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Sample records for n2o emission hotspots

  1. Hotspots of soil N2O emission enhanced through water absorption by plant residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, A. N.; Toosi, E. R.; Guber, A. K.; Ostrom, N. E.; Yu, J.; Azeem, K.; Rivers, M. L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2017-07-01

    N2O is a highly potent greenhouse gas and arable soils represent its major anthropogenic source. Field-scale assessments and predictions of soil N2O emission remain uncertain and imprecise due to the episodic and microscale nature of microbial N2O production, most of which occurs within very small discrete soil volumes. Such hotspots of N2O production are often associated with decomposing plant residue. Here we quantify physical and hydrological soil characteristics that lead to strikingly accelerated N2O emissions in plant residue-induced hotspots. Results reveal a mechanism for microscale N2O emissions: water absorption by plant residue that creates unique micro-environmental conditions, markedly different from those of the bulk soil. Moisture levels within plant residue exceeded those of bulk soil by 4-10-fold and led to accelerated N2O production via microbial denitrification. The presence of large (∅ >35 μm) pores was a prerequisite for maximized hotspot N2O production and for subsequent diffusion to the atmosphere. Understanding and modelling hotspot microscale physical and hydrologic characteristics is a promising route to predict N2O emissions and thus to develop effective mitigation strategies and estimate global fluxes in a changing environment.

  2. Hotspots of N2O and CH4 emissions in tropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldi, Simona; Bertolini, Teresa; Santini, Monia; Thongo M'Bou, Armel; De Grandcourt, Agnes; Nicolini, Giacomo; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    At global level, tropics represent the strongest biogenic source of N2O and CH4, with natural ecosystems having a comparable or even dominant role, in terms of source strength, respect to agro-ecosystems. The uncertainty related to both sources is very high, due to the paucity of data and small frequency of sampling in tropical studies. We present data of ongoing measurements of N2O and CH4 fluxes from tropical areas of the African continent spanning from savannas to humid forests and ephemeral wetlands. Natural and managed sites are also compared. A budget at African continental level is presented based on empirical relationships derived from a reanalysis of experimental published studies. Data show that humid tropical forests are the strongest N2O terrestrial source. Both spatial and temporal variability seem to be mainly driven by organic matter inputs. At Regional level annual N2O production follows a sigmoid distribution with rainfall, a key drivers of NPP. In presence of land conversion, agro-ecosystems are significant sources of N2O in the first year following deforestation, but after 10-15 years they strongly reduce their emissions compared with primary forests. Wetlands are the strongest source of CH4 but humid forests, when analysed at landscape level, present lowland hotspots of CH4 emissions which counterbalance the CH4 sink of upland areas. Also the CH4 sink from seasonally dry areas seems weaker than previous estimates.

  3. Substantial N2O emissions from peat decomposition and N fertilization in an oil palm plantation exacerbated by hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergoualc'h, Kristell; Oktarita, Satria; Anwar, Syaiful; Verchot, Louis Vincent

    2017-04-01

    It is unclear to what extent emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) from drained histosols in the tropics may contribute to the burden of climate change. We examined spatio-temporal variations of N2O emissions from peat decomposition and nitrogen (N) application in an oil palm plantation fertilizer trial in Sumatra, which included 3 N application rates: 0 (N0), 153 (N1) and 306 (N2) kg N ha-1 y-1. The magnitude of annual emissions was substantial with rates of 22.1 ± 5.7, 12.8 ± 2.7 and 26.6 ± 5.7 kg N-N2O ha-1 in the N0, N1 and N2 treatments. The site presented a high spatial variation with 2 persistent hotspots contributing 33 and 46% of annual emissions in N0 and N2 while representing only 10% of the area sampled. The response of emissions to fertilization was exponential but restricted to the small area of N application. Annual rates among treatments were similar when discarding the contribution of hotspots to evaluate N addition effect (14.7 ± 3.3 and 14.5 ± 3.8 kg N ha-1 in N0 and N2). High N2O emissions from peat decomposition in the tropics tend to be common according to the restricted existing literature but their mechanisms remain poorly understood.

  4. Spatial variability of nitrous oxide and methane emissions from an MBT landfill in operation: strong N2O hotspots at the working face.

    PubMed

    Harborth, Peter; Fuss, Roland; Münnich, Kai; Flessa, Heinz; Fricke, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is an effective technique, which removes organic carbon from municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to deposition. Thereby, methane (CH4) production in the landfill is strongly mitigated. However, direct measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from full-scale MBT landfills have not been conducted so far. Thus, CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a German MBT landfill in operation as well as their concentrations in the landfill gas (LFG) were measured. High N2O emissions of 20-200gCO2eq.m(-2)h(-1) magnitude (up to 428mgNm(-2)h(-1)) were observed within 20m of the working face. CH4 emissions were highest at the landfill zone located at a distance of 30-40m from the working face, where they reached about 10gCO2eq.m(-2)h(-1). The MBT material in this area has been deposited several weeks earlier. Maximum LFG concentration for N2O was 24.000ppmv in material below the emission hotspot. At a depth of 50cm from the landfill surface a strong negative correlation between N2O and CH4 concentrations was observed. From this and from the distribution pattern of extractable ammonium, nitrite, and nitrate it has been concluded that strong N2O production is associated with nitrification activity and the occurrence of nitrite and nitrate, which is initiated by oxygen input during waste deposition. Therefore, CH4 mitigation measures, which often employ aeration, could result in a net increase of GHG emissions due to increased N2O emissions, especially at MBT landfills. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. CH4 and N2O Emissions from Rice Paddy Soils in Vietnam - Identifying Regional Hotspots and Quantifying the Total Emission Strength using a Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Kraus, D.; Mai, T. V.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2016-12-01

    Agriculture is the economic backbone for over two thirds of Vietnam's population, providing food security, employment and income. However, agriculture in Vietnam is challenged by climate change and climate extremes and at the same time, agriculture remains a key source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The first bi-annual update report (BUR1), published in 2014 indicated that while the proportion of GHG emissions from agriculture had fallen from 43.1% to 33.2% from 2000 to 2010, the emission total increased from 65.1 mio to 88.4 mio t CO2e. Reducing GHG emissions from agriculture has thus become a key issue within the national strategy of GHG emission management. Here we present first data using IPCC Tier 3 modeling for quantifying the source strength of rice based crop systems for CH4 and N2O. We used LandscapeDNDC and linked it to a newly developed spatial landuse and land management database (climate, soil properties, and detailed field management data). Site application showed good agreement of simulated biomass, yield and GHG emissions with field observations, providing confidence for model use at national scale. Our results also show good agreement with national yield data and total annual emissions of the simulated period (2006-2015) ranged from 1060 - 1502 kt CH4 and 6.2 - 7.7 kt N2O, respectively. The dominating emission hotspot for CH4 is the Mekong Delta region with its double and triple rice cropping systems (819 kt CH4/yr, Fig. 1). With regard to N2O, emission hotspots have been identified to be closely related to regions with high fertilizer use and single to double rice cropping systems (Fig. 1). Though, our emission estimates are likely representing the best of current knowledge on national GHG emissions from rice based systems in Vietnam, the uncertainty is significant as information on rice system management remains vague. Sensitivity studies show that changes in field management affecting the soil organic carbon dynamics (duration of flooding

  6. Decreased N2O reduction by low soil pH causes high N2O emissions in a riparian ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Van den Heuvel, R N; Bakker, S E; Jetten, M S M; Hefting, M M

    2011-05-01

    Quantification of harmful nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions from soils is essential for mitigation measures. An important N(2)O producing and reducing process in soils is denitrification, which shows deceased rates at low pH. No clear relationship between N(2)O emissions and soil pH has yet been established because also the relative contribution of N(2)O as the denitrification end product decreases with pH. Our aim was to show the net effect of soil pH on N(2)O production and emission. Therefore, experiments were designed to investigate the effects of pH on NO(3)(-) reduction, N(2)O production and reduction and N(2) production in incubations with pH values set between 4 and 7. Furthermore, field measurements of soil pH and N(2)O emissions were carried out. In incubations, NO(3)(-) reduction and N(2) production rates increased with pH and net N(2)O production rate was highest at pH 5. N(2)O reduction to N(2) was halted until NO(3)(-) was depleted at low pH values, resulting in a built up of N(2)O. As a consequence, N(2)O:N(2) production ratio decreased exponentially with pH. N(2)O reduction appeared therefore more important than N(2)O production in explaining net N(2)O production rates. In the field, a negative exponential relationship for soil pH against N(2)O emissions was observed. Soil pH could therefore be used as a predictive tool for average N(2)O emissions in the studied ecosystem. The occurrence of low pH spots may explain N(2)O emission hotspot occurrence. Future studies should focus on the mechanism behind small scale soil pH variability and the effect of manipulating the pH of soils.

  7. Microcosm N2O emissions wth calibration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The dataset consists of measurements of soil nitrous oxide emissions from soils under three different amendments: glucose, cellulose, and manure. Data includes the four isotopomers of nitrous oxide (14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, 14N14N18O, 14N14N16O), and the site preference.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Chen , H., D. Williams , P. Deshmukh , F. Birgand, B. Maxwell, and J. Walker. Probing the Biological Sources of Soil N2O Emissions by Quantum Cascade Laser-Based 15N Isotopocule Analysis. SOIL SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA JOURNAL. Soil Science Society of America, Madison, WI, USA, 100(0): 175-181, (2016).

  8. Soil invertebrate fauna affect N2 O emissions from soil.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Imke; de Deyn, Gerlinde B; Thakur, Madhav P; van Groenigen, Jan Willem

    2013-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions from soils contribute significantly to global warming. Mitigation of N2 O emissions is severely hampered by a lack of understanding of its main controls. Fluxes can only partly be predicted from soil abiotic factors and microbial analyses - a possible role for soil fauna has until now largely been overlooked. We studied the effect of six groups of soil invertebrate fauna and tested the hypothesis that all of them increase N2 O emissions, although to different extents. We conducted three microcosm experiments with sandy soil and hay residue. Faunal groups included in our experiments were as follows: fungal-feeding nematodes, mites, springtails, potworms, earthworms and isopods. In experiment I, involving all six faunal groups, N2 O emissions declined with earthworms and potworms from 78.4 (control) to 37.0 (earthworms) or 53.5 (potworms) mg N2 O-N m(-2) . In experiment II, with a higher soil-to-hay ratio and mites, springtails and potworms as faunal treatments, N2 O emissions increased with potworms from 51.9 (control) to 123.5 mg N2 O-N m(-2) . Experiment III studied the effect of potworm density; we found that higher densities of potworms accelerated the peak of the N2 O emissions by 5 days (P < 0.001), but the cumulative N2 O emissions remained unaffected. We propose that increased soil aeration by the soil fauna reduced N2 O emissions in experiment I, whereas in experiment II N2 O emissions were driven by increased nitrogen and carbon availability. In experiment III, higher densities of potworms accelerated nitrogen and carbon availability and N2 O emissions, but did not increase them. Overall, our data show that soil fauna can suppress, increase, delay or accelerate N2 O emissions from soil and should therefore be an integral part of future N2 O studies.

  9. N2O emissions from a nitrogen-enriched river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Dennehy, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from the South Platte River in Colorado were measured using closed chambers in the fall, winter, and summer of 1994- 1995. The South Platte River was enriched in inorganic N (9-800 ??M) derived from municipal wastewater effluent and groundwater return flows from irrigated agricultural fields. River water was as much as 2500% supersaturated with N2O, and median N2O emission rates from the river surface ranged from less than 90 to 32 600 ??g-N m-2 d-1. Seventy-nine percent of the variance in N2O emission rates was explained by concentrations of total inorganic N in river water and by water temperature. The estimated total annual N2O emissions from the South Platte River were 2 x 1013-6 x 1013 ??g-N yr-1. This amount of annual N2O emissions was similar to the estimated annual N2O emissions from all primary municipal wastewater treatment processes in the United States (1). Results from this study indicate that N-enriched rivers could be important anthropogenic sources of N2O to the atmosphere. However, N2O emission measurements from other N-enriched rivers are needed to better quantify this source.Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from the South Platte River in Colorado were measured using closed chambers in the fall, winter, and summer of 1994-1995. The South Platte River was enriched in inorganic N (9-800 ??M) derived from municipal wastewater effluent and groundwater return flows from irrigated agricultural fields. River water was as much as 2500% supersaturated with N2O, and median N2O emission rates from the river surface ranged from less than 90 to 32 600 ??g-N m-2 d-1. Seventy-nine percent of the variance in N2O emission rates was explained by concentrations of total inorganic N in river water and by water temperature. The estimated total annual N2O emissions from the South Platte River were 2??1013-6??1013 ??g-N yr-1. This amount of annual N2O emissions was similar to the estimated annual N2O emissions from all primary municipal

  10. Diurnality of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, I.; Moyer, R.; Poe, A.; Pan, D.; Abraha, M.; Chen, J.; Zondlo, M. A.; Robertson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are important contributors to the greenhouse gas balance of the atmosphere. Agricultural soils contribute ~65% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Understanding temporal and spatial variability of N2O emissions from agricultural soils is vital for closure of the global N2O budget and the development of mitigation opportunities. Recent studies have observed higher N2O fluxes during the day and lower at night. Understanding the mechanisms of such diurnality may have important consequences for our understanding of the N cycle. We tested the hypothesis that diurnal cycles are driven by root carbon exudes that stimulate denitrification and therefore N2O production. Alternatively, we considered that the cycle could result from higher afternoon temperatures that accelerate soil microbial activity. We removed all plants from a corn field plot and left another plot untouched. We measured soil N2O emissions in each plot using a standard static chamber technique throughout the corn growing season. And also compared static chamber results to ecosystem level N2O emissions as measured by eddy covariance tower equipped with an open-path N2O sensor. We also measured soil and air temperatures and soil water and inorganic N contents. Soil N2O emissions followed soil inorganic N concentrations and in control plot chambers ranged from 10 μg N m-2 hr-1 before fertilization to 13×103 after fertilization. We found strong diurnal cycles measured by both techniques with emissions low during night and morning hours and high during the afternoon. Corn removal had no effect on diurnality, but had a strong effect on the magnitude of soil N2O emissions. Soil temperature exhibited a weak correlation with soil N2O emissions and could not explain diurnal patterns. Further studies are underway to explore additional mechanisms that might contribute to this potentially important phenomena.

  11. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from aquaculture: a review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2012-06-19

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an important greenhouse gas (GHG) which has a global warming potential 310 times that of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) over a hundred year lifespan. N(2)O is generated during microbial nitrification and denitrification, which are common in aquaculture systems. To date, few studies have been conducted to quantify N(2)O emission from aquaculture. Additionally, very little is known with respect to the microbial pathways through which N(2)O is formed in aquaculture systems. This review suggests that aquaculture can be an important anthropogenic source of N(2)O emission. The global N(2)O-N emission from aquaculture in 2009 is estimated to be 9.30 × 10(10) g, and will increase to 3.83 × 10(11)g which could account for 5.72% of anthropogenic N(2)O-N emission by 2030 if the aquaculture industry continues to increase at the present annual growth rate (about 7.10%). The possible mechanisms and various factors affecting N(2)O production are summarized, and two possible methods to minimize N(2)O emission, namely aquaponic and biofloc technology aquaculture, are also discussed. The paper concludes with future research directions.

  12. UV-induced N2O emission from plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian R.; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Ambus, Per

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important long-lived greenhouse gas and precursor of stratospheric ozone-depleting mono-nitrogen oxides. The atmospheric concentration of N2O is persistently increasing; however, large uncertainties are associated with the distinct source strengths. Here we investigate for the first time N2O emission from terrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurements to investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and without UV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted with a range of species to study the controls and possible loci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c. 20-50 nmol m-2h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission response to UV-A is of the same magnitude as that to UV-B. Therefore, UV-A is more important than UV-B given the natural UV-spectrum at Earth's surface. Plants also emitted N2O in darkness, although at reduced rates. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a rather high activation energy indicative for an abiotic process. The prevailing zone for the N2O formation appears to be at the very surface of leaves. However, only c. 26% of the UV-induced N2O appears to originate from plant-N. Further, the process is dependent on atmospheric oxygen concentration. Our work demonstrates that ecosystem emission of the important greenhouse gas, N2O, may be up to c. 30% higher than hitherto assumed.

  13. Nitrogen fertiliser formulation: The impact on N2O emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harty, Mary; Krol, Dominika; Carolan, Rachael; McNeill, Gavin; McGeough, Karen; Laughlin, Ronnie; Watson, Catherine; Richards, Karl; Lanigan, Gary; Forrestal, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture was responsible for 31% of Ireland's Agricultural Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions in 2012, with 39% of these emissions arising from chemical/organic fertilizers in the form of nitrous oxide (N2O). Switching from calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) to a urea based fertiliser limits the soil residence period of nitrate, the major substrate for denitrification loss in the N2O form. However, urea is susceptible to ammonia (NH3) volatilisation but this risk can be managed using urease inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of switching from CAN to urea, urea with the urease inhibitor N- (n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (trade name Agrotain®) and/or the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD on direct and indirect N2O emissions. The experiment is a two year study (commenced March 2013) at six permanent pasture sites located on the island of Ireland, at Johnstown Castle Co. Wexford, Moorepark Co. Cork and Hillsborough Co. Down, covering a range of soil textures and drainage characteristics. The experiment simulated a grazing environment; annual fertiliser N was applied at different rates (0, 100, 200, 300, 400 or 500 kg N ha-1) in five equal splits, with grass harvested prior to fertilizer application. Direct N2O emissions were quantified regularly using static chambers over 1 year and indirect N2O from ammonia volatilisation was measured using wind tunnels and annual emission factors calculated. Switching from CAN to urea dramatically reduced direct N2O emissions, but had little effect on dry-matter yield. However, there was evidence of pollution swapping of direct for indirect N2O from NH3. In the first year, two urea based formulations successfully reduced both direct and indirect N2O emissions at all sites. Fertiliser formulation strategy has the potential to be a solution for reduction of direct and indirect N2O emissions.

  14. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hotspots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging because of their high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the relevant microbial pathways. Flood events have been shown to trigger moments of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. This coupling might be modulated by microhabitat effects related to soil aggregate formation, root soil interactions and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with N-rich floodplain soils comprising different combinations of soil aggregate size classes and inert matrix material. These model soils were either planted with basket willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter, or left untreated. Throughout a simulated flood event, we repeatedly measured the net N2O production rate. In addition, soil water content, redox potential, as well as C and N substrate availability were monitored. In order to gain insight into the sources of, and biogeochemical controls on N2O production, we also measured the bulk δ15N signature of the produced N2O, as well as its intramolecular 15N site preference (SP). In this presentation we focus on a period of enhanced N2O emission during the drying phase after 48 hrs of flooding. We will discuss the observed emission patterns in the context of possible treatment effects. Soils with large aggregates showed a

  15. Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls on Hyporheic N2O Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quick, A. M.; Reeder, W. J.; Farrell, T. B.; Tonina, D.; Feris, K. P.; Benner, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    The hyporheic zones (HZ) of streams and rivers may be a significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, but the hydrological and biogeochemical controls on if and how much N2O is released from the HZ are not well constrained. We employed a multidisciplinary approach to examine HZ N2O emissions that included a column experiment and two large-scale flume experiments in which we controlled initial particulate organic matter, exogenous nitrate loading, flow rates, and streambed geomorphology at the scales of a natural stream. In both 1D (column) and 2D (flume) experiments, hyporheic flow paths and residence times were modeled and measured with tracers. We measured in-situ pore water concentrations of dissolved oxygen and inorganic nitrogen species, including dissolved N2O. We observed both N2O production and consumption along HZ flow paths. Our results indicate that N2O generation and consumption are dictated by hyporheic residence times and biological nitrogen reduction rates. For N2O to be released from the HZ, residence times must be sufficiently long (or reaction rates must be sufficiently fast) to promote reduction of nitrate to N2O. However, if residence times are too long (or reaction rates are too fast) N2O will be converted to N2. As a result, only a small fraction of HZ flow paths will produce N2O at a given time. For example, although we observed concentrations up to 122 μg L-1 N-N2O in the HZ, most of this N2O was reduced to N2 before leaving the HZ and entering the surface stream water. We also observed that higher N2O concentrations in the HZ correspond to high surface water nitrate and low carbon reactivity in the sediments. The conceptual model supported by these flume and column experiments suggests that both reduction of nitrate loading and increased hyporheic residence times may moderate the potential for N2O emissions from stream hyporheic zones.

  16. Oceanic N2O emissions in the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Rey, J.; Bopp, L.; Gehlen, M.; Tagliabue, A.; Gruber, N.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean is a substantial source of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, but little is known on how this flux might change in the future. Here, we investigate the potential evolution of marine N2O emissions in the 21st century in response to anthropogenic climate change using the global ocean biogeochemical model NEMO-PISCES. We implemented two different parameterizations of N2O production, which differ primarily at low oxygen (O2) conditions. When forced with output from a climate model simulation run under the business-as-usual high CO2 concentration scenario (RCP8.5), our simulations suggest a decrease of 4 to 12% in N2O emissions from 2005 to 2100, i.e., a reduction from 4.03/3.71 to 3.54/3.56 Tg N yr-1 depending on the parameterization. The emissions decrease strongly in the western basins of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, while they tend to increase above the Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs), i.e., in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and in the northern Indian Ocean. The reduction in N2O emissions is caused on the one hand by weakened nitrification as a consequence of reduced primary and export production, and on the other hand by stronger vertical stratification, which reduces the transport of N2O from the ocean interior to the ocean surface. The higher emissions over the OMZ are linked to an expansion of these zones under global warming, which leads to increased N2O production associated primarily with denitrification. From the perspective of a global climate system, the averaged feedback strength associated with the projected decrease in oceanic N2O emissions amounts to around -0.009 W m-2 K-1, which is comparable to the potential increase from terrestrial N2O sources. However, the assesment for a compensation between the terrestrial and marine feedbacks calls for an improved representation of N2O production terms in fully coupled next generation of Earth System Models.

  17. Slowdown of N2O emissions from China's croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Shang, Z.; Ciais, P.; Piao, S.; Tian, H.; Saikawa, E.; Zaehle, S.; Del Grosso, S. J.; Galloway, J. N.

    2016-12-01

    To feed the increasing population, China has experienced a rapid agricultural development over past decades, accompanied by increased fertilizer consumptions in croplands, but the magnitude, trend, and causes of the associated nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions has remain unclear. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of fertilizer consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few regional representativeness of the Nrate-flux relationships in China. Here we re-estimate China's N2O emissions from croplands using three different methods: flux upscaling technique, process-based models and atmospheric inversion, and also analyze the corresponding drivers using an attribution approach. The three methods produce similar estimates of N2O emissions in the range of 0.67 ± 0.08 to 0.62± 0.11 Tg nitrogen per year, which is 29% larger than the estimates by the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) that is adopted by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as the emission baseline and twofold larger than the latest Chinese national report submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, but the revised trend slows down after 2005. Fertilizer N application per area is the dominant factor driving the increase in N2O emissions across most cropping regions from 1990 to 2004, but climate-induced change of emission factors has also controlled N2O flux from 2005 onwards. Our findings suggest that, as precipitation would increase in North China but decline in the South in future, EF will increasingly control China's agri. soil emissions of N2O, unless offset by larger reductions of fertilizer consumptions.

