant hnRNP protein A1 and its N-terminal domain show preferential affinity for oligodeoxynucleotides homologous to intron/exon acceptor sites.

    PubMed Central

    Buvoli, M; Cobianchi, F; Biamonti, G; Riva, S

    1990-01-01

    The reported binding preference of human hnRNP protein A1 for the 3'-splice site of some introns (Swanson and Dreyfuss (1988) EMBO J. 7, 3519-3529; Mayrand and Pederson (1990) Nucleic Acids Res. 18, 3307-3318) was tested by assaying in vitro the binding of purified recombinant A1 protein (expressed in bacteria) to synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (21-mers) of suitable sequence. In such a minimal system we find preferential binding of protein A1 to oligodeoxynucleotide sequences corresponding to the 3'-splice site of IVS1 of human beta-globin pre-mRNA and of IVS1 of Adenovirus type 2 major late transcript. Mutation studies demonstrate that the binding specificity is dependent on the known critical domains of this intron region, the AG splice site dinucleotide and polypyrimidine tract, and resides entirely in the short oligonucleotide sequence. Moreover specific binding does not require the presence of other hnRNP proteins or of snRNP particles. Studies with a truncated recombinant protein demonstrated that the minimal protein sequence determinants for A1 recognition of 3'-splice acceptor site reside entirely in the N-terminal 195 aa of the unmodified protein. Images PMID:2251120

  14. IFU Spectroscopy of Galaxy Truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoachim, Peter; Debattista, V. P.; Roskar, R.

    2010-01-01

    We have used the VIRUS-P spectrograph to obtain IFU spectroscopy of a sample of 10 nearby disk galaxies. We observe galaxies that show a mix of radial surface brightness profiles (i.e, downbending truncation regions and upturns). Because VIRUS-P is currently the largest field-of-view spectrograph, and has large 4.3" diameter fibers, we are able to spectroscopically measure stellar ages and metallicities down to very low surface brightness levels (muv 24 mag/sq arcsec). We have combined Bruzual & Charlot models with the GANDALF spectral fitting code to measure robust average ages of disk galaxy stellar populations. Simulations have shown that surface brightness truncations could be caused by stellar migration, implying that stars beyond the break should be older and metal poor. While we find a few examples of the expected behavior, in general there seems to be little correlation with stellar population parameters and a galaxy's surface brightness profile implying the physics of star formation is decoupled from the mechanism creating surface brightness profile breaks.

  15. CFTR mutations altering CFTR fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Kendra; Stobbart, Michelle; Cassidy, Diane M.; Venerando, Andrea; Pagano, Mario A.; Luz, Simão; Amaral, Margarida D.; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Farinha, Carlos M.; Mehta, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Most CF (cystic fibrosis) results from deletion of a phenylalanine (F508) in the CFTR {CF transmembrane-conductance regulator; ABCC7 [ABC (ATP-binding cassette) sub-family C member 7]} which causes ER (endoplasmic reticulum) degradation of the mutant. Using stably CFTR-expressing BHK (baby-hamster kidney) cell lines we demonstrated that wild-type CTFR and the F508delCFTR mutant are cleaved into differently sized N- and C-terminal-bearing fragments, with each hemi-CFTR carrying its nearest NBD (nucleotide-binding domain), reflecting differential cleavage through the central CFTR R-domain. Similar NBD1-bearing fragments are present in the natively expressing HBE (human bronchial epithelial) cell line. We also observe multiple smaller fragments of different sizes in BHK cells, particularly after F508del mutation (ladder pattern). Trapping wild-type CFTR in the ER did not generate a F508del fragmentation fingerprint. Fragments change their size/pattern again post-mutation at sites involved in CFTR's in vitro interaction with the pleiotropic protein kinase CK2 (S511A in NBD1). The F508del and S511A mutations generate different fragmentation fingerprints that are each unlike the wild-type; yet, both mutants generate new N-terminal-bearing CFTR fragments that are not observed with other CK2-related mutations (S511D, S422A/D and T1471A/D). We conclude that the F508delCFTR mutant is not degraded completely and there exists a relationship between CFTR's fragmentation fingerprint and the CFTR sequence through putative CK2-interactive sites that lie near F508. PMID:23067305

  16. Structure of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser of Aβ-peptide with phospholipase A2 from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Zeenat; Pillai, Vikram Gopalakrishna; Zhong, Wei-Zhu

    2014-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most significant social and health burdens of the present century. Plaques formed by extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) are the prime player of AD's neuropathology. Studies have implicated the varied role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in brain where it contributes to neuronal growth and inflammatory response. Overall contour and chemical nature of the substrate-binding channel in the low molecular weight PLA2s are similar. This study involves the reductionist fragment-based approach to understand the structure adopted by N-terminal fragment of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide in its complex with PLA2. In the current communication, we report the structure determined by X-ray crystallography of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser (DAEFRHDS) of Aβ-peptide with a Group I PLA2 purified from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution (Protein Data Bank (PDB) Code: 3JQ5). This is probably the first attempt to structurally establish interaction between amyloid-β peptide fragment and hydrophobic substrate binding site of PLA2 involving H bond and van der Waals interactions. We speculate that higher affinity between Aβ and PLA2 has the therapeutic potential of decreasing the Aβ-Aβ interaction, thereby reducing the amyloid aggregation and plaque formation in AD.

  17. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  18. Endogenous Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase N-Terminal Tagging Affects Human Telomerase Function at Telomeres In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Kunitoshi; Vogan, Jacob M.; Wu, Robert A.; Gill, Manraj S.; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Collins, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Telomerase action at telomeres is essential for the immortal phenotype of stem cells and the aberrant proliferative potential of cancer cells. Insufficient telomere maintenance can cause stem cell and tissue failure syndromes, while increased telomerase levels are associated with tumorigenesis. Both pathologies can arise from only small perturbation of telomerase function. To analyze telomerase at its low endogenous expression level, we genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to express various N-terminal fusion proteins of the telomerase reverse transcriptase from its endogenous locus. Using this approach, we found that these modifications can perturb telomerase function in hPSCs and cancer cells, resulting in telomere length defects. Biochemical analysis suggests that this defect is multileveled, including changes in expression and activity. These findings highlight the unknown complexity of telomerase structural requirements for expression and function in vivo. PMID:27872149

  19. Site-Specific N-Terminal Labeling of Peptides and Proteins using Butelase 1 and Thiodepsipeptide.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Cao, Yuan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Chuan Fa; Tam, James P

    2015-12-21

    An efficient ligase with exquisite site-specificity is highly desirable for protein modification. Recently, we discovered the fastest known ligase called butelase 1 from Clitoria ternatea for intramolecular cyclization. For intermolecular ligation, butelase 1 requires an excess amount of a substrate to suppress the reverse reaction, a feature similar to other ligases. Herein, we describe the use of thiodepsipeptide substrates with a thiol as a leaving group and an unacceptable nucleophile to render the butelase-mediated ligation reactions irreversible and in high yields. Butelase 1 also accepted depsipeptides as substrates, but unlike a thiodesipeptide, the desipeptide ligation was partially reversible as butelase 1 can tolerate an alcohol group as a poor nucleophile. The thiodesipeptide method was successfully applied in N-terminal labeling of ubiquitin and green fluorescent protein using substrates with or without a biotin group in high yields.

  20. [Proteolysis of semax analogues with different N-terminal amino acids by aminopeptidases].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, K V; V'iunova, T V; Nagaev, I Iu; Andreeva, L A; Alfeeva, L Iu; Miasoedov, N F

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis of semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro, Sem) and its analogues ([Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem, [Thr1]Sem, [Trp1]Sem) that are differ from semax in substitution of N-terminal Met residue were studied. It is shown that such replacement changes the rate of peptides degradation by N-aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.2, Sigma, Type VI, 9.2 units. Akt. / mg). [Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem and [Thr1]Sem semax analogues proved to be more stable to proteolysis than semax (Sem), and their initial product of proteolysis is His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-5). For triptophan analogue both Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-6) and Sem-5 product are formed in similar quantities. It is found that all investigated analogues can be used as inhibitors in Sem proteolysis.

  1. Cyclic N-terminal loop of amylin forms non amyloid fibers.

    PubMed

    Cope, Stephanie M; Shinde, Sandip; Best, Robert B; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Vaiana, Sara M

    2013-10-01

    We report for the first time, to our knowledge, that the N-terminal loop (N_loop) of amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) residues 1-8) forms extremely long and stable non-β-sheet fibers in solution under the same conditions in which human amylin (hIAPP) forms amyloid fibers. This observation applies to the cyclic, oxidized form of the N_loop but not to the linear, reduced form, which does not form fibers. Our findings indicate a potential role of direct N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not been previously explored, with important implications for the mechanism of hIAPP amyloid fiber formation, the inhibitory action of IAPP variants, and the competition between ordered and disordered aggregation in peptides of the calcitonin peptide family.

