Science.gov

Sample records for n-vector model collective

  1. Low Temperature Properties for Correlation Functions in Classical N-Vector Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaban, Tadeusz; O'Carroll, Michael

    We obtain convergent multi-scale expansions for the one-and two-point correlation functions of the low temperature lattice classical N- vector spin model in d>= 3 dimensions, N>= 2. The Gibbs factor is taken as where , , , are large and 0 < v<= 1. In the thermodynamic and limits, with h=e1, and Δ≡∂*∂, the expansion gives (spontaneous magnetization), , (Goldstone Bosons), , and , where , for some ρ > 0, and c0 is aprecisely determined constant.

  2. A n-vector model for charge transport in molecular semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Kohlstedt, Kevin L; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-11-28

    We develop a lattice model utilizing coarse-grained molecular sites to study charge transport in molecular semiconducting materials. The model bridges atomistic descriptions and structureless lattice models by mapping molecular structure onto sets of spatial vectors isomorphic with spin vectors in a classical n-vector Heisenberg model. Specifically, this model incorporates molecular topology-dependent orientational and intermolecular coupling preferences, including the direct inclusion of spatially correlated transfer integrals and site energy disorder. This model contains the essential physics required to explicitly simulate the interplay of molecular topology and correlated structural disorder, and their effect on charge transport. As a demonstration of its utility, we apply this model to analyze the effects of long-range orientational correlations, molecular topology, and intermolecular interaction strength on charge motion in bulk molecular semiconductors.

  3. A n-vector model for charge transport in molecular semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Kohlstedt, Kevin L.; Chen, Lin X.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a lattice model utilizing coarse-grained molecular sites to study charge transport in molecular semiconducting materials. The model bridges atomistic descriptions and structureless lattice models by mapping molecular structure onto sets of spatial vectors isomorphic with spin vectors in a classical n-vector Heisenberg model. Specifically, this model incorporates molecular topology-dependent orientational and intermolecular coupling preferences, including the direct inclusion of spatially correlated transfer integrals and site energy disorder. This model contains the essential physics required to explicitly simulate the interplay of molecular topology and correlated structural disorder, and their effect on charge transport. As a demonstration of its utility, we apply this model to analyze the effects of long-range orientational correlations, molecular topology, and intermolecular interaction strength on charge motion in bulk molecular semiconductors.

  4. Off-equilibrium scaling behaviors driven by time-dependent external fields in three-dimensional O(N) vector models.

    PubMed

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    We consider the dynamical off-equilibrium behavior of the three-dimensional O(N) vector model in the presence of a slowly varying time-dependent spatially uniform magnetic field H(t)=h(t)e, where e is an N-dimensional constant unit vector, h(t)=t/t(s), and t(s) is a time scale, at fixed temperature T≤T(c), where T(c) corresponds to the continuous order-disorder transition. The dynamic evolutions start from equilibrium configurations at h(i)<0, correspondingly t(i)<0, and end at time t(f)>0 with h(t(f))>0, or vice versa. We show that the magnetization displays an off-equilibrium scaling behavior close to the transition line H(t)=0. It arises from the interplay among the time t, the time scale t(s), and the finite size L. The scaling behavior can be parametrized in terms of the scaling variables t(s)(κ)/L and t/t(s)(κ(t)), where κ>0 and κ(t)>0 are appropriate universal exponents, which differ at the critical point and for Tmodel under a purely relaxational dynamics. They confirm the predicted off-equilibrium scaling behaviors at and below T(c). We also discuss hysteresis phenomena in round-trip protocols for the time dependence of the external field. We define a scaling function for the hysteresis loop area of the magnetization that can be used to quantify how far the system is from equilibrium.

  5. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  6. Neurodynamical model of collective brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1992-01-01

    A dynamical system which mimics collective purposeful activities of a set of units of intelligence is introduced and discussed. A global control of the unit activities is replaced by the probabilistic correlations between them. These correlations are learned during a long term period of performing collective tasks, and are stored in the synaptic interconnections. The model is represented by a system of ordinary differential equations with terminal attractors and repellers, and does not contain any man-made digital devices.

  7. Bohr model as an algebraic collective model

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, D. J.; Welsh, T. A.; Caprio, M. A.

    2009-05-15

    Developments and applications are presented of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model. Illustrative examples show that fully converged calculations can be performed quickly and easily for a large range of Hamiltonians. As a result, the Bohr model becomes an effective tool in the analysis of experimental data. The examples are chosen both to confirm the reliability of the algebraic collective model and to show the diversity of results that can be obtained by its use. The focus of the paper is to facilitate identification of the limitations of the Bohr model with a view to developing more realistic, computationally tractable models.

  8. An Intelligence Collection Management Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    classification of inteligence collection requirements in terms of. the a-.- metnodo"c, .ev--e in Chaster Five. 116 APPgENDIX A A METHOD OF RANKING...of Artificial Intelligence Tools and Technigues to!TN’X n~l is n rs aa~emfft-.3-ufnyva: ’A TZ Ashby W. Ecss. An Introduction to Cybernetics. New York

  9. A model of electron collecting plasma contractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    A model of plasma contractors is being developed, which can be used to describe electron collection in a laboratory test tank and in the space environment. To validate the model development, laboratory experiments are conducted in which the source plasma is separated from the background plasma by a double layer. Model calculations show that an increase in ionization rate with potential produces a steep rise in collected current with increasing potential.

  10. Modeling Charge Collection in Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardage, Donna (Technical Monitor); Pickel, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A detector array charge collection model has been developed for use as an engineering tool to aid in the design of optical sensor missions for operation in the space radiation environment. This model is an enhancement of the prototype array charge collection model that was developed for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) program. The primary enhancements were accounting for drift-assisted diffusion by Monte Carlo modeling techniques and implementing the modeling approaches in a windows-based code. The modeling is concerned with integrated charge collection within discrete pixels in the focal plane array (FPA), with high fidelity spatial resolution. It is applicable to all detector geometries including monolithc charge coupled devices (CCDs), Active Pixel Sensors (APS) and hybrid FPA geometries based on a detector array bump-bonded to a readout integrated circuit (ROIC).

  11. Modelling fuel consumption in kerbside source segregated food waste collection: separate collection and co-collection.

    PubMed

    Chu, T W; Heaven, S; Gredmaier, L

    2015-01-01

    Source separated food waste is a valuable feedstock for renewable energy production through anaerobic digestion, and a variety of collection schemes for this material have recently been introduced. The aim of this study was to identify options that maximize collection efficiency and reduce fuel consumption as part of the overall energy balance. A mechanistic model was developed to calculate the fuel consumption of kerbside collection of source segregated food waste, co-mingled dry recyclables and residual waste. A hypothetical city of 20,000 households was considered and nine scenarios were tested with different combinations of collection frequencies, vehicle types and waste types. The results showed that the potential fuel savings from weekly and fortnightly co-collection of household waste range from 7.4% to 22.4% and 1.8% to 26.6%, respectively, when compared to separate collection. A compartmentalized vehicle split 30:70 always performed better than one with two compartments of equal size. Weekly food waste collection with alternate weekly collection of the recyclables and residual waste by two-compartment collection vehicles was the best option to reduce the overall fuel consumption.

  12. Consistent quadrupole-octupole collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolski, A.; Mazurek, K.; Góźdź, A.

    2016-11-01

    Within this work we present a consistent approach to quadrupole-octupole collective vibrations coupled with the rotational motion. A realistic collective Hamiltonian with variable mass-parameter tensor and potential obtained through the macroscopic-microscopic Strutinsky-like method with particle-number-projected BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) approach in full vibrational and rotational, nine-dimensional collective space is diagonalized in the basis of projected harmonic oscillator eigensolutions. This orthogonal basis of zero-, one-, two-, and three-phonon oscillator-like functions in vibrational part, coupled with the corresponding Wigner function is, in addition, symmetrized with respect to the so-called symmetrization group, appropriate to the collective space of the model. In the present model it is D4 group acting in the body-fixed frame. This symmetrization procedure is applied in order to provide the uniqueness of the Hamiltonian eigensolutions with respect to the laboratory coordinate system. The symmetrization is obtained using the projection onto the irreducible representation technique. The model generates the quadrupole ground-state spectrum as well as the lowest negative-parity spectrum in 156Gd nucleus. The interband and intraband B (E 1 ) and B (E 2 ) reduced transition probabilities are also calculated within those bands and compared with the recent experimental results for this nucleus. Such a collective approach is helpful in searching for the fingerprints of the possible high-rank symmetries (e.g., octahedral and tetrahedral) in nuclear collective bands.

  13. Locust Collective Motion and Its Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, Gil; Ayali, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, technological advances in experimental and animal tracking techniques have motivated a renewed theoretical interest in animal collective motion and, in particular, locust swarming. This review offers a comprehensive biological background followed by comparative analysis of recent models of locust collective motion, in particular locust marching, their settings, and underlying assumptions. We describe a wide range of recent modeling and simulation approaches, from discrete agent-based models of self-propelled particles to continuous models of integro-differential equations, aimed at describing and analyzing the fascinating phenomenon of locust collective motion. These modeling efforts have a dual role: The first views locusts as a quintessential example of animal collective motion. As such, they aim at abstraction and coarse-graining, often utilizing the tools of statistical physics. The second, which originates from a more biological perspective, views locust swarming as a scientific problem of its own exceptional merit. The main goal should, thus, be the analysis and prediction of natural swarm dynamics. We discuss the properties of swarm dynamics using the tools of statistical physics, as well as the implications for laboratory experiments and natural swarms. Finally, we stress the importance of a combined-interdisciplinary, biological-theoretical effort in successfully confronting the challenges that locusts pose at both the theoretical and practical levels. PMID:26656851

  14. The modelling cycle for collective animal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, David J T; Mann, Richard P; Perna, Andrea

    2012-12-06

    Collective animal behaviour is the study of how interactions between individuals produce group level patterns, and why these interactions have evolved. This study has proved itself uniquely interdisciplinary, involving physicists, mathematicians, engineers as well as biologists. Almost all experimental work in this area is related directly or indirectly to mathematical models, with regular movement back and forth between models, experimental data and statistical fitting. In this paper, we describe how the modelling cycle works in the study of collective animal behaviour. We classify studies as addressing questions at different levels or linking different levels, i.e. as local, local to global, global to local or global. We also describe three distinct approaches-theory-driven, data-driven and model selection-to these questions. We show, with reference to our own research on species across different taxa, how we move between these different levels of description and how these various approaches can be applied to link levels together.

  15. Developing New Models for Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffle, Carla J.; Fore, Janet; Allen, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop new models for collection development in academic libraries, based on experiences at the University of Arizona. Highlights include changes in the organizational chart; focusing on users' information goals and needs; integrative services; shared resources; interlibrary loans; digital technology; and funding. (LRW)

  16. Relating ground truth collection to model sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Faouzi; Fung, Adrian K.; Karam, Mostafa A.; Mougin, Eric

    1993-01-01

    The importance of collecting high quality ground truth before a SAR mission over a forested area is two fold. First, the ground truth is used in the analysis and interpretation of the measured backscattering properties; second, it helps to justify the use of a scattering model to fit the measurements. Unfortunately, ground truth is often collected based on visual assessment of what is perceived to be important without regard to the mission itself. Sites are selected based on brief surveys of large areas, and the ground truth is collected by a process of selecting and grouping different scatterers. After the fact, it may turn out that some of the relevant parameters are missing. A three-layer canopy model based on the radiative transfer equations is used to determine, before hand, the relevant parameters to be collected. Detailed analysis of the contribution to scattering and attenuation of various forest components is carried out. The goal is to identify the forest parameters which most influence the backscattering as a function of frequency (P-, L-, and C-bands) and incident angle. The influence on backscattering and attenuation of branch diameters, lengths, angular distribution, and permittivity; trunk diameters, lengths, and permittivity; and needle sizes, their angular distribution, and permittivity are studied in order to maximize the efficiency of the ground truth collection efforts. Preliminary results indicate that while a scatterer may not contribute to the total backscattering, its contribution to attenuation may be significant depending on the frequency.

  17. Modeling pattern in collections of parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Wildlife management is increasingly guided by analyses of large and complex datasets. The description of such datasets often requires a large number of parameters, among which certain patterns might be discernible. For example, one may consider a long-term study producing estimates of annual survival rates; of interest is the question whether these rates have declined through time. Several statistical methods exist for examining pattern in collections of parameters. Here, I argue for the superiority of 'random effects models' in which parameters are regarded as random variables, with distributions governed by 'hyperparameters' describing the patterns of interest. Unfortunately, implementation of random effects models is sometimes difficult. Ultrastructural models, in which the postulated pattern is built into the parameter structure of the original data analysis, are approximations to random effects models. However, this approximation is not completely satisfactory: failure to account for natural variation among parameters can lead to overstatement of the evidence for pattern among parameters. I describe quasi-likelihood methods that can be used to improve the approximation of random effects models by ultrastructural models.

  18. MMW turntable data collection, data analysis, and target model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, Annie V.; Barr, Douglas P.; Mobley, Scott B.; Leonard, Wayne

    2000-07-01

    Turntable data collection on ground targets using an instrumentation W-band monopulse radar is reported. The data collection site, instrumentation, and test methodology are described. Preliminary analysis results showing target RCS comparisons are reported. The turntable measurements are used to generate point scatterer target models for all-digital and real-time hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations. Model development techniques are described. The models are validated against measured data utilizing generic high range resolution acquisition and tracking algorithms.

  19. Modeling crowdsourcing as collective problem solving

    PubMed Central

    Guazzini, Andrea; Vilone, Daniele; Donati, Camillo; Nardi, Annalisa; Levnajić, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Crowdsourcing is a process of accumulating the ideas, thoughts or information from many independent participants, with aim to find the best solution for a given challenge. Modern information technologies allow for massive number of subjects to be involved in a more or less spontaneous way. Still, the full potentials of crowdsourcing are yet to be reached. We introduce a modeling framework through which we study the effectiveness of crowdsourcing in relation to the level of collectivism in facing the problem. Our findings reveal an intricate relationship between the number of participants and the difficulty of the problem, indicating the optimal size of the crowdsourced group. We discuss our results in the context of modern utilization of crowdsourcing. PMID:26552943

  20. The Mathematical Concept of Set and the 'Collection' Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischbein, Efraim; Baltsan, Madlen

    1999-01-01

    Hypothesizes that various misconceptions held by students with regard to the mathematical set concept may be explained by the initial collection model. Study findings confirm the hypothesis. (Author/ASK)

  1. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  2. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2008-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  3. Particle Swarm Based Collective Searching Model for Adaptive Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Patton, Robert M; Potok, Thomas E; Treadwell, Jim N

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a pilot study of an integration of particle swarm algorithm, social knowledge adaptation and multi-agent approaches for modeling the collective search behavior of self-organized groups in an adaptive environment. The objective of this research is to apply the particle swarm metaphor as a model of social group adaptation for the dynamic environment and to provide insight and understanding of social group knowledge discovering and strategic searching. A new adaptive environment model, which dynamically reacts to the group collective searching behaviors, is proposed in this research. The simulations in the research indicate that effective communication between groups is not the necessary requirement for whole self-organized groups to achieve the efficient collective searching behavior in the adaptive environment.

  4. Physical models of collective cell motility: from cell to tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, B. A.; Rappel, W.-J.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we review physics-based models of collective cell motility. We discuss a range of techniques at different scales, ranging from models that represent cells as simple self-propelled particles to phase field models that can represent a cell’s shape and dynamics in great detail. We also extensively review the ways in which cells within a tissue choose their direction, the statistics of cell motion, and some simple examples of how cell–cell signaling can interact with collective cell motility. This review also covers in more detail selected recent works on collective cell motion of small numbers of cells on micropatterns, in wound healing, and the chemotaxis of clusters of cells.

  5. Satellite image collection modeling for large area hazard emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shufan; Hodgson, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    Timely collection of critical hazard information is the key to intelligent and effective hazard emergency response decisions. Satellite remote sensing imagery provides an effective way to collect critical information. Natural hazards, however, often have large impact areas - larger than a single satellite scene. Additionally, the hazard impact area may be discontinuous, particularly in flooding or tornado hazard events. In this paper, a spatial optimization model is proposed to solve the large area satellite image acquisition planning problem in the context of hazard emergency response. In the model, a large hazard impact area is represented as multiple polygons and image collection priorities for different portion of impact area are addressed. The optimization problem is solved with an exact algorithm. Application results demonstrate that the proposed method can address the satellite image acquisition planning problem. A spatial decision support system supporting the optimization model was developed. Several examples of image acquisition problems are used to demonstrate the complexity of the problem and derive optimized solutions.

  6. Collection methods of trematode eggs using experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Tsubokawa, Daigo; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Mikami, Fusako; Shibata, Katsumasa; Shibahara, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Koichi; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2016-10-01

    Although observing the eggs of human parasitic helminth is essential for medical education in parasitology, opportunities for collection of the eggs are limited. Collection of the eggs using experimental animal models is needed for a sustainable supply. The metacercariae of three trematode species, Paragonimus westermani, Clonorchis sinensis and Metagonimus yokogawai, were collected from the second intermediate hosts: freshwater crabs and fishes, which were obtained using online shopping in Japan, and inoculated to experimental animal rat and dog. Consequently, eggs of the three trematode species were obtained abundantly from the feces of the animals. The eggs are being used for student training in several Japanese universities. In this article, we introduce the collection procedures for trematode eggs.

  7. A simple generative model of collective online behavior.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, James P; Cellai, Davide; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Porter, Mason A; Reed-Tsochas, Felix

    2014-07-22

    Human activities increasingly take place in online environments, providing novel opportunities for relating individual behaviors to population-level outcomes. In this paper, we introduce a simple generative model for the collective behavior of millions of social networking site users who are deciding between different software applications. Our model incorporates two distinct mechanisms: one is associated with recent decisions of users, and the other reflects the cumulative popularity of each application. Importantly, although various combinations of the two mechanisms yield long-time behavior that is consistent with data, the only models that reproduce the observed temporal dynamics are those that strongly emphasize the recent popularity of applications over their cumulative popularity. This demonstrates--even when using purely observational data without experimental design--that temporal data-driven modeling can effectively distinguish between competing microscopic mechanisms, allowing us to uncover previously unidentified aspects of collective online behavior.

  8. Building and Sustaining Digital Collections: Models for Libraries and Museums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library and Information Resources, Washington, DC.

    In February 2001, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) and the National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage (NINCH) convened a meeting to discuss how museums and libraries are building digital collections and what business models are available to sustain them. A group of museum and library senior executives met with…

  9. Emergent collective decision-making: Control, model and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tian

    In this dissertation we study emergent collective decision-making in social groups with time-varying interactions and heterogeneously informed individuals. First we analyze a nonlinear dynamical systems model motivated by animal collective motion with heterogeneously informed subpopulations, to examine the role of uninformed individuals. We find through formal analysis that adding uninformed individuals in a group increases the likelihood of a collective decision. Secondly, we propose a model for human shared decision-making with continuous-time feedback and where individuals have little information about the true preferences of other group members. We study model equilibria using bifurcation analysis to understand how the model predicts decisions based on the critical threshold parameters that represent an individual's tradeoff between social and environmental influences. Thirdly, we analyze continuous-time data of pairs of human subjects performing an experimental shared tracking task using our second proposed model in order to understand transient behavior and the decision-making process. We fit the model to data and show that it reproduces a wide range of human behaviors surprisingly well, suggesting that the model may have captured the mechanisms of observed behaviors. Finally, we study human behavior from a game-theoretic perspective by modeling the aforementioned tracking task as a repeated game with incomplete information. We show that the majority of the players are able to converge to playing Nash equilibrium strategies. We then suggest with simulations that the mean field evolution of strategies in the population resemble replicator dynamics, indicating that the individual strategies may be myopic. Decisions form the basis of control and problems involving deciding collectively between alternatives are ubiquitous in nature and in engineering. Understanding how multi-agent systems make decisions among alternatives also provides insight for designing

  10. Forecasting rain events - Meteorological models or collective intelligence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazy, Ofer; Halfon, Noam; Malkinson, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Collective intelligence is shared (or group) intelligence that emerges from the collective efforts of many individuals. Collective intelligence is the aggregate of individual contributions: from simple collective decision making to more sophisticated aggregations such as in crowdsourcing and peer-production systems. In particular, collective intelligence could be used in making predictions about future events, for example by using prediction markets to forecast election results, stock prices, or the outcomes of sport events. To date, there is little research regarding the use of collective intelligence for prediction of weather forecasting. The objective of this study is to investigate the extent to which collective intelligence could be utilized to accurately predict weather events, and in particular rainfall. Our analyses employ metrics of group intelligence, as well as compare the accuracy of groups' predictions against the predictions of the standard model used by the National Meteorological Services. We report on preliminary results from a study conducted over the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winters. We have built a web site that allows people to make predictions on precipitation levels on certain locations. During each competition participants were allowed to enter their precipitation forecasts (i.e. 'bets') at three locations and these locations changed between competitions. A precipitation competition was defined as a 48-96 hour period (depending on the expected weather conditions), bets were open 24-48 hours prior to the competition, and during betting period participants were allowed to change their bets with no limitation. In order to explore the effect of transparency, betting mechanisms varied across study's sites: full transparency (participants able to see each other's bets); partial transparency (participants see the group's average bet); and no transparency (no information of others' bets is made available). Several interesting findings emerged from

  11. A Microscopic Quantal Model for Nuclear Collective Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulshani, P.

    2007-10-26

    A microscopic, quantal model to describe nuclear collective rotation in two dimensions is derived from the many-nucleon Schrodinger equation. The Schrodinger equation is transformed to a body-fixed frame to decompose the Hamiltonian into a sum of intrinsic and rotational components plus a Coriolis-centrifugal coupling term. This Hamiltonian (H) is expressed in terms of space-fixed-frame particle coordinates and momenta by using commutator of H with a rotation angle. A unified-rotational-model type wavefunction is used to obtain an intrinsic Schrodinger equation in terms of angular momentum quantum number and two-body operators. A Hartree-Fock mean-field representation of this equation is then obtained and, by means of a unitary transformation, is reduced to a form resembling that of the conventional semi-classical cranking model when exchange terms and intrinsic spurious collective excitation are ignored.

  12. Collective rationality: the integrative model explains it (as) well.

    PubMed

    Van Lange, Paul A M

    2008-06-01

    In this commentary, I argue that there is indeed considerable evidence in support of the notion that people tend to reason from a collective (or team) perspective by asking themselves questions such as "What do we want, and what should I do help achieve it?" [Colman, A. M., Pulford, B. D., & Rose, J. (2008). Collective rationality in interactive decisions: Evidence for team reasoning. Acta Psychologica]. As such, in my view, team reasoning -- and thinking, feeling, and acting in terms of collective rationality -- is consistent with a social utility model (or transformational model) which considers the weights that people attach not only to outcomes for self, but also to outcomes for other, and to equality in outcomes [Van Lange, P. A. M. (1999). The pursuit of joint outcomes and equality in outcomes: An integrative model of social value orientation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,77, 337-349]. This commentary provides an illustration demonstrating that the integrative model is well-suited to account for the findings observed by Colman et al. (2008).

  13. Collective motion of cells: from experiments to models.

    PubMed

    Méhes, Előd; Vicsek, Tamás

    2014-09-01

    Swarming or collective motion of living entities is one of the most common and spectacular manifestations of living systems that have been extensively studied in recent years. A number of general principles have been established. The interactions at the level of cells are quite different from those among individual animals, therefore the study of collective motion of cells is likely to reveal some specific important features which we plan to overview in this paper. In addition to presenting the most appealing results from the quickly growing related literature we also deliver a critical discussion of the emerging picture and summarize our present understanding of collective motion at the cellular level. Collective motion of cells plays an essential role in a number of experimental and real-life situations. In most cases the coordinated motion is a helpful aspect of the given phenomenon and results in making a related process more efficient (e.g., embryogenesis or wound healing), while in the case of tumor cell invasion it appears to speed up the progression of the disease. In these mechanisms cells both have to be motile and adhere to one another, the adherence feature being the most specific to this sort of collective behavior. One of the central aims of this review is to present the related experimental observations and treat them in light of a few basic computational models so as to make an interpretation of the phenomena at a quantitative level as well.

  14. Approximating nonequilibrium processes using a collection of surrogate diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Christopher P.; Chelli, Riccardo

    2008-04-01

    The surrogate process approximation (SPA) is applied to model the nonequilibrium dynamics of a reaction coordinate (RC) associated with the unfolding and refolding processes of a deca-alanine peptide at 300K. The RC dynamics, which correspond to the evolution of the end-to-end distance of the polypeptide, are produced by steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and approximated using overdamped diffusion models. We show that the collection of (estimated) SPA models contain structural information "orthogonal" to the RC monitored in this study. Functional data analysis ideas are used to correlate functions associated with the fitted SPA models with the work done on the system in SMD simulations. It is demonstrated that the shape of the nonequilibrium work distributions for the unfolding and refolding processes of deca-alanine can be predicted with functional data analysis ideas using a relatively small number of simulated SMD paths for calibrating the SPA diffusion models.

  15. Collective aspects of protein folding illustrated by a toy model

    SciTech Connect

    Stillinger, F.H.; Head-Gordon, T.

    1995-09-01

    A simple toy model for polypeptides serves as a testbed to illuminate some nonlocal, or collective, aspects of protein folding phenomena. The model is two dimensional and has only two amino acids, but involves a continuous range of backbone bend angles. Global potential energy minima and their folding structures have been determined for leading members of two special and contrasting polypeptide sequences, center doped and Fibonacci, named descriptively for their primary structures. The results display the presence of spontaneous symmetry breaking, elastic strain, and substantial conformational variation for specific embedded amino acid strings. We conclude that collective variables generated by the primary amino acid structure may be required for fully effective protein folding predictors, including those based on neural networks.

  16. Waste collection multi objective model with real time traceability data.

    PubMed

    Faccio, Maurizio; Persona, Alessandro; Zanin, Giorgia

    2011-12-01

    Waste collection is a highly visible municipal service that involves large expenditures and difficult operational problems, plus it is expensive to operate in terms of investment costs (i.e. vehicles fleet), operational costs (i.e. fuel, maintenances) and environmental costs (i.e. emissions, noise and traffic congestions). Modern traceability devices, like volumetric sensors, identification RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) systems, GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) and GPS (Global Positioning System) technology, permit to obtain data in real time, which is fundamental to implement an efficient and innovative waste collection routing model. The basic idea is that knowing the real time data of each vehicle and the real time replenishment level at each bin makes it possible to decide, in function of the waste generation pattern, what bin should be emptied and what should not, optimizing different aspects like the total covered distance, the necessary number of vehicles and the environmental impact. This paper describes a framework about the traceability technology available in the optimization of solid waste collection, and introduces an innovative vehicle routing model integrated with the real time traceability data, starting the application in an Italian city of about 100,000 inhabitants. The model is tested and validated using simulation and an economical feasibility study is reported at the end of the paper.

  17. Modeling closure of circular wounds through coordinated collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, David S.; Zimmermann, Juliane; Levine, Herbert

    2016-02-01

    Wound healing enables tissues to restore their original states, and is achieved through collective cell migration into the wound space, contraction of the wound edge via an actomyosin filament ‘purse-string,’ as well as cell division. Recently, experimental techniques have been developed to create wounds with various regular morphologies in epithelial monolayers, and these experiments of circular closed-contour wounds support coordinated lamellipodial cell crawling as the predominant driver of gap closure. Through utilizing a particle-based mechanical tissue simulation, exhibiting long-range coordination of cell motility, we computationally model these closed-contour experiments with a high level of agreement between experimentally observed and simulated wound closure dynamics and tissue velocity profiles. We also determine the sensitivity of wound closure time in the model to changes in cell motility force and division rate. Our simulation results confirm that circular wounds can close due to collective cell migration without the necessity for a purse-string mechanism or for cell division, and show that the alignment mechanism of cellular motility force with velocity, leading to collective motion in the model, may speed up wound closure.

  18. [Hannover synthetic moulages. A singular collection of dermatologic teaching models].

    PubMed

    Schnalke, T

    1987-12-01

    Dermatological moulages rapidly lost their importance during the 1950s. The disadvantages of the classical moulage materials, plaster of Paris and wax, are pointed out. In the 1960s and 1970s modern plastics were introduced to moulage technology at the Linden Dermatological Clinic in Hannover. Silicon-caoutchouc and Vestolit-PVC were the substances used. This paper describes how the Hannover collection of plastic models was assembled and presents its current status. Wax and plastic models are set against each other in the illustrations.

  19. Modeling species-abundance relationships in multi-species collections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, S.; Yin, Z.; Ren, H.; Guo, Q.

    2003-01-01

    Species-abundance relationship is one of the most fundamental aspects of community ecology. Since Motomura first developed the geometric series model to describe the feature of community structure, ecologists have developed many other models to fit the species-abundance data in communities. These models can be classified into empirical and theoretical ones, including (1) statistical models, i.e., negative binomial distribution (and its extension), log-series distribution (and its extension), geometric distribution, lognormal distribution, Poisson-lognormal distribution, (2) niche models, i.e., geometric series, broken stick, overlapping niche, particulate niche, random assortment, dominance pre-emption, dominance decay, random fraction, weighted random fraction, composite niche, Zipf or Zipf-Mandelbrot model, and (3) dynamic models describing community dynamics and restrictive function of environment on community. These models have different characteristics and fit species-abundance data in various communities or collections. Among them, log-series distribution, lognormal distribution, geometric series, and broken stick model have been most widely used.

  20. Minimal model for collective kinetochore–microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Banigan, Edward J.; Chiou, Kevin K.; Ballister, Edward R.; Mayo, Alyssa M.; Lampson, Michael A.; Liu, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segregation during cell division depends on interactions of kinetochores with dynamic microtubules (MTs). In many eukaryotes, each kinetochore binds multiple MTs, but the collective behavior of these coupled MTs is not well understood. We present a minimal model for collective kinetochore–MT dynamics, based on in vitro measurements of individual MTs and their dependence on force and kinetochore phosphorylation by Aurora B kinase. For a system of multiple MTs connected to the same kinetochore, the force–velocity relation has a bistable regime with two possible steady-state velocities: rapid shortening or slow growth. Bistability, combined with the difference between the growing and shrinking speeds, leads to center-of-mass and breathing oscillations in bioriented sister kinetochore pairs. Kinetochore phosphorylation shifts the bistable region to higher tensions, so that only the rapidly shortening state is stable at low tension. Thus, phosphorylation leads to error correction for kinetochores that are not under tension. We challenged the model with new experiments, using chemically induced dimerization to enhance Aurora B activity at metaphase kinetochores. The model suggests that the experimentally observed disordering of the metaphase plate occurs because phosphorylation increases kinetochore speeds by biasing MTs to shrink. Our minimal model qualitatively captures certain characteristic features of kinetochore dynamics, illustrates how biochemical signals such as phosphorylation may regulate the dynamics, and provides a theoretical framework for understanding other factors that control the dynamics in vivo. PMID:26417109

  1. Collecting, Visualising, Communicating and Modelling Geographic Data for the Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, A.; Hudson-Smith, A.; Milton, R.; Smith, D.; Batty, M.; Neuhaus, F.

    2009-12-01

    New web technologies and task specific software packages and services are fundamentally changing the way we share, collect, visualise, communicate and distribute geographic information. Coupled with these new technologies is the emergence of rich fine scale and extensive geographical datasets of the built environment. Such technologies and data are providing opportunities for both the social and physical sciences that were unimaginable ten years ago. Within this paper we discus such change from our own experiences at the Centre of Advanced Spatial Analysis. Specifically, how it is now possible to harness the crowd to collect peoples’ opinions about topical events such as the current financial crisis, in real time and map the results, through the use of our GMapCreator software and the MapTube website. Furthermore, such tools allow for widespread dissemination and visualisation of geographic data to whoever has an internet connection. We will explore how one can use new datasets to visualise the city using our Virtual London model as an example. Within the model individual buildings are tagged with multiple attributes providing a lens to explore the urban structure offering a plethora of research applications. We then turn to how one can visualise and communicate such data through low cost software and virtual worlds such as Crysis and Second Life with a look into their potential for modelling and finally how we disseminated much of this information through weblogs (blogs) such as Digital Urban, GIS and Agent-based modelling and Urban Tick.

  2. AdS{sub 4}/CFT{sub 3} construction from collective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Rodrigues, Joao P.; Jevicki, Antal; Jin, Kewang

    2011-01-15

    We pursue the construction of higher-spin theory in AdS{sub 4} from CFT{sub 3} of the O(N) vector model in terms of canonical collective fields. In null-plane quantization an exact map is established between the two spaces. The coordinates of the AdS{sub 4} space-time are generated from the collective coordinates of the bi-local field. This, in the light-cone gauge, provides an exact one-to-one reconstruction of bulk AdS{sub 4} space-time and higher-spin fields.

  3. A New Model for Building Digital Science Education Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepold, F.; McCaffrey, M.; Morrill, C.; Ganse, J.; Weston, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Polar Regions play an integral role in how our Earth system operates. However, the Polar Regions are marginally studied in the K-12 classroom in the United States. The International Polar Year's (IPY) coordinated campaign of polar observations, research, and analysis that will be multidisciplinary in scope and international in participation offers a powerful opportunity for K-12 classroom. The IPY's scientific objective to better understand the key roles of the Polar Regions in global processes will allow students a window into the poles and this unique regions role in the Earth system. IPY will produce careful, useful scientific information that will advance our understanding of the Polar Regions and their connections to the rest of the globe. The IPY is an opportunity to inspire the next generation of very young Earth system scientists. The IPY's draft education & outreach position paper asks a key question that must guide future educational projects; "Why is the polar regions and polar research important to all people on earth?" In efforts to coordinate educational activities and collaborate with international projects, United States national agencies, and other educational initiatives, it is the purpose of this session to explore potential partnerships, while primarily recommending a model for educational product development and review. During such a large international science endeavor, numerous educational activities and opportunities are developed, but these educational programs can suffer from too many unconnected options being available to teachers and students. Additionally, activities often are incompatible with each other making classroom implementation unnecessarily complex and prohibitively time consuming for teachers. A newly develop educational activity collection technique developed for DLESE offers an effective model for IPY product gap analysis and development. The Climate Change Collection developed as a pilot project for the Digital Library

  4. Modeling local chemistry in the presence of collective phenomena.

    SciTech Connect

    Chandross, Michael Evan; Modine, Normand Arthur

    2005-01-01

    Confinement within the nanoscale pores of a zeolite strongly modifies the behavior of small molecules. Typical of many such interesting and important problems, realistic modeling of this phenomena requires simultaneously capturing the detailed behavior of chemical bonds and the possibility of collective dynamics occurring in a complex unit cell (672 atoms in the case of Zeolite-4A). Classical simulations alone cannot reliably model the breaking and formation of chemical bonds, while quantum methods alone are incapable of treating the extended length and time scales characteristic of complex dynamics. We have developed a robust and efficient model in which a small region treated with the Kohn-Sham density functional theory is embedded within a larger system represented with classical potentials. This model has been applied in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of water, ammonia, the hydroxide ion, and the ammonium ion in Zeolite-4a. Understanding this behavior is important to the predictive modeling of the aging of Zeolite-based desiccants. In particular, we have studied the absorption of these molecules, interactions between water and the ammonium ion, and reactions between the hydroxide ion and the zeolite cage. We have shown that interactions with the extended Zeolite cage strongly modifies these local chemical phenomena, and thereby we have proven out hypothesis that capturing both local chemistry and collective phenomena is essential to realistic modeling of this system. Based on our results, we have been able to identify two possible mechanisms for the aging of Zeolite-based desiccants.

  5. User-friendly software for modeling collective spin wave excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Steven; Peterson, Peter; Fishman, Randy; Ehlers, Georg

    There exists a great need for user-friendly, integrated software that assists in the scientific analysis of collective spin wave excitations measured with inelastic neutron scattering. SpinWaveGenie is a C + + software library that simplifies the modeling of collective spin wave excitations, allowing scientists to analyze neutron scattering data with sophisticated models fast and efficiently. Furthermore, one can calculate the four-dimensional scattering function S(Q,E) to directly compare and fit calculations to experimental measurements. Its generality has been both enhanced and verified through successful modeling of a wide array of magnetic materials. Recently, we have spent considerable effort transforming SpinWaveGenie from an early prototype to a high quality free open source software package for the scientific community. S.E.H. acknowledges support by the Laboratory's Director's fund, ORNL. Work was sponsored by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC.

  6. Modelling Influence and Opinion Evolution in Online Collective Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gend, Pascal; Rentfrow, Peter J.; Hendrickx, Julien M.; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion evolution and judgment revision are mediated through social influence. Based on a large crowdsourced in vitro experiment (n = 861), it is shown how a consensus model can be used to predict opinion evolution in online collective behaviour. It is the first time the predictive power of a quantitative model of opinion dynamics is tested against a real dataset. Unlike previous research on the topic, the model was validated on data which did not serve to calibrate it. This avoids to favor more complex models over more simple ones and prevents overfitting. The model is parametrized by the influenceability of each individual, a factor representing to what extent individuals incorporate external judgments. The prediction accuracy depends on prior knowledge on the participants’ past behaviour. Several situations reflecting data availability are compared. When the data is scarce, the data from previous participants is used to predict how a new participant will behave. Judgment revision includes unpredictable variations which limit the potential for prediction. A first measure of unpredictability is proposed. The measure is based on a specific control experiment. More than two thirds of the prediction errors are found to occur due to unpredictability of the human judgment revision process rather than to model imperfection. PMID:27336834

  7. A Bayesian subgroup analysis using collections of ANOVA models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhong; Sivaganesan, Siva; Laud, Purushottam W; Müller, Peter

    2017-03-20

    We develop a Bayesian approach to subgroup analysis using ANOVA models with multiple covariates, extending an earlier work. We assume a two-arm clinical trial with normally distributed response variable. We also assume that the covariates for subgroup finding are categorical and are a priori specified, and parsimonious easy-to-interpret subgroups are preferable. We represent the subgroups of interest by a collection of models and use a model selection approach to finding subgroups with heterogeneous effects. We develop suitable priors for the model space and use an objective Bayesian approach that yields multiplicity adjusted posterior probabilities for the models. We use a structured algorithm based on the posterior probabilities of the models to determine which subgroup effects to report. Frequentist operating characteristics of the approach are evaluated using simulation. While our approach is applicable in more general cases, we mainly focus on the 2 × 2 case of two covariates each at two levels for ease of presentation. The approach is illustrated using a real data example.

  8. Collective field theory of a singular supersymmetric matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello Koch, R.; Rodrigues, J.P.

    1995-05-15

    The supersymmetric collective field theory with the potential {ital v}{prime}({ital x})={omega}{ital x}{minus}{eta}/{ital x} is studied. Consistency with supersymmetry enforces a two band solution. A supersymmetric classical configuration is found, and interpreted in terms of the density of zeroes of certain Laguerre polynomials. The spectrum of the model is then studied and is seen to correspond to a massless scalar and a Majorana fermion. The {ital x} space eigenfunctions are constructed and expressed in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. Higher order interactions are also discussed.

  9. Quantum chaos in the nuclear collective model. II. Peres lattices.

    PubMed

    Stránský, Pavel; Hruska, Petr; Cejnar, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    This is a continuation of our paper [Phys. Rev. E 79, 046202 (2009)] devoted to signatures of quantum chaos in the geometric collective model of atomic nuclei. We apply the method by Peres to study ordered and disordered patterns in quantum spectra drawn as lattices in the plane of energy vs average of a chosen observable. Good qualitative agreement with standard measures of chaos is manifested. The method provides an efficient tool for studying structural changes in eigenstates across quantum spectra of general systems.

  10. Simple model for multiple-choice collective decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching Hua; Lucas, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    We describe a simple model of heterogeneous, interacting agents making decisions between n ≥2 discrete choices. For a special class of interactions, our model is the mean field description of random field Potts-like models and is effectively solved by finding the extrema of the average energy E per agent. In these cases, by studying the propagation of decision changes via avalanches, we argue that macroscopic dynamics is well captured by a gradient flow along E . We focus on the permutation symmetric case, where all n choices are (on average) the same, and spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) arises purely from cooperative social interactions. As examples, we show that bimodal heterogeneity naturally provides a mechanism for the spontaneous formation of hierarchies between decisions and that SSB is a preferred instability to discontinuous phase transitions between two symmetric points. Beyond the mean field limit, exponentially many stable equilibria emerge when we place this model on a graph of finite mean degree. We conclude with speculation on decision making with persistent collective oscillations. Throughout the paper, we emphasize analogies between methods of solution to our model and common intuition from diverse areas of physics, including statistical physics and electromagnetism.

  11. Collective Properties of a Transcription Initiation Model Under Varying Environment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yucheng; Lowengrub, John S

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of gene transcription is tightly regulated in eukaryotes. Recent experiments have revealed various kinds of transcriptional dynamics, such as RNA polymerase II pausing, that involves regulation at the transcription initiation stage, and the choice of different regulation pattern is closely related to the physiological functions of the target gene. Here we consider a simplified model of transcription initiation, a process including the assembly of transcription complex and the pausing and releasing of the RNA polymerase II. Focusing on the collective behaviors of a population level, we explore the potential regulatory functions this model can offer. These functions include fast and synchronized response to environmental change, or long-term memory about the transcriptional status. As a proof of concept we also show that, by selecting different control mechanisms cells can adapt to different environments. These findings may help us better understand the design principles of transcriptional regulation.

  12. Yang-Mills generalization of the geometrical collective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, George; Sparks, Nick

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical or Bohr-Mottelson model is generalized and recast as a Yang-Mills theory. The gauge symmetry determines conservation of Kelvin circulation. The circulation commutes with the Hamiltonian when it is the sum of the kinetic energy and a potential that depends only on deformation. The conventional Bohr-Mottelson model is the special case of circulation zero, and wave functions are complex-valued. In the generalization, any quantized value of the circulation is allowed, and the wave functions are vector-valued. The Yang-Mills formulation introduces a new coupling between the geometrical and intrinsic degrees of freedom. The coupling appears in the covariant derivative term of the collective kinetic energy. This kind of coupling is sometimes called ``magnetic'' because of the analogy with electrodynamics.

  13. Nuclear structure and triaxiality with the algebraic collective model

    SciTech Connect

    Caprio, M. A.; Rowe, D. J.; Welsh, T. A.

    2009-01-28

    A tractable scheme for numerical diagonalization of the Bohr Hamiltonian, based on SU(1,1)xSO(5) algebraic methods, has recently been proposed. The direct product basis obtained from an optimally chosen set of SU(1,1){beta} wave functions and the SO(5) spherical harmonics {psi}{sub v{alpha}}{sub LM}({gamma},{omega}) provides an exceedingly efficient basis for numerical solution, as compared to conventional diagonalization in a five-dimensional oscillator basis. In this contribution, the status of the SU(1,1)xSO(5) algebraic collective model is summarized and applications are presented. In particular, the transition from axially symmetric to triaxial structure is explored.

  14. Models of Digital Collection Use in a University Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Kristin M.; Puckett, Cassidy; Rockman, Saul

    2008-01-01

    Digital collections enable university students and faculty to share academic scholarship across their campuses and beyond. Based on interviews, the authors present cases of faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates to illustrate some factors that seem to determine why they do or do not use digital collections in their research, teaching, and…

  15. Collectivity in the light xenon isotopes: A shell model study

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Sieja, K.; Poves, A.

    2010-12-15

    The lightest xenon isotopes are studied in the shell model framework, within a valence space that comprises all the orbits lying between the magic closures N=Z=50 and N=Z=82. The calculations produce collective deformed structures of triaxial nature that encompass nicely the known experimental data. Predictions are made for the (still unknown) N=Z nucleus {sup 108}Xe. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition between the quadrupole correlations enhanced by the pseudo-SU(3) structure of the positive parity orbits and the pairing correlations brought in by the 0h{sub 11/2} orbit. We also have studied the effect of the excitations from the {sup 100}Sn core on our predictions. We show that the backbending in this region is due to the alignment of two particles in the 0h{sub 11/2} orbit. In the N=Z case, one neutron and one proton align to J=11 and T=0. In {sup 110,112}Xe the alignment begins in the J=10, T=1 channel and it is dominantly of neutron-neutron type. Approaching the band termination the alignment of a neutron-proton pair to J=11 and T=0 takes over. In a more academic mood, we have studied the role of the isovector and isoscalar pairing correlations on the structure on the yrast bands of {sup 108,110}Xe and examined the possible existence of isovector and isoscalar pairing condensates in these N{approx}{approx}Z nuclei.

  16. Universal correlations of collective observables: Empirical phenomenology and model interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. ||; Brenner, D.S.

    1994-11-01

    Universal and simple correlations of collective observables, with each other and with structural parameters such as N{sub p}N{sub n}, are discussed along with their implications for the evolution of nuclear structure.

  17. Models of collective cell spreading with variable cell aspect ratio: A motivation for degenerate diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Baker, Ruth E.; McCue, Scott W.

    2011-02-01

    Continuum diffusion models are often used to represent the collective motion of cell populations. Most previous studies have simply used linear diffusion to represent collective cell spreading, while others found that degenerate nonlinear diffusion provides a better match to experimental cell density profiles. In the cell modeling literature there is no guidance available with regard to which approach is more appropriate for representing the spreading of cell populations. Furthermore, there is no knowledge of particular experimental measurements that can be made to distinguish between situations where these two models are appropriate. Here we provide a link between individual-based and continuum models using a multiscale approach in which we analyze the collective motion of a population of interacting agents in a generalized lattice-based exclusion process. For round agents that occupy a single lattice site, we find that the relevant continuum description of the system is a linear diffusion equation, whereas for elongated rod-shaped agents that occupy L adjacent lattice sites we find that the relevant continuum description is connected to the porous media equation (PME). The exponent in the nonlinear diffusivity function is related to the aspect ratio of the agents. Our work provides a physical connection between modeling collective cell spreading and the use of either the linear diffusion equation or the PME to represent cell density profiles. Results suggest that when using continuum models to represent cell population spreading, we should take care to account for variations in the cell aspect ratio because different aspect ratios lead to different continuum models.