  18. Re-quantifying China's N2O emissions from croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Shang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) entering agricultural soils from fertilizer applications worldwide results into a 43%~63% of global anthropogenic N2O emissions (EDGAR, 2014; Saikawa et al., 2014; Tian et al., 2014). This contribution is likely to increase in countries with intensive agricultural systems such as China (Zhou et al., 2014). yet the patterns, trends, and the associated causes of Chinese emissions remains subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China's total agricultural soils N2O emissions at present varied by ~150% (Zhou et al., 2015). The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of emission factors, nitrogen inputs, and the associated environmental conditions, yet none of previous estimates are based upon large-scale measurements and high-resolution activity data. Here, we re-quantify China's N2O emissions from croplands from 1990 to 2012, including direct and indirect pathways, using updated and harmonized N input data, high-resolution environmental factors data, and a comprehensive dataset of global N2O observation networks. The spatially-variable emission factor, and leaching and runoff rates are derived by empirical upscaling of ground-based observations, but validated by ecosystem models and atmospheric inversions of N2O concentration data. N inputs, such as synthetic fertilizer, manure, crop residues, human excretion applied to croplands, are compiled at county-scale, and atmospheric N depositions are simulated by using LMDZ-OR-INCA atmospheric transport chemistry model that has been calibrated by Asian observation networks. We also develop the high-resolution datasets including landuse dynamics (1-km), SOC changes (0.1-deg), climates (0.1-deg), and irrigation rates (city-scale). Three main tasks have been performed in this study: i) the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of N2O emissions over China croplands from 1990 to 2012; ii) the attributions of anthropogenic causes of the spatial variations, interannual variability

  19. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz; Niklaus, Pascal; Frey, Beat; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hot spots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging in the environment because of the high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the microbial pathways that produce or consume N2O. The availability of oxygen, reactive organic carbon, and dissolved nitrogen substrates likely play key roles with regards to the net production of N2O. Previous field studies demonstrated, for example, that flooding can trigger "hot moments" of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. Such microhabitat effects likely depend on soil aggregate formation, plant soil interactions in the rhizosphere and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with model soils comprising various mixtures of N-rich floodplain soil aggregates (4000 - 250 µm representing large aggregates, or <250 µm representing small aggregates) and inert matrix material (glass beads of 150 - 250 µm size, or quartz sand of 2000 - 3200 µm size, respectively). Soils containing the different aggregate size groups were either planted with willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter or left untreated. At several time points before, during and after a simulated flood event, we measure the net efflux rate of N2O. In addition, soil water content, redox potential as well as carbon and nitrogen substrate availability are monitored. In order to

  20. High-resolution measurement of nitrous oxide in the Elbe estuary under hypoxia: Hot-spots of biological N2O production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brase, Lisa; Lendt, Ralf; Sanders, Tina; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most important greenhouse gases. Its global warming potential exceeds that of CO2 by a factor of ˜300. Estuaries, being sites of intense biological N-turnover, are one of the major natural sources of N2O emissions. On two ship cruises in April and June 2015, concentrations of N2O were measured in the surface water using equilibrator laser based on-line measurements. Based on these high-resolution N2O profiles along the Elbe estuary, N2O saturation and N2O-fluxes between surface water and air were calculated. Additionally, DIN concentrations and dual stable isotopes of nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) were analyzed. Concentration and water-to-air fluxes of N2O were highest in the Hamburg port region and dropped quickly further downstream. Highest water-to-air fluxes were up to 800μM/m2/d and 1600μM/m2/d in April and in June, respectively. Downstream of the port region, an N2O oversaturation of 150-200% was estimated over the entire estuary, with saturation approaching equilibrium (96-100%) only in the North Sea region. N2O production was much higher in June than in April 2015, likely coupled to lower oxygen saturation in the water column in June. Based on these measurements, the port of Hamburg region was identified as a hot-spot of N2O production. High N2O concentration and depleted values of nitrate isotopes suggest that nitrification is a significant source of N2O in the estuary, especially at low oxygen concentration. In the Elbe estuary, hypoxia obviously drastically increased the emissions of the greenhouse gas N2O.

  1. Isotopic Monitoring of N2O Emissions from Wastewater Treatment: Evidence for N2O Production Associated with Anammox Metabolism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E. J.; Wunderlin, P.; Joss, A.; Emmenegger, L.; Kipf, M.; Wolf, B.; Mohn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial production is the major source of N2O, the strongest greenhouse gas produced within the nitrogen cycle, and the most important stratospheric ozone destructant released in the 21st century. Wastewater treatment is an important and growing source of N2O, with best estimates predicting N2O emissions from this sector will have increased by >25% by 2020. Novel treatment employing partial nitritation-anammox, rather than traditional nitrification-denitrification, has the potential to achieve a neutral carbon footprint due to increased biogas production - if N2O production accounts for <0.5-1% of total nitrogen turnover. As a further motivation for this research, microbial pathways identified from wastewater treatment can be applied to our understanding of N cycling in the natural environment. This study presents the first online isotopic measurements of offgas N2O from a partial-nitritation anammox reactor 1. The measured N2O isotopic composition - in particular the N2O isotopic site preference (SP = δ15Nα - δ15Nβ) - was used to understand N2O production pathways in the reactor. When N2O emissions peaked due to high dissolved oxygen concentrations, low SP showed that N2O was produced primarily via nitrifier denitrification by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOBs). N2O production by AOBs via NH2OH oxidation, in contrast, did not appear to be important under any conditions. Over the majority of the one-month measurement period, the measured SP was much higher than expected following our current understanding of N2O production pathways 2. SP reached 41‰ during normal operating conditions and achieved a maximum of 45‰ when nitrite was added under anoxic conditions. These results could be explained by unexpectedly strong heterotrophic N2O reduction despite low dissolved organic matter concentrations, or by an incomplete understanding of isotopic fractionation during N2O production from NH2OH oxidation by AOBs - however the explanation most consistent with all

  2. Uncertainties in United States agricultural N2O emissions: comparing forward model simulations to atmospheric N2O data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Saikawa, E.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric N2O concentrations have increased from 275 ppb in the preindustrial to about 325 ppb in recent years, a ~20% increase with important implications for both anthropogenic greenhouse forcing and stratospheric ozone recovery. This increase has been driven largely by synthetic fertilizer production and other perturbations to the global nitrogen cycle associated with human agriculture. Several recent regional atmospheric inversion studies have quantified North American agricultural N2O emissions using top-down constraints based on atmospheric N2O data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network, including surface, aircraft and tall tower platforms. These studies have concluded that global N2O inventories such as EDGAR may be underestimating the true U.S. anthropogenic N2O source by a factor of 3 or more. However, simple back-of-the-envelope calculations show that emissions of this magnitude are difficult to reconcile with the basic constraints of the global N2O budget. Here, we explore some possible reasons why regional atmospheric inversions might overestimate the U.S. agricultural N2O source. First, the seasonality of N2O agricultural sources is not well known, but can have an important influence on inversion results, particularly when the inversions are based on data that are concentrated in the spring/summer growing season. Second, boundary conditions can strongly influence regional inversions but the boundary conditions used may not adequately account for remote influences on surface data such as the seasonal stratospheric influx of N2O-depleted air. We will present a set of forward model simulations, using the Community Land Model (CLM) and two atmospheric chemistry tracer transport models, MOZART and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), that examine the influence of terrestrial emissions and atmospheric chemistry and dynamics on atmospheric variability in N2O at U.S. and

  3. Global and regional emissions estimates for N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Ishijima, K.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Langenfelds, R.; Tohjima, Y.; Machida, T.; Manizza, M.; Rigby, M. L.; Odoherty, S. J.; Patra, P. K.; Harth, C.; Weiss, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; van der Schoot, M.; Fraser, P.; Steele, P.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Elkins, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive estimate of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions using observations and models from 1995 to 2008. High-frequency records of tropospheric N2O are available from measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania; Cape Matatula, American Samoa; Ragged Point, Barbados; Mace Head, Ireland; and at Trinidad Head, California using the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) instrumentation and calibrations. The Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) has also discrete air samples collected in flasks and in situ measurements from remote sites across the globe and analyzed them for a suite of species including N2O. In addition to these major networks, we include in situ and aircraft measurements from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) and flask measurements from the Tohoku University and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) networks. All measurements show increasing atmospheric mole fractions of N2O, with a varying growth rate of 0.1-0.7%yr-1, resulting in a 7.4% increase in the background atmospheric mole fraction between 1979 and 2011. Using existing emission inventories as well as bottom-up process modeling results, we first create globally-gridded a priori N2O emissions over the 37 yr since 1975. We then use the three-dimensional chemical transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 4 (MOZART v4), and a Bayesian inverse method to estimate global as well as regional annual emissions for five source sectors from 13 regions in the world. This is the first time that all of these measurements from multiple networks have been combined to determine emissions. Our inversion indicates that global and regional N2O emissions have an increasing trend between 1995 and 2008. Despite large uncertainties, a significant increase is seen from the Asian agricultural sector in the recent years, most likely due

  4. Global and regional emissions estimates for N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ishijima, K.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Langenfelds, R.; Tohjima, Y.; Machida, T.; Manizza, M.; Rigby, M.; O'Doherty, S.; Patra, P. K.; Harth, C. M.; Weiss, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; van der Schoot, M.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Elkins, J. W.

    2014-05-01

    We present a comprehensive estimate of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions using observations and models from 1995 to 2008. High-frequency records of tropospheric N2O are available from measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania; Cape Matatula, American Samoa; Ragged Point, Barbados; Mace Head, Ireland; and at Trinidad Head, California using the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) instrumentation and calibrations. The Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) has also collected discrete air samples in flasks and in situ measurements from remote sites across the globe and analyzed them for a suite of species including N2O. In addition to these major networks, we include in situ and aircraft measurements from the National Institute of Environmental Studies (NIES) and flask measurements from the Tohoku University and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) networks. All measurements show increasing atmospheric mole fractions of N2O, with a varying growth rate of 0.1-0.7% per year, resulting in a 7.4% increase in the background atmospheric mole fraction between 1979 and 2011. Using existing emission inventories as well as bottom-up process modeling results, we first create globally gridded a priori N2O emissions over the 37 years since 1975. We then use the three-dimensional chemical transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 4 (MOZART v4), and a Bayesian inverse method to estimate global as well as regional annual emissions for five source sectors from 13 regions in the world. This is the first time that all of these measurements from multiple networks have been combined to determine emissions. Our inversion indicates that global and regional N2O emissions have an increasing trend between 1995 and 2008. Despite large uncertainties, a significant increase is seen from the Asian agricultural sector in recent years, most likely

  5. Global and regional emissions estimates for N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ishijima, K.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Langenfelds, R.; Tohjima, Y.; Machida, T.; Manizza, M.; Rigby, M.; O'Doherty, S.; Patra, P. K.; Harth, C. M.; Weiss, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; van der Schoot, M.; Fraser, P. B.; Steele, L. P.; Aoki, S.; Nakazawa, T.; Elkins, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    We present a comprehensive estimate of nitrous oxide ( N2O) emissions using observations and models from 1995 to 2008. High-frequency records of tropospheric N2O are available from measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania; Cape Matatula, American Samoa; Ragged Point, Barbados; Mace Head, Ireland; and at Trinidad Head, California using the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) instrumentation and calibrations. The Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) has also discrete air samples collected in flasks and in situ measurements from remote sites across the globe and analyzed them for a suite of species including N2O. In addition to these major networks, we include in situ and aircraft measurements from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) and flask measurements from the Tohoku University and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) networks. All measurements show increasing atmospheric mole fractions of N2O, with a varying growth rate of 0.1-0.7 % yr-1, resulting in a 7.4% increase in the background atmospheric mole fraction between 1979 and 2011. Using existing emission inventories as well as bottom-up process modeling results, we first create globally-gridded a priori N2O emissions over the 37 yr since 1975. We then use the three-dimensional chemical transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers version 4 (MOZART v4), and a Bayesian inverse method to estimate global as well as regional annual emissions for five source sectors from 13 regions in the world. This is the first time that all of these measurements from multiple networks have been combined to determine emissions. Our inversion indicates that global and regional N2O emissions have an increasing trend between 1995 and 2008. Despite large uncertainties, a significant increase is seen from the Asian agricultural sector in the recent years, most likely

  6. Linkage between N2O emission and functional gene abundance in an intensively managed calcareous fluvo-aquic soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuqing; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ju, Xiaotang

    2017-02-24

    The linkage between N2O emissions and the abundance of nitrifier and denitrifier genes is unclear in the intensively managed calcareous fluvo-aquic soils of the North China Plain. We investigated the abundance of bacterial amoA for nitrification and narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ for denitrification by in situ soil sampling to determine how the abundance of these genes changes instantly during N fertilization events and is related to high N2O emission peaks. We also investigated how long-term incorporated straw and/or manure affect(s) the abundance of these genes based on a seven-year field experiment. The overall results demonstrate that the long-term application of urea-based fertilizer and/or manure significantly enhanced the number of bacterial amoA gene copies leading to high N2O emission peaks after N fertilizer applications. These peaks contributed greatly to the annual N2O emissions in the crop rotation. A significant correlation between annual N2O emissions and narG, nirS, and nirK gene numbers indicates that the abundance of these genes is related to N2O emission under conditions for denitrification, thus partly contributing to the annual N2O emissions. These findings will help to draw up appropriate measures for mitigation of N2O emissions in this 'hotspot' region.

  7. Continuous measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallman, Magdalena; Lammirato, Carlo; Rütting, Tobias; Delin, Sofia; Weslien, Per; Klemedtsson, Leif

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture represents 59 % of the anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, according to the IPCC (Ciais et al. 2013). N2O emissions are typically irregular and vary widely in time and space, which makes it difficult to get a good representation of the emissions (Henault et al. 2012), particularly if measurements have low frequency and/or cover only a short time period. Manual measurements are, for practical reasons, often short-term and low-frequent, or restricted to periods where emissions are expected to be high, e.g. after fertilizing. However, the nature of N2O emissions, being largely unpredictable, calls for continuous or near-continuous measurements over long time periods. So far, rather few long-term, high resolution measurements of N2O emissions from arable fields are reported; among them are Flessa et al. (2002) and Senapati et al. (2016). In this study, we have a two-year data set (2015-2017) with hourly measurements from ten automatic chambers, covering unfertilized controls as well as different nitrogen fertilizer treatments. Grain was produced on the field, and effects of tillage, harvest and other cropping measures were covered. What we can see from the experiment is that (a) the unfertilized control plots seem to follow the same emission pattern as the fertilized plots, at a level similar to the standard mineral fertilized plots (120 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and (b) freeze/thaw emissions are comparable in size to emissions after fertilizing. These two findings imply that the importance of fertilizing to the overall N2O emissions from arable soils may be smaller than previously expected. References: Ciais, P., C. Sabine, G. Bala, L. Bopp, V. Brovkin, J. Canadell et al. 2013: Carbon and Other Biogeochemical Cycles. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung et

  8. Identifying N2O formation and emissions from a full-scale partial nitritation reactor.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; De Kreuk, Merle K; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2016-01-01

    In this study, N2O formation and emissions from a full-scale partial nitritation (SHARON) reactor were identified through a three-weeks monitoring campaign during which the off-gas was analysed for N2O, O2, CO2 and NO. The overall N2O emission was 3.7% of the incoming ammonium load. By fitting the N2O emission to a theoretical gas stripping profile, the N2O emissions could be assigned to aerobically formed N2O and N2O formed under anoxic conditions. This was further substantiated by liquid N2O measurements. Under standard operation, 70% of the N2O emission was attributed to anoxic N2O formation. Dedicated experiments revealed that low dissolved oxygen concentrations (<1.0 gO2·m(-3)) and longer anoxic periods resulted in an increased N2O emission. Minimising or avoiding anoxic conditions has the highest effect in lowering the N2O emissions. As an additional result, the use of the off-gas N2O concentration measurements to monitor the gas-liquid mass transfer rate coefficient (kLa) during dynamic reactor operation was demonstrated.

  9. Effects of substrates on N2O emissions in an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) reactor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Wang, Dunqiu; Zhang, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    N2O emission in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process is of growing concern. In this study, effects of substrate concentrations on N2O emissions were investigated in an anammox reactor. Extremely high N2O emissions of 1.67 % were led by high NH4-N concentrations. Results showed that N2O emissions have a positive correlation with NH4-N concentrations in the anammox reactor. Reducing NH4-N concentrations by recycling pump resulted in decreasing N2O emissions. In addition, further studies were performed to identify a key biological process that is contributed to N2O emissions from the anammox reactor. Based on the results obtained, Nitrosomonas, which can oxidize ammonia to nitrite, was deemed as the main sources of N2O emissions.

  10. Effects of changing lawn care practices on N2O emissions: A scenario analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, J. W.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Lawn soil emissions of N2O are controlled by a variety of factors, among them the varied lawn care practices employed by homeowners or lawn care professionals. Frequency, intensity, and timing of fertilizer application and irrigation all place controls on soil N2O emissions produced as an intermediary of both nitrification and denitrification. We use a process-based biogeochemical model of C and N dynamics to determine how modifying these lawn care practices affect N2O emissions from lawn soils in Nashville, TN. Closed chamber sampling of N2O emissions is used to calibrate the model and provide a base case allowing additional scenarios to be run. We show that seasonal timing of fertilizer application strongly drives the magnitude of N2O emissions, with early summer application effectively doubling these emissions with no changes to other lawn care practices. Decreasing N fertilizer application intensity causes a fairly direct decrease in N2O emissions, while the frequency of fertilizer applications does not have a so clearly direct impact. Irrigation practices also place controls on N2O emissions, as frequent, intense irrigation increases soil moisture, creates anoxic conditions in the soil and results in elevated N2O emissions. These results suggest that understanding how lawn care affects N2O emissions from lawn soils could provide simple guidelines for lawn care that could substantively reduce lawn N2O emissions.

  11. Gas entrapment and microbial N2O reduction reduce N2O emissions from a biochar-amended sandy clay loam soil

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Johannes; Guzman-Bustamante, Ivan; Kuehfuss, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Well, Reinhard; Spott, Oliver; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that is produced during microbial nitrogen transformation processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Soils represent the largest sources of N2O emissions with nitrogen fertilizer application being the main driver of rising atmospheric N2O concentrations. Soil biochar amendment has been proposed as a promising tool to mitigate N2O emissions from soils. However, the underlying processes that cause N2O emission suppression in biochar-amended soils are still poorly understood. We set up microcosm experiments with fertilized, wet soil in which we used 15N tracing techniques and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the impact of biochar on mineral and gaseous nitrogen dynamics and denitrification-specific functional marker gene abundance and expression. In accordance with previous studies our results showed that biochar addition can lead to a significant decrease in N2O emissions. Furthermore, we determined significantly higher quantities of soil-entrapped N2O and N2 in biochar microcosms and a biochar-induced increase in typical and atypical nosZ transcript copy numbers. Our findings suggest that biochar-induced N2O emission mitigation is based on the entrapment of N2O in water-saturated pores of the soil matrix and concurrent stimulation of microbial N2O reduction resulting in an overall decrease of the N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio. PMID:28008997

  12. Gas entrapment and microbial N2O reduction reduce N2O emissions from a biochar-amended sandy clay loam soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, Johannes; Guzman-Bustamante, Ivan; Kuehfuss, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Well, Reinhard; Spott, Oliver; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that is produced during microbial nitrogen transformation processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Soils represent the largest sources of N2O emissions with nitrogen fertilizer application being the main driver of rising atmospheric N2O concentrations. Soil biochar amendment has been proposed as a promising tool to mitigate N2O emissions from soils. However, the underlying processes that cause N2O emission suppression in biochar-amended soils are still poorly understood. We set up microcosm experiments with fertilized, wet soil in which we used 15N tracing techniques and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the impact of biochar on mineral and gaseous nitrogen dynamics and denitrification-specific functional marker gene abundance and expression. In accordance with previous studies our results showed that biochar addition can lead to a significant decrease in N2O emissions. Furthermore, we determined significantly higher quantities of soil-entrapped N2O and N2 in biochar microcosms and a biochar-induced increase in typical and atypical nosZ transcript copy numbers. Our findings suggest that biochar-induced N2O emission mitigation is based on the entrapment of N2O in water-saturated pores of the soil matrix and concurrent stimulation of microbial N2O reduction resulting in an overall decrease of the N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio.

  13. Gas entrapment and microbial N2O reduction reduce N2O emissions from a biochar-amended sandy clay loam soil.

    PubMed

    Harter, Johannes; Guzman-Bustamante, Ivan; Kuehfuss, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Well, Reinhard; Spott, Oliver; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-12-23

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that is produced during microbial nitrogen transformation processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Soils represent the largest sources of N2O emissions with nitrogen fertilizer application being the main driver of rising atmospheric N2O concentrations. Soil biochar amendment has been proposed as a promising tool to mitigate N2O emissions from soils. However, the underlying processes that cause N2O emission suppression in biochar-amended soils are still poorly understood. We set up microcosm experiments with fertilized, wet soil in which we used (15)N tracing techniques and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to investigate the impact of biochar on mineral and gaseous nitrogen dynamics and denitrification-specific functional marker gene abundance and expression. In accordance with previous studies our results showed that biochar addition can lead to a significant decrease in N2O emissions. Furthermore, we determined significantly higher quantities of soil-entrapped N2O and N2 in biochar microcosms and a biochar-induced increase in typical and atypical nosZ transcript copy numbers. Our findings suggest that biochar-induced N2O emission mitigation is based on the entrapment of N2O in water-saturated pores of the soil matrix and concurrent stimulation of microbial N2O reduction resulting in an overall decrease of the N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio.

  14. Investigation of the N2O emission strength in the U. S. Corn Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Congsheng; Lee, Xuhui; Griffis, Timothy J.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Andrews, Arlyn E.

    2017-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) has a high global warming potential and depletes stratospheric ozone. The U. S. Corn Belt plays an important role in the global anthropogenic N2O budget. To date, studies on local surface N2O emissions and the atmospheric N2O budget have commonly used Lagrangian models. In the present study, we used an Eulerian model - Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model to investigate the relationships between N2O emissions in the Corn Belt and observed atmospheric N2O mixing ratios. We derived a simple equation to relate the emission strengths to atmospheric N2O mixing ratios, and used the derived equation and hourly atmospheric N2O measurements at the KCMP tall tower in Minnesota to constrain agricultural N2O emissions. The modeled spatial patterns of atmospheric N2O were evaluated against discrete observations at multiple tall towers in the NOAA flask network. After optimization of the surface flux, the model reproduced reasonably well the hourly N2O mixing ratios monitored at the KCMP tower. Agricultural N2O emissions in the EDGAR42 database needed to be scaled up by 19.0 to 28.1 fold to represent the true emissions in the Corn Belt for June 1-20, 2010 - a peak emission period. Optimized mean N2O emissions were 3.00-4.38, 1.52-2.08, 0.61-0.81 and 0.56-0.75 nmol m- 2 s- 1 for June 1-20, August 1-20, October 1-20 and December 1-20, 2010, respectively. The simulated spatial patterns of atmospheric N2O mixing ratios after optimization were in good agreement with the NOAA discrete observations during the strong emission peak in June. Such spatial patterns suggest that the underestimate of emissions using IPCC (Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change) inventory methodology is not dependent on tower measurement location.

  15. Emission factors for organic fertilizer-induced N2O emissions from Japanese agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, T.; Nishina, K.; Sudo, S.