  2. Cyclic N-Terminal Loop of Amylin Forms Non Amyloid Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Stephanie M.; Shinde, Sandip; Best, Robert B.; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Vaiana, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time, to our knowledge, that the N-terminal loop (N_loop) of amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) residues 1–8) forms extremely long and stable non-β-sheet fibers in solution under the same conditions in which human amylin (hIAPP) forms amyloid fibers. This observation applies to the cyclic, oxidized form of the N_loop but not to the linear, reduced form, which does not form fibers. Our findings indicate a potential role of direct N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not been previously explored, with important implications for the mechanism of hIAPP amyloid fiber formation, the inhibitory action of IAPP variants, and the competition between ordered and disordered aggregation in peptides of the calcitonin peptide family. PMID:24094407

  3. Endogenous Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase N-Terminal Tagging Affects Human Telomerase Function at Telomeres In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Kunitoshi; Vogan, Jacob M; Wu, Robert A; Gill, Manraj S; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Collins, Kathleen; Hockemeyer, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Telomerase action at telomeres is essential for the immortal phenotype of stem cells and the aberrant proliferative potential of cancer cells. Insufficient telomere maintenance can cause stem cell and tissue failure syndromes, while increased telomerase levels are associated with tumorigenesis. Both pathologies can arise from only small perturbation of telomerase function. To analyze telomerase at its low endogenous expression level, we genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to express various N-terminal fusion proteins of the telomerase reverse transcriptase from its endogenous locus. Using this approach, we found that these modifications can perturb telomerase function in hPSCs and cancer cells, resulting in telomere length defects. Biochemical analysis suggests that this defect is multileveled, including changes in expression and activity. These findings highlight the unknown complexity of telomerase structural requirements for expression and function in vivo. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. SSDP1 gene encodes a protein with a conserved N-terminal FORWARD domain.

    PubMed

    Bayarsaihan, Dashzeveg

    2002-09-23

    I describe the characterization of mouse, human and chicken SSDP1 orthologs that encode a highly conserved protein with over 90% identity at the amino acid level. Structurally, the protein consists of a well-preserved FWD (FORWARD)-domain at the N-terminal end and a proline-, glycine-, methionine- and serine-rich sequence in the central and C-terminal regions. The FORWARD domain, comprised of three alpha-helices, is characterized by the presence of a FWD-box of unknown function conserved not only in vertebrates, but also in nematode, plants, fly and yeast. Human SSDP1 spans about 200 kb on the chromosome 1p31-p32 region and consists of 17 exons. The SSDP1 mRNA transcripts are distributed ubiquitously in adult human and mouse tissues.

  5. Identification of succinimide sites in proteins by N-terminal sequence analysis after alkaline hydroxylamine cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, M. Y.; Harris, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Under favorable conditions, Asp or Asn residues can undergo rearrangement to a succinimide (cyclic imide), which may also serve as an intermediate for deamidation and/or isoaspartate formation. Direct identification of such succinimides by peptide mapping is hampered by their lability at neutral and alkaline pH. We determined that incubation in 2 M hydroxylamine, 0.2 M Tris buffer, pH 9, for 2 h at 45 degrees C will specifically cleave on the C-terminal side of succinimides without cleavage at Asn-Gly bonds; yields are typically approximately 50%. N-terminal sequence analysis can then be used to identify an internal sequence generated by cleavage of the succinimide, hence identifying the succinimide site. PMID:8142891

  6. Efficient sortase-mediated N-terminal labeling of TEV protease cleaved recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarpong, Kwabena; Bose, Ron

    2017-03-15

    A major challenge in attaching fluorophores or other handles to proteins is the availability of a site-specific labeling strategy that provides stoichiometric modification without compromising protein integrity. We developed a simple approach that combines TEV protease cleavage, sortase modification and affinity purification to N-terminally label proteins. To achieve stoichiometrically-labeled protein, we included a short affinity tag in the fluorophore-containing peptide for post-labeling purification of the modified protein. This strategy can be easily applied to any recombinant protein with a TEV site and we demonstrate this on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Membrane Scaffold Protein (MSP) constructs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hexameric ring structure of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaB helicase

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tapan; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2009-01-15

    Hexameric DnaB helicase unwinds the DNA double helix during replication of genetic material in bacteria. DnaB is an essential bacterial protein; therefore, it is an important potential target for antibacterial drug discovery. We report a crystal structure of the N-terminal region of DnaB from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDnaBn), determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides atomic resolution details of formation of the hexameric ring of DnaB by two distinct interfaces. An extensive hydrophobic interface stabilizes a dimer of MtDnaBn by forming a four-helix bundle. The other, less extensive, interface is formed between the dimers, connecting three of them into a hexameric ring. On the basis of crystal packing interactions between MtDnaBn rings, we suggest a model of a helicase-primase complex that explains previously observed effects of DnaB mutations on DNA priming.

  8. Human T-cells recognise N-terminally Fmoc-modified peptide.

    PubMed

    Mannering, Stuart I; Purcell, Anthony W; Honeyman, Margo C; McCluskey, James; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-09-08

    We aimed to generate T-cell clones specific for human pre-proinsulin. An HLA DQ8, CD4+ T-cell clone that recognised a 10mer (C65-A9) peptide from pre-proinsulin was isolated. Further analysis revealed that the clone responded neither to recombinant proinsulin nor to re-synthesised C65-A9 peptide. Analysis of the original peptide revealed minor contamination (<0.5%) with an N-terminal Fmoc adduct. This peptide was synthesised and shown to stimulate the clone. Thus, Fmoc-modified peptides, which are common contaminants in synthetic peptides, can stimulate human CD4+ T-cells. This finding has important implications for the use of synthetic peptides in screening and epitope mapping studies and their use as vaccines in humans.

  9. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  10. Structure-Function Study of the N-terminal Domain of Exocyst Subunit Sec3

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Kyuwon; Knödler, Andreas; Lee, Sung Haeng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Orlando, Kelly; Zhang, Jian; Foskett, Trevor J.; Guo, Wei; Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-04-19

    The exocyst is an evolutionarily conserved octameric complex involved in polarized exocytosis from yeast to humans. The Sec3 subunit of the exocyst acts as a spatial landmark for exocytosis through its ability to bind phospholipids and small GTPases. The structure of the N-terminal domain of Sec3 (Sec3N) was determined ab initio and defines a new subclass of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains along with a new family of proteins carrying this domain. Respectively, N- and C-terminal to the PH domain Sec3N presents an additional {alpha}-helix and two {beta}-strands that mediate dimerization through domain swapping. The structure identifies residues responsible for phospholipid binding, which when mutated in cells impair the localization of exocyst components at the plasma membrane and lead to defects in exocytosis. Through its ability to bind the small GTPase Cdc42 and phospholipids, the PH domain of Sec3 functions as a coincidence detector at the plasma membrane.

  11. Synaptic transmission and plasticity require AMPA receptor anchoring via its N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jake F; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2017-03-14

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and are selectively recruited during activity-dependent plasticity to increase synaptic strength. A prerequisite for faithful signal transmission is the positioning and clustering of AMPARs at postsynaptic sites. The mechanisms underlying this positioning have largely been ascribed to the receptor cytoplasmic C-termini and to AMPAR-associated auxiliary subunits, both interacting with the postsynaptic scaffold. Here, using mouse organotypic hippocampal slices, we show that the extracellular AMPAR N-terminal domain (NTD), which projects midway into the synaptic cleft, plays a fundamental role in this process. This highly sequence-diverse domain mediates synaptic anchoring in a subunit-selective manner. Receptors lacking the NTD exhibit increased mobility in synapses, depress synaptic transmission and are unable to sustain long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, synaptic transmission and the expression of LTP are dependent upon an AMPAR anchoring mechanism that is driven by the NTD.

  12. N-Terminal Presequence-Independent Import of Phosphofructokinase into Hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Petr; Makki, Abhijith Radhakrishna; Zimorski, Verena; Garg, Sriram; Hampl, Vladimír; Hrdý, Ivan; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial evolution entailed the origin of protein import machinery that allows nuclear-encoded proteins to be targeted to the organelle, as well as the origin of cleavable N-terminal targeting sequences (NTS) that allow efficient sorting and import of matrix proteins. In hydrogenosomes and mitosomes, reduced forms of mitochondria with reduced proteomes, NTS-independent targeting of matrix proteins is known. Here, we studied the cellular localization of two glycolytic enzymes in the anaerobic pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis: PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase (TvPPi-PFK), which is the main glycolytic PFK activity of the protist, and ATP-dependent PFK (TvATP-PFK), the function of which is less clear. TvPPi-PFK was detected predominantly in the cytosol, as expected, while all four TvATP-PFK paralogues were imported into T. vaginalis hydrogenosomes, although none of them possesses an NTS. The heterologous expression of TvATP-PFK in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed an intrinsic capability of the protein to be recognized and imported into yeast mitochondria, whereas yeast ATP-PFK resides in the cytosol. TvATP-PFK consists of only a catalytic domain, similarly to “short” bacterial enzymes, while ScATP-PFK includes an N-terminal extension, a catalytic domain, and a C-terminal regulatory domain. Expression of the catalytic domain of ScATP-PFK and short Escherichia coli ATP-PFK in T. vaginalis resulted in their partial delivery to hydrogenosomes. These results indicate that TvATP-PFK and the homologous ATP-PFKs possess internal structural targeting information that is recognized by the hydrogenosomal import machinery. From an evolutionary perspective, the predisposition of ancient ATP-PFK to be recognized and imported into hydrogenosomes might be a relict from the early phases of organelle evolution. PMID:26475173