  18. Collective (Team) Learning Process Models: A Conceptual Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Teams have become a key resource for learning and accomplishing work in organizations. The development of collective learning in specific contexts is not well understood, yet has become critical to organizational success. The purpose of this conceptual review is to inform human resource development (HRD) practice about specific team behaviors and…

  19. Backtracking search algorithm in CVRP models for efficient solid waste collection and route optimization.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mahmuda; Hannan, M A; Begum, R A; Basri, Hassan; Scavino, Edgar

    2017-03-01

    Waste collection is an important part of waste management that involves different issues, including environmental, economic, and social, among others. Waste collection optimization can reduce the waste collection budget and environmental emissions by reducing the collection route distance. This paper presents a modified Backtracking Search Algorithm (BSA) in capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP) models with the smart bin concept to find the best optimized waste collection route solutions. The objective function minimizes the sum of the waste collection route distances. The study introduces the concept of the threshold waste level (TWL) of waste bins to reduce the number of bins to be emptied by finding an optimal range, thus minimizing the distance. A scheduling model is also introduced to compare the feasibility of the proposed model with that of the conventional collection system in terms of travel distance, collected waste, fuel consumption, fuel cost, efficiency and CO2 emission. The optimal TWL was found to be between 70% and 75% of the fill level of waste collection nodes and had the maximum tightness value for different problem cases. The obtained results for four days show a 36.80% distance reduction for 91.40% of the total waste collection, which eventually increases the average waste collection efficiency by 36.78% and reduces the fuel consumption, fuel cost and CO2 emission by 50%, 47.77% and 44.68%, respectively. Thus, the proposed optimization model can be considered a viable tool for optimizing waste collection routes to reduce economic costs and environmental impacts.

  20. Endogenous Crisis Waves: Stochastic Model with Synchronized Collective Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualdi, Stanislao; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Cencetti, Giulia; Tarzia, Marco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    We propose a simple framework to understand commonly observed crisis waves in macroeconomic agent-based models, which is also relevant to a variety of other physical or biological situations where synchronization occurs. We compute exactly the phase diagram of the model and the location of the synchronization transition in parameter space. Many modifications and extensions can be studied, confirming that the synchronization transition is extremely robust against various sources of noise or imperfections.

  1. Information Processing and Collective Behavior in a Model Neuronal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-28

    at times weekly) telecoms with them and Eli Shlizerman at the University of Washington. In summary, we were happy to work with many groups within...states cause high intracellular calcium concentrations, which could trigger transcription of clock genes . The model also predicts that circadian...phenotypes of mutations or knockdown of clock genes as well as the time courses and relative expression of clock transcripts and proteins. Using this model

  2. Boolean modeling of collective effects in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Norrell, Johannes; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Complex systems are often modeled as Boolean networks in attempts to capture their logical structure and reveal its dynamical consequences. Approximating the dynamics of continuous variables by discrete values and Boolean logic gates may, however, introduce dynamical possibilities that are not accessible to the original system. We show that large random networks of variables coupled through continuous transfer functions often fail to exhibit the complex dynamics of corresponding Boolean models in the disordered (chaotic) regime, even when each individual function appears to be a good candidate for Boolean idealization. A suitably modified Boolean theory explains the behavior of systems in which information does not propagate faithfully down certain chains of nodes. Model networks incorporating calculated or directly measured transfer functions reported in the literature on transcriptional regulation of genes are described by the modified theory. PMID:19658525

  3. The Diversity Challenge: A Collection of Model Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellander, Gustavo A., Ed.; Prochaska, Fred, Ed.

    Model programs designed to promote diversity within the West Valley-Mission Community College District (WVMCCD) in California are discussed and described in this report. First, an introductory chapter, "The Importance of Cultural Issues to Higher Education," by Gustavo A. Mellander and Fred Prochaska, reviews the diversity recommendations of the…

  4. Comparative analysis of data collection methods for individualized modeling of radiologists' visual similarity judgments

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Xu, Songhua; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Morin-Ducote, Garnetta; Hudson, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: We conducted an observer study to investigate how the data collection method affects the efficacy of modeling individual radiologists judgments regarding the perceptual similarity of breast masses on mammograms. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained prior to the study. Six observers of variable experience levels in breast imaging were recruited to assess the perceptual similarity of mammographic masses. The observers subjective judgments were collected using: (i) a rating method, (ii) a preference method, and (iii) a hybrid method combining rating and ranking. Personalized user models were developed with the collected data to predict observers opinions. The relative efficacy of each data collection method was assessed based on the classification accuracy of the resulting user models. Results: The hybrid data collection method produced significantly more accurate individualized user models of perceptual opinions with comparable and sometimes better time efficiency than the other two data collection methods. The user models derived from hybrid data were clearly superior even when developed with a dramatically smaller number of training cases. Conclusions: A hybrid method combining rating and ranking is an intuitive and efficient way for collecting subjective similarity judgments to model human perceptual opinions with a higher accuracy than other more commonly used data collection methods.

  5. Extension of the ADC Charge-Collection Model to Include Multiple Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    The ADC model is a charge-collection model derived for simple p-n junction silicon diodes having a single reverse-biased p-n junction at one end and an ideal substrate contact at the other end. The present paper extends the model to include multiple junctions, and the goal is to estimate how collected charge is shared by the different junctions.

  6. Energy and time modelling of kerbside waste collection: Changes incurred when adding source separated food waste.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Joel; Othman, Maazuza; Burn, Stewart; Crossin, Enda

    2016-10-01

    The collection of source separated kerbside municipal FW (SSFW) is being incentivised in Australia, however such a collection is likely to increase the fuel and time a collection truck fleet requires. Therefore, waste managers need to determine whether the incentives outweigh the cost. With literature scarcely describing the magnitude of increase, and local parameters playing a crucial role in accurately modelling kerbside collection; this paper develops a new general mathematical model that predicts the energy and time requirements of a collection regime whilst incorporating the unique variables of different jurisdictions. The model, Municipal solid waste collect (MSW-Collect), is validated and shown to be more accurate at predicting fuel consumption and trucks required than other common collection models. When predicting changes incurred for five different SSFW collection scenarios, results show that SSFW scenarios require an increase in fuel ranging from 1.38% to 57.59%. There is also a need for additional trucks across most SSFW scenarios tested. All SSFW scenarios are ranked and analysed in regards to fuel consumption; sensitivity analysis is conducted to test key assumptions.

  7. Collective Philanthropy: Describing and Modeling the Ecology of Giving

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, William L.; Reagan, Andrew James; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2014-01-01

    Reflective of income and wealth distributions, philanthropic gifting appears to follow an approximate power-law size distribution as measured by the size of gifts received by individual institutions. We explore the ecology of gifting by analysing data sets of individual gifts for a diverse group of institutions dedicated to education, medicine, art, public support, and religion. We find that the detailed forms of gift-size distributions differ across but are relatively constant within charity categories. We construct a model for how a donor's income affects their giving preferences in different charity categories, offering a mechanistic explanation for variations in institutional gift-size distributions. We discuss how knowledge of gift-sized distributions may be used to assess an institution's gift-giving profile, to help set fundraising goals, and to design an institution-specific giving pyramid. PMID:24983864

  8. Seven challenges for model-driven data collection in experimental and observational studies.

    PubMed

    Lessler, J; Edmunds, W J; Halloran, M E; Hollingsworth, T D; Lloyd, A L

    2015-03-01

    Infectious disease models are both concise statements of hypotheses and powerful techniques for creating tools from hypotheses and theories. As such, they have tremendous potential for guiding data collection in experimental and observational studies, leading to more efficient testing of hypotheses and more robust study designs. In numerous instances, infectious disease models have played a key role in informing data collection, including the Garki project studying malaria, the response to the 2009 pandemic of H1N1 influenza in the United Kingdom and studies of T-cell immunodynamics in mammals. However, such synergies remain the exception rather than the rule; and a close marriage of dynamic modeling and empirical data collection is far from the norm in infectious disease research. Overcoming the challenges to using models to inform data collection has the potential to accelerate innovation and to improve practice in how we deal with infectious disease threats.

  9. Seven Challenges for Model-Driven Data Collection in Experimental and Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lessler, J.; Edmunds, W.J.; Halloran, M.E.; Hollingsworth, T.D.; Lloyd, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious disease models are both concise statements of hypotheses and powerful techniques for creating tools from hypotheses and theories. As such, they have tremendous potential for guiding data collection in experimental and observational studies, leading to more efficient testing of hypotheses and more robust study designs. In numerous instances, infectious disease models have played a key role in informing data collection, including the Garki project studying malaria, the response to the 2009 pandemic of H1N1 influenza in the United Kingdom and studies of T-cell immunodynamics in mammals. However, such synergies remain the exception rather than the rule; and a close marriage of dynamic modelling and empirical data collection is far from the norm in infectious disease research. Overcoming the challenges to using models to inform data collection has the potential to accelerate innovation and to improve practice in how we deal with infectious disease threats. PMID:25843389

  10. Yang-Mills equation for the nuclear geometrical collective model connexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, N.; Rosensteel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Bohr-Mottelson collective model of rotations and quadrupole vibrations is a foundational model in nuclear structure physics. A modern formulation using differential geometry of bundles builds on this legacy collective model to allow a deformation-dependent interaction between rotational and vortical degrees of freedom. The interaction is described by the bundle connexion. This article reports the Yang-Mills equation for the connexion. For a class of solutions to the Yang-Mills equation, the differential geometric collective model attains agreement between experiment and theory for the moments of inertia of deformed isotopes. More generally, the differential geometric framework applies to models of emergent phenomena in which two interacting sets of degrees of freedom must be unified.

  11. Acting in solidarity: Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members.

    PubMed

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    2015-09-01

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Based on two proposed functions of social identity performance (Klein, Spears, & Reicher, 2007), we distinguished between the efficacy of collective action at consolidating the identity of a protest movement and its efficacy at achieving social change (political efficacy). We expected identity consolidation efficacy to positively predict collective action tendencies directly and indirectly via political efficacy. We also expected collective action tendencies to be positively predicted by moral outrage and by sympathy in response to disadvantaged outgroup's suffering. These hypotheses were supported in two surveys examining intentions to protest for Palestine in Britain (Study 1), and intentions to attend the June 4th vigil in Hong Kong to commemorate the Tiananmen massacre among a sample of Hong Kong citizens (Study 2). The contributions of these findings to research on the dual pathway model of collective action and the different functions of collective action are discussed.

  12. Collective Bargaining in Four Year Institutions: A Faculty Perspective Viewed through the Easton Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockman, Ilene F.

    A systems model, developed by David Easton, is used to provide some clarity to many of the issues involved with collective bargaining in American higher education. The model serves as an illustration for understanding how decisions are made, and as a conceptual frame of reference to analyze the political situation. The issues surrounding…

  13. Academic Optimism and Collective Responsibility: An Organizational Model of the Dynamics of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jason H.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the construct of academic optimism and its relationship with collective responsibility in a sample of Taiwan elementary schools. The construct of academic optimism was tested using confirmatory factor analysis, and the whole structural model was tested with a structural equation modeling analysis. The data were…

  14. Collective Labor Supply: A Single-Equation Model and Some Evidence from French Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donni, Olivier; Moreau, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    In Chiappori's (1988) collective model of labor supply, hours of work are supposed flexible. In many countries, however, male labor supply does not vary much. In that case, the husband's labor supply is no longer informative about the household decision process and individual preferences. To identify structural components of the model, additional…

  15. Collective Tunneling Model between Two-Dimensional Electron Gas to Si-Nano Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraguchi, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Takada, Y.; Nomura, S.; Shiraishi, K.; Makihara, K.; Ikeda, M.; Miyazaki, S.; Shigeta, Y.; Endoh, T.

    2011-12-01

    We study the temperature dependence of electron injection voltage in Si-Nano-Dot (Si-NDs) Floating Gate MOS capacitor by using the collective tunneling model, which models the tunneling between two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and the Si-NDs. We clarify the temperature dependence by numerical calculation, which emulate the experiment in this system, and we obtained a new insight into the origin of the temperature dependence. We have revealed that the collective tunneling model can reproduce the temperature dependence of electron tunneling.

  16. An agent-based model of collective emotions in online communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, F.; Garcia, D.

    2010-10-01

    We develop an agent-based framework to model the emergence of collective emotions, which is applied to online communities. Agent’s individual emotions are described by their valence and arousal. Using the concept of Brownian agents, these variables change according to a stochastic dynamics, which also considers the feedback from online communication. Agents generate emotional information, which is stored and distributed in a field modeling the online medium. This field affects the emotional states of agents in a non-linear manner. We derive conditions for the emergence of collective emotions, observable in a bimodal valence distribution. Dependent on a saturated or a superlinear feedback between the information field and the agent’s arousal, we further identify scenarios where collective emotions only appear once or in a repeated manner. The analytical results are illustrated by agent-based computer simulations. Our framework provides testable hypotheses about the emergence of collective emotions, which can be verified by data from online communities.

  17. Modeling collective animal behavior with a cognitive perspective: a methodological framework.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Sebastian; Blanco, Stéphane; Fournier, Richard; Gautrais, Jacques; Jost, Christian; Theraulaz, Guy

    2012-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increasing interest in modeling collective animal behavior. Some studies try to reproduce as accurately as possible the collective dynamics and patterns observed in several animal groups with biologically plausible, individual behavioral rules. The objective is then essentially to demonstrate that the observed collective features may be the result of self-organizing processes involving quite simple individual behaviors. Other studies concentrate on the objective of establishing or enriching links between collective behavior researches and cognitive or physiological ones, which then requires that each individual rule be carefully validated. Here we discuss the methodological consequences of this additional requirement. Using the example of corpse clustering in ants, we first illustrate that it may be impossible to discriminate among alternative individual rules by considering only observational data collected at the group level. Six individual behavioral models are described: They are clearly distinct in terms of individual behaviors, they all reproduce satisfactorily the collective dynamics and distribution patterns observed in experiments, and we show theoretically that it is strictly impossible to discriminate two of these models even in the limit of an infinite amount of data whatever the accuracy level. A set of methodological steps are then listed and discussed as practical ways to partially overcome this problem. They involve complementary experimental protocols specifically designed to address the behavioral rules successively, conserving group-level data for the overall model validation. In this context, we highlight the importance of maintaining a sharp distinction between model enunciation, with explicit references to validated biological concepts, and formal translation of these concepts in terms of quantitative state variables and fittable functional dependences. Illustrative examples are provided of the benefits expected

  18. Shoreline Change and Storm-Induced Beach Erosion Modeling: A Collection of Seven Papers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    seasonal variations in wave climate , such as changes in predominant direction and wave steepness, on shoreline position. Duration of Simulation The...used by both the shoreline change model and the nearshore wave transformation model to describe the characteristics of the wave climate . These are the...DTEC FpLE copy MISCELLANEOUS PAPER CERC-90-2 DSHORELINE CHANGE AND STORM-INDUCED BEACH EROSION MODELING: A COLLECTION OF SEVEN PAPERS Edited by

  19. Modeling the efficiency of a magnetic needle for collecting magnetic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kimberly S.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Bryant, H. C.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2014-07-01

    As new magnetic nanoparticle-based technologies are developed and new target cells are identified, there is a critical need to understand the features important for magnetic isolation of specific cells in fluids, an increasingly important tool in disease research and diagnosis. To investigate magnetic cell collection, cell-sized spherical microparticles, coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were suspended in (1) glycerine-water solutions, chosen to approximate the range of viscosities of bone marrow, and (2) water in which 3, 5, 10 and 100% of the total suspended microspheres are coated with magnetic nanoparticles, to model collection of rare magnetic nanoparticle-coated cells from a mixture of cells in a fluid. The magnetic microspheres were collected on a magnetic needle, and we demonstrate that the collection efficiency versus time can be modeled using a simple, heuristically-derived function, with three physically-significant parameters. The function enables experimentally-obtained collection efficiencies to be scaled to extract the effective drag of the suspending medium. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the effective drag scales linearly with fluid viscosity, as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the number of non-magnetic microspheres in the suspending fluid results increases the collection of magnetic microspheres, corresponding to a decrease in the effective drag of the medium.

  20. Model-driven approach to data collection and reporting for quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Curcin, Vasa; Woodcock, Thomas; Poots, Alan J.; Majeed, Azeem; Bell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Continuous data collection and analysis have been shown essential to achieving improvement in healthcare. However, the data required for local improvement initiatives are often not readily available from hospital Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems or not routinely collected. Furthermore, improvement teams are often restricted in time and funding thus requiring inexpensive and rapid tools to support their work. Hence, the informatics challenge in healthcare local improvement initiatives consists of providing a mechanism for rapid modelling of the local domain by non-informatics experts, including performance metric definitions, and grounded in established improvement techniques. We investigate the feasibility of a model-driven software approach to address this challenge, whereby an improvement model designed by a team is used to automatically generate required electronic data collection instruments and reporting tools. To that goal, we have designed a generic Improvement Data Model (IDM) to capture the data items and quality measures relevant to the project, and constructed Web Improvement Support in Healthcare (WISH), a prototype tool that takes user-generated IDM models and creates a data schema, data collection web interfaces, and a set of live reports, based on Statistical Process Control (SPC) for use by improvement teams. The software has been successfully used in over 50 improvement projects, with more than 700 users. We present in detail the experiences of one of those initiatives, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease project in Northwest London hospitals. The specific challenges of improvement in healthcare are analysed and the benefits and limitations of the approach are discussed. PMID:24874182

  1. Model-driven approach to data collection and reporting for quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Curcin, Vasa; Woodcock, Thomas; Poots, Alan J; Majeed, Azeem; Bell, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Continuous data collection and analysis have been shown essential to achieving improvement in healthcare. However, the data required for local improvement initiatives are often not readily available from hospital Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems or not routinely collected. Furthermore, improvement teams are often restricted in time and funding thus requiring inexpensive and rapid tools to support their work. Hence, the informatics challenge in healthcare local improvement initiatives consists of providing a mechanism for rapid modelling of the local domain by non-informatics experts, including performance metric definitions, and grounded in established improvement techniques. We investigate the feasibility of a model-driven software approach to address this challenge, whereby an improvement model designed by a team is used to automatically generate required electronic data collection instruments and reporting tools. To that goal, we have designed a generic Improvement Data Model (IDM) to capture the data items and quality measures relevant to the project, and constructed Web Improvement Support in Healthcare (WISH), a prototype tool that takes user-generated IDM models and creates a data schema, data collection web interfaces, and a set of live reports, based on Statistical Process Control (SPC) for use by improvement teams. The software has been successfully used in over 50 improvement projects, with more than 700 users. We present in detail the experiences of one of those initiatives, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease project in Northwest London hospitals. The specific challenges of improvement in healthcare are analysed and the benefits and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  2. Collection of Culicoides spp. with four light trap models during different seasons in the Balearic Islands.

    PubMed

    del Río, R; Monerris, M; Miquel, M; Borràs, D; Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Lucientes, J; Miranda, M A

    2013-07-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease that affects ruminants, being especially pathogenic in certain breeds of sheep. Its viral agent (bluetongue virus; BTV) is transmitted by several species of Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Different models of suction light traps are being used in a number of countries for the collection of BTV vector species. To determine the relative effectiveness of different light traps under field conditions, four traps (Onderstepoort, Mini-CDC, Rieb and Pirbright) were compared. These traps were rotated between four sites on a cattle farm in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) for several non-consecutive nights. Results showed remarkable disparities in the efficacy of the traps for the collection of Culicoides midges. The highest number of midges collected in the Onderstepoort trap (x¯±SD=62±94.2) was not significantly different from that collected in the Mini-CDC (x¯±SD=58±139.2). The Rieb trap collected the lowest number of midges (x¯±SD=3±4.0). Significantly higher mean numbers of midges were collected in the Onderstepoort than in either the Pirbright (P=0.002) or Rieb traps (P=0.008). There were also differences in the Culicoides species composition as determine with the various traps. These results indicate that the Onderstepoort or Mini-CDC traps will be more effective than either the Rieb or Pirbright traps for the collection of large numbers of Culicoides midges.

  3. Exploring the dynamics of collective cognition using a computational model of cognitive dissonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Paul R.; Sycara, Katia; Richardson, Darren P.

    2013-05-01

    The socially-distributed nature of cognitive processing in a variety of organizational settings means that there is increasing scientific interest in the factors that affect collective cognition. In military coalitions, for example, there is a need to understand how factors such as communication network topology, trust, cultural differences and the potential for miscommunication affects the ability of distributed teams to generate high quality plans, to formulate effective decisions and to develop shared situation awareness. The current paper presents a computational model and associated simulation capability for performing in silico experimental analyses of collective sensemaking. This model can be used in combination with the results of human experimental studies in order to improve our understanding of the factors that influence collective sensemaking processes.

  4. The Data Collection Matrix Model: A Tool for Functional Area and Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Dana Rosenberg; Friedel, Janice Nahra

    1991-01-01

    The data collection matrix makes possible the integration of functional area data from numerous assessment sources and presentation of the information in a unified composite report. This model is discussed in relation to the various assessment instruments and the evaluation of functional areas and programs in colleges and universities. (Author/MSE)

  5. Collective Bargaining and the Community College: A Process Model for Management Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, Alfred "Bud"; And Others

    The model presented in this monograph was designed to aid state and district school systems and college administrators in dealing with the challenge of faculty collective bargaining in Washington community colleges. First, Chapter 1 provides a historical analysis of the laws and statutes relating to negotiations in the state's community colleges.…

  6. Does the Race of Neighborhood Role Models Matter? Collective Socialization Effects on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, James W.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether neighborhood level collective socialization processes are racialized. It addresses whether Black and White students are affected differentially by their general neighborhood characteristics; whether the racial composition of positive and negative role models in a neighborhood shape student performance differently; and…

  7. A Field-Study/Data-Collection Model for Developing an Education-Business Liaison Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Olive D.

    Thirteen Wyoming teachers and counselors interviewed managers in 215 businesses covering 9,515 jobs. This field study served as a basis for developing a field study-data collection model to be used in establishing an education-business liaison network. Each interviewer participating in the study was instructed to contact from 10 to 20 local…

  8. Extracting cellular automaton rules from physical Langevin equation models for single and collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nava-Sedeño, J M; Hatzikirou, H; Peruani, F; Deutsch, A

    2017-02-27

    Cellular automata (CA) are discrete time, space, and state models which are extensively used for modeling biological phenomena. CA are "on-lattice" models with low computational demands. In particular, lattice-gas cellular automata (LGCA) have been introduced as models of single and collective cell migration. The interaction rule dictates the behavior of a cellular automaton model and is critical to the model's biological relevance. The LGCA model's interaction rule has been typically chosen phenomenologically. In this paper, we introduce a method to obtain lattice-gas cellular automaton interaction rules from physically-motivated "off-lattice" Langevin equation models for migrating cells. In particular, we consider Langevin equations related to single cell movement (movement of cells independent of each other) and collective cell migration (movement influenced by cell-cell interactions). As examples of collective cell migration, two different alignment mechanisms are studied: polar and nematic alignment. Both kinds of alignment have been observed in biological systems such as swarms of amoebae and myxobacteria. Polar alignment causes cells to align their velocities parallel to each other, whereas nematic alignment drives cells to align either parallel or antiparallel to each other. Under appropriate assumptions, we have derived the LGCA transition probability rule from the steady-state distribution of the off-lattice Fokker-Planck equation. Comparing alignment order parameters between the original Langevin model and the derived LGCA for both mechanisms, we found different areas of agreement in the parameter space. Finally, we discuss potential reasons for model disagreement and propose extensions to the CA rule derivation methodology.

  9. Accuracy of growth model parameters: effects of frequency and duration of data collection, and missing information.

    PubMed

    Aggrey, Samuel E

    2008-01-01

    This study was done to compare the accuracy of prediction of growth parameters using the Gompertz model when (1) data was collected infrequently, (2) data collection was truncated, and (3) data was missing. Initial growth rate and rate of decay were reduced by half when the model was fitted to data collected biweekly compared to data collected weekly. This reduction led to an increase in age of maximum growth and subsequently over-predicted the asymptotic body weight. When only part of the growth duration was used for prediction, both the initial growth rate and rate of decay were reduced. The degree of data truncation also affected sexual dimorphism of the parameters estimated. Using pre-asymptotic data for growth parameter prediction does not allow the intrinsic efficiency of growth to be determined accurately. However, using growth data with body weights missing at different phases of the growth curve does not seem to significantly affect the predicted growth parameters. Speculative or diagnostic conclusions on intrinsic growth should be done with data collected at short intervals to avoid potential inaccuracies in the prediction of initial growth rate, exponential decay rate, age of maximum growth and asymptotic weight.

  10. HOCOMOCO: a comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    PubMed Central

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Kasianov, Artem S.; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. PMID:23175603

  11. Models in animal collective decision-making: information uncertainty and conflicting preferences.

    PubMed

    Conradt, Larissa

    2012-04-06

    Collective decision-making plays a central part in the lives of many social animals. Two important factors that influence collective decision-making are information uncertainty and conflicting preferences. Here, I bring together, and briefly review, basic models relating to animal collective decision-making in situations with information uncertainty and in situations with conflicting preferences between group members. The intention is to give an overview about the different types of modelling approaches that have been employed and the questions that they address and raise. Despite the use of a wide range of different modelling techniques, results show a coherent picture, as follows. Relatively simple cognitive mechanisms can lead to effective information pooling. Groups often face a trade-off between decision accuracy and speed, but appropriate fine-tuning of behavioural parameters could achieve high accuracy while maintaining reasonable speed. The right balance of interdependence and independence between animals is crucial for maintaining group cohesion and achieving high decision accuracy. In conflict situations, a high degree of decision-sharing between individuals is predicted, as well as transient leadership and leadership according to needs and physiological status. Animals often face crucial trade-offs between maintaining group cohesion and influencing the decision outcome in their own favour. Despite the great progress that has been made, there remains one big gap in our knowledge: how do animals make collective decisions in situations when information uncertainty and conflict of interest operate simultaneously?

  12. Flocking and Turning: a New Model for Self-organized Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas; Jelic, Asja; Melillo, Stefania; Mora, Thierry; Parisi, Leonardo; Silvestri, Edmondo; Viale, Massimiliano; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2015-02-01

    Birds in a flock move in a correlated way, resulting in large polarization of velocities. A good understanding of this collective behavior exists for linear motion of the flock. Yet observing actual birds, the center of mass of the group often turns giving rise to more complicated dynamics, still keeping strong polarization of the flock. Here we propose novel dynamical equations for the collective motion of polarized animal groups that account for correlated turning including solely social forces. We exploit rotational symmetries and conservation laws of the problem to formulate a theory in terms of generalized coordinates of motion for the velocity directions akin to a Hamiltonian formulation for rotations. We explicitly derive the correspondence between this formulation and the dynamics of the individual velocities, thus obtaining a new model of collective motion. In the appropriate overdamped limit we recover the well-known Vicsek model, which dissipates rotational information and does not allow for polarized turns. Although the new model has its most vivid success in describing turning groups, its dynamics is intrinsically different from previous ones in a wide dynamical regime, while reducing to the hydrodynamic description of Toner and Tu at very large length-scales. The derived framework is therefore general and it may describe the collective motion of any strongly polarized active matter system.

  13. Development of model for analysing respective collections of intended hematopoietic stem cells and harvests of unintended mature cells in apheresis for autologous hematopoietic stem cell collection.

    PubMed

    Hequet, O; Le, Q H; Rodriguez, J; Dubost, P; Revesz, D; Clerc, A; Rigal, D; Salles, G; Coiffier, B

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) required to perform peripheral hematopoietic autologous stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) can be collected by processing several blood volumes (BVs) in leukapheresis sessions. However, this may cause granulocyte harvest in graft and decrease in patient's platelet blood level. Both consequences may induce disturbances in patient. One apheresis team's current purpose is to improve HSC collection by increasing HSC collection and prevent increase in granulocyte and platelet harvests. Before improving HSC collection it seemed important to know more about the way to harvest these types of cells. The purpose of our study was to develop a simple model for analysing respective collections of intended CD34+ cells among HSC (designated here as HSC) and harvests of unintended platelets or granulocytes among mature cells (designated here as mature cells) considering the number of BVs processed and factors likely to influence cell collection or harvest. For this, we processed 1, 2 and 3 BVs in 59 leukapheresis sessions and analysed corresponding collections and harvests with a referent device (COBE Spectra). First we analysed the amounts of HSC collected and mature cells harvested and second the evolution of the respective shares of HSC and mature cells collected or harvested throughout the BV processes. HSC collections and mature cell harvests increased globally (p<0.0001) and their respective shares remained stable throughout the BV processes (p non-significant). We analysed the role of intrinsic (patient's features) and extrinsic (features before starting leukapheresis sessions) factors in collections and harvests, which showed that only pre-leukapheresis blood levels (CD34+cells and platelets) influenced both cell collections and harvests (CD34+cells and platelets) (p<0.001) and shares of HSC collections and mature unintended cells harvests (p<0.001) throughout the BV processes. Altogether, our results suggested that the main factors likely

  14. A model for individual and collective cell movement in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Palsson, Eirikur; Othmer, Hans G.

    2000-01-01

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is a widely used model system for studying a variety of basic processes in development, including cell–cell signaling, signal transduction, pattern formation, cell motility, and the movement of tissue-like aggregates of cells. Many aspects of cell motion are poorly understood, including how individual cell behavior produces the collective motion of cells observed within the mound and slug. Herein, we describe a biologically realistic model for motile D. discoideum cells that can generate active forces, that interact via surface molecules, and that can detect and respond to chemotactic signals. We model the cells as deformable viscoelastic ellipsoids and incorporate signal transduction and cell–cell signaling by using a previously developed model. The shape constraint restricts the admissible deformations but makes the simulation of a large number of interacting cells feasible. Because the model is based on known processes, the parameters can be estimated or measured experimentally. We show that this model can reproduce the observations on the chemotactic behavior of single cells, streaming during aggregation, and the collective motion of an aggregate of cells driven by a small group of pacemakers. The model predicts that the motion of two-dimensional slugs [Bonner, J. T. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 9355–9359] results from the same behaviors that are exhibited by individual cells; it is not necessary to invoke different mechanisms or behaviors. Our computational experiments also suggest previously uncharacterized phenomena that may be experimentally observable. PMID:10984537

  15. Computational model of collective nest selection by ants with heterogeneous acceptance thresholds.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; O'shea-Wheller, Thomas A; Doran, Carolina; Franks, Nigel R

    2015-06-01

    Collective decision-making is a characteristic of societies ranging from ants to humans. The ant Temnothorax albipennis is known to use quorum sensing to collectively decide on a new home; emigration to a new nest site occurs when the number of ants favouring the new site becomes quorate. There are several possible mechanisms by which ant colonies can select the best nest site among alternatives based on a quorum mechanism. In this study, we use computational models to examine the implications of heterogeneous acceptance thresholds across individual ants in collective nest choice behaviour. We take a minimalist approach to develop a differential equation model and a corresponding non-spatial agent-based model. We show, consistent with existing empirical evidence, that heterogeneity in acceptance thresholds is a viable mechanism for efficient nest choice behaviour. In particular, we show that the proposed models show speed-accuracy trade-offs and speed-cohesion trade-offs when we vary the number of scouts or the quorum threshold.

  16. Analyzing mHealth Engagement: Joint Models for Intensively Collected User Engagement Data

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Li, Zhigang; Kane, John M

    2017-01-01

    Background Evaluating engagement with an intervention is a key component of understanding its efficacy. With an increasing interest in developing behavioral interventions in the mobile health (mHealth) space, appropriate methods for evaluating engagement in this context are necessary. Data collected to evaluate mHealth interventions are often collected much more frequently than those for clinic-based interventions. Additionally, missing data on engagement is closely linked to level of engagement resulting in the potential for informative missingness. Thus, models that can accommodate intensively collected data and can account for informative missingness are required for unbiased inference when analyzing engagement with an mHealth intervention. Objective The objectives of this paper are to discuss the utility of the joint modeling approach in the analysis of longitudinal engagement data in mHealth research and to illustrate the application of this approach using data from an mHealth intervention designed to support illness management among people with schizophrenia. Methods Engagement data from an evaluation of an mHealth intervention designed to support illness management among people with schizophrenia is analyzed. A joint model is applied to the longitudinal engagement outcome and time-to-dropout to allow unbiased inference on the engagement outcome. Results are compared to a naïve model that does not account for the relationship between dropout and engagement. Results The joint model shows a strong relationship between engagement and reduced risk of dropout. Using the mHealth app 1 day more per week was associated with a 23% decreased risk of dropout (P<.001). The decline in engagement over time was steeper when the joint model was used in comparison with the naïve model. Conclusions Naïve longitudinal models that do not account for informative missingness in mHealth data may produce biased results. Joint models provide a way to model intensively collected

  17. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  18. Mapping out the solid waste generation and collection models: The case of Kampala City.

    PubMed

    Kinobe, Joel R; Niwagaba, Charles B; Gebresenbet, Girma; Komakech, Allan J; Vinnerås, Björn

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a mapping of the waste collection systems in Kampala city, using geographical information system (GIS) ArcGIS mapping software. It discusses the existing models of waste collection to the final disposal destinations. It was found that food and yard wastes constitute 92.7% of the waste generated in Kampala. Recyclables and other special wastes constitute only 7.3% of the total waste, mainly because of the increased level of reuse and recycling activities. The generation rate of solid wastes was on average, 582, 169, 105, and 90 tons/day from poor areas, upscale wealthier areas, business centers, and market areas respectively. This tonnage of waste was collected, transported, and disposed of at the city landfill. The study found that in total, residential areas of poor people generate more waste than other categories stated earlier, mainly because of their large populations. In total, there were 133 unofficial temporary storage sites acknowledged by Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) but not formally designated, 59 illegal dump sites, and 35 officially recognized temporary waste storage locations. This paper presents large-scale data that can help with understanding the collection models and their influence on solid waste management in Kampala city, which could be used for similar cities in developing countries.

  19. Modeling age-specific cancer incidences using logistic growth equations: implications for data collection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Rong; Feng, Rui; Chai, Jing; Cheng, Jing; Wang, De-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Large scale secular registry or surveillance systems have been accumulating vast data that allow mathematical modeling of cancer incidence and mortality rates. Most contemporary models in this regard use time series and APC (age-period-cohort) methods and focus primarily on predicting or analyzing cancer epidemiology with little attention being paid to implications for designing cancer registry, surveillance or evaluation initiatives. This research models age-specific cancer incidence rates using logistic growth equations and explores their performance under different scenarios of data completeness in the hope of deriving clues for reshaping relevant data collection. The study used China Cancer Registry Report 2012 as the data source. It employed 3-parameter logistic growth equations and modeled the age-specific incidence rates of all and the top 10 cancers presented in the registry report. The study performed 3 types of modeling, namely full age-span by fitting, multiple 5-year- segment fitting and single-segment fitting. Measurement of model performance adopted adjusted goodness of fit that combines sum of squred residuals and relative errors. Both model simulation and performance evalation utilized self-developed algorithms programed using C# languade and MS Visual Studio 2008. For models built upon full age-span data, predicted age-specific cancer incidence rates fitted very well with observed values for most (except cervical and breast) cancers with estimated goodness of fit (Rs) being over 0.96. When a given cancer is concerned, the R valuae of the logistic growth model derived using observed data from urban residents was greater than or at least equal to that of the same model built on data from rural people. For models based on multiple-5-year-segment data, the Rs remained fairly high (over 0.89) until 3-fourths of the data segments were excluded. For models using a fixed length single-segment of observed data, the older the age covered by the corresponding

  20. Collective Flocking Dynamics: Long Rang Order in a Non-Equilibrium 2D XY Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yuhai

    1996-03-01

    We propose and study a non-equilibrium continuum dynamical model for the collective motion of large groups of biological organisms (e.g., flocks of birds, slime molds, schools of fishs, etc.) (J. Toner and Y. Tu, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 75(23), 4326(1995) Our model becomes highly non-trivial, and different from the equilibrium model, for dmodel exhibits a broken continuous symmetry even in d=2. Our model describes a large universality class of microscopic rules, including those recently simulated by Vicsek et. al.( T. Vicsek et. al. , Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 1226(95).

  1. From Mindless Masses to Small Groups: Conceptualizing Collective Behavior in Crowd Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations are increasingly used to monitor and predict behavior at large crowd events, such as mass gatherings, festivals and evacuations. We critically examine the crowd modeling literature and call for future simulations of crowd behavior to be based more closely on findings from current social psychological research. A systematic review was conducted on the crowd modeling literature (N = 140 articles) to identify the assumptions about crowd behavior that modelers use in their simulations. Articles were coded according to the way in which crowd structure was modeled. It was found that 2 broad types are used: mass approaches and small group approaches. However, neither the mass nor the small group approaches can accurately simulate the large collective behavior that has been found in extensive empirical research on crowd events. We argue that to model crowd behavior realistically, simulations must use methods which allow crowd members to identify with each other, as suggested by self-categorization theory. PMID:26388685

  2. Collective Molecular Superrotation: A Model for Extremely Flexible Molecules Applied to Protonated Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiedt, Hanno; Jensen, Per; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    The concept of molecular structure is traditionally considered to be virtually fundamental. However, it breaks down in extremely flexible molecules, whose dynamics are governed by large-amplitude motions. For the dynamics of molecules with free internal rotations, we therefore propose a five-dimensional rigid rotor model, with states characterized by two generalized angular momentum quantum numbers and a rotational constant B . The quantum numbers characterize a 5D angular-momentum vector, super-j , which describes collective rotations that involve both the internal and the overall rotation. This model predicts the lowest energy states of the prototypical, extremely flexible molecule, CH5+ . Both energies and symmetries compare very favorably to recent experimental results. The respective assignment to the new quantum numbers indicates the validity of our concept of collective rotations in extremely flexible molecules.

  3. Sustainment of Individual and Collective Future Combat Skills: Modeling and Research Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    particular time interval following the attainment of task proficiency. We would use our data to build and validate a generalized model of FCS skill ... used ? 1. Weekly. 2. Monthly. 3. Quarterly. 4. Other (i.e., less frequently than quarterly). 5. Daily. Note a skill may be used off-duty as... skill decay. We implemented our findings in a survey-based instrument to be used for rating individual and collective tasks on several of these

  4. Three Models of Classroom Collections of Trade Books: A Summary Report of the 1994 Grolier Award Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doiron, Ray

    1995-01-01

    Describes elementary school classroom trade book collections in the Prince Edward Island (Canada) school district, and explores the relationship between the collections and school library resource center program. The report is based on a survey of 46 classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, and principals. Three models of classroom collections are…

  5. Toward an Integrative Social Identity Model of Collective Action: A Quantitative Research Synthesis of Three Socio-Psychological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Postmes, Tom; Spears, Russell

    2008-01-01

    An integrative social identity model of collective action (SIMCA) is developed that incorporates 3 socio-psychological perspectives on collective action. Three meta-analyses synthesized a total of 182 effects of perceived injustice, efficacy, and identity on collective action (corresponding to these socio-psychological perspectives). Results…

  6. Models of population-based analyses for data collected from large extended families.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Fabsitz, Richard R; Devereux, Richard B; MacCluer, Jean W; Laston, Sandra; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Shara, Nawar M; Welty, Thomas K

    2010-12-01

    Large studies of extended families usually collect valuable phenotypic data that may have scientific value for purposes other than testing genetic hypotheses if the families were not selected in a biased manner. These purposes include assessing population-based associations of diseases with risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics such as disease prevalence and incidence. Relatedness among participants however, violates the traditional assumption of independent observations in these classic analyses. The commonly used adjustment method for relatedness in population-based analyses is to use marginal models, in which clusters (families) are assumed to be independent (unrelated) with a simple and identical covariance (family) structure such as those called independent, exchangeable and unstructured covariance structures. However, using these simple covariance structures may not be optimally appropriate for outcomes collected from large extended families, and may under- or over-estimate the variances of estimators and thus lead to uncertainty in inferences. Moreover, the assumption that families are unrelated with an identical family structure in a marginal model may not be satisfied for family studies with large extended families. The aim of this paper is to propose models incorporating marginal models approaches with a covariance structure for assessing population-based associations of diseases with their risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics for epidemiological studies while adjusting for the complicated relatedness among outcomes (continuous/categorical, normally/non-normally distributed) collected from large extended families. We also discuss theoretical issues of the proposed models and show that the proposed models and covariance structure are appropriate for and capable of achieving the aim.

  7. Length scale competition in nonlinear Klein-Gordon models: A collective coordinate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenda, Sara; Sanchez, Angel

    2005-06-01

    Working within the framework of nonlinear Klein-Gordon models as a paradigmatic example, we show that length scale competition, an instability of solitons subjected to perturbations of an specific length, can be understood by means of a collective coordinate approach in terms of soliton position and width. As a consequence, we provide a natural explanation of the phenomenon in much simpler terms than any previous treatment of the problem. Our technique allows us to study the existence of length scale competition in most soliton bearing nonlinear models and can be extended to coherent structures with more degrees of freedom.

  8. Isotopic Dependence of the Shape of Se Nuclei in the Collective-Model Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovskaya, O.I.; Kashuba, I.E.; Porodzinsky, Yu.V.

    2005-06-01

    The energy structure of low-lying excited states in the nuclei of even selenium isotopes is considered on the basis of a soft-nucleus model. The nuclei are treated as nonaxial rotors, longitudinal and transverse vibrations of their surface being taken into account in the quadrupole-deformation approximation featuring an admixture of an octupole deformation. The parameters of a phenomenological collective model for the {sup 72,74,76,78,80,82}Se nuclei are found both in the case of {beta} vibrations (longitudinal vibrations) and in the presence of additional {gamma} vibrations (transverse vibrations) of the nuclear surface.

  9. Using Synchronous Boolean Networks to Model Several Phenomena of Collective Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kochemazov, Stepan; Semenov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for modeling and analysis of a number of phenomena of collective behavior. By collectives we mean multi-agent systems that transition from one state to another at discrete moments of time. The behavior of a member of a collective (agent) is called conforming if the opinion of this agent at current time moment conforms to the opinion of some other agents at the previous time moment. We presume that at each moment of time every agent makes a decision by choosing from the set (where 1-decision corresponds to action and 0-decision corresponds to inaction). In our approach we model collective behavior with synchronous Boolean networks. We presume that in a network there can be agents that act at every moment of time. Such agents are called instigators. Also there can be agents that never act. Such agents are called loyalists. Agents that are neither instigators nor loyalists are called simple agents. We study two combinatorial problems. The first problem is to find a disposition of instigators that in several time moments transforms a network from a state where the majority of simple agents are inactive to a state with the majority of active agents. The second problem is to find a disposition of loyalists that returns the network to a state with the majority of inactive agents. Similar problems are studied for networks in which simple agents demonstrate the contrary to conforming behavior that we call anticonforming. We obtained several theoretical results regarding the behavior of collectives of agents with conforming or anticonforming behavior. In computational experiments we solved the described problems for randomly generated networks with several hundred vertices. We reduced corresponding combinatorial problems to the Boolean satisfiability problem (SAT) and used modern SAT solvers to solve the instances obtained. PMID:25526612

  10. A lateral thoracotomy approach for thoracic duct cannulation and lymphatic fluid collection in a feline model.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Robert J; Sheehan, Nora K

    2016-10-01

    This study describes a lateral thoracotomy approach for thoracic duct cannulation and lymphatic fluid collection in a feline model. The thoracic duct was cannulated via a left lateral intercostal thoracotomy in 12 cats. Lymphatic fluid was collected for up to 16 days and analyzed on days 3, 9 and 16. The volume collected and duration of cannula patency were recorded. Contrast imaging of the thoracic duct was performed if fluid ceased to flow or at the end of the 16-day study period. In two cats, the cannula became dislodged within 24 h. For the remaining 10 cats, mean daily volume collected was 43.7 mL (median 41.0, range 2.3 to 152.4 mL), and mean duration of cannula patency was 8.2 days (median 6.5, range 3 to 16 days). Contrast imaging revealed that the cannula was patent in three cats, obstructed in two cats, and the thoracic duct had ruptured or had extravasation of contrast outside the duct in five cats. Cytological examination of lymphatic fluid from the three time points revealed normal appearing small lymphocytes (97%) and few (3%) non-degenerate neutrophils, macrophages, eosinophils, and plasma cells. Based on the results of this study, lateral thoracotomy approach for thoracic duct cannulation is a feasible technique for collecting lymphatic fluid in cats. This technique may have application as a model for short-term evaluation of thoracic fluid in cats; however, cannula patency was unpredictable and should be considered when utilizing this technique.

  11. A stochastic vision-based model inspired by zebrafish collective behaviour in heterogeneous environments

    PubMed Central

    Collignon, Bertrand; Séguret, Axel; Halloy, José

    2016-01-01

    Collective motion is one of the most ubiquitous behaviours displayed by social organisms and has led to the development of numerous models. Recent advances in the understanding of sensory system and information processing by animals impels one to revise classical assumptions made in decisional algorithms. In this context, we present a model describing the three-dimensional visual sensory system of fish that adjust their trajectory according to their perception field. Furthermore, we introduce a stochastic process based on a probability distribution function to move in targeted directions rather than on a summation of influential vectors as is classically assumed by most models. In parallel, we present experimental results of zebrafish (alone or in group of 10) swimming in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. We use these experimental data to set the parameter values of our model and show that this perception-based approach can simulate the collective motion of species showing cohesive behaviour in heterogeneous environments. Finally, we discuss the advances of this multilayer model and its possible outcomes in biological, physical and robotic sciences. PMID:26909173

  12. An evaluation of 1D loss model collections for the off-design performance prediction of automotive turbocharger compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.; Dietrich, M.

    2013-12-01

    Single-zone modelling is used to assess different collections of impeller 1D loss models. Three collections of loss models have been identified in literature, and the background to each of these collections is discussed. Each collection is evaluated using three modern automotive turbocharger style centrifugal compressors; comparisons of performance for each of the collections are made. An empirical data set taken from standard hot gas stand tests for each turbocharger is used as a baseline for comparison. Compressor range is predicted in this study; impeller diffusion ratio is shown to be a useful method of predicting compressor surge in 1D, and choke is predicted using basic compressible flow theory. The compressor designer can use this as a guide to identify the most compatible collection of losses for turbocharger compressor design applications. The analysis indicates the most appropriate collection for the design of automotive turbocharger centrifugal compressors.

  13. Automatic method for building indoor boundary models from dense point clouds collected by laser scanners.

    PubMed

    Valero, Enrique; Adán, Antonio; Cerrada, Carlos

    2012-11-22

    In this paper we present a method that automatically yields Boundary Representation Models (B-rep) for indoors after processing dense point clouds collected by laser scanners from key locations through an existing facility. Our objective is particularly focused on providing single models which contain the shape, location and relationship of primitive structural elements of inhabited scenarios such as walls, ceilings and floors. We propose a discretization of the space in order to accurately segment the 3D data and generate complete B-rep models of indoors in which faces, edges and vertices are coherently connected. The approach has been tested in real scenarios with data coming from laser scanners yielding promising results. We have deeply evaluated the results by analyzing how reliably these elements can be detected and how accurately they are modeled.

  14. Ground water flow modeling with sensitivity analyses to guide field data collection in a mountain watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.