    2013-12-01

    1. Introduction Agricultural fields are significant sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is one of the important greenhouse gases with a contribution of 7.9% to the anthropogenic global warming (IPCC, 2007). Direct fertilizer-induced N2O emission from agricultural soil is estimated using the emission factor (EF). National greenhouse gas inventory of Japan defines direct EF for N2O associated with the application of chemical and organic fertilizers as the same value (0.62%) in Japanese agricultural fields. However, it is necessary to estimate EF for organic fertilizers separately, because there are some differences in factors controlling N2O emissions (e.g. nutrient content) between chemical and organic fertilizers. The purpose of this study is to estimate N2O emissions and EF for applied organic fertilizers in Japanese agricultural fields. 2. Materials and Methods We conducted the experiments at 10 prefectural agricultural experimental stations in Japan (Yamagata, Fukushima, Niigata, Ibaraki, Aichi, Shiga, Tokushima, Nagasaki, Kumamoto, and Kagoshima) to consider the variations of cultivation and environmental conditions among regions. Field measurements had been conducted for 2-2.5 years during August 2010-April 2013. Each site set experimental plots with the applications of composted manure (cattle, swine, and poultry), chemical fertilizer, and non-nitrogen fertilizer as a control. The annual amount of applied nitrogen ranged from 16 g-N m-2 y-1 to 60 g-N m-2 y-1 depending on cropping system and cultivated crops (e.g. cabbage, potato) at each site. N2O fluxes were measured using a closed-chamber method. N2O concentrations of gas samples were measured with gas chromatography. The EF value of each fertilizer was calculated as the N2O emission from fertilizer plots minus the background N2O emission (emission from a control plot), and was expressed as a percentage of the applied nitrogen. The soil NH4+ and NO3-, soil temperature, precipitation, and WFPS (water

  16. [Characteristics of N2O emissions from vegetal soils on Fildes peninsula, Antarctica].

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Zhu, R; Xie, Z; Zhao, J; Xing, G; Shi, S; Du, L

    2001-07-01

    The N2O fluxes from the vegetal soils were first measured on the Fildes peninsula, Antarctica, and the total N2O emission was also estimated in the summer 2 months. The daily variations of N2O fluxes appeared single-peak trend under the sunshine or rainy weather conditions but they were irregular under the snow weather conditions and inconsistent with the atmospheric temperatures. The seasonal variations of the N2O fluxes were affected by the temperature and rainfall. The conditions during the transitions between dry and wet seasons improved the N2O emission. The total N2O emissions from moss and lichen soils were 3.7152 kg and 2.5344 kg, respectively. It follows that the vegetal soils are the sources for the atmospheric N2O on the Fildes peninsula, Antarctica.

  17. The effects of nitrogen fertilization on N2O emissions from a rubber plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Ji, Hong-Li; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Liu, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Wei; Dong, Yu-Xin; Bai, Xiao-Long; Lin, You-Xin; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zheng, Xun-Hua

    2016-06-01

    To gain the effects of N fertilizer applications on N2O emissions and local climate change in fertilized rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations in the tropics, we measured N2O fluxes from fertilized (75 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and unfertilized rubber plantations at Xishuangbanna in southwest China over a 2-year period. The N2O emissions from the fertilized and unfertilized plots were 4.0 and 2.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively, and the N2O emission factor was 1.96%. Soil moisture, soil temperature, and the area weighted mean ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4+-N) content controlled the variations in N2O flux from the fertilized and unfertilized rubber plantations. NH4+-N did not influence temporal changes in N2O emissions from the trench, slope, or terrace plots, but controlled spatial variations in N2O emissions among the treatments. On a unit area basis, the 100-year carbon dioxide equivalence of the fertilized rubber plantation N2O offsets 5.8% and 31.5% of carbon sink of the rubber plantation and local tropical rainforest, respectively. When entire land area in Xishuangbanna is considered, N2O emissions from fertilized rubber plantations offset 17.1% of the tropical rainforest’s carbon sink. The results show that if tropical rainforests are converted to fertilized rubber plantations, regional N2O emissions may enhance local climate warming.

  18. The effects of nitrogen fertilization on N2O emissions from a rubber plantation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Ji, Hong-Li; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Liu, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Wei; Dong, Yu-Xin; Bai, Xiao-Long; Lin, You-Xin; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zheng, Xun-Hua

    2016-06-21

    To gain the effects of N fertilizer applications on N2O emissions and local climate change in fertilized rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations in the tropics, we measured N2O fluxes from fertilized (75 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) and unfertilized rubber plantations at Xishuangbanna in southwest China over a 2-year period. The N2O emissions from the fertilized and unfertilized plots were 4.0 and 2.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively, and the N2O emission factor was 1.96%. Soil moisture, soil temperature, and the area weighted mean ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) content controlled the variations in N2O flux from the fertilized and unfertilized rubber plantations. NH4(+)-N did not influence temporal changes in N2O emissions from the trench, slope, or terrace plots, but controlled spatial variations in N2O emissions among the treatments. On a unit area basis, the 100-year carbon dioxide equivalence of the fertilized rubber plantation N2O offsets 5.8% and 31.5% of carbon sink of the rubber plantation and local tropical rainforest, respectively. When entire land area in Xishuangbanna is considered, N2O emissions from fertilized rubber plantations offset 17.1% of the tropical rainforest's carbon sink. The results show that if tropical rainforests are converted to fertilized rubber plantations, regional N2O emissions may enhance local climate warming.

  19. The effects of nitrogen fertilization on N2O emissions from a rubber plantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Ji, Hong-li; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Liu, Yun-Tong; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Wei; Dong, Yu-xin; Bai, Xiao-Long; Lin, You-Xin; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zheng, Xun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    To gain the effects of N fertilizer applications on N2O emissions and local climate change in fertilized rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations in the tropics, we measured N2O fluxes from fertilized (75 kg N ha−1 yr−1) and unfertilized rubber plantations at Xishuangbanna in southwest China over a 2-year period. The N2O emissions from the fertilized and unfertilized plots were 4.0 and 2.5 kg N ha−1 yr−1, respectively, and the N2O emission factor was 1.96%. Soil moisture, soil temperature, and the area weighted mean ammoniacal nitrogen (NH4+-N) content controlled the variations in N2O flux from the fertilized and unfertilized rubber plantations. NH4+-N did not influence temporal changes in N2O emissions from the trench, slope, or terrace plots, but controlled spatial variations in N2O emissions among the treatments. On a unit area basis, the 100-year carbon dioxide equivalence of the fertilized rubber plantation N2O offsets 5.8% and 31.5% of carbon sink of the rubber plantation and local tropical rainforest, respectively. When entire land area in Xishuangbanna is considered, N2O emissions from fertilized rubber plantations offset 17.1% of the tropical rainforest’s carbon sink. The results show that if tropical rainforests are converted to fertilized rubber plantations, regional N2O emissions may enhance local climate warming. PMID:27324813

  20. [Research advances in control of N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill sites].

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuan-Yu; Li, Bo; Lü, Hao-Hao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2012-05-01

    Landfill is one of the main approaches for municipal solid waste treatment, and landfill site is a main emission source of greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). As a high-efficient trace greenhouse gas, N2O has a very high warming potential, with a warming capacity 296 times of CO2, and has a long-term stability in atmosphere, giving greater damage to the ozone layer. Aiming at the researches in the control of N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill sites, this paper summarized the characteristics and related affecting factors of the N2O emission from the landfill sites, and put forward a series of the measures adaptable to the N2O emission control of present municipal solid waste landfill sites in China. Some further research focuses on the control of N2O emission from the landfill sites were also presented.

  1. Biologically produced volatile compounds: N2O emissions from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.

    1985-01-01

    Tropospheric nitrous concentration has increased by 0.2 0.4% per year over the period 1975 to 1982, amounting to net addition to the atmosphere of 2.8 - 5.6 Tg N2O-N per year. This perturbation, if continued into the future, will affect stratospheric chemical cycles, and the thermal balance of the Earth. In turn it will have direct and indirect global effects on the biosphere. Though the budget and cycles of N2O on Earth are not yet fully resolved, accumulating information and recent modelling efforts permit a more complete evaluation and better definition of gaps in our knowledge.

  2. Phylogenetic and functional potential links pH and N2O emissions in pasture soils

    PubMed Central

    Samad, M. d. Sainur; Biswas, Ambarish; Bakken, Lars R.; Clough, Timothy J.; de Klein, Cecile A. M.; Richards, Karl G.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Morales, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is mediated by microbial, and physicochemical, processes leading to nitrogen loss via N2O and N2 emissions. Soil pH regulates the reduction of N2O to N2, however, it can also affect microbial community composition and functional potential. Here we simultaneously test the link between pH, community composition, and the N2O emission ratio (N2O/(NO + N2O + N2)) in 13 temperate pasture soils. Physicochemical analysis, gas kinetics, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and quantitative PCR (of denitrifier genes: nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII) analysis were carried out to characterize each soil. We found strong evidence linking pH to both N2O emission ratio and community changes. Soil pH was negatively associated with N2O emission ratio, while being positively associated with both community diversity and total denitrification gene (nir & nos) abundance. Abundance of nosZII was positively linked to pH, and negatively linked to N2O emissions. Our results confirm that pH imposes a general selective pressure on the entire community and that this results in changes in emission potential. Our data also support the general model that with increased microbial diversity efficiency increases, demonstrated in this study with lowered N2O emission ratio through more efficient conversion of N2O to N2. PMID:27782174

  3. Phylogenetic and functional potential links pH and N2O emissions in pasture soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, M. D. Sainur; Biswas, Ambarish; Bakken, Lars R.; Clough, Timothy J.; de Klein, Cecile A. M.; Richards, Karl G.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Morales, Sergio E.

    2016-10-01

    Denitrification is mediated by microbial, and physicochemical, processes leading to nitrogen loss via N2O and N2 emissions. Soil pH regulates the reduction of N2O to N2, however, it can also affect microbial community composition and functional potential. Here we simultaneously test the link between pH, community composition, and the N2O emission ratio (N2O/(NO + N2O + N2)) in 13 temperate pasture soils. Physicochemical analysis, gas kinetics, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and quantitative PCR (of denitrifier genes: nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII) analysis were carried out to characterize each soil. We found strong evidence linking pH to both N2O emission ratio and community changes. Soil pH was negatively associated with N2O emission ratio, while being positively associated with both community diversity and total denitrification gene (nir & nos) abundance. Abundance of nosZII was positively linked to pH, and negatively linked to N2O emissions. Our results confirm that pH imposes a general selective pressure on the entire community and that this results in changes in emission potential. Our data also support the general model that with increased microbial diversity efficiency increases, demonstrated in this study with lowered N2O emission ratio through more efficient conversion of N2O to N2.

  4. Surface Nitrification: A Major Uncertainty in Marine N2O Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamora, Lauren M.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The ocean is responsible for up to a third of total global nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, but uncertainties in emission rates of this potent greenhouse gas are high (approaching 100%). Here we use a marine biogeochemical model to assess six major uncertainties in estimates of N2O production, thereby providing guidance in how future studies may most effectively reduce uncertainties in current and future marine N2O emissions. Potential surface N2O production from nitrification causes the largest uncertainty in N2O emissions (estimated up to approximately 1.6 Tg N/yr (sup -1) or 48% of modeled values), followed by the unknown oxygen concentration at which N2O production switches to N2O consumption (0.8 Tg N/yr (sup -1)or 24% of modeled values). Other uncertainties are minor, cumulatively changing regional emissions by less than 15%. If production of N2O by surface nitrification could be ruled out in future studies, uncertainties in marine N2O emissions would be halved.

  5. Surface nitrification: A major uncertainty in marine N2O emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Lauren M.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    The ocean is responsible for up to a third of total global nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, but uncertainties in emission rates of this potent greenhouse gas are high (>100%). Here we use a marine biogeochemical model to assess six major uncertainties in estimates of N2O production, thereby providing guidance in how future studies may most effectively reduce uncertainties in current and future marine N2O emissions. Potential surface N2O production from nitrification causes the largest uncertainty in N2O emissions (estimated up to ~1.6 Tg N yr-1 or 48% of modeled values), followed by the unknown oxygen concentration at which N2O production switches to N2O consumption (0.8 Tg N yr-1 or 24% of modeled values). Other uncertainties are minor, cumulatively changing regional emissions by <15%. If production of N2O by surface nitrification could be ruled out in future studies, uncertainties in marine N2O emissions would be halved.

  6. Spatiotemporal variations of nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from two reservoirs in SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Li, Si-Liang; Wang, Fu-Shun; Wang, Bao-Li; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2011-10-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric dams have recently given rise to controversies about whether hydropower still provides clean energy. China has a large number of dams used for energy supply and irrigation, but few studies have been carried out on aquatic nitrous oxide (N 2O) variation and its emissions in Chinese river-reservoir systems. In this study, N 2O spatiotemporal variations were investigated monthly in two reservoirs along the Wujiang River, Southwest China, and the emission fluxes of N 2O were estimated. N 2O production in the reservoirs tended to be dominated by nitrification, according to the correlation between N 2O and other parameters. N 2O saturation in the surface water of the Wujiangdu reservoir ranged from 214% to 662%, with an average fluctuation of 388%, while in the Hongjiadu reservoir, it ranged from 201% to 484%, with an average fluctuation of 312%. The dissolved N 2O in both reservoirs was over-saturated with respect to atmospheric equilibrium levels, suggesting that the reservoirs were net sources of N 2O emissions to the atmosphere. The averaged N 2O emission flux in the Wujiangdu reservoir was 0.64 μmol m -2 h -1, while it was 0.45 μmol m -2 h -1 in the Hongjiadu reservoir, indicating that these two reservoirs had moderate N 2O emission fluxes as compared to other lakes in the world. Downstream water of the dams had quite high levels of N 2O saturation, and the estimated annual N 2O emissions from hydropower generation were 3.60 × 10 5 and 2.15 × 10 5 mol N 2O for the Wujiangdu and the Hongjiadu reservoir, respectively. These fluxes were similar to the total N 2O emissions from the reservoir surfaces, suggesting that water released from reservoirs would be another important way for N 2O to diffuse into the atmosphere. It can be concluded that dam construction significantly changes the water environment, especially in terms of nutrient status and physicochemical conditions, which have obvious influences on the N 2O

  7. Effect of high frequency surface and subsurface drip irrigations on N2O emissions in orchards

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fertilized agricultural soil is a source for greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. A sustainable agricultural practice needs to consider minimizing N2O emissions while increasing N use efficiency and maintaining crop economic yield and quality. In order to develop a sustainable crop producti...

  8. Reducing N2O emissions from orchard using subsurfce drip irrigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural soil is the major source for N2O emissions. Minimizing N2O emissions along with increasing N use efficiency, reducing leaching loss, and maintaining crop economic yield and quality can lead to increased sustainability of crop production. The main objective of this research is to evaluat...

  9. Partitioning N2O emissions within the US Corn Belt using an inverse modeling approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions within the US Corn Belt have been estimated to be 2- to 9-11 fold larger than predictions from emission inventories, implying that one or more source 12 categories in bottom-up approaches are underestimated. Here we interpret hourly N2O 13 mixing ratios measured during ...

  10. Elevated CO2 and O3 modify N turnover rates, but not N2O emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to predict and mitigate future climate change, it is essential to understand effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and O3 (eO3) on N-cycling, including N2O emissions, due to plant mediated changes. This is of particular interest for agroecosystems, since N-cycling and N2O emissions are responsive ...

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen on emission of N2O from rivers in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianing; Chen, Nengwang; Yan, Weijin; Wang, Bei; Yang, Libiao

    2015-02-01

    Six rivers from three watersheds in China were chosen to study the temporal and spatial variations in nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations and emissions in order to examine the link between N2O production and dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrogen levels. These rivers can generally be divided into two types: runoff rivers with significant natural and agricultural runoff, and urban rivers with significant urban effluents. The results showed that N2O concentrations were 0.15-1.07 (mean 0.51) and 0.22-22.7 (mean 4.10) ug N L-1 in runoff rivers and an urban river, respectively. N2O was oversaturated in almost all the rivers, suggesting that the rivers were sources of atmospheric N2O. N2O emissions in the urban river (range from 1.53 to 2453, mean 529 ug N m-2h-1) were significantly higher than those in runoff rivers (range from 0.51 to 80.9, mean 18.0 ug N m-2h-1). We found a significant positive correlation of N2O production with NO3- (r2 = 0.30, p < 0.001) and a negative correlation of N2O production with DO concentrations (r2 = 0.22, p < 0.001) in runoff rivers. Particularly, there existed a significant positive relationship (r2 = 0.21, p < 0.001) between NH4+ and N2O production in an urban river. By using stepwise regression analysis, we found N2O production can be predicted by the dynamics of DO and N levels: for runoff rivers, NO3- and DO explained 47% variability in N2O production, while for the urban river, NH4+ and DO explained 64% variability in N2O production. We suggest that the IPCC method to calculate N2O emission factors should be revised in view of the importance of these multiple factors.

  12. Potential N2O emissions from leguminous tree plantation soils in the humid tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Seiko; Ishizuka, Shigehiro; Ohta, Seiichi; Ansori, Saifuddin; Tokuchi, Naoko; Tanaka, Nagaharu; Hardjono, Arisman

    2008-06-01

    We compared nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions over 1 year from soils of plantations growing acacia, which is a leguminous plant capable of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in root nodules, and secondary forests in Sumatra, Indonesia. N2O emissions from acacia plantation soils fluctuated seasonally, from high in the wetter season to low in the drier season, whereas N2O emissions from secondary forest soils were low throughout the year. Water-filled-pore-space data showed that denitrification contributed substantially to N2O emissions from soils at acacia sites. The average annual N2O flux in acacia plantations was 2.56 kg N ha-1 a-1, which was eight times higher than that from secondary forest soils (0.33 kg N ha-1 a-1). In secondary forests, NH4+ was the dominant form of inorganic nitrogen. However, in acacia plantations, the NH4+: NO3- ratio was relatively lower than that in secondary forests. These results suggest that secondary forests were nitrogen limited, but acacia plantations were less nitrogen limited. Leguminous tree plantations may increase nitrogen cycling, resulting in greater N2O emissions from the soil. However, on a global warming potential basis, N2O emissions from acacia plantation soils accounted for less than 10% of the carbon uptake by plants. Nevertheless, because of the spread of leguminous tree plantations in Asia, the importance of N2O emissions from leguminous tree stands will increase in the coming decades.

  13. Functional diversity of soil invertebrates: a potential tool to explain N2O emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbers, Ingrid; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Drake, Harold; Hunger, Sindy; Oppermann, Timo; van Groenigen, Jan Willem

    2017-04-01

    Soil biota play a crucial role in the mineralization of nutrients from organic material. However, they can thereby increase emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Our current lack of understanding of the factors controlling N2O production and emission is impeding the development of effective mitigation strategies. It is the challenge to control N2O emissions from production systems without reducing crop yield, and diversity of soil fauna may play a key role. A high functional diversity of soil invertebrates is known to stimulate nitrogen mineralization and thereby plant growth, however, it is unknown whether a high functional diversity of soil invertebrates can concurrently diminish N2O emissions. We hypothesized that increased functional diversity of soil invertebrates reduces faunal-induced N2O emissions by facilitating more complete denitrification through (i) stimulating the activity of denitrifying microbes, and (ii) affecting the distribution of micro and macro pores, creating more anaerobic reaction sites. Using state-of-the-art X-ray tomography and next-generation sequencing, we studied effects of functional diversity on soil structural properties and the diversity of the microbial community (16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA), and linked these to soil N2O emissions. In a 120-day study we found that the functional composition of the soil invertebrate community determined N2O emissions: earthworm activity was key to faunal-induced N2O emissions (a 32-fold increase after 120 days, P<0.001). No proof was found to explain faunal-induced N2O emissions through differences in stimulated microbial activity. On the other hand, soil structural properties (mean pore size, pore size distribution) were found to be radically altered by earthworm activity. We conclude that the presence of a few functional groups (ecosystem engineers) is more important than overall increased functional diversity in explaining faunal-affected N2O emissions.

  14. The estimation of N2O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho; Park, Jinwon

    2011-08-01

    The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)), and nitrous oxide (N(2)O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N(2)O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N(2)O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N(2)O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N(2)O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153g-N(2)O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N(2)O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N(2)O emissions. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Extreme Emission of N2O from Tropical Wetland Soil (Pantanal, South America)

    PubMed Central

    Liengaard, Lars; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Enrich-Prast, Alex; Kühl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleter, but the global budget of N2O remains unbalanced. Currently, ∼25% of the global N2O emission is ascribed to uncultivated tropical soils, but the exact locations and controlling mechanisms are not clear. Here we present the first study of soil N2O emission from the Pantanal indicating that this South American wetland may be a significant natural source of N2O. At three sites, we repeatedly measured in situ fluxes of N2O and sampled porewater nitrate (NO3-) during the low water season in 2008 and 2009. In 2010, 10 sites were screened for in situ fluxes of N2O and soil NO3- content. The in situ fluxes of N2O were comparable to fluxes from heavily fertilized forests or agricultural soils. An important parameter affecting N2O emission rate was precipitation, inducing peak emissions of >3 mmol N2O m−2 day−1, while the mean daily flux was 0.43 ± 0.03 mmol N2O m−2 day−1. Over 170 days of the drained period, we estimated non-wetted drained soil to contribute 70.0 mmol N2O m−2, while rain-induced peak events contributed 9.2 mmol N2O m−2, resulting in a total N2O emission of 79.2 mmol N2O m−2. At the sites of repeated sampling, the pool of porewater nitrate varied (0.002-7.1μmolNO3-gdW-1) with higher concentrations of NO3- (p < 0.05) found in drained soil than in water-logged soil, indicating dynamic shifts between nitrification and denitrification. In the field, O2 penetrated the upper 60 cm of drained soil, but was depleted in response to precipitation. Upon experimental wetting the soil showed rapid O2 depletion followed by N2O accumulation and a peak emission of N2O (2.5 - 3.0mmolN2Om-2day-1). Assuming that the observed emission of N2O from these wetland soils is generally representative to the Pantanal, we suggest that this undisturbed tropical wetland potentially contributes ∼1.7% to the global N2O emission budget, a significant

  16. Simulation of N2O peak emissions on peat soils with SWAP-ANIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolk, P. C.; Hendriks, R. H. A.; Jacobs, C. M. J.; Weststrate, H.; Duyzer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a very strong greenhouse gas, with agricultural soils as its main anthropogenic source. Various management practices, like fertilization or tillage, can give rise to pulses of N2O emissions. In spite of their short duration, in the order of a couple of days to weeks, these pulses can constitute major part of total annual nitrous oxide emission. Understanding, predicting and ultimately mitigating these pulses poses a considerable challenge. N2O is mainly produced by nitrifiers and denitrifiers. These require different conditions with respect to aerobicity and available mineral N. Simulation models offer a promising tool to test and further develop process knowledge on N2O production and -emission. SWAP-ANIMO is a process oriented biogeochemical model, originally developed for the simulation of nitrate leaching, that has recently been extended with an N2O module. It includes production and consumption of N2O by denitrification, production of N2O by nitrification and transport by diffusion and convection in the soil water and soil air. Here we present the validation of N2O surface flux simulations, with daily measurements of fluxes from grassland on peat in The Netherlands. As a first step to evaluate the simulation of the processes in the soil, we compare observed and simulated soil N2O concentration profiles.