  13. Immobilization of the N-terminal helix stabilizes prefusion paramyxovirus fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Song, Albert S.; Poor, Taylor A.; Abriata, Luciano A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Lamb, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family. PIV5 fusion and entry are mediated by the coordinated action of the receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin–neuraminidase (HN), and the fusion protein (F). Upon triggering by HN, F undergoes an irreversible ATP- and pH-independent conformational change, going down an energy gradient from a metastable prefusion state to a highly stable postfusion state. Previous studies have highlighted key conformational changes in the F-protein refolding pathway, but a detailed understanding of prefusion F-protein metastability remains elusive. Here, using two previously described F-protein mutations (S443D or P22L), we examine the capacity to modulate PIV5 F stability and the mechanisms by which these point mutants act. The S443D mutation destabilizes prefusion F proteins by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the base of the F-protein globular head. The introduction of a P22L mutation robustly rescues destabilized F proteins through a local hydrophobic interaction between the N-terminal helix and a hydrophobic pocket. Prefusion stabilization conferred by a P22L-homologous mutation is demonstrated in the F protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus of a different genus, suggesting a conserved stabilizing structural element within the paramyxovirus family. Taken together, the available data suggest that movement of the N-terminal helix is a necessary early step for paramyxovirus F-protein refolding and presents a novel target for structure-based drug design. PMID:27335462

  14. Specific cleavage of N-terminal acetyl-methionine from peptides by rabbit muscle fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, G.R.; Wold, F.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated the hypothesis that the processing of eukaryotic proteins involves acetylation of the N-terminal Met, followed by removal of the resulting Ac-Met to expose the second amino acid in the sequence. An activity was identified in rabbit muscle extracts that effectively removes Ac-Met from a synthetic peptide I (AcMDETGDTALVA) resembling the N-terminus of actin. The activity is associated with microsomes and free ribosomes, but can be extracted from the ribosomes by treatment with 0.5 M NaCl in the presence of 2 mM Mg/sup + +/; a 200 fold purification is achieved by this differential centrifugation procedure. A number of chemically acetylated (/sup 14/C-Ac) peptides have been tested as substrates using an HPLC assay for liberated /sup 14/C-Ac-Met. The results suggest that the partially purified activity is specific for N-terminal Ac-Met in that other Ac-amino acids (Gly, Ala, Ser, Asp) were not released from similar peptides, including a derivative of peptide I with Met missing and with Ac-Asp as n-terminus. The amino acid in the second position also appears to be involved as a specificity determinant; a peptide Ac-Met-Arg-Phe-Ala was inert and the tripeptide Ac-Met/sub 3/ was a poor substrate. The dipeptide Ac-Met-Glu was also a very poor substrate, while several tripeptides Ac-Met-X-Y, were good substrates, although not as good as the actinlike peptide I.

  15. Structural basis of damage recognition by thymine DNA glycosylase: Key roles for N-terminal residues

    PubMed Central

    Coey, Christopher T.; Malik, Shuja S.; Pidugu, Lakshmi S.; Varney, Kristen M.; Pozharski, Edwin; Drohat, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is a base excision repair enzyme functioning in DNA repair and epigenetic regulation. TDG removes thymine from mutagenic G·T mispairs arising from deamination of 5-methylcytosine (mC), and it processes other deamination-derived lesions including uracil (U). Essential for DNA demethylation, TDG excises 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine, derivatives of mC generated by Tet (ten-eleven translocation) enzymes. Here, we report structural and functional studies of TDG82-308, a new construct containing 29 more N-terminal residues than TDG111-308, the construct used for previous structures of DNA-bound TDG. Crystal structures and NMR experiments demonstrate that most of these N-terminal residues are disordered, for substrate- or product-bound TDG82-308. Nevertheless, G·T substrate affinity and glycosylase activity of TDG82-308 greatly exceeds that of TDG111-308 and is equivalent to full-length TDG. We report the first high-resolution structures of TDG in an enzyme-substrate complex, for G·U bound to TDG82-308 (1.54 Å) and TDG111-308 (1.71 Å), revealing new enzyme-substrate contacts, direct and water-mediated. We also report a structure of the TDG82-308 product complex (1.70 Å). TDG82-308 forms unique enzyme–DNA interactions, supporting its value for structure-function studies. The results advance understanding of how TDG recognizes and removes modified bases from DNA, particularly those resulting from deamination. PMID:27580719

  16. Functional differences between HOX proteins conferred by two residues in the homeodomain N-terminal arm.

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, M L; Sadoul, R; Featherstone, M S

    1994-01-01

    Hox genes encode homeodomain-containing transcriptional regulators that function during development to specify positional identity along embryonic axes. The homeodomain is composed of a flexible N-terminal arm and three alpha helices, and it differentially binds DNA. A number of homeodomains recognize sites containing a TAAT core motif. The product of the murine Hoxd-4 (Hox-4.2) gene functions in a positive autoregulatory fashion in P19 cells that is dependent on two TAAT motifs in the Hoxd-4 promoter. This effect is specific in that murine HOXA-1 (HOX-1.6) is unable to activate transcription through the Hoxd-4 autoregulatory element. Here we show that this is due to an inability of the HOXA-1 homeodomain to bind a HOXD-4 recognition site effectively. We have produced chimeras between HOXD-4 and HOXA-1 to map specific residues responsible for this functional difference. When positions 2 and 3 in the N-terminal arm of HOXA-1 were converted to HOXD-4 identity, both strong DNA binding and transcriptional activation were rescued. This substitution appears to confer an increased DNA-binding ability on the HOXA-1 homeodomain, since we were unable to detect a high-affinity recognition sequence for HOXA-1 in a randomized pool of DNA probes. The contribution of position 3 to DNA binding has been implicated by structural studies, but this is the first report of the importance of position 2 in regulating homeodomain-DNA interactions. Additionally, specific homeodomain residues that confer major differences in DNA binding and transcriptional activation between Hox gene products have not been previously determined. Identity at these two positions is generally conserved among paralogs but varies between Hox gene subfamilies. As a result, these residues may be important for the regulation of target gene expression by specific Hox products. Images PMID:7913516

  17. Intranasal delivery of N-terminal modified leptin-pluronic conjugate for treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongfen; Yi, Xiang; Zhao, Yuling; Poon, Chi-Duen; Bullock, Kristin M; Hansen, Kim M; Salameh, Therese S; Farr, Susan A; Banks, William A; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2017-03-24

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that is delivered via a specific transport system across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to the brain where it acts on the hypothalamus receptors to control appetite and thermogenesis. Peripheral resistance to leptin due to its impaired brain delivery prevents therapeutic use of leptin in overweight and moderately obese patients. To address this problem, we modified the N-terminal amine of leptin with Pluronic P85 (LepNP85) and administered this conjugate intranasally using the nose-to-brain (INB) route to bypass the BBB. We compared this conjugate with the native leptin, the N-terminal leptin conjugate with poly(ethylene glycol) (LepNPEG5K), and two conjugates of leptin with Pluronic P85 attached randomly to the lysine amino groups of the hormone. Compared to the random conjugates of leptin with P85, LepNP85 has shown higher affinity upon binding with the leptin receptor, and similarly to native hormone activated hypothalamus receptors after direct injection into brain. After INB delivery, LepNP85 conjugate was transported to the brain and accumulated in the hypothalamus and hippocampus to a greater extent than the native leptin and LepNPEG5K and activated leptin receptors in hypothalamus at lower dose than native leptin. Our work suggests that LepNP85 can access the brain directly after INB delivery and confirms our hypothesis that the improvement in brain accumulation of this conjugate is due to its enhanced brain absorption. In conclusion, the LepNP85 with optimized conjugation chemistry is a promising candidate for treatment of obesity.

  18. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme N-Terminal Inactivation Alleviates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Xiao, Hong D.; Xu, Jianguo; Ong, Frank S.; Kwon, Mike; Roman, Jesse; Gal, Anthony; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycin has potent anti-oncogenic properties for several neoplasms, but drug administration is limited by bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system has been suggested to decrease bleomycin toxicity, but the efficacy of such strategies remains uncertain and somewhat contradictory. Our hypothesis is that, besides angiotensin II, other substrates of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), such as the tetrapeptide N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (AcSDKP), play a significant role in controlling fibrosis. We studied bleomycin-induced lung injury in normotensive mice, termed N-KO and C-KO, which have point mutations inactivating either the N- or C-terminal catalytic sites of ACE, respectively. N-KO, but not C-KO mice, have a marked resistance to bleomycin lung injury as assessed by lung histology and hydroxyproline content. To determine the importance of the ACE N-terminal peptide substrate AcSDKP in the resistance to bleomycin injury, N-KO mice were treated with S-17092, a prolyl-oligopeptidase inhibitor that inhibits the formation of AcSDKP. In response to bleomycin injection, S-17092-treated N-KO mice developed lung fibrosis similar to wild-type mice. In contrast, the administration of AcSDKP to wild-type mice reduced lung fibrosis due to bleomycin administration. This study shows that the inactivation of the N-terminal catalytic site of ACE significantly reduced bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and implicates AcSDKP in the mechanism of protection. These data suggest a possible means to increase tolerance to bleomycin and to treat fibrosing lung diseases. PMID:20651228

  19. Defining Lipid Interacting Domains in the N-terminal Region of Apolipoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhenghui Gordon; Gantz, Donald; Bullitt, Esther; McKnight, C. James