    2007-01-01

    In mountain watersheds, the increased demand for clean water resources has led to an increased need for an understanding of ground water flow in alpine settings. In Prospect Gulch, located in southwestern Colorado, understanding the ground water flow system is an important first step in addressing metal loads from acid-mine drainage and acid-rock drainage in an area with historical mining. Ground water flow modeling with sensitivity analyses are presented as a general tool to guide future field data collection, which is applicable to any ground water study, including mountain watersheds. For a series of conceptual models, the observation and sensitivity capabilities of MODFLOW-2000 are used to determine composite scaled sensitivities, dimensionless scaled sensitivities, and 1% scaled sensitivity maps of hydraulic head. These sensitivities determine the most important input parameter(s) along with the location of observation data that are most useful for future model calibration. The results are generally independent of the conceptual model and indicate recharge in a high-elevation recharge zone as the most important parameter, followed by the hydraulic conductivities in all layers and recharge in the next lower-elevation zone. The most important observation data in determining these parameters are hydraulic heads at high elevations, with a depth of less than 100 m being adequate. Evaluation of a possible geologic structure with a different hydraulic conductivity than the surrounding bedrock indicates that ground water discharge to individual stream reaches has the potential to identify some of these structures. Results of these sensitivity analyses can be used to prioritize data collection in an effort to reduce time and money spend by collecting the most relevant model calibration data.

  15. Evaluation of a collective kitchens program: using the Population Health Promotion Model.

    PubMed

    Fano, Tara J; Tyminski, Sheila M; Flynn, Mary A T

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the Calgary Health Region Collective Kitchen Program on various Population Health Promotion Model health determinants, data were collected through mail-in questionnaires that examined the members' (n=331) and coordinators' (n=58) perspectives of the program. Seventy-nine members (24%) and 26 coordinators (45%) were included in the study. Three incomplete questionnaires (from prenatal program members) were discarded. Sixty-one percent of members who reported income level and family size (n=61) had incomes below the low-income cut-off. Fifty-eight members (73%) reported improvements in their lives because of the program. Sixty-four members (81%) perceived they learned to feed their families healthier foods. The members reported their fruit and vegetable consumption before and since joining a collective kitchen, and the proportion of those consuming at least five fruit and vegetable servings a day rose from 29% to 47%. The most common reasons for joining this program concerned social interactions and support. Over 90% of the coordinators perceived that they were competent to coordinate a kitchen. The results indicate that the collective kitchens program addresses several health determinants, and may increase members' capacity to attain food security and to achieve improved nutritional health.

  16. Microgrooved Polymer Substrates Promote Collective Cell Migration To Accelerate Fracture Healing in an in Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Dong, Hua; Li, Yuli; Zhu, Ye; Zeng, Lei; Gao, Huichang; Yuan, Bo; Chen, Xiaofeng; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-10-21

    Surface topography can affect cell adhesion, morphology, polarity, cytoskeleton organization, and osteogenesis. However, little is known about the effect of topography on the fracture healing in repairing nonunion and large bone defects. Microgrooved topography on the surface of bone implants may promote cell migration into the fracture gap to accelerate fracture healing. To prove this hypothesis, we used an in vitro fracture (wound) healing assay on the microgrooved polycaprolactone substrates to study the effect of microgroove widths and depths on the osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) migration and the subsequent healing. We found that the microgrooved substrates promoted MG-63 cells to migrate collectively into the wound gap, which serves as a fracture model, along the grooves and ridges as compared with the flat substrates. Moreover, the groove widths did not show obvious influence on the wound healing whereas the smaller groove depths tended to favor the collective cell migration and thus subsequent healing. The microgrooved substrates accelerated the wound healing by facilitating the collective cell migration into the wound gaps but not by promoting the cell proliferation. Furthermore, microgrooves were also found to promote the migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to heal the fracture model. Though osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was not improved on the microgrooved substrate, collagen I and minerals deposited by hMSCs were organized in a way similar to those in the extracellular matrix of natural bone. These findings suggest the necessity in using microgrooved implants in enhancing fracture healing in bone repair.

  17. Analysis and classification of collective behavior using generative modeling and nonlinear manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Bollt, Erik M; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-11-07

    In this paper, we build a framework for the analysis and classification of collective behavior using methods from generative modeling and nonlinear manifold learning. We represent an animal group with a set of finite-sized particles and vary known features of the group structure and motion via a class of generative models to position each particle on a two-dimensional plane. Particle positions are then mapped onto training images that are processed to emphasize the features of interest and match attainable far-field videos of real animal groups. The training images serve as templates of recognizable patterns of collective behavior and are compactly represented in a low-dimensional space called embedding manifold. Two mappings from the manifold are derived: the manifold-to-image mapping serves to reconstruct new and unseen images of the group and the manifold-to-feature mapping allows frame-by-frame classification of raw video. We validate the combined framework on datasets of growing level of complexity. Specifically, we classify artificial images from the generative model, interacting self-propelled particle model, and raw overhead videos of schooling fish obtained from the literature.

  18. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses. PMID:27187068

  19. Recasting Janis's Groupthink Model: The Key Role of Collective Efficacy in Decision Fiascoes.

    PubMed

    Whyte

    1998-02-01

    This paper advances an explanation for decision fiascoes that reflects recent theoretical trends and was developed in response to a growing body of research that has failed to substantiate the groupthink model (Janis, 1982). In this new framework, the lack of vigilance and preference for risk that characterizes groups contaminated by groupthink are attributed in large part to perceptions of collective efficacy that unduly exceed capability. High collective efficacy may also contribute to the negative framing of decisions and to certain administrative and structural organizational faults. In the making of critical decisions, these factors induce a preference for risk and a powerful concurrence seeking tendency that, facilitated by group polarization, crystallize around a decision option that is likely to fail. Implications for research and some evidence in support of this approach to the groupthink phenomenon are also discussed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  20. Collective behavior of asperities as a model for friction and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan

    Understanding friction and adhesion in static and sliding contact of surfaces is important in numerous physical phenomena and technological applications. Most surfaces are rough at the microscale, and thus the real area of contact is only a fraction of the nominal area. The macroscopic frictional and adhesive response is determined by the collective behavior of the population of evolving and interacting microscopic contacts. This collective behavior can be very different from the behavior of individual contacts. It is thus important to understand how the macroscopic response emerges from the microscopic one. In this thesis, we develop a theoretical and computational framework to study the collective behavior. Our philosophy is to assume a simple behavior of a single asperity and study the collective response of an ensemble. Our work bridges the existing well-developed studies of single asperities with phenomenological laws that describe macroscopic rate-and-state behavior of frictional interfaces. We find that many aspects of the macroscopic behavior are robust with respect to the microscopic response. This explains why qualitatively similar frictional features are seen for a diverse range of materials. We first show that the collective response of an ensemble of one-dimensional independent viscoelastic elements interacting through a mean field reproduces many qualitative features of static and sliding friction evolution. The resulting macroscopic behavior is different from the microscopic one: for example, even if each contact is velocity-strengthening, the macroscopic behavior can be velocity-weakening. The framework is then extended to incorporate three-dimensional rough surfaces, long- range elastic interactions between contacts, and time-dependent material behaviors such as viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity. Interestingly, the mean field behavior dominates and the elastic interactions, though important from a quantitative perspective, do not change the

  1. The development of empirical models to evaluate energy use and energy cost in wastewater collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, David Morgan

    This research introduces a unique data analysis method and develops empirical models to evaluate energy use and energy cost in wastewater collection systems using operational variables. From these models, several Best Management Processes (BMPs) are identified that should benefit utilities and positively impact the operation of existing infrastructure as well as the design of new infrastructure. Further, the conclusions generated herein display high transferability to certain manufacturing processes. Therefore, it is anticipated that these findings will also benefit pumping applications outside of the water sector. Wastewater treatment is often the single largest expense at the local government level. Not surprisingly, significant research effort has been expended on examining the energy used in wastewater treatment. However, the energy used in wastewater collection systems remains underexplored despite significant potential for energy savings. Estimates place potential energy savings as high as 60% within wastewater collection; which, if applied across the United States equates to the energy used by nearly 125,000 American homes. Employing three years of data from Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the largest wastewater utility in the Upstate of South Carolina, this study aims to develop useful empirical equations that will allow utilities to efficiently evaluate the energy use and energy cost of its wastewater collection system. ReWa's participation was motivated, in part, by their recent adoption of the United States Environmental Protection Agency "Effective Utility Strategies" within which exists a focus on energy management. The study presented herein identifies two primary variables related to the energy use and cost associated with wastewater collection: Specific Energy (Es) and Specific Cost (Cs). These two variables were found to rely primarily on the volume pumped by the individual pump stations and exhibited similar power functions for the three year

  2. A Mathematical Model of Collective Cell Migration in a Three-Dimensional, Heterogeneous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stonko, David P.; Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle; Peercy, Bradford E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is essential in animal development, homeostasis, and disease progression, but many questions remain unanswered about how this process is controlled. While many kinds of individual cell movements have been characterized, less effort has been directed towards understanding how clusters of cells migrate collectively through heterogeneous, cellular environments. To explore this, we have focused on the migration of the border cells during Drosophila egg development. In this case, a cluster of different cell types coalesce and traverse as a group between large cells, called nurse cells, in the center of the egg chamber. We have developed a new model for this collective cell migration based on the forces of adhesion, repulsion, migration and stochastic fluctuation to generate the movement of discrete cells. We implement the model using Identical Math Cells, or IMCs. IMCs can each represent one biological cell of the system, or can be aggregated using increased adhesion forces to model the dynamics of larger biological cells. The domain of interest is filled with IMCs, each assigned specific biophysical properties to mimic a diversity of cell types. Using this system, we have successfully simulated the migration of the border cell cluster through an environment filled with larger cells, which represent nurse cells. Interestingly, our simulations suggest that the forces utilized in this model are sufficient to produce behaviors of the cluster that are observed in vivo, such as rotation. Our framework was developed to capture a heterogeneous cell population, and our implementation strategy allows for diverse, but precise, initial position specification over a three- dimensional domain. Therefore, we believe that this model will be useful for not only examining aspects of Drosophila oogenesis, but also for modeling other two or three-dimensional systems that have multiple cell types and where investigating the forces between cells is of interest. PMID:25875645

  3. Modeling the Emergence of Modular Leadership Hierarchy During the Collective Motion of Herds Made of Harems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozogány, Katalin; Vicsek, Tamás

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious animals need to make collective decisions in order to keep their cohesiveness. Several species of them live in multilevel societies, and form herds composed of smaller communities. We present a model for the development of a leadership hierarchy in a herd consisting of loosely connected sub-groups (e.g. harems) by combining self organization and social dynamics. It starts from unfamiliar individuals without relationships and reproduces the emergence of a hierarchical and modular leadership network that promotes an effective spreading of the decisions from more capable individuals to the others, and thus gives rise to a beneficial collective decision. Our results stemming from the model are in a good agreement with our observations of a Przewalski horse herd (Hortobágy, Hungary). We find that the harem-leader to harem-member ratio observed in Przewalski horses corresponds to an optimal network in this approach regarding common success, and that the observed and modeled harem size distributions are close to a lognormal.

  4. Spatio-temporal correlations in models of collective motion ruled by different dynamical laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Conti, Daniele; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S.; Melillo, Stefania; Viale, Massimiliano

    2016-12-01

    Information transfer is an essential factor in determining the robustness of biological systems with distributed control. The most direct way to study the mechanisms ruling information transfer is to experimentally observe the propagation across the system of a signal triggered by some perturbation. However, this method may be inefficient for experiments in the field, as the possibilities to perturb the system are limited and empirical observations must rely on natural events. An alternative approach is to use spatio-temporal correlations to probe the information transfer mechanism directly from the spontaneous fluctuations of the system, without the need to have an actual propagating signal on record. Here we test this method on models of collective behaviour in their deeply ordered phase by using ground truth data provided by numerical simulations in three dimensions. We compare two models characterized by very different dynamical equations and information transfer mechanisms: the classic Vicsek model, describing an overdamped noninertial dynamics and the inertial spin model, characterized by an underdamped inertial dynamics. By using dynamic finite-size scaling, we show that spatio-temporal correlations are able to distinguish unambiguously the diffusive information transfer mechanism of the Vicsek model from the linear mechanism of the inertial spin model.

  5. Crises and Collective Socio-Economic Phenomena: Simple Models and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Financial and economic history is strewn with bubbles and crashes, booms and busts, crises and upheavals of all sorts. Understanding the origin of these events is arguably one of the most important problems in economic theory. In this paper, we review recent efforts to include heterogeneities and interactions in models of decision. We argue that the so-called Random Field Ising model ( rfim) provides a unifying framework to account for many collective socio-economic phenomena that lead to sudden ruptures and crises. We discuss different models that can capture potentially destabilizing self-referential feedback loops, induced either by herding, i.e. reference to peers, or trending, i.e. reference to the past, and that account for some of the phenomenology missing in the standard models. We discuss some empirically testable predictions of these models, for example robust signatures of rfim-like herding effects, or the logarithmic decay of spatial correlations of voting patterns. One of the most striking result, inspired by statistical physics methods, is that Adam Smith's invisible hand can fail badly at solving simple coordination problems. We also insist on the issue of time-scales, that can be extremely long in some cases, and prevent socially optimal equilibria from being reached. As a theoretical challenge, the study of so-called "detailed-balance" violating decision rules is needed to decide whether conclusions based on current models (that all assume detailed-balance) are indeed robust and generic.

  6. Hamiltonian Lattice Studies of Pionic Collective Excitations in the Non-linear Sigma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Siu A.

    2001-04-01

    The latticization of the non-linear sigma model reduces a chiral meson field theory to an O(4) spin system with quantum fluctuations. By solving the resulting lattice Hamiltonian by Monte Carlo methods, the dynamics and thermodynamics of pions can be determined non-perturbatively. In particular, the mas gap of pionic collective excitations with quantum number of vector mesons can be determined as the chiral phase transition is approached. Results based on a newly discovered 4th order method of solving for the ground state of a quantum many-body Hamitonian will be presented.

  7. Collective states of odd nuclei in a model with quadrupole-octupole degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Minkov, N. Drenska, S. B.; Yotov, P.; Bonatsos, D. Scheid, W.

    2007-08-15

    We apply the collective axial quadrupole-octupole Hamiltonian to describe the rotation-vibration motion of odd nuclei with Coriolis coupling between the even-even core and the unpaired nucleon.We consider that the core oscillates coherently with respect to the quadrupole and octupole axialdeformation variables. The coupling between the core and the unpaired nucleon provides a split paritydoublet structure of the spectrum. The formalism successfully reproduces the parity-doublet splitting in a wide range of odd-A nuclei. It provides model estimations for the third angular-momentum projection K on the intrinsic symmetry axis and the related intrinsic nuclear structure.

  8. Computation of the memory functions in the generalized Langevin models for collective dynamics of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minxin; Li, Xiantao; Liu, Chun

    2014-08-14

    We present a numerical method to approximate the memory functions in the generalized Langevin models for the collective dynamics of macromolecules. We first derive the exact expressions of the memory functions, obtained from projection to subspaces that correspond to the selection of coarse-grain variables. In particular, the memory functions are expressed in the forms of matrix functions, which will then be approximated by Krylov-subspace methods. It will also be demonstrated that the random noise can be approximated under the same framework, and the second fluctuation-dissipation theorem is automatically satisfied. The accuracy of the method is examined through several numerical examples.

  9. Technique of right lymphatic duct cannulation for pulmonary lymph collection in an acute porcine model.

    PubMed

    Chuang, G J; Gao, C X; Mulder, D S; Chiu, R C

    1986-12-01

    The pig is an increasingly preferred model for biomedical research, including studies for pulmonary pathophysiology. However, in piglets, the technique for cannulating the right lymphatic duct, which is subject to more anatomical variations and technically more demanding than that in dogs, has not been described. Our technique evolved to enable this collection of porcine lung lymph in acute experiments. The lymphatic ampulla is cannulated via one of the cervical lymphatics. The right lymphatic duct is invariably dorsal to the cranial vena cava and classically leads to the lymphatic ampulla. Yet in 18% of our pigs, cannulation was difficult or not feasible because the lymphatic duct either drained directly into the cranial vena cava at a distance from the lymphatic ampulla, or into the axillary lymph node of the first rib or the caudal deep cervical lymph nodes. Gently squeezing back regurgitated blood in the lymphatic ampulla before tying the suture and frequently withdrawing lymph with a syringe when the flow is small enabled us to collect clear lymph, usually immediately after completing the cannulation. The rate of lymph flow varied widely (1.7 +/- 0.6 ml/hr) and increased when the left atrial pressure was raised. The lymph protein was 2.8 +/- 0.2 g% with lymph/plasma protein ratio at 0.55 +/- 0.04. The anatomical variations encountered in our 34 dissections, as well as the technical maneuvers found to be useful in the successful cannulation and collection of the porcine lung lymph, are described in detail.

  10. Optimizing Numerical Modeling and Field Data Collection in an Interdisciplinary Study of Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, R. T.; Wood, T. M.; Gartner, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    collection network for the summer 2005 field season. Up to five wind anemometers have been installed around the lake to define the spatial variability of the wind field, and five ADCPs have been deployed in the lake to capture essential circulation features. The water quality monitoring network has been extended to cover the entire UKL, and monitoring stations have been placed at locations that will optimize the observation of important temporal and spatial variability in water quality as indicated by the circulation patterns predicted by the numerical model. The 2005 field data set will be used to refine the numerical hydrodynamic model upon which water quality modeling modules will be built. This case study demonstrated the use of field data to support numerical model implementation, and then the use of the numerical model results to improve the next cycle of field data collection. This loop optimizes the implementation of the numerical model and the effectiveness of field data collection.

  11. Critical Comparison of Information Models used by US Water Data Collection Agencies and Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.; Whitenack, T.

    2009-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project has been working to simply access to repositories of hydrologic information by developing information models, and data exchange standards. We are presently working with international community through the Open GIS Consortium to create standard that uses hydrologic semantics to communicate time series. As part of the process to create a water data exchange language, we reviewed the information structures that are presently being used by several agencies to define the requirements of the data model. In the US, federal agencies, the USGS and US EPA, collect and distribute information that is utilized by scientists in the hydrologic sciences. We determined that there are two orthogonal information sets utilized; observation data, such as stream gauge and temperature data, and water quality data, such as analytical chemistry analyses. While the data values can be represented in a time series in a common manner, the process used to collect and manage the information represent separate information sets. For continuous observations an organization manages information single point location, are managed as a set of data streams from instruments that produce a set of observations that are processed into a set of public data. For analytical data, and organization collects information as part of a project, which has a set of collection locations; at each location, a set of methods is used to collect samples, which are analyzed to produce water quality information. While the details of the observations between the two information sets differ, a common set of information can be conveyed as a time series. The CUAHSI Observations Data Model (ODM), a core set of information can be represented as “data value”: variable, location, date & time, value, units, quality control level (QCL), source, and method. The ODM also included optional attributes that are associated with a data value such as qualifier, accuracy, sample medium

  12. Activated sludge rheology: a critical review on data collection and modelling.

    PubMed

    Ratkovich, N; Horn, W; Helmus, F P; Rosenberger, S; Naessens, W; Nopens, I; Bentzen, T R

    2013-02-01

    Rheological behaviour is an important fluid property that severely impacts its flow behaviour and many aspects related to this. In the case of activated sludge, the apparent viscosity has an influence on e.g. pumping, hydrodynamics, mass transfer rates, sludge-water separation (settling and filtration). It therefore is an important property related to process performance, including process economics. To account for this, rheological behaviour is being included in process design, necessitating its measurement. However, measurements and corresponding protocols in literature are quite diverse, leading to varying results and conclusions. In this paper, a vast amount of papers are critically reviewed with respect to this and important flaws are highlighted with respect to rheometer choice, rheometer settings and measurement protocol. The obtained rheograms from experimental efforts have frequently been used to build viscosity models. However, this is not that straightforward and a lot of errors can be detected with respect to good modelling practice, including fair model selection criteria, qualitative parameter estimations and proper model validation. These important steps are however recurrently violated, severely affecting the model reliability and predictive power. This is illustrated with several examples. In conclusion, dedicated research is required to improve the rheological measurements and the models derived from them. At this moment, there is no guidance with respect to proper rheological measurements. Moreover, the rheological models are not very trustworthy and remain very "black box". More insight in the physical background needs to be gained. A model-based approach with dedicated experimental data collection is the key to address this.

  13. A computer code for calculations in the algebraic collective model of the atomic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, T. A.; Rowe, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    A Maple code is presented for algebraic collective model (ACM) calculations. The ACM is an algebraic version of the Bohr model of the atomic nucleus, in which all required matrix elements are derived by exploiting the model's SU(1 , 1) × SO(5) dynamical group. This paper reviews the mathematical formulation of the ACM, and serves as a manual for the code. The code enables a wide range of model Hamiltonians to be analysed. This range includes essentially all Hamiltonians that are rational functions of the model's quadrupole moments qˆM and are at most quadratic in the corresponding conjugate momenta πˆN (- 2 ≤ M , N ≤ 2). The code makes use of expressions for matrix elements derived elsewhere and newly derived matrix elements of the operators [ π ˆ ⊗ q ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] 0 and [ π ˆ ⊗ π ˆ ] LM. The code is made efficient by use of an analytical expression for the needed SO(5)-reduced matrix elements, and use of SO(5) ⊃ SO(3) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients obtained from precomputed data files provided with the code.

  14. Modeling the emergence of language as an embodied collective cognitive activity.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Edwin; Johnson, Christine M

    2009-07-01

    Two decades of attempts to model the emergence of language as a collective cognitive activity have demonstrated a number of principles that might have been part of the historical process that led to language. Several models have demonstrated the emergence of structure in a symbolic medium, but none has demonstrated the emergence of the capacity for symbolic representation. The current shift in cognitive science toward theoretical frameworks based on embodiment is already furnishing computational models with additional mechanisms relevant to the emergence of symbolic language. An analysis of embodied interaction among captive, but not human-enculturated, bonobo chimpanzees reveals a number of additional features of embodiment that are relevant to the emergence of symbolic language, but that have not yet been explored in computational simulation models; for example, complementarity of action in addition to imitation, iconic in addition to indexical gesture, coordination among multiple sensory and perceptual modalities, and the orchestration of intra- and inter-individual motor coordination. The bonobos provide an evolutionarily plausible intermediate stage in the development of symbolic expression that can inform efforts to model the emergence of symbolic language.

  15. An adaptive scheduling model for a multi-agent based VEPR data collection actions.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Marques, Pedro; Jácome, Jorge; Hilário-Patriarca, José; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    With the purpose of improving the access to departmental legacy information systems, a multi agent based Virtual Electronic Patient Record (VEPR) was deployed at a major Portuguese Hospital. The agent module (MAID) is in charge of identifying new data produced (reports), collecting and making it available through an integrated web interface. The deployed MAID system uses a static interval for checking the existence of new data, however from the gathered data regarding each department data production it is observable a variable rate throughout the day. In order to address this variability an adaptive model was developed and tested in a simulated environment with real data. The model takes in consideration the past report production profiles for determining a variable query frequency in order to reduce the average time to make data available minimizing the number of departmental requests.

  16. Kinetic models of collective decision-making in the presence of equality bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Lorenzo; Vellucci, Pierluigi; Zanella, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    We introduce and discuss kinetic models describing the influence of the competence in the evolution of decisions in a multi-agent system. The original exchange mechanism, which is based on the human tendency to compromise and change opinion through self-thinking, is here modified to include the role of the agents' competence. In particular, we take into account the agents' tendency to behave in the same way as if they were as good, or as bad, as their partner: the so-called equality bias. This occurred in a situation where a wide gap separated the competence of group members. We discuss the main properties of the kinetic models and numerically investigate some examples of collective decision under the influence of the equality bias. The results confirm that the equality bias leads the group to suboptimal decisions.

  17. A data collection scheme for identification of parameters in a driver model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooring, B. W.; Mcdermott, M.; Su, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A high gain steering controller to compensate for limitations in a handicapped driver's range of motion is employed when adapting vehicle to his use. A driver/vehicle system can become unstable as vehicle speed is increased, therefore it is desirable to use a computer simulation of the driver/vehicle combination as a design tool to investigate the system response prior to construction of a controller and road testing. Unknown driver parameters must be identified prior to use of the model for system analysis. A means to collect the data necessary for identification of these driver model parameters without extensive instrumentation of a vehicle to measure and record vehicle states is addressed. Initial tests of the procedure identified all of the driver parameters with errors of 6% or less.

  18. A Mechanistic Collective Cell Model for Epithelial Colony Growth and Contact Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Aland, Sebastian; Hatzikirou, Haralambos; Lowengrub, John; Voigt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    We present a mechanistic hybrid continuum-discrete model to simulate the dynamics of epithelial cell colonies. Collective cell dynamics are modeled using continuum equations that capture plastic, viscoelastic, and elastic deformations in the clusters while providing single-cell resolution. The continuum equations can be viewed as a coarse-grained version of previously developed discrete models that treat epithelial clusters as a two-dimensional network of vertices or stochastic interacting particles and follow the framework of dynamic density functional theory appropriately modified to account for cell size and shape variability. The discrete component of the model implements cell division and thus influences cell size and shape that couple to the continuum component. The model is validated against recent in vitro studies of epithelial cell colonies using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In good agreement with experiments, we find that mechanical interactions and constraints on the local expansion of cell size cause inhibition of cell motion and reductive cell division. This leads to successively smaller cells and a transition from exponential to quadratic growth of the colony that is associated with a constant-thickness rim of growing cells at the cluster edge, as well as the emergence of short-range ordering and solid-like behavior. A detailed analysis of the model reveals a scale invariance of the growth and provides insight into the generation of stresses and their influence on the dynamics of the colonies. Compared to previous models, our approach has several advantages: it is independent of dimension, it can be parameterized using classical elastic properties (Poisson’s ratio and Young’s modulus), and it can easily be extended to incorporate multiple cell types and general substrate geometries. PMID:26445436

  19. Rooftop dew, fog and rain collection in southwest Morocco and predictive dew modeling using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekouch, Imad; Lekouch, Khalid; Muselli, Marc; Mongruel, Anne; Kabbachi, Belkacem; Beysens, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    SummaryTwo coastal sites were investigated in an arid region of southwest Morocco to determine the amount of dew, fog and rain that could be collected from rooftops for household use. Systematic measurements were performed in Mirleft (43 m asl, 200 m from the coast) for 1 year (May 1, 2007 to April 30, 2008) and in Id Ouasskssou (240 m asl, 8 km from the coast) for three summer months (July 1, 2007 to September 30, 2007). Dew water was collected using standard passive dew condensers and fog water by utilizing planar fog collectors. The wind flow was simulated on the rooftop to establish the location of the fog collector. At both sites, dew yields and, to a lesser extent, fog water yields, were found to be significant in comparison to rain events. Mirleft had 178 dew events (48.6% of the year, 18 ± 2 L m-2 cumulated amount) and 20 fog episodes (5.5% of the year, 1.4 L m-2 with uncertainty -0.2/+0.4 L m-2 cumulated amount), corresponding to almost 40% of the yearly rain contribution (31 rain events, 8.5% of the year, 49 ± 7 mm cumulated amount). At Id Ouasskssou there were 50 dew events (7.1 ± 0.3 L m-2, 54.3% frequency), 16 fog events (6.5 L m-2 with uncertainty -0.1/+1.8 L m-2, 17.4% frequency) and six rain events (16 ± 2 mm, 6.5% frequency). Meteorological data (air and dew point temperature and/or relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, cloud cover) were recorded continuously at Mirleft to assess the influence of local meteorological conditions on dew and fog formation. Using the set of collected data, a new model for dew yield prediction based on artificial neural networks was developed and tested for the Mirleft site. This model was then extrapolated to 15 major cities in Morocco to assess their potential for dew water collection. It was found that the location of the cities with respect to the Atlas mountain chain, which controls the circulation of the humid marine air, is the main factor that influences dew production.

  20. Ottawa's urban forest: A geospatial approach to data collection for the UFORE/i-Tree Eco ecosystem services valuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael D.

    The i-Tree Eco model, developed by the U.S. Forest Service, is commonly used to estimate the value of the urban forest and the ecosystem services trees provide. The model relies on field-based measurements to estimate ecosystem service values. However, the methods for collecting the field data required for the model can be extensive and costly for large areas, and data collection can thus be a barrier to implementing the model for many cities. This study investigated the use of geospatial technologies as a means to collect urban forest structure measurements within the City of Ottawa, Ontario. Results show that geospatial data collection methods can serve as a proxy for urban forest structure parameters required by i-Tree Eco. Valuations using the geospatial approach are shown to be less accurate than those developed from field-based data, but significantly less expensive. Planners must weigh the limitations of either approach when planning assessment projects.

  1. Distribution models for koalas in South Australia using citizen science-collected data.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Ana M M; Roetman, Philip E J; Daniels, Christopher B; Baker, Andrew K; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2014-06-01

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) occurs in the eucalypt forests of eastern and southern Australia and is currently threatened by habitat fragmentation, climate change, sexually transmitted diseases, and low genetic variability throughout most of its range. Using data collected during the Great Koala Count (a 1-day citizen science project in the state of South Australia), we developed generalized linear mixed-effects models to predict habitat suitability across South Australia accounting for potential errors associated with the dataset. We derived spatial environmental predictors for vegetation (based on dominant species of Eucalyptus or other vegetation), topographic water features, rain, elevation, and temperature range. We also included predictors accounting for human disturbance based on transport infrastructure (sealed and unsealed roads). We generated random pseudo-absences to account for the high prevalence bias typical of citizen-collected data. We accounted for biased sampling effort along sealed and unsealed roads by including an offset for distance to transport infrastructures. The model with the highest statistical support (wAIC c ∼ 1) included all variables except rain, which was highly correlated with elevation. The same model also explained the highest deviance (61.6%), resulted in high R (2)(m) (76.4) and R (2)(c) (81.0), and had a good performance according to Cohen's κ (0.46). Cross-validation error was low (∼ 0.1). Temperature range, elevation, and rain were the best predictors of koala occurrence. Our models predict high habitat suitability in Kangaroo Island, along the Mount Lofty Ranges, and at the tips of the Eyre, Yorke and Fleurieu Peninsulas. In the highest-density region (5576 km(2)) of the Adelaide-Mount Lofty Ranges, a density-suitability relationship predicts a population of 113,704 (95% confidence interval: 27,685-199,723; average density = 5.0-35.8 km(-2)). We demonstrate the power of citizen science data for predicting species

  2. Study on collection efficiency of fission products by spray: Experimental device and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, D.; Roblot, D.; Vendel, J.; Billarand, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Consequences of an hypothetical overheating reactor accident in nuclear power plants can be limited by spraying cold water drops into containment building. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam and leads to the washout of fission products (aerosols and gaseous iodine). The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. An experimental device (named CARAIDAS) was designed and built in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols and iodine absorption by drops with representative conditions of post-accident atmosphere. This experimental device is presented in the paper and more particularly: (1) the experimental enclosure in which representative thermodynamic conditions can be achieved, (2) the monosized drops generator, the drops diameter measurement and the drops collector, (3) the cesium iodide aerosols generator and the aerosols measurements. Modelling of steam condensation on drops aerosols collection and iodine absorption are described. First experimental and code results on drops and aerosols behaviour are compared. 8 refs., 18 figs.

  3. Data Collection Handbook to Support Modeling Impacts of Radioactive Material in Soil and Building Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Charley; Kamboj, Sunita; Wang, Cheng; Cheng, Jing-Jy

    2015-09-01

    This handbook is an update of the 1993 version of the Data Collection Handbook and the Radionuclide Transfer Factors Report to support modeling the impact of radioactive material in soil. Many new parameters have been added to the RESRAD Family of Codes, and new measurement methodologies are available. A detailed review of available parameter databases was conducted in preparation of this new handbook. This handbook is a companion document to the user manuals when using the RESRAD (onsite) and RESRAD-OFFSITE code. It can also be used for RESRAD-BUILD code because some of the building-related parameters are included in this handbook. The RESRAD (onsite) has been developed for implementing U.S. Department of Energy Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines. Hydrogeological, meteorological, geochemical, geometrical (size, area, depth), crops and livestock, human intake, source characteristic, and building characteristic parameters are used in the RESRAD (onsite) code. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code is an extension of the RESRAD (onsite) code and can also model the transport of radionuclides to locations outside the footprint of the primary contamination. This handbook discusses parameter definitions, typical ranges, variations, and measurement methodologies. It also provides references for sources of additional information. Although this handbook was developed primarily to support the application of RESRAD Family of Codes, the discussions and values are valid for use of other pathway analysis models and codes.

  4. Geostatistical Modeling of Malaria Endemicity using Serological Indicators of Exposure Collected through School Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Ruth A.; Kefyalew, Takele; Rand, Alison; Sime, Heven; Assefa, Ashenafi; Mekasha, Addis; Edosa, Wasihun; Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Cano, Jorge; Teka, Hiwot; Reithinger, Richard; Pullan, Rachel L.; Drakeley, Chris J.; Brooker, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethiopia has a diverse ecology and geography resulting in spatial and temporal variation in malaria transmission. Evidence-based strategies are thus needed to monitor transmission intensity and target interventions. A purposive selection of dried blood spots collected during cross-sectional school-based surveys in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, were tested for presence of antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax antigens. Spatially explicit binomial models of seroprevalence were created for each species using a Bayesian framework, and used to predict seroprevalence at 5 km resolution across Oromia. School seroprevalence showed a wider prevalence range than microscopy for both P. falciparum (0–50% versus 0–12.7%) and P. vivax (0–53.7% versus 0–4.5%), respectively. The P. falciparum model incorporated environmental predictors and spatial random effects, while P. vivax seroprevalence first-order trends were not adequately explained by environmental variables, and a spatial smoothing model was developed. This is the first demonstration of serological indicators being used to detect large-scale heterogeneity in malaria transmission using samples from cross-sectional school-based surveys. The findings support the incorporation of serological indicators into periodic large-scale surveillance such as Malaria Indicator Surveys, and with particular utility for low transmission and elimination settings. PMID:25962770

  5. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Vittone, Ettore; Pastuovic, Zeljko; Breese, Mark B. H.; ...

    2016-02-08

    This study investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and themore » charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.« less

  6. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Vittone, Ettore; Pastuovic, Zeljko; Breese, Mark B. H.; Lopez, Javier Garicia; Jaksic, Milko; Raisanen, Jyrki; Siegele, Rainer; Simon, Aliz; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2016-02-08

    This study investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  7. Emergence of cluster structures and collectivity within a no-core shell-model framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launey, K. D.; Dreyfuss, A. C.; Draayer, J. P.; Dytrych, T.; Baker, R.

    2014-12-01

    An innovative symmetry-guided concept, which capitalizes on partial as well as exact symmetries that underpin the structure of nuclei, is discussed. Within this framework, ab initio applications of the theory to light nuclei reveal the origin of collective modes and the emergence a simple orderly pattern from first principles. This provides a strategy for determining the nature of bound states of nuclei in terms of a relatively small fraction of the complete shell-model space, which, in turn, can be used to explore ultra-large model spaces for a description of alpha-cluster and highly deformed structures together with the associated rotations. We find that by using only a fraction of the model space extended far beyond current no-core shell-model limits and a long-range interaction that respects the symmetries in play, the outcome reproduces characteristic features of the low-lying 0+ states in 12 C (including the elusive Hoyle state and its 2+ excitation) and agrees with ab initio results in smaller spaces. This is achieved by selecting those particle configurations and components of the interaction found to be foremost responsible for the primary physics governing clustering phenomena and large spatial deformation in the ground-state and Hoyle-state rotational bands of 12 C. For these states, we offer a novel perspective emerging out of no-core shell-model considerations, including a discussion of associated nuclear deformation, matter radii, and density distribution. The framework we find is also extensible to negative-parity states (e.g., the 3-1 state in 12C) and beyond, namely, to the low-lying 0+ states of 8Be as well as the ground-state rotational band of Ne, Mg, and Si isotopes. The findings inform key features of the nuclear interaction and point to a new insight into the formation of highly-organized simple patterns in nuclear dynamics.

  8. Using a communication model to collect measurement data through mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Bravo, José; Villarreal, Vladimir; Hervás, Ramón; Urzaiz, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Wireless systems and services have undergone remarkable development since the first mobile phone system was introduced in the early 1980s. The use of sensors in an Ambient Intelligence approach is a great solution in a medical environment. We define a communication architecture to facilitate the information transfer between all connected devices. This model is based in layers to allow the collection of measurement data to be used in our framework monitoring architecture. An overlay-based solution is built between network elements in order to provide an efficient and highly functional communication platform that allows the connection of a wide variety of devices and technologies, and serves also to perform additional functions such as the possibility to perform some processing in the network that may help to improve overall performance.

  9. Multiscale modelling and analysis of collective decision making in swarm robotics.

    PubMed

    Vigelius, Matthias; Meyer, Bernd; Pascoe, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describing certain types of collective decision making in swarm robotics that bridges from a microscopic individual-based description to aggregate properties. Our approach encompasses robot swarm experiments, microscopic and probabilistic macroscopic-discrete simulations as well as an analytic mathematical model. Following up on previous work, we identify the symmetry parameter, a measure of the progress of the swarm towards a decision, as a fundamental integrated swarm property and formulate its time evolution as a continuous-time Markov process. Contrary to previous work, which justified this approach only empirically and a posteriori, we justify it from first principles and derive hard limits on the parameter regime in which it is applicable.

  10. Using a Communication Model to Collect Measurement Data through Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, José; Villarreal, Vladimir; Hervás, Ramón; Urzaiz, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Wireless systems and services have undergone remarkable development since the first mobile phone system was introduced in the early 1980s. The use of sensors in an Ambient Intelligence approach is a great solution in a medical environment. We define a communication architecture to facilitate the information transfer between all connected devices. This model is based in layers to allow the collection of measurement data to be used in our framework monitoring architecture. An overlay-based solution is built between network elements in order to provide an efficient and highly functional communication platform that allows the connection of a wide variety of devices and technologies, and serves also to perform additional functions such as the possibility to perform some processing in the network that may help to improve overall performance. PMID:23012542

  11. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  12. Efficient Data Collection and Event Boundary Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Tiny Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Kraig; Nittel, Silvia

    Using wireless geosensor networks (WGSN), sensor nodes often monitor a phenomenon that is both continuous in time and space. However, sensor nodes take discrete samples, and an analytical framework inside or outside the WSN is used to analyze the phenomenon. In both cases, expensive communication is used to stream a large number of data samples to other nodes and to the base station. In this work, we explore a novel alternative that utilizes predictive process knowledge of the observed phenomena to minimize upstream communication. Often, observed phenomena adhere to a process with predictable behavior over time. We present a strategy for developing and running so-called 'tiny models' on individual sensor nodes that capture the predictable behavior of the phenomenon; nodes now only communicate when unexpected events are observed. Using multiple simulations, we demonstrate that a significant percentage of messages can be reduced during data collection.

  13. Standardized data collection to build prediction models in oncology: a prototype for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Meldolesi, Elisa; van Soest, Johan; Damiani, Andrea; Dekker, Andre; Alitto, Anna Rita; Campitelli, Maura; Dinapoli, Nicola; Gatta, Roberto; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Lanzotti, Vito; Lambin, Philippe; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The advances in diagnostic and treatment technology are responsible for a remarkable transformation in the internal medicine concept with the establishment of a new idea of personalized medicine. Inter- and intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and the clinical outcome and/or treatment's toxicity's complexity, justify the effort to develop predictive models from decision support systems. However, the number of evaluated variables coming from multiple disciplines: oncology, computer science, bioinformatics, statistics, genomics, imaging, among others could be very large thus making traditional statistical analysis difficult to exploit. Automated data-mining processes and machine learning approaches can be a solution to organize the massive amount of data, trying to unravel important interaction. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strategy to collect and analyze data properly for decision support and introduce the concept of an 'umbrella protocol' within the framework of 'rapid learning healthcare'.

  14. Bias correction in species distribution models: pooling survey and collection data for multiple species

    PubMed Central

    Fithian, William; Elith, Jane; Hastie, Trevor; Keith, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Presence-only records may provide data on the distributions of rare species, but commonly suffer from large, unknown biases due to their typically haphazard collection schemes. Presence–absence or count data collected in systematic, planned surveys are more reliable but typically less abundant.We proposed a probabilistic model to allow for joint analysis of presence-only and survey data to exploit their complementary strengths. Our method pools presence-only and presence–absence data for many species and maximizes a joint likelihood, simultaneously estimating and adjusting for the sampling bias affecting the presence-only data. By assuming that the sampling bias is the same for all species, we can borrow strength across species to efficiently estimate the bias and improve our inference from presence-only data.We evaluate our model’s performance on data for 36 eucalypt species in south-eastern Australia. We find that presence-only records exhibit a strong sampling bias towards the coast and towards Sydney, the largest city. Our data-pooling technique substantially improves the out-of-sample predictive performance of our model when the amount of available presence–absence data for a given species is scarceIf we have only presence-only data and no presence–absence data for a given species, but both types of data for several other species that suffer from the same spatial sampling bias, then our method can obtain an unbiased estimate of the first species’ geographic range. PMID:27840673

  15. Collecting Protein Biomarkers in Breath Using Electret Filters: A Preliminary Method on New Technical Model and Human Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Pi, Xitian; Qiao, Panpan; Liu, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers in exhaled breath are useful for respiratory disease diagnosis in human volunteers. Conventional methods that collect non-volatile biomarkers, however, necessitate an extensive dilution and sanitation processes that lowers collection efficiencies and convenience of use. Electret filter emerged in recent decade to collect virus biomarkers in exhaled breath given its simplicity and effectiveness. To investigate the capability of electret filters to collect protein biomarkers, a model that consists of an atomizer that produces protein aerosol and an electret filter that collects albumin and carcinoembryonic antigen-a typical biomarker in lung cancer development- from the atomizer is developed. A device using electret filter as the collecting medium is designed to collect human albumin from exhaled breath of 6 volunteers. Comparison of the collecting ability between the electret filter method and other 2 reported methods is finally performed based on the amounts of albumin collected from human exhaled breath. In conclusion, a decreasing collection efficiency ranging from 17.6% to 2.3% for atomized albumin aerosol and 42% to 12.5% for atomized carcinoembryonic antigen particles is found; moreover, an optimum volume of sampling human exhaled breath ranging from 100 L to 200 L is also observed; finally, the self-designed collecting device shows a significantly better performance in collecting albumin from human exhaled breath than the exhaled breath condensate method (p<0.05) but is not significantly more effective than reported 3-stage impactor method (p>0.05). In summary, electret filters are potential in collecting non-volatile biomarkers in human exhaled breath not only because it was simpler, cheaper and easier to use than traditional methods but also for its better collecting performance.

  16. Collecting Protein Biomarkers in Breath Using Electret Filters: A Preliminary Method on New Technical Model and Human Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang; Pi, Xitian; Qiao, Panpan; Liu, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers in exhaled breath are useful for respiratory disease diagnosis in human volunteers. Conventional methods that collect non-volatile biomarkers, however, necessitate an extensive dilution and sanitation processes that lowers collection efficiencies and convenience of use. Electret filter emerged in recent decade to collect virus biomarkers in exhaled breath given its simplicity and effectiveness. To investigate the capability of electret filters to collect protein biomarkers, a model that consists of an atomizer that produces protein aerosol and an electret filter that collects albumin and carcinoembryonic antigen-a typical biomarker in lung cancer development- from the atomizer is developed. A device using electret filter as the collecting medium is designed to collect human albumin from exhaled breath of 6 volunteers. Comparison of the collecting ability between the electret filter method and other 2 reported methods is finally performed based on the amounts of albumin collected from human exhaled breath. In conclusion, a decreasing collection efficiency ranging from 17.6% to 2.3% for atomized albumin aerosol and 42% to 12.5% for atomized carcinoembryonic antigen particles is found; moreover, an optimum volume of sampling human exhaled breath ranging from 100 L to 200 L is also observed; finally, the self-designed collecting device shows a significantly better performance in collecting albumin from human exhaled breath than the exhaled breath condensate method (p<0.05) but is not significantly more effective than reported 3-stage impactor method (p>0.05). In summary, electret filters are potential in collecting non-volatile biomarkers in human exhaled breath not only because it was simpler, cheaper and easier to use than traditional methods but also for its better collecting performance. PMID:26934615

  17. Universal model for collective access patterns in the Internet traffic dynamics: A superstatistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamazian, A.; Nguyen, V. D.; Markelov, O. A.; Bogachev, M. I.

    2016-07-01

    We suggest a universal phenomenological description for the collective access patterns in the Internet traffic dynamics both at local and wide area network levels that takes into account erratic fluctuations imposed by cooperative user behaviour. Our description is based on the superstatistical approach and leads to the q-exponential inter-session time and session size distributions that are also in perfect agreement with empirical observations. The validity of the proposed description is confirmed explicitly by the analysis of complete 10-day traffic traces from the WIDE backbone link and from the local campus area network downlink from the Internet Service Provider. Remarkably, the same functional forms have been observed in the historic access patterns from single WWW servers. The suggested approach effectively accounts for the complex interplay of both “calm” and “bursty” user access patterns within a single-model setting. It also provides average sojourn time estimates with reasonable accuracy, as indicated by the queuing system performance simulation, this way largely overcoming the failure of Poisson modelling of the Internet traffic dynamics.

  18. Collective behavior and predation success in a predator-prey model inspired by hunting bats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Abaid, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    We establish an agent-based model to study the impact of prey behavior on the hunting success of predators. The predators and prey are modeled as self-propelled particles moving in a three-dimensional domain and subject to specific sensing abilities and behavioral rules inspired by bat hunting. The predators randomly search for prey. The prey either align velocity directions with peers, defined as "interacting" prey, or swarm "independently" of peer presence; both types of prey are subject to additive noise. In a simulation study, we find that interacting prey using low noise have the maximum predation avoidance because they form localized large groups, while they suffer high predation as noise increases due to the formation of broadly dispersed small groups. Independent prey, which are likely to be uniformly distributed in the domain, have higher predation risk under a low noise regime as they traverse larger spatial extents. These effects are enhanced in large prey populations, which exhibit more ordered collective behavior or more uniform spatial distribution as they are interacting or independent, respectively.

  19. Collective behavior and predation success in a predator-prey model inspired by hunting bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Abaid, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    We establish an agent-based model to study the impact of prey behavior on the hunting success of predators. The predators and prey are modeled as self-propelled particles moving in a three-dimensional domain and subject to specific sensing abilities and behavioral rules inspired by bat hunting. The predators randomly search for prey. The prey either align velocity directions with peers, defined as "interacting" prey, or swarm "independently" of peer presence; both types of prey are subject to additive noise. In a simulation study, we find that interacting prey using low noise have the maximum predation avoidance because they form localized large groups, while they suffer high predation as noise increases due to the formation of broadly dispersed small groups. Independent prey, which are likely to be uniformly distributed in the domain, have higher predation risk under a low noise regime as they traverse larger spatial extents. These effects are enhanced in large prey populations, which exhibit more ordered collective behavior or more uniform spatial distribution as they are interacting or independent, respectively.