  17. A new high-resolution N2O emission inventory for China in 2008.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Shang, Ziyin; Ciais, Philippe; Tao, Shu; Piao, Shilong; Raymond, Peter; He, Canfei; Li, Bengang; Wang, Rong; Wang, Xuhui; Peng, Shushi; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Chen, Han; Ying, Na; Hou, Xikang; Xu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The amount and geographic distribution of N2O emissions over China remain largely uncertain. In this study, county-level and 0.1° × 0.1° gridded anthropogenic N2O emission inventories for China (PKU-N2O) in 2008 are developed based on high-resolution activity data and regional emission factors (EFs) and parameters. These new estimates are compared with previous inventories, and with two sensitivity tests: one that uses high-resolution activity data but the default IPCC methodology (S1) and the other that uses regional EFs and parameters but starts from coarser-resolution activity data. The total N2O emissions are 2150 GgN2O/yr (interquartile range from 1174 to 2787 GgN2O/yr). Agriculture contributes 64% of the total, followed by energy (17%), indirect emissions (12%), wastes (5%), industry (2.8%), and wildfires (0.2%). Our national emission total is 17% greater than that of the EDGAR v4.2 global product sampled over China and is also greater than the GAINS-China, NDRC, and S1 estimates by 10%, 50%, and 17%, respectively. We also found that using uniform EFs and parameters or starting from national/provincial data causes systematic spatial biases compared to PKU-N2O. Spatial analysis shows nonlinear relationships between N2O emission intensities and urbanization. Per-capita and per-GDP N2O emissions increase gradually with an increase in the urban population fraction from 0.3 to 0.9 among 2884 counties, and N2O emission density increases with urban expansion.

  18. Lowering N2O emissions from soils using eucalypt biochar: the importance of redox reactions

    PubMed Central

    Quin, P; Joseph, S; Husson, O; Donne, S; Mitchell, D; Munroe, P; Phelan, D; Cowie, A; Van Zwieten, L

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural soils are the primary anthropogenic source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), contributing to global warming and depletion of stratospheric ozone. Biochar addition has shown potential to lower soil N2O emission, with the mechanisms remaining unclear. We incubated eucalypt biochar (550 °C) – 0, 1 and 5% (w/w) in Ferralsol at 3 water regimes (12, 39 and 54% WFPS) – in a soil column, following gamma irradiation. After N2O was injected at the base of the soil column, in the 0% biochar control 100% of expected injected N2O was released into headspace, declining to 67% in the 5% amendment. In a 100% biochar column at 6% WFPS, only 16% of the expected N2O was observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy identified changes in surface functional groups suggesting interactions between N2O and the biochar surfaces. We have shown increases in -O-C = N /pyridine pyrrole/NH3, suggesting reactions between N2O and the carbon (C) matrix upon exposure to N2O. With increasing rates of biochar application, higher pH adjusted redox potentials were observed at the lower water contents. Evidence suggests that biochar has taken part in redox reactions reducing N2O to dinitrogen (N2), in addition to adsorption of N2O. PMID:26615820

  19. Lowering N2O emissions from soils using eucalypt biochar: the importance of redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quin, P.; Joseph, S.; Husson, O.; Donne, S.; Mitchell, D.; Munroe, P.; Phelan, D.; Cowie, A.; van Zwieten, L.

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural soils are the primary anthropogenic source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), contributing to global warming and depletion of stratospheric ozone. Biochar addition has shown potential to lower soil N2O emission, with the mechanisms remaining unclear. We incubated eucalypt biochar (550 °C) - 0, 1 and 5% (w/w) in Ferralsol at 3 water regimes (12, 39 and 54% WFPS) - in a soil column, following gamma irradiation. After N2O was injected at the base of the soil column, in the 0% biochar control 100% of expected injected N2O was released into headspace, declining to 67% in the 5% amendment. In a 100% biochar column at 6% WFPS, only 16% of the expected N2O was observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy identified changes in surface functional groups suggesting interactions between N2O and the biochar surfaces. We have shown increases in -O-C = N /pyridine pyrrole/NH3, suggesting reactions between N2O and the carbon (C) matrix upon exposure to N2O. With increasing rates of biochar application, higher pH adjusted redox potentials were observed at the lower water contents. Evidence suggests that biochar has taken part in redox reactions reducing N2O to dinitrogen (N2), in addition to adsorption of N2O.

  20. Contributions of agricultural plants and soils to N2O emission in a farmland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Lee, X.; Yu, Q.; Tong, X.; Qin, Z.; MacDonald, B.

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the roles of plants and soil in the N2O budget of a cropland in North China. Plant and soil N2O fluxes were measured with transparent and dark plant chambers and soil chambers, respectively, in three adjacent fields of fertilized cotton, fertilized maize and unfertilized soybean. During the observation period, the soil flux was 448 ± 89, 230 ± 74 and 90 ± 14 μg N2O m-2 h-1 in cotton, maize and soybean fields, respectively. The plant flux was 54 ± 43 and 16 ± 41 μg N2O m-2 h-1, about 10 % and 26 % to the total ecosystem flux, for the cotton and the soybean field, respectively. Ignoring the contribution of plants would cause an obvious underestimation on the ecosystem N2O flux. The influence of sunlight on plant N2O flux was insignificant. However, in the cotton field, the responses of the plant N2O flux to air temperature and soil ammonium content were significant under sunlight but insignificant under darkness, suggesting that stomatal activity might influence the release process. In the cotton field, temperature sensitivity of plant N2O emission was 1.13, much lower than the value of soil flux (5.74). No relationship was found between plant N2O flux and soil nitrate content. It was implied that nitrate reduction in plants might not be the main source of plant N2O emission under field conditions. The seasonal patterns of the soil and plant N2O emissions were similarly affected by fertilization, indicating that plants might serve as a passive conduit transporting N2O produced in the soil.

  1. Biochar reduces N2O emissions from soils: A meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirrmann, Michael; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Fuertes-Mendizábal, Teresa; Estavillo, José-María; Ippolito, Jim; Spokas, Kurt; Novak, Jeff; Kammann, Claudia; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Borchard, Nils

    2017-04-01

    Global efforts to mitigate climate change and to increase food security are challenging. Technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture while increasing crop yields simultaneously are not well characterized for their efficiency. For instance, biochar used to sequester carbon and to increase crop yields also alters the soil nitrogen cycle. This in turn affects N2O emissions from soil, where N2O has a higher global warming potential than emitted CO2. However, the mechanisms of biochar regarding the N2O emission process are not well understood due to complex interactions between soil organic and inorganic materials and their impact on the physical soil structure. To further understand the complex relationship, a single experimental study may not provide critical answers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis by reviewing literature published between 2010 and 2016 that focused on N2O emission from soils amended with biochars. A meta-analysis is a quantitative technique that allows estimating an overall treatment effect from many divergent research experiments. In our case, we included 92 publications that contained a total of 437 comparisons between biochar treated soils and biochar non-treated soils. We used a random effects model and bootstrapping with 1000 intervals to estimate the general percentage increase or decrease of N2O emission through biochar amendment. Our results showed that biochar treatment leads to a significant decrease of N2O emissions between 33% and 45%. This promising result highlights the need to increase investigations to more fully assess (i) the multitude of mechanisms involved in the observed N2O emission reductions such as soil pH changes, alterations in the soil microbial community and soil N cycling, a shift in the ratio of denitrifier end products (N2O/(N2O+N2) ratio) or nitrate capture by biochar particles, and (ii) the impact of biochar characteristics, soil properties and land use types on the multiple mechanisms

  2. Isotopic constraints on marine and terrestrial N2O emissions during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Schilt, Adrian; Brook, Edward J; Bauska, Thomas K; Baggenstos, Daniel; Fischer, Hubertus; Joos, Fortunat; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Schaefer, Hinrich; Schmitt, Jochen; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Spahni, Renato; Stocker, Thomas F

    2014-12-11

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance that has anthropogenic as well as natural marine and terrestrial sources. The tropospheric N2O concentrations have varied substantially in the past in concert with changing climate on glacial-interglacial and millennial timescales. It is not well understood, however, how N2O emissions from marine and terrestrial sources change in response to varying environmental conditions. The distinct isotopic compositions of marine and terrestrial N2O sources can help disentangle the relative changes in marine and terrestrial N2O emissions during past climate variations. Here we present N2O concentration and isotopic data for the last deglaciation, from 16,000 to 10,000 years before present, retrieved from air bubbles trapped in polar ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica. With the help of our data and a box model of the N2O cycle, we find a 30 per cent increase in total N2O emissions from the late glacial to the interglacial, with terrestrial and marine emissions contributing equally to the overall increase and generally evolving in parallel over the last deglaciation, even though there is no a priori connection between the drivers of the two sources. However, we find that terrestrial emissions dominated on centennial timescales, consistent with a state-of-the-art dynamic global vegetation and land surface process model that suggests that during the last deglaciation emission changes were strongly influenced by temperature and precipitation patterns over land surfaces. The results improve our understanding of the drivers of natural N2O emissions and are consistent with the idea that natural N2O emissions will probably increase in response to anthropogenic warming.

  3. Symbiotic relationships between soil fungi and plants reduce N2O emissions from soil

    PubMed Central

    Bender, S Franz; Plantenga, Faline; Neftel, Albrecht; Jocher, Markus; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Köhl, Luise; Giles, Madeline; Daniell, Tim J; van der Heijden, Marcel GA

    2014-01-01

    N2O is a potent greenhouse gas involved in the destruction of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and contributing to global warming. The ecological processes regulating its emissions from soil are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a dominant group of soil fungi, which form symbiotic associations with the majority of land plants and which influence a range of important ecosystem functions, can induce a reduction in N2O emissions from soil. To test for a functional relationship between AMF and N2O emissions, we manipulated the abundance of AMF in two independent greenhouse experiments using two different approaches (sterilized and re-inoculated soil and non-mycorrhizal tomato mutants) and two different soils. N2O emissions were increased by 42 and 33% in microcosms with reduced AMF abundance compared to microcosms with a well-established AMF community, suggesting that AMF regulate N2O emissions. This could partly be explained by increased N immobilization into microbial or plant biomass, reduced concentrations of mineral soil N as a substrate for N2O emission and altered water relations. Moreover, the abundance of key genes responsible for N2O production (nirK) was negatively and for N2O consumption (nosZ) positively correlated to AMF abundance, indicating that the regulation of N2O emissions is transmitted by AMF-induced changes in the soil microbial community. Our results suggest that the disruption of the AMF symbiosis through intensification of agricultural practices may further contribute to increased N2O emissions. PMID:24351937

  4. Symbiotic relationships between soil fungi and plants reduce N2O emissions from soil.

    PubMed

    Bender, S Franz; Plantenga, Faline; Neftel, Albrecht; Jocher, Markus; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Köhl, Luise; Giles, Madeline; Daniell, Tim J; van der Heijden, Marcel Ga

    2014-06-01

    N2O is a potent greenhouse gas involved in the destruction of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and contributing to global warming. The ecological processes regulating its emissions from soil are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a dominant group of soil fungi, which form symbiotic associations with the majority of land plants and which influence a range of important ecosystem functions, can induce a reduction in N2O emissions from soil. To test for a functional relationship between AMF and N2O emissions, we manipulated the abundance of AMF in two independent greenhouse experiments using two different approaches (sterilized and re-inoculated soil and non-mycorrhizal tomato mutants) and two different soils. N2O emissions were increased by 42 and 33% in microcosms with reduced AMF abundance compared to microcosms with a well-established AMF community, suggesting that AMF regulate N2O emissions. This could partly be explained by increased N immobilization into microbial or plant biomass, reduced concentrations of mineral soil N as a substrate for N2O emission and altered water relations. Moreover, the abundance of key genes responsible for N2O production (nirK) was negatively and for N2O consumption (nosZ) positively correlated to AMF abundance, indicating that the regulation of N2O emissions is transmitted by AMF-induced changes in the soil microbial community. Our results suggest that the disruption of the AMF symbiosis through intensification of agricultural practices may further contribute to increased N2O emissions.

  5. Marine animals significantly increase tundra N2O and CH4 emissions in maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Renbin; Liu, Yashu; Xu, Hua; Ma, Dawei; Jiang, Shan

    2013-12-01

    studies on greenhouse gas emissions from animals concentrated on domestic animals, with limited data available from wild animals. The number of marine animals is potentially large in coastal Antarctica. In this paper, N2O and CH4 emissions were investigated from a penguin colony, a seal colony, a skua colony, the adjacent animal-lacking tundra, and background tundra sites to test the effects of marine animals on their fluxes in maritime Antarctica. Extremely high N2O emissions occurred in the penguin puddles (mean 392 µg N2O m-2 h-1) and seal wallows (mean 579 µg N2O m-2 h-1). The N2O emissions from animal colony tundra (13-57 µg N2O m-2 h-1) are much higher than those from the animal-lacking tundra, whereas the background tundra showed negligible N2O fluxes. Penguin puddles and seal wallows were stronger CH4 emitters than animal colony tundra soils, while animal-lacking tundra soils were strong CH4 sinks. Overall high N2O and CH4 emissions were modulated by soil physical and chemical processes associated with marine animal activities: sufficient supply of the nutrients NH4+-N and NO3--N, total nitrogen, and total organic carbon from marine animal excreta, animal tramp, and high soil water-filled pore space. Laboratory incubation experiments further confirmed that penguin and seal colony soils produced much higher N2O and CH4 emissions than animal-lacking tundra soils. Our results indicate that marine animal colonies are the hot spots for N2O and CH4 emissions in maritime Antarctica, and even at the global scale, and current climate warming will further increase their emissions.

  6. Isotopic constraints on marine and terrestrial N2O emissions during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilt, Adrian; Brook, Edward J.; Bauska, Thomas K.; Baggenstos, Daniel; Fischer, Hubertus; Joos, Fortunat; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Schaefer, Hinrich; Schmitt, Jochen; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Spahni, Renato; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance that has anthropogenic as well as natural marine and terrestrial sources. The tropospheric N2O concentrations have varied substantially in the past in concert with changing climate on glacial-interglacial and millennial timescales. It is not well understood, however, how N2O emissions from marine and terrestrial sources change in response to varying environmental conditions. The distinct isotopic compositions of marine and terrestrial N2O sources can help disentangle the relative changes in marine and terrestrial N2O emissions during past climate variations. Here we present N2O concentration and isotopic data for the last deglaciation, from 16,000 to 10,000 years before present, retrieved from air bubbles trapped in polar ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica. With the help of our data and a box model of the N2O cycle, we find a 30 per cent increase in total N2O emissions from the late glacial to the interglacial, with terrestrial and marine emissions contributing equally to the overall increase and generally evolving in parallel over the last deglaciation, even though there is no a priori connection between the drivers of the two sources. However, we find that terrestrial emissions dominated on centennial timescales, consistent with a state-of-the-art dynamic global vegetation and land surface process model that suggests that during the last deglaciation emission changes were strongly influenced by temperature and precipitation patterns over land surfaces. The results improve our understanding of the drivers of natural N2O emissions and are consistent with the idea that natural N2O emissions will probably increase in response to anthropogenic warming.

  7. N2O emission from organic barley cultivation as affected by green manure treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Hansen, S.; Bleken, M.; Dörsch, P.

    2012-04-01

    Legumes are an important source of nitrogen in stockless organic cereal production. However, substantial amounts of N can be lost from legume-grass leys prior to or after incorporation as green manure (GM). Here we report N2O emissions from a field experiment in SE Norway exploring different green manure management strategies: mulching versus removal of grass-clover herbage during a whole growing season and replacement as biogas residue to a subsequent barley crop. Grass-clover ley had significantly higher N2O emissions as compared with a non fertilized cereal reference during the GM year (2009). Mulching of herbage induced significantly more N2O emission (+ 0.37 kg N2O-N ha-1) throughout the growing season than removing herbage. In spring 2010, all plots were ploughed (with and without GM) resulting in generally higher N2O emissions during barley production. Addition of biogas residue (80 kg N ha-1) in 2010 to previously non mulched GM and unfertilized cereal plots (2009) had no significant effect on cumulative N2O emissions relative to a treatment receiving the same amount of N in form of mulched aboveground GM. Ley management (mulching vs. removing biomass in 2009) had no effect on N2O emissions during barley production in 2010. In general, organic amendments (previously mulched or harvested GM, biorest) increased N2O emissions relative to a reference treatment with low mineral N fertilisation (80 kg N ha-1). Organic cereal production emitted 95 g N2O-N kg-1 N yield in barley grain, which was substantially higher than in the reference treatment with 80 kg mineral N fertilization in 2010 (47 g N2O-N kg-1 N yield in barley grain).

  8. Emissions of N2O and NO from fertilized fields: Summary of available measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, A. F.; Boumans, L. J. M.; Batjes, N. H.

    2002-12-01

    Information from 846 N2O emission measurements in agricultural fields and 99 measurements for NO emissions was summarized to assess the influence of various factors regulating emissions from mineral soils. The data indicate that there is a strong increase of both N2O and NO emissions accompanying N application rates, and soils with high organic-C content show higher emissions than less fertile soils. A fine soil texture, restricted drainage, and neutral to slightly acidic conditions favor N2O emission, while (though not significant) a good soil drainage, coarse texture, and neutral soil reaction favor NO emission. Fertilizer type and crop type are important factors for N2O but not for NO, while the fertilizer application mode has a significant influence on NO only. Regarding the measurements, longer measurement periods yield more of the fertilization effect on N2O and NO emissions, and intensive measurements (≥1 per day) yield lower emissions than less intensive measurements (2-3 per week). The available data can be used to develop simple models based on the major regulating factors which describe the spatial variability of emissions of N2O and NO with less uncertainty than emission factor approaches based on country N inputs, as currently used in national emission inventories.

  9. [Effects of controlled release fertilizers on N2O emission from paddy field].

    PubMed

    Li, Fangmin; Fan, Xiaolin; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qiang

    2004-11-01

    With close chamber method, this paper studied the effects of controlled release fertilizer (CRF), non-coated compound fertilizer (Com) and conventional urea (CK) on N2O emission from paddy field. The results showed that within 10 days after transplanting, the ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the surface water of the plot treated with CRF were significantly different from those treated with Com. The partial coefficient between N2O emission rates and corresponding nitrate concentrations in the water was significantly high (r = 0.6834). Compared with Com, CRF was able to reduce N2O emission from the paddy field. Within 100 days after basal application, the N2O emission rate of treatment CRF was only 13.45%-21.26% of Corn and 71.17%-112.47% of CK. The N2O emission of Com was mainly concentrated in 1-25 d after basal fertilization and mid-aeration period, but that of CRF was remarkably lower during same period, while the peak of N2O emission of CK was postponed and reduced. It was concluded that both one-time fertilization of CRF and several-time fertilizations of conventional urea were able to reduce N2O emission from the paddy field.

  10. Effects of temperature on nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from intensive aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Shukra Raj; Choi, Ohkyung; Khanal, Samir Kumar; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Lee, Jae Woo

    2015-06-15

    This study examines the effects of temperature on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in a bench-scale intensive aquaculture system rearing Koi fish. The water temperature varied from 15 to 24 °C at interval of 3 °C. Both volumetric and specific rate for nitrification and denitrification declined as the temperature decreased. The concentrations of ammonia and nitrite, however, were lower than the inhibitory level for Koi fish regardless of temperature. The effects of temperature on N2O emissions were significant, with the emission rate and emission factor increasing from 1.11 to 1.82 mg N2O-N/d and 0.49 to 0.94 mg N2O-N/kg fish as the temperature decreased from 24 to 15 °C. A global map of N2O emission from aquaculture was established by using the N2O emission factor depending on temperature. This study demonstrates that N2O emission from aquaculture is strongly dependent on regional water temperatures as well as on fish production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Frozen cropland soil in northeast China as source of N2O and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shujie; Qiao, Yunfa; Han, Xiaozeng; Brancher Franco, Roberta; Burger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural soils are important sources of atmospheric N2O and CO2. However, in boreal agro-ecosystems the contribution of the winter season to annual emissions of these gases has rarely been determined. In this study, soil N2O and CO2 fluxes were measured for 6 years in a corn-soybean-wheat rotation in northeast China to quantify the contribution of wintertime N2O and CO2 fluxes to annual emissions. The treatments were chemical fertilizer (NPK), chemical fertilizer plus composted pig manure (NPKOM), and control (Cont.). Mean soil N2O fluxes among all three treatments in the winter (November-March), when soil temperatures are below -7°C for extended periods, were 0.89-3.01 µg N m(-2) h(-1), and in between the growing season and winter (October and April), when freeze-thaw events occur, 1.73-5.48 µg N m(-2) h(-1). The cumulative N2O emissions were on average 0.27-1.39, 0.03-0.08 and 0.03-0.11 kg N2O_N ha(-1) during the growing season, October and April, and winter, respectively. The average contributions of winter N2O efflux to annual emissions were 6.3-12.1%. In all three seasons, the highest N2O emissions occurred in NPKOM, while NPK and Cont. emissions were similar. Cumulative CO2 emissions were 2.73-4.94, 0.13-0.20 and 0.07-0.11 Mg CO2-C ha(-1) during growing season, October and April, and winter, respectively. The contribution of winter CO2 to total annual emissions was 2.0-2.4%. Our results indicate that in boreal agricultural systems in northeast China, CO2 and N2O emissions continue throughout the winter.

  12. Abiotic controls on N2O emissions from soils and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    The increase in atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) is a critical climate change issue contributing to global warming. Most studies on N2O production attribute microbial processes and their associated enzymatic reactions to be the main driver affecting emissions. The role of redox capable iron, manganese and organic compounds that can react with intermediates in the nitrogen cycle has also been shown to produce N2O abiotically. The importance of the abiotic pathways, however, is highly debated. The abiotic production of N2O is related to biophysiochemical controls and unique isotopic signatures of nitrogen cycle intermediates (hydroxylamine, nitric oxide, and nitrite), redox-active metals (iron and manganese) and organic matter (humic and fulvic acids). In a range of soils, we find that the iron directly associated with organic compounds is the strongest variable relating to N2O emissions. In addition to these factors, management is also assumed to affect abiotic N2O production through its impact on nitrogen cycle intermediates, but the environmental and physiochemical conditions that are changed by management are rarely considered in the abiotic production of N2O. We find that the amount and quality of organic compounds in soils directly determines the fate of soil N2O production (i.e. be emitted or consumed). Water depth in rice paddies and wetlands also plays a significant role in partitioning production and consumption of N2O. What is evident from studies on N2O emission is that abiotic reactions are coupled to biotic processes and they cannot be easily separated. The biotic/abiotic interactions have important ecological outcomes that influence abiotic production mechanisms and should be recognized as important controllers of N2O production and consumption processes in soils and sediments.