    2008-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a nonexchangeable apolipoprotein that dictates the synthesis of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins. ApoB is the major protein in low density lipoprotein, also known as the “bad cholesterol” that is directly implicated in atherosclerosis. It has been suggested that the N-terminal domain of apoB plays a critical role in the formation of apoB-containing lipoproteins through the initial recruitment of phospholipids in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, very little is known about the mechanism of lipoprotein nucleation by apoB. Here we demonstrate that a strong phospholipid remodeling function is associated with the predicted α-helical and C-sheet domains in the N-terminal 17% of apoB (B17). Using dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) as a model lipid, these domains can convert multilamellar DMPC vesicles into discoidal-shaped particles. The nascent particles reconstituted from different apoB domains are distinctive and compositionally homogenous. This phospholipid remodeling activity is also observed with egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) and is therefore not DMPC dependent. Using kinetic analysis of the DMPC clearance assay, we show that the identified phospholipid binding sequences all map to the surface of the lipid binding pocket in the B17 model based on the homologous protein, lipovitellin. Since both B17 and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), a critical chaperone during lipoprotein assembly, are homologous to lipovitellin, the identification of these phospholipid remodeling sequences in B17 provides important insights into the potential mechanism that initiates the assembly of apoB-containing lipoproteins. PMID:17002280

  20. PERSPECTIVE: Intra-molecular chaperone: the role of the N-terminal in conformational selection and kinetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    The vast majority of the proteins in nature are under thermodynamic control, consistent with the universally accepted notion that proteins exist in their thermodynamically most stable state. Yet, recently a number of examples of proteins whose fold is under kinetic control have come to light. Their functions and environments vary. The first among these are some proteases, discovered in the early 1990s. There, an N-terminal proregion is self-cleaved after the protein folded, leaving the remainder of the chain in a kinetically trapped state. A related scenario was observed for microcin J25, an antibacterial peptide. This peptide presents a trapped covalently knotted conformation. The third and the most recently discovered case is the multidrug-resistant transporter protein, P-glycoprotein. There, a synonymous 'silent' mutation leads to ribosome stalling with a consequent altered kinetically trapped state. Here we argue that in all three examples, the N-terminal plays the role of an intra-molecular chaperone, that is, the N-terminal conformation selects among all competing local conformations of a downstream segment. By providing a pattern, the N-terminal chaperone segment assists the protein folding process. If the N-terminal is subsequently cleaved, the protein can be under kinetic control, since it is trapped in a thermodynamically less-stable state.

  1. The Impact of N-terminal Acetylation of α-Synuclein on Phospholipid Membrane Binding and Fibril Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Aditya; Roeters, Steven J.; Schilderink, Nathalie; Hommersom, Bob; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Woutersen, Sander; Claessens, Mireille M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Human α-synuclein (αS) has been shown to be N terminally acetylated in its physiological state. This modification is proposed to modulate the function and aggregation of αS into amyloid fibrils. Using bacterially expressed acetylated-αS (NTAc-αS) and endogenous αS (Endo-αS) from human erythrocytes, we show that N-terminal acetylation has little impact on αS binding to anionic membranes and thus likely not relevant for regulating membrane affinity. N-terminal acetylation does have an effect on αS aggregation, resulting in a narrower distribution of the aggregation lag times and rates. 2D-IR spectra show that acetylation changes the secondary structure of αS in fibrils. This difference may arise from the slightly higher helical propensity of acetylated-αS in solution leading to a more homogenous fibril population with different fibril structure than non-acetylated αS. We speculate that N-terminal acetylation imposes conformational restraints on N-terminal residues in αS, thus predisposing αS toward specific interactions with other binding partners or alternatively decrease nonspecific interactions. PMID:27531743

  2. Crystallization of Galectin-8 Linker Reveals Intricate Relationship between the N-terminal Tail and the Linker.

    PubMed

    Si, Yunlong; Wang, Yue; Gao, Jin; Song, Chenyang; Feng, Shiqiong; Zhou, Yifa; Tai, Guihua; Su, Jiyong

    2016-12-12

    Galectin-8 (Gal-8) plays a significant role in normal immunological function as well as in cancer. This lectin contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) connected by a peptide linker. The N-terminal CRD determines ligand binding specificity, whereas the linker has been proposed to regulate overall Gal-8 function, including multimerization and biological activity. Here, we crystallized the Gal-8 N-terminal CRD with the peptide linker using a crystallization condition that contains Ni(2+). The Ni(2+) ion was found to be complexed between two CRDs via crystal packing contacts. The coordination between Ni(2+) and Asp25 plays an indirect role in determining the structure of β-strand F0 and in influencing the linker conformation which could not be defined due to its dynamic nature. The linker was also shortened in situ and crystallized under a different condition, leading to a higher resolution structure refined to 1.08 Å. This crystal structure allowed definition of a short portion of the linker interacting with the Gal-8 N-terminal tail via ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds. Observation of two Gal-8 N-terminal CRD structures implies that the N-terminal tail and the linker may influence each other's conformation. In addition, under specific crystallization conditions, glycerol could replace lactose and was observed at the carbohydrate binding site. However, glycerol did not show inhibition activity in hemagglutination assay.

  3. Crystallization of Galectin-8 Linker Reveals Intricate Relationship between the N-terminal Tail and the Linker

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yunlong; Wang, Yue; Gao, Jin; Song, Chenyang; Feng, Shiqiong; Zhou, Yifa; Tai, Guihua; Su, Jiyong

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-8 (Gal-8) plays a significant role in normal immunological function as well as in cancer. This lectin contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) connected by a peptide linker. The N-terminal CRD determines ligand binding specificity, whereas the linker has been proposed to regulate overall Gal-8 function, including multimerization and biological activity. Here, we crystallized the Gal-8 N-terminal CRD with the peptide linker using a crystallization condition that contains Ni2+. The Ni2+ ion was found to be complexed between two CRDs via crystal packing contacts. The coordination between Ni2+ and Asp25 plays an indirect role in determining the structure of β-strand F0 and in influencing the linker conformation which could not be defined due to its dynamic nature. The linker was also shortened in situ and crystallized under a different condition, leading to a higher resolution structure refined to 1.08 Å. This crystal structure allowed definition of a short portion of the linker interacting with the Gal-8 N-terminal tail via ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds. Observation of two Gal-8 N-terminal CRD structures implies that the N-terminal tail and the linker may influence each other’s conformation. In addition, under specific crystallization conditions, glycerol could replace lactose and was observed at the carbohydrate binding site. However, glycerol did not show inhibition activity in hemagglutination assay. PMID:27973456

  4. The N-terminal sequence of the extrinsic PsbP protein modulates the redox potential of Cyt b559 in photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Taishi; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi; Nield, Jon; Sato, Fumihiko; Ifuku, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The PsbP protein, an extrinsic subunit of photosystem II (PSII) in green plants, is known to induce a conformational change around the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster securing the binding of Ca2+ and Cl– in PSII. PsbP has multiple interactions with the membrane subunits of PSII, but how these affect the structure and function of PSII requires clarification. Here, we focus on the interactions between the N-terminal residues of PsbP and the α subunit of Cytochrome (Cyt) b559 (PsbE). A key observation was that a peptide fragment formed of the first N-terminal 15 residues of PsbP, ‘pN15’, was able to convert Cyt b559 into its HP form. Interestingly, addition of pN15 to NaCl-washed PSII membranes decreased PSII’s oxygen-evolving activity, even in the presence of saturating Ca2+ and Cl– ions. In fact, pN15 reversibly inhibited the S1 to S2 transition of the OEC in PSII. These data suggest that pN15 can modulate the redox property of Cyt b559 involved in the side-electron pathway in PSII. This potential change of Cyt b559, in the absence of the C-terminal domain of PsbP, however, would interfere with any electron donation from the Mn4CaO5 cluster, leading to the possibility that multiple interactions of PsbP, binding to PSII, have distinct roles in regulating electron transfer within PSII. PMID:26887804

  5. Truncated Gaussian and derived methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Hélène; Renard, Didier

    2016-09-01

    The interest of a digital model to represent the geological characteristics of the field is well established. However, the way to obtain it is not straightforward because this translation is necessarily a simplification of the actual field. This paper describes a stochastic model called truncated Gaussian simulations (TGS), which distributes a collection of facies or lithotypes over an area of interest. This method is based on facies proportions, spatial distribution and relationships, which can be easily tuned to produce numerous different textures. Initially developed for ordered facies, this model has been extended to complex organizations, where facies are not sequentially ordered. This method called pluri-Gaussian simulation (PGS) considers several Gaussian random functions, which can be correlated. PGS can produce a large variety of lithotype setups, as illustrated by several examples such as oriented deposits or high frequency layering.

  6. N-truncation and pyroglutaminylation enhances the opsonizing capacity of Aβ-peptides and facilitates phagocytosis by macrophages and microglia.