  20. Modeling the Transitions between Collective and Solitary Migration Phenotypes in Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Lu, Mingyang; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, Jose’ N

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity during cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge. Two key cellular plasticity mechanisms —Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Mesenchymal-to-Amoeboid Transition (MAT) – have been carefully investigated individually, yet a comprehensive understanding of their interconnections remains elusive. Previously, we have modeled the dynamics of the core regulatory circuits for both EMT (miR-200/ZEB/miR-34/SNAIL) and MAT (Rac1/RhoA). We now extend our previous work to study the coupling between these two core circuits by considering the two microRNAs (miR-200 and miR-34) as external signals to the core MAT circuit. We show that this coupled circuit enables four different stable steady states (phenotypes) that correspond to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M), mesenchymal (M), amoeboid (A) and hybrid amoeboid/mesenchymal (A/M) phenotypes. Our model recapitulates the metastasis-suppressing role of the microRNAs even in the presence of EMT-inducing signals like Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). It also enables mapping the microRNA levels to the transitions among various cell migration phenotypes. Finally, it offers a mechanistic understanding for the observed phenotypic transitions among different cell migration phenotypes, specifically the Collective-to-Amoeboid Transition (CAT). PMID:26627083

  1. Risk assessment model to prioritize sewer pipes inspection in wastewater collection networks.

    PubMed

    Anbari, Mohammad Javad; Tabesh, Massoud; Roozbahani, Abbas

    2017-04-01

    In wastewater systems as one of the most important urban infrastructures, the adverse consequences and effects of unsuitable performance and failure event can sometimes lead to disrupt part of a city functioning. By identifying high failure risk areas, inspections can be implemented based on the system status and thus can significantly increase the sewer network performance. In this study, a new risk assessment model is developed to prioritize sewer pipes inspection using Bayesian Networks (BNs) as a probabilistic approach for computing probability of failure and weighted average method to calculate the consequences of failure values. Finally to consider uncertainties, risk of a sewer pipe is obtained from integration of probability and consequences of failure values using a fuzzy inference system (FIS). As a case study, sewer pipes of a local wastewater collection network in Iran are prioritized to inspect based on their criticality. Results show that majority of sewers (about 62%) has moderate risk, but 12%of sewers are in a critical situation. Regarding the budgetary constraints, the proposed model and resultant risk values are expected to assist wastewater agencies to repair or replace risky sewer pipelines especially in dealing with incomplete and uncertain datasets.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Demand-Supply Dynamics with Collectability and Saturation Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Charles; Yang, Hong

    We introduce a mathematical model on the dynamics of demand and supply incorporating collectability and saturation factors. Our analysis shows that when the fluctuation of the determinants of demand and supply is strong enough, there is chaos in the demand-supply dynamics. Our numerical simulation shows that such a chaos is not an attractor (i.e. dynamics is not approaching the chaos), instead a periodic attractor (of period-3 under the Poincaré period map) exists near the chaos, and coexists with another periodic attractor (of period-1 under the Poincaré period map) near the market equilibrium. Outside the basins of attraction of the two periodic attractors, the dynamics approaches infinity indicating market irrational exuberance or flash crash. The period-3 attractor represents the product’s market cycle of growth and recession, while period-1 attractor near the market equilibrium represents the regular fluctuation of the product’s market. Thus our model captures more market phenomena besides Marshall’s market equilibrium. When the fluctuation of the determinants of demand and supply is strong enough, a three leaf danger zone exists where the basins of attraction of all attractors intertwine and fractal basin boundaries are formed. Small perturbations in the danger zone can lead to very different attractors. That is, small perturbations in the danger zone can cause the market to experience oscillation near market equilibrium, large growth and recession cycle, and irrational exuberance or flash crash.

  3. Modeling the Transitions between Collective and Solitary Migration Phenotypes in Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Lu, Mingyang; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, Jose' N.

    2015-12-01

    Cellular plasticity during cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge. Two key cellular plasticity mechanisms —Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Mesenchymal-to-Amoeboid Transition (MAT) - have been carefully investigated individually, yet a comprehensive understanding of their interconnections remains elusive. Previously, we have modeled the dynamics of the core regulatory circuits for both EMT (miR-200/ZEB/miR-34/SNAIL) and MAT (Rac1/RhoA). We now extend our previous work to study the coupling between these two core circuits by considering the two microRNAs (miR-200 and miR-34) as external signals to the core MAT circuit. We show that this coupled circuit enables four different stable steady states (phenotypes) that correspond to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M), mesenchymal (M), amoeboid (A) and hybrid amoeboid/mesenchymal (A/M) phenotypes. Our model recapitulates the metastasis-suppressing role of the microRNAs even in the presence of EMT-inducing signals like Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). It also enables mapping the microRNA levels to the transitions among various cell migration phenotypes. Finally, it offers a mechanistic understanding for the observed phenotypic transitions among different cell migration phenotypes, specifically the Collective-to-Amoeboid Transition (CAT).

  4. Assessing Historical Fish Community Composition Using Surveys, Historical Collection Data, and Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Labay, Ben; Cohen, Adam E.; Sissel, Blake; Hendrickson, Dean A.; Martin, F. Douglas; Sarkar, Sahotra

    2011-01-01

    Accurate establishment of baseline conditions is critical to successful management and habitat restoration. We demonstrate the ability to robustly estimate historical fish community composition and assess the current status of the urbanized Barton Creek watershed in central Texas, U.S.A. Fish species were surveyed in 2008 and the resulting data compared to three sources of fish occurrence information: (i) historical records from a museum specimen database and literature searches; (ii) a nearly identical survey conducted 15 years earlier; and (iii) a modeled historical community constructed with species distribution models (SDMs). This holistic approach, and especially the application of SDMs, allowed us to discover that the fish community in Barton Creek was more diverse than the historical data and survey methods alone indicated. Sixteen native species with high modeled probability of occurrence within the watershed were not found in the 2008 survey, seven of these were not found in either survey or in any of the historical collection records. Our approach allowed us to more rigorously establish the true baseline for the pre-development fish fauna and then to more accurately assess trends and develop hypotheses regarding factors driving current fish community composition to better inform management decisions and future restoration efforts. Smaller, urbanized freshwater systems, like Barton Creek, typically have a relatively poor historical biodiversity inventory coupled with long histories of alteration, and thus there is a propensity for land managers and researchers to apply inaccurate baseline standards. Our methods provide a way around that limitation by using SDMs derived from larger and richer biodiversity databases of a broader geographic scope. Broadly applied, we propose that this technique has potential to overcome limitations of popular bioassessment metrics (e.g., IBI) to become a versatile and robust management tool for determining status of

  5. Enabling School Structure, Collective Responsibility, and a Culture of Academic Optimism: Toward a Robust Model of School Performance in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jason H.; Hoy, Wayne K.; Tarter, C. John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold: to test a theory of academic optimism in Taiwan elementary schools and to expand the theory by adding new variables, collective responsibility and enabling school structure, to the model. Design/methodology/approach: Structural equation modeling was used to test, refine, and expand an…

  6. Collective Political Violence in Easton’s Political Systems Model (La Violence Politique Collective dans le Modele de Systeme Politique d’Easton)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of National Defence,.2011 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada...d’autocorrection du système. Le recours à la violence peut – dans une certaine mesure – permettre à un régime de restaurer le niveau critique ...Model ............................................................................................. 3 4 A Critique of Easton’s Model

  7. The spherical segmented Langmuir probe in a flowing thermal plasma: numerical model of the current collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séran, E.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Saouri, F. Z.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2005-07-01

    The segmented Langmuir probe (SLP) has been recently proposed by one of the authors (Lebreton, 2002) as an instrument to derive the bulk velocity of terrestrial or planetary plasmas, in addition to the electron density and temperature that are routinely measured by Langmuir probes. It is part of the scientific payload on the DEMETER micro-satellite developed by CNES. The basic concept of this probe is to measure the current distribution over the surface using independent collectors under the form of small spherical caps and to use the angular anisotropy of these currents to obtain the plasma bulk velocity in the probe reference frame. In order to determine the SLP capabilities, we have developed a numerical PIC (Particles In Cell) model which provides a tool to compute the distribution of the current collected by a spherical probe. Our model is based on the simultaneous determination of the charge densities in the probe sheath and on the probe surface, from which the potential distribution in the sheath region can be obtained. This method is well adapted to the SLP problem and has some advantages since it provides a natural control of the charge neutrality inside the simulation box, allows independent mesh sizes in the sheath and on the probe surface, and can be applied to complex surfaces. We present in this paper initial results obtained for plasma conditions corresponding to a Debye length equal to the probe radius. These plasma conditions are observed along the Demeter orbit. The model results are found to be in very good agreement with those published by Laframboise (1966) for a spherical probe in a thermal non-flowing plasma. This demonstrates the adequacy of the computation method and of the adjustable numerical parameters (size of the numerical box and mesh, time step, number of macro-particles, etc.) for the considered plasma-probe configuration. We also present the results obtained in the case of plasma flowing with mesothermal conditions reproducing the

  8. Receptor modeling of globally circulating airborne particles collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Weekly airborne particle samples were collected at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii from February 1979 through May 1985. Receptor models were used to identify sources of airborne particles at MLO, determine compositions of particles from these sources, and assess the relative impacts of them. Major sources of ambient particles at MLO include Asian continental material, oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} species, marine particles, Asian anthropogenic material, local volcanic emissions, and basalt. Source composition profiles were developed for each component. The Asian continental component represents particles transported from Eastern Asia to the North Pacific, and the component consists of crustal material contaminated by anthropogenic emissions. To account for variations in the relative strengths of anthropogenic and crustal sources, a separate Asian anthropogenic component was also developed. During the dust season, Asian continental material accounts for 80% of total suspended particulate material (TSP) at MLO, oceanic productions of Se and SO{sub 4} 11%, marine particles 2.8%, basalt 1.9%, volcanic emissions 1.7%, and Asian anthropogenic material in excess of Asian continental material 3.2%. During the clean season, the oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} contributes 62% of TSP at MLO. Continental material contributes 22%, marine particles 6.4%, basalt 2.7%, volcanic emissions 2.4%, and anthropogenic materials in excess of continental material 4.3%.

  9. Urban solid waste collection system using mathematical modelling and tools of geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Claudia Andrea; Blazquez, Carola Alejandra; Lamas, Alejandro

    2010-04-01

    A poorly designed urban solid waste collection system has an enormous impact on labour, operational and transport costs, and on society in general due to road contamination and negative effects on public health and the environment. This study proposes a methodology for designing an urban solid waste collection system. This methodology uses combinatorial optimisation and integer programing, and GIS tools to minimise collection time, and operational and transport costs while enhancing the current solid waste collection system. This methodology establishes feasible collection routes, determines an adequate vehicle fleet size and presents a comparative cost and sensitivity analysis of the results. The implementation of this methodology in a study case of a zone in Santiago yields significant cost savings in the total collection system.

  10. Tavis-Cummings model and collective multiqubit entanglement in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Retzker, A.; Solano, E.; Reznik, B.

    2007-02-15

    We present a method of generating collective multiqubit entanglement via global addressing of an ion chain performing blue and red Tavis-Cummings interactions, where several qubits are coupled to a collective motional mode. We show that a wide family of Dicke states and irradiant states can be generated by single global laser pulses, unitarily or helped with suitable postselection techniques.

  11. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria

    SciTech Connect

    Ramusch, R. Pertl, A.; Scherhaufer, S.; Schmied, E.; Obersteiner, G.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Informal collectors from Hungary collect bulky waste and reusable items in Austria. • Two methodologies were applied to estimate the informally collected quantities. • Both approaches lead to an estimation of roughly 100,000 t p.a. informally collected. • The formal Austrian system collects 72 kg/cap/yr of bulky waste, WEE & scrap metal. • Informal collection amounts to approx. 12 kg/cap/yr. - Abstract: Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector.

  12. Identifying robustness in the regulation of collective foraging of ant colonies using an interaction-based model with backward bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Udiani, Oyita; Pinter-Wollman, Noa; Kang, Yun

    2015-02-21

    Collective behaviors in social insect societies often emerge from simple local rules. However, little is known about how these behaviors are dynamically regulated in response to environmental changes. Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to identify factors that allow harvester ant colonies to regulate collective foraging activity in response to their environment. We propose a set of differential equations describing the dynamics of: (1) available foragers inside the nest, (2) active foragers outside the nest, and (3) successful returning foragers, to understand how colony-specific parameters, such as baseline number of foragers, interactions among foragers, food discovery rates, successful forager return rates, and foraging duration might influence collective foraging dynamics, while maintaining functional robustness to perturbations. Our analysis indicates that the model can undergo a forward (transcritical) bifurcation or a backward bifurcation depending on colony-specific parameters. In the former case, foraging activity persists when the average number of recruits per successful returning forager is larger than one. In the latter case, the backward bifurcation creates a region of bistability in which the size and fate of foraging activity depends on the distribution of the foraging workforce among the model's compartments. We validate the model with experimental data from harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex barbatus) and perform sensitivity analysis. Our model provides insights on how simple, local interactions can achieve an emergent and robust regulatory system of collective foraging activity in ant colonies.

  13. Development of a multicriteria assessment model for ranking biomass feedstock collection and transportation systems.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Flynn, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    This study details multicriteria assessment methodology that integrates economic, social, environmental, and technical factors in order to rank alternatives for biomass collection and transportation systems. Ranking of biomass collection systems is based on cost of delivered biomass, quality of biomass supplied, emissions during collection, energy input to the chain operations, and maturity of supply system technologies. The assessment methodology is used to evaluate alternatives for collecting 1.8 x 10(6) dry t/yr based on assumptions made on performance of various assemblies of biomass collection systems. A proposed collection option using loafer/ stacker was shown to be the best option followed by ensiling and baling. Ranking of biomass transport systems is based on cost of biomass transport, emissions during transport, traffic congestion, and maturity of different technologies. At a capacity of 4 x 10(6) dry t/yr, rail transport was shown to be the best option, followed by truck transport and pipeline transport, respectively. These rankings depend highly on assumed maturity of technologies and scale of utilization. These may change if technologies such as loafing or ensiling (wet storage) methods are proved to be infeasible for large-scale collection systems.

  14. A Collective Case Study of Secondary Students' Model-Based Inquiry on Natural Selection through Programming in an Agent-Based Modeling Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Lin

    2011-01-01

    This is a collective case study seeking to develop detailed descriptions of how programming an agent-based simulation influences a group of 8th grade students' model-based inquiry (MBI) by examining students' agent-based programmable modeling (ABPM) processes and the learning outcomes. The context of the present study was a biology unit on…

  15. Emergence of collective strategies in a prey-predator game model.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, S I; Ikegami, T

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of collective strategies in a prey-predator system is studied. We use the term "collective" in the sense of the collective motion of defense or attack often found in behaviors of animal groups. In our prey-predator system, both prey and predators move around on a two-dimensional plane, interacting by playing a game; predators can score by touching the backside of a prey. Thresholds are assumed for the scores of both prey and predators. The species with the higher scores can reproduce more, and that with the lower scores will be diminished. As a result, strategies as collective motions are observed; these consist of rotating cluster motions, line formations, disordered but one-way marching, and random swarming. In particular, the strategy of random swarming encourages symbiosis in the sense that it is associated with a low extinction probability for the whole system.

  16. Computer modeling of current collection by the CHARGE-2 mother payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Lilley, J. R., Jr.; Katz, I.; Neubert, T.; Myers, Neil B.

    1990-01-01

    The three-dimensional computer codes NASCAP/LEO and POLAR have been used to calculate current collection by the mother payload of the CHARGE-2 rocket under conditions of positive and negative potential up to several hundred volts. For negative bias (ion collection), the calculations lie about 25 percent above the data, indicating that the ions were less dense, colder, or heavier than the input parameters. For positive bias (electron collection), NASCAP/LEO and POLAR calculations show similar agreement with the measurements at the highest altitudes. This agreement indicates that the current is classically magnetically limited, even during electron beam emission. However, the calculated values fall well below the data at lower altitudes. It is suggested that beam-plasma-neutral interactions are responsible for the high values of collected current at altitudes below 240 km.

  17. EVALUATION OF SEVERAL PM 2.5 FORECAST MODELS USING DATA COLLECTED DURING THE ICARTT/NEAQS 2004 FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time forecasts of PM2.5 aerosol mass from seven air-quality forecast models (AQFMs) are statistically evaluated against observations collected in the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada from two surface networks and aircraft data during the summer of 2004 IC...

  18. Data collection for cooperative water resources modeling in the Lower Rio Grande Basin, Fort Quitman to the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Pallachula, Kiran; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Villalobos, Joshua; Piccinni, Giovanni; Brainard, James Robert; Gerik, Thomas; Morrison, Wendy; Serrat-Capdevila, Aleix; Valdes, Juan; Sheng, Zhuping; Lovato, Rene; Guitron, Alberto; Ennis, Martha Lee; Aparicio, Javier; Newman, Gretchen Carr; Michelsen, Ari M.

    2004-10-01

    Water resource scarcity around the world is driving the need for the development of simulation models that can assist in water resources management. Transboundary water resources are receiving special attention because of the potential for conflict over scarce shared water resources. The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo along the U.S./Mexican border is an example of a scarce, transboundary water resource over which conflict has already begun. The data collection and modeling effort described in this report aims at developing methods for international collaboration, data collection, data integration and modeling for simulating geographically large and diverse international watersheds, with a special focus on the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo. This report describes the basin, and the data collected. This data collection effort was spatially aggregated across five reaches consisting of Fort Quitman to Presidio, the Rio Conchos, Presidio to Amistad Dam, Amistad Dam to Falcon Dam, and Falcon Dam to the Gulf of Mexico. This report represents a nine-month effort made in FY04, during which time the model was not completed.

  19. Modelling informally collected quantities of bulky waste and reusable items in Austria.

    PubMed

    Ramusch, R; Pertl, A; Scherhaufer, S; Schmied, E; Obersteiner, G

    2015-10-01

    Disparities in earnings between Western and Eastern European countries are the reason for a well-established informal sector actively involved in collection and transboundary shipment activities from Austria to Hungary. The preferred objects are reusable items and wastes within the categories bulky waste, WEEE and metals, intended to be sold on flea markets. Despite leading to a loss of recyclable resources for Austrian waste management, these informal activities may contribute to the extension of the lifetime of certain goods when they are reused in Hungary; nevertheless they are discussed rather controversially. The aim of this paper is to provide objective data on the quantities informally collected and transhipped. The unique activities of informal collectors required the development and implementation of a new set of methodologies. The concept of triangulation was used to verify results obtained by field visits, interviews and a traffic counting campaign. Both approaches lead to an estimation of approx. 100,000 t per year of reusable items informally collected in Austria. This means that in addition to the approx. 72 kg/cap/yr formally collected bulky waste, bulky waste wood, household scrap (excluding packaging) and WEEE, up to a further 12 kg/cap/yr might, in the case that informal collection is abandoned, end up as waste or in the second-hand sector.

  20. Alignment vs noise in self-propelled particles: minimal models for collective motion and their continuous descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, Hugues

    2012-02-01

    Two important 1995 papers have marked the birth of collective motion studies in physics: Vicsek et al introduced what could now be described as the ``Ising model'' of this new subfield. This prompted Toner and Tu to propose a continuum theory of flocks which they showed to give rise to long-range orientational order even in two space dimensions. In this setting, the complexity of most natural instances of collective motion is reduced to the competition between local alignment and noise in interacting self-propelled particles. As I will show, this nevertheless gives rise to important and new physics. In this talk, I will give an update of our current knowledge about the Vicsek model, the Toner-Tu theory, and their relationship. I will also present the emerging picture of universality classes brought about by recent progress in the study of Vicsek-like models together with their continuous descriptions.

  1. A study of randomness, correlations, and collectivity in the nuclear shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, V.; Hirsch, J. G.; Frank, A.; Zuker, A. P.

    2003-03-01

    A variable combination of realistic and random two-body interactions allows the study of collective properties [such as the energy spectra and B(E2) transition strengths] in 44Ti, 48Cr, and 24Mg. It is found that the average energies of the yrast band states maintain the ordering for any degree of randomness, but the B(E2) values lose their quadrupole collectivity when randomness dominates the Hamiltonian. The high probability of the yrast band to be ordered in the presence of pure random forces exhibits the strong correlations between the different members of the band.

  2. Collective excitation of Rydberg-atom ensembles beyond the superatom model.

    PubMed

    Gärttner, Martin; Whitlock, Shannon; Schönleber, David W; Evers, Jörg

    2014-12-05

    In an ensemble of laser-driven atoms involving strongly interacting Rydberg states, the steady-state excitation probability is usually substantially suppressed. In contrast, here we identify a regime in which the Rydberg excited fraction is enhanced by the interaction. This effect is associated with the buildup of many-body coherences induced by coherent multiphoton excitations between collective states. The excitation enhancement should be observable under currently existing experimental conditions and may serve as a direct probe for the presence of coherent multiphoton dynamics involving collective quantum states.

  3. Collective enumeration.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-04-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a 2-alternative forced-choice task and when in disagreement, they negotiated joint decisions via verbal communication and received feedback about accuracy at the end of each trial. The results showed that two people could collectively count better than either one alone, but not as well as expected by previous models of collective sensory decision making in more basic perceptual domains (e.g., luminance contrast). Moreover, such collective enumeration benefited from prior, noninteractive practice showing that social learning of how to combine shared information about enumeration required substantial individual experience. Finally, the collective context had a positive but transient impact on an individual's enumeration sensitivity. This transient social influence may be explained as a motivational factor arising from the fact that members of a collective must take responsibility for their individual decisions and face the consequences of their judgments.

  4. Efficiently Maintaining a National Resource of Historical and Contemporary Biological Collections: The NHLBI Biorepository Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Elizabeth L.; Marchesani, Leah; Meagher, Kevin; Giffen, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Reducing costs by improving storage efficiency has been a focus of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Biologic Specimen Repository (Biorepository) and Biologic Specimen and Data Repositories Information Coordinating Center (BioLINCC) programs for several years. Methods: Study specimen profiles were compiled using the BioLINCC collection catalog. Cost assessments and calculations on the return on investments to consolidate or reduce a collection, were developed and implemented. Results: Over the course of 8 months, the NHLBI Biorepository evaluated 35 collections that consisted of 1.8 million biospecimens. A total of 23 collections were selected for consolidation, with a total of 1.2 million specimens located in 21,355 storage boxes. The consolidation resulted in a savings of 4055 boxes of various sizes and 10.2 mechanical freezers (∼275 cubic feet) worth of space. Conclusion: As storage costs in a biorepository increase over time, the development and use of information technology tools to assess the potential advantage and feasiblity of vial consolidation can reduce maintenance expenses. PMID:28186851

  5. Combinatoric Models of Information Retrieval Ranking Methods and Performance Measures for Weakly-Ordered Document Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation answers three research questions: (1) What are the characteristics of a combinatoric measure, based on the Average Search Length (ASL), that performs the same as a probabilistic version of the ASL?; (2) Does the combinatoric ASL measure produce the same performance result as the one that is obtained by ranking a collection of…

  6. Development and Implementation of a Collective Gaining Model in Teacher Negotiations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brynildson, Gerald

    The traditional approach to collective bargaining as a win/loss situation in the educational field adversely affects staff members' confidence, security, and morale. Typically, those involved in this form of negotiation see only two ways to negotiate: soft and hard. Neither approach proves satisfactory because the soft negotiator often ends up…

  7. Building a bridge with the customer to facilitate collecting and validating information in modeling sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, S.M.

    1994-07-21

    To build a bridge with customers, we balance the linear modeling process with the dynamics of the individuals we serve, who may feel unfamiliar, even confused, with that process. While it is recognized that human factors engineers improve the physical aspect of the workplace, they also work to integrate customers` cognitive styles, feelings, and concerns into the workplace tools. We take customers` feelings into consideration and integrate their expressed needs and concerns into the modeling sessions. After establishing an agreeable, professional relationship, we use a simple, portable CASE tool to reveal the effectiveness of NIAM. This tool, Modeler`s Assistant, is friendly enough to use directly with people who know nothing of NIAM, yet it captures all the information necessary to create complete models. The Modeler`s Assistant succeeds because it organizes the detailed information in an enhanced text format for customer validation. Customer cooperation results from our modeling sessions as they grow comfortable and become enthused about providing information.

  8. Mechanism to support generic collective communication across a variety of programming models

    DOEpatents

    Almasi, Gheorghe; Dozsa, Gabor; Kumar, Sameer

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for supporting collective communications on a plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms, in one aspect, may comprise a schedule defining one or more tasks in a collective operation, an executor that executes the task, a multisend module to perform one or more data transfer functions associated with the tasks, and a connection manager that controls one or more connections and identifies an available connection. The multisend module uses the available connection in performing the one or more data transfer functions. A plurality of processors that use different parallel programming paradigms can use a common implementation of the schedule module, the executor module, the connection manager and the multisend module via a language adaptor specific to a parallel programming paradigm implemented on a processor.

  9. 78 FR 14838 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the Resource Justification Model (RJM); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, conducts a preclearance consultation program to provide the general public and Federal agencies with an opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing collections of information in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA95) [44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)]. This program helps to......

  10. An Animal Model for Collective Behavior in Humans: The Impact of Manipulated Trust and Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    David Eilam 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) TEL AVIV UNIVERSITY...RESEARCH AUTHORITY RAMAT AVIV TEL AVIV 69978 ISRAEL 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER N/A 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...summary of achievements on each of these objectives. 1. Measure the collective response in same-gender vs . mixed-gender groups (status: published) 2

  11. Collection efficiency model based on boundary-layer characteristics for cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.S.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-10-01

    In cyclones, the boundary layer formed on the collecting-wall surface acts as a barrier for particle migration toward the wall due to a decreased centrifugal force on particles inside the boundary layer. A new theory for high-efficiency cyclones based on the boundary-layer characteristics is presented. The cyclone was divided into two regions: the turbulent-core region where the centrifugal force is large, and the near-wall region where the centrifugal force is small. Particle trajectories in the turbulent-core region are calculated from the mean fluid motion based on the quasi-steady drag assumption, and the collection probability of particles in the near-wall region is calculated by the deposition velocity that results from both turbulent diffusion and centrifugal force. The deposition velocity by centrifugal force was assumed equal to the equilibrium migration velocity at a certain point inside the boundary layer, and the distance to that point from the wall is assumed to be linearly proportional to the dimensionless-particle relaxation time. When the proportional constant was determined by fitting the theoretical results to experimental data, the theory showed an excellent enhancement in predicting the variation of collection efficiency with the inlet flow velocity and particle size.

  12. Mass collecting and the diet breadth model: A Great Basin example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madsen, D.B.; Schmitt, D.N.

    1998-01-01

    The energetic return rates of many small animal and plant resources are often density dependent. When these resources are collected in mass, change in abundance can dramatically affect diet rank, and challenges the assumption that return rates are generally correlated with body size. When mass collecting is employed, as a result of either natural events (e.g. windrows) or technological developments (e.g. nets), population density may largely determine the overall return rate for a resource. Since a single food or resource type can be many prey types, an increase in the abundance of a food resource can change its diet rank. We examined this relationship at Lakeside Cave in northwestern Utah, and discovered that when the abundance of grasshoppers is high, and mass collecting is productive, the hunting of bighorn sheep and other large animal resources may have been abandoned, contradicting commonly held assumptions about prey size. In archaeological situations it may be necessary to determine what foraging technique was used before assuming that the presence of small animals and fish in the diet is a result of reduced foraging efficiency. ?? 1998 Academic Press Limited.

  13. A Model Using Local Weather Data to Determine the Effective Sampling Volume for PCB Congeners Collected on Passive Air Samplers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a mathematical model to determine the effective sampling volumes (Veff) of PCBs and similar compounds captured using polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF–PAS). We account for the variability in wind speed, air temperature, and equilibrium partitioning over the course of the deployment of the samplers. The model, provided as an annotated Matlab script, predicts the Veff as a function of physical-chemical properties of each compound and meteorology from the closest Integrated Surface Database (ISD) data set obtained through NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). The model was developed to be user-friendly, only requiring basic Matlab knowledge. To illustrate the effectiveness of the model, we evaluated three independent data sets of airborne PCBs simultaneously collected using passive and active samplers: at sites in Chicago, Lancaster, UK, and Toronto, Canada. The model provides Veff values comparable to those using depuration compounds and calibration against active samplers, yielding an average congener specific concentration method ratio (active/passive) of 1.1 ± 1.2. We applied the model to PUF–PAS samples collected in Chicago and show that previous methods can underestimate concentrations of PCBs by up to 40%, especially for long deployments, deployments conducted under warming conditions, and compounds with log Koa values less than 8. PMID:26963482

  14. Verification and adjustment of regional regression models for urban storm-runoff quality using data collected in Little Rock, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barks, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    Storm-runoff water-quality data were used to verify and, when appropriate, adjust regional regression models previously developed to estimate urban storm- runoff loads and mean concentrations in Little Rock, Arkansas. Data collected at 5 representative sites during 22 storms from June 1992 through January 1994 compose the Little Rock data base. Comparison of observed values (0) of storm-runoff loads and mean concentrations to the predicted values (Pu) from the regional regression models for nine constituents (chemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, total nitrogen, total ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, total recoverable copper, total recoverable lead, and total recoverable zinc) shows large prediction errors ranging from 63 to several thousand percent. Prediction errors for six of the regional regression models are less than 100 percent, and can be considered reasonable for water-quality models. Differences between 0 and Pu are due to variability in the Little Rock data base and error in the regional models. Where applicable, a model adjustment procedure (termed MAP-R-P) based upon regression with 0 against Pu was applied to improve predictive accuracy. For 11 of the 18 regional water-quality models, 0 and Pu are significantly correlated, that is much of the variation in 0 is explained by the regional models. Five of these 11 regional models consistently overestimate O; therefore, MAP-R-P can be used to provide a better estimate. For the remaining seven regional models, 0 and Pu are not significanfly correlated, thus neither the unadjusted regional models nor the MAP-R-P is appropriate. A simple estimator, such as the mean of the observed values may be used if the regression models are not appropriate. Standard error of estimate of the adjusted models ranges from 48 to 130 percent. Calibration results may be biased due to the limited data set sizes in the Little Rock data base. The relatively large values of

  15. 75 FR 16840 - Proposed Extension of Information Collection Request Submitted for Public Comment; Model Employer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Comment; Model Employer CHIP Notice AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Department of Labor... Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA 95) (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)), provides the general public and Federal agencies... ] Administration is soliciting comments on the Model CHIP Employer Notice. A copy of the information...

  16. Performance evaluation model of a pilot food waste collection system in Suzhou City, China.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zongguo; Wang, Yuanjia; De Clercq, Djavan

    2015-05-01

    This paper analyses the food waste collection and transportation (C&T) system in a pilot project in Suzhou by using a novel performance evaluation method. The method employed to conduct this analysis involves a unified performance evaluation index containing qualitative and quantitative indicators applied to data from Suzhou City. Two major inefficiencies were identified: a) low system efficiency due to insufficient processing capacity of commercial food waste facilities; and b) low waste resource utilization due to low efficiency of manual sorting. The performance evaluation indicated that the pilot project collection system's strong points included strong economics, low environmental impact and low social impact. This study also shows that Suzhou's integrated system has developed a comprehensive body of laws and clarified regulatory responsibilities for each of the various government departments to solve the problems of commercial food waste management. Based on Suzhou's experience, perspectives and lessons can be drawn for other cities and areas where food waste management systems are in the planning stage, or are encountering operational problems.

  17. Modeling municipal solid waste collection: A generalized vehicle routing model with multiple transfer stations, gather sites and inhomogeneous vehicles in time windows.

    PubMed

    Son, Le Hoang; Louati, Amal

    2016-06-01

    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) collection is a necessary process in any municipality resulting in the quality-of-life, economic aspects and urban structuralization. The intrinsic nature of MSW collection relates to the development of effective vehicle routing models that optimize the total traveling distances of vehicles, the environmental emission and the investment costs. In this article, we propose a generalized vehicle routing model including multiple transfer stations, gather sites and inhomogeneous vehicles in time windows for MSW collection. It takes into account traveling in one-way routes, the number of vehicles per m(2) and waiting time at traffic stops for reduction of operational time. The proposed model could be used for scenarios having similar node structures and vehicles' characteristics. A case study at Danang city, Vietnam is given to illustrate the applicability of this model. The experimental results have clearly shown that the new model reduces both total traveling distances and operational hours of vehicles in comparison with those of practical scenarios. Optimal routes of vehicles on streets and markets at Danang are given. Those results are significant to practitioners and local policy makers.

  18. Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles.

    PubMed

    Burini, D; De Lillo, S; Gibelli, L

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a systems approach to the theory of perception and learning in populations composed of many living entities. Starting from a phenomenological description of these processes, a mathematical structure is derived which is deemed to incorporate their complexity features. The modeling is based on a generalization of kinetic theory methods where interactions are described by theoretical tools of game theory. As an application, the proposed approach is used to model the learning processes that take place in a classroom.

  19. Collection of Calibration and Validation Data for an Airport Landside Dynamic Simulation Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    34 The Trans- portation Systems Center has developed a computer model which simulates the movements of passengers in an airport terminal and vehicles on...conditions to efforts leading to the development of detailed mathematical models simulating the entire landside passenger and vehicular system...Denver-Stapleton International Airport, during the period December 12-15, 1975. -1- cut! AWAG9CLAI XII SAGWA CLIR REGIONALL ICKETING ENTANC SEURT CTAS OR

  20. Statistical Mechanics Model for the Dynamics of Collective Epigenetic Histone Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Kim, K. S.; Xing, Jianhua

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetic histone modifications play an important role in the maintenance of different cell phenotypes. The exact molecular mechanism for inheritance of the modification patterns over cell generations remains elusive. We construct a Potts-type model based on experimentally observed nearest-neighbor enzyme lateral interactions and nucleosome covalent modification state biased enzyme recruitment. The model can lead to effective nonlocal interactions among nucleosomes suggested in previous theoretical studies, and epigenetic memory is robustly inheritable against stochastic cellular processes.

  1. A hemodynamics model to study the collective behavior of the ventricular-arterial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin Wang, Yuh-Ying; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2013-01-01

    Applying principles from complex systems to study the efficacy of integrative therapies has become a new interest in medical research. We aimed to construct a concise model for the ventricular-arterial (VA) system and to provide a systematic method for exploring its overall behavior. The transportation of blood from the heart to the peripheral arterioles via hydraulic pressure forces was described by a multi-rank model. Parts of the VA system that have strong mutual interactions were combined into a single sub system. Sub systems of four different ranks were characterized. We then applied the multi-rank model to analyze the aortic pressure wave generated by the periodic ventricular blood ejection, the renal pressure in response to the input from the VA system, and the blood flowing from the renal artery to its arterioles. Maintaining the pressure distribution along the main arteries and in all of the organs with the lowest possible ventricular input turned out to be the first principle for the operation of an efficient VA system. By this principle, we pointed out the benefit of some arterial structures in mammals, derived specific regulation rules and deduced some fundamental concepts for healing. The justification of the biomechanics in our model that differed greatly from those in the prevailing models was given. We concluded that the oscillatory motion and the pressure pulse of the arterial system can be analyzed as steady states with resonance behaviors and suggested utilizing this model to construct integrative therapies for diseases correlated with abnormality in blood circulation.

  2. Double Stimulation in the Waiting Experiment with Collectives: Testing a Vygotskian Model of the Emergence of Volitional Action.

    PubMed

    Sannino, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    This study explores what human conduct looks like when research embraces uncertainty and distance itself from the dominant methodological demands of control and predictability. The context is the waiting experiment originally designed in Kurt Lewin's research group, discussed by Vygotsky as an instance among a range of experiments related to his notion of double stimulation. Little attention has been paid to this experiment, despite its great heuristic potential for charting the terrain of uncertainty and agency in experimental settings. Behind the notion of double stimulation lays Vygotsky's distinctive view of human beings' ability to intentionally shape their actions. Accordingly, human beings in situations of uncertainty and cognitive incongruity can rely on artifacts which serve the function of auxiliary motives and which help them undertake volitional actions. A double stimulation model depicting how such actions emerge is tested in a waiting experiment conducted with collectives, in contrast with a previous waiting experiment conducted with individuals. The model, validated in the waiting experiment with individual participants, applies only to a limited extent to the collectives. The analysis shows the extent to which double stimulation takes place in the waiting experiment with collectives, the differences between the two experiments, and what implications can be drawn for an expanded view on experiments.

  3. Collective coordinate models of domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized systems under the spin hall effect and longitudinal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S. Ali; Moretti, Simone; Martinez, Eduardo; Serpico, Claudio; Durin, Gianfranco

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies on heterostructures of ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and an oxide have highlighted the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and broken inversion symmetry in domain wall (DW) motion. Specifically, chiral DWs are stabilized in these systems due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). SOC can also lead to enhanced current induced DW motion, with the Spin Hall effect (SHE) suggested as the dominant mechanism for this observation. The efficiency of SHE driven DW motion depends on the internal magnetic structure of the DW, which could be controlled using externally applied longitudinal in-plane fields. In this work, micromagnetic simulations and collective coordinate models are used to study current-driven DW motion under longitudinal in-plane fields in perpendicularly magnetized samples with strong DMI. Several extended collective coordinate models are developed to reproduce the micromagnetic results. While these extended models show improvements over traditional models of this kind, there are still discrepancies between them and micromagnetic simulations which require further work.

  4. The Transportation Leapfrog: Using Smart Phones to Collect Driving Data and Model Fuel Economy in India

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Anand; Schewel, Laura; Saxena, Samveg; Phadke, Amol

    2013-05-01

    Car ownership in India is expected to skyrocket in the coming decades, strongly driven by rising incomes. This phenomenon provides unprecedented opportunities for automakers and equally unprecedented social and environmental challenges. Policymakers, urban planners and civil society see this car boom leading to an explosion in problems related to congestion, infrastructure, air pollution, safety, higher oil imports and climate change. For all these stakeholders to take effective action, good data on how people use their cars, their demand for mobility and their behavior in mobility is essential. Unfortunately, there is very little data on the Indian transport sector as a whole and virtually none on real-world vehicle performance and use. The rapid development of high quality mobile telecommunications infrastructure provides India with the opportunity to leapfrog the West in cheaply collecting vast amounts of useful data from transportation. In this paper, we describe a pilot project in which we use commercial smart phone apps to collect per second car driving data from the city of Pune, instantly upload it through 3G and prepare it for analysis using advanced noise filtering algorithms for less than $1 per day per car. We then use our data in an Autonomie simulation to show that India’s currently planned fuel economy test procedures will result in over-estimates of fuel economy of approximately 35% for a typical Indian car when it is operated in real world conditions. Supporting better driving cycle development is just one of many applications for smart phone derived data in Indian transportation.

  5. Promoting a Collective Conscience: Designing a Resilient Staff-Student Partnership Model for Educational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses experiences of a student-ambassador network within one UK-based Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, problematising key issues in relation to transience in staff-student partnerships in high education, and highlighting the importance of the educational developer in facilitating institution-wide partnership models.…

  6. 75 FR 34767 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the Resource Justification Model (RJM); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... functional activity and two years of projected expenditures. The actual cost data informs ETA's... Model (RJM); Comment Request AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Labor. ACTION: Notice... addressee section below on or before August 17, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send comments to Lauren C. Harrel,...

  7. Modeling the collective relaxation time of glass-forming polymers at intermediate length scales: Application to polyisobutylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, Juan; Alvarez, Fernando; Khairy, Yasmin; Arbe, Arantxa

    2013-07-01

    In a recent paper [V. N. Novikov, K. S. Schweizer, and A. P. Sokolov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164508 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4802771 a simple analytical ansatz has been proposed to describe the momentum transfer (Q) dependence of the collective relaxation time of glass-forming systems in a wide Q-range covering the region of the first maximum of the static structure factor S(Q) and the so-called intermediate length scale regime. In this work we have generalized this model in order to deal with glass-forming systems where the atomic diffusive processes are sub-linear in nature. This is for instance the case of glass-forming polymers. The generalized expression considers a sub-linear jump-diffusion model and reduces to the expression previously proposed for normal diffusion. The generalized ansatz has been applied to the experimental results of the Q- and temperature-dependence of polyisobutylene (PIB), which were previously published. To reduce the number of free parameters of the model to only one, we have taken advantage of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of PIB properly validated by neutron scattering results. The model perfectly describes the experimental results capturing both, Q- and temperature-dependences. Moreover, the model also reproduces the experimental Q-dependence of the effective activation energy of the collective relaxation time in the temperature range of observation. This non-trivial result gives additional support to the way the crossover between two different relaxation mechanisms of density fluctuations is formulated in the model.

  8. Modeling the 360° Innovating Firm as a Multiple System or Collective Being

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Véronique

    Confronted with fast changing technologies and markets and with increasing competitive pressures, firms are now required to innovate fast and continuously. In order to do so, several firms superpose an intrapreneurial layer (IL) to their formal organization (FO). The two systems are in complex relations: the IL is embedded in the FO, sharing human, financial and technical components, but strongly diverges from it when it comes to representation, structure, values and behavior of the shared components. Furthermore, the two systems simultaneously cooperate and compete. In the long run, the organizational dynamics usually end to the detriment of the intrapreneurial layer, which remains marginal or regresses after an initial period of boom. The concepts of Multiple Systems and Collective Beings, proposed by Minati and Pessa, can help students of the firm adopt a different viewpoint on this issue. These concepts can help them move away from a rigid, Manichean view of the two systems' respective functions and roles towards a more fluid and elaborate vision of their relations, allowing for greater flexibility and coherence.

  9. Human Development IX: a model of the wholeness of man, his consciousness, and collective consciousness.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Rald, Erik; Nielsen, Maj Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-11-14

    In this paper we look at the rational and the emotional interpretation of reality in the human brain and being, and discuss the representation of the brain-mind (ego), the body-mind (Id), and the outer world in the human wholeness (the I or "soul"). Based on this we discuss a number of factors including the coherence between perception, attention and consciousness, and the relation between thought, fantasies, visions and dreams. We discuss and explain concepts as intent, will, morals and ethics. The Jungian concept of the human collective conscious and unconscious is also analyzed. We also hypothesis on the nature of intuition and consider the source of religious experience of man. These phenomena are explained based on the concept of deep quantum chemistry and infinite dancing fractal spirals making up the energetic backbone of the world. In this paper we consider man as a real wholeness and debate the concepts of subjectivity, consciousness and intent that can be deduced from such a perspective.

  10. Developing a model for understanding patient collection of observations of daily living: A qualitative meta-synthesis of the Project HealthDesign Program.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Deborah J; Keller, Sara R; Hayes, Gillian R; Dorr, David A; Ash, Joan S; Sittig, Dean F

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-synthesis of five different studies that developed, tested, and implemented new technologies for the purpose of collecting Observations of Daily Living (ODL). From this synthesis, we developed a model to explain user motivation as it relates to ODL collection. We describe this model that includes six factors that motivate patients' collection of ODL data: usability, illness experience, relevance of ODLs, information technology infrastructure, degree of burden, and emotional activation. We show how these factors can act as barriers or facilitators to the collection of ODL data and how interacting with care professionals and sharing ODL data may also influence ODL collection, health-related awareness, and behavior change. The model we developed and used to explain ODL collection can be helpful to researchers and designers who study and develop new, personal health technologies to empower people to improve their health.

  11. Developing a model for understanding patient collection of observations of daily living: A qualitative meta-synthesis of the Project HealthDesign Program

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah J.; Keller, Sara R.; Hayes, Gillian R.; Dorr, David A.; Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a meta-synthesis of five different studies that developed, tested, and implemented new technologies for the purpose of collecting Observations of Daily Living (ODL). From this synthesis, we developed a model to explain user motivation as it relates to ODL collection. We describe this model that includes six factors that motivate patients’ collection of ODL data: usability, illness experience, relevance of ODLs, information technology infrastructure, degree of burden, and emotional activation. We show how these factors can act as barriers or facilitators to the collection of ODL data and how interacting with care professionals and sharing ODL data may also influence ODL collection, health-related awareness, and behavior change. The model we developed and used to explain ODL collection can be helpful to researchers and designers who study and develop new, personal health technologies to empower people to improve their health. PMID:26949381

  12. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  13. Data collection handbook to support modeling the impacts of radioactive material in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Jones, L.G.; Wang, Y.Y.; Faillace, E.; Loureiro, C.; Chia, Y.P.

    1993-04-01

    A pathway analysis computer code called RESRAD has been developed for implementing US Department of Energy Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines. Hydrogeological, meteorological, geochemical, geometrical (size, area, depth), and material-related (soil, concrete) parameters are used in the RESRAD code. This handbook discusses parameter definitions, typical ranges, variations, measurement methodologies, and input screen locations. Although this handbook was developed primarily to support the application of RESRAD, the discussions and values are valid for other model applications.

  14. Utility of Modeling and Simulation in the Department of Defense: Initial Data Collection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    employing forces, developing theater intelligence, conducting mission rehearsal, and operational movement and maneuver . In the future, technologies of the...Chiefs of Staff Combat Maneuver Training Center Cost and Operational Effectiveness Analysis Conduct of Fire Trainer Covert Remote Electronic...000493 The work was conducted under contract DASW01 94 C 0054 for the Defense Modeling and Simulation Office. The publication of this IDA document does

  15. A Predictive Model to Optimize the Collection of Data Needed to Characterize Fluvial Sand Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    a particular sand body has been determined, the appropriate hydrologic or physical control can be implemented. From the above ideas, a predictive... modern are based on those observed in modem-day environments of deposition. Each environment of deposition has a characteristic distribution of...a range of meander belt widths of approximately 10 ft, from physical models, to near 15,000 ft, from natural streams. The estimated sand body width

  16. The relationship between the interacting boson model and the algebraic version of Bohrʼs collective model in its triaxial limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiamova, G.; Rowe, D. J.; Caprio, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent developments and applications of an algebraic version of Bohr's collective model, known as the algebraic collective model (ACM), have shown that fully converged calculations can be performed for a large range of Hamiltonians. Examining the algebraic structure underlying the Bohr model (BM) has also clarified its relationship with the interacting boson model (IBM), with which it has related solvable limits and corresponding dynamical symmetries. In particular, the algebraic structure of the IBM is obtained as a compactification of the BM and conversely the BM is regained in various contraction limits of the IBM. In a previous paper, corresponding contractions were identified and confirmed numerically for axially-symmetric states of relatively small deformation. In this paper, we extend the comparisons to realistic deformations and compare results of the two models in the rotor-vibrator limit. These models describe rotations and vibrations about an axially symmetric prolate or oblate rotor, and rotations and vibrations of a triaxial rotor. It is determined that most of the standard results of the BM can be obtained as contraction limits of the IBM in its U(5)-SO(6) dynamical symmetries.