  13. Inverse modelling estimates of N2O surface emissions and stratospheric losses using a global dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Aalto, T.; Haszpra, L.; Meinhardt, F.; O'Doherty, S.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Popa, M.; Steinbacher, M.; Jordan, A.; Schuck, T. J.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Kort, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) levels have been steadily increasing in the atmosphere over the past few decades at a rate of approximately 0.3% per year. This trend is of major concern as N2O is both a long-lived Greenhouse Gas (GHG) and an Ozone Depleting Substance (ODS), as it is a precursor of NO and NO2, which catalytically destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Recently, N2O emissions have been recognised as the most important ODS emissions and are now of greater importance than emissions of CFC's. The growth in atmospheric N2O is predominantly due to the enhancement of surface emissions by human activities. Most notably, the intensification and proliferation of agriculture since the mid-19th century, which has been accompanied by the increased input of reactive nitrogen to soils and has resulted in significant perturbations to the natural N-cycle and emissions of N2O. There exist two approaches for estimating N2O emissions, the so-called 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' approaches. Top-down approaches, based on the inversion of atmospheric measurements, require an estimate of the loss of N2O via photolysis and oxidation in the stratosphere. Uncertainties in the loss magnitude contribute uncertainties of 15 to 20% to the global annual surface emissions, complicating direct comparisons between bottom-up and top-down estimates. In this study, we present a novel inversion framework for the simultaneous optimization of N2O surface emissions and the magnitude of the loss, which avoids errors in the emissions due to incorrect assumptions about the lifetime of N2O. We use a Bayesian inversion with a variational formulation (based on 4D-Var) in order to handle very large datasets. N2O fluxes are retrieved at 4-weekly resolution over a global domain with a spatial resolution of 3.75° x 2.5° longitude by latitude. The efficacy of the simultaneous optimization of emissions and losses is tested using a global synthetic dataset, which mimics the available atmospheric data. Lastly, using real

  14. Instream Large Wood: Dentrification Hotspots With Low N2O Production

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maintenance and restoration of forested riparian cover is important for watershed nitrogen (N) cycling. Forested riparian zones provide woody debris to streams that may stimulate in-stream denitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. We examined the effects of woody an...

  15. Instream Large Wood: Dentrification Hotspots With Low N2O Production

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maintenance and restoration of forested riparian cover is important for watershed nitrogen (N) cycling. Forested riparian zones provide woody debris to streams that may stimulate in-stream denitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. We examined the effects of woody an...

  16. Woody Debris: Denitrification Hotspots and N2O Production in Fluvial Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maintenance and restoration of forested riparian cover is important for watershed nitrogen (N) cycling. Forested riparian zones provide woody debris to streams that may stimulate in-stream denitrification and control nitrous oxide (N2O) production. We examined the effects of ...

  17. Woody Debris: Denitrification Hotspots and N2O Production in Fluvial Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The maintenance and restoration of forested riparian cover is important for watershed nitrogen (N) cycling. Forested riparian zones provide woody debris to streams that may stimulate in-stream denitrification and control nitrous oxide (N2O) production. We examined the effects of ...

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions in a subtropical forest catchment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Mulder, J.; Wu, L. P.; Meng, X. X.; Wang, Y. H.; Dörsch, P.

    2013-03-01

    Subtropical forests in southern China have received chronically large amounts of atmogenic nitrogen (N), causing N saturation. Recent studies suggest that a significant proportion of the N input is returned to the atmosphere, in part as nitrous oxide (N2O). We measured N2O emission fluxes by closed chamber technique throughout two years in a Masson pine-dominated headwater catchment with acrisols (pH ~ 4) at Tieshanping (Chongqing, SW China) and assessed the spatial and temporal variability in two landscape elements typical for this region: a mesic forested hillslope (HS) and a hydrologically connected, terraced groundwater discharge zone (GDZ) in the valley bottom. High emission rates of up to 1800 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 were recorded on the HS shortly after rain storms during monsoonal summer, whereas emission fluxes during the dry winter season were generally low. Overall, N2O emission was lower in GDZ than on HS, rendering the mesic HS the dominant source of N2O in this landscape. Temporal variability of N2O emissions on HS was largely explained by soil temperature (ST) and moisture, pointing at denitrification as a major process for N removal and N2O production. The concentration of nitrate (NO3-) in pore water on HS was high even in the rainy season, apparently never limiting denitrification and N2O production. The concentration of NO3- decreased along the terraced GDZ, indicating efficient N removal, but with moderate N2O-N loss. The extrapolated annual N2O fluxes from soils on HS (0.54 and 0.43 g N2O-N m-2 yr-1 for a year with a wet and a dry summer, respectively) are among the highest N2O fluxes reported from subtropical forests so far. Annual N2O-N emissions amounted to 8-10% of the annual atmogenic N deposition, suggesting that forests on acid soils in southern China are an important, hitherto overlooked component of the anthropogenic N2O budget.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of N2O emissions in a subtropical forest catchment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Mulder, J.; Wu, L. P.; Meng, X. X.; Wang, Y. H.; Dörsch, P.

    2012-10-01

    Subtropical forests in South China have received chronically large amounts of atmogenic nitrogen (N) causing N saturation. Recent studies suggest that a significant proportion of the N input is returned to the atmosphere, in part as nitrous oxide (N2O). We measured N2O emission fluxes by closed chamber technique throughout two years in a Masson pine-dominated headwater catchment with acrisols (pH ~ 4) at TieShanPing (Chongqing, SW China) and assessed the spatial and temporal variability in two landscape elements typical for this region: a mesic forested hill slope (HS) and a hydrologically connected, terraced groundwater discharge zone (GDZ) in the valley bottom. High emission rates of up to 1800 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 were recorded on the HS shortly after rain storms during monsoonal summer, whereas emission fluxes during the dry winter season were generally low. Overall, N2O emission was lower in GDZ than in HS, rendering the mesic HS the dominant source of N2O in this landscape. Temporal variability of N2O emissions on HS was largely explained by soil temperature and moisture, pointing at denitrification as a major process for N removal and N2O production. The concentration of nitrate (NO3-) in pore water on HS was high even in the rainy season, apparently never limiting denitrification and N2O production. The concentration of NO3- decreased along the terraced GDZ, indicating efficient N removal, but with moderate N2O-N loss. The extrapolated annual N2O fluxes from soils on HS (0.50 and 0.41 g N2O-N m-2 yr-1 for a year with a wet and a dry summer, respectively) are among the highest N2O fluxes reported from subtropical forests so far. Annual N2O-N emissions amounted to 8-10% of the annual atmogenic N-deposition, suggesting that forests on acid soils in South China are an important, hitherto overlooked component of the anthropogenic N2O budget.

  20. N2O emission from plant surfaces - light stimulated and a global phenomenon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Teis; Bruhn, Dan; Ambus, Per

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important long-lived greenhouse gas and precursor of stratospheric ozone depleting mono-nitrogen oxides. The atmospheric concentration of N2O is persistently increasing; however, large uncertainties are associated with the distinct source strengths. Here we investigate for the first time N2O emission from terrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurements to investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and without UV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted with a range of species to study the controls and possible loci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c. 20-50 nmol m-2 h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a rather high activation energy indicative for an abiotic process. The prevailing zone for the N2O formation appears to be at the very surface of leaves. However, only c. 26% of the UV-induced N2O appears to originate from plant-N. Further, the process is dependent on atmospheric oxygen concentration. Our work demonstrates that ecosystem emission of the important greenhouse gas, N2O, may be up to c. 30% higher than hitherto assumed. Literature: Mikkelsen TN, Bruhn D & Ambus P. (2016). Solar UV Irradiation-Induced Production of Greenhouse Gases from Plant Surfaces: From Leaf to Earth. Progress in Botany, DOI 10.1007/124_2016_10. Bruhn D, Albert KR, Mikkelsen TN & Ambus P. (2014). UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Atmospheric Environment 99, 206-214.

  1. Effects of crop management, soil type, and climate on N2O emissions from Austrian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sigmund, Elisabeth; Kasper, Martina; Kitzler, Barbara; Haas, Edwin; Wandl, Michael; Strauss, Peter; Poetzelsberger, Elisabeth; Dersch, Georg; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Amon, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Within the project FarmClim ("Farming for a better climate") we assessed recent N2O emissions from two selected regions in Austria. Our aim was to deepen the understanding of Austrian N2O fluxes regarding region specific properties. Currently, N2O emissions are estimated with the IPCC default emission factor which only considers the amount of N-input as an influencing factor for N2O emissions. We evaluated the IPCC default emission factor for its validity under spatially distinct environmental conditions. For this two regions for modeling with LandscapeDNDC have been identified in this project. The benefit of using LandscapeDNDC is the detailed illustration of microbial processes in the soil. Required input data to run the model included daily climate data, vegetation properties, soil characteristics and land management. The analysis of present agricultural practices was basis for assessing the hot spots and hot moments of nitrogen emissions on a regional scale. During our work with LandscapeDNDC we were able to adapt specific model algorithms to Austrian agricultural conditions. The model revealed a strong dependency of N2O emissions on soil type. We could estimate how strongly soil texture affects N2O emissions. Based on detailed soil maps with high spatial resolution we calculated region specific contribution to N2O emissions. Accordingly we differentiated regions with deviating gas fluxes compared to the predictions by the IPCC inventory methodology. Taking region specific management practices into account (tillage, irrigation, residuals) calculation of crop rotation (fallow, catch crop, winter wheat, barley, winter barley, sugar beet, corn, potato, onion and rapeseed) resulted in N2O emissions differing by a factor of 30 depending on preceding crop and climate. A maximum of 2% of N fertilizer input was emitted as N2O. Residual N in the soil was a major factor stimulating N2O emissions. Interannual variability was affected by varying N-deposition even in case

  2. Contrasting denitrifier communities relate to contrasting N2O emission patterns from acidic peat soils in arctic tundra.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Katharina; Biasi, Christina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-05-01

    Cryoturbated peat circles (that is, bare surface soil mixed by frost action; pH 3-4) in the Russian discontinuous permafrost tundra are nitrate-rich 'hotspots' of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions in arctic ecosystems, whereas adjacent unturbated peat areas are not. N(2)O was produced and subsequently consumed at pH 4 in unsupplemented anoxic microcosms with cryoturbated but not in those with unturbated peat soil. Nitrate, nitrite and acetylene stimulated net N(2)O production of both soils in anoxic microcosms, indicating denitrification as the source of N(2)O. Up to 500 and 10 μM nitrate stimulated denitrification in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Apparent maximal reaction velocities of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 28 and 18 nmol N(2)O g(DW)(-1) h(-1), for cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing of narG, nirK/nirS and nosZ (encoding nitrate, nitrite and N(2)O reductases, respectively) yielded ≈49 000 quality-filtered sequences with an average sequence length of 444 bp. Up to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units were detected per soil and gene, many of which were distantly related to cultured denitrifiers or environmental sequences. Denitrification-associated gene diversity in cryoturbated and in unturbated peat soils differed. Quantitative PCR (inhibition-corrected per DNA extract) revealed higher copy numbers of narG in cryoturbated than in unturbated peat soil. Copy numbers of nirS were up to 1000 × higher than those of nirK in both soils, and nirS nirK(-1) copy number ratios in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils differed. The collective data indicate that the contrasting N(2)O emission patterns of cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils are associated with contrasting denitrifier communities.

  3. Contrasting denitrifier communities relate to contrasting N2O emission patterns from acidic peat soils in arctic tundra

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Katharina; Biasi, Christina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-01-01

    Cryoturbated peat circles (that is, bare surface soil mixed by frost action; pH 3–4) in the Russian discontinuous permafrost tundra are nitrate-rich ‘hotspots' of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in arctic ecosystems, whereas adjacent unturbated peat areas are not. N2O was produced and subsequently consumed at pH 4 in unsupplemented anoxic microcosms with cryoturbated but not in those with unturbated peat soil. Nitrate, nitrite and acetylene stimulated net N2O production of both soils in anoxic microcosms, indicating denitrification as the source of N2O. Up to 500 and 10 μ nitrate stimulated denitrification in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Apparent maximal reaction velocities of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 28 and 18 nmol N2O gDW−1 h−1, for cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing of narG, nirK/nirS and nosZ (encoding nitrate, nitrite and N2O reductases, respectively) yielded ≈49 000 quality-filtered sequences with an average sequence length of 444 bp. Up to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units were detected per soil and gene, many of which were distantly related to cultured denitrifiers or environmental sequences. Denitrification-associated gene diversity in cryoturbated and in unturbated peat soils differed. Quantitative PCR (inhibition-corrected per DNA extract) revealed higher copy numbers of narG in cryoturbated than in unturbated peat soil. Copy numbers of nirS were up to 1000 × higher than those of nirK in both soils, and nirS nirK−1 copy number ratios in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils differed. The collective data indicate that the contrasting N2O emission patterns of cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils are associated with contrasting denitrifier communities. PMID:22134649

  4. A New High-Resolution N2O Emission Inventory for China in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Z.; Zhou, F.; Ciais, P.; Tao, S.; Piao, S.; Raymond, P. A.; He, C.; Li, B.; Wang, R.; Wang, X.; Peng, S.; Zeng, Z.; Chen, H.; Ying, N.; Hou, X.; Xu, P.

    2014-12-01

    The amount and geographic distribution of N2O emissions over China remain largely uncertain. Most of existing emission inventories use uniform emission factors (EFs) and the associated parameters and apply spatial proxies to downscale national or provincial data, resulting in the introduction of spatial bias. In this study, county-level and 0.1° × 0.1° gridded anthropogenic N2O emission inventories for China (PKU-N2O) in 2008 are developed based on high-resolution activity data and regional EFs and parameters. These new estimates are compared with estimates from EDGAR v4.2, GAINS-China, National Development and Reform Commission of China (NDRC), and with two sensitivity tests: one that uses high-resolution activity data but the default IPCC methodology (S1) and the other that uses regional EFs and parameters but starts from coarser-resolution activity data. The total N2O emissions are 2150 GgN2O/yr (interquartile range from 1174 to 2787 GgN2O/yr). Agriculture contributes 64% of the total, followed by energy (17%), indirect emissions (12%), wastes (5%), industry (2.8%), and wildfires (0.2%). Our national emission total is 17% greater than that of the EDGAR v4.2 global product sampled over China and is also greater than the GAINS-China, NDRC, and S1 estimates by 10%, 50%, and 17%, respectively. We also found that using uniform EFs and parameters or starting from national/provincial data causes systematic spatial biases compared to PKU-N2O. In addition, the considerable differences between the relative contributions of the six sectors across the six Agro-Climate Zones primarily reflect the different distributions of industrial activities and land use. Eastern China (8.7% area of China) is the largest contributor of N2O emissions and accounts for nearly 25% of the total. Spatial analysis also shows nonlinear relationships between N2O emission intensities and urbanization. Per-capita and per-GDP N2O emissions increase gradually with an increase in the urban

  5. Emissions of N2O from peat soils under different cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Lisbet; Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    Drainage of peatlands for agriculture use leads to an increase in nitrogen turnover rate causing emissions of N2O to the atmosphere. Agriculture contributes to a substantial part of the anthropogenic emissions of N2O therefore mitigation options for the farmers are important. Here we present a field study with the aim to investigate if the choice of cropping system can mitigate the emission of N2O from cultivated organic soils. The sites used in the study represent fen peat soils with a range of different soil properties located in different parts of southern Sweden. All sites are on active farms with good drainage. N2O emissions from the soil under two different crops grown on the same field, with the same soil type, drainage intensity and weather conditions, are compared by gas sampling. The crops included are oat, barley, carrot, potato and grassland. Three or four sampling occasions during the growing season in 2010 were carried out with static chambers. The N2O emission is calculated from the linear increase of gas concentration in the chamber headspace during the incubation time of 40 minutes. Parallel to the gas sampling soil temperature and soil moisture are measured and some soil properties determined. The result from the gas sampling and measurements show no significant difference in seasonal average N2O emission between the compared crops at any site. There are significant differences in N2O emissions between the compared crops at some of the single sampling occasions but the result vary and no crop can be pointed out as a mitigation option. The seasonal average N2O emissions varies from 16±17 to 1319±1971 μg N2O/m2/h with peaks up to 3317 μg N2O/m2/h. The N2O emission rate from peat soils are determined by other factors than the type of crops grown on the field. The emission rates vary during the season and especially between sites. Although all sites are fen peat soil the soil properties are different, e.g. carbon content varies between 27-43% and

  6. Spatial and temporal variability of N2O emission on grazed pastures - influence of management and meteorological drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Voglmeier, Karl; Jocher, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Grazed pastures are considered as strong sources of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) with local hot-spots resulting from the uneven spatial distribution of the excretion of the grazing animals. Especially urine patches can result in a high local nitrogen (N) surplus, which can cause large deviations from average soil conditions. The strong spatial and temporal variability of the gaseous emissions represents an inherent problem for the quantification, interpretation and modelling. Micrometeorological methods integrating over a larger domain like the eddy covariance method are well suited to quantify the integrated ecosystem emissions of N2O. In contrast, chamber methods are more useful to investigate specific underlying processes and their dependences on driving parameters. We present results of a pasture experiment in western Switzerland where eddy covariance and chamber measurements of N2O fluxes have been performed using a very sensitive and fast response quantum cascade laser (QCL) instrument. Small scale emissions of N2O from dung and urine patches as well as from other "background" pasture surface areas were quantified using an optimized 'fast-box' chamber system. Variable and partly high N2O emissions of the pasture were observed during all seasons. Beside management factors (grazing phases, fertiliser application), temperature and soil moisture showed a large effect on the fluxes. Fresh urine patches from grazing cows were found to be main emission sources and their temporal dynamics was studied in detail. We present a first approach to up-scale the chamber measurements to the field-scale and compare the results with the eddy covariance measurements.

  7. N2O emission from organic barley cultivation as affected by green manure management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Hansen, S.; Azzaroli Bleken, M.; Dörsch, P.

    2012-02-01

    Legumes are an important source of nitrogen in stockless organic cereal production. However, substantial amounts of N can be lost from legume-grass leys prior to or after incorporation as green manure (GM). Here we report N2O emissions from a field experiment in SE Norway exploring different green manure management strategies: mulching versus removal of grass-clover herbage during a whole growing season and replacement as biogas residue to a subsequent barley crop. Grass-clover ley had small but significantly higher N2O emissions as compared with a non-fertilized cereal reference during the year of green manure (GM) production in 2009. Mulching of herbage induced significantly more N2O emission (+0.37 kg N2O-N ha-1) throughout the growing season than removing herbage. In spring 2010 all plots were ploughed (with and without GM) and sown with barley, resulting in generally higher N2O emissions than during the previous year. Application of biogas residue (110 kg N ha-1) before sowing did not increase emissions neither when applied to previous ley plots nor when applied to previously unfertilized cereal plots. Ley management (mulching vs. removing biomass in 2009) had no effect on N2O emissions during barley production in 2010. In general, GM ley (mulched or harvested) increased N2O emissions relative to a cereal reference with low mineral N fertilisation (80 kg N ha-1). Organic cereal production emitted 95 g N2O-N kg-1 N yield in barley grain, which was substantially higher than in the cereal reference treatment with 80 kg mineral N fertilization in 2010 (47 g N2O-N kg-1 N yield in barley grain).

  8. N2O emission from organic barley cultivation as affected by green manure management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Hansen, S.; Azzaroli Bleken, M.; Dörsch, P.

    2012-07-01

    Legumes are an important source of nitrogen in stockless organic cereal production. However, substantial amounts of N can be lost from legume-grass leys prior to or after incorporation as green manure (GM). Here we report N2O emissions from a field experiment in SE Norway exploring different green manure management strategies: mulching versus removal of grass-clover herbage during a whole growing season and return as biogas residue to a subsequent barley crop. Grass-clover ley had small but significantly higher N2O emissions as compared with a non-fertilised cereal reference during the year of green manure (GM) production in 2009. Mulching of herbage induced significantly more N2O emission (+0.37 kg N2O-N ha-1) throughout the growing season than removing herbage. In spring 2010, all plots were ploughed (with and without GM) and sown with barley, resulting in generally higher N2O emissions than during the previous year. Application of biogas residue (60 kg NH4+-N + 50 kg organic N ha-1) before sowing did not increase emissions neither when applied to previous ley plots nor when applied to previously unfertilised cereal plots. Ley management (mulching vs. removing biomass in 2009) had no effect on N2O emissions during barley production in 2010. In general, GM ley (mulched or harvested) increased N2O emissions relative to a cereal reference with low mineral N fertilisation (80 kg N ha-1). Based on measurements covering the growing season 2010, organic cereal production emitted 95 g N2O-N kg-1 N yield in barley grain, which was substantially higher than in the cereal reference treatment with 80 kg mineral N fertilisation (47 g N2O-N kg-1 N yield in barley grain).

  9. Emissions of N2O from the burning of biomass in an experimental system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, W. M.; Scharffe, D.; Lobert, J. M.; Grutzen, P. J.

    Fifteen experiments were conducted in an open burning system to determine the amounts of N2O produced from burning savanna grass (Venezuelan Trachypogon, Australian Sorghum intrans), straw, hay, oak, pine needles and litter of pine forest. Samples in stainless steel canisters were analyzed within one day after sampling in order to avoid artifact N2O formation during storage. Emissions of N2O were observed to be nearly coincident with the emissions' of CO2 during the burning period for all the experiments. The amount of N2O produced was dependent on the nitrogen content of the biomass. About 0.7% of the fuel nitrogen was oxidized to N2O and most of the N2O was formed during the flaming stage. Using our experimental data and the amounts of different types of vegetation burned globally per year, we estimate that about 2.7 × 1011 g of N2O-N are produced per year from burning biomass, contributing only 2% to the global source of N2O.

  10. Global N2O emissions - with a focus on natural soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Schlosser, C. A.; Rigby, M. L.; Prinn, R. G.; Weiss, R. F.; Fraser, P.; Krummel, P. B.; Steele, P.; Odoherty, S. J.; Simmonds, P.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Tohjima, Y.; Machida, T.; Nakazawa, T.; Aoki, S.; Ishijima, K.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions weighted by ozone depletion potential currently dominate emissions of ozone depleting substances, and N2O is now the third most significant long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas after CO2 and CH4. Despite its impact on stratospheric ozone destruction, it is not regulated under the Montreal Protocol, and global observations show a continuous N2O mole fraction increase of 0.2 to 0.3% per year. Sinks and sources of N2O still have large uncertainties but previous studies have estimated that soil emissions share more than a half of the global total. Because the variability in soil emissions could potentially have important implications for regional and global climate, and vice versa, it is essential to better understand the processes and feedbacks associated with soil N2O emissions. To achieve this goal and quantify global soil N2O emissions, we have included nitrification-denitrification processes (DNDC) into the Community Land Model (CLM) version 3.5. Using three different bias-corrected, reanalysis-based meteorological datasets (NCC, CAS and GOLD), we constructed a suite of global gridded soil N2O emissions estimates from 1975 through the mid-2000s. We evaluate our global soil N2O flux estimates against: 1) an existing emissions inventory (GEIA), 2) another process model (NASA-CASA), and 3) observations from an existing forest N2O flux dataset in the Amazon and in the United States. Both the global and regional totals agree well and the model reproduces the observed seasonal cycles of N2O emissions. Next, we input these emission estimates to a 3-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport model - the Model for OZone And Related Tracers (MOZART) version 4 - to analyze the impact of monthly and inter-annual variability in soil emissions on atmospheric observations. Using these emissions as an initial estimate, we also determine new regional and global N2O emissions by inverse modeling from 1995 through 2009. Data from the Advanced Global

  11. High N2O emission in an N-saturated subtropical forest, southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörsch, P.; Zhu, J.; Mulder, J.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen (N)-saturated forests in subtropical China are significant N sinks, despite low forest growth rates. In a forested headwater catchment at Tieshanping, Chongqing, SW China, with 4 g N m-2a-1 atmogenic deposition (60% of which as NH4+-N) and leaching of only 0.6 g N m-2 a-1 (NO3--N dominated), we applied state-of-the-art field and laboratory methodologies to investigate the nature of the N sinks. The study included the determination of spatiotemporal patterns of N2O emission, a 15N labeling experiment and laboratory incubations to determine nitrification and denitrification characteristics and their gaseous product stoichiometries. Emission of N2O occurred predominantly during the wet season (summer), driven by rain episodes. N2O emission rates were particularly high along a hill slope (HS) with a thin organic surface layer overlaying an argic B horizon causing transient interflow during storm flow conditions. Lower N2O emission rates were observed at the foot slope in a colluvium-derived groundwater discharge zone (GDZ). Laboratory incubation experiments suggested that the difference in N2O emission rate is primarily due to higher N2O/N2 product ratios of denitrification in the HS topsoil being exposed to frequent drying-rewetting. Lower N2O/N2 product ratios in soils of the GDZ, in turn, could be attributed to more stable anoxia, lower NO3- availability and higher pH as compared with the hillslope, all of which favor the expression of N2O reductase. Estimated annual N2O emission for the relatively dry hydrological year 2009-2010 was 0.4 g N m-2, which is equivalent to approximately 10% of the annual input of reactive N. Measurements during summer 2009 indicated that N2O emissions can be even higher during wet years. A 15NO3- labeling experiment conducted on HS soils during summer revealed that between 75 and 86% of the N2O emission derived from denitrification during the first 6 days after label addition, accounting for 8-15% of the applied NO3--N. Our

  12. A toy model for estimating N2O emissions from natural soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Inez

    1992-01-01

    A model of N2O emissions from natural soils, whose ultimate objective is to evaluate what contribution natural ecosystems make to the global N2O budget and how the contribution would change with global change, is presented. Topics covered include carbon and nitrogen available in the soil, delivery of nitrifiable N, soil water and oxygen status, soil water budget model, effects of drainage, nitrification and denitrification potentials, soil fertility, N2O production, and a model evaluation. A major implication of the toy model is that the tropics account for more than 80 percent of global emission.