    PubMed

    Condic, Mateja; Oberstein, Timo Jan; Herrmann, Martin; Reimann, Mareike Carola; Kornhuber, Johannes; Maler, Juan Manuel; Spitzer, Philipp

    2014-10-01

    Abnormal accumulations of amyloid-β (Aβ)-peptides are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The precursor of the Aβ-peptides, the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is also found in peripheral blood cells, but its function in these cells remains elusive. We previously observed that mononuclear phagocytes release Aβ-peptides during activation and phagocytosis, suggesting a physiologic role in inflammatory processes. Here, we show that supplementing the media with soluble N-terminally truncated Aβ(2-40) and Aβ(2-42) as well as Aβ(1-42) induced the phagocytosis of polystyrene particles (PSPs) by primary human monocytes. If the PSPs were pre-incubated with Aβ-peptides, phagocytosis was induced by all tested Aβ-peptide species. N-terminally truncated Aβ(x-42) induced the phagocytosis of PSPs significantly more effectively than did Aβ(x-40). Similarly, the phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by GM-CSF- and M-CSF-elicited macrophages as well as microglia was particularly facilitated by pre-incubation with N-terminally truncated Aβ(x-42). The proinflammatory polarization of monocytes was indicated by the reduced MSRI expression and IL-10 secretion after phagocytosis of PSPs coated with Aβ(1-42), Aβ(2-42) and Aβ(3p-42). Polarization of the macrophages by GM-CSF reduced the phagocytic activity, but it did not affect the capabilities of Aβ-peptides to opsonize prey. Taken together, Aβ-peptides support phagocytosis as soluble factors and act as opsonins. Differential effects among the Aβ-peptide variants point to distinct mechanisms of interaction among monocytes/macrophages, prey and Aβ-peptides. A proinflammatory polarization induced by the phagocytosis of Aβ-peptide coated particles may provide a model for the chronic inflammatory reaction and sustained plaque deposition in AD.

  7. Intergenic complementation truncation mutants of cyclin-dependent kinase.

    PubMed

    Bitter, G A; Tsai, M M; Putzke, A P; Leong, K

    2000-03-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes PHO80 and PHO85 encode, respectively, a cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase, which negatively regulate PHO5 gene transcription by phosphorylating the transcription activator Pho4p. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are highly conserved proteins, both within and between species. It was previously demonstrated, using reporter genes activated in yeast by Pho4p, that hybrid proteins in which over two-thirds of Pho85p were replaced with the homologous region from human Cdk2 retained the function of native Pho85p with respect to promoter repression. In the present study, various truncated forms of the hybrid human-yeast CDKs were tested for function. Surprisingly, truncations in which significant portions of the C-terminal region of the 291-residue hybrid CDK were deleted retained activity. Genes encoding human Cdk2 proteins which terminated after amino acids 151, 140, 130, 120 and 90 each complement a chromosomal pho85 gene disruption in which the HIS3 gene is inserted at codon 49. Truncated Cdk2 proteins containing less than 60 amino acids failed to complement the pho85::HIS3 gene disruption. Although the functional C-terminal truncations disrupt the ATP-binding and active sites of Cdk2, reporter gene repression mediated by these truncated proteins is apparently due to phosphorylation of Pho4p, since a gene in which the essential lysine codon at position 33 was converted to an arginine codon does not complement the chromosomal gene disruption. The human Cdk2 truncations were demonstrated to function through intergenic complementation. The intact Cdk2-Pho85 hybrid CDK complemented the pho85 mutation in yeast strains in which the entire PHO85 coding region was deleted from chromosome XVI. The C-terminal Cdk2 truncations, however, were non-functional in these strains and thus dependent for activity on the pho85 coding region which remained in the mutant pho85::HIS3 chromosomal locus. These genetic results are consistent with a model

  8. N-terminal region of myelin basic protein reduces fibrillar amyloid-β deposition in Tg-5xFAD mice.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Xu, Feng; Liao, Mei-Chen; Davis, Judianne; Robinson, John K; Van Nostrand, William E

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by extensive deposition of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. Previously, myelin basic protein (MBP) was identified to be a potent inhibitor to Aβ fibril formation, and this inhibitory activity was localized to the N-terminal residues 1-64, a fragment designated MBP1. Here, we show that the modest neuronal expression of a fusion protein of the biologically active MBP1 fragment and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (MBP1-EGFP) significantly improved the performance of spatial learning memory in Tg-5xFAD mice, a model of pathologic Aβ accumulation in brain. The levels of insoluble Aβ and fibrillar amyloid were significantly reduced in bigenic Tg-5xFAD/Tg-MBP1-EGFP mice. Quantitative stereological analysis revealed that the reduction in amyloid was because of a reduction in the size of fibrillar plaques rather than a decrease in plaque numbers. The current findings support previous studies showing that MBP1 inhibits Aβ fibril formation in vitro and demonstrate the ability of MBP1 to reduce Aβ pathology and improve behavioral performance.

  9. Correlation between spina bifida manifesta in fetal rats and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling★

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yinghuan; Bao, Yongxin; Li, Chenghao; Jiao, Fubin; Xin, Hongjie; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2012-01-01

    Fetal rat models with neural tube defects were established by injection with retinoic acid at 10 days after conception. The immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis showed that the number of caspase-3 positive cells in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta was increased. There was also increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation level was positively correlated with caspase-3 expression in myeloid tissues for spina bifida manifesta. Experimental findings indicate that abnormal apoptosis is involved in retinoic acid-induced dominant spina bifida formation in fetal rats, and may be associated with the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signal transduction pathway. PMID:25337099

  10. Modifications in the purification protocol of Celosia cristata antiviral proteins lead to protein that can be N-terminally sequenced.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Ashraf; Kapoor, H C

    2004-12-01

    Plants antiviral proteins are being used as anticancer agents and inhibit other viral diseases in humans. We modified the purification protocol of the two N-terminally blocked antiviral glycoproteins, CCP-25 and CCP-27, purified from the leaves of Celosia cristata. This not only gave rise to single pure samples with few steps of purification but also resulted in N-terminally free proteins. The extra purity of the samples was analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Deglycosylation studies of CCP-25 with PNGase F enzyme revealed that its asparagine or asparagine-linked glycon contents are negligible. Partial N-terminal sequence of the CCP-25 showed the sequence (ANDIS), which seems to be conserved among plant antiviral proteins.

  11. N-Terminal signal sequence is required for cellular trafficking and hyaluronan-depolymerization of KIAA1199.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nagaoka, Aya; Nakamura, Sachiko; Tobiishi, Megumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2014-01-03

    Recently, we disclosed that KIAA1199-mediated hyaluronan (HA) depolymerization requires an acidic cellular microenvironment (e.g. clathrin-coated vesicles or early endosomes), but no information about the structural basis underlying the cellular targeting and functional modification of KIAA1199 was available. Here, we show that the cleavage of N-terminal 30 amino acids occurs in functionally matured KIAA1199, and the deletion of the N-terminal portion results in altered intracellular trafficking of the molecule and loss of cellular HA depolymerization. These results suggest that the N-terminal portion of KIAA1199 functions as a cleavable signal sequence required for proper KIAA1199 translocation and KIAA1199-mediated HA depolymerization.

  12. Control of Polarized Growth by the Rho Family GTPase Rho4 in Budding Yeast: Requirement of the N-Terminal Extension of Rho4 and Regulation by the Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Bem2

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ting; Liao, Yuan; He, Fei; Yang, Yang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho4 GTPase partially plays a redundant role with Rho3 in the control of polarized growth, as deletion of RHO4 and RHO3 together, but not RHO4 alone, caused lethality and a loss of cell polarity at 30°C. Here, we show that overexpression of the constitutively active rho4Q131L mutant in an rdi1Δ strain caused a severe growth defect and generated large, round, unbudded cells, suggesting that an excess of Rho4 activity could block bud emergence. We also generated four temperature-sensitive rho4-Ts alleles in a rho3Δ rho4Δ strain. These mutants showed growth and morphological defects at 37°C. Interestingly, two rho4-Ts alleles contain mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Rho4. Rho4 possesses a long N-terminal extension that is unique among the six Rho GTPases in the budding yeast but is common in Rho4 homologs in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. We show that the N-terminal extension plays an important role in Rho4 function since rho3Δ rho4Δ61 cells expressing truncated Rho4 lacking amino acids (aa) 1 to 61 exhibited morphological defects at 24°C and a growth defect at 37°C. Furthermore, we show that Rho4 interacts with Bem2, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) for Cdc42 and Rho1, by yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays. Bem2 specifically interacts with the GTP-bound form of Rho4, and the interaction is mediated by its RhoGAP domain. Overexpression of BEM2 aggravates the defects of rho3Δ rho4 mutants. These results suggest that Bem2 might be a novel GAP for Rho4. PMID:23264647

  13. The Bordetella Secreted Regulator BspR Is Translocated into the Nucleus of Host Cells via Its N-Terminal Moiety: Evaluation of Bacterial Effector Translocation by the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Akio; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Tanaka, Naomichi; Kurushima, Jun; Kuwae, Asaomi

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is genetically related to B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, which cause respiratory tract infections in humans. These pathogens possess a large number of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system (T3SS), which is required for the delivery of effectors into the host cells. In a previous study, we identified a transcriptional regulator, BspR, that is involved in the regulation of the T3SS-related genes in response to iron-starved conditions. A unique feature of BspR is that this regulator is secreted into the extracellular milieu via the T3SS. To further characterize the role of BspR in extracellular localization, we constructed various truncated derivatives of BspR and investigated their translocation into the host cells using conventional translocation assays. In this study, the effector translocation was evaluated by the T3SS of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), since the exogenous expression of BspR triggers severe repression of the Bordetella T3SS expression. The results of the translocation assays using the EPEC T3SS showed that the N-terminal 150 amino acid (aa) residues of BspR are sufficient for translocation into the host cells in a T3SS-dependent manner. In addition, exogenous expression of BspR in HeLa cells demonstrated that the N-terminal 100 aa residues are involved in the nuclear localization. In contrast, the N-terminal 54 aa residues are sufficient for the extracellular secretion into the bacterial culture supernatant via the EPEC T3SS. Thus, BspR is not only a transcriptional regulator in bacteria cytosol, but also functions as an effector that translocates into the nuclei of infected host cells. PMID:26247360