  17. Prospects of Genomic Prediction in the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection: Historical Data Creates Robust Models for Enhancing Selection of Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Jarquin, Diego; Specht, James; Lorenz, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The identification and mobilization of useful genetic variation from germplasm banks for use in breeding programs is critical for future genetic gain and protection against crop pests. Plummeting costs of next-generation sequencing and genotyping is revolutionizing the way in which researchers and breeders interface with plant germplasm collections. An example of this is the high density genotyping of the entire USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection. We assessed the usefulness of 50K single nucleotide polymorphism data collected on 18,480 domesticated soybean (Glycine max) accessions and vast historical phenotypic data for developing genomic prediction models for protein, oil, and yield. Resulting genomic prediction models explained an appreciable amount of the variation in accession performance in independent validation trials, with correlations between predicted and observed reaching up to 0.92 for oil and protein and 0.79 for yield. The optimization of training set design was explored using a series of cross-validation schemes. It was found that the target population and environment need to be well represented in the training set. Second, genomic prediction training sets appear to be robust to the presence of data from diverse geographical locations and genetic clusters. This finding, however, depends on the influence of shattering and lodging, and may be specific to soybean with its presence of maturity groups. The distribution of 7608 nonphenotyped accessions was examined through the application of genomic prediction models. The distribution of predictions of phenotyped accessions was representative of the distribution of predictions for nonphenotyped accessions, with no nonphenotyped accessions being predicted to fall far outside the range of predictions of phenotyped accessions. PMID:27247288

  18. New development of the projected shell model and description of low-lying collective states in transitional nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang-Qi; Sun, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Description of the interplay between different nuclear shapes is an interesting but challenging problem. The original projected shell model (PSM) is applicable to nuclei with fixed shapes. We extend the PSM by superimposing (angular-momentum- and particle-number-) projected product wave functions in the spirit of the generate coordinate method. With this development, the Gd isotopes across the N = 90 region are studied, and the results indicate spectroscopic features of shape phase transition with varying neutron number. In order to illustrate the shape distribution in microscopic wave functions, we introduce a deformation representation and show that the collectively excited Kπ = 0+ states in the Gd isotopes have characters of shape vibration.

  19. Modelling the rheology of sea ice as a collection of diamond-shaped floes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilchinsky, A. V.; Feltham, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    In polar oceans, seawater freezes to form a layer of sea ice of several metres thickness that can cover up to 8% of the Earth's surface. The modelled sea ice cover state is described by thickness and the orientational distribution of interlocking, anisotropic diamond-shaped ice floes delineated by slip lines, as supported by observation. The purpose of this study is to develop a set of equations describing the mean-field sea ice stresses that result from interactions between the ice floes and the evolution of the ice floe orientation, which are simple enough to be incorporated into a climate model. The sea ice stress caused by a deformation of the ice cover is determined by employing an existing kinematic model of ice floe motion, which enables us to calculate the forces acting on the ice floes due to crushing into and sliding past each other, and then by averaging over all possible floe orientations. We describe the orientational floe distribution with a structure tensor and propose an evolution equation for this tensor that accounts for rigid body rotation of the floes, their apparent re-orientation due to new slip line formation, and change of shape of the floes due to freezing and melting. The form of the evolution equation proposed is motivated by laboratory observations of sea ice failure under controlled conditions. Finally, we present simulations of the evolution of sea ice stress and floe orientation for several imposed flow types. Although evidence to test the simulations against is lacking, the simulations seem physically reasonable.

  20. Testing prediction capabilities of an 131I terrestrial transport model by using measurements collected at the Hanford nuclear facility.

    PubMed

    Apostoaei, A Iulian

    2005-05-01

    A model describing transport of 131I in the environment was developed by SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., for assessment of radiation doses and excess lifetime risk from 131I atmospheric releases from Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in southeast Idaho. This paper describes the results of an exercise designed to test the reliability of this model and to identify the main sources of uncertainty in doses and risks estimated by this model. The testing of the model was based on materials published by the International Atomic Energy Agency BIOMASS program, specifically environmental data collected after the release into atmosphere of 63 curies of 131I during 2-5 September 1963, after an accident at the Hanford PUREX Chemical Separations Plant, in Hanford, Washington. Measurements of activity in air, vegetation, and milk were collected in nine counties around Hanford during the first couple of months after the accident. The activity of 131I in the thyroid glands of two children was measured 47 d after the accident. The model developed by SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., was used to estimate concentrations of 131I in environmental media, thyroid doses for the general population, and the activity of 131I in thyroid glands of the two children. Predicted concentrations of 131I in pasture grass and milk and thyroid doses were compared with similar estimates produced by other modelers. The SENES model was also used to estimate excess lifetime risk of thyroid cancer due to the September 1963 releases of 131I from Hanford. The SENES model was first calibrated and then applied to all locations of interest around Hanford without fitting the model parameters to a given location. Predictions showed that the SENES model reproduces satisfactorily the time-dependent and the time-integrated measured concentrations in vegetation and milk, and provides reliable estimates of 131I activity in thyroids of children. SENES model

  1. Practice Models and Challenges in Teledermatology: A Study of Collective Experiences from Teledermatologists

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, April W.; Kwong, Mei W.; Ledo, Lynda; Nesbitt, Thomas S.; Shewry, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite increasing practice of teledermatology in the U.S., teledermatology practice models and real-world challenges are rarely studied. Methods The primary objective was to examine teledermatology practice models and shared challenges among teledermatologists in California, focusing on practice operations, reimbursement considerations, barriers to sustainability, and incentives. We conducted in-depth interviews with teledermatologists that practiced store-and-forward or live-interactive teledermatology from January 1, 2007 through March 30, 2011 in California. Results Seventeen teledermatologists from academia, private practice, health maintenance organizations, and county settings participated in the study. Among them, 76% practiced store-and-forward only, 6% practiced live-interactive only, and 18% practiced both modalities. Only 29% received structured training in teledermatology. The average number of years practicing teledermatology was 4.29 years (SD±2.81). Approximately 47% of teledermatologists served at least one Federally Qualified Health Center. Over 75% of patients seen via teledermatology were at or below 200% federal poverty level and usually lived in rural regions without dermatologist access. Practice challenges were identified in the following areas. Teledermatologists faced delays in reimbursements and non-reimbursement of teledermatology services. The primary reason for operational inefficiency was poor image quality and/or inadequate history. Costly and inefficient software platforms and lack of communication with referring providers also presented barriers. Conclusion Teledermatology enables underserved populations to access specialty care. Improvements in reimbursement mechanisms, efficient technology platforms, communication with referring providers, and teledermatology training are necessary to support sustainable practices. PMID:22194887

  2. Collective responsibility for freeway rear-ending accidents? An application of probabilistic casual models.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gary A; Swenson, Tait

    2006-07-01

    Determining whether or not an event was a cause of a road accident often involves determining the truth of a counterfactual conditional, where what happened is compared to what would have happened had the supposed cause been absent. Using structural causal models, Pearl and his associates have recently developed a rigorous method for posing and answering causal questions, and this approach is especially well suited to the reconstruction and analysis of road accidents. Here, we applied these methods to three freeway rear-end collisions. Starting with video recordings of the accidents, trajectory information for a platoon of vehicles involved in and preceding the collision was extracted from the video record, and this information was used to estimate each driver's initial speed, following distance, reaction time, and braking rate. Using Brill's model of rear-end accidents, it was then possible to simulate what would have happened, other things being equal, had certain driver actions been other than they were. In each of the three accidents we found evidence that: (1) short following headways by the colliding drivers were probable causal factors for the collisions, (2) for each collision, at least one driver ahead of the colliding vehicles probably had a reaction time that was longer than his or her following headway, and (3) had that driver's reaction time been equal to his or her following headway, the rear-end collision probably would not have happened.

  3. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    PubMed Central

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized. PMID:24463569

  4. Collective Cell Motion in an Epithelial Sheet Can Be Quantitatively Described by a Stochastic Interacting Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Cochet, Olivier; Grasland-Mongrain, Erwan; Silberzan, Pascal; Hakim, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Modelling the displacement of thousands of cells that move in a collective way is required for the simulation and the theoretical analysis of various biological processes. Here, we tackle this question in the controlled setting where the motion of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells in a confluent epithelium is triggered by the unmasking of free surface. We develop a simple model in which cells are described as point particles with a dynamic based on the two premises that, first, cells move in a stochastic manner and, second, tend to adapt their motion to that of their neighbors. Detailed comparison to experimental data show that the model provides a quantitatively accurate description of cell motion in the epithelium bulk at early times. In addition, inclusion of model “leader” cells with modified characteristics, accounts for the digitated shape of the interface which develops over the subsequent hours, providing that leader cells invade free surface more easily than other cells and coordinate their motion with their followers. The previously-described progression of the epithelium border is reproduced by the model and quantitatively explained. PMID:23505356

  5. {Sigma}PAH: A model to predict the toxicity of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in field-collected sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.; Schults, D.W.; Ozretich, R.J.; Lamberson, J.O.; Cole, F.A.; Ferraro, S.P.; DeWitt, T.H.; Redmond, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    The {Sigma}PAH model estimates the probability of toxicity of PAH-contaminated sediments using a combination of equilibrium partitioning, WSAR, toxic unit, additivity, and concentration-response models. The sediment concentration of organic carbon and 13 PAH (polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon) compounds were measured. Interstitial water concentrations (PAH{sub iw}) of the 13 compounds were predicted by equilibrium partitioning. The 10-d LC50 of each compound in interstitial water (10-d LC50{sub iw}) was predicted by a QSAR regression of 10-d LC50{sub iw} (From spiked sediment tests) to K{sub ow}. Toxic unit concentrations of individual compounds (TU{sub i}) were predicted as PAH{sub iw}/10-d LC50{sub iw}. The total number of toxic units of the 13 compounds ({Sigma}TU{sub i}) was calculated assuming the additivity of toxic effects of PAHs. {Sigma}TU{sub i} was used to predict the probability of toxicity to marine and estuarine amphipods using a concentration-response model derived from spiked sediment toxicity tests. The {Sigma}PAH model was verified by comparing predicted and observed toxicity in field-collected sediment samples. There was 86.6% correspondence and no significant difference between predicted and observed toxicity at PAH-contaminated sites. Ecological-effect levels predicted by the {Sigma}PAH model correspond with several sediment-quality guidelines.

  6. Collective dynamics in atomistic models with coupled translational and spin degrees of freedom

    DOE PAGES

    Perera, Dilina; Nicholson, Don M.; Eisenbach, Markus; ...

    2017-01-26

    When using an atomistic model that simultaneously treats the dynamics of translational and spin degrees of freedom, we perform combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations to investigate the mutual influence of the phonons and magnons on their respective frequency spectra and lifetimes in ferromagnetic bcc iron. Furthermore, by calculating the Fourier transforms of the space- and time-displaced correlation functions, the characteristic frequencies and the linewidths of the vibrational and magnetic excitation modes were determined. A comparison of the results with that of the stand-alone molecular dynamics and spin dynamics simulations reveals that the dynamic interplay between the phonons and magnonsmore » leads to a shift in the respective frequency spectra and a decrease in the lifetimes. Moreover, in the presence of lattice vibrations, additional longitudinal magnetic excitations were observed with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonons.« less

  7. Collective dynamics in atomistic models with coupled translational and spin degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Dilina; Nicholson, Don M.; Eisenbach, Markus; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Landau, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Using an atomistic model that simultaneously treats the dynamics of translational and spin degrees of freedom, we perform combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations to investigate the mutual influence of the phonons and magnons on their respective frequency spectra and lifetimes in ferromagnetic bcc iron. By calculating the Fourier transforms of the space- and time-displaced correlation functions, the characteristic frequencies and the linewidths of the vibrational and magnetic excitation modes were determined. Comparison of the results with that of the stand-alone molecular dynamics and spin dynamics simulations reveals that the dynamic interplay between the phonons and magnons leads to a shift in the respective frequency spectra and a decrease in the lifetimes. Moreover, in the presence of lattice vibrations, additional longitudinal magnetic excitations were observed with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonons.

  8. Nanostructuring for enhanced absorption and carrier collection in CZTS-based solar cells: Coupled optical and electrical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelraouf, Omar A. M.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2016-04-01

    Earth-abundant Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is being considered as a potential photon-absorbing layer for low cost thin film solar cells. Nanostructured light trapping is recently investigated as a technique for enhancing the efficiency of CZTS solar cells. Herein, we used coupled electrical and optical modeling for different combinations of nanostructured CZTS solar cells to guide optimization of such nanostructures. The model is validated by a comparison of simulated I-V curves with previously reported experimental data. A very good agreement is achieved. Simulations are used to demonstrate that nanostructures can be tailored to maximize the absorption, carrier generation, carrier collection, and efficiency in CZTS solar cells. All proposed nanostructured solar cells showed enhancement in the overall conversion efficiency.

  9. Evaluating the efficiency of municipalities in collecting and processing municipal solid waste: a shared input DEA-model.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Nicky; De Jaeger, Simon

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposed an adjusted "shared-input" version of the popular efficiency measurement technique Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) that enables evaluating municipality waste collection and processing performances in settings in which one input (waste costs) is shared among treatment efforts of multiple municipal solid waste fractions. The main advantage of this version of DEA is that it not only provides an estimate of the municipalities overall cost efficiency but also estimates of the municipalities' cost efficiency in the treatment of the different fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW). To illustrate the practical usefulness of the shared input DEA-model, we apply the model to data on 293 municipalities in Flanders, Belgium, for the year 2008.

  10. Does Model Development Ahead of Data Collection Have Merit? A Case for Advancing Non-Local Fluvial Transport Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voller, V. R.; Falcini, F.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ganti, V.; Paola, C.; Hill, K. M.; Swenson, J. B.; Longjas, A.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to suggest how experiments might be constructed to provide data to test recently proposed phenomenological non-local model of depositional transport; formulated on the basis of morphological arguments but with limited data. A sound methodology for developing models of geological systems is to first collect significant data and then carefully identify an appropriate model form and parameters. An alternative approach is to construct what might be referred to as a phenomenological model, where limited observation of the system is used to suggest an appropriate mathematical form that matches the critical nature of the physical system behavior. By their nature, phenomenological models are often developed within a fairly narrow range of observations. In this way, interesting findings can occur when the models are modified and exercised across wider physical domains, in particular in domains where there is an absence of hard data to corroborate or invalidate the model predictions. Although this approach might be frown on my some, it is important to recognize the stellar and proven track record of phenomenological models, which despite the original scarcity of data, often pave the way to new perspectives and important findings. The poster child example is the Higgs boson. In the early 60's manipulation of the quantum field equations revealed a critical inconsistency related to the masses of fundamental particles that could only be mathematically resolved by assuming that they operated within a field that would exert drag; this conjecture took almost fifty years and the vast experimental operation of the Large Hadron Collider to physically confirm. In this work we examine a current phenomenological model used to describe non-local transport in fluvial sediment domains. This model has its genesis in attempting to describe the shapes of hill slope profiles, while acknowledging the fact that two points of the landscape with the same local slope are

  11. Collective molecular dissipation on Navier-Stokes macroscopic scales: Accretion disc viscous modeling in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    In the nonlinear Navier-Stokes viscous flow dynamics, physical damping is mathematically accomplished by a braking term in the momentum equation, corresponding to a heating term in the energy equation, both responsible of the conversion of mechanical energy into heat. In such two terms, it is essential the role of the viscous stress tensor, relative to contiguous macroscopic moving flow components, depending on the macroscopic viscosity coefficient ν. A working formulation for ν can always be found analytically, tuning some arbitrary parameters in the current known formulations, according to the geometry, morphology and physics of the flow. Instead, in this paper, we write an alternative hybrid formulation for ν, where molecular parameters are also included. Our expression for ν has a more physical interpretation of the internal damping in dilute gases because the macroscopic viscosity is related to the small scale molecular dissipation, not strictly dependent on the flow morphology, as well as it is free of any arbitrary parameter. Results for some basic 2D tests are shown in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. An application to the 3D accretion disc modeling for low mass cataclysmic variables is also discussed. Consequences of the macroscopic viscosity coefficient reformulation in a more strictly physical terms on the thermal conductivity coefficient for dilute gases are also discussed.

  12. Collective Commitment and Collective Efficacy: A Theoretical Model for Understanding the Motivational Dynamics of Dilemma Resolution in Inter-Professional Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jo; Norwich, Brahm

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model which conceptualizes inter-professional and multi-agency collaborative working, at the level of the individual within a group. This arises from a review of the literature around joint working, and is based on social psychological theories which refer to shared goals. The model assumes that collective…

  13. Stochastic simulation tools and continuum models for describing two-dimensional collective cell spreading with universal growth functions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wang; Penington, Catherine J; McCue, Scott W; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-10-07

    Two-dimensional collective cell migration assays are used to study cancer and tissue repair. These assays involve combined cell migration and cell proliferation processes, both of which are modulated by cell-to-cell crowding. Previous discrete models of collective cell migration assays involve a nearest-neighbour proliferation mechanism where crowding effects are incorporated by aborting potential proliferation events if the randomly chosen target site is occupied. There are two limitations of this traditional approach: (i) it seems unreasonable to abort a potential proliferation event based on the occupancy of a single, randomly chosen target site; and, (ii) the continuum limit description of this mechanism leads to the standard logistic growth function, but some experimental evidence suggests that cells do not always proliferate logistically. Motivated by these observations, we introduce a generalised proliferation mechanism which allows non-nearest neighbour proliferation events to take place over a template of [Formula: see text] concentric rings of lattice sites. Further, the decision to abort potential proliferation events is made using a crowding function, f(C), which accounts for the density of agents within a group of sites rather than dealing with the occupancy of a single randomly chosen site. Analysing the continuum limit description of the stochastic model shows that the standard logistic source term, [Formula: see text], where λ is the proliferation rate, is generalised to a universal growth function, [Formula: see text]. Comparing the solution of the continuum description with averaged simulation data indicates that the continuum model performs well for many choices of f(C) and r. For nonlinear f(C), the quality of the continuum-discrete match increases with r.

  14. Stochastic simulation tools and continuum models for describing two-dimensional collective cell spreading with universal growth functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wang; Penington, Catherine J.; McCue, Scott W.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional collective cell migration assays are used to study cancer and tissue repair. These assays involve combined cell migration and cell proliferation processes, both of which are modulated by cell-to-cell crowding. Previous discrete models of collective cell migration assays involve a nearest-neighbour proliferation mechanism where crowding effects are incorporated by aborting potential proliferation events if the randomly chosen target site is occupied. There are two limitations of this traditional approach: (i) it seems unreasonable to abort a potential proliferation event based on the occupancy of a single, randomly chosen target site; and, (ii) the continuum limit description of this mechanism leads to the standard logistic growth function, but some experimental evidence suggests that cells do not always proliferate logistically. Motivated by these observations, we introduce a generalised proliferation mechanism which allows non-nearest neighbour proliferation events to take place over a template of r≥slant 1 concentric rings of lattice sites. Further, the decision to abort potential proliferation events is made using a crowding function, f(C), which accounts for the density of agents within a group of sites rather than dealing with the occupancy of a single randomly chosen site. Analysing the continuum limit description of the stochastic model shows that the standard logistic source term, λ C(1-C), where λ is the proliferation rate, is generalised to a universal growth function, λ C f(C). Comparing the solution of the continuum description with averaged simulation data indicates that the continuum model performs well for many choices of f(C) and r. For nonlinear f(C), the quality of the continuum-discrete match increases with r.

  15. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  16. Collective modes and Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in a magnetic field in the planar Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Gaoqing; He, Lianyi; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2014-09-15

    It is known that a constant magnetic field is a strong catalyst of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in 2+1 dimensions, leading to generating dynamical fermion mass even at weakest attraction. In this work we investigate the collective modes associated with the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in a constant magnetic field in the (2+1)-dimensional Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model with continuous U(1) chiral symmetry. We introduce a self-consistent scheme to evaluate the propagators of the collective modes at the leading order in 1/N. The contributions from the vacuum and from the magnetic field are separated such that we can employ the well-established regularization schememore » for the case of vanishing magnetic field. The same scheme can be applied to the study of the next-to-leading order correction in 1/N. We show that the sigma mode is always a lightly bound state with its mass being twice the dynamical fermion mass for arbitrary strength of the magnetic field. Since the dynamics of the collective modes is always 2+1 dimensional, the finite temperature transition should be of the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) type. We determine the KT transition temperature TKT as well as the mass melting temperature T* as a function of the magnetic field. It is found that the pseudogap domain TKT < T < T* is enlarged with increasing strength of the magnetic field. The influence of a chiral imbalance or axial chemical potential μ5 is also studied. We find that even a constant axial chemical potential μ5 can lead to inverse magnetic catalysis of the KT transition temperature in 2+1 dimensions. As a result, the inverse magnetic catalysis behavior is actually the de Haas–van Alphen oscillation induced by the interplay between the magnetic field and the Fermi surface.« less

  17. Collective modes and Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in a magnetic field in the planar Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Gaoqing; He, Lianyi; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2014-09-15

    It is known that a constant magnetic field is a strong catalyst of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in 2+1 dimensions, leading to generating dynamical fermion mass even at weakest attraction. In this work we investigate the collective modes associated with the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking in a constant magnetic field in the (2+1)-dimensional Nambu–Jona-Lasinio model with continuous U(1) chiral symmetry. We introduce a self-consistent scheme to evaluate the propagators of the collective modes at the leading order in 1/N. The contributions from the vacuum and from the magnetic field are separated such that we can employ the well-established regularization scheme for the case of vanishing magnetic field. The same scheme can be applied to the study of the next-to-leading order correction in 1/N. We show that the sigma mode is always a lightly bound state with its mass being twice the dynamical fermion mass for arbitrary strength of the magnetic field. Since the dynamics of the collective modes is always 2+1 dimensional, the finite temperature transition should be of the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) type. We determine the KT transition temperature TKT as well as the mass melting temperature T* as a function of the magnetic field. It is found that the pseudogap domain TKT < T < T* is enlarged with increasing strength of the magnetic field. The influence of a chiral imbalance or axial chemical potential μ5 is also studied. We find that even a constant axial chemical potential μ5 can lead to inverse magnetic catalysis of the KT transition temperature in 2+1 dimensions. As a result, the inverse magnetic catalysis behavior is actually the de Haas–van Alphen oscillation induced by the interplay between the magnetic field and the Fermi surface.

  18. Collection Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains collection mapping for library media collections. Discusses purposes for creating collection maps, including helping with selection and weeding decisions, showing how the collection supports the curriculum, and making budget decisions; and methods of data collection, including evaluating a collaboratively taught unit with the classroom…

  19. PsN-Toolkit--a collection of computer intensive statistical methods for non-linear mixed effect modeling using NONMEM.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, Lars; Pihlgren, Pontus; Jonsson, E Niclas; Jonsson, Niclas

    2005-09-01

    PsN-Toolkit is a collection of statistical tools for pharmacometric data analysis using the non-linear mixed effect modeling software NONMEM. The toolkit is object oriented and written in the programming language Perl using the programming library Perl-speaks-NONMEM (PsN). Five methods: the Bootstrap, the Jackknife, Log-likelihood Profiling, Case-deletion Diagnostics and Stepwise Covariate Model building are included as separate classes and may be used in user-written Perl scripts or through stand-alone command line applications. The tools are designed with the ability to cooperate and with an emphasis on common structures for workflow and result handling. Parallel execution of independent tool sections is supported on shared memory multiprocessor (SMP) computers, Mosix/openMosix clusters and distributed computing environments following the NorduGrid standard. In conclusion, PsN-Toolkit makes it easier to use the Bootstrap, the Jackknife, Log-likelihood Profiling, Case-deletion Diagnostics and Stepwise Covariate Model building in pharmacometric data analysis.

  20. Exciton dissociation at donor-acceptor heterojunctions: Dynamics using the collective effective mode representation of the spin-boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Chenel, Aurélie; Mangaud, Etienne; Burghardt, Irene E-mail: chris@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Meier, Christoph E-mail: chris@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Desouter-Lecomte, Michèle E-mail: chris@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr

    2014-01-28

    Following the recent quantum dynamics investigation of the charge transfer at an oligothiophene-fullerene heterojunction by the multi-configuration time dependent Hartree method [H. Tamura, R. Martinazzo, M. Ruckenbauer and I. Burghardt, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A540 (2012)], we revisit the transfer process by a perturbative non-Markovian master equation treated by the time local auxiliary density matrix approach. We compare the efficiency of the spin-boson model calibrated by quantum chemistry with the effective mode representation. A collective mode is extracted from the spin-boson spectral density. It is weakly coupled to a residual bath of vibrational modes, allowing second-order dynamics. The electron transfer is analyzed for a sampling of inter-fragment distances showing the fine interplay of the electronic coupling and energy gap on the relaxation. The electronic coherence, expected to play a role in the process, is preserved during about 200 fs.

  1. Collection Directions: The Evolution of Library Collections and Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Lorcan; Malpas, Constance; Lavoie, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article takes a broad view of the evolution of collecting behaviors in a network environment and suggests some future directions based on various simple models. The authors look at the changing dynamics of print collections, at the greater engagement with research and learning behaviors, and at trends in scholarly communication. The goal is…

  2. Calcium dynamics and homeostasis in a mathematical model of the principal cell of the cortical collecting tubule

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) dynamics are incorporated into a mathematical model of the principal cell in the cortical collecting tubule developed earlier in Strieter et al. (1992a. Am. J Physiol. 263:F1063-1075). The Ca components are modeled after the Othmer-Tang model for IP(3)-sensitive calcium channels (1993, in Experimental and Theoretical Advances in Biological Pattern Formation, 295-319). There are IP(3)-sensitive Ca channels and ATP-driven pumps on the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. Calcium enters the cell passively down its electrochemical gradient. A Ca pump and Na/Ca exchange in the basolateral membrane are responsible for the extrusion of cytoplasmic calcium. Na/Ca exchange can also operate in reverse mode to transport Ca into the cell. Regulatory effects of cytoplasmic Ca on the apical Na channels are modeled after experimental data that indicate apical Na permeability varies inversely with cytoplasmic Ca concentration. Numerical results on changes in intracellular Ca caused by decreasing NaCl in the bath and the lumen are similar to those from experiments in Bourdeau and Lau (1990. Am. J Physiol. 258:F1497-1503). This match of simulation and experiment requires the synergistic action of the Na/Ca exchanger and the Ca regulated apical Na permeability. In a homogeneous medium, cytoplasmic Ca becomes oscillatory when extracellular Na is severely decreased, as observed in experiments of cultured principal cells (Koster, H., C. van Os and R. Bindels. 1993. Kidney Int.43:828-836). This essentially pathological situation arises because the hyperpolarization of membrane potential caused by Na-free medium increases Ca influx into the cell, while the Na/Ca exchanger is inactivated by the low extracellular Na and can no longer move Ca out of the cell effectively. The raising of the total amount of intracellular Ca induces oscillatory Ca movement between the cytoplasm and the endoplasmic reticulum. Ca homeostasis is investigated under the condition of severe

  3. Modeling the influence of string collective phenomena on the long range rapidity correlations between the transverse momentum and the multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Andronov, E.; Vechernin, V.

    2016-01-22

    The long-range rapidity correlations between the multiplicities (n-n) and the transverse momentum and the multiplicity (pT-n) of charge particles are analyzed in the framework of the simple string inspired model with two types of sources. The sources of the first type correspond to the initial strings formed in a hadronic collision. The sources of the second type imitate the appearance of the emitters of a new kind resulting from interaction (fusion) of the initial strings. The model enabled to describe effectively the influence of the string fusion effects on the strength both the n-n and the pT-n correlations. It was found that in the region, where the process of string fusion comes into play, the calculation results predict the non-monotonic behaviour of the n-n and pT-n correlation coefficients with the growth of the mean number of initial strings, i.e. with the increase of the collision centrality. It was shown also that the increase of the event-by-event fluctuation in the number of primary strings leads to the change of the pT-n correlation sign from negative to positive. One can try to search these signatures of string collective phenomena in interactions of various nuclei at different energies varying the class of collision centrality and its width.

  4. Can Government Be Self-Organized? A Mathematical Model of the Collective Social Organization of Ancient Teotihuacan, Central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Tom; Gershenson, Carlos; Manzanilla, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    Teotihuacan was the first urban civilization of Mesoamerica and one of the largest of the ancient world. Following a tradition in archaeology to equate social complexity with centralized hierarchy, it is widely believed that the city’s origin and growth was controlled by a lineage of powerful individuals. However, much data is indicative of a government of co-rulers, and artistic traditions expressed an egalitarian ideology. Yet this alternative keeps being marginalized because the problems of collective action make it difficult to conceive how such a coalition could have functioned in principle. We therefore devised a mathematical model of the city’s hypothetical network of representatives as a formal proof of concept that widespread cooperation was realizable in a fully distributed manner. In the model, decisions become self-organized into globally optimal configurations even though local representatives behave and modify their relations in a rational and selfish manner. This self-optimization crucially depends on occasional communal interruptions of normal activity, and it is impeded when sections of the network are too independent. We relate these insights to theories about community-wide rituals at Teotihuacan and the city’s eventual disintegration. PMID:25303308

  5. Can government be self-organized? A mathematical model of the collective social organization of ancient Teotihuacan, central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Froese, Tom; Gershenson, Carlos; Manzanilla, Linda R

    2014-01-01

    Teotihuacan was the first urban civilization of Mesoamerica and one of the largest of the ancient world. Following a tradition in archaeology to equate social complexity with centralized hierarchy, it is widely believed that the city's origin and growth was controlled by a lineage of powerful individuals. However, much data is indicative of a government of co-rulers, and artistic traditions expressed an egalitarian ideology. Yet this alternative keeps being marginalized because the problems of collective action make it difficult to conceive how such a coalition could have functioned in principle. We therefore devised a mathematical model of the city's hypothetical network of representatives as a formal proof of concept that widespread cooperation was realizable in a fully distributed manner. In the model, decisions become self-organized into globally optimal configurations even though local representatives behave and modify their relations in a rational and selfish manner. This self-optimization crucially depends on occasional communal interruptions of normal activity, and it is impeded when sections of the network are too independent. We relate these insights to theories about community-wide rituals at Teotihuacan and the city's eventual disintegration.

  6. Evaluating the efficiency of municipalities in collecting and processing municipal solid waste: A shared input DEA-model

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, Nicky; De Jaeger, Simon

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexity in local waste management calls for more in depth efficiency analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shared-input Data Envelopment Analysis can provide solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable room for the Flemish municipalities to improve their cost efficiency. - Abstract: This paper proposed an adjusted 'shared-input' version of the popular efficiency measurement technique Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) that enables evaluating municipality waste collection and processing performances in settings in which one input (waste costs) is shared among treatment efforts of multiple municipal solid waste fractions. The main advantage of this version of DEA is that it not only provides an estimate of the municipalities overall cost efficiency but also estimates of the municipalities' cost efficiency in the treatment of the different fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW). To illustrate the practical usefulness of the shared input DEA-model, we apply the model to data on 293 municipalities in Flanders, Belgium, for the year 2008.

  7. Analysis of Diffusion-Controlled Dissolution from Polydisperse Collections of Drug Particles with an Assessed Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanxing; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Lindfors, Lennart; Brasseur, James G

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a "hierarchical" modeling strategy designed to be systematically extensible to increase the detail of dissolution predictions from polydisperse collections of drug particles and to be placed on firm mathematical and physical foundations with diffusion-dominated dissolution at its core to predict dissolution and the evolution of particle size distribution. We assess the model with experimental data and demonstrate higher accuracy by treating the polydisperse nature of dissolution. A level in the hierarchy is applied to study elements of diffusion-driven dissolution, in particular the role of particle-size distribution width with varying dose level and the influences of "confinement" on the process of dissolution. Confinement influences surface molecular flux, directly by the increase in bulk concentration and indirectly by the relative volume of particles to container. We find that the dissolution process can be broadly categorized within three "regimes" defined by the ratio of total concentration Ctot to solubility CS . Sink conditions apply in the first regime, when C tot /CS<∼0.1. When C tot /CS>∼5 (regime 3) dissolution is dominated by confinement and normalized saturation time follows a simple power law relationship. Regime 2 is characterized by a "saturation singularity" where dissolution is sensitive to both initial particle size distribution and confinement.

  8. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  9. A Collective Case Study of Secondary Students' Model-Based Inquiry on Natural Selection through Programming in an Agent-Based Modeling Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Lin

    This is a collective case study seeking to develop detailed descriptions of how programming an agent-based simulation influences a group of 8 th grade students' model-based inquiry (MBI) by examining students' agent-based programmable modeling (ABPM) processes and the learning outcomes. The context of the present study was a biology unit on natural selection implemented in a charter school of a major California city during spring semester of 2009. Eight 8th grade students, two boys and six girls, participated in this study. All of them were low socioeconomic status (SES). English was a second language for all of them, but they had been identified as fluent English speakers at least a year before the study. None of them had learned either natural selection or programming before the study. The study spanned over 7 weeks and was comprised of two study phases. In phase one the subject students learned natural selection in science classroom and how to do programming in NetLogo, an ABPM tool, in a computer lab; in phase two, the subject students were asked to program a simulation of adaptation based on the natural selection model in NetLogo. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected in this study. The data resources included (1) pre and post test questionnaire, (2) student in-class worksheet, (3) programming planning sheet, (4) code-conception matching sheet, (5) student NetLogo projects, (6) videotaped programming processes, (7) final interview, and (8) investigator's field notes. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were applied to analyze the gathered data. The findings suggested that students made progress on understanding adaptation phenomena and natural selection at the end of ABPM-supported MBI learning but the progress was limited. These students still held some misconceptions in their conceptual models, such as the idea that animals need to "learn" to adapt into the environment. Besides, their models of natural selection appeared to be

  10. The Eastern Iowa Community College District Data Collection Matrix Model: A Tool for Functional Area and Program Evaluation. AIR 1990 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Dana Rosenberg; Friedel, Janice Nahra

    A matrix model for the collection, management, and utilization of data was developed at Eastern Iowa Community College District, (Davenport, Iowa) for evaluating institutional effectiveness. The model was examined in relation to various assessment instruments and the evaluation of functional areas and programs. Surveys of six different target…

  11. The Collective Impact Model and Its Potential for Health Promotion: Overview and Case Study of a Healthy Retail Initiative in San Francisco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Johnna; Minkler, Meredith; Lavery, Susana Hennessey; Estrada, Jessica; Falbe, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    As resources for health promotion become more constricted, it is increasingly important to collaborate across sectors, including the private sector. Although many excellent models for cross-sector collaboration have shown promise in the health field, collective impact (CI), an emerging model for creating larger scale change, has yet to receive…

  12. Methods for using groundwater model predictions to guide hydrogeologic data collection, with application to the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hill, M.C.; D'Agnese, F. A.; Faunt, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    Calibrated models of groundwater systems can provide substantial information for guiding data collection. This work considers using such models to guide hydrogeologic data collection for improving model predictions by identifying model parameters that are most important to the predictions. Identification of these important parameters can help guide collection of field data about parameter values and associated flow system features and can lead to improved predictions. Methods for identifying parameters important to predictions include prediction scaled sensitivities (PSS), which account for uncertainty on individual parameters as well as prediction sensitivity to parameters, and a new "value of improved information" (VOII) method presented here, which includes the effects of parameter correlation in addition to individual parameter uncertainty and prediction sensitivity. In this work, the PSS and VOII methods are demonstrated and evaluated using a model of the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system. The predictions of interest are advective transport paths originating at sites of past underground nuclear testing. Results show that for two paths evaluated the most important parameters include a subset of five or six of the 23 defined model parameters. Some of the parameters identified as most important are associated with flow system attributes that do not lie in the immediate vicinity of the paths. Results also indicate that the PSS and VOII methods can identify different important parameters. Because the methods emphasize somewhat different criteria for parameter importance, it is suggested that parameters identified by both methods be carefully considered in subsequent data collection efforts aimed at improving model predictions.

  13. Methods for Using Ground-Water Model Predictions to Guide Hydrogeologic Data Collection, with Applications to the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System

    SciTech Connect

    Claire R. Tiedeman; M.C. Hill; F.A. D'Agnese; C.C. Faunt

    2001-07-31

    Calibrated models of ground-water systems can provide substantial information for guiding data collection. This work considers using such models to guide hydrogeologic data collection for improving model predictions, by identifying model parameters that are most important to the predictions. Identification of these important parameters can help guide collection of field data about parameter values and associated flow-system features that can lead to improved predictions. Methods for identifying parameters important to predictions include prediction scaled sensitivities (PSS), which account for uncertainty on individual parameters as well as prediction sensitivity to parameters, and a new ''value of improved information'' (VOII) method, which includes the effects of parameter correlation in addition to individual parameter uncertainty and prediction sensitivity. The PSS and VOII methods are demonstrated using a model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system. The predictions of interest are advective-transport paths originating at sites of past underground nuclear testing. Results show that for two paths evaluated, the most important parameters include a subset of five or six of the 23 defined model parameters. Some of the parameters identified as most important are associated with flow-system attributes that do not lie in the immediate vicinity of the paths. Results also indicate that the PSS and VOII methods can identify different important parameters. Because the methods emphasize somewhat different criteria for parameter importance, it is suggested that parameters identified by both methods be carefully considered in subsequent data collection efforts aimed at improving model predictions.

  14. Leading malignant cells initiate collective epithelial cell invasion in a three-dimensional heterotypic tumor spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Starchenko, Alina; McGregor, Alexandra L; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2013-06-01

    Solid tumors consist of genetically and phenotypically diverse subpopulations of cancer cells with unique capacities for growth, differentiation, and invasion. While the molecular and microenvironmental bases for heterogeneity are increasingly appreciated, the outcomes of such intratumor heterogeneity, particularly in the context of tumor invasion and metastasis, remain poorly understood. To study heterotypic cell-cell interactions and elucidate the biological consequences of intratumor heterogeneity, we developed a tissue-engineered multicellular spheroid (MCS) co-culture model that recapitulates the cellular diversity and fully three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions that characterize human carcinomas. We found that "invasion-competent" malignant cells induced the collective invasion of otherwise "invasion-incompetent" epithelial cells, and that these two cell types consistently exhibited distinct leader and follower roles during invasion. Analysis of extracellular matrix (ECM) microarchitecture revealed that malignant cell invasion was accompanied by extensive ECM remodeling including matrix alignment and proteolytic track-making. Inhibition of cell contractility- and proteolysis-mediated matrix reorganization prevented leader-follower behavior and malignant cell-induced epithelial cell invasion. These results indicate that heterogeneous subpopulations within a tumor may possess specialized roles during tumor progression and suggest that complex interactions among the various subpopulations of cancer cells within a tumor may regulate critical aspects of tumor biology and affect clinical outcome.

  15. An ISA-TAB-Nano based data collection framework to support data-driven modelling of nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Marchese Robinson, Richard L; Richarz, Andrea-Nicole; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analysis of trends in nanotoxicology data and the development of data driven models for nanotoxicity is facilitated by the reporting of data using a standardised electronic format. ISA-TAB-Nano has been proposed as such a format. However, in order to build useful datasets according to this format, a variety of issues has to be addressed. These issues include questions regarding exactly which (meta)data to report and how to report them. The current article discusses some of the challenges associated with the use of ISA-TAB-Nano and presents a set of resources designed to facilitate the manual creation of ISA-TAB-Nano datasets from the nanotoxicology literature. These resources were developed within the context of the NanoPUZZLES EU project and include data collection templates, corresponding business rules that extend the generic ISA-TAB-Nano specification as well as Python code to facilitate parsing and integration of these datasets within other nanoinformatics resources. The use of these resources is illustrated by a “Toy Dataset” presented in the Supporting Information. The strengths and weaknesses of the resources are discussed along with possible future developments. PMID:26665069

  16. Modeling the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus ensuing heat stroke: iterative cycle of model calibration, identifiability analysis, experimental design and data collection.

    PubMed

    Klett, Hagen; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Dineen, Shauna; Leon, Lisa R; Timmer, Jens; Doyle, Francis J

    2015-02-01

    Heat Stroke (HS) is a life-threatening illness caused by prolonged exposure to heat that causes severe hyperthermia and nervous system abnormalities. The long term consequences of HS are poorly understood and deeper insight is required to find possible treatment strategies. Elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during HS recovery suggest to play a major role in the immune response. In this study, we developed a mathematical model to understand the interactions and dynamics of cytokines in the hypothalamus, the main thermoregulatory center in the brain. Uncertainty and identifiability analysis of the calibrated model parameters revealed non-identifiable parameters due to the limited amount of data. To overcome the lack of identifiability of the parameters, an iterative cycle of optimal experimental design, data collection, re-calibration and model reduction was applied and further informative experiments were suggested. Additionally, a new method of approximating the prior distribution of the parameters for Bayesian optimal experimental design based on the profile likelihood is presented.

  17. Collective pinning model of the mixed state in YBa2Cu3O7-δ : Critical currents and flux creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, J. W.; Cowan, D. L.; Kornecki, M.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic hysteresis and flux creep measurements in single crystal samples of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) are presented for a wide range of B , T phase space. Some of these samples can be described as weakly or collectively pinned. For these, over a large portion of this phase space, the flux creep can be described in terms of thermally activated single-fluxoid motion. A simple model based on maximizing the pinning energy of a fluxoid segment provides a good, semiquantitative picture of the low-temperature data, where the experimentally measured critical current density j is proportional to 1/T and the activation barrier height is proportional to j-μ , where μ=1 . In this model individual fluxoids are pinned by stochastic fluctuations in defect concentration, and are driven over the pinning barriers by critical currents and thermal activation. Incorporating flux lattice elasticity into this simple model leads to new predictions for the low-temperature data and allows the simple model to be extended to higher temperature. There are two distinct effects, both of which can be put in the form of effective current densities. One effective current density js arises from direct fluxoid-fluxoid repulsion, and the second effective current density jr arises from fluxoid relaxation. In YBCO at 7K and 2T , where the measured critical current density is j=8.9×109A/m2 , we find js=0.57×109A/m2(6%) and jr=-2.1×109A/m2 (-20%) . We present a discussion of their origin that leads to plausible temperature and field dependences. The model accounts for the rapid drop of j(T) with increasing temperature, the peak effect in j(B) at high temperature, and the temperature and field dependence of the “critical exponent” μ . Thermal fluxoid vibrations play an important role in the pinning, and we find effects consistent with calculations in the literature. The model postulates that fluxoid motion takes place by hopping in segments on a characteristic length scale lmodel . In the model we

  18. Collecting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles P.

    1983-01-01

    An improved collecting apparatus for small aquatic or airborne organisms such as plankton, larval fish, insects, etc. The improvement constitutes an apertured removal container within which is retained a collecting bag, and which is secured at the apex of a conical collecting net. Such collectors are towed behind a vessel or vehicle with the open end of the conical net facing forward for trapping the aquatic or airborne organisms within the collecting bag, while allowing the water or air to pass through the apertures in the container. The container is readily removable from the collecting net whereby the collecting bag can be quickly removed and replaced for further sample collection. The collecting bag is provided with means for preventing the bag from being pulled into the container by the water or air flowing therethrough.

  19. MODEL IMPLEMENTATION TO EVALUATE THE COLLECTIVE FUTURE RADIONUCLIDE RELEASES FROM MULTIPLE FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.; Smith, F.; Hamm, L.; Phifer, M.; Swingle, R.

    2009-12-15

    A comprehensive Composite Analysis (CA) has been performed considering 152 sources of residual radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As part of the CA a model was developed to perform deterministic base case calculations using the commercial GoldSim software. The model treated transport and decay of radionuclides as they are released at the source location and transported through the source region, vadose zone and aquifer to stream outcrops and from there to the Savannah River. A dose to the public was calculated assuming recreational use of stream water and residential use of river water. The specific results from the GoldSim modeling evaluation conducted as part of the CA indicate that the collective maximum dose resulting from the release of radionuclides from all 152 anticipated SRS End State sources of residual radionuclides demonstrate that maximum exposures expected to occur to any offsite MOP will not approach the 300 uSv/yr (30 mrem/yr) dose constraint, and in fact are currently estimated to be only 10% of this. For each of the POA's evaluated, the highest cumulative dose is realized at the Lower Three Runs POA and is calculated to be 29.7 uSv/yr (2.97 mrem/yr). The major dose contributing radionuclide for all of the POA's, with the exception of Upper Three Runs, was {sup 137}Cs in the contaminated streambed sediments. In Upper Three Runs {sup 237}Np from the H-Area Canyon Building was the major dose contributing radionuclide. The major exposure pathway for the SRS streams (where the Recreational Scenario was evaluated) was by the ingestion of fish. In the Savannah River, where the Residential Scenario was evaluated, ingestion of vegetation was the dominant exposure pathway. The uncertainty evaluation lends added assurance to the conclusion that the 30 mrem/yr dose constraint will not be exceeded, in that even at the 95th Percentile, this performance measure is not expected to be exceeded. It must also be added that these conclusions

  20. Collections Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCandido, Robert

    Collections conservation is an approach to the preservation treatment of books and book-like materials that is conceptualized and organized in terms of large groups of materials. This guide is intended to enable a library to evaluate its current collections conservation activities. The introduction describes collections conservation and gives…

  1. Proposal of a new model to improve the collection of small WEEE: a pilot project for the recovery and recycling of toys.

    PubMed

    Solé, Miquel; Watson, Jenna; Puig, Rita; Fullana-i-Palmer, Pere

    2012-11-01

    A new collection model was designed and tested in Catalonia (Spain) to foster the separate collection and recycling of electrical and electronic toys, with the participation of selected primary and secondary schools, as well as waste collection points and municipalities. This project approach is very original and important because small household WEEE has low rates of collection (16-21% WEEE within the EU or 5-7% WEEE in Spain) and no research on new approaches to enhance the collection of small WEEE is found in the literature. The project was successful in achieving enhanced toys collection and recycling rates, which went up from the national Spanish average of 0.5% toys before the project to 1.9 and 6% toys during the two project years, respectively. The environmental benefits of the campaign were calculated through a life-cycle approach, accounting for the avoided impact afforded by the reuse of the toys and the recycling of the valuable materials contained therein (such as metals, batteries and circuit boards) and subtracting the additional environmental burdens associated with the establishment of the collection campaign.

  2. Assessing the performance of gas collection systems in select Chinese landfills according to the LandGEM model: drawbacks and potential direction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Yue, Dongbei; Li, Rundong; Yang, Ting; Liu, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    In China, municipal solid waste (MSW) is primarily treated by landfilling. Landfill gas (LFG) collection effectively reduces methane emission from MSW landfills. An accurate system of LFG collection is important in landfill planning, design, and operation. However, China has not developed such systems. In this study, the efficiency of methane collection is calculated in three Chinese landfills with different collection systems (A: vertical wells for MSW before 2010; combined horizontal trenches and under-membrane pipes for MSW from 2011 onwards; B: combined horizontal trenches and vertical wells; C: vertical wells only). This efficiency was computed by dividing the quantity of methane obtained from landfill operation records by the quantity estimated based on the LandGEM model. Results show that the collection efficiencies of landfills with vertical wells and/or horizontal pipes ranged from 8.3% to 27.9%, whereas those of a system equipped with geomembrane reached 65.3%. The poor performance of the landfills was attributed to the open burning of early-stage LFG, LFG release from cracks in high-density polyethylene covers, and high levels of leachate within a landfill site. Therefore, this study proposes an integrated LFG collection system that can remove leachate and collect gas from landfills that accept waste with high moisture content.