  13. Dolomite application to acidic soils: a promising option for mitigating N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Peng, Qi-An; Hu, Ronggui; Wu, Yupeng; Lin, Shan; Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-12-01

    Soil acidification is one of the main problems to crop productivity as well as a potent source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O). Liming practice is usually performed for the amelioration of acidic soils, but the effects of dolomite application on N2O emissions from acidic soils are still not well understood. Therefore, a laboratory study was conducted to examine N2O emissions from an acidic soil following application of dolomite. Dolomite was applied to acidic soil in a factorial design under different levels of moisture and nitrogen (N) fertilizer. Treatments were as follows: dolomite was applied as 0, 1, and 2 g kg(-1) soil (named as CK, L, and H, respectively) under two levels of moisture [i.e., 55 and 90 % water-filled pore space (WFPS)]. All treatments of dolomite and moisture were further amended with 0 and 200 mg N kg(-1) soil as (NH4)2SO4. Soil properties such as soil pH, mineral N (NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil N2O emissions were analyzed throughout the study period. Application of N fertilizer rapidly increased soil N2O emissions and peaked at 0.59 μg N2O-N kg(-1) h(-1) under 90 % WFPS without dolomite application. The highest cumulative N2O flux was 246.32 μg N2O-N kg(-1) under 90 % WFPS without dolomite addition in fertilized soil. Addition of dolomite significantly (p ≤ 0.01) mitigated N2O emissions as soil pH increased, and H treatment was more effective for mitigating N2O emissions as compared to L treatment. The H treatment decreased the cumulative N2O emissions by up to 73 and 67 % under 55 and 90 % WFPS, respectively, in fertilized soil, and 60 and 68 % under 55 and 90 % WFPS, respectively, in unfertilized soil when compared to those without dolomite addition. Results demonstrated that application of dolomite to acidic soils is a promising option for mitigating N2O emissions.

  14. Impact of Aquatic and Terrestrial Emissions on Atmospheric N2O Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.; Riddick, S. N.; Saikawa, E.; Hess, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) have increased by about 20% since the preindustrial era, an increase that has been driven largely by use of anthropogenic nitrogen fertilizers. The N2O source associated with agriculture was historically underestimated by assessments that considered only direct emissions from fertilized fields, but more recently it has been recognized that 'indirect' emissions associated with N leaching and runoff to rivers and may account for as much as half of total agricultural N2O emissions. Meanwhile, recent regional atmospheric N2O inversions have inferred large North American agricultural N2O sources that are difficult to reconcile with global budget constraints. At the same time, it is not clear whether the inversions can detect indirect N2O emissions associated with nitrogen leaching and runoff. Here, we will present forward model simulations aimed at quantifying the relative magnitude, spatial distribution and timing of direct and indirect agricultural N2O emissions. The model simulations will be based on the Community Land Model (CLM), with new agricultural and trace N gas parameterizations, coupled to the River Transport Model (RTM), with a module for estimating river N transport and N2O production associated with in-stream sediment denitrification. The coupled CLM-RTM N2O fluxes will be used to force atmospheric chemistry tracer transport model (ACTM) simulations, with direct and indirect emissions carried as separate tracers. The ACTM results will be used to evaluate the impact of both types of emissions on site-specific variability in atmospheric N2O at United States monitoring sites and to assess the likelihood that current atmospheric monitoring networks can detect these signals. Locations of selected NOAA monitoring sites for atmospheric N2O over the continental United States, showing both aircraft (triangles) and surface flask or tower sites (filled circles). Site locations are superimposed on a

  15. Emission of N2O and CH4 from a constructed wetland in southeastern Norway.

    PubMed

    Søvik, A K; Kløve, B

    2007-07-15

    The Skjønhaug constructed wetland (CW) is a free surface water (FSW) wetland polishing chemically treated municipal wastewater in southeastern Norway and consists of three ponds as well as trickling, unsaturated filters with light weight aggregates (LWA). Fluxes of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) have been measured during the autumn, winter and summer from all three ponds as well as from the unsaturated filters. Physicochemical parameters of the water have been measured at the same localities. The large temporal and spatial variation of N(2)O fluxes was found to cover a range of -0.49 to 110 mg N(2)O-N m(-2) day(-1), while the fluxes of CH(4) was found to cover a range of -1.2 to 1900 mg m(-2) day(-1). Thus, both emission and consumption occurred. Regarding fluxes of N(2)O there was a significant difference between the summer, winter and autumn, with the highest emissions occurring during the autumn. The fluxes of CH(4) were, on the other hand, not significantly different with regard to seasons. Both the emissions of N(2)O and CH(4) were positively influenced by the amount of total organic carbon (TOC). The measured fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) are in the same range as those reported from other CWs treating wastewater. There was an approximately equal contribution to the global warming potential from N(2)O and CH(4).

  16. Ocean N2O Emissions : Recent Global Estimates and Anthropogenically Influenced Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suntharalingam, P.; Buithenuis, E.; Andrews, O.; Le Quere, C.

    2016-12-01

    Oceanic N2O is produced by microbial activity during organic matter cycling in the subsurface ocean; its production mechanisms display sensitivity to ambient oxygen level. In the oxic ocean, N2O is produced as a byproduct during the oxidation of ammonia to nitrate, mediated by ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archea. N2O is also produced and consumed in sub-oxic and anoxic waters through the action of marine denitrifiers during the multi-step reduction of nitrate to gaseous nitrogen. The oceanic N2O distribution therefore displays significant heterogeneity with background levels of 10-20 nmol/l in the well-oxygenated ocean basins, high concentrations (> 40 nmol/l) in hypoxic waters, and N2O depletion in the core of ocean oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Oceanic N2O emissions are estimated to account for up to a third of the pre-industrial N2O fluxes to the atmosphere, however the natural cycle of ocean N2O has been perturbed in recent decades by inputs of anthropogenically derived nutrient, and by the impacts of climate change. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (e.g., NOx and NHy from fossil fuel combustion and agricultural fertilizer) enter the ocean via atmospheric deposition and riverine fluxes, influencing oceanic N2O production via their impact on the marine organic matter cycle. In addition, climate variations associated with surface ocean warming affect oceanic circulation and nutrient transport pathways, influencing marine productivity and the ventilation of oxygen minimum zones. Recent studies have suggested that possible expansion of oceanic OMZs in a warming climate could lead to significant changes in N2O production and fluxes from these regions. We will summarise the current state of knowledge on the ocean N2O budget and net flux to the atmosphere. Recently reported estimates have been based on (i) empirical relationships derived from ocean tracer data (e.g., involving excess N2O and Apparent Oxygen Utilization (AOU) correlations), (ii) ocean biogeochemical

  17. [Effects of applying controlled release fertilizers on N2O emission from a lateritic red soil].

    PubMed

    Du, Ya-qin; Zheng, Li-xing; Fan, Xiao-lin

    2011-09-01

    Static closed chamber technique and contrast method were adopted to study the effects of three coated compound fertilizers (N:P2O5:K2O = 19:8.6:10.5, high N; 14.4:14.4:14.4, balanced NPK; and 12.5:9.6:20.2, high K) on the NO2O emission from a lateritic red soil under the condition of no crop planting, taking uncoated compound fertilizers (N:P2O5:K2O = 20:9:11, high N; 15:15:15, balanced NPK; and 13:10:21, high K) as the contrasts. Different formula of fertilizer NPK induced significant difference in the N2O emission. Under the application of uncoated compound fertilizers, the cumulative N2O emission was in the order of balanced NPK > or = high N > high K. Applying coated compound fertilizers decreased the N2O emission significantly, and the emission amount under the application of high N, balanced NPK, and high K was 34.4%, 30.5%, and 89.3% of the corresponding uncoated compound fertilizers, respectively. Comparing with the application of uncoated compound fertilizers, applying coated compound fertilizers also decreased the daily N2O flux significantly, and delayed and shortened the N2O peak, suggesting that coated fertilizers could reduce soil nitrogen loss and the global warming potential induced by N2O emission.

  18. N2O emissions from streams in the Neuse river watershed, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Stow, Craig A; Walker, John T; Cardoch, Lynette; Spence, Porche; Geron, Chris

    2005-09-15

    We present N2O emission data from 11 sites in the Neuse River watershed. Emissions were measured using a static surface enclosure technique deployed on eight sites on the main river channel and three tributary sites. Ancillary data collected included dissolved oxygen, nitrate, total nitrogen, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, total phosphorus, and temperature. Analysis using standard linear models, and classification and regression trees (CART), indicated nitrate to be the primary driving variable associated with N2O emission, although dissolved organic carbon concentration and water temperature were positively related with N2O emission as well. Relationships between nitrate concentration and N2O emission were consistent with those found in previous studies, although the data presented here represent the lower end of the range for both variables among published studies. Using our measured N2O emission rates along with literature values for the ratio of nitrogen gas to N2O produced during denitrification, we estimate N loss via denitrification in the Neuse River is approximately 17% of the annual N load delivered to the estuary.

  19. Climate change and N2O emissions from South West England grasslands: A modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalos, Diego; Cardenas, Laura M.; Wu, Lianhai

    2016-05-01

    Unravelling the impacts of climate change on agriculture becomes increasingly important, as the rates and magnitude of its effects are accelerating. Current estimates of the consequences of climate change on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions remain largely uncertain; there is a need for more consistent and comprehensive assessments of this impact. In this study we explored the implications of two IPCC climate change projections (high and medium emissions scenarios) on N2O emissions from South West England grasslands for the time slices of a baseline, the 2020s, the 2050s and the 2080s, employing a process-based model (SPACSYS). The model was initially calibrated and validated using datasets collected from three grassland sites of the region. Statistical analysis showed that simulated results had no significant total error or bias compared to measured values. We found a consistent increase in N2O emissions of up to 94% under future climate change scenarios compared to those under the baseline, and warming rather than precipitation variability was the overriding factor controlling the N2O rise. Modelling fertilizer forms showed that replacing ammonium-nitrate fertilizers with urea or slurry significantly reduced N2O emissions (c. 30%). Our study highlights the urgent necessity to adopt viable N2O mitigation measures now in order to avoid higher emissions in the future.

  20. Biochar Mediated Mechanisms for Reducing N2O Emissions: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, Jim; Kammann, Claudia; Schirrmann, Michael; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Estavillo, Txema; Fuertes, Teresa; Cayuela, Mariluz; Borchard, Nils; Novak, Jeff; Spokas, Kurt; Sigua, Gilbert

    2017-04-01

    Continuing land-use change (e.g., greater inorganic and organic N fertilizer use) due to increasing population growth has led to significant increases in global N2O emissions. N2O has a high global warming potential; thus, a clear need exists to lessen further emissions. Biochar, a pyrolysis by-product, holds promise as a material that can influence soil and manure N transformations and drastically reduce N2O emissions. Biochar has been shown to: 1) entrap and thus decrease NO3-N concentrations; 2) sorb and thus decrease NH4-N concentrations; 3) alter microbial community composition; 4) be a source of electrons and thus alter redox conditions; 5) potentially react with N2O; and 6) locally increase soil pH, all of which can lead to reduced N2O emissions. The purpose of this presentation is to provide overarching mechanisms behind these six points in terms of how biochar reduces N2O emissions.

  1. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-07-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions.

  2. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions. PMID:27378420

  3. Denitrification and N2O emission from forested and cultivated alluvial clay soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ullah, S.; Breitenbeck, G.A.; Faulkner, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Restored forested wetlands reduce N loads in surface discharge through plant uptake and denitrification. While removal of reactive N reduces impact on receiving waters, it is unclear whether enhanced denitrification also enhances emissions of the greenhouse gas N2O, thus compromising the water-quality benefits of restoration. This study compares denitrification rates and N2O:N2 emission ratios from Sharkey clay soil in a mature bottomland forest to those from an adjacent cultivated site in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Potential denitrification of forested soil was 2.4 times of cultivated soil. Using intact soil cores, denitrification rates of forested soil were 5.2, 6.6 and 2.0 times those of cultivated soil at 70, 85 and 100% water-filled pore space (WFPS), respectively. When NO3 was added, N2O emissions from forested soil were 2.2 times those of cultivated soil at 70% WFPS. At 85 and 100% WFPS, N2O emissions were not significantly different despite much greater denitrification rates in the forested soil because N2O:N2 emission ratios declined more rapidly in forested soil as WFPS increased. These findings suggest that restoration of forested wetlands to reduce NO3 in surface discharge will not contribute significantly to the atmospheric burden of N2O. ?? Springer 2005.

  4. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions by Termites: Does the Feeding Guild Matter?

    PubMed

    Brauman, Alain; Majeed, Muhammad Zeeshan; Buatois, Bruno; Robert, Alain; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    In the tropics, termites are major players in the mineralization of organic matter leading to the production of greenhouse gases including nitrous oxide (N2O). Termites have a wide trophic diversity and their N-metabolism depends on the feeding guild. This study assessed the extent to which N2O emission levels were determined by termite feeding guild and tested the hypothesis that termite species feeding on a diet rich in N emit higher levels of N2O than those feeding on a diet low in N. An in-vitro incubation approach was used to determine the levels of N2O production in 14 termite species belonging to different feeding guilds, collected from a wide range of biomes. Fungus-growing and soil-feeding termites emit N2O. The N2O production levels varied considerably, ranging from 13.14 to 117.62 ng N2O-N d(-1) (g dry wt.)(-1) for soil-feeding species, with Cubitermes spp. having the highest production levels, and from 39.61 to 65.61 ng N2O-N d(-1) (g dry wt.)(-1) for fungus-growing species. Wood-feeding termites were net N2O consumers rather than N2O producers with a consumption ranging from 16.09 to 45.22 ng N2O-N d(-1) (g dry wt.)(-1). Incubating live termites together with their mound increased the levels of N2O production by between 6 and 13 fold for soil-feeders, with the highest increase in Capritermes capricornis, and between 14 and 34 fold for fungus-growers, with the highest increase in Macrotermes muelleri. Ammonia-oxidizing (amoA-AOB and amoA-AOA) and denitrifying (nirK, nirS, nosZ) gene markers were detected in the guts of all termite species studied. No correlation was found between the abundance of these marker genes and the levels of N2O production from different feeding guilds. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that N2O production rates were higher in termites feeding on substrates with higher N content, such as soil and fungi, compared to those feeding on N-poor wood.

  5. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions by Termites: Does the Feeding Guild Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Buatois, Bruno; Robert, Alain; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Miambi, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    In the tropics, termites are major players in the mineralization of organic matter leading to the production of greenhouse gases including nitrous oxide (N2O). Termites have a wide trophic diversity and their N-metabolism depends on the feeding guild. This study assessed the extent to which N2O emission levels were determined by termite feeding guild and tested the hypothesis that termite species feeding on a diet rich in N emit higher levels of N2O than those feeding on a diet low in N. An in-vitro incubation approach was used to determine the levels of N2O production in 14 termite species belonging to different feeding guilds, collected from a wide range of biomes. Fungus-growing and soil-feeding termites emit N2O. The N2O production levels varied considerably, ranging from 13.14 to 117.62 ng N2O-N d-1 (g dry wt.)-1 for soil-feeding species, with Cubitermes spp. having the highest production levels, and from 39.61 to 65.61 ng N2O-N d-1 (g dry wt.)-1 for fungus-growing species. Wood-feeding termites were net N2O consumers rather than N2O producers with a consumption ranging from 16.09 to 45.22 ng N2O-N d-1 (g dry wt.)-1. Incubating live termites together with their mound increased the levels of N2O production by between 6 and 13 fold for soil-feeders, with the highest increase in Capritermes capricornis, and between 14 and 34 fold for fungus-growers, with the highest increase in Macrotermes muelleri. Ammonia-oxidizing (amoA-AOB and amoA-AOA) and denitrifying (nirK, nirS, nosZ) gene markers were detected in the guts of all termite species studied. No correlation was found between the abundance of these marker genes and the levels of N2O production from different feeding guilds. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that N2O production rates were higher in termites feeding on substrates with higher N content, such as soil and fungi, compared to those feeding on N-poor wood. PMID:26658648

  6. Attenuation of N2O emission rates from agricultural soil at different dicyandiamide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Amitosh; Tyagi, Larisha; Singh, S N

    2008-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess the role of different concentrations of dicyandiamide (DCD), a potent nitrification inhibitor, on temporal changes in nitrous oxide emission from sandy loam agricultural soil. It was found that with increasing concentration of DCD i.e. from 6 to 12% of nitrogen applied in the form of urea, there was a decrease in the both average and peak N(2)O emissions. However, from 14% DCD treated soil, there was a non-significant alteration in the N(2)O emission. Maximum average N(2)O efflux of 217.55 microg m(-2) h(-1) was noted from control plots. As compared to control, there was an attenuation of 50, 58, 65, and 91% average N(2)O efflux from 6, 8, 10 and 12% DCD applied pots, respectively, whereas, there was a negative average of N(2)O efflux from the soil with 14% DCD treatment. The soil N content also showed a significant correlation with N(2)O emission. Therefore, 12% DCD treatment has been found to be the best with regard to attenuation of nitrous oxide from sandy loam agricultural soils.

  7. Predicting N2O emissions from nitrifying and denitrifying biofilms: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Sabba, Fabrizio; Picioreanu, Cristian; Boltz, Joshua P; Nerenberg, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants can be significant sources of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. While our understanding of N2O emissions from suspended-growth processes has advanced significantly, less is known about emissions from biofilm processes. Biofilms may behave differently due to their substrate gradients and microbial stratification. In this study, we used mathematical modeling to explore the mechanisms of N2O emissions from nitrifying and denitrifying biofilms. Our ammonia-oxidizing bacteria biofilm model suggests that N2O emissions from biofilm can be significantly greater than from suspended-growth systems. The driving factor is the diffusion of hydroxylamine, a nitrification intermediate, from the aerobic to the anoxic regions of the biofilm. The presence of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria further increased emissions. For denitrifying biofilms, our results suggest that emissions are generally greater than for suspended-growth systems. However, the magnitude of the difference depends on the bulk dissolved oxygen, chemical oxygen demand, and nitrate concentrations, as well as the biofilm thickness. Overall, the accumulation and diffusion of key intermediates, i.e. hydroxylamine and nitrite, distinguish biofilms from suspended-growth systems. Our research suggests that the mechanisms of N2O emissions from biofilms are much more complex than suspended-growth systems, and that emissions may be higher in many cases.

  8. Detailed regional predictions of N2O and NO emissions from a tropical highland rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharahi Ghehi, N.; Werner, C.; Hufkens, K.; Kiese, R.; Van Ranst, E.; Nsabimana, D.; Wallin, G.; Klemedtsson, L.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Boeckx, P.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical forest soils are a significant source for the greenhouse gas N2O as well as for NO, a precursor of tropospheric ozone. However, current estimates are uncertain due to the limited number of field measurements. Furthermore, there is considerable spatial and temporal variability of N2O and NO emissions due to the variation of environmental conditions such as soil properties, vegetation characteristics and meteorology. In this study we used a process-based model (ForestDNDC-tropica) to estimate N2O and NO emissions from tropical highland forest (Nyungwe) soils in southwestern Rwanda. To extend the model inputs to regional scale, ForestDNDC-tropica was linked to an exceptionally large legacy soil dataset. There was agreement between N2O and NO measurements and the model predictions though the ForestDNDC-tropica resulted in considerable lower emissions for few sites. Low similarity was specifically found for acidic soil with high clay content and reduced metals, indicating that chemo-denitrification processes on acidic soils might be under-represented in the current ForestDNDC-tropica model. The results showed that soil bulk density and pH are the most influential factors driving spatial variations in soil N2O and NO emissions for tropical forest soils. The area investigated (1113 km2) was estimated to emit ca. 439 ± 50 t N2O-N yr-1 (2.8-5.5 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1) and 244 ± 16 t NO-N yr-1 (0.8-5.1 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Consistent with less detailed studies, we confirm that tropical highland rainforest soils are a major source of atmospheric N2O and NO.

  9. Effects of dicyandiamide and dolomite application on N2O emission from an acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Shaaban, Muhammad; Wu, Yupeng; Peng, Qi-an; Lin, Shan; Mo, Yongliang; Wu, Lei; Hu, Ronggui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Soil acidification is a major problem for sustainable agriculture since it limits productivity of several crops. Liming is usually adopted to ameliorate soil acidity that can trigger soil processes such as nitrification, denitrification, and loss of nitrogen (N) as nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The loss of N following liming of acidic soils can be controlled by nitrification inhibitors (such as dicyandiamide). However, effects of nitrification inhibitors following liming of acidic soils are not well understood so far. Here, we conducted a laboratory study using an acidic soil to examine the effects of dolomite and dicyandiamide (DCD) application on N2O emissions. Three levels of DCD (0, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1); DCD0, DCD10, and DCD20, respectively) were applied to the acidic soil under two levels of dolomite (0 and 1 g kg(-1)) which were further treated with two levels of N fertilizer (0 and 200 mg N kg(-1)). Results showed that N2O emissions were highest at low soil pH levels in fertilizer-treated soil without application of DCD and dolomite. Application of DCD and dolomite significantly (P ≤ 0.001) reduced N2O emissions through decreasing rates of NH4 (+)-N oxidation and increasing soil pH, respectively. Total N2O emissions were reduced by 44 and 13% in DCD20 and dolomite alone treatments, respectively, while DCD20 + dolomite reduced N2O emissions by 54% when compared with DCD0 treatment. The present study suggests that application of DCD and dolomite to acidic soils can mitigate N2O emissions.