  14. Role of Prion Disease-Linked Mutations in the Intrinsically Disordered N-Terminal Domain of the Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaojing; Casiraghi, Nicola; Rossetti, Giulia; Mohanty, Sandipan; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe; Carloni, Paolo

    2013-11-12

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals and other animal species. In humans, about 15% of these maladies are caused by pathogenic mutations (PMs) in the gene encoding for the prion protein (PrP(C)). Seven PMs are located in the naturally unfolded PrP(C) N-terminal domain, which constitutes about half of the protein. Intriguingly and in sharp contrast to other PMs clustered in the folded domain, N-terminal PMs barely affect the conversion to the pathogenic (scrapie, or PrP(Sc)) isoform of PrP(C). Here, we hypothesize that the neurotoxicity of these PMs arises from changes in structural determinants of the N-terminal domain, affecting the protein binding with its cellular partners and/or the cotranslational translocation during the PrP(C) biosynthesis. We test this idea by predicting the conformational ensemble of the wild-type (WT) and mutated mouse PrP(C) N-terminal domain, whose sequence is almost identical to that of the human one and for which the largest number of in vivo data is available. The conformational properties of the WT are consistent with those inferred experimentally. Importantly, the PMs turn out to affect in a subtle manner the intramolecular contacts in the putative N-terminal domain binding sites for Cu(2+) ions, sulphated glycosaminoglycans, and other known PrP(C) cellular partners. The PMs also alter the local structural features of the transmembrane domain and adjacent stop transfer effector, which act together to regulate the protein topology. These results corroborate the hypothesis that N-terminal PMs affect the PrP(C) binding to functional interactors and/or the translocation.

  15. The N-terminal extension of the P. falciparum GBP130 signal peptide is irrelevant for signal sequence function.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Corinna; Barniol, Luis; Hiss, Jan A; Przyborski, Jude M

    2017-07-17

    The malaria parasite P. falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is not well understood, many exported proteins appear to play a role in modification of the erythrocyte following invasion. Protein export to the erythrocyte is a secretory process that begins with entry to the endoplasmic reticulum. For most exported proteins, this step is mediated by hydrophobic signal peptides found towards the N-terminal end of proteins. The signal peptides present on P. falciparum exported proteins often differ in length from those found in other systems, and generally contain a highly extended N-terminal region. Here we have investigated the function of these extended N-terminal regions, using the exported parasite protein GBP130 as a model. Surprisingly, several deletions of the extended N-terminal regions of the GBP130 signal peptide have no effect on the ability of the signal peptide to direct a fluorescent reporter to the secretory pathway. Addition of the same N-terminal extension to a canonical signal peptide does not affect transport of either soluble or membrane proteins to their correct respective subcellular localisations. Finally, we show that extended signal peptides are able to complement canonical signal peptides in driving protein traffic to the apicoplast of the parasite, and are also functional in a mammalian cell system. Our study is the first detailed analysis of an extended P. falciparum signal peptide and suggests that N-terminal extensions of exported Plasmodium falciparum proteins are not required for entry to the secretory system, and are likely to be involved in other, so far unknown, processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  17. Site-specific Chemical Modification of a Glycoprotein Fragment Expressed in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junpeng; Tolbert, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific modification of glycoproteins has wide application in both biochemical and biophysical studies. This method describes the conjugation of synthetic molecules to the N-terminus of a glycoprotein fragment: immunoglobulin G subclass 1 fragment crystallizable (IgG1 Fc) by native chemical ligation. The glycosylated IgG1 Fc is expressed in a glycosylation deficient yeast strain. The N-terminal cysteine is generated by the endogenous yeast protease Kex2 in the yeast secretory pathway. The N-terminal cysteine is then conjugated with a biotin thioester to produce a biotinylated, glycosylated IgG1 Fc using native chemical ligation. PMID:21674341

  18. Computing correct truncated excited state wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Zang, J.; Karaoulanis, D.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that, if a wave function's truncated expansion is small, then the standard excited states computational method, of optimizing one "root" of a secular equation, may lead to an incorrect wave function - despite the correct energy according to the theorem of Hylleraas, Undheim and McDonald - whereas our proposed method [J. Comput. Meth. Sci. Eng. 8, 277 (2008)] (independent of orthogonality to lower lying approximants) leads to correct reliable small truncated wave functions. The demonstration is done in He excited states, using truncated series expansions in Hylleraas coordinates, as well as standard configuration-interaction truncated expansions.

  19. Reducing Truncation Error In Integer Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. Brooks; Berner, Jeffrey B.; Graham, J. Scott

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of rounding off (truncation of least-significant bits) in integer processing of data devised. Provides for reduction, to extremely low value, of numerical bias otherwise generated by accumulation of truncation errors from many arithmetic operations. Devised for use in integer signal processing, in which rescaling and truncation usually performed to reduce number of bits, which typically builds up in sequence of operations. Essence of method to alternate direction of roundoff (plus, then minus) on alternate occurrences of truncated values contributing to bias.

  20. Solid-phase N-terminal peptide enrichment study by optimizing trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine modified proteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Yang, Jonathon; Zhukova, Daria; Nguen, Hamilton; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proteolytic cleavages generate active precursor proteins by creating new N-termini in the proteins. A number of strategies recently published regarding the enrichment of original or newly formed N-terminal peptides using guanidination of lysine residues and amine reactive reagents. For effective enrichment of N-terminal peptides, the efficiency of trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine (guanidinated) modified proteins must be understood and simple and versatile solid-phase N-terminal capture strategies should be developed. Methods We present here a mass spectrometry-based study to evaluate and optimize the trypsin proteolysis on a guanidinated modified protein. Trypsin proteolysis was studied using different amount of trypsin to modified protein ratios. To capture the original N-termini, after guanidination of proteins, original N-termini were acetylated and the proteins were digested with trypsin. The newly formed N-terminal tryptic peptides were captured with a new amine reactive acid-cleavable solid-phase reagent. The original N-terminal peptides were then collected from the supernatant of the solution. Results We demonstrated a detailed study of the efficiency of enzyme trypsin on homoarginine modified proteins. We observed that the rate of hydrolysis of homoarginine residues compared to their lysine/arginine counter parts were slower but generally cleaved after an overnight digestion period depending on the protein to protease concentration ratios. Selectivity of the solid-phase N-terminal reagent was studied by enrichment of original N-terminal peptides from two standard proteins, ubiquitin and RNaseS. Conclusion We found enzyme trypsin is active in guanidinated form of protein depending on enzyme to protein concentrations, time and the proximity of arginine residues in the sequence. The novel solid-phase capture reagent also successfully enriched N-terminal peptides from the standard protein mixtures. We believe this trypsin proteolysis study on

  1. Nitrone protecting groups for enantiopure N-hydroxyamino acids: synthesis of N-terminal peptide hydroxylamines for chemoselective ligations.

    PubMed

    Medina, S Irene; Wu, Jian; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2010-08-07

    The synthesis of enantiopure N-benzylidene nitrones of N-hydroxy-alpha-amino acids and their incorporation using standard Fmoc-based peptide chemistry into solid-supported peptide chains is described. Deprotection and resin cleavage affords N-terminal peptide hydroxylamines, which are the key substrates for chemoselective ligations with C-terminal peptide alpha-ketoacids. This general route is applicable to a variety of different N-terminal residues and provides a general approach to the solid phase synthesis of peptide hydroxylamines.

  2. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in acute Kawasaki disease correlates with coronary artery involvement.

    PubMed

    Adjagba, Philippe M; Desjardins, Laurent; Fournier, Anne; Spigelblatt, Linda; Montigny, Martine; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-10-01

    We have lately documented the importance of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in aiding the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. We sought to investigate the potential value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide pertaining to the prediction of coronary artery dilatation (Z-score>2.5) and/or of resistance to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. We hypothesised that increased serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level correlates with increased coronary artery dilatation and/or resistance to intravenous immunoglobulin. We carried out a prospective study involving newly diagnosed patients treated with 2 g/kg intravenous immunoglobulin within 5-10 days of onset of fever. Echocardiography was performed in all patients at onset, then weekly for 3 weeks, then at month 2, and month 3. Coronary arteries were measured at each visit, and coronary artery Z-score was calculated. All the patients had N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide serum level measured at onset, and the Z-score calculated. There were 109 patients enrolled at 6.58±2.82 days of fever, age 3.79±2.92 years. High N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level was associated with coronary artery dilatation at onset in 22.2 versus 5.6% for normal N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (odds ratio 4.8 [95% confidence interval 1.05-22.4]; p=0.031). This was predictive of cumulative coronary artery dilatation for the first 3 months (p=0.04-0.02), but not during convalescence at 2-3 months (odds ratio 1.28 [95% confidence interval 0.23-7.3]; p=non-significant). Elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels did not predict intravenous immunoglobulin resistance, 15.3 versus 13.5% (p=1). Elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level correlates with acute coronary artery dilatation in treated Kawasaki disease, but not with intravenous immunoglobulin resistance.