  3. Collection Mapping and Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes the use of collection mapping to assess media collections of Aurora, Colorado, Public Schools. Case studies of elementary, middle, and high school media centers describe materials selection and weeding and identify philosophies that library collections should support school curriculum, and teacher-library media specialist cooperation in…

  4. Calculation of the number of collective degrees of freedom and of the admissible cluster size for isotherms in the Van-der-Waals model in supercritical states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, general questions concerning equilibrium and non-equilibrium states are discussed. Using the Van-der-Waals model, the relationship between Gentile statistics and non-ideal gas is demonstrated. The second virial coefficient is expressed in terms of collective degrees of freedom. The admissible cluster size at given temperature is determined.

  5. EVALUATION OF THE CMB AND PMF MODELS USING ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN FINE PARTICULATE MATTER COLLECTED DURING THE PITTSBURGH AIR QUALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research investigated different strategies for source apportionment of airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected as part of the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Two source receptor models were used, the EPA Chemical Mass Balance 8.2 (CMB) and EPA Positive Matrix Facto...

  6. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  7. Collective Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrami, Bahador; Didino, Daniele; Frith, Chris; Butterworth, Brian; Rees, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    Many joint decisions in everyday life (e.g., Which bar is less crowded?) depend on approximate enumeration, but very little is known about the psychological characteristics of counting together. Here we systematically investigated collective approximate enumeration. Pairs of participants made individual and collective enumeration judgments in a…

  8. Jay's Collectibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappel, James J.; Gillman, Jason R., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in collectibles of many types, as indicated by the popularity of television programs such as the History Channel's "Pawn Stars" and "American Pickers" and the Public Broadcasting Service's "Antiques Road Show." The availability of online auction sites such as eBay has enabled many people to collect items of interest as a…

  9. Genetic structure and linkage disequilibrium in a diverse, representative collection of the C4 model plant, Sorghum bicolor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To facilitate the mapping of genes in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] underlying economically important traits, we analyzed the genetic structure and linkage disequilibrium in a sorghum mini core collection of 242 landraces with 14,739 SNPs. The SNPs were produced using a highly multiplexed g...

  10. Response surface modeling of photogenerated charge collection of silver-based plasmonic dye-sensitized solar cell using central composite design experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, Samaila; Shafie, Suhaidi; Rashid, Suraya Abdul; Jaafar, Haslina; Khalifa, Ali

    In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have been prepared and successfully incorporated in TiO2 nanopowder and used in dye-sensitized solar cell as photoanode. The effect of the AgNP concentration and photoanode film thickness on the charge collection efficiency of a photogenerated electron at the external circuit was investigated using response surface methodology. A multiple regression analysis of second order polynomial was employed to fit the experimental data and an empirical model was subsequently developed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results show that two independent variables (AgNP concentration and photoanode film thickness) have significantly influenced the charge collection efficiency of the silver-based plasmonic DSSC. An optimum charge collection of 64.3% was obtained at AgNP concentration and film thickness of 5%wt and 10 μm, respectively.

  11. Micrometeorite Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toubes, Joe; Hoff, Darrel

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to collect micrometeorites and suggests a number of related activities such as determining the number of meteors entering the atmosphere and determining the composition of the micrometeorites. (BR)

  12. Models of collective cell behaviour with crowding effects: comparing lattice-based and lattice-free approaches.

    PubMed

    Plank, Michael J; Simpson, Matthew J

    2012-11-07

    Individual-based models describing the migration and proliferation of a population of cells frequently restrict the cells to a predefined lattice. An implicit assumption of this type of lattice-based model is that a proliferative population will always eventually fill the lattice. Here, we develop a new lattice-free individual-based model that incorporates cell-to-cell crowding effects. We also derive approximate mean-field descriptions for the lattice-free model in two special cases motivated by commonly used experimental set-ups. Lattice-free simulation results are compared with these mean-field descriptions and with a corresponding lattice-based model. Data from a proliferation experiment are used to estimate the parameters for the new model, including the cell proliferation rate, showing that the model fits the data well. An important aspect of the lattice-free model is that the confluent cell density is not predefined, as with lattice-based models, but an emergent model property. As a consequence of the more realistic, irregular configuration of cells in the lattice-free model, the population growth rate is much slower at high cell densities and the population cannot reach the same confluent density as an equivalent lattice-based model.

  13. Comparative study of spectral diffuse-only and diffuse-specular radiative transfer models and field-collected data in the LWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar M.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Meola, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity of hyper-spectral remote sensing to the directional reflectance of surfaces was studied using both laboratory and field measurements. Namely, the effects of the specular- and diffuse-reflectance properties of a set of eight samples, ranging from high to low in both total reflectance and specularity, on diffuse-only and diffusespecular radiative transfer models in the long-wave infrared (LWIR, 7-14-μm wavelength) were studied. The samples were measured in the field as a set of eight panels, each in two orientations, with surface normal pointing toward zenith and tipped at 45° from zenith. The field-collected data also included down-welling spectral sky radiance at several angles from zenith to the horizon, ground spectral radiance, panel spectral radiances in both orientations, Infragold® spectral radiances in both orientations near each panel location, and panel temperatures. Laboratory measurements included spectral hemispherical, specular and diffuse directional reflectance (HDR, SDR and DDR) for each sample for several reflectance angles with respect to the surface normal. The diffuse-only radiative transfer model used the HDR data, while the diffuse-specular model used the SDR and DDR data. Both calculated spectral reflected and self-emitted radiances for each panel, using the field-collected sky radiance data to avoid uncertainties associated with atmospheric models. The modeled spectral radiances were then compared to the field-collected values to quantify differences in moving from an HDR-based model to an SDR/DDR model in the LWIR for a variety of surface-reflectance types.

  14. Investment into the future of microbial resources: culture collection funding models and BRC business plans for biological resource centres.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; McCluskey, Kevin; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2014-01-01

    Through their long history of public service, diverse microbial Biological Resource Centres (mBRCs) have made myriad contributions to society and science. They have enabled the maintenance of specimens isolated before antibiotics, made available strains showing the development and change of pathogenicity toward animals, humans and plants, and have maintained and provided reference strains to ensure quality and reproducibility of science. However, this has not been achieved without considerable financial commitment. Different collections have unique histories and their support is often tied to their origins. However many collections have grown to serve large constituencies and need to develop novel funding mechanisms. Moreover, several international initiatives have described mBRCs as a factor in economic development and have led to the increased professionalism among mBRCs.

  15. A New Model for the Brittle-to-Ductile Transition Based on a Collective Dislocation Generation Instability: Theory and Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Khantha 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Univ of Pennsylvania 133 South 36th St ., Suite 300 Philadelphia, PA 19104-3246 9...Khantha, D. P. Pope and V. Vitek, Acta mater. 45, 4687 (1997). 6. C. St . John , Philos. Mag. 32,1193 (1975). 7. H. A. Lipsitt, D. Shechtman and E...Collective Dislocation Generation Instability: Theory and Experiment 1998 5. FUNDING NUMBERS F49620-95-1-0143 6. AUTHOR( S ) V. Vitek, D. P. Pope, M

  16. Blood Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The method that is used for the collection, storage and real-time analysis of blood and other bodily fluids has been licensed to DBCD, Inc. by NASA. The result of this patent licensing agreement has been the development of a commercial product that can provide serum or plasma from whole blood volumes of 20 microliters to 4 milliliters. The device has a fibrous filter with a pore size of less than about 3 microns, and is coated with a mixture of mannitol and plasma fraction protein. The coating causes the cellular fraction to be trapped by the small pores, leaving the cellular fraction intact on the fibrous filter while the acellular fraction passes through the filter for collection in unaltered form from the serum sample collection chamber. The method used by this product is useful to NASA for blood analysis on manned space missions.

  17. A Prototype Digital Library for 3D Collections: Tools To Capture, Model, Analyze, and Query Complex 3D Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jeremy; Razdan, Anshuman

    The Partnership for Research in Spatial Modeling (PRISM) project at Arizona State University (ASU) developed modeling and analytic tools to respond to the limitations of two-dimensional (2D) data representations perceived by affiliated discipline scientists, and to take advantage of the enhanced capabilities of three-dimensional (3D) data that…

  18. Using Physical and Computer Simulations of Collective Behaviour as an Introduction to Modelling Concepts for Applied Biologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rands, Sean A.

    2012-01-01

    Models are an important tool in science: not only do they act as a convenient device for describing a system or problem, but they also act as a conceptual tool for framing and exploring hypotheses. Models, and in particular computer simulations, are also an important education tool for training scientists, but it is difficult to teach students the…

  19. Bio-AIMS Collection of Chemoinformatics Web Tools based on Molecular Graph Information and Artificial Intelligence Models.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Gonzalez-Diaz, Humberto; Garcia, Rafael; Loza, Mabel; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular information encoding into molecular descriptors is the first step into in silico Chemoinformatics methods in Drug Design. The Machine Learning methods are a complex solution to find prediction models for specific biological properties of molecules. These models connect the molecular structure information such as atom connectivity (molecular graphs) or physical-chemical properties of an atom/group of atoms to the molecular activity (Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationship, QSAR). Due to the complexity of the proteins, the prediction of their activity is a complicated task and the interpretation of the models is more difficult. The current review presents a series of 11 prediction models for proteins, implemented as free Web tools on an Artificial Intelligence Model Server in Biosciences, Bio-AIMS (http://bio-aims.udc.es/TargetPred.php). Six tools predict protein activity, two models evaluate drug - protein target interactions and the other three calculate protein - protein interactions. The input information is based on the protein 3D structure for nine models, 1D peptide amino acid sequence for three tools and drug SMILES formulas for two servers. The molecular graph descriptor-based Machine Learning models could be useful tools for in silico screening of new peptides/proteins as future drug targets for specific treatments.

  20. A Latent Markov Model for the Analysis of Longitudinal Data Collected in Continuous Time: States, Durations, and Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockenholt, Ulf

    2005-01-01

    Markov models provide a general framework for analyzing and interpreting time dependencies in psychological applications. Recent work extended Markov models to the case of latent states because frequently psychological states are not directly observable and subject to measurement error. This article presents a further generalization of latent…

  1. Wastewater Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjee, Samar; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater collection systems and components. This review covers: (1) planning, (2) construction; (3) sewer system evaluation; (4) maintenance; (5) rehabilitation; (6) overview prevention; and (7) wastewater pumping. A list of 111 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Collecting Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Fresh out of college, the author had only a handful of items worthy of displaying, which included some fossils she had collected in her paleontology class. She had binders filled with great science information, but kids want to see "real" science, not paper science. Then it came to her: she could fill the shelves with science artifacts with the…

  3. Collective dynamics of glass-forming polymers at intermediate length scales . A synergetic combination of neutron scattering, atomistic simulations and theoretical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenero, Juan; Alvarez, Fernando; Arbe, Arantxa

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the proposition of a new theoretical ansatz [V.N. Novikov, K.S. Schweizer, A.P. Sokolov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164508 (2013)], we have revisited the question of the characterization of the collective response of polyisobutylene at intermediate length scales observed by neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments. The model, generalized for sublinear diffusion -as it is the case of glass-forming polymers- has been successfully applied by using the information on the total self-motions available from MD-simulations properly validated by direct comparison with experimental results. From the fits of the coherent NSE data, the collective time at Q → 0 has been extracted that agrees very well with compiled results from different experimental techniques directly accessing such relaxation time. We show that a unique temperature dependence governs both, the Q → 0 and Q →∞ asymptotic characteristic times. The generalized model also gives account for the modulation of the apparent activation energy of the collective times with the static structure factor. It mainly results from changes of the short-range order at inter-molecular length scales.

  4. From the model of El Sistema in Venezuela to current applications: learning and integration through collective music education.

    PubMed

    Majno, Maria

    2012-04-01

    Over the last years, El Sistema--the Venezuelan project started in 1975 and now acknowledged worldwide as the most significant example of collective music education--has inspired a profusion of remarkable initiatives on all continents. From the original impulse by founder José Antonio Abreu, strong social principles of integration are combined with specific musical approaches to achieve individual empowerment as a large-scale alternative to endemic juvenile crime, counteracting the risk factors of social unease, serving as a stimulating example toward emancipation, and providing professional opportunities to the talented. Such a network, in turn, proves to be a powerful instrument of cultural progress: the tenets of "Sistema" become shared values able to foster development, reaching into issues of disability and rehabilitation. This paper presents continuities and contrasts in various ramifications of such a successful trend and outlines perspectives for further impact of this powerful transformational agent.

  5. Modeling contextual effects using individual-level data and without aggregation: an illustration of multilevel factor analysis (MLFA) with collective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Erin C; Masyn, Katherine E; Johnston, William R; Subramanian, S V

    2015-01-01

    Population health scientists increasingly study how contextual-level attributes affect individual health. A major challenge in this domain relates to measurement, i.e., how best to measure and create variables that capture characteristics of individuals and their embedded contexts. This paper presents an illustration of multilevel factor analysis (MLFA), an analytic method that enables researchers to model contextual effects using individual-level data without using derived variables. MLFA uses the shared variance in sets of observed items among individuals within the same context to estimate a measurement model for latent constructs; it does this by decomposing the total sample variance-covariance matrix into within-group (e.g., individual-level) and between-group (e.g., contextual-level) matrices and simultaneously modeling distinct latent factor structures at each level. We illustrate the MLFA method using items capturing collective efficacy, which were self-reported by 2,599 adults in 65 census tracts from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (LAFANS). MLFA identified two latent factors at the individual level and one factor at the neighborhood level. Indicators of collective efficacy performed differently at each level. The ability of MLFA to identify different latent factor structures at each level underscores the utility of this analytic tool to model and identify attributes of contexts relevant to health.

  6. Data collection and development of a hydrodynamic and temperature model to evaluate causeway modifications at the mouth of the Yakima River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Furnans, J.; Hudson, C.; Magan, C.

    2012-12-01

    Management decisions on rivers and associated habitats require sound tools to identify major drivers for spatial and temporal variations of temperature and related water quality variables. 3D hydrodynamic and water quality models are key components to abstract flow dynamics in complex river systems as they allow extrapolating available observations to ungaged locations and alternative scenarios. The data collection and model development are intended to support the Mid-Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group in conjunction with the Benton Conservation District in efforts to understand how seasonal flow patterns in the Yakima and Columbia rivers interact with the Yakima delta geometry to cause the relatively high water temperatures previously observed west of Bateman Island. These high temperatures are suspected of limiting salmonid success in the area, possibly contributing to adjustments in migration patterns and increased predation. The Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) and Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) are used to model flow patterns and enable simulations of temperature distributions and water quality parameters at the confluence. Model development is supported by a bathymetric campaign in 2011 to evaluate delta geometry and to construct the EFDC domain, a sonar river survey in 2012 to measure velocity profiles and to enable model calibration, and a continuous collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen records from Level Scout probes at key locations during last year to drive water quality simulations. The current model is able to reproduce main flow features observed at the confluence and is being prepared to integrate previous and current temperature observations. The final model is expected to evaluate scenarios for the removal or alteration of the Bateman Island Causeway. Alterations to the causeway that permit water passage to the south of Bateman Island are likely to dramatically alter the water flow patterns through the Yakima

  7. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  8. Collective Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Carver A.

    2002-08-01

    In this book Carver Mead offers a radically new approach to the standard problems of electromagnetic theory. Motivated by the belief that the goal of scientific research should be the simplification and unification of knowledge, he describes a new way of doing electrodynamics--collective electrodynamics--that does not rely on Maxwell's equations, but rather uses the quantum nature of matter as its sole basis. Collective electrodynamics is a way of looking at how electrons interact, based on experiments that tell us about the electrons directly. (As Mead points out, Maxwell had no access to these experiments.) The results Mead derives for standard electromagnetic problems are identical to those found in any text. Collective electrodynamics reveals, however, that quantities that we usually think of as being very different are, in fact, the same--that electromagnetic phenomena are simple and direct manifestations of quantum phenomena. Mead views his approach as a first step toward reformulating quantum concepts in a clear and comprehensible manner. The book is divided into five sections: magnetic interaction of steady currents, propagating waves, electromagnetic energy, radiation in free space, and electromagnetic interaction of atoms. In an engaging preface, Mead tells how his approach to electromagnetic theory was inspired by his interaction with Richard Feynman. Carver A. Mead is the Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Emeritus, at the California Institute of Technology. He won the 1999 Lemelson-MIT Prize for Invention and Innovation.

  9. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  10. Exploring the Relevance of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model in Adapted Physical Activity: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Paul M.; White, Katherine; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the application of the Personal and Social Responsibility Model (PSRM) in an adapted physical activity program. Although the PSRM was developed for use with underserved youth, scholars in the field of adapted physical activity have noted its potential relevance for children with disabilities. Using a…

  11. Spatial structuring and size selection as collective behaviours in an agent-based model for barchan fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2013-11-01

    In order to test parameters of the peculiar dynamics occurring in barchan fields, and compute statistical analysis over large numbers of dunes, we build and study an agent-based model, which includes the well-known physics of an isolated barchan, and observations of interactions between dunes. We showed in a previous study that such a model, where barchans interact through short-range sand recapture and collisions, reproduces the peculiar behaviours of real fields, namely its spatial structuring along the wind direction, and the size selection by the local density. In this paper we focus on the mechanisms that drives these features. In particular, we show that eolian remote sand transfer between dunes ensures that a dense field structures itself into a very heterogeneous pattern, which alternates dense and diluted stripes in the wind direction. In these very dense clusters of dunes, the accumulation of collisions leads to the local emergence of a new size for the dunes.

  12. User Guide for Air Force Base Automotive Transportation Simulation Model -BATS. Volume I. Data Collection and Reduction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    Engineer Chief, Assessment Technology & Energy Br EMIL C. FREIN , Maj, USAF 6 iOSEPH S. PIZZUTO, Col, USAF, BSC Chief, Environics Division Commander... community near an air base proposed routing some buses to the base and wished to predict the change in air pollution and in peak hour congestion due...operating 2 than without. The civilian community might further use the models to evaluate the cost effectiveness of the proposed bus service as compared to

  13. San Francisco Central Bay Suspended Sediment Movement. Report 1. Summer Condition Data Collection Program and Numerical Model Verification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    79 PLATES 1-21 APPENDIX A: BIBLIOGRAPHY ON SAN FRANCISCO BAY SEDIMENTATION ......... Al APPENDIX B: THE TABS-2...north, the Farallon Islands to the west, and Half Moon Bay to the south, which are all approximately 22 nautical miles from the Golden Cate Bridge...physical model 58 results for water levels and velocities are compared in Plates 1-7. The sta- tion locations for comparisons are shown in Figure 22

  14. Insights from socio-hydrology modelling on dealing with flood risk: roles of collective memory, risk-taking attitude and trust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglione, A.; Di Baldassarre, G.; Brandimarte, L.; Kuil, L.; Carr, G.; Salinas, J.; Scolobig, A.

    2013-12-01

    The risk coping culture of a community plays a major role in decision making in urban flood plains. While flood awareness is not necessarily linked to being prepared to face flooding at an individual level, the connection at the community level seems to be stronger through creating policy and initiating protection works. In this work we analyse, in a conceptual way, the interplay of community risk coping culture, flooding damage and economic growth. We particularly focus on three aspects: (i) collective memory, i.e., the capacity of the community to keep the awareness of flooding high; (ii) risk-taking attitude, i.e., the amount of risk a community is collectively willing to expose themselves to; and (iii) trust of people in risk protection measures. We use a dynamic model that represents the feedbacks between the hydrological and social system components. The model results indicate that, on one hand, by under perceiving the risk of flooding (because of short collective memory and too much trust in flood protection structures) in combination with a high risk-attitude, community survival is severely limited because of destruction caused by flooding. On the other hand, high perceived risk (long memory and lack of trust in flood protection structures) relative to the actual risk leads to lost economic opportunities and recession. There are many optimal scenarios for survival and economic growth, but greater certainty of survival plus economic growth can be achieved by ensuring community has accurate risk perception (memory neither too long nor too short and trust in flood protection neither too great nor too low) combined with a low to moderate risk-taking attitude. Interestingly, the model gives rise to situations in which the development of the community in the floodplain is path dependent, i.e., the history of flooding may lead to its growth or recession. Schematic of human adjustments to flooding: (a) settling away from the river; (b) raising levees/dikes.

  15. Neutron-Rich {sup 62,64,64}Fe Show Enhanced Collectivity: The Washout of N = 40 in Terms of Experiment, Valence Proton Symmetry and Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, W.; Dewald, A.; Fransen, C.; Hackstein, M.; Jolie, J.; Pissulla, Th.; Zel, K.-O.; Iwasaki, H.; Baugher, T.; Brown, B. A.; Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Voss, P.; Walsh, K. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Ur, C. A.; Starosta, K.; Bazin, D.

    2011-10-28

    Probing shell structure at a large neutron excess has been of particular interest in recent times. Neutron-rich nuclei between the proton shell closures Z = 20 and Z = 28 offer an exotic testing ground for shell evolution. The development of the N = 40gap between neutron fp and lg{sub 9/2} shells gives rise to highly interesting variations of collectivity for nuclei in this region. While {sup 68}Ni shows doubly magic properties in level energies and transition strengths, this was not observed in neighbouring nuclei. Especially neutron-rich Fe isotopes proved particularly resistant to calculational approaches using the canonical valence space (fpg) resulting in important deviations of the predicted collectivity. Only an inclusion of the d{sub 5/2}-orbital could solve the problem [1]. Hitherto no transition strengths for {sup 66}Fe have been reported. We determined B(E2,2{sup +}{sub 1}{yields}0{sup +}{sub 1}) values from lifetimes measured with the recoil distance Doppler-shift method using the Cologne plunger for radioactive beams at National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. Excited states were populated by projectile Coulomb excitation for {sup 62,64,66}Fe. The data show a rise in collectivity for Fe isotopes towards N = 40. Results [2] are interpreted by means of a modified version of the Valence Proton Symmetry [3] and compared to shell model calculations using a new effective interaction recently developed for the fpgd valence space [4].

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models for predicting drug-induced liver injury based on FDA-approved drug labeling annotation and using a large collection of drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjun; Hong, Huixiao; Fang, Hong; Kelly, Reagan; Zhou, Guangxu; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2013-11-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is one of the leading causes of the termination of drug development programs. Consequently, identifying the risk of DILI in humans for drug candidates during the early stages of the development process would greatly reduce the drug attrition rate in the pharmaceutical industry but would require the implementation of new research and development strategies. In this regard, several in silico models have been proposed as alternative means in prioritizing drug candidates. Because the accuracy and utility of a predictive model rests largely on how to annotate the potential of a drug to cause DILI in a reliable and consistent way, the Food and Drug Administration-approved drug labeling was given prominence. Out of 387 drugs annotated, 197 drugs were used to develop a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model and the model was subsequently challenged by the left of drugs serving as an external validation set with an overall prediction accuracy of 68.9%. The performance of the model was further assessed by the use of 2 additional independent validation sets, and the 3 validation data sets have a total of 483 unique drugs. We observed that the QSAR model's performance varied for drugs with different therapeutic uses; however, it achieved a better estimated accuracy (73.6%) as well as negative predictive value (77.0%) when focusing only on these therapeutic categories with high prediction confidence. Thus, the model's applicability domain was defined. Taken collectively, the developed QSAR model has the potential utility to prioritize compound's risk for DILI in humans, particularly for the high-confidence therapeutic subgroups like analgesics, antibacterial agents, and antihistamines.

  17. A collection of the collapsed results of general tank tests of miscellaneous flying-boat-hull models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, F W S , Jr

    1947-01-01

    Presented here are the summary charts of the collapsed results of general tank tests of about 100 flying boat hull models. These summary charts are intended to be used as an engineering tool to enable a flying boat designer to grasp more quickly the significance of various hull form parameters as they influence his particular airplane. The form in which the charts are prepared is discussed in some detail in order to make them clearer to the designer. This is a data report, and no attempt has been made to produce conclusions or correlations of the usual sort. However, some generalizations are put forward on the various methods in which summary charts may be used.

  18. Modified Glauber model and a new interpretation of collective effects in AA and pA at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seryakov, Andrey; Feofilov, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo version of the Modified Glauber Model (MGM) [1] is updated and applied to the analysis of the total multiplicity yields of charged particles in mucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions in a broad energy range. The MGM takes into account the energy conservation and momentum loss for particle production in each nucleon-nucleon inelastic collision. This is done by introducing a mean fraction of the initial nucleon momentum which is allowed to be lost in each inelastic interaction between nucleons of colliding nuclei. Therefore, the next nucleon-nucleon inelastic collision takes place at a lower energy √{s } and with the relevant cross-section σinel (√{s }) . Comparison of the MGM calculations to the available experimental data on mean total multiplicity < Nch > in central nucleus-nucleus collisions from AGS to RHIC energies allows to fit a single model parameter k=0.35. The same value of k is found to be valid for successful description of the scaling of < Nch >/2Npart with the number of nucleon-participants Npart in Pb-Pb collisions observed in ALICE at the LHC [2]. A considerable reduction of Ncoll is obtained in MGM for the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energy in omparison with the standard Glauber approach, while the number of participants Npart is practically unchanged. In the MGM approach the nucleon stopping phenomenon is observed, that has dramatic effect in case of proton-nucleus collisions. The MGM predicts considerable decrease (by a factor of about 3 for central collisions in comparison with the standard Glauber-based estimates) of the number of participants < Npart >= < Ncoll > +1 in case of pA interactions at the LHC.

  19. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  20. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake - Data collection/analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  1. OPC model data collection for 45-nm technology node using automatic CD-SEM offline recipe creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Daniel; Talbi, Mohamed; Wei, Alex; Menadeva, Ovadya; Cornell, Roger

    2007-03-01

    Optical and Process Correction in the 45nm node is requiring an ever higher level of characterization. The greater complexity drives a need for automation of the metrology process allowing more efficient, accurate and effective use of the engineering resources and metrology tool time in the fab, helping to satisfy what seems an insatiable appetite for data by lithographers and modelers charged with development of 45nm and 32nm processes. The scope of the work referenced here is a 45nm design cycle "full-loop automation", starting with gds formatted target design layout and ending with the necessary feedback of one and two dimensional printed wafer metrology. In this paper the authors consider the key elements of software, algorithmic framework and Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CDSEM) functionality necessary to automate its recipe creation. We evaluate specific problems with the methodology of the former art, "on-tool on-wafer" recipe construction, and discuss how the implementation of the design based recipe generation improves upon the overall metrology process. Individual target-by-target construction, use of a one pattern recognition template fits all approach, a blind navigation to the desired measurement feature, lengthy sessions on tool to construct recipes and limited ability to determine measurement quality in the resultant data set are each discussed as to how the state of the art Design Based Metrology (DBM) approach is implemented. The offline created recipes have shown pattern recognition success rates of up to 100% and measurement success rates of up to 93% for line/space as well as for 2D Minimum/Maximum measurements without manual assists during measurement.

  2. Boltzmann equation modelling of Learning Dynamics. Comment on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie

    2016-03-01

    The paper by Burini et al. [7] presents an interesting use of the Boltzmann equation of kinetic theory to model real learning processes. The authors provide a comprehensive discussion of the basic concepts involved in their modelling work. The Boltzmann equation as used by physicists and chemists to model a variety of transport processes in many diverse fields is based on the notion of the binary collisions between identifiable particles in the defined system [9]. The particles exchange energy on collision and the distribution function, which depends on the three velocity components and the three spatial coordinates, varies with time. The classical or quantum collision dynamics between particles play a central role in the definition of the kernels in the integral operators that define the Boltzmann equation [8].

  3. Forward problem solution as the operator of filtered and back projection matrix to reconstruct the various method of data collection and the object element model in electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ain, Khusnul; Kurniadi, Deddy; Suprijanto; Santoso, Oerip; Wibowo, Arif

    2015-04-16

    Back projection reconstruction has been implemented to get the dynamical image in electrical impedance tomography. However the implementation is still limited in method of adjacent data collection and circular object element model. The study aims to develop the methods of back projection as reconstruction method that has the high speed, accuracy, and flexibility, which can be used for various methods of data collection and model of the object element. The proposed method uses the forward problem solution as the operator of filtered and back projection matrix. This is done through a simulation study on several methods of data collection and various models of the object element. The results indicate that the developed method is capable of producing images, fastly and accurately for reconstruction of the various methods of data collection and models of the object element.

  4. The physics of a single-event upset in integrated circuits: A review and critique of analytical models for charge collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.; Zoutendyk, J.

    1983-01-01

    When an energetic particle (kinetic energy 0.5 MeV) originating from a radioactive decay or a cosmic ray transverse the active regions of semiconductor devices used in integrated circuit (IC) chips, it leaves along its track a high density electron hole plasma. The subsequent decay of this plasma by drift and diffusion leads to charge collection at the electrodes large enough in most cases to engender a false reading, hence the name single-event upset (SEU). The problem of SEU's is particularly severe within the harsh environment of Jupiter's radiation belts and constitutes therefore a matter of concern for the Galileo mission. The physics of an SEU event is analyzed in some detail. Owing to the predominance of nonlinear space charge effects and the fact that positive (holes) and negative (electrons) charges must be treated on an equal footing, analytical models for the ionized-charge collection and their corresponding currents as a function of time prove to be inadequate even in the simplest case of uniformly doped, abrupt p-n junctions in a one-dimensional geometry. The necessity for full-fledged computer simulation of the pertinent equations governing the electron-hole plasma therefore becomes imperative.

  5. Learning dynamics: A fundamental building block in social models. Comment on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopoff, Damián A.

    2016-03-01

    In the last several years there has been an increasing interest in the development of mathematical tools to study a vast number of social phenomena. The recent paper by Burini, De Lillo and Gibelli [7] constitutes a novel and valuable contribution on the modelling of learning dynamics over networks. In the spectrum of social sciences, this approach will surely provide new and useful tools for the progress of this field of interdisciplinary science.

  6. Learning dynamics towards modeling living systems. Reply to comments on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burini, D.; De Lillo, S.; Gibelli, L.

    2016-03-01

    Our paper [19] presents a review and critical analysis on a mathematical theory of learning in populations composed of many interacting individuals. Furthermore, it attempts to provide a foundational mathematical framework which may incorporate the main features of the learning process in view of applications to modeling complex systems, including crowds [15,39], swarms [2,4], and social systems [1,24,35,41].

  7. Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2010-02-22

    In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

  8. Final Report for "Improved Representations of Cloud Microphysics for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using Data Collected during ISDAC, TWP-ICE and RACORO

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg M.

    2003-06-11

    We were funded by ASR to use data collected during ISDAC and TWP-ICE to evaluate models with a variety of temporal and spatial scales, to evaluate ground-based remote sensing retrievals and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. In particular, we proposed to: 1) Calculate distributions of microphysical properties observed in arctic stratus during ISDAC for initializing and evaluating LES and GCMs, and for developing parameterizations of effective particle sizes, mean fall velocities, and mean single-scattering properties for such models; 2) Improve representations of particle sizes, fall velocities and scattering properties for tropical and arctic cirrus using TWP-ICE, ISDAC and M-PACE data, and to determine the contributions that small ice crystals, with maximum dimensions D less than 50 μm, make to mass and radiative properties; 3) Study fundamental interactions between clouds and radiation by improving representations of small quasi-spherical particles and their scattering properties. We were additionally funded 1-year by ASR to use RACORO data to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties. We accomplished all of our goals.

  9. The Collective Impact Model and Its Potential for Health Promotion: Overview and Case Study of a Healthy Retail Initiative in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Flood, Johnna; Minkler, Meredith; Hennessey Lavery, Susana; Estrada, Jessica; Falbe, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    As resources for health promotion become more constricted, it is increasingly important to collaborate across sectors, including the private sector. Although many excellent models for cross-sector collaboration have shown promise in the health field, collective impact (CI), an emerging model for creating larger scale change, has yet to receive much study. Complementing earlier collaboration approaches, CI has five core tenets: a shared agenda, shared measurement systems, mutually reinforcing activities, continuous communication, and a central infrastructure. In this article, we describe the CI model and its key dimensions and constructs. We briefly compare CI to community coalition action theory and discuss our use of the latter to provide needed detail as we apply CI in a critical case study analysis of the Tenderloin Healthy Corner Store Coalition in San Francisco, California. Using Yin's multimethod approach, we illustrate how CI strategies, augmented by the community coalition action theory, are being used, and with what successes or challenges, to help affect community- and policy-level change to reduce tobacco and alcohol advertising and sales, while improving healthy, affordable, and sustainable food access. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of CI as a framework for health promotion, as well as the benefits, challenges, and initial outcomes of the healthy retail project and its opportunities for scale-up. Implications for health promotion practice and research also are discussed.

  10. Triaxially deformed relativistic point-coupling model for Λ hypernuclei: A quantitative analysis of the hyperon impurity effect on nuclear collective properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, W. X.; Yao, J. M.; Hagino, K.; Li, Z. P.; Mei, H.; Tanimura, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Background: The impurity effect of hyperons on atomic nuclei has received a renewed interest in nuclear physics since the first experimental observation of appreciable reduction of E 2 transition strength in low-lying states of the hypernucleus Λ7Li . Many more data on low-lying states of Λ hypernuclei will be measured soon for s d -shell nuclei, providing good opportunities to study the Λ impurity effect on nuclear low-energy excitations. Purpose: We carry out a quantitative analysis of the Λ hyperon impurity effect on the low-lying states of s d -shell nuclei at the beyond-mean-field level based on a relativistic point-coupling energy density functional (EDF), considering that the Λ hyperon is injected into the lowest positive-parity (Λs) and negative-parity (Λp) states. Method: We adopt a triaxially deformed relativistic mean-field (RMF) approach for hypernuclei and calculate the Λ binding energies of hypernuclei as well as the potential-energy surfaces (PESs) in the (β ,γ ) deformation plane. We also calculate the PESs for the Λ hypernuclei with good quantum numbers by using a microscopic particle rotor model (PRM) with the same relativistic EDF. The triaxially deformed RMF approach is further applied in order to determine the parameters of a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian (5DCH) for the collective excitations of triaxially deformed core nuclei. Taking 25,27Mg Λ and Si31Λ as examples, we analyze the impurity effects of Λs and Λp on the low-lying states of the core nuclei. Results: We show that Λs increases the excitation energy of the 21+ state and decreases the E 2 transition strength from this state to the ground state by 12 %to17 % . On the other hand, Λp tends to develop pronounced energy minima with larger deformation, although it modifies the collective parameters in such a way that the collectivity of the core nucleus can be either increased or decreased. Conclusions: The quadrupole deformation significantly affects the

  11. Algebraic Nonlinear Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troupe, J.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-11-01

    Finite-dimensional Lie algebras of vector fields determine geometrical collective models in quantum and classical physics. Every set of vector fields on Euclidean space that generates the Lie algebra sl(3, R) and contains the angular momentum algebra so(3) is determined. The subset of divergence-free sl(3, R) vector fields is proven to be indexed by a real numberΛ. TheΛ=0 solution is the linear representation that corresponds to the Riemann ellipsoidal model. The nonlinear group action on Euclidean space transforms a certain family of deformed droplets among themselves. For positiveΛ, the droplets have a neck that becomes more pronounced asΛincreases; for negativeΛ, the droplets contain a spherical bubble of radius |Λ|1/3. The nonlinear vector field algebra is extended to the nonlinear general collective motion algebra gcm(3) which includes the inertia tensor. The quantum algebraic models of nonlinear nuclear collective motion are given by irreducible unitary representations of the nonlinear gcm(3) Lie algebra. These representations model fissioning isotopes (Λ>0) and bubble and two-fluid nuclei (Λ<0).

  12. A better understanding of hydroxyl radical photochemical sources in cloud waters collected at the puy de Dôme station - experimental versus modelled formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, A.; Passananti, M.; Perroux, H.; Voyard, G.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Chaumerliac, N.; Mailhot, G.; Deguillaume, L.; Brigante, M.

    2015-08-01

    The oxidative capacity of the cloud aqueous phase is investigated during three field campaigns from 2013 to 2014 at the top of the puy de Dôme station (PUY) in France. A total of 41 cloud samples are collected and the corresponding air masses are classified as highly marine, marine and continental. Hydroxyl radical (HO•) formation rates (RHO•f) are determined using a photochemical setup (xenon lamp that can reproduce the solar spectrum) and a chemical probe coupled with spectroscopic analysis that can trap all of the generated radicals for each sample. Using this method, the obtained values correspond to the total formation of HO• without its chemical sinks. These formation rates are correlated with the concentrations of the naturally occurring sources of HO•, including hydrogen peroxide, nitrite, nitrate and iron. The total hydroxyl radical formation rates are measured as ranging from approximately 2 × 10-11 to 4 × 10-10 M s-1, and the hydroxyl radical quantum yield formation (ΦHO•) is estimated between 10-4 and 10-2. Experimental values are compared with modelled formation rates calculated by the model of multiphase cloud chemistry (M2C2), considering only the chemical sources of the hydroxyl radicals. The comparison between the experimental and the modelled results suggests that the photoreactivity of the iron species as a source of HO• is overestimated by the model, and H2O2 photolysis represents the most important source of this radical (between 70 and 99 %) for the cloud water sampled at the PUY station (primarily marine and continental).

  13. 2015 Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives Unconference and Symposium: Innovation, Collaboration, and Models. Proceedings of the CLIR Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives Symposium (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 12-13, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oestreicher, Cheryl, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 CLIR Unconference & Symposium was the capstone event to seven years of grant funding through CLIR's Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives program. These proceedings group presentations by theme. Collaborations provides examples of multi-institutional projects, including one international collaboration; Student and Faculty…

  14. Reduction of collectivity at very high spins in 134Nd: Expanding the projected-shell-model basis up to 10-quasiparticle states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-Jun; Sun, Yang; Mizusaki, Takahiro; Oi, Makito; Ghorui, Surja K.

    2016-03-01

    Background: The recently started physics campaign with the new generation of γ -ray spectrometers, "GRETINA" and "AGATA," will possibly produce many high-quality γ rays from very fast-rotating nuclei. Microscopic models are needed to understand these states. Purpose: It is a theoretical challenge to describe high-spin states in a shell-model framework by the concept of configuration mixing. To meet the current needs, one should overcome the present limitations and vigorously extend the quasiparticle (qp) basis of the projected shell model (PSM). Method: With the help of the recently proposed Pfaffian formulas, we apply the new algorithm and develop a new PSM code that extends the configuration space to include up to 10-qp states. The much-enlarged multi-qp space enables us to investigate the evolutional properties at very high spins in fast-rotating nuclei. Results: We take 134Nd as an example to demonstrate that the known experimental yrast and the several negative-parity side bands in this nucleus could be well described by the calculation. The variations in moment of inertia with spin are reproduced and explained in terms of successive band crossings among the 2-qp, 4-qp, 6-qp, 8-qp, and 10-qp states. Moreover, the electric quadrupole transitions in these bands are studied. Conclusions: A pronounced decrease in the high-spin B (E 2 ) of 134Nd is predicted, which suggests reduction of collectivity at very high spins because of increased level density and complex band mixing. The possibility for a potential application of the present development in the study of highly excited states in warm nuclei is mentioned.

  15. Multi-scale analysis of collective behavior in 2D self-propelled particle models of swarms: An Advection-Diffusion with Memory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    Self-propelled particle models (SPP's) are a class of agent-based simulations that have been successfully used to explore questions related to various flavors of collective motion, including flocking, swarming, and milling. These models typically consist of particle configurations, where each particle moves with constant speed, but changes its orientation in response to local averages of the positions and orientations of its neighbors found within some interaction region. These local averages are based on `social interactions', which include avoidance of collisions, attraction, and polarization, that are designed to generate configurations that move as a single object. Errors made by the individuals in the estimates of the state of the local configuration are modeled as a random rotation of the updated orientation resulting from the social rules. More recently, SPP's have been introduced in the context of collective decision-making, where the main innovation consists of dividing the population into naïve and `informed' individuals. Whereas naïve individuals follow the classical collective motion rules, members of the informed sub-population update their orientations according to a weighted average of the social rules and a fixed `preferred' direction, shared by all the informed individuals. Collective decision-making is then understood in terms of the ability of the informed sub-population to steer the whole group along the preferred direction. Summary statistics of collective decision-making are defined in terms of the stochastic properties of the random walk followed by the centroid of the configuration as the particles move about, in particular the scaling behavior of the mean squared displacement (msd). For the region of parameters where the group remains coherent , we note that there are two characteristic time scales, first there is an anomalous transient shared by both purely naïve and informed configurations, i.e. the scaling exponent lies between 1 and

  16. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  17. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic…

  18. Collective Computation of Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    Sciences, Beijing ABSTRACT Computational neuroscience is a new branch of neuroscience originating from current research on the theory of computer...scientists working in artificial intelligence engineering and neuroscience . The paper introduces the collective computational properties of model neural...vision research. On this basis, the authors analyzed the significance of the Hopfield model. Key phrases: Computational Neuroscience , Neural Network, Model

  19. Synthetic collective intelligence.

    PubMed

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Conde-Pueyo, Núria; Carbonell-Ballestero, Max; Montañez, Raúl

    2016-10-01

    Intelligent systems have emerged in our biosphere in different contexts and achieving different levels of complexity. The requirement of communication in a social context has been in all cases a determinant. The human brain, probably co-evolving with language, is an exceedingly successful example. Similarly, social insects complex collective decisions emerge from information exchanges between many agents. The difference is that such processing is obtained out of a limited individual cognitive power. Computational models and embodied versions using non-living systems, particularly involving robot swarms, have been used to explore the potentiality of collective intelligence. Here we suggest a novel approach to the problem grounded in the genetic engineering of unicellular systems, which can be modified in order to interact, store memories or adapt to external stimuli in collective ways. What we label as Synthetic Swarm Intelligence defines a parallel approach to the evolution of computation and swarm intelligence and allows to explore potential embodied scenarios for decision making at the microscale. Here, we consider several relevant examples of collective intelligence and their synthetic organism counterparts.

  20. Collection Directions: Some Reflections on the Future of Library Collections and Collecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Lorcan; Malpas, Constance; Lavoie, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This article takes a broad view of the evolution of collecting behaviors in a network environment and suggests some future directions based on various simple models. The authors look at the changing dynamics of print collections, at the greater engagement with research and learning behaviors, and at trends in scholarly communication. The goal is…

  1. Curvature Interaction in Collective Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Richard

    2012-12-01

    For the Riemannian space, built from the collective coordinates used within nuclear models, an additional interaction with the metric is investigated, using the collective equivalent to Einstein's curvature scalar. The coupling strength is determined using a fit with the AME2003 ground state masses. An extended finite-range droplet model including curvature is introduced, which generates significant improvements for light nuclei and nuclei in the trans-fermium region.

  2. Leadership, collective personality, and performance.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, David A; Jones, Lisa M

    2005-05-01

    By viewing behavior regularities at the individual and collective level as functionally isomorphic, a referent-shift compositional model for the Big 5 personality dimensions is developed. On the basis of this compositional model, a common measure of Big 5 personality at the individual level is applied to the collective as a whole. Within this framework, it is also hypothesized that leadership (i.e., transformational, transactional, and passive) would predict collective personality and that collective personality would be significantly related to collective performance. The results supported these hypotheses using a sample of franchised units. On the basis of recent research at the individual level, several interactions among the various personality dimensions were hypothesized and supported. Implications are discussed.

  3. Collections Management, Collections Maintenance, and Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Museums, Washington, DC.

    This national survey of the state of the nation's museum collections investigates collection care policies and practices, conservation issues, and private sector and federal support for museum needs. It consists of two major projects and four additional information gathering projects. The Museum Collection Survey is designed to examine all major…

  4. Asymptotics of Mean-Field O( N) Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Kay; Nawaz, Tayyab

    2016-12-01

    We study mean-field classical N-vector models, for integers N≥2. We use the theory of large deviations and Stein's method to study the total spin and its typical behavior, specifically obtaining non-normal limit theorems at the critical temperatures and central limit theorems away from criticality. Important special cases of these models are the XY (N=2) model of superconductors, the Heisenberg (N=3) model [previously studied in Kirkpatrick and Meckes (J Stat Phys 152:54-92, 2013) but with a correction to the critical distribution here], and the Toy (N=4) model of the Higgs sector in particle physics.

  5. Collective Labor Supply with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Richard; Chiappori, Pierre-Andre; Meghir, Costas

    2005-01-01

    We extend the collective model of household behavior to allow for the existence of public consumption. We show how this model allows the analysis of welfare consequences of policies aimed at changing the distribution of power within the household. Our setting provides a conceptual framework for addressing issues linked to the "targeting" of…

  6. ThermoFit: A Set of Software Tools, Protocols and Schema for the Organization of Thermodynamic Data and for the Development, Maintenance, and Distribution of Internally Consistent Thermodynamic Data/Model Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Internally consistent thermodynamic databases are critical resources that facilitate the calculation of heterogeneous phase equilibria and thereby support geochemical, petrological, and geodynamical modeling. These 'databases' are actually derived data/model systems that depend on a diverse suite of physical property measurements, calorimetric data, and experimental phase equilibrium brackets. In addition, such databases are calibrated with the adoption of various models for extrapolation of heat capacities and volumetric equations of state to elevated temperature and pressure conditions. Finally, these databases require specification of thermochemical models for the mixing properties of solid, liquid, and fluid solutions, which are often rooted in physical theory and, in turn, depend on additional experimental observations. The process of 'calibrating' a thermochemical database involves considerable effort and an extensive computational infrastructure. Because of these complexities, the community tends to rely on a small number of thermochemical databases, generated by a few researchers; these databases often have limited longevity and are universally difficult to maintain. ThermoFit is a software framework and user interface whose aim is to provide a modeling environment that facilitates creation, maintenance and distribution of thermodynamic data/model collections. Underlying ThermoFit are data archives of fundamental physical property, calorimetric, crystallographic, and phase equilibrium constraints that provide the essential experimental information from which thermodynamic databases are traditionally calibrated. ThermoFit standardizes schema for accessing these data archives and provides web services for data mining these collections. Beyond simple data management and interoperability, ThermoFit provides a collection of visualization and software modeling tools that streamline the model/database generation process. Most notably, ThermoFit facilitates the

  7. Collecting Artists' Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalberto, Janet

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of increase in library collections of artists' books (artwork conceived in book form and designed entirely by artists) highlights reasons to collect artists' books, major collections, establishing a collection, housing and preservation, organization, outreach, and networking. Collection policy and procedures of Virginia Commonwealth…

  8. Learning and dynamics in social systems. Comment on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfin, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The interesting novelty of the paper by Burini et al. [1] is that the authors present a survey and a new approach of collective learning based on suitable development of methods of the kinetic theory [2] and theoretical tools of evolutionary game theory [3]. Methods of statistical dynamics and kinetic theory lead naturally to stochastic and collective dynamics. Indeed, the authors propose the use of games where the state of the interacting entities is delivered by probability distributions.