  10. Top-down Constraints on Global N2O Emissions at Optimal Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Griffis, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial emissions of N2O exhibit strong spatial and temporal variability. Quantification of N2O surface fluxes, and the attribution of those fluxes to specific locations and mechanisms, thus requires observational constraints with high space-time resolution. This presents a challenge to top-down analyses because of the sparse coverage of measurement sites and weak variability in atmospheric N2O. In this talk we present a quantitative evaluation of the emission constraints provided by the current N2O observing network using the adjoint of GEOS-Chem and a new, efficient information content analysis technique. This technique allows the construction of a state vector based on the spatial and temporal information afforded by N2O measurements, rather than relying on an arbitrary aggregation scheme. We employ this technique in a global source inversion to derive top-down estimates of N2O emissions at this optimal resolution, and discuss the results in terms of the underlying processes that can be inferred.

  11. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from waste and biomass to energy plants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Gutierrez, Maria Jose; Baxter, David; Hunter, Christopher; Svoboda, Karel

    2005-04-01

    Following the Kyoto protocol with respect to reducing emissions of greenhouse gases emissions, and EU energy policy and sustainability in waste management, there has been an increased interest in the reduction of emissions from waste disposal operations. From the point of view of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, waste incineration and waste co-combustion are very acceptable methods for waste disposal. In order to achieve very low N2O emissions from waste incineration, particularly for waste with higher nitrogen content (e.g. sewage sludge), two factors are important: temperature of incineration over 900 degrees C and avoiding the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) de-NO(X) method based on urea or ammonia treatments. The more modern selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for de-NO(X) give rise to negligible sources of N2O.

  12. Effect of long-term compost and inorganic fertilizer application on background N2O and fertilizer-induced N2O emissions from an intensively cultivated soil.

    PubMed

    Ding, Weixin; Luo, Jiafa; Li, Jie; Yu, Hongyan; Fan, Jianling; Liu, Deyan

    2013-11-01

    The influence of inorganic fertilizer and compost on background nitrous oxide (N2O) and fertilizer-induced N2O emissions were examined over a maize-wheat rotation year from June 2008 to May 2009 in a fluvo-aquic soil in Henan Province of China where a field experiment had been established in 1989 to evaluate the long-term effects of manure and fertilizer on soil organic status. The study involved five treatments: compost (OM), fertilizer NPK (nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium, NPK), half compost N plus half fertilizer N (HOM), fertilizer NK (NK), and control without any fertilizer (CK). The natural logarithms of the background N2O fluxes were significantly (P<0.05) correlated with soil temperature, but not with soil moisture, during the maize or wheat growing season. The 18-year application of compost alone and inorganic fertilizer not only significantly (P<0.05) increased soil organic carbon (SOC) by 152% and 10-43% (respectively), but also increased background N2O emissions by 106% and 48-76% (respectively) compared with the control. Total N in soils was a better indicator for predicting annual background N2O emission than SOC. The estimated emission factor (EF) of mineralized N, calculated by dividing annual N2O emission by mineralized N was 0.13-0.19%, significantly (P<0.05) lower than the EF of added N (0.30-0.39%). The annual N2O emission in the NPK, HOM and OM soils amended with 300 kg ha(-1) organic or inorganic N was 1427, 1325 and 1178 g N ha(-1), respectively. There was a significant (P<0.05) difference between the NPK and OM. The results of this study indicate that soil indigenous N was less efficiently converted into N2O compared with exogenous N. Increasing SOC by compost application, then partially increasing N supply to crops instead of adding inorganic N fertilizer, may be an effective measure to mitigate N2O emissions from arable soils in the North China plain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulating N2O emissions in different tillage systems of irrigated corn using RZ-Shaw model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is potent greenhouse gas (GHG) and agriculture is a global source of N2O emissions from soil fertility management. Yet emissions vary by agronomic practices and environmental factors that govern soil moisture and temperature. Ecosystem models are important tools to estimate N2O e...

  14. Rainfall reduction amplifies the stimulatory effect of nitrogen addition on N2O emissions from a temperate forest soil

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shicong; Chen, Zhijie; Han, Shijie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Junhui

    2017-01-01

    Soil is a significant source of atmospheric N2O, and soil N2O emissions at a global scale are greatly affected by environment changes that include continuous deposition of atmospheric nitrogen and changing precipitation distribution. However, to date, field simulations of multiple factors that control the interaction between nitrogen deposition and precipitation on forest soil N2O emissions are scarce. In this study, we conducted a 2-year continuous assessment of N2O emissions from November 2012 to October 2014 at a nitrogen addition and rainfall reduction manipulation platform in an old broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest at Changbai Mountain in northeastern China. We found that N2O emissions from control plots were 1.25 ± 0.22 kg N2O-N ha−1 a−1. Nitrogen addition significantly increased N2O emissions, with the emission factor of 1.59%. A 30% reduction in rainfall decreased N2O emissions by 17–45%. However, in combination, nitrogen addition and rainfall reduction increased N2O emissions by 58–140%, with the emission factor of 3.19%, and had a larger promotional effect than the addition of nitrogen alone. Our results indicated that drought slightly decreases forest soil N2O emission; however, with increasing deposition of atmospheric N in temperate forest soils, the effect of drought might become altered to increase N2O emission. PMID:28233839

  15. Rainfall reduction amplifies the stimulatory effect of nitrogen addition on N2O emissions from a temperate forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Shicong; Chen, Zhijie; Han, Shijie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Junhui

    2017-02-01

    Soil is a significant source of atmospheric N2O, and soil N2O emissions at a global scale are greatly affected by environment changes that include continuous deposition of atmospheric nitrogen and changing precipitation distribution. However, to date, field simulations of multiple factors that control the interaction between nitrogen deposition and precipitation on forest soil N2O emissions are scarce. In this study, we conducted a 2-year continuous assessment of N2O emissions from November 2012 to October 2014 at a nitrogen addition and rainfall reduction manipulation platform in an old broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest at Changbai Mountain in northeastern China. We found that N2O emissions from control plots were 1.25 ± 0.22 kg N2O-N ha‑1 a‑1. Nitrogen addition significantly increased N2O emissions, with the emission factor of 1.59%. A 30% reduction in rainfall decreased N2O emissions by 17–45%. However, in combination, nitrogen addition and rainfall reduction increased N2O emissions by 58–140%, with the emission factor of 3.19%, and had a larger promotional effect than the addition of nitrogen alone. Our results indicated that drought slightly decreases forest soil N2O emission; however, with increasing deposition of atmospheric N in temperate forest soils, the effect of drought might become altered to increase N2O emission.

  16. Quantification of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and soluble microbial product (SMP) production by a modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model.

    PubMed

    Kim, MinJeong; Wu, Guangxue; Yoo, ChangKyoo

    2017-03-01

    A modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model able to quantify nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and soluble microbial product (SMP) production during wastewater treatment is proposed. The modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model takes into account: (1) two-step nitrification by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), (2) N2O production by AOB denitrification under oxygen-limited conditions and (3) SMP production by microbial growth and endogenous respiration. Validity of the modified model is demonstrated by comparing the simulation results with experimental data from lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). To reliably implement the modified model, a model calibration that adjusts model parameters to fit the model outputs to the experimental data is conducted. The results of this study showed that the modeling accuracy of the modified AOB-NOB-N2O-SMP model increases by 19.7% (NH4), 51.0% (NO2), 57.8% (N2O) and 16.7% (SMP) compared to the conventional model which does not consider the two-step nitrification and SMP production by microbial endogenous respiration.

  17. [Vertical distribution characteristics of N2O emission in tea garden and its adjacent woodland].

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-chao; Han, Wen-yan; Li, Xin; Li, Zhi-xin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we determined the vertical distribution of N2O emission rates in tea soils and its adjacent woodland soils. The results showed that total nitrogen contents, N2O fluxes and cumulative emissions in the tea garden and woodland decreased with the increasing depth of the soil layer, and their average values were greater in tea garden than in woodland. Generally, pH, soil water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N contents had a downward trend with the increasing depth of soil layer. The WSON, MBN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N contents from each soil layer were greater in tea garden than in woodland, but the pH value in tea garden was lower than that in woodland. The N2O emission rate was significantly positively related with TN, MBN and NH(4+)-N contents, but not with pH value. The N2O emission rate was significantly correlated with WSON content in woodland, but not in tea garden. The N20 emission rate was significantly correlated with NO(3-)-N concentration in tea garden, but not in woodland. WSON/TN and N2O-N/SMBN were averagely greater than in tea garden in woodland, and SMBN/TN was opposite. These results indicated that tea soil was not conducive to accumulate nitrogen pool, maintain soil quality and its sustainable use compared to woodland.

  18. Assessment of N2O emissions from rapeseed cultivation in Poland by various approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syp, Alina; Faber, Antoni; Kozak, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare four tools for calculation of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions under the renewable energy directive. All the tools follow the methodology of the international panel on climate change. The first calculations of N2O fluxes were based on the Tier 1 method using the BioGrace tool. The second and the third ones followed the Tier 2 methodology, applying the global nitrous oxide calculator and the Lesschen emission factors, respectively. The last assessment was performed in accordance with the Tier 3 approach by using the denitrification- decomposition model. The N2O fluxes were calculated for rapeseed cultivation in a 4-year crop rotation in Poland. The same input data were applied in all methods. The average of N2O emissions varied in the range of 1.99-3.78 kg N2O ha-1 y-1, depending on the approach used (Lesschen emission factors > denitrificationdecomposition > global nitrous oxide calculator > BioGrace). This paper illustrates that, at country level, the Lesschen emission factors method worked as well as the denitrification-decomposition model for Poland. The advantage of this approach is the simplicity of collecting the necessary data, in contrast to process-based modelling. Moreover, the Tier 2 method provides mitigation measures similar to the denitrification-decomposition model, related to crop type, climatic conditions, and management practices.

  19. N2O emissions and carbon sequestration in a nitrogen-fertilized Douglas fir stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassal, Rachhpal S.; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Baozhang; Roy, Real; Nesic, Zoran; Spittlehouse, D. L.; Trofymow, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated how nitrogen (N) fertilization with 200 kg N ha-1 of a 58-year-old West Coast Douglas fir stand influenced its net greenhouse gas (GHG) global warming potential (GWP) in the first year after fertilization. Effects of fertilization on GHG GWP were calculated considering changes in soil N2O emissions, measured using the static chamber technique and the soil N2O gradient technique; eddy covariance (EC) measured net ecosystem productivity (NEP); and energy requirements of fertilizer production, transport, and its aerial spreading. We found significant N2O losses in fertilized plots compared to a small uptake in nonfertilized plots. Chamber-measured N loss in the fertilized plots was about 16 kg N2O ha-1 in the first year, which is equivalent to 10 kg N ha-1 or 5% of the applied fertilizer N. Soil N2O emissions measured using the gradient technique, however, exceeded the chamber measurements by about 50%. We also compared a polymer-coated slow-release urea with regular urea and found that the former delayed N2O emissions but the year-end total loss was about the same as that from regular urea. Change in NEP due to fertilization was determined by relating annual NEP for the nonfertilized stand to environmental controls using an empirical and a process-based model. Annual NEP increased by 64%, from 326 g C m-2, calculated assuming that the stand was not fertilized, to the measured value of 535 g C m-2 with fertilization. At the end of the year, net change in GHG GWP was -2.28 t CO2 ha-1 compared to what it would have been without fertilization, thereby indicating favorable effect of fertilization even in the first year after fertilization with significant emissions of N2O.

  20. Emissions of NO and N2O in wetland microcosms for swine wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunan; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Yong; Zhou, Juan; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emitted from wetland systems contribute an important proportion to the global warming effect. In this study, four wetland microcosms vegetated with Myriophyllum elatinoides (WM), Alternanthera philoxeroides (WA), Eichhornia crassipes (WE), or without vegetation (NW) were compared to investigate the emissions of NO and N2O during nitrogen (N) removal process when treating swine wastewater. After 30-day incubation, TN removal rates of 96.4, 74.2, 97.2, and 47.3 % were observed for the WM, WA, WE, and NW microcosms, respectively. Yet, no significant difference was observed in WM and WE (p > 0.05). The average NO and N2O emissions in WE was significantly higher than those in WM, WA, and NW (p < 0.05). In addition, the emission of N2O in WE accounted for 2.10 % of initial TN load and 2.17 % of the total amount of TN removal, compared with less than 1 % in the other microcosms. These findings indicate that wetland vegetated with M. elatinoides may be an optimal system for swine wastewater treatment, based on its higher removal of N and lower emissions of NO and N2O.

  1. Nitrogen and phosphorus addition impact soil N2O emission in a secondary tropical forest of South China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Faming; Li, Jian; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Bi; Neher, Deborah A.; Li, Zhian

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient availability greatly regulates ecosystem processes and functions of tropical forests. However, few studies have explored impacts of N addition (aN), P addition (aP) and N×P interaction on tropical forests N2O fluxes. We established an N and P addition experiment in a tropical forest to test whether: (1) N addition would increase N2O emission and nitrification, and (2) P addition would increase N2O emission and N transformations. Nitrogen and P addition had no effect on N mineralization and nitrification. Soil microbial biomass was increased following P addition in wet seasons. aN increased 39% N2O emission as compared to control (43.3 μgN2O-N m−2h−1). aP did not increase N2O emission. Overall, N2O emission was 60% greater for aNP relative to the control, but significant difference was observed only in wet seasons, when N2O emission was 78% greater for aNP relative to the control. Our results suggested that increasing N deposition will enhance soil N2O emission, and there would be N×P interaction on N2O emission in wet seasons. Given elevated N deposition in future, P addition in this tropical soil will stimulate soil microbial activities in wet seasons, which will further enhance soil N2O emission. PMID:25001013

  2. Spatially explicit estimates of N2 O emissions from croplands suggest climate mitigation opportunities from improved fertilizer management.

    PubMed

    Gerber, James S; Carlson, Kimberly M; Makowski, David; Mueller, Nathaniel D; Garcia de Cortazar-Atauri, Iñaki; Havlík, Petr; Herrero, Mario; Launay, Marie; O'Connell, Christine S; Smith, Pete; West, Paul C

    2016-10-01

    With increasing nitrogen (N) application to croplands required to support growing food demand, mitigating N2 O emissions from agricultural soils is a global challenge. National greenhouse gas emissions accounting typically estimates N2 O emissions at the country scale by aggregating all crops, under the assumption that N2 O emissions are linearly related to N application. However, field studies and meta-analyses indicate a nonlinear relationship, in which N2 O emissions are relatively greater at higher N application rates. Here, we apply a super-linear emissions response model to crop-specific, spatially explicit synthetic N fertilizer and manure N inputs to provide subnational accounting of global N2 O emissions from croplands. We estimate 0.66 Tg of N2 O-N direct global emissions circa 2000, with 50% of emissions concentrated in 13% of harvested area. Compared to estimates from the IPCC Tier 1 linear model, our updated N2 O emissions range from 20% to 40% lower throughout sub-Saharan Africa and Eastern Europe, to >120% greater in some Western European countries. At low N application rates, the weak nonlinear response of N2 O emissions suggests that relatively large increases in N fertilizer application would generate relatively small increases in N2 O emissions. As aggregated fertilizer data generate underestimation bias in nonlinear models, high-resolution N application data are critical to support accurate N2 O emissions estimates. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Multivariate regulation of soil CO2 and N2 O pulse emissions from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liyin L; Grantz, David A; Jenerette, G Darrel

    2016-03-01

    Climate and land-use models project increasing occurrence of high temperature and water deficit in both agricultural production systems and terrestrial ecosystems. Episodic soil wetting and subsequent drying may increase the occurrence and magnitude of pulsed biogeochemical activity, affecting carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and influencing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In this study, we provide the first data to explore the responses of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and nitrous oxide (N2 O) fluxes to (i) temperature, (ii) soil water content as percent water holding capacity (%WHC), (iii) substrate availability throughout, and (iv) multiple soil drying and rewetting (DW) events. Each of these factors and their interactions exerted effects on GHG emissions over a range of four (CO2 ) and six (N2 O) orders of magnitude. Maximal CO2 and N2 O fluxes were observed in environments combining intermediate %WHC, elevated temperature, and sufficient substrate availability. Amendments of C and N and their interactions significantly affected CO2 and N2 O fluxes and altered their temperature sensitivities (Q10 ) over successive DW cycles. C amendments significantly enhanced CO2 flux, reduced N2 O flux, and decreased the Q10 of both. N amendments had no effect on CO2 flux and increased N2 O flux, while significantly depressing the Q10 for CO2 , and having no effect on the Q10 for N2 O. The dynamics across DW cycles could be attributed to changes in soil microbial communities as the different responses to wetting events in specific group of microorganisms, to the altered substrate availabilities, or to both. The complex interactions among parameters influencing trace gas fluxes should be incorporated into next generation earth system models to improve estimation of GHG emissions.

  4. Frozen Cropland Soil in Northeast China as Source of N2O and CO2 Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yunfa; Han, Xiaozeng; Brancher Franco, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural soils are important sources of atmospheric N2O and CO2. However, in boreal agro-ecosystems the contribution of the winter season to annual emissions of these gases has rarely been determined. In this study, soil N2O and CO2 fluxes were measured for 6 years in a corn-soybean-wheat rotation in northeast China to quantify the contribution of wintertime N2O and CO2 fluxes to annual emissions. The treatments were chemical fertilizer (NPK), chemical fertilizer plus composted pig manure (NPKOM), and control (Cont.). Mean soil N2O fluxes among all three treatments in the winter (November–March), when soil temperatures are below −7°C for extended periods, were 0.89–3.01 µg N m−2 h−1, and in between the growing season and winter (October and April), when freeze-thaw events occur, 1.73–5.48 µg N m−2 h−1. The cumulative N2O emissions were on average 0.27–1.39, 0.03–0.08 and 0.03–0.11 kg N2O–N ha−1 during the growing season, October and April, and winter, respectively. The average contributions of winter N2O efflux to annual emissions were 6.3–12.1%. In all three seasons, the highest N2O emissions occurred in NPKOM, while NPK and Cont. emissions were similar. Cumulative CO2 emissions were 2.73–4.94, 0.13–0.20 and 0.07–0.11 Mg CO2-C ha−1 during growing season, October and April, and winter, respectively. The contribution of winter CO2 to total annual emissions was 2.0–2.4%. Our results indicate that in boreal agricultural systems in northeast China, CO2 and N2O emissions continue throughout the winter. PMID:25536036

  5. Nitrous oxide emission hotspots from organic soils in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, T.; Dechow, R.; Gebbert, S.; Freibauer, A.; Lohila, A.; Augustin, J.; Drösler, M.; Fiedler, S.; Glatzel, S.; Höper, H.; Järveoja, J.; Lærke, P. E.; Maljanen, M.; Mander, Ü.; Mäkiranta, P.; Minkkinen, K.; Ojanen, P.; Regina, K.; Strömgren, M.

    2014-06-01

    Organic soils are a main source of direct nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, an important greenhouse gas (GHG). Observed N2O emissions from organic soils are highly variable in space and time which causes high uncertainties in national emission inventories. Those uncertainties could be reduced when relating the upscaling process to a priori identified key drivers by using available N2O observations from plot scale in empirical approaches. We used the empirical fuzzy modelling approach MODE to identify main drivers for N2O and utilize them to predict the spatial emission pattern of European organic soils. We conducted a meta study with a total amount of 659 annual N2O measurements which was used to derive separate models for different land use types. We applied our models to available, spatial explicit input driver maps to upscale N2O emissions on European level and compared the inventory with recently published IPCC emission factors. The final statistical models explained up to 60% of the N2O variance. Our study results showed that cropland and grasslands emitted the highest N2O fluxes 0.98 ± 1.08 and 0.58 ± 1.03 g N2O-N m-2 a-1, respectively. High fluxes from cropland sites were mainly controlled by low soil pH-value and deep drained groundwater tables. Grassland hotspot emissions were strongly related to high amount of N-fertilizer inputs and warmer winter temperatures. In contrast N2O fluxes from natural peatlands were predominantly low (0.07±0.27 g N2O-N m-2 a-1) and we found no relationship with the tested drivers. The total inventory for direct N2O emissions from organic soils in Europe amount up to 149.5 Gg N2O-N a-1, which included also fluxes from forest and peat extraction sites and exceeds the inventory calculated by IPCC emission factors of 87.4 Gg N2O-N a-1. N2O emissions from organic soils represent up to 13% of total European N2O emissions reported in the European Union (EU) greenhouse gas inventory of 2011 from only 7% of the EU area. Thereby the

  6. Quantifying Uncertainties in N2O Emission Due to N Fertilizer Application in Cultivated Areas

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Aurore; Loyce, Chantal; Makowski, David

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 298 times greater than that of CO2. In 2006, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimated N2O emission due to synthetic and organic nitrogen (N) fertilization at 1% of applied N. We investigated the uncertainty on this estimated value, by fitting 13 different models to a published dataset including 985 N2O measurements. These models were characterized by (i) the presence or absence of the explanatory variable “applied N”, (ii) the function relating N2O emission to applied N (exponential or linear function), (iii) fixed or random background (i.e. in the absence of N application) N2O emission and (iv) fixed or random applied N effect. We calculated ranges of uncertainty on N2O emissions from a subset of these models, and compared them with the uncertainty ranges currently used in the IPCC-Tier 1 method. The exponential models outperformed the linear models, and models including one or two random effects outperformed those including fixed effects only. The use of an exponential function rather than a linear function has an important practical consequence: the emission factor is not constant and increases as a function of applied N. Emission factors estimated using the exponential function were lower than 1% when the amount of N applied was below 160 kg N ha−1. Our uncertainty analysis shows that the uncertainty range currently used by the IPCC-Tier 1 method could be reduced. PMID:23226430

  7. Quantifying uncertainties in N(2)O emission due to N fertilizer application in cultivated areas.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Aurore; Loyce, Chantal; Makowski, David

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 298 times greater than that of CO(2). In 2006, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimated N(2)O emission due to synthetic and organic nitrogen (N) fertilization at 1% of applied N. We investigated the uncertainty on this estimated value, by fitting 13 different models to a published dataset including 985 N(2)O measurements. These models were characterized by (i) the presence or absence of the explanatory variable "applied N", (ii) the function relating N(2)O emission to applied N (exponential or linear function), (iii) fixed or random background (i.e. in the absence of N application) N(2)O emission and (iv) fixed or random applied N effect. We calculated ranges of uncertainty on N(2)O emissions from a subset of these models, and compared them with the uncertainty ranges currently used in the IPCC-Tier 1 method. The exponential models outperformed the linear models, and models including one or two random effects outperformed those including fixed effects only. The use of an exponential function rather than a linear function has an important practical consequence: the emission factor is not constant and increases as a function of applied N. Emission factors estimated using the exponential function were lower than 1% when the amount of N applied was below 160 kg N ha(-1). Our uncertainty analysis shows that the uncertainty range currently used by the IPCC-Tier 1 method could be reduced.

  8. Future N2O from US agriculture: projecting effects of changing land use, agricultural technology, and climate on N2O emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M J.; Sands, Ronald D. ); Rosenberg, Norman J. ); Izaurralde, R Cesar C. )

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this paper is to detailed supply relationships for nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from U.S. agriculture for the purpose of conducting policy-sensitive emissions modeling of this greenhouse gas. The basic tool used is the emissions framework of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Phase II guidelines developed by the IPCC and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for national emissions inventories. The inventory method has been modified based on the results of an updated literature review and analysis. The supply relationships developed in this project are used to estimate emissions of N2O for U.S. agriculture through the year 2080 under baseline conditions and a policy to restrain emissions growth.