  3. The N-terminal Zinc Finger and Flanking Basic Domains Represent the Minimal Region of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein for Targeting Chaperone Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mithun; Wang, Wei; Vo, My-Nuong; Rouzina, Ioulia; Barany, George; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid (NC) protein is a chaperone that facilitates nucleic acid conformational changes to form the most thermodynamically stable arrangement. The critical role of NC in many steps of the viral life cycle makes it an attractive therapeutic target. The chaperone activity of NC depends on its nucleic acid aggregating ability, duplex destabilizing activity and rapid on/off binding kinetics. During the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription, NC chaperones the annealing of highly structured transactivation response region (TAR) RNA to the complementary TAR DNA. In this work, the role of different functional domains of NC in facilitating 59-nucleotide TAR RNA/DNA annealing was probed by using chemically-synthesized peptides derived from full-length (55 amino acids) HIV-1 NC: NC(1-14), NC(15-35), NC(1-28), NC(1-35), NC(29-55), NC(36-55) and NC(11-55). Most of these peptides displayed significantly reduced annealing kinetics, even when present at much higher concentrations than wild-type (WT) NC. In addition, these truncated NC constructs generally bind more weakly to single-stranded DNA and are less effective nucleic acid aggregating agents than full-length NC, consistent with the loss of both electrostatic and hydrophobic contacts. However, NC(1-35) displayed annealing kinetics, nucleic acid binding, and aggregation activity that were very similar to that of WT NC. Thus, we conclude that the N-terminal zinc finger, flanked by the N-terminus and linker domains, represents the minimal sequence that is necessary and sufficient for chaperone function in vitro. In addition, covalent continuity of the N-terminal 35 amino acids of NC is critical for full activity. Thus, although the hydrophobic pocket formed by residues proximal to the C-terminal zinc finger has been a major focus of recent anti-NC therapeutic strategies, NC(1-35) represents an alternative target for therapeutics aimed at disrupting NC

  4. PylSn and the Homologous N-terminal Domain of Pyrrolysyl-tRNA Synthetase Bind the tRNA That Is Essential for the Genetic Encoding of Pyrrolysine*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruisheng; Krzycki, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrrolysine is represented by an amber codon in genes encoding proteins such as the methylamine methyltransferases present in some Archaea and Bacteria. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) attaches pyrrolysine to the amber-suppressing tRNAPyl. Archaeal PylRS, encoded by pylS, has a catalytic C-terminal domain but an N-terminal region of unknown function and structure. In Bacteria, homologs of the N- and C-terminal regions of archaeal PylRS are respectively encoded by pylSn and pylSc. We show here that wild type PylS from Methanosarcina barkeri and PylSn from Desulfitobacterium hafniense bind tRNAPyl in EMSA with apparent Kd values of 0.12 and 0.13 μm, respectively. Truncation of the N-terminal region of PylS eliminated detectable tRNAPyl binding as measured by EMSA, but not catalytic activity. A chimeric protein with PylSn fused to the N terminus of truncated PylS regained EMSA-detectable tRNAPyl binding. PylSn did not bind other D. hafniense tRNAs, nor did the competition by the Escherichia coli tRNA pool interfere with tRNAPyl binding. Further indicating the specificity of PylSn interaction with tRNAPyl, substitutions of conserved residues in tRNAPyl in the variable loop, D stem, and T stem and loop had significant impact in binding, whereas those having base changes in the acceptor stem or anticodon stem and loop still retained the ability to complex with PylSn. PylSn and the N terminus of PylS comprise the protein superfamily TIGR03129. The members of this family are not similar to any known RNA-binding protein, but our results suggest their common function involves specific binding of tRNAPyl. PMID:22851181

  5. Structure and Function of the N-Terminal Domain of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shihong; Ogino, Minako; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have various mechanisms to duplicate their genomes and produce virus-specific mRNAs. Negative-strand RNA viruses encode their own polymerases to perform each of these processes. For the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the polymerase is comprised of the large polymerase subunit (L) and the phosphoprotein (P). L proteins from members of the Rhabdoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, and Filoviridae share sequence and predicted secondary structure homology. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal domain (conserved region I) of the L protein from a rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, at 1.8-Å resolution. The strictly and strongly conserved residues in this domain cluster in a single area of the protein. Serial mutation of these residues shows that many of the amino acids are essential for viral transcription but not for mRNA capping. Three-dimensional alignments show that this domain shares structural homology with polymerases from other viral families, including segmented negative-strand RNA and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. IMPORTANCE Negative-strand RNA viruses include a diverse set of viral families that infect animals and plants, causing serious illness and economic impact. The members of this group of viruses share a set of functionally conserved proteins that are essential to their replication cycle. Among this set of proteins is the viral polymerase, which performs a unique set of reactions to produce genome- and subgenome-length RNA transcripts. In this article, we study the polymerase of vesicular stomatitis virus, a member of the rhabdoviruses, which has served in the past as a model to study negative-strand RNA virus replication. We have identified a site in the N-terminal domain of the polymerase that is essential to viral transcription and that shares sequence homology with members of the paramyxoviruses and the filoviruses. Newly identified sites such as that described here could prove to be useful targets in the

  6. Truncation of C-terminal 20 amino acids in PA-X contributes to adaptation of swine influenza virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guanlong; Zhang, Xuxiao; Sun, Yipeng; Liu, Qinfang; Sun, Honglei; Xiong, Xin; Jiang, Ming; He, Qiming; Wang, Yu; Pu, Juan; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-02-25

    The PA-X protein is a fusion protein incorporating the N-terminal 191 amino acids of the PA protein with a short C-terminal sequence encoded by an overlapping ORF (X-ORF) in segment 3 that is accessed by + 1 ribosomal frameshifting, and this X-ORF exists in either full length or a truncated form (either 61-or 41-condons). Genetic evolution analysis indicates that all swine influenza viruses (SIVs) possessed full-length PA-X prior to 1985, but since then SIVs with truncated PA-X have gradually increased and become dominant, implying that truncation of this protein may contribute to the adaptation of influenza virus in pigs. To verify this hypothesis, we constructed PA-X extended viruses in the background of a "triple-reassortment" H1N2 SIV with truncated PA-X, and evaluated their biological characteristics in vitro and in vivo. Compared with full-length PA-X, SIV with truncated PA-X had increased viral replication in porcine cells and swine respiratory tissues, along with enhanced pathogenicity, replication and transmissibility in pigs. Furthermore, we found that truncation of PA-X improved the inhibition of IFN-I mRNA expression. Hereby, our results imply that truncation of PA-X may contribute to the adaptation of SIV in pigs.

  7. Perspective on rainbow-ladder truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Eichmann, G.; Alkofer, R.; Krassnigg, A.; Cloeet, I. C.; Roberts, C. D.

    2008-04-15

    Prima facie the systematic implementation of corrections to the rainbow-ladder truncation of QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations will uniformly reduce in magnitude those calculated mass-dimensioned results for pseudoscalar and vector meson properties that are not tightly constrained by symmetries. The aim and interpretation of studies employing rainbow-ladder truncation are reconsidered in this light.

  8. SILProNAQ: A Convenient Approach for Proteome-Wide Analysis of Protein N-Termini and N-Terminal Acetylation Quantitation.

    PubMed

    Bienvenut, Willy V; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    Protein N-terminal modifications have recently been involved in overall proteostasis through their impact on cell fate and protein life time. This explains the development of new approaches to characterize more precisely the N-terminal end of mature proteins. Although few approaches are available to perform N-terminal enrichment based on positive or negative discriminations, these methods are usually restricted to the enrichment in N-terminal peptides and their characterization by mass spectrometry. Recent investigation highlights both (1) the knowledge of the N-terminal acetylation status of most cytosolic proteins and (2) post-translational addition of this modification on the N-terminus of nuclear coded chloroplast proteins imported in the plastid and after the cleavage of the transit peptide. The workflow involves stable isotope labeling to assess N-acetylation rates followed by Strong Cation eXchange (SCX ) fractionation of the samples to provide protein N-terminal enriched fractions. Combined with mass spectrometry analyses, the technology finally requires extensive data processing. This last step aims first at discriminating the most relevant mature N-termini from the characterized peptides, next at determining its experimental position and then at calculating the N-terminal acetylation yield. Stable-Isotope Protein N-terminal Acetylation Quantification (SILProNAQ) is a complete workflow combining wet-lab techniques together with dry-lab processing to determine the N-terminal acetylation yield of mature proteins for a clearly defined localization.