  9. Collective motion of dimers.

    PubMed

    Penington, Catherine J; Korvasová, Karolína; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2012-11-01

    We consider a discrete agent-based model on a one-dimensional lattice and a two-dimensional square lattice, where each agent is a dimer occupying two sites. Agents move by vacating one occupied site in favor of a nearest-neighbor site and obey either a strict simple exclusion rule or a weaker constraint that permits partial overlaps between dimers. Using indicator variables and careful probability arguments, a discrete-time master equation for these processes is derived systematically within a mean-field approximation. In the continuum limit, nonlinear diffusion equations that describe the average agent occupancy of the dimer population are obtained. In addition, we show that multiple species of interacting subpopulations give rise to advection-diffusion equations. Averaged discrete simulation data compares very well with the solution to the continuum partial differential equation models. Since many cell types are elongated rather than circular, this work offers insight into population-level behavior of collective cellular motion.

  10. Collecting a multi-disciplinary field dataset to model the interactions between a flood control reservoir and the underlying porous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgatti, L.; Corsini, A.; Chiapponi, L.; D'Oria, M.; Giuffredi, F.; Lancellotta, R.; Mignosa, P.; Moretti, G.; Orlandini, S.; Pellegrini, M.; Remitti, F.; Ronchetti, F.; Tanda, M.; Zanini, A.

    2008-12-01

    and relatively thin silty and clayey strata. The aquifer can be simplified in three layers: a phreatic aquifer (from 0 to 20 m depth), a thin clayey layer (20 to 25 m) and a regional semi-confined aquifer (beneath 25 m), whose level tend to respond to the reservoir levels. The multidisciplinary database collected so far is the basis of a numerical model that is going to be developed to understand the interactions between the reservoir and the aquifer, in different scenarios.

  11. Print Capitalism, New School and Circulation of Reading Models. A Brazilian Collection at the Primary Education Museum-Library in Portugal (1931-1950)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Maria Rita Almeida; Carvalho, Marta Maria Chagas

    2011-01-01

    The present article is the fruit of research on the circulation of Brazilian books from the "Atualidades Pedagogicas" collection at the "Biblioteca Museu do Ensino Primario" (Primary Education Museum-Library) in Lisbon. This library was headed by Adolfo Lima, one of the exponents of the Portuguese New School, and gave form to…

  12. 76 FR 67668 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... consistent with the CFPB's statutory authorities. The CFPB expects to collect qualitative data through a variety of collection methods, including interviews and research, to inform the design, development and implementation of the model form(s). The information collected through qualitative evaluation methods will...

  13. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURES: A COMPARISON OF SHEDS-PM EXPOSURE MODEL PREDICTIONS AND ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM MEASUREMENTS COLLECTED DURING NERL'S RTP PM PANEL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently refining and evaluating a population exposure model for particulate matter (PM), called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model. The SHEDS-PM model estimates the population distribu...

  14. 78 FR 1917 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Comments for a New Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... includes, but is not limited to, information to support transportation research, capacity building, data collection, planning, travel modeling, and performance management. This also includes information about how... Federal Highway Administration Agency Information Collection Activities: Request for Comments for a...

  15. A matrix model from string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeze, Syoji

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that a Hermitian matrix model can be derived from level truncated open string field theory with Chan-Paton factors. The Hermitian matrix is coupled with a scalar and U(N) vectors which are responsible for the D-brane at the tachyon vacuum. Effective potential for the scalar is evaluated both for finite and large N. Increase of potential height is observed in both cases. The large N matrix integral is identified with a system of N ZZ branes and a ghost FZZT brane.

  16. Controlling Collective Behaviors of Dictyostelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Mehta, Pankaj; Gregor, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    We study the collective dynamics of a population of Dictyostelium cells, focusing on how single cell dynamics influence, and give rise to, the behavior of the aggregate. Through analysis of quantitative single cell experiments, we develop a simple model of the single cell response to time-dependent pulses of the extracellular signaling molecule cAMP, characterized by a particular type of excitable system. We then use this model to study collective multicellular dynamics mediated by diffusion coupling. We first consider the mean-field case where we find an intriguing ``dynamical quorum sensing'' transition in which all cells simultaneously transition from quiescent to oscillating across the phase boundary. Then we include spatial dynamics and study pattern formation, both with and without the cells capable of chemotactic response to signal gradients. Finally, we highlight how modification of single cells can alter the collective dynamics.

  17. The neurobiology of collective action

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Paul J.; Barraza, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    This essay introduces a neurologically-informed mathematical model of collective action (CA) that reveals the role for empathy and distress in motivating costly helping behaviors. We report three direct tests of model with a key focus on the neuropeptide oxytocin as well as a variety of indirect tests. These studies, from our lab and other researchers, show support for the model. Our findings indicate that empathic concern, via the brain's release of oxytocin, is a trigger for CA. We discuss the implications from this model for our understanding why human beings engage in costly CA. PMID:24311995

  18. Team and Collective Performance Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    missions with specific as well as general questions. Relationships between the indices have been analyzed by means of structural equation modeling [21... equation modeling with the SIMPLIS command language’. Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1993. [17] Berggren, P. (2000). ‘Situational awareness...2004. TEAM AND COLLECTIVE PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT RTO-TR-HFM-121-Part-II 7 - 15 [16] Jöreskog, K.G. and Sörbom, D. ‘LISREL8: Structural

  19. Learning dynamics for systems with space structure. Comment on the paper "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhad, Nadia

    2016-03-01

    I have examined paper [1] based also on my scientific experience, namely the derivation of macroscopic models from the underlying description delivered at the microscopic scale by kinetic theory models. More precisely, I refer to the approach developed by Bellouquid and co-authors, from [2] to more recent results, on the derivation of macroscopic models for large systems of self-propelled particles [3], and fractal systems [4].

  20. The Multiage Classroom: A Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Robin, Ed.

    Noting that the recent call for holistic models of schooling dictates a thorough investigation of more natural groupings of students, this collection of articles reviews available literature on multiage, nongraded, continuous progress classrooms. Divided into six sections, the chapters explore the overriding concerns and the pros and cons of such…

  1. Wyoming greater sage-grouse habitat prioritization: a collection of multi-scale seasonal models and geographic information systems land management tools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Fedy, Bradley C.

    2015-01-01

    We deliver all products described herein as online geographic information system data for visualization and downloading. We outline the data properties for each model and their data inputs, describe the process of selecting appropriate data products for multifarious applications, describe all data products and software, provide newly derived model composites, and discuss how land managers may use the models to inform future sage-grouse studies and potentially refine conservation efforts. The models, software tools, and associated opportunities for novel applications of these products should provide a suite of additional, but not exclusive, tools for assessing Wyoming Greater Sage-grouse habitats, which land managers, conservationists, and scientists can apply to myriad applications.

  2. Collection Mode Lens System

    DOEpatents

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Kino, Gordon S.

    2002-11-05

    A lens system including a collection lens and a microlens spaced from the collection lens adjacent the region to be observed. The diameter of the observablel region depends substantially on the radius of the microlens.

  3. Emergence of Collective Memories

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungmin; Ramenzoni, Verónica C.; Holme, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Background We understand the dynamics of the world around us as by associating pairs of events, where one event has some influence on the other. These pairs of events can be aggregated into a web of memories representing our understanding of an episode of history. The events and the associations between them need not be directly experienced—they can also be acquired by communication. In this paper we take a network approach to study the dynamics of memories of history. Methodology/Principal Findings First we investigate the network structure of a data set consisting of reported events by several individuals and how associations connect them. We focus our measurement on degree distributions, degree correlations, cycles (which represent inconsistencies as they would break the time ordering) and community structure. We proceed to model effects of communication using an agent-based model. We investigate the conditions for the memory webs of different individuals to converge to collective memories, how groups where the individuals have similar memories (but different from other groups) can form. Conclusions/Significance Our work outlines how the cognitive representation of memories and social structure can co-evolve as a contagious process. We generate some testable hypotheses including that the number of groups is limited as a function of the total population size. PMID:20824141

  4. Guide to data collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines and recommendations are presented for the collection of software development data. Motivation and planning for, and implementation and management of, a data collection effort are discussed. Topics covered include types, sources, and availability of data; methods and costs of data collection; types of analyses supported; and warnings and suggestions based on software engineering laboratory (SEL) experiences. This document is intended as a practical guide for software managers and engineers, abstracted and generalized from 5 years of SEL data collection.

  5. Student Loan Collection Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This manual on the collection of student loans is intended for the use of business officers and loan collection personnel of colleges and universities of all sizes. The introductory chapter is an overview of sound collection practices and procedures. It discusses the making of a loan, in-school servicing of the accounts, the exit interview, the…

  6. Collection Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuby, Mary

    Undertaken to provide data on the current status of collection development in selected academic libraries, this study also analyzed the structure of the collection development function at Chicago Academic Library Council (CALC) institutions and outlined a formal collection development policy for Chicago State University's Douglas Library.…

  7. Collection Assessment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Blaine H.

    This manual is designed to help bibliographers, librarians, and other materials selectors plan and conduct systematic collection evaluations using both collection centered and client centered techniques. Topics covered in five chapters are: (1) planning the assessment; (2) collection-centered techniques, comprising the compilation of statistics,…

  8. Faculty Collective Bargaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Hershel H.

    Faculties in a number of institutions of higher education utilize collective bargaining agents to represent their interests. Collective bargaining is primarily a community college phenomenon. Of 212 institutions with certified bargaining agents, 150 are 2-year institutions. Motivating factors in choosing the collective bargaining process are: the…

  9. Remote application for spectral collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, Shelli R.; Steele, R. J.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Firpi, Alexer H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the area of collecting field spectral data using a spectrometer, it is common to have the instrument over the material of interest. In certain instances it is beneficial to have the ability to remotely control the spectrometer. While several systems have the ability to use a form of connectivity to capture the measurement it is essential to have the ability to control the settings. Additionally, capturing reference information (metadata) about the setup, system configuration, collection, location, atmospheric conditions, and sample information is necessary for future analysis leading towards material discrimination and identification. This has the potential to lead to cumbersome field collection and a lack of necessary information for post processing and analysis. The method presented in this paper describes a capability to merge all parts of spectral collection from logging reference information to initial analysis as well as importing information into a web-hosted spectral database. This allows the simplification of collecting, processing, analyzing and storing field spectra for future analysis and comparisons. This concept is developed for field collection of thermal data using the Designs and Prototypes (D&P) Hand Portable FT-IR Spectrometer (Model 102). The remote control of the spectrometer is done with a customized Android application allowing the ability to capture reference information, process the collected data from radiance to emissivity using a temperature emissivity separation algorithm and store the data into a custom web-based service. The presented system of systems allows field collected spectra to be used for various applications by spectral analysts in the future.

  10. Guide for data collection to calibrate a predictive digital ground-water model of the unconfined aquifer in and near the city of Modesto, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    The city of Modesto encompasses about 12 square miles in the northeastern part of the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. The ground-water model encompasses about 542 square miles. In the Modesto area, ground water occurs in an unconfined aquifer a confined aquifer. both of which are composed of unconsolidated materials, and a consolidated-rock aquifer. Only the unconfined aquifer was modeled, using several simplifying assumptions concerning hydrologic conditions in the ground-water basin. A program is used that computes the net rate of recharge and discharge under steady-state conditions. The model was then modified until reasonable values of recharge and discharge were computed. Testing of the model indicated that simulated water levels were especially sensitive to tansmissivity, storage coefficient, irrigation return, and riverbed hydraulic conductivity; amond the parameters that affected water levels least were the vertical hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of the confining bed, the so-called E-clay. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. The (kinetic) theory of active particles applied to learning dynamics. Comment on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.

    2016-03-01

    The learning phenomena, their complexity, concepts, structure, suitable theories and models, have been extensively treated in the mathematical literature in the last century, and [4] contains a very good introduction to the literature describing the many approaches and lines of research developed about them. Two main schools have to be pointed out [5] in order to understand the two -not exclusive- kinds of existing models: the stimulus sampling models and the stochastic learning models. Also [6] should be mentioned as a survey where two methods of learning are pointed out, the cognitive and the social, and where the knowledge looks like a mathematical unknown. Finally, as the authors do, we refer to the works [9,10], where the concept of population thinking was introduced and which motivate the game theory rules as a tool (both included in [4] to develop their theory) and [7], where the ideas of developing a mathematical kinetic theory of perception and learning were proposed.

  12. Collective learning dynamics in behavioral crowds. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modeling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burini, D.

    2016-09-01

    A recent literature on crowd dynamics [9,10] has enlightened that the management of crisis situations needs models able to depict social behaviors and, in particular, the spread of emotional feelings such as stress by panic situation.

  13. Information on living systems: A kinetic approach. Comment on the paper "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, L.

    2016-03-01

    Information appears naturally in the description of living systems. In kinetic models of such systems, information defined as the knowledge that a population has of the structure of the environment plays a key role in the dynamics of the system. For example, on chemotaxis models of cell movement, the concentration of a certain chemical substance can be understood to be the information that cells have of the structure of the surrounding media, and adapt their movement to that [6,7].

  14. Epifluorescence collection in two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Mertz, Jerome

    2002-09-01

    We present a simple model to describe epifluorescence collection in two-photon microscopy when one images in a turbid slab with an objective. Bulk and surface scattering determine the spatial and angular distributions of the outgoing fluorescence photons at the slab surface, and geometrical optics determines how efficiently the photons are collected. The collection optics are parameterized by the objective's numerical aperture and working distance and by an effective collection field of view. We identify the roles of each of these parameters and provide simple rules of thumb for the optimization of the epifluorescence collection efficiency. Analytical results are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Effects of aggressive behaviour and group size on collective escape in an emergency: a test between a social identity model and deindividuation theory.

    PubMed

    Kugihara, N

    2001-12-01

    This study models escape behaviour in emergency situations and compares the ability of deindividuation and social identity-based explanations in particular to account for responses. According to deindividuation theory, the larger the group, the higher the degree of anonymity and the stronger antisocial responses such as competitiveness will be. Moreover, the competition for escape should be more severe, and the escape rate lowered, in a large group, regardless of whether participants have an aggressive option. A social identity model predicts that when group members have an option of aggressive behaviour, the salience of the aggressive norm in a larger group will be stronger than that in a smaller group. In contrast, when participants only have concessive option, the salience of the non-aggressive norm in a large group is expected to be stronger than that in a small group. The results of Study 1 supported the social identity model. Study 2 tested how participants responded to their norm. The social identity model suggests a more conscious and socially regulated process whereas deindividuation theory implies an unconscious or unregulated process. The results showed that what directly affects norm formation is the density of stimulus, that is, the amount of aggression received from others and of others' escape activity divided by group size. The results suggest the conscious process of the norm formation and support the social identity model.

  16. Collective Behaviour without Collective Order in Wild Swarms of Midges

    PubMed Central

    Attanasi, Alessandro; Cavagna, Andrea; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Pohl, Oliver; Rossaro, Bruno; Shen, Edward; Silvestri, Edmondo; Viale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Collective behaviour is a widespread phenomenon in biology, cutting through a huge span of scales, from cell colonies up to bird flocks and fish schools. The most prominent trait of collective behaviour is the emergence of global order: individuals synchronize their states, giving the stunning impression that the group behaves as one. In many biological systems, though, it is unclear whether global order is present. A paradigmatic case is that of insect swarms, whose erratic movements seem to suggest that group formation is a mere epiphenomenon of the independent interaction of each individual with an external landmark. In these cases, whether or not the group behaves truly collectively is debated. Here, we experimentally study swarms of midges in the field and measure how much the change of direction of one midge affects that of other individuals. We discover that, despite the lack of collective order, swarms display very strong correlations, totally incompatible with models of non-interacting particles. We find that correlation increases sharply with the swarm's density, indicating that the interaction between midges is based on a metric perception mechanism. By means of numerical simulations we demonstrate that such growing correlation is typical of a system close to an ordering transition. Our findings suggest that correlation, rather than order, is the true hallmark of collective behaviour in biological systems. PMID:25057853

  17. The EMBRACE web service collection

    PubMed Central

    Pettifer, Steve; Ison, Jon; Kalaš, Matúš; Thorne, Dave; McDermott, Philip; Jonassen, Inge; Liaquat, Ali; Fernández, José M.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Partners, INB-; Pisano, David G.; Blanchet, Christophe; Uludag, Mahmut; Rice, Peter; Bartaseviciute, Edita; Rapacki, Kristoffer; Hekkelman, Maarten; Sand, Olivier; Stockinger, Heinz; Clegg, Andrew B.; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Salzemann, Jean; Breton, Vincent; Attwood, Teresa K.; Cameron, Graham; Vriend, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The EMBRACE (European Model for Bioinformatics Research and Community Education) web service collection is the culmination of a 5-year project that set out to investigate issues involved in developing and deploying web services for use in the life sciences. The project concluded that in order for web services to achieve widespread adoption, standards must be defined for the choice of web service technology, for semantically annotating both service function and the data exchanged, and a mechanism for discovering services must be provided. Building on this, the project developed: EDAM, an ontology for describing life science web services; BioXSD, a schema for exchanging data between services; and a centralized registry (http://www.embraceregistry.net) that collects together around 1000 services developed by the consortium partners. This article presents the current status of the collection and its associated recommendations and standards definitions. PMID:20462862

  18. Aquatic Vegetation of the St. Louis River Estuary: Initial Analysis of Point-intercept Data Collected in 2010 for Restoration Modeling.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new effort to model aquatic vegetation patterns in the St. Louis River Estuary was initiated in summer of 2010 for the purpose of informing wetland restoration planning in the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) at 40th Avenue West in Duluth. Aquatic vascular plants were doc...

  19. Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Gregory

    2014-11-12

    Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

  20. Solar energy collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved solar energy collection system, having enhanced energy collection and conversion capabilities, is delineated. The system is characterized by a plurality of receivers suspended above a heliostat field comprising a multiplicity of reflector surfaces, each being adapted to direct a concentrated beam of solar energy to illuminate a target surface for a given receiver. A magnitude of efficiency, suitable for effectively competing with systems employed in collecting and converting energy extracted from fossil fuels, is indicated.

  1. Electrostatic particle collection in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Damit, Brian; Wu, Chang-Yu; Sorloaica-Hickman, Nicoleta

    2011-09-01

    Lunar grains accumulate charges due to solar-based ionizing radiations, and the repelling action of like-charged particles causes the levitation of lunar dust. The lunar dust deposit on sensitive and costly surfaces of investigative equipment is a serious concern in lunar explorations. Inspired by electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), the Electrostatic Lunar Dust Collector (ELDC) was proposed for collecting already charged lunar dust particles to prevent the lunar dust threat. As the conditions for terrestrial counterparts are not valid in the lunar environment, equations developed for terrestrial devices yield incorrect predictions in lunar application. Hence, a mathematical model was developed for the ELDC operating in vacuum to determine its collection efficiency. The ratios of electrical energy over potential energy, kinetic energy over potential energy and the ratio of ELDC dimensions were identified to be the key dimensionless parameters. Sensitivity analyses of the relevant parameters showed that depending on ELDC orientation, smaller particles would be collected more easily at vertical orientation, whereas larger particles were easier to collect in a horizontal ELDC configuration. In the worst case scenario, the electrostatic field needed to be 10 times stronger in the vertical mode in order to adequately collect larger particles. The collection efficiency was very sensitive to surface potential of lunar dust and it reached the maximum when surface potential was between 30 and 120 V. Except for regions of the lunar day side with surface potential close to zero, providing 1 kV ( E = 20 kV m -1) with the ELDC was more than enough for collecting all the particles in the most critical orientation. The needed field strength was about 4000 times less than that for repelling 1-μm size particles already settled on the surfaces. The analysis shows that the ELDC offers a viable solution for lunar dust control due to its effectiveness, ease of cleaning and low voltage

  2. Composite collective decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Czaczkes, Tomer J.; Czaczkes, Benjamin; Iglhaut, Carolin; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Individual animals are adept at making decisions and have cognitive abilities, such as memory, which allow them to hone their decisions. Social animals can also share information. This allows social animals to make adaptive group-level decisions. Both individual and collective decision-making systems also have drawbacks and limitations, and while both are well studied, the interaction between them is still poorly understood. Here, we study how individual and collective decision-making interact during ant foraging. We first gathered empirical data on memory-based foraging persistence in the ant Lasius niger. We used these data to create an agent-based model where ants may use social information (trail pheromones), private information (memories) or both to make foraging decisions. The combined use of social and private information by individuals results in greater efficiency at the group level than when either information source was used alone. The modelled ants couple consensus decision-making, allowing them to quickly exploit high-quality food sources, and combined decision-making, allowing different individuals to specialize in exploiting different resource patches. Such a composite collective decision-making system reaps the benefits of both its constituent parts. Exploiting such insights into composite collective decision-making may lead to improved decision-making algorithms. PMID:26019155

  3. From particle systems to learning processes. Comment on "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by Diletta Burini, Silvana De Lillo, and Livio Gibelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachowicz, Mirosław

    2016-03-01

    The very stimulating paper [6] discusses an approach to perception and learning in a large population of living agents. The approach is based on a generalization of kinetic theory methods in which the interactions between agents are described in terms of game theory. Such an approach was already discussed in Ref. [2-4] (see also references therein) in various contexts. The processes of perception and learning are based on the interactions between agents and therefore the general kinetic theory is a suitable tool for modeling them. However the main question that rises is how the perception and learning processes may be treated in the mathematical modeling. How may we precisely deliver suitable mathematical structures that are able to capture various aspects of perception and learning?

  4. Collective behavior in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal'Maso Peron, T. K.; Rodrigues, F. A.

    2011-11-01

    The financial market is an example of a complex system characterized by a highly intricate organization and the emergence of collective behavior. In this paper, this emergent dynamics in the financial market is quantified by using concepts of network synchronization. We consider networks constructed by the correlation matrix of asset returns and study the time evolution of the phase coherence among stock prices. It is verified that during a financial crisis a synchronous state emerges in the system, defining the market's direction. Furthermore, the paper proposes a statistical regression model able to identify the topological features that mostly influence such an emergence. The coefficients of the proposed model indicate that the average shortest path length is the measurement most related to network synchronization. Therefore, during an economic crisis, the stock prices present a similar evolution, which tends to shorten the distances between stocks indicating a collective dynamics.

  5. Collective behavior states in animal groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambui, Dorílson S.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we study some states of collective behavior observed in groups of animals. For this end we consider an agent-based model with biologically motivated behavioral rules where the speed is treated as an independent stochastic variable, and the motion direction is adjusted in accord with alignment and attractive interactions. Four types of collective behavior have been observed: disordered motion, collective rotation, coherent collective motion, and formation flight. We investigate the case when transitions between collective states depend on both the speed and the attraction between individuals. Our results show that, to any size of the attraction, small speeds are associated to the coherent collective motion, while collective rotation is more and more pronounced for high speed since the attraction radius is large enough.

  6. Collecting Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedford, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    How many beginning teachers struggle to create new lessons despite the fact that experienced teachers have already designed effective lessons for the same content? Shulman (1987) used the term "collective amnesia" to describe the failure of school leaders to design professional development that included the collection of its best…

  7. UNO's Afghanistan Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKernan, M. D.

    This paper explores the background history and sources of the Afghanistan collection at the University Library, University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO). Credit for the impetus behind the development of the collection is given to Chris Jung, a former UNO geography/geology faculty member; Ronald Roskens, then UNO chancellor; and the Afghanistan…

  8. Weeding Library Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slote, Stanley J.

    This work, based on two recent research projects in the weeding of library collections and the identification of core collections, provides a comprehensive summary of the literature and research on these topics. It also presents practical guidance in weeding for the professional librarian or for the library school student. The book is divided into…

  9. Collection Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Law Library, St. Paul.

    This collection development plan of the Minnesota State Law Library includes detailed information on policies and annotations. After an overview of the Library's collection, general policy guidelines on the following are discussed: material selection; principles of selection; exclusions; gifts; interlibrary loan; cooperation; replacements;…

  10. Urine collection device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, R. B. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A urine collection device for females is described. It is comprised of a collection element defining a urine collection chamber and an inlet opening into the chamber and is adapted to be disposed in surrounding relation to the urethral opening of the user. A drainage conduit is connected to the collection element in communication with the chamber whereby the chamber and conduit together comprise a urine flow pathway for carrying urine generally away from the inlet. A first body of wicking material is mounted adjacent the collection element and extends at least partially into the flow pathway. The device preferably also comprise a vaginal insert element including a seal portion for preventing the entry of urine into the vagina.

  11. 77 FR 26773 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... there a change from a ``youth-guided'' model to a ``youth and young adult consumer-driven'' model? 6... social and peer relationships. While participants are enrolled in HTI services, these data collected by... collection and management. The HTI DC will be a secure Web site that allows uploading of data,...

  12. Management Strategies for Promoting Teacher Collective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Eric C. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to validate a theoretical model for developing teacher collective learning by using a quasi-experimental design, and explores the management strategies that would provide a school administrator practical steps to effectively promote collective learning in the school organization. Twenty aided secondary schools in Hong Kong were…

  13. The Perception and Classification of Collective Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.

    1972-01-01

    A classificatory model of collective behavior based upon perceptual dimensions was proposed. The four major dimensions found to underlie a domain of collective phenomena were identified as: (a) Violence, (b) Amorphous-Focused, (c) Anomie, and (d) Ideology. Potentially predictive aspects of the system were examined briefly. (Author)

  14. 78 FR 53135 - Agency Information Collection Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... collect coal market data. The data elements include production, consumption, receipts, stocks, and prices... Coal Distribution Report, each contain data collected through the coal production and consumption surveys listed above. The EIA uses the data in short-term and long-term models such as the...

  15. Crosstalk and transitions between multiple spatial maps in an attractor neural network model of the hippocampus: Collective motion of the activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasson, R.; Rosay, S.

    2014-03-01

    The dynamics of a neural model for hippocampal place cells storing spatial maps is studied. In the absence of external input, depending on the number of cells and on the values of control parameters (number of environments stored, level of neural noise, average level of activity, connectivity of place cells), a "clump" of spatially localized activity can diffuse or remains pinned due to crosstalk between the environments. In the single-environment case, the macroscopic coefficient of diffusion of the clump and its effective mobility are calculated analytically from first principles and corroborated by numerical simulations. In the multienvironment case the heights and the widths of the pinning barriers are analytically characterized with the replica method; diffusion within one map is then in competition with transitions between different maps. Possible mechanisms enhancing mobility are proposed and tested.

  16. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  17. 77 FR 27738 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... contractor employing cognitive psychological testing methods. This approach has been demonstrated to be... concerning the information collection efforts relating to the qualitative testing mortgage servicing related... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Qualitative Testing of Mortgage Servicing Related Model Forms and...

  18. Collected software engineering papers, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Topics addressed include: summaries of the software engineering laboratory (SEL) organization, operation, and research activities; results of specific research projects in the areas of resource models and software measures; and strategies for data collection for software engineering research.

  19. 78 FR 70577 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested, New Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested, New Collection: Uniform Crime... Collection (1) Type of information collection: New Collection. (2) The title of the form/collection: Uniform... agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the department sponsoring the...

  20. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  1. The Statistical Modeling of Aging and Risk of Transition Project: Data Collection and Harmonization Across 11 Longitudinal Cohort Studies of Aging, Cognition, and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Abner, E L; Schmitt, F A; Nelson, P T; Lou, W; Wan, L; Gauriglia, R; Dodge, H H; Woltjer, R L; Yu, L; Bennett, D A; Schneider, J A; Chen, R; Masaki, K; Katz, M J; Lipton, R B; Dickson, D W; Lim, K O; Hemmy, L S; Cairns, N J; Grant, E; Tyas, S L; Xiong, C; Fardo, D W; Kryscio, R J

    2015-03-01

    Longitudinal cognitive trajectories and other factors associated with mixed neuropathologies (such as Alzheimer's disease with co-occurring cerebrovascular disease) remain incompletely understood, despite being the rule and not the exception in older populations. The Statistical Modeling of Aging and Risk of Transition study (SMART) is a consortium of 11 different high-quality longitudinal studies of aging and cognition (N=11,541 participants) established for the purpose of characterizing risk and protective factors associated with subtypes of age-associated mixed neuropathologies (N=3,001 autopsies). While brain donation was not required for participation in all SMART cohorts, most achieved substantial autopsy rates (i.e., > 50%). Moreover, the studies comprising SMART have large numbers of participants who were followed from intact cognition and transitioned to cognitive impairment and dementia, as well as participants who remained cognitively intact until death. These data provide an exciting opportunity to apply sophisticated statistical methods, like Markov processes, that require large, well-characterized samples. Thus, SMART will serve as an important resource for the field of mixed dementia epidemiology and neuropathology.

  2. Sweat collection capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaplaine, R. W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Capsule, with filter paper insert, is used to collect sweat for rate monitoring, chromatographic analysis, or active sweat gland location within specified area. Construction of capsule allows change of inserts while device remains strapped in place.

  3. Online Data Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topp, Neal W.; Pawloski, Bob

    2002-01-01

    Describes the eventful history of online data collection and presents a review of current literature following by a list of pros and cons to be considered when stepping into online surveying. (Contains 14 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. Consulting in Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Lee

    1980-01-01

    Considers the role of the consultant in the areas of library collection development and weeding, and offers suggestions on determining the need for a consultant, obtaining one, and what to do when the consultant arrives. (FM)

  5. Weeding Your Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerby, Ramona

    2002-01-01

    Offers guidelines for weeding as part of school library collection development. Highlights include developing a weeding policy; and the CREW (Continuous Review Evaluation and Weeding) method, including reasons for weeding, scheduling, and guidelines for fiction and for nonfiction. (LRW)

  6. Sweat collection capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Delaplaine, R. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A sweat collection capsule permitting quantitative collection of sweat is described. The device consists of a frame held immobile on the skin, a closure secured to the frame and absorbent material located next to the skin in a cavity formed by the frame and the closure. The absorbent material may be removed from the device by removing the closure from the frame while the frame is held immobile on the skin.

  7. Sparse matrix test collections

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, I.

    1996-12-31

    This workshop will discuss plans for coordinating and developing sets of test matrices for the comparison and testing of sparse linear algebra software. We will talk of plans for the next release (Release 2) of the Harwell-Boeing Collection and recent work on improving the accessibility of this Collection and others through the World Wide Web. There will only be three talks of about 15 to 20 minutes followed by a discussion from the floor.

  8. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  9. A Survey of Collectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Due to the increasing sophistication and miniaturization of computational components, complex, distributed systems of interacting agents are becoming ubiquitous. Such systems, where each agent aims to optimize its own performance, but where there is a well-defined set of system-level performance criteria, are called collectives. The fundamental problem in analyzing/designing such systems is in determining how the combined actions of self-interested agents leads to 'coordinated' behavior on a iarge scale. Examples of artificial systems which exhibit such behavior include packet routing across a data network, control of an array of communication satellites, coordination of multiple deployables, and dynamic job scheduling across a distributed computer grid. Examples of natural systems include ecosystems, economies, and the organelles within a living cell. No current scientific discipline provides a thorough understanding of the relation between the structure of collectives and how well they meet their overall performance criteria. Although still very young, research on collectives has resulted in successes both in understanding and designing such systems. It is eqected that as it matures and draws upon other disciplines related to collectives, this field will greatly expand the range of computationally addressable tasks. Moreover, in addition to drawing on them, such a fully developed field of collective intelligence may provide insight into already established scientific fields, such as mechanism design, economics, game theory, and population biology. This chapter provides a survey to the emerging science of collectives.

  10. Spectral imagery collection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Joao M.; Rosario, Dalton; Farley, Vincent; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL for the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of adverse weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives at 549 and 1280m from the sensor location. The collected database will allow for: 1) Understand of signature variability under the different weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of hyperspectral and polarimetric technologies; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  11. Optimality, reduction and collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Justh, Eric W.; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The planar self-steering particle model of agents in a collective gives rise to dynamics on the N-fold direct product of SE(2), the rigid motion group in the plane. Assuming a connected, undirected graph of interaction between agents, we pose a family of symmetric optimal control problems with a coupling parameter capturing the strength of interactions. The Hamiltonian system associated with the necessary conditions for optimality is reducible to a Lie–Poisson dynamical system possessing interesting structure. In particular, the strong coupling limit reveals additional (hidden) symmetry, beyond the manifest one used in reduction: this enables explicit integration of the dynamics, and demonstrates the presence of a ‘master clock’ that governs all agents to steer identically. For finite coupling strength, we show that special solutions exist with steering controls proportional across the collective. These results suggest that optimality principles may provide a framework for understanding imitative behaviours observed in certain animal aggregations. PMID:27547087

  12. 78 FR 69934 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Information Collection Renewal; Submission for OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... comment on the renewal of an information collection, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995... transactions is the Internal Model Method. Under this method, the use of a model (other than a model for which... limit purposes. If a national bank or savings association proposes to use an internal model for...

  13. Theory of Collective Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    In this chapter an analysis of the behavior of an arbitrary (perhaps massive) collective of computational processes in terms of an associated "world" utility function is presented We concentrate on the situation where each process in the collective can be viewed as though it were striving to maximize its own private utility function. For such situations the central design issue is how to initialize/update the collective's structure, and in particular the private utility functions, so as to induce the overall collective to behave in a way that has large values of the world utility. Traditional "team game" approaches to this problem simply set each private utility function equal to the world utility function. The "Collective Intelligence" (COIN) framework is a semi-formal set of heuristics that recently have been used to construct private utility. functions that in many experiments have resulted in world utility values up to orders of magnitude superior to that ensuing from use of the team game utility. In this paper we introduce a formal mathematics for analyzing and designing collectives. We also use this mathematics to suggest new private utilities that should outperform the COIN heuristics in certain kinds of domains. In accompanying work we use that mathematics to explain previous experimental results concerning the superiority of COIN heuristics. In that accompanying work we also use the mathematics to make numerical predictions, some of which we then test. In this way these two papers establish the study of collectives as a proper science, involving theory, explanation of old experiments, prediction concerning new experiments, and engineering insights.

  14. Polarimetric imagery collection experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Joao M.; Felton, Melvin; Chenault, David; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL that is focused on the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives in an open field. The database will allow for: 1) Understanding of signature variability under adverse weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of polarimetric technology; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  15. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Leon, Amanda; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Tsontos, Vardis; Shie, Chung-Lin; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use. Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer.

  16. Dibaryons from Exceptional Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Walcher, Johannes

    2003-09-01

    We discuss aspects of the dictionary between brane configurations in del Pezzo geometries and dibaryons in the dual superconformal quiver gauge theories. The basis of fractional branes defining the quiver theory at the singularity has a K-theoretic dual exceptional collection of bundles which can be used to read off the spectrum of dibaryons in the weakly curved dual geometry. Our prescription identifies the R-charge R and all baryonic U(1) charges QI with divisors in the del Pezzo surface without any Weyl group ambiguity. As one application of the correspondence, we identify the cubic anomaly trRQIQJ as an intersection product for dibaryon charges in large-N superconformal gauge theories. Examples can be given for all del Pezzo surfaces using three- and four-block exceptional collections. Markov-type equations enforce consistency among anomaly equations for three-block collections.

  17. The Geneva brain collection

    PubMed Central

    Kövari, Enikö; Hof, Patrick R.; Bouras, Constantin

    2011-01-01

    The University of Geneva brain collection was founded at the beginning of the 20th century. Today, it consists of 10,154 formaldehyde- or buffered formaldehyde–fixed brains obtained from the autopsies of the Department of Psychiatry and, since 1971, from the Department of Geriatrics as well. More than 100,000 paraffin-embedded blocks and 200,000 histological slides have also been collected since 1901. From the time of its creation, this collection has served as an important resource for pathological studies and clinicopathological correlations, primarily in the field of dementing illnesses and brain aging research. These materials have permitted a number of original neuropathological observations, such as the classification of Pick’s disease by Constantinidis, or the description of dyshoric angiopathy and laminar sclerosis by Morel. The large number of cases, including some very rare conditions, provides a unique resource and an opportunity for worldwide collaborations. PMID:21599692

  18. Quantifying collective effervescence

    PubMed Central

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Bulbulia, Joseph; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Collective rituals are ubiquitous and resilient features of all known human cultures. They are also functionally opaque, costly, and sometimes dangerous. Social scientists have speculated that collective rituals generate benefits in excess of their costs by reinforcing social bonding and group solidarity, yet quantitative evidence for these conjectures is scarce. Our recent study measured the physiological effects of a highly arousing Spanish fire-walking ritual, revealing shared patterns in heart-rate dynamics between participants and related spectators. We briefly describe our results, and consider their implications. PMID:22446541

  19. Portable data collection device

    DOEpatents

    French, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time.

  20. Portable data collection device

    DOEpatents

    French, P.D.

    1996-06-11

    The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of a time. 7 figs.

  1. Werther's collection of medical moulages.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Hansel, Gesina; França, Katlein; Lotti, Torello; Roccia, Maria Grazia; Fioranelli, Massimo

    2017-03-02

    Moulages are individualized wax models that were very popular as teaching aids in medicine during the 19(th) and until the first half of the 20(th) century. After a period of decline, moulages have become a subject of interest again in more recent times since they represent unique artifacts of art, craftsmanship, and medical history. Werther's collection at Dresden-Friedrichstadt Hospital was one of the most important in Dresden-the capital of Saxony-during the period before World War II. Some relicts have survived and have been restored.

  2. Collective superlubricity of graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, Merel M.; de Wijn, Astrid S.; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    We investigate solid lubrication of graphene and graphene flakes using atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations. We find that graphene flakes yield lower friction than graphene as a result of a collective mechanism that emerges from the independent behaviour of the flakes. By freezing out different degrees of freedom of the flakes, we are able to attribute the low friction to non-simultaneous slipping of the individual flakes. We also compare the results of the atomistic simulations to those of a simplified two-dimensional model and find that the behaviour of the latter is strongly dependent on parameters, which emerge naturally from the atomistic simulations.

  3. Collective superlubricity of graphene flakes.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Merel M; de Wijn, Astrid S; Fasolino, Annalisa

    2016-04-06

    We investigate solid lubrication of graphene and graphene flakes using atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations. We find that graphene flakes yield lower friction than graphene as a result of a collective mechanism that emerges from the independent behaviour of the flakes. By freezing out different degrees of freedom of the flakes, we are able to attribute the low friction to non-simultaneous slipping of the individual flakes. We also compare the results of the atomistic simulations to those of a simplified two-dimensional model and find that the behaviour of the latter is strongly dependent on parameters, which emerge naturally from the atomistic simulations.

  4. Collective organization in aerotactic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Marco G.

    Some bacteria exhibit interesting behavior in the presence of an oxygen concentration. They perform an aerotactic motion along the gradient until they reach their optimal oxygen concentration. But they often organize collectively by forming dense regions, called 'bands', that travel towards the oxygen source. We have developed a model of swimmers with stochastic interaction rules moving in proximity of an air bubble. We perform molecular dynamics simulations and also solve advection-diffusion equations that reproduce the aerotactic behavior of mono-flagellated, facultative anaerobic bacteria. If the oxygen concentration in the system sinks locally below a threshold value, the formation of a migrating aerotactic band toward the bubble can be observed.

  5. Sao Paulo Map Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, G. Robert

    1985-01-01

    Describes geographical, subject, and chronological aspects of 25 cartographic collections housed in university, public, special, state, and semi-state libraries in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three size categories of map holdings (more than 10,000, 1,000-10,000, less than 1,000) are distinguished. A list of 27 Sao Paulo institutions housing map collections…

  6. Digital Collections Inventory Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClung, Patricia A.

    This report is intended to inform and stimulate discussion on digital library programs as well as the potential usefulness, scope, and desired features of future inventories of online digital collections. It describes a joint project by the Commission on Preservation and Access and the Council on Library Resources to determine the extent to which…

  7. Surface reference data collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applications of remote sensing must define relationships between image data and conditions at corresponding points on the ground. Unfortunately, many published remote sensing reports focus on image processing techniques with little detail regarding the methods used for collecting ground truth data....

  8. Authentic Assessment: A Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Kay, Ed.

    The essays in this collection consider the meaning of authentic assessment and the implications of its use. "Section 1: Assessing Assessment" includes the following essays: (1) "The Nation's Report Card Goes Home: Good News and Bad about Trends in Achievement" (Robert L. Linn and Stephen B. Dunbar); (2) "Budgets, Politics, and Testing" (Chris…

  9. Microcomputer Software Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demas, Samuel

    1985-01-01

    Presents overview of special considerations in developing microcomputer software collections, review of standardized cataloging practices, and discussion of problems of selection and acquisition of software. Policies governing loan procedures for microcomputer software which involve four types of copy protection (patent, trade secret, contract,…

  10. Collection Maintenance and Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Sherry

    This resource guide provides information about the range of activities that can be implemented to maintain and improve the condition of research collections to ensure that they remain usable as long as possible. After an introduction that describes the major activities and a review of an investigation process that gives an overview of good…

  11. The collective coordinates Jacobian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Moshe; Vinograd, Guy

    2002-05-01

    We develop an expansion for the Jacobian of the transformation from particle coordinates to collective coordinates. As a demonstration, we use the lowest order of the expansion in conjunction with a variational principle to obtain the Percus Yevick equation for a monodisperse hard sphere system and the Lebowitz equations for a polydisperse hard sphere system.

  12. RIF and Collective Bargaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1994-01-01

    Focuses on the modern case-law intersection between state legislation for school districts that applies to reduction-in-force (RIF) and other state legislation that applies to collective bargaining. One conclusion is that the implementation of RIF is more likely to be negotiable and arbitrable than the reasons for RIF. (96 footnotes) (MLF)

  13. Collection Development Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Wanda V.; And Others

    This document is an overall policy statement for library collection development for the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Part 1 comprises the library mission statement and a list of ongoing objectives. The second part provides some background information about the university environment and campus libraries. It also gives instructions…

  14. Deterritorializing Collective Biography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susanne; Walsh, Susan; Byers, Michele; Rajiva, Mythili

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new move in the methodological practice of collective biography, by provoking a shift beyond any remnant attachment to the speaking/writing subject towards her dispersal and displacement via textual interventions that stress multivocality. These include the use of photographs, drama, and various genres of writing. Using a…

  15. Quick Fixes: Collection Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabb, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    The Do It Yourself (DIY) section is an essential and well-used part of the public library's collection and must be kept up-to-date to remain valuable, since tools, materials, and building codes are always changing. Current economic decline has increased the topic's popularity as homeowners choose to remodel rather than buy, or attempt to make…

  16. Wastewater Collection Systems.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Srinivas

    2015-10-01

    This chapter presents a review of the literature published in 2014 on topics relating to wastewater collection systems. It presents advances in noteworthy research and industry experiences selected from major literature sources. This review is divided into the following sections: sewer system planning; sewer condition assessment/rehabilitation; pump stations and system design; operation and maintenance; and regulatory issues/ integrated planning.

  17. The Fall Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDeman, Barry A.

    1984-01-01

    Presents ideas for collecting objects on the school grounds or in the surrounding neighborhood. Objects include feathers/fur, leaves, galls, seeds, shells, spiderwebs, and litter. Also presents procedures for making impressions of bark, leaves, fossils, flora, and shadows. All activities can be adopted for students in kindergarten through grade…

  18. Collection Management, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortman, William A.

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 literature on collection management is reviewed under six major headings: (1) general overview; (2) materials; (3) kinds of users and libraries; (4) evaluation and cooperation; (5) selection, acquisitions, and allocation; and (6) access, weeding, and preservation. A list of 251 references is provided. (MES)

  19. 75 FR 59261 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Asbestos...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Rule and Revised Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan Rule; EPA ICR No. 1365.09... the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). This ICR, entitled: ``Asbestos-Containing Materials...

  20. 76 FR 20708 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Elder Justice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... advancement. The purpose of this data collection is to identify policy, practice, and research priorities in..., implicit theoretical models that can be used for planning and action. The process requires respondents to... multivariate analyses. The collection of data for all concept mapping activities will be facilitated via...

  1. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    Collective dynamics in biology is an interesting subject for physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase separation and criticality. However, the emergence of order is often less drastic in systems composed of the living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability among individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the cells migrate collectively in viscoelastic fluids, exhibiting behavior similar to ``flocking''. This collectiveness is greatly reduced in similarly viscous Newtonian fluids, suggesting that the cell-cell interaction is primarily a result of the elastic property or the memory effect of the fluids, instead of pure hydrodynamic interactions. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require a change in phenotype of the cells; therefore, it is a better model system for physicists. Supported by NIH grant 1R01HD070038.

  2. Sports Reference: A Core Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safford, Barbara Ripp

    2003-01-01

    Discusses reasons for including sports books in school library reference collections, explains why they should not be found only in public library collections, and provides six annotated bibliographies of sports books suitable for intermediate or middle school library collections. (LRW)

  3. 76 FR 55742 - Proposed Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... to take this opportunity to comment on proposed and/or continuing information collections, as... approved collection. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations. Estimated Number...

  4. Culture collections and biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, Manuel; Iborra, José L

    2003-06-01

    This review describes the relationships and links between culture collections, which act as sources of genomes, transcriptomes, proteome, and metabolomes, and fields of research biochemistry that demand their support and help. In addition, the invaluable but not always rewarded efforts of these organizations as a source and conservator of organism diversity is discussed. Biological waste-water treatment, ethanol as a non-finite source of energy, Rhodococcus fascians as the source of a citrus-juice debittering agent, the sporulation of filamentous fungi in liquid medium, and biotransformation with growing and resting cells are processes developed by the authors that demonstrate some of the applications of organisms from culture collections in the general field of biotechnology and related areas, including industrial biochemistry and biocatalytic synthesis.

  5. Collective network routing

    DOEpatents

    Hoenicke, Dirk

    2014-12-02

    Disclosed are a unified method and apparatus to classify, route, and process injected data packets into a network so as to belong to a plurality of logical networks, each implementing a specific flow of data on top of a common physical network. The method allows to locally identify collectives of packets for local processing, such as the computation of the sum, difference, maximum, minimum, or other logical operations among the identified packet collective. Packets are injected together with a class-attribute and an opcode attribute. Network routers, employing the described method, use the packet attributes to look-up the class-specific route information from a local route table, which contains the local incoming and outgoing directions as part of the specifically implemented global data flow of the particular virtual network.

  6. Wastewater Collection Systems.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Srinivas

    2016-10-01

    This chapter presents a review of the literature published in 2015 on topics relating to wastewater collection systems. It presents noteworthy advances in research and industry experiences selected from major literature sources. This review is divided into the following sections: sewer system planning; sewer condition assessment/rehabilitation; pump stations/force mains/ system design; operation and maintenance; asset management; and regulatory issues/ integrated planning.

  7. Collective behaviour in vertebrates: a sensory perspective

    PubMed Central

    Collignon, Bertrand; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Collective behaviour models can predict behaviours of schools, flocks, and herds. However, in many cases, these models make biologically unrealistic assumptions in terms of the sensory capabilities of the organism, which are applied across different species. We explored how sensitive collective behaviour models are to these sensory assumptions. Specifically, we used parameters reflecting the visual coverage and visual acuity that determine the spatial range over which an individual can detect and interact with conspecifics. Using metric and topological collective behaviour models, we compared the classic sensory parameters, typically used to model birds and fish, with a set of realistic sensory parameters obtained through physiological measurements. Compared with the classic sensory assumptions, the realistic assumptions increased perceptual ranges, which led to fewer groups and larger group sizes in all species, and higher polarity values and slightly shorter neighbour distances in the fish species. Overall, classic visual sensory assumptions are not representative of many species showing collective behaviour and constrain unrealistically their perceptual ranges. More importantly, caution must be exercised when empirically testing the predictions of these models in terms of choosing the model species, making realistic predictions, and interpreting the results. PMID:28018616

  8. Collective effects in deuteron induced reactions of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canbula, Bora

    2017-01-01

    Cross sections of 27 Al (d,x)22 Na , 27 Al (d,x)24 Na , and 27 Al (d,x)27 Mg reactions are calculated by using TALYS 1.6 computer code with different nuclear level density models, which are composite Gilbert-Cameron model, back-shifted Fermi gas model, generalized superfluid model, and recently proposed collective semi-classical Fermi gas model in the energy range of 3-180 MeV. The results are compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR library. In these deuteron induced reactions, collective effects are investigated by means of nuclear level density models. Collective semi-classical Fermi gas model including the collective effects via the level density parameter represents the best agreement with the experimental data compared to the other level density models, especially in the low deuteron bombarding energies where the collective effects dominate.

  9. STARLINK Software Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Steve; Lawden, Mike; Bly, Martin

    The Starlink Software Collection is a set of software which is managed and distributed by the Starlink Project. Some of the software was written by members of the Project, but some of it comes from outside the Project. This note describes the functions of the individual items in the Collection and provides an overview of the software so that readers can identify the items they need. The software is classified into four main divisions: * Packages -- are large collections of programs for people who want to analyse, convert, and display data. They are subdivided into eleven classes to help you find what you want. * Utilities -- are small programs devoted to a specific purpose. For example, they help you prepare for observations, write documents, and write programs. * Subroutine Libraries -- are for programmers writing astronomical software. They provide facilities such as astronomical calculations, data management and graphics. * Infrastructure -- are items which are mainly of interest to people writing programs within the Starlink Software Environment. They are included for completeness. Each item is described in sufficient detail for you to decide whether or not to investigate it further. If you want to find out more about an item, follow the document references given opposite the item name. If you are using the hypertext version of this document, the most up-to-date document references can be found by following the link from the software item name.

  10. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Ramapriyan, H.; Leon, A.; Tsontos, V. M.; Liu, Z.; Shie, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use.Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Science themes can be: Specific applications (uses) of the data, e.g., landslide prediction Geophysical events (e.g., Hurricane Sandy) A specific science research problem Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer. Eligible resources include anything accessible via URL: data files: data file URLs data subsets: OPeNDAP, webification or Web Coverage Service URLs data visualizations: Web Map Service data search results: OpenSearch Atom response custom analysis workflows: e.g., Giovanni analysis URL

  11. 78 FR 46347 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Medical Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... international standards ``ISO 9001: Quality Systems Model for Quality Assurance in Design/Development... device CGMP requirements with QS specifications in the international standard ``ISO 9001: Quality Systems... Collection; Comment Request; Medical Devices Current Good Manufacturing Practice Quality System...

  12. 75 FR 36092 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Medical Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... international standards ``ISO 9001: Quality Systems Model for Quality Assurance in Design/Development... harmonizes device CGMP requirements with QS specifications in the international standard ``ISO 9001: Quality... Collection; Comment Request; Medical Devices: Current Good Manufacturing Practice Quality System...

  13. 75 FR 25203 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Regional Economic Data Collection Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Economic Data Collection Program for Southeast Alaska AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... associated with fishery management policies, appropriate economic models and the data to implement them are needed. Much of the data required for regional economic analysis associated with Southeast...

  14. Dynamic Method for Identifying Collected Sample Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John

    2008-01-01

    G-Sample is designed for sample collection missions to identify the presence and quantity of sample material gathered by spacecraft equipped with end effectors. The software method uses a maximum-likelihood estimator to identify the collected sample's mass based on onboard force-sensor measurements, thruster firings, and a dynamics model of the spacecraft. This makes sample mass identification a computation rather than a process requiring additional hardware. Simulation examples of G-Sample are provided for spacecraft model configurations with a sample collection device mounted on the end of an extended boom. In the absence of thrust knowledge errors, the results indicate that G-Sample can identify the amount of collected sample mass to within 10 grams (with 95-percent confidence) by using a force sensor with a noise and quantization floor of 50 micrometers. These results hold even in the presence of realistic parametric uncertainty in actual spacecraft inertia, center-of-mass offset, and first flexibility modes. Thrust profile knowledge is shown to be a dominant sensitivity for G-Sample, entering in a nearly one-to-one relationship with the final mass estimation error. This means thrust profiles should be well characterized with onboard accelerometers prior to sample collection. An overall sample-mass estimation error budget has been developed to approximate the effect of model uncertainty, sensor noise, data rate, and thrust profile error on the expected estimate of collected sample mass.

  15. A Collection of Reprints,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    The model utilized constant eddy diffusivities with all the incumbent problems (see secs. IV-A and IV-B). A better parameterization of the turbulent ...Ice Zone, Cold Regions Sci. and Tech., Vol. 2. OCEAN CURRENT PROCESSES 453 Mellor, G. L., and T. Yamada, 1974, A hierarchy of turbulence closure models ...engi- neering and environmental studies is summarized, for instance, by Woodward et al. (1978). An excellent review of oil spill modeling is presented

  16. 77 FR 34461 - Agency Information Collection Activity; Proposed Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Internal Revenue Service Agency Information Collection Activity; Proposed Collection AGENCY: Internal... information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506... income under Code section 108. The collection of information is required for a taxpayer to elect...

  17. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  18. Nodoids and toroids: comparison of two geometries for the meniscus profile of a wetting liquid between two touching isolated spheres and extensions to the model of a collection of packed spheres.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Raymond P; Stowe, Robert A

    2005-05-15

    In the mid 1960s the present authors published two papers dealing with penetration of nonwetting liquids such as mercury into the interstitial void spaces using the model of uniform packed spheres. A circular arc was used to approximate the liquid-vapor interface in both papers. However, our circular arc-toroid values for the pressure-volume relationship in the pendular ring which exists between two touching spheres was criticized. The authors concluded that our approximation led to unacceptably large differences compared to the values calculated from the exact nodoid shape. This incorrect conclusion was never rebutted and has, in fact, been misinterpreted by subsequent workers to include values calculated for the shape of the access opening and the associated pressure for penetration into the void space of a collection of spheres. This leaves a cloud of uncertainty, not only over our original work on nonwetting fluids, but on the application of our procedures to the field of wetting fluids. The contrast in the geometrical shapes of the toroid and nodoid is depicted and the pressure values are compared at equal volumes. In contrast to the claim of excessive error, we show the toroid geometry, in conjunction with a pressure-volume work derivation, to have a maximum error of 0.06% as compared to the nodoid at all liquid-solid contact angles. The toroid also has the advantage of using a readily derived work versus surface free energy balance rather than requiring the use of incomplete elliptic integrals to evaluate the nodoid. Attempts to use radii of curvature to evaluate the toroid shape are shown to give extremely poor approximations of the exact values for the pressure. Values reported for access to the interior void space of a collection of spheres still need adjustment for the effect of contact angles between 0 degrees and 180 degrees for characterizing assemblies of real solids by computing "equivalent spherical" particle size from porosity and mercury

  19. Ice Jam Data Collection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Sweden, p. 301- LITERATURE CITED 317. Pomerleau, R.T. (1992a) Field ice measurements Beltaos , S . (1978) Field investigations of river ice for...9, LuleA, Sweden, p. 355-371. Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference of the Beltaos , S ., R. Gerard, S . Petryk and T.D. Association of State...AD- A280 067 Ice Jam Data Collection Kathleen D. White and Jon E. ZufelT March 1994 DTIC S EECTEa @8199M411 aF FI 1,0 Tis EWE’~t a, pm. DTIC QUALFPy

  20. Collection Analysis Project. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Carol; And Others

    This interim report of the University of Wyoming's Collection Analysis Project, whose purpose is to examine the university library's collection development process and make workable recommendations for process improvement, consists of a brief history of the library's collection, including a review of the evolution of the collection development…

  1. Collection Assessment. SPEC Kit 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This Association of Research Libraries (ARL) kit on collection assessment contains the following documents: (1) "Guidelines for the Evaluation of Library Collections--Draft Copy" (Collection Development Committee, Resource Section, Resources and Technical Services Division, American Library Association); (2) "Guidelines for Collection Assessment"…

  2. 75 FR 68956 - Debt Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... collection procedures. The interim final rule includes procedures for collection of debts through salary... be referred to debt collection centers for collection. \\7\\ 31 CFR chapter IX. 2. Subpart B, Salary... employees and former FHFA employees who are employed by other agencies by salary offset, that is,...

  3. Portable liquid collection electrostatic precipitator

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Halverson, Justin E.

    2005-10-18

    A portable liquid collection electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a tubular collection electrode, a reservoir for a liquid, and a pump. The pump pumps the liquid into the collection electrode such that the liquid flows down the exterior of the collection electrode and is recirculated to the reservoir. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows near the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. A portable power source is connected to the air intake and the collection electrode. Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the liquid. The precipitator may also have an analyzer for the liquid and may have a transceiver allowing remote operation and data collection.

  4. Collective dynamics during cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapperi, Stefano; Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    In order to correctly divide, cells have to move all their chromosomes at the center, a process known as congression. This task is performed by the combined action of molecular motors and randomly growing and shrinking microtubules. Chromosomes are captured by growing microtubules and transported by motors using the same microtubules as tracks. Coherent motion occurs as a result of a large collection of random and deterministic dynamical events. Understanding this process is important since a failure in chromosome segregation can lead to chromosomal instability one of the hallmarks of cancer. We describe this complex process in a three dimensional computational model involving thousands of microtubules. The results show that coherent and robust chromosome congression can only happen if the total number of microtubules is neither too small, nor too large. Our results allow for a coherent interpretation a variety of biological factors already associated in the past with chromosomal instability and related pathological conditions.

  5. Collective Functionality through Bacterial Individuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Martin

    According to the conventional view, the properties of an organism are a product of nature and nurture - of its genes and the environment it lives in. Recent experiments with unicellular organisms have challenged this view: several molecular mechanisms generate phenotypic variation independently of environmental signals, leading to variation in clonal groups. My presentation will focus on the causes and consequences of this microbial individuality. Using examples from bacterial genetic model systems, I will first discuss different molecular and cellular mechanisms that give rise to bacterial individuality. Then, I will discuss the consequences of individuality, and focus on how phenotypic variation in clonal populations of bacteria can promote interactions between individuals, lead to the division of labor, and allow clonal groups of bacteria to cope with environmental uncertainty. Variation between individuals thus provides clonal groups with collective functionality.

  6. 75 FR 43989 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Sample Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Sample Collection Plan for Dogs Treated With SLENTROL AGENCY: Food and Drug... response to the notice. This notice solicits comments on the sample collection plan for dogs treated with... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Sample Collection Plan for Dogs Treated With...

  7. 77 FR 6573 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Collection of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Collection of Qualitative Feedback Through Focus Groups AGENCY: U.S. Citizenship... Government-wide effort to streamline the process to seek feedback from the public on service delivery, the... Generic Information Collection Request (Generic ICR): ``Collection of Qualitative Feedback through...

  8. Geoengineering as Collective Experimentation.

    PubMed

    Stilgoe, Jack

    2016-06-01

    Geoengineering is defined as the 'deliberate and large-scale intervention in the Earth's climatic system with the aim of reducing global warming'. The technological proposals for doing this are highly speculative. Research is at an early stage, but there is a strong consensus that technologies would, if realisable, have profound and surprising ramifications. Geoengineering would seem to be an archetype of technology as social experiment, blurring lines that separate research from deployment and scientific knowledge from technological artefacts. Looking into the experimental systems of geoengineering, we can see the negotiation of what is known and unknown. The paper argues that, in renegotiating such systems, we can approach a new mode of governance-collective experimentation. This has important ramifications not just for how we imagine future geoengineering technologies, but also for how we govern geoengineering experiments currently under discussion.

  9. Solar energy collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector having an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material, reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well known freeway paving machinery. The solar energy absorber is preferably a fluid transporting pipe. Efficient utilization leading to high temperatures from the reflected solar energy is obtained by cylindrical shaped secondary reflectors that direct off-angle energy to the absorber pipe. A seriatim arrangement of cylindrical secondary reflector stages and spot-forming reflector stages produces a high temperature solar energy collection system of greater efficiency.

  10. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Collective dynamics of artificial swimmers has gathered a lot of attention from physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase transitions. However, the emergence of order tends to be less drastic in the systems composed of real living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability in individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the local orientation order of sperm spontaneously emerges in viscoelastic fluids, migrating collectively in clusters in high cell concentrations, or pairs in low cell concentrations. This collectiveness is similar to a liquid-gas phase transition, as both phases coexist simultaneously in our system. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require the cells to be in a different phenotype than the regular swimming one, providing further simplicity to the physicists. We will discuss the underlying interaction mechanism, and the potential influence in biology. Supported by NIH Grant 1R01HD070038.

  11. Collective and non-collective structures in nuclei of mass region A ≈ 125

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A. K.; Collaboration: INGA Collaboration; Gammasphere Collaboration

    2014-08-14

    Generation of angular momentum in nuclei is a key question in nuclear structure studies. In single particle model, it is due to alignment of spin of individual nucleon available in the valence space, whereas coherent motion of nucleons are assumed in the collective model. The nuclei near the closed shell at Z = 50 with mass number A ≈ 120-125 represent ideal cases to explore the interplay between these competing mechanisms and the transition from non-collective to collective behavior or vice versa. Recent spectroscopic studies of nuclei in this region reveal several non-collective maximally aligned states representing the first kind of excitation mechanism, where 8-12 particles above the {sup 114}Sn align their spins to generate these states. Deformed rotational bands feeding the non-collective states in the spin range I=20-25 and excitation energies around 10 MeV have also been observed. Structure of the collective and non-collective states are discussed in the framework of Cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky model.

  12. Mechanics of collective unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruel, M.; Allain, J.-M.; Truskinovsky, L.

    2015-03-01

    Mechanically induced unfolding of passive crosslinkers is a fundamental biological phenomenon encountered across the scales from individual macro-molecules to cytoskeletal actin networks. In this paper we study a conceptual model of athermal load-induced unfolding and use a minimalistic setting allowing one to emphasize the role of long-range interactions while maintaining full analytical transparency. Our model can be viewed as a description of a parallel bundle of N bistable units confined between two shared rigid backbones that are loaded through a series spring. We show that the ground states in this model correspond to synchronized, single phase configurations where all individual units are either folded or unfolded. We then study the fine structure of the wiggly energy landscape along the reaction coordinate linking the two coherent states and describing the optimal mechanism of cooperative unfolding. Quite remarkably, our study shows the fundamental difference in the size and the structure of the folding-unfolding energy barriers in the hard (fixed displacements) and soft (fixed forces) loading devices which persists in the continuum limit. We argue that both, the synchronization and the non-equivalence of the mechanical responses in hard and soft devices, have their origin in the dominance of long-range interactions. We then apply our minimal model to skeletal muscles where the power-stroke in acto-myosin crossbridges can be interpreted as passive folding. A quantitative analysis of the muscle model shows that the relative rigidity of myosin backbone provides the long-range interaction mechanism allowing the system to effectively synchronize the power-stroke in individual crossbridges even in the presence of thermal fluctuations. In view of the prototypical nature of the proposed model, our general conclusions pertain to a variety of other biological systems where elastic interactions are mediated by effective backbones.

  13. Forecasting Zakat collection using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sy Ahmad Ubaidillah, Sh. Hafizah; Sallehuddin, Roselina

    2013-04-01

    'Zakat', "that which purifies" or "alms", is the giving of a fixed portion of one's wealth to charity, generally to the poor and needy. It is one of the five pillars of Islam, and must be paid by all practicing Muslims who have the financial means (nisab). 'Nisab' is the minimum level to determine whether there is a 'zakat' to be paid on the assets. Today, in most Muslim countries, 'zakat' is collected through a decentralized and voluntary system. Under this voluntary system, 'zakat' committees are established, which are tasked with the collection and distribution of 'zakat' funds. 'Zakat' promotes a more equitable redistribution of wealth, and fosters a sense of solidarity amongst members of the 'Ummah'. The Malaysian government has established a 'zakat' center at every state to facilitate the management of 'zakat'. The center has to have a good 'zakat' management system to effectively execute its functions especially in the collection and distribution of 'zakat'. Therefore, a good forecasting model is needed. The purpose of this study is to develop a forecasting model for Pusat Zakat Pahang (PZP) to predict the total amount of collection from 'zakat' of assets more precisely. In this study, two different Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models using two different learning algorithms are developed; Back Propagation (BP) and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM). Both models are developed and compared in terms of their accuracy performance. The best model is determined based on the lowest mean square error and the highest correlations values. Based on the results obtained from the study, BP neural network is recommended as the forecasting model to forecast the collection from 'zakat' of assets for PZP.

  14. Collection Development Policy, United States Documents Selective Depository Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langston Univ., OK.

    The purpose of the government document collection in the Langston University (Oklahoma) libraries is to serve as a complement to the general collection of the libraries. The general collection in turn exists in order to provide the maximum coverage of information to support the curriculum and the community needs. This policy is developed to ensure…

  15. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.

  16. Swarms, phase transitions, and collective intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-12-31

    A model of the collective behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The model is intended to be realistic, but turns out to fit naturally into the category of connectionist models, Like all connectionist models, its properties can be divided into the categories of structure, dynamics, and learning. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell hag a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding constitutes of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters. It is hoped that the present mode; might serve as a paradigmatic example of a complex cooperative system in nature. In particular this model can be used to explore the relation of phase transitions to at least three important issues encountered in artificial life. Firstly, that of emergence as complex adaptive behavior. Secondly, as an exploration of second order phase transitions in biological systems. Lastly, to derive behavioral criteria for the evolution of collective behavior in social organisms. The model is then applied to the specific case of ants moving on a lattice. The local behavior of the ants is inspired by the actual behavior observed in the laboratory, and analytic results for the collective behavior are compared to the corresponding laboratory results. Monte carlo simulations are used as illustrations.

  17. Designing a Collection Development Plan for Sailor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Denise M.

    1996-01-01

    Sailor, Maryland's public information network, has become a national model for public libraries and states planning telecommunications networks and library systems integration. This article summarizes the design and implementation of the network's Internet resource collection development, highlighting the database committee, editorial board,…

  18. Reconstructing Professional Learning Community as Collective Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a cross-domain inquiry into schoolwide professional learning community. It examines tensions in how professional learning community is conceptualized and how it is enacted in the processes of teacher groups. Drawing on a study of contemporary theatre arts practices, it proposes a model of collective creation that highlights…

  19. Collective decision making in cohesive flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; Vicsek, Tamás

    2010-09-01

    Most of us must have been fascinated by the eye-catching displays of collectively moving animals. Schools of fish can move in a rather orderly fashion and then change direction amazingly abruptly. There are a large number of further examples both from the living and the non-living world for phenomena during which the many interacting, permanently moving units seem to arrive at a common behavioural pattern taking place in a short time. As a paradigm of this type of phenomena we consider the problem of how birds arrive at a decision resulting in their synchronized landing. We introduce a simple model to interpret this process. Collective motion prior to landing is modelled using a simple self-propelled particle (SPP) system with a new kind of boundary condition, while the tendency and the sudden propagation of the intention of landing are introduced through rules analogous to the random field Ising model in an external field. We show that our approach is capable of capturing the most relevant features of collective decision making in a system of units with variance of individual intentions and being under an increasing level of pressure to switch states. We find that as a function of the few parameters of our model the collective switching from the flying to the landing state is indeed much sharper than the distribution of individual landing intentions. The transition is accompanied by a number of interesting features discussed in this paper.

  20. Collective Wisdom, Clones, and New Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villadsen, Alice W.

    2002-01-01

    Concerned with the impending community college leadership deficit, the author articulates a vision for reinventing leadership development programs that balance the collective wisdom of experience with the innovation essential for addressing the cultural and technological challenges of the future. Presents three model leadership programs that…

  1. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transitions in two-dimensional non-Abelian spin models.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Oleg; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cuteri, Francesca; Papa, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    It is argued that two-dimensional U(N) spin models for any N undergo a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT)-like phase transition, similarly to the famous XY model. This conclusion follows from the Berezinskii-like calculation of the two-point correlation function in U(N) models, approximate renormalization group analysis, and numerical investigations of the U(2) model. It is shown, via Monte Carlo simulations, that the universality class of the U(2) model coincides with that of the XY model. Moreover, preliminary numerical results point out that two-dimensional SU(N) spin models with the fundamental and adjoint terms and N>4 exhibit two phase transitions of BKT type, similarly to Z(N) vector models.

  2. Waste collection subsystem study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Practical ways were explored of improving waste compaction and of providing rapid turnaround between flights at essentially no cost for the space shuttle waste collection subsystem commode. Because of the possible application of a fully developed shuttle commode to the space station, means of providing waste treatment without overboard venting were also considered. Three basic schemes for compaction and rapid turnaround, each fully capable of meeting the objectives, were explored in sufficient depth to bring out the characteristic advantages and disadvantages of each. Tradeoff comparisons were very close between leading contenders and efforts were made to refine the design concepts sufficiently to justify a selection. The concept selected makes use of a sealed canister containing wastes that have been forcibly compacted, which is removable in flight. No selection was made between three superior non-venting treatment methods owing to the need for experimental evaluations of the processes involved. A system requirements definition document has been prepared to define the task for a test embodiment of the selected concept.

  3. Collective Bargaining--Oregon Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Eldon G.

    The implications of the mandatory collective bargaining law in Oregon, House Bill 2263, are described in a case history of Lane Community College. In addition, problems that have emerged as a result of collective bargaining in Oregon are listed. (DB)

  4. Collective complexes--total perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alho, Päivi Marjaana

    2006-11-01

    A much greater part of our identity than we generally believe is collectively determined. Awareness of the causal link between identity, its connected values and the influence exerted by these values on perception is therefore crucial. In the implicit personality model of Peabody and Goldberg (1989), the apparent wide variety of human characteristics is broken down into three broad dimensions: general evaluation, impulse control and assertiveness. My hypothesis is that the regulation of impulses can be equated with the Jungian concept of the mother and father complexes, and assertiveness with the relation between individualism and collectivism. I have utilized Montgomery's perspective theory and Jung's concepts of the union of opposites, the complex and the shadow in order to provide an alternative interpretation of the implicit personality model. According to my interpretation, the traditional values of any culture can be read against these three dimensions. These values can be seen as the greatest treasure of a culture but, at the same time, they can also be devastating if they become complex-like.

  5. Collective decisions among bacterial viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Richard; Mileyko, Yuriy; Voit, Eberhard; Weitz, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    For many temperate bacteriophages, the decision of whether to kill hosts or enter a latent state depends on the multiplicity of infection. In this talk, I present a quantitative model of gene regulatory dynamics to describe how phages make collective decisions within host cells. Unlike most previous studies, the copy number of viral genomes is treated as a variable. In the absence of feedback loops, viral mRNA transcription is expected to be proportional to the viral copy number. However, when there are nonlinear feedback loops in viral gene regulation, our model shows that gene expression patterns are sensitive to changes in viral copy number and there can be a domain of copy number where the system becomes bistable. Hence, the viral copy number is a key control parameter determining host cell fates. This suggests that bacterial viruses can respond adaptively to changes in population dynamics, and can make alternative decisions as a bet-hedging strategy. Finally, I present a stochastic version of viral gene regulation and discuss speed-accuracy trade-offs in the context of cell fate determination by viruses.

  6. 75 FR 42662 - Debt Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    .... This proposed rule would add salary offset and administrative wage garnishment to the collection... also provide for the collection of debts via salary offset and the use of administrative wage garnishment. Salary offset is the collection of debt owed by a Federal employee by withholding up to...

  7. 75 FR 68203 - Debt Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    .... PBGC is adding salary offset and administrative wage garnishment to the collection methods allowed..., and to add salary offset and administrative wage garnishment to the collection methods allowed under... operations. The final regulation also provides for the collection of debts via salary offset and the use...

  8. Collection Development Policy: Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazek, Dan

    Intended as a general guideline for selecting government documents at the University of Miami (Florida) Otto G. Richter Library, this collection development policy includes the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Mission Statement; (3) Selection Responsibility; (4) Subject Areas, Collection Intensity Levels and Collection Arrangement,…

  9. Houston Cole Library Collection Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, William Abbot, Ed.; McAbee, Sonja L., Ed.

    This document reports on an assessment of the Jacksonville State University's Houston Cole Library collection that employed a variety of methodologies and tools, including list-checking, direct collection examination, shelflist measurement and analysis, WLN (Washington Library Network) conspectus sheets, analysis of OCLC/AMIGOS Collection Analysis…

  10. Managing University Research Microdata Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolfrey, Lynn; Fry, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the management of microdata collections in a university context. It is a cross-country analysis: Collection management at data services in Canada and South Africa are considered. The case studies are of two university sub-contexts: One collection is located in a library; the other at a Faculty-based Data Service. Stages in…

  11. Physician collective bargaining.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Anthony Hunter

    2009-11-01

    Current antitrust enforcement policy unduly restricts physician collaboration, especially among small physician practices. Among other matters, current enforcement policy has hindered the ability of physicians to implement efficient healthcare delivery innovations, such as the acquisition and implementation of health information technology (HIT). Furthermore, the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice have unevenly enforced the antitrust laws, thereby fostering an increasingly severe imbalance in the healthcare market in which dominant health insurers enjoy the benefit of largely unfettered consolidation at the cost of both consumers and providers. This article traces the history of antitrust enforcement in healthcare, describe the current marketplace, and suggest the problems that must be addressed to restore balance to the healthcare market and help to ensure an innovative and efficient healthcare system capable of meeting the demands of the 21st century. Specifically, the writer explains how innovative physician collaborations have been improperly stifled by the policies of the federal antitrust enforcement agencies, and recommend that these policies be relaxed to permit physicians more latitude to bargain collectively with health insurers in conjunction with procompetitive clinical integration efforts. The article also explains how the unbridled consolidation of the health insurance industry has resulted in higher premiums to consumers and lower compensation to physicians, and recommends that further consolidation be prohibited. Finally, the writer discusses how health insurers with market power are improperly undermining the physician-patient relationship, and recommend federal antitrust enforcement agencies take appropriate steps to protect patients and their physicians from this anticompetitive conduct. The article also suggests such steps will require changes in three areas: (1) health insurers must be prohibited from engaging in anticompetitive

  12. Evolutionary dynamics of collective index insurance.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Santos, Francisco C; Levin, Simon A

    2016-03-01

    Index-based insurances offer promising opportunities for climate-risk investments in developing countries. Indeed, contracts conditional on, e.g., weather or livestock indexes can be cheaper to set up than conventional indemnity-based insurances, while offering a safety net to vulnerable households, allowing them to eventually escape poverty traps. Moreover, transaction costs by insurance companies may be additionally reduced if contracts, instead of arranged with single households, are endorsed by collectives of households that bear the responsibility of managing the division of the insurance coverage by its members whenever the index is surpassed, allowing for additional flexibility in what concerns risk-sharing and also allowing insurance companies to avoid the costs associated with moral hazard. Here we resort to a population dynamics framework to investigate under which conditions household collectives may find collective index insurances attractive, when compared with individual index insurances. We assume risk sharing among the participants of each collective, and model collective action in terms of an N-person threshold game. Compared to less affordable individual index insurances, we show how collective index insurances lead to a coordination problem in which the adoption of index insurances may become the optimal decision, spreading index insurance coverage to the entire population. We further investigate the role of risk-averse and risk-prone behaviors, as well as the role of partial correlation between insurance coverage and actual loss of crops, and in which way these affect the original coordination thresholds.

  13. THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND COLLECTIVE EFFICACY

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A; Inagami, Sanae; Finch, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Collective efficacy, or perception of mutual trust and willingness to help each other, is a measure of neighborhood social capital and has been associated with positive health outcomes including lower rates of assaults, homicide, premature mortality, and asthma. Collective efficacy is frequently considered a “cause”, but we hypothesized that environmental features might be the foundation for, or the etiology of personal reports of neighborhood collective efficacy. We analyzed data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Study (LA FANS) together with geographical data from Los Angeles County to determine which social and environmental features were associated with personal reports of collective efficacy, including presence of parks, alcohol outlets, elementary schools and fast food outlets. We used multi-level modeling controlling for age, education, annual family income, sex, marital status, employment and race/ethnicity at the individual level. At the tract level we controlled for tract level disadvantage, the number of off-sale alcohol outlets per roadway mile; the number of parks and the number of fast-food outlets within the tract and within one-half mile of the tract’s boundaries. We found that parks were independently and positively associated with collective efficacy; alcohol outlets were negatively associated with collective efficacy only when tract level disadvantage was not included in the model. Fast food outlets and elementary schools were not linearly related to collective efficacy. Certain environmental features may set the stage for neighborhood social interactions, thus serving as a foundation for underlying health and well-being. Altering these environmental features may have greater than expected impact on health. PMID:17644395

  14. Influence of pH, water activity and acetic acid concentration on Listeria monocytogenes at 7 degrees C: data collection for the development of a growth/no growth model.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Gysemans, K P M; Bernaerts, K; Geeraerd, A H; Van Impe, J F; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F

    2007-03-20

    Growth/no growth models can be used to determine the chance that microorganisms will grow in specific environmental conditions. As a consequence, these models are of interest in the assessment of the safety of foods which can be contaminated with food pathogens. In this paper, growth/no growth data for Listeria monocytogenes (in a monoculture and in a mixed strain culture) are presented. The data were gathered at 7 degrees C in Nutrient Broth with different combinations of environmental factors pH (5.0-6.0, six levels), water activity (0.960-0.990, six levels) and acetic acid concentration (0-0.8% (w/w), five levels). This combination of environmental factors for the development of a growth/no growth model was based on the characteristics of sauces and mayonnaise based salads. The strains used were chosen from screening experiments in which the pH, water activity and acetic acid resistance of 26 L. monocytogenes strains (LFMFP culture collection) was determined at 30 degrees C in Brain Heart Infusion broth. The screening showed that most L. monocytogenes strains were not able to grow at a(w)<0.930, pH<4.3 or a total acetic acid concentration >0.4% (w/w). Among these strains, the ones chosen were the most resistant to one of these factors in the hope that, if the resulting model predicted no growth at certain conditions for those more resistant strains, then these predictions would also be valid for the less resistant strains. A mixed strain culture was also examined to combine the strains that were most resistant to one of the factors. A full factorial design with the selected strains was tested. The experiments were performed in microtiter plates and the growth was followed by optical density measurements at 380 nm. The plates were inoculated with 6 log CFU/ml and twenty replicates were made for each treatment combination. These data were used (1) to determine the growth/no growth boundary and (2) to estimate the influence of the environmental conditions on the

  15. Realistic collective nuclear Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Marianne; Zuker, Andrés P.

    1996-10-01

    The residual part of the realistic forces-obtained after extracting the monopole terms responsible for bulk properties-is strongly dominated by pairing and quadrupole interactions, with important στ.στ, octupole, and hexadecapole contributions. Their forms retain the simplicity of the traditional pairing plus multipole models, while eliminating their flaws through a normalization mechanism dictated by a universal A-1/3 scaling. Coupling strengths and effective charges are calculated and shown to agree with empirical values. Comparisons between different realistic interactions confirm the claim that they are very similar.

  16. Loftin Collection - Boeing Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1933-01-01

    Either a F2B-1 or F3B-1, both aircraft were built by Boeing and both were powered by Pratt and Whitney Wasp engines. These fighters were intended for Navy shipboard use. Boeing F3B-1: While most Boeing F3B-1s served the U. S. Navy aircraft carriers the Lexington and the Saratoga, this example flew in NACA hands at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in the late 1920's. Also known as the Boeing Model 77, the aircraft was the next to last F3B-1 build in November 1928.

  17. Stories, skulls, and colonial collections.

    PubMed

    Roque, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The essay explores the hypothesis of colonial collecting processes involving the active addition of the colonial context and historical past to museum objects through the production of short stories. It examines the emergent historicity of collections through a focus on the "histories" that museum workers and colonial agents have been attaching to scientific collections of human skulls. Drawing on the notions of collection trajectory and historiographical work, it offers an alternative perspective from which to approach the creation of singular histories and individual archives for objects in collections.

  18. Study of data collection platform concepts: Data collection system user requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The overall purpose of the survey was to provide real world data on user requirements. The intent was to assess data collection system user requirements by questioning actual potential users rather than speculating on requirements. The end results of the survey are baseline requirements models for both a data collection platform and a data collection system. These models were derived from the survey results. The real value of these models lies in the fact that they are based on actual user requirements as delineated in the survey questionnaires. Some users desire data collection platforms of small size and light weight. These sizes and weights are beyond the present state of the art. Also, the survey provided a wealth of information on the nature and constituency of the data collection user community as well as information on user applications for data collection systems. Finally, the data sheds light on the generalized platform concept. That is, the diversity of user requirements shown in the data indicates the difficulty that can be anticipated in attempting to implement such a concept.

  19. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  20. Collective rhythmicity in biological oscillator ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.L.; Wille, L.T.

    1993-12-31

    Many biological phenomena, including peristalsis, circadian rhythms, and cardiac synchronization, may be modeled in terms of the collective behavior of non-linear oscillator ensembles. The possible types of synergetics include modelocking, amplitude death, quasiperiodicity, and chaos. This paper presents large-scale simulations on a SIMD-computer with a mesh architecture (the MasPar-1 or DECmpp 12000 system) of one- and two-dimensional arrays of disparate limit-cycle oscillators. The simulations have been optimized for this type of architecture and permit the determination of the collective behavior over time scales and for system sizes that are much larger than has hitherto been feasible.

  1. Introduction to the Rosetta Special Collection

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sagar D.; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    The Rosetta macromolecular modeling software is a versatile, rapidly developing set of tools that are now being routinely utilized to address state-of-the-art research challenges in academia and industrial research settings. A Rosetta Conference (RosettaCon) describing updates to the Rosetta source code is held annually. Every two years, a Rosetta Conference (RosettaCon) special collection describing the results presented at the annual conference by participating RosettaCommons labs is published by the Public Library of Science (PLOS). This is the introduction to the third RosettaCon 2014 Special Collection published by PLOS. PMID:26714017

  2. 76 FR 7081 - Proposed Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... data collected on Schedule CMR currently are used as input for the OTS's Interest Rate Risk Model (IRR Model). The results of the IRR Model are used by examiners and supervisory staff as an aid in monitoring... institution with its own IRR Model results to aid the institution's own interest rate risk management; and...

  3. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  4. MicroED data collection and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E.; Nannenga, Brent L.; Shi, Dan; Cruz, M. Jason de la; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Gonen, Tamir

    2015-07-01

    The collection and processing of MicroED data are presented. MicroED, a method at the intersection of X-ray crystallography and electron cryo-microscopy, has rapidly progressed by exploiting advances in both fields and has already been successfully employed to determine the atomic structures of several proteins from sub-micron-sized, three-dimensional crystals. A major limiting factor in X-ray crystallography is the requirement for large and well ordered crystals. By permitting electron diffraction patterns to be collected from much smaller crystals, or even single well ordered domains of large crystals composed of several small mosaic blocks, MicroED has the potential to overcome the limiting size requirement and enable structural studies on difficult-to-crystallize samples. This communication details the steps for sample preparation, data collection and reduction necessary to obtain refined, high-resolution, three-dimensional models by MicroED, and presents some of its unique challenges.

  5. Current Collection from Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra (Editor); Wright, K. H., Jr. (Editor); Stone, Nobie H. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The First Workshop on Current Collection from Space Plasmas was held at the Tom Bevil Center on the campus of The University of Alabama in Huntsville on April 24 to 25, 1989. The intent of the workshop was to assemble experts on various topics related to the problem of current collection for deliberations that would elucidate the present understanding of the overall current collection problem. Papers presented at the workshop are presented.

  6. Transmitter data collection using Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    A data collection system installed on the 400 kilowatt X-band transmitter of the Goldstone Solar System Radar is described. The data collection system is built around the off-the-shelf IEEE 488 instrumentation, linked with fiber optics, controlled by an inexpensive computer, and uses software written in the Ada language. The speed and accuracy of the system is discussed, along with programming techniques used for both data collection and reduction.

  7. 77 FR 46527 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Collection Request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. This ICR describes the nature of the information collection and its estimated burden and cost. DATE: Submit written..., Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Room 10235, Washington, DC 20503....

  8. 77 FR 20820 - Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ..., 44 U.S.C. 3501-3521, AHRQ invites the public to comment on this proposed information collection...) approve, under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, AHRQ's collection of information for the Synthesis of... healthcareassociated infections (HAIs), both internally and through contracts and grants. AHRQ's grant- and...

  9. Collective action problem in heterogeneous groups

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilets, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    I review the theoretical and experimental literature on the collective action problem in groups whose members differ in various characteristics affecting individual costs, benefits and preferences in collective actions. I focus on evolutionary models that predict how individual efforts and fitnesses, group efforts and the amount of produced collective goods depend on the group's size and heterogeneity, as well as on the benefit and cost functions and parameters. I consider collective actions that aim to overcome the challenges from nature or win competition with neighbouring groups of co-specifics. I show that the largest contributors towards production of collective goods will typically be group members with the highest stake in it or for whom the effort is least costly, or those who have the largest capability or initial endowment. Under some conditions, such group members end up with smaller net pay-offs than the rest of the group. That is, they effectively behave as altruists. With weak nonlinearity in benefit and cost functions, the group effort typically decreases with group size and increases with within-group heterogeneity. With strong nonlinearity in benefit and cost functions, these patterns are reversed. I discuss the implications of theoretical results for animal behaviour, human origins and psychology. PMID:26503689

  10. Mist collection on parallel fiber arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbé, Romain; Duprat, Camille

    2016-11-01

    Fog is an important source of fresh water in specific arid regions such as the Atacama Desert in Chile. The method used to collect water passively from fog, either for domestic consumption or research purposes, consists in erecting large porous fiber nets on which the mist droplets impact. The two main mechanisms involved with this process are the impact of the drops on the fibers and the drainage of the fluid from the net, while the main limiting factor is the clogging of the mesh by accumulated water. We consider a novel collection system, made of an array of parallel fibers, that we study experimentally with a wind mist tunnel. In addition, we develop theoretical models considering the coupling of wind flow, droplet trajectories and wetting of the fibers. We find that the collection efficiency strongly depends on the size and distribution of the drops formed on the fibers, and thus on the fibers diameter, inclination angle and wetting properties. In particular, we show that the collection efficiency is greater when large drops are formed on the fibers. By adjusting the fibers diameter and the inter-fiber spacing, we look for an optimal structure that maximizes the collection surface and the drainage, while avoiding flow deviations.

  11. Particle Collection Efficiency for Nylon Mesh Screens

    PubMed Central

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Ku, Bon-Ki; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesh screens composed of nylon fibers leave minimal residual ash and produce no significant spectral interference when ashed for spectrometric examination. These characteristics make nylon mesh screens attractive as a collection substrate for nanoparticles. A theoretical single-fiber efficiency expression developed for wire-mesh screens was evaluated for estimating the collection efficiency of submicrometer particles for nylon mesh screens. Pressure drop across the screens, the effect of particle morphology (spherical and highly fractal) on collection efficiency and single-fiber efficiency were evaluated experimentally for three pore sizes (60, 100 and 180 μm) at three flow rates (2.5, 4 and 6 Lpm). The pressure drop across the screens was found to increase linearly with superficial velocity. The collection efficiency of the screens was found to vary by less than 4% regardless of particle morphology. Single-fiber efficiency calculated from experimental data was in good agreement with that estimated from theory for particles between 40 and 150 nm but deviated from theory for particles outside this size range. New coefficients for the single-fiber efficiency model were identified that minimized the sum of square error (SSE) between the values estimated with the model and those determined experimentally. Compared to the original theory, the SSE calculated using the modified theory was at least one order of magnitude lower for all screens and flow rates with the exception of the 60-μm pore screens at 2.5 Lpm, where the decrease was threefold. PMID:26692631

  12. Fishing out collective memory of migratory schools

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Giancarlo; Mariani, Patrizio; MacKenzie, Brian R.; Marsili, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Animals form groups for many reasons, but there are costs and benefits associated with group formation. One of the benefits is collective memory. In groups on the move, social interactions play a crucial role in the cohesion and the ability to make consensus decisions. When migrating from spawning to feeding areas, fish schools need to retain a collective memory of the destination site over thousands of kilometres, and changes in group formation or individual preference can produce sudden changes in migration pathways. We propose a modelling framework, based on stochastic adaptive networks, that can reproduce this collective behaviour. We assume that three factors control group formation and school migration behaviour: the intensity of social interaction, the relative number of informed individuals and the strength of preference that informed individuals have for a particular migration area. We treat these factors independently and relate the individuals’ preferences to the experience and memory for certain migration sites. We demonstrate that removal of knowledgeable individuals or alteration of individual preference can produce rapid changes in group formation and collective behaviour. For example, intensive fishing targeting the migratory species and also their preferred prey can reduce both terms to a point at which migration to the destination sites is suddenly stopped. The conceptual approaches represented by our modelling framework may therefore be able to explain large-scale changes in fish migration and spatial distribution. PMID:24647905

  13. 2004 Savannah River Cooling Tower Collection (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred; Parker, Matthew J.; Villa-Aleman, E.

    2005-05-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected ground truth in and around the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area cooling tower during the spring and summer of 2004. The ground truth data consisted of air temperatures and humidity inside and around the cooling tower, wind speed and direction, cooling water temperatures entering; inside adn leaving the cooling tower, cooling tower fan exhaust velocities and thermal images taken from helicopters. The F-Area cooling tower had six cells, some of which were operated with fans off during long periods of the collection. The operating status (fan on or off) for each of the six cells was derived from operations logbooks and added to the collection database. SRNL collected the F-Area cooling tower data to produce a database suitable for validation of a cooling tower model used by one of SRNL's customer agencies. SRNL considers the data to be accurate enough for use in a model validation effort. Also, the thermal images of the cooling tower decks and throats combined with the temperature measurements inside the tower provide valuable information about the appearance of cooling towers as a function of fan operating status and time of day.

  14. Collective stochastic coherence in recurrent neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancristóbal, Belén; Rebollo, Beatriz; Boada, Pol; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent networks of dynamic elements frequently exhibit emergent collective oscillations, which can show substantial regularity even when the individual elements are considerably noisy. How noise-induced dynamics at the local level coexists with regular oscillations at the global level is still unclear. Here we show that a combination of stochastic recurrence-based initiation with deterministic refractoriness in an excitable network can reconcile these two features, leading to maximum collective coherence for an intermediate noise level. We report this behaviour in the slow oscillation regime exhibited by a cerebral cortex network under dynamical conditions resembling slow-wave sleep and anaesthesia. Computational analysis of a biologically realistic network model reveals that an intermediate level of background noise leads to quasi-regular dynamics. We verify this prediction experimentally in cortical slices subject to varying amounts of extracellular potassium, which modulates neuronal excitability and thus synaptic noise. The model also predicts that this effectively regular state should exhibit noise-induced memory of the spatial propagation profile of the collective oscillations, which is also verified experimentally. Taken together, these results allow us to construe the high regularity observed experimentally in the brain as an instance of collective stochastic coherence.

  15. Statistical Mechanics of Collective Transport by Ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkoviezky, Itai; Gelblum, Aviram; Fonio, Ehud; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gov, Nir; Feinerman, Ofer

    Collective decisions and cooperation within groups are essential for the survival of many species. Conflicts within the group must be suppressed but conformism may render the system unresponsive to new information. Collective transport by ants is therefore an ideal model system to study how animal groups optimize these opposing requirements. We combine experiments and theory to characterize the collective transport. The ants are modeled as binary Ising spins, representing the two roles ants can perform during transport. It turns out that the ants poise themselves collectively near a critical point where the response to a newly attached ant is maximized. We identify the size as being proportional to an inverse effective temperature and thus the system can exhibit a mesoscopic transition between order and disorder by manipulating the size. Constraining the cargo with a string makes the system behave as a strongly non-linear pendulum. Theoretically we predict that a Hopf bifurcation occurs at a critical size followed by a global bifurcation where full swings emerge. Remarkably, these theoretical predictions were verified experimentally.

  16. Fishing out collective memory of migratory schools.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giancarlo; Mariani, Patrizio; MacKenzie, Brian R; Marsili, Matteo

    2014-06-06

    Animals form groups for many reasons, but there are costs and benefits associated with group formation. One of the benefits is collective memory. In groups on the move, social interactions play a crucial role in the cohesion and the ability to make consensus decisions. When migrating from spawning to feeding areas, fish schools need to retain a collective memory of the destination site over thousands of kilometres, and changes in group formation or individual preference can produce sudden changes in migration pathways. We propose a modelling framework, based on stochastic adaptive networks, that can reproduce this collective behaviour. We assume that three factors control group formation and school migration behaviour: the intensity of social interaction, the relative number of informed individuals and the strength of preference that informed individuals have for a particular migration area. We treat these factors independently and relate the individuals' preferences to the experience and memory for certain migration sites. We demonstrate that removal of knowledgeable individuals or alteration of individual preference can produce rapid changes in group formation and collective behaviour. For example, intensive fishing targeting the migratory species and also their preferred prey can reduce both terms to a point at which migration to the destination sites is suddenly stopped. The conceptual approaches represented by our modelling framework may therefore be able to explain large-scale changes in fish migration and spatial distribution.

  17. 76 FR 6181 - Information Collection Available for Public Comments and Recommendations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...: MARAD's Marine Transportation Economic Impact Model Data Needs. Type of Request: Extension of currently.... Summary of Collection of Information: MARAD's Marine Transportation Economic Impact Model Data...

  18. Tritium monitor and collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.D.; Wickham, K.L.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Grafwaller, E.G.; Maltrud, H.R.; Bourne, G.L.

    1991-03-26

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next online getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

  19. Tritium monitor and collection system

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Gary L.; Meikrantz, David H.; Ely, Walter E.; Tuggle, Dale G.; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Wickham, Keith L.; Maltrud, Herman R.; Baker, John D.

    1992-01-01

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

  20. Tritium monitor and collection system

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, G.L.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Wickham, K.L.; Maltrud, H.R.; Baker, J.D.

    1992-01-14

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter. 7 figs.