  9. Establishment of a Cre/loxP recombination system for N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Epitope tagging is a powerful strategy to study the function of proteins. Although tools for C-terminal protein tagging in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila have been developed, N-terminal protein tagging in this organism is still technically demanding. Results In this study, we have established a Cre/loxP recombination system in Tetrahymena and have applied this system for the N-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes. Cre can be expressed in Tetrahymena and localizes to the macronucleus where it induces precise recombination at two loxP sequences in direct orientation in the Tetrahymena macronuclear chromosome. This Cre/loxP recombination can be used to remove a loxP-flanked drug-resistance marker from an N-terminal tagging construct after it is integrated into the macronucleus. Conclusions The system established in this study allows us to express an N-terminal epitope tagged gene from its own endogenous promoter in Tetrahymena. PMID:20626890

  10. Molecular evolution of troponin I and a role of its N-terminal extension in nematode locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dawn E.; Hwang, Hyundoo; Ono, Kanako; Lu, Hang; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary The troponin complex, composed of troponin T (TnT), troponin I (TnI), and troponin C (TnC), is the major calcium-dependent regulator of muscle contraction, which is present widely in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Little is known about evolutionary aspects of troponin in the animal kingdom. Using a combination of data mining and functional analysis of TnI, we report evidence that an N-terminal extension of TnI is present in most of bilaterian animals as a functionally important domain. Troponin components have been reported in species in most of representative bilaterian phyla. Comparison of TnI sequences shows that the core domains are conserved in all examined TnIs, and that N- and C-terminal extensions are variable among isoforms and species. In particular, N-terminal extensions are present in all protostome TnIs and chordate cardiac TnIs but lost in a subset of chordate TnIs including vertebrate skeletal-muscle isoforms. Transgenic rescue experiments in C. elegans striated muscle show that the N-terminal extension of TnI (UNC-27) is required for coordinated worm locomotion but not in sarcomere assembly and single muscle-contractility kinetics. These results suggest that N-terminal extensions of TnIs are retained from a TnI ancestor as a functional domain. PMID:26849746

  11. Cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics bind to the N-terminal domain of the prokaryotic Hsp90 to inhibit the chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Shun; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Sueoka, Keigo; Osada, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2011-04-01

    Chemical arrays were employed to screen ligands for HtpG, the prokaryotic homologue of Hsp (heat-shock protein) 90. We found that colistins and the closely related polymyxin B interact physically with HtpG. They bind to the N-terminal domain of HtpG specifically without affecting its ATPase activity. The interaction caused inhibition of chaperone function of HtpG that suppresses thermal aggregation of substrate proteins. Further studies were performed with one of these cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics, colistin sulfate salt. It inhibited the chaperone function of the N-terminal domain of HtpG. However, it inhibited neither the chaperone function of the middle domain of HtpG nor that of other molecular chaperones such as DnaK, the prokaryotic homologue of Hsp70, and small Hsp. The addition of colistin sulfate salt increased surface hydrophobicity of the N-terminal domain of HtpG and induced oligomerization of HtpG and its N-terminal domain. These structural changes are discussed in relation to the inhibition of the chaperone function.

  12. N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen as a biomarker of anabolic response to recombinant human GH and testosterone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Context: Biomarkers that predict musculoskeletal response to anabolic therapies should expedite drug development. During collagen synthesis in soft lean tissue, N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (P3NP) is released into circulation. We investigated P3NP as a biomarker of lean body mass (L...

  13. N-Terminal Ubiquitination of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 3 and p21 Directs Their Degradation by the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Philippe; Rodier, Geneviève; Bonneil, Eric; Thibault, Pierre; Meloche, Sylvain

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 (ERK3) is an unstable mitogen-activated protein kinase homologue that is constitutively degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in proliferating cells. Here we show that a lysineless mutant of ERK3 is still ubiquitinated in vivo and requires a functional ubiquitin conjugation pathway for its degradation. Addition of N-terminal sequence tags of increasing size stabilizes ERK3 by preventing its ubiquitination. Importantly, we identified a fusion peptide between the N-terminal methionine of ERK3 and the C-terminal glycine of ubiquitin in vivo by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. These findings demonstrate that ERK3 is conjugated to ubiquitin via its free NH2 terminus. We found that large N-terminal tags also stabilize the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 but not that of substrates ubiquitinated on internal lysine residues. Consistent with this observation, lysineless p21 is ubiquitinated and degraded in a ubiquitin-dependent manner in intact cells. Our results suggests that N-terminal ubiquitination is a more prevalent modification than originally recognized. PMID:15226418

  14. N-terminal amino acid sequence of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase: comparison with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus subtilis Enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, H; Fietzek, P P; Lampen, J O

    1982-01-01

    The thermostable, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis was immunologically cross-reactive with the thermolabile, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed extensive homology with each other, but not with the saccharifying alpha-amylases of Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6172418

  15. Non-native, N-terminal Hsp70 Molecular Motor Recognition Elements in Transit Peptides Support Plastid Protein Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Bruce, Barry D.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we identified the N-terminal domain of transit peptides (TPs) as a major determinant for the translocation step in plastid protein import. Analysis of Arabidopsis TP dataset revealed that this domain has two overlapping characteristics, highly uncharged and Hsp70-interacting. To investigate these two properties, we replaced the N-terminal domains of the TP of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and its reverse peptide with a series of unrelated peptides whose affinities to the chloroplast stromal Hsp70 have been determined. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that eight out of nine peptides in this series are not similar to the TP N terminus. Using in vivo and in vitro protein import assays, the majority of the precursors containing Hsp70-binding elements were targeted to plastids, whereas none of the chimeric precursors lacking an N-terminal Hsp70-binding element were targeted to the plastids. Moreover, a pulse-chase assay showed that two chimeric precursors with the most uncharged peptides failed to translocate into the stroma. The ability of multiple unrelated Hsp70-binding elements to support protein import verified that the majority of TPs utilize an N-terminal Hsp70-binding domain during translocation and expand the mechanistic view of the import process. This work also indicates that synthetic biology may be utilized to create de novo TPs that exceed the targeting activity of naturally occurring sequences. PMID:25645915

  16. Molecular Insights into the Dynamics of Pharmacogenetically Important N-Terminal Variants of the Human β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Durba; Joshi, Manali

    2014-01-01

    The human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family, is expressed in bronchial smooth muscle cells. Upon activation by agonists, β2AR causes bronchodilation and relief in asthma patients. The N-terminal polymorphism of β2AR at the 16th position, Arg16Gly, has warranted a lot of attention since it is linked to variations in response to albuterol (agonist) treatment. Although the β2AR is one of the well-studied GPCRs, the N-terminus which harbors this mutation, is absent in all available experimental structures. The goal of this work was to study the molecular level differences between the N-terminal variants using structural modeling and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations reveal that the N-terminal region of the Arg variant shows greater dynamics than the Gly variant, leading to differential placement. Further, the position and dynamics of the N-terminal region, further, affects the ligand binding-site accessibility. Interestingly, long-range effects are also seen at the ligand binding site, which is marginally larger in the Gly as compared to the Arg variant resulting in the preferential docking of albuterol to the Gly variant. This study thus reveals key differences between the variants providing a molecular framework towards understanding the variable drug response in asthma patients. PMID:25501358

  17. CXCL12 N-terminal end is sufficient to induce chemotaxis and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Filippo, Thais R M; Galindo, Layla T; Barnabe, Gabriela F; Ariza, Carolina B; Mello, Luiz E; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Porcionatto, Marimélia A

    2013-09-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) respond to injury after brain injuries secreting IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10, as well as chemokine members of the CC and CXC ligand families. CXCL12 is one of the chemokines secreted at an injury site and is known to attract NSC-derived neuroblasts, cells that express CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4. Activation of CXCR4 by CXCL12 depends on two domains located at the N-terminal of the chemokine. In the present work we aimed to investigate if the N-terminal end of CXCL12, where CXCR4 binding and activation domains are located, was sufficient to induce NSC-derived neuroblast chemotaxis. Our data show that a synthetic peptide analogous to the first 21 amino acids of the N-terminal end of CXCL12, named PepC-C (KPVSLSYRCPCRFFESHIARA), is able to promote chemotaxis of neuroblasts in vivo, and stimulate chemotaxis and proliferation of CXCR4+ cells in vitro, without affecting NSC fate. We also show that PepC-C upregulates CXCL12 expression in vivo and in vitro. We suggest the N-terminal end of CXCL12 is responsible for a positive feedback loop to maintain a gradient of CXCL12 that attracts neuroblasts from the subventricular zone into an injury site.

  18. c-Jun-N-Terminal Kinase Signaling Is Involved in Cyclosporine-Induced Epithelial Phenotypic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pallet, Nicolas; Thervet, Eric; Anglicheau, Dany

    2012-01-01

    Tubular epithelial cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic nephropathies. Previous toxicogenomic studies have demonstrated that cyclosporine- (CsA-) induced epithelial phenotypic changes (EPCs) are reminiscent of an incomplete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in a TGF-β-independent manner. Furthermore, we identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a potential mechanism that may participate in the modulation of tubular cell plasticity during CsA exposure. Because c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is activated during ER stress, is implicated in kidney fibrogenesis, we undertook the current study to identify the role of JNK signaling in EPCs induced by CsA. In primary cultures of human renal epithelial cells, CsA activates JNK signaling, and the treatment with a JNK inhibitor reduces the occurrence of cell shape changes, E-cadherin downregulation, cell migration, and Snail-1 expression. Our results suggest that CsA activates JNK signaling, which, in turn, may participate in the morphological alterations through the regulation of Snail-1 expression. PMID:22028950

  19. c-Jun-N-Terminal Kinase Signaling Is Involved in Cyclosporine-Induced Epithelial Phenotypic Changes.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Thervet, Eric; Anglicheau, Dany

    2012-01-01

    Tubular epithelial cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic nephropathies. Previous toxicogenomic studies have demonstrated that cyclosporine- (CsA-) induced epithelial phenotypic changes (EPCs) are reminiscent of an incomplete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in a TGF-β-independent manner. Furthermore, we identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a potential mechanism that may participate in the modulation of tubular cell plasticity during CsA exposure. Because c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), which is activated during ER stress, is implicated in kidney fibrogenesis, we undertook the current study to identify the role of JNK signaling in EPCs induced by CsA. In primary cultures of human renal epithelial cells, CsA activates JNK signaling, and the treatment with a JNK inhibitor reduces the occurrence of cell shape changes, E-cadherin downregulation,