  9. N2O emission characteristics and its affecting factors in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwei; Wang, Cheng; Pan, Zhihua; Xu, Hui; Gao, Lin; Zhao, Peiyi; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, hui

    2017-05-01

    Representing an important greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from cultivated land is a hot topic in current climate change research. This study examined the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil moisture on the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A ( amoA) gene copy numbers and N2O emission characteristics. The experimental observation of N2O fluxes was based on the static chamber-gas chromatographic method. The ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) gene copy numbers in different periods were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results indicated that rain-fed potato field was a N2O source, and the average annual N2O emission was approximately 0.46 ± 0.06 kgN2O-N/ha/year. N2O emissions increased significantly with increase in fertilisation, temperatures below 19.6 °C and soil volumetric water content under 15%. Crop rotation appreciably decreases N2O emissions by 34.4 to 52.4% compared to continuous cropping in rain-fed potato fields. The significant correlation between N2O fluxes and AOB copy numbers implied that N2O emissions were primarily controlled by AOB in rain-fed potato fields. The research has important theoretical and practical value for understanding N2O emissions from rain-fed dry farmland fields.

  10. N2O emission characteristics and its affecting factors in rain-fed potato fields in Wuchuan County, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwei; Wang, Cheng; Pan, Zhihua; Xu, Hui; Gao, Lin; Zhao, Peiyi; Dong, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingting; Cui, Guohui; Wang, Sen; Han, Guolin; Zhao, hui

    2016-12-01

    Representing an important greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from cultivated land is a hot topic in current climate change research. This study examined the influences of nitrogen fertilisation, temperature and soil moisture on the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene copy numbers and N2O emission characteristics. The experimental observation of N2O fluxes was based on the static chamber-gas chromatographic method. The ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) gene copy numbers in different periods were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results indicated that rain-fed potato field was a N2O source, and the average annual N2O emission was approximately 0.46 ± 0.06 kgN2O-N/ha/year. N2O emissions increased significantly with increase in fertilisation, temperatures below 19.6 °C and soil volumetric water content under 15%. Crop rotation appreciably decreases N2O emissions by 34.4 to 52.4% compared to continuous cropping in rain-fed potato fields. The significant correlation between N2O fluxes and AOB copy numbers implied that N2O emissions were primarily controlled by AOB in rain-fed potato fields. The research has important theoretical and practical value for understanding N2O emissions from rain-fed dry farmland fields.

  11. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification significantly reduces N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Qing; Lu, Hui; Ding, Zhi; Meng, Liao; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    The Sulfate reduction-Autotrophic denitrification-Nitrification Integrated (SANI) process build on anaerobic carbon conversion through biological sulfate reduction and autotrophic denitrification by using the sulfide byproduct from the previous reaction. This study confirmed extra decreases in N2O emissions from the sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification by investigating N2O reduction, accumulation, and emission in the presence of different sulfide/nitrate (S/N) mass ratios at pH 7 in a long-term laboratory-scale granular sludge autotrophic denitrification reactor. The N2O reduction rate was linearly proportional to the sulfide concentration, which confirmed that no sulfide inhibition of N2O reductase occurred. At S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N, this rate resulted by sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge (average granule size = 701 μm) was 27.7 mg-N/g-VSS/h (i.e., 2 and 4 times greater than those at 2.5 and 0.8 g-S/g-N, respectively). Sulfide actually stimulates rather than inhibits N2O reduction no matter what granule size of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying sludge engaged. The accumulations of N2O, nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA) with average granule size 701 μm of sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrifying granular sludge engaged at S/N = 5.0 g-S/g-N were 4.7%, 11.4% and 4.2% relative to those at 3.0 g-S/g-N, respectively. The accumulation of FNA can inhibit N2O reduction and increase N2O accumulation during sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification. In addition, the N2O gas emission level from the reactor significantly increased from 14.1 ± 0.5 ppmv (0.002% of the N load) to 3707.4 ± 36.7 ppmv (0.405% of the N load) as the S/N mass ratio in the influent decreased from 2.1 to 1.4 g-S/g-N over the course of the 120-day continuous monitoring period. Sulfide-driven autotrophic denitrification may significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from biological nutrient removal when sulfur conversion processes are applied.

  12. Optimizing biochars to mitigate N2O emissions in Mediterranean areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayuela, Maria Luz; Sanchez-Garcia, Maria; Roig, Asuncion; Sanchez-Monedero, Miguel Angel

    2017-04-01

    Some of the most productive agricultural soils stand in Mediterranean-type climate areas of the world (e.g. California's Central Valley, Andalucia region in South Spain, and Lombardy region in Italy). Many of these soils are under intensive agricultural production, bearing the addition of substantial amounts of N fertilizers, which are known to promote soil N2O emissions. Laboratory studies have shown the potential of biochar to decrease N2O emissions in soils from Mediterranean areas. These soils generally have alkaline pH and low concentrations of organic C and several laboratory experiments found that applying biochar at a rate of 2% in weight could decrease N2O emissions up to 90%. However, field studies carried out in areas of California, Italy and Spain (all under Mediterranean climate) showed none or very limited N2O mitigation with biochar. We postulate that this discrepancy may be because biochar-soil combinations were not optimal in field studies and that developing biochars adjusted to specific soil properties is crucial for their successful application to mitigate N2O emissions. Thus, in this study we aimed at (i) collecting and characterizing a variety of the most representative Mediterranean agricultural residues (olive tree, almond and orange tree pruning, olive mill waste, rice straw, horticultural residues, etc.), (ii) exploring their suitability as feedstocks for biochar production and (iii) analyzing their impact on N2O emissions in a Mediterranean agricultural soil. Biochars were produced by slow pyrolysis with a heating rate of 5˚C min-1 at two pyrolysis temperatures (400 and 600˚C) and a retention time of two hours. Soil incubations were set up simulating conditions of highly intensive crop production (high N fertilization, high moisture) to test how the biochars produced from different feedstocks and under two pyrolysis temperatures influence N2O emissions. Our starting hypothesis was that it is possible to optimize biochar characteristics

  13. Improving and disaggregating N2O emission factors for ruminant excreta on temperate pasture soils.

    PubMed

    Krol, D J; Carolan, R; Minet, E; McGeough, K L; Watson, C J; Forrestal, P J; Lanigan, G J; Richards, K G

    2016-10-15

    Cattle excreta deposited on grazed grasslands are a major source of the greenhouse gas (GHG) nitrous oxide (N2O). Currently, many countries use the IPCC default emission factor (EF) of 2% to estimate excreta-derived N2O emissions. However, emissions can vary greatly depending on the type of excreta (dung or urine), soil type and timing of application. Therefore three experiments were conducted to quantify excreta-derived N2O emissions and their associated EFs, and to assess the effect of soil type, season of application and type of excreta on the magnitude of losses. Cattle dung, urine and artificial urine treatments were applied in spring, summer and autumn to three temperate grassland sites with varying soil and weather conditions. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured from the three experiments over 12months to generate annual N2O emission factors. The EFs from urine treated soil was greater (0.30-4.81% for real urine and 0.13-3.82% for synthetic urine) when compared with dung (-0.02-1.48%) treatments. Nitrous oxide emissions were driven by environmental conditions and could be predicted by rainfall and temperature before, and soil moisture deficit after application; highlighting the potential for a decision support tool to reduce N2O emissions by modifying grazing management based on these parameters. Emission factors varied seasonally with the highest EFs in autumn and were also dependent on soil type, with the lowest EFs observed from well-drained and the highest from imperfectly drained soil. The EFs averaged 0.31 and 1.18% for cattle dung and urine, respectively, both of which were considerably lower than the IPCC default value of 2%. These results support both lowering and disaggregating EFs by excreta type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Direct N2O emissions from rice paddy fields: Summary of available data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hiroko; Yagi, Kazuyuki; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2005-03-01

    Rice cultivation is an important anthropogenic source of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane. We compiled and analyzed data on N2O emissions from rice fields (113 measurements from 17 sites) reported in peer-reviewed journals. Mean N2O emission ± standard deviation and mean fertilizer-induced emission factor during the rice-cropping season were, respectively, 341 ± 474 g N ha-1 season-1 and 0.22 ± 0.24% for fertilized fields continuously flooded, 993 ± 1075 g N ha-1 season-1 and 0.37 ± 0.35% for fertilized fields with midseason drainage, and 667 ± 885 g N ha-1 season-1 and 0.31 ± 0.31% for all water regimes. The estimated whole-year background emission was 1820 g N ha-1 yr-1. A large uncertainty remains, especially for background emission because of limited data availability. Although midseason drainage generally reduces CH4 and increases N2O emissions, it may be an effective option for mitigating the net global warming potential of rice fields.

  15. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bin; Miller, Scot M.; Kort, Eric A.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Daube, Bruce C.; Commane, Roisin; Angevine, Wayne M.; Ryerson, Tom B.; Trainer, Michael K.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Tian, Hanqin; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with a lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from the application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements in atmospheric concentration. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the agricultural heartland of California based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a new quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA WP-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in late spring 2010. We coupled the WRF (weather research and forecasting) model, a meso-scale meteorology model, with the STILT (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport) model, a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, to link our in-situ airborne observations to surface emissions. We then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to optimize emission rates. Our results are consistent with the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. The spatial distribution of surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emission inventory (EDGAR 4.0). Our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California in May and June was 3 - 4 times larger than the annual mean given for the state by EDGAR and other inventories, indicating a strong seasonal variation. We estimated the statewide total annual emissions of N2O to be 0.042 ± 0.011 Tg N/year, roughly equivalent to inventory values if we account for seasonal variations using observations obtained in the midwestern United States. This state total N2O

  16. Evaluating Soil Oxygen as a Control on N2O Emissions from Ruminant Urine Patches under Different Irrigation Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J.; Clough, T. J.; Laubach, J.; Hunt, J.; Venterea, R. T.; Phillips, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Urine patches from grazing ruminant animals are a significant source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and irrigation is increasingly used to improve forage quality and yield for grazing cattle. The objective of this study was to test whether irrigation frequency influenced N2O emissions from urine patches on a free-draining grazed pasture soil. It was hypothesized that greater irrigation frequency would increase soil moisture thereby lowering soil oxygen (O2), and that these O2-limited conditions would increase the potential for N2O to be reduced to nitrogen gas (N2), resulting in lower N2O emissions. A field trial tested the effects of two irrigation frequencies and urine deposition on N2O fluxes measured daily for 35 days. Denitrification potential measurements using the acetylene inhibition technique were completed to infer N2O/(N2O+N2) ratios, and soil O2 concentrations were measured continuously at three depths within the soil profile. While a more frequent irrigation treatment resulted in a lower N2O/(N2O+N2) ratio, this did not give rise to lower N2O emissions. Nitrous oxide fluxes were not influenced by irrigation frequency, and approximately 0.09% of the nitrogen applied as urine was emitted as N2O from both irrigation treatments. Neither N2O nor soil O2 varied with individual irrigation events. Soil O2 ranged from 17 to 20% expect following urine deposition, where it temporarily decreased to 13%. Soil O2 measurements failed to explain N2O emissions, but a relationship was derived between N2O fluxes and estimates of soil gas diffusivity (Dp/Do). This work is the first to show how soil O2 concentrations vary under a urine patch and under different irrigation treatments, and supports Dp/Do as robust predictor of N2O emissions in situ.

  17. Biofuel cropping system impacts on soil C, microbial communities and N2O emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Andrew R.

    Substitution of cellulosic biofuel in place of gasoline or diesel could reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transportation. However, emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) could have a large impact on the GHG balance of cellulosic biofuel, thus there is a need to quantify these responses in cellulosic biofuel crops. The objectives of this study were to: (i) measure changes in yield, SOC and microbial communities in potential cellulosic biofuel cropping systems (ii) measure and characterize the temporal variation in N2O emissions from these systems (iii) characterize the yield and N2O response of switchgrass to N fertilizer and to estimate the costs of production. Sweet sorghum, photoperiod-sensitive sorghum, and miscanthus yielded the highest aboveground biomass (20-32 Mg ha-1). The perennial grasses sequestered SOC over 4 yrs, while SOC stocks did not change in the annual crops. Root stocks were 4-8 times higher in the perennial crops, suggesting greater belowground C inputs. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) abundance and aggregate mean weight diameter were higher in the perennials. No consistent significant differences were found in N2O emissions between crops, though miscanthus tended to have the lowest emissions. Most N2O was emitted during large events of short duration (1-3 days) that occurred after high rainfall events with high soil NO3-. There was a weak relationship between IPCC Tier 1 N2O estimates and measured emissions, and the IPCC method tended to underestimate emissions. The response of N2O to N rate was nonlinear in 2 of 3 years. Fertilizer induced emission factor (EF) increased from 0.7% at 50 kg N ha-1 to 2.6% at 150 kg N ha-1. Switchgrass yields increased with N inputs up to 100-150 kg N ha-1, but the critical N level for maximum yields decreased each year, suggesting N was being applied in excess at higher N rates. Yield-scaled costs of production were minimized at 100 kg N ha-1 ($70.91 Mg-1

  18. Sunflower N2O emissions under two different water regimes in Mediterranean climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Eugenia; Vitale, Luca; Di Tommasi, Paul; Tedeschi, Anna; Tosca, Maurizio; Magliulo, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Human activities are altering the atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentration with negative effects on global climate and environment. Cropland represents about 12 % of earth's surface and largely contribute to GHGs production, in particular N2O, due to a massive use of nitrogen fertilization. In particular, agriculture and intensive livestock farming may significantly affect biogeochemical cycles included nitrogen cycle. However, it is often difficult to predict the total amount of fluxes caused by agricultural management, which impact on both the whole agro-ecosystem. The objective of the experiment was to evaluate soil N2O fluxes under two different irrigation managements. The experimental trial was conducted in a farm in surrounding of Naples, southern Italy. The crop monitored was sunflower for biomass uses. Two irrigation levels were performed: returning 100% (optimal irrigation) and 50% (deficit irrigation) of soil field capacity for the layer 0.0-0.50 m. 314 Kg ha-1 of urea fertilizer was supplied in two times: at sowing and 40 days later. Before sowing, six autochambers were inserted 3 cm into the soil and connected to a gas chromatograph and a scanning apparatus. A program for chambers' management was implemented to monitor soil N2O fluxes measured different times of the day. Biometric parameters such as LAI, root depth, above- and below-ground biomass were monitored during the experiment. Results shows that soil N2O fluxes were affected by irrigation regime; in particular, the deficit irrigation determined lower N2O fluxes compared to optimal irrigation but the total biomass production and yield were comparable between the two water regimes. So low input farm management could be take in account to reduce the total N2O emission and maintain at the same time high productivity level in terms of biomass and yield. Keywords: N2O fluxes, Irrigation schedule, sunflower

  19. New model for capturing the variations of fertilizer-induced emission factors of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Shang, Ziyin; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Raymond, Peter A.; Wang, Xuhui; Wang, Rong; Chen, Minpeng; Yang, Changliang; Tao, Shu; Zhao, Yue; Meng, Qian; Gao, Shuoshuo; Mao, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that N2O emission factors (EFs) vary with nitrogen additions and environmental variations. Yet the impact of the latter was often ignored by previous EF determinations. We developed piecewise statistical models (PMs) to explain how the N2O EFs in agricultural soils depend upon various predictors such as climate, soil attributes, and agricultural management. The PMs are derived from a new Bayesian Recursive Regression Tree algorithm. The PMs were applied to the case of EFs from agricultural soils in China, a country where large EF spatial gradients prevail. The results indicate substantial improvements of the PMs compared with other EF determinations. First, PMs are able to reproduce a larger fraction of the variability of observed EFs for upland grain crops (84%, n = 381) and paddy rice (91%, n = 161) as well as the ratio of EFs to nitrogen application rates (73%, n = 96). The superior predictive accuracy of PMs is further confirmed by evaluating their predictions against independent EF measurements (n = 285) from outside China. Results show that the PMs calibrated using Chinese data can explain 75% of the variance. Hence, the PMs could be reliable for upscaling of N2O EFs and fluxes for regions that have a phase space of predictors similar to China. Results from the validated models also suggest that climatic factors regulate the heterogeneity of EFs in China, explaining 69% and 85% of their variations for upland grain crops and paddy rice, respectively. The corresponding N2O EFs in 2008 are 0.84 ± 0.18% (as N2O-N emissions divided by the total N input) for upland grain crops and 0.65 ± 0.14% for paddy rice, the latter being twice as large as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Tier 1 defaults. Based upon these new estimates of EFs, we infer that only 22% of current arable land could achieve a potential reduction of N2O emission of 50%.

  20. CO2-induced alterations in plant nitrate utilization and root exudation stimulate N2O emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide enrichment (eCO2) often increases soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, which has been largely attributed to increased denitrification induced by CO2-enhancement of soil labile C and moisture. However, the origin of the nitrogen (N) remains unexplained. Emerging evidence sug...

  1. Evaluation of intensive '4R' strategies for decreasing N2O emissions in rainfed corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ‘4R’ approach of using the ‘right’ rate, source, timing and placement is an accepted framework for increasing crop N use efficiency. However, modifying one 4R component by itself does not consistently reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Our objective was to determine if split application tim...

  2. Nitrite intensity explains N management effects on N2O emissions in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is typically assumed that the dependence of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions on soil nitrogen (N) availability is best quantified in terms of ammonium (NH4+) and/or nitrate (NO3-) concentrations. In contrast, nitrite (NO2-) is seldom measured separately from NO3- despite its role as a central substr...

  3. Effects of Carbon and Cover Crop Residues on N2O and N2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M.; Cooperman, Y.; Horwath, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    In Mediterranean climate, nitrous oxide emissions occurring with the first rainfall after the dry summer season can contribute up to 50% of agricultural systems' total annual emissions, but the drivers of these emissions have not been clearly identified, and there are only few measurements of atmospheric nitrogen (N2) production (denitrification) during these events. In lab incubations, we investigated N2O and N2 production, gross ammonification and nitrification, and microbial N immobilization with wet-up in soil from a vineyard that was previously fallow or where cover crop residue had been incorporated the previous spring. Before the first rainfall, we measured 120 mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC-C) kg-1 soil in the 0-5 cm layer of this vineyard, and after the rain 10 mg DOC-C kg-1, while nitrate levels before the rain were <5 mg N kg-1 in fallow and <10 mg N kg-1 in previously cover cropped soil. The N2O/N2 production was 2, 7, 9, and 86% in fallow, legume-grass mixture, rye, and legume cover cropped soil. The N2O/N2 ratio tended to increase with lower DOC (post-rain) levels in the soil. The results suggest that accumulated carbon in dry surface soil is the main driving factor of N2O and N2 emissions through denitrification with the first rainfall after prolonged dry periods.

  4. Estimating Uncertainty in N2O Emissions from US Cropland Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Monte Carlo analysis was combined with an empirically-based approach to quantify uncertainties in soil N2O emissions from US croplands estimated with the DAYCENT simulation model. Only a subset of croplands was simulated in the Monte Carlo analysis which was used to infer uncertainties across the ...

  5. Aerial Photography Estimation of CH4 and N2O Emissions from Adelie Penguins During 1983-2012 in Victoria Land, Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.; Li, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    Sea animals are the "bio-indicators" of the climate change in the Antarctic. The abundant nutrient components in their excreta such as carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) promote the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Adélie Penguins are important sea animals, their colonies therefore become the potential "hotspots" of the GHGs emissions. Some field observations have been carried out to study the penguin excreta on CH4 and N2O emissions in the Antarctic peninsula. However, due to the lacking of the penguin population data, the total emissions of GHGs have not been estimated at regional scale. This study aimed to extract penguin information from two period aerial photographs respectively in 1983 and 2012 using object-oriented method in Victoria Land, Antarctic, and then estimate the Adélie penguin populations on Inexpressible Island combined with the shadow analysis. Meanwhile, a GHGs model was developed to estimate CH4 and N2O emissions from Adelie penguins based on the CH4 and N2O fluxes of penguin guanos, the number of penguins, and the fresh weight of penguin guanos and so on. The results indicated that object-oriented method was effective in penguin information extraction from high-resolution images, and there were 17120 and 21183 Adélie penguins respectively in 1983 and 2012, respectively. The main reasons for the increase in penguin populations from 1983 to 2012 might be explained from physical environment and biological environment, such as the rising temperatures and reduced Antarctic toothfishes. And the total CH4 and N2O emissions from penguins on Inexpressible Island during breeding season were 246 kg CH4 and 2.67 kg N2O in 1983, and 304 kg CH4 and 3.31 kg N2O in 2012. Our study aimed to provide important reference value for the estimation of GHG budget in Antarctic.

  6. Modelling climate change impact on N2O emissions from agricultural soils based on long-term observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priesack, Eckart; Heinlein, Florian; Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Intensive agricultural land use is considered to be the major source of the anthropogenic contribution to the increase in atmospheric N2O concentration during the last decades. A reduction of anthropogenic N2O emissions therefore requires a change in agricultural management practices. Mathematical models help to understand the interaction between the determining processes of N2O production and the dynamics of state variables affecting N2O emissions. In particular the impact of climate change on N2O emissions can be better analyzed. The aim of this study was to test the modeling approaches for their ability to describe and quantify the long-term development of N2O emissions from agricultural fields observed at the Research farm Scheyern situated 40 km north of Munich, Bavaria. Data for model evaluation were obtained during 25 years (1992-2017) mainly by the closed chamber method. We applied two different modeling approaches, where one model assumes a fixed N2O/N2 ratio for N2O production and neglects the transport of N2O in the soil profile; whereas the other model explicitly considers N2O transport and assumes a dynamic reduction of N2O to N2. Generally, both modeling approaches were able to describe the observed long-term and seasonal dynamics of N2O emissions and events of high N2O emissions due to increased denitrification activity after heavy precipitation and during thawing after soil freezing. It is concluded that the decrease of frost thaw-events due to higher temperatures during the cold season is the main reason for the decrease of N2O from the agricultural fields at the research farm Scheyern.

  7. Measurements of N2O emissions from different vegetable fields on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Tiantian; Xie, Liyong; Guo, Liping; Yan, Hongliang; Lin, Miao; Zhang, He; Lin, Jia; Lin, Erda

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have measured the N2O emission fluxes from vegetable fields. In order to identify the characteristics and the influencing factors of N2O emissions from different vegetable fields, we measured N2O emissions for a full year from four typical fields, including an open-ground vegetable field that has produced vegetables for over 20 years (OV20), a recently developed open-ground vegetable field that was converted from a maize field three years earlier (OV3), a recently developed greenhouse vegetable field that was converted from a maize field 3 years earlier (GV3) and a typical local maize field (Maize). Four different fertilization treatments were set additionally in the recently developed open-ground vegetable field. These were: no fertilizer or manure (OV3_CK), manure only (OV3_M) and the combination of manure with different rates of chemical fertilizer application (OV3_MF1 and OV3_MF3). The results showed that N2O emission fluxes fluctuated between 0.3 ± 0.1 and 912.4 ± 80.0 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1 with the highest emission peak occurring after fertilization followed by irrigation. Nitrogen application explained 64.6-84.5% of the N2O emission in the vegetable fields. The magnitude of the emission peaks depended on the nitrogen application rate and the duration of the emission peaks was mainly associated with soil temperature when appropriate irrigation was given after fertilization. The N2O emission peaks occurred later and lasted for a longer period when the soil temperature was <24 °C in May. However, emission peaks occurred earlier and lasted for a shorter period when the soil temperature was around 25-33 °C from June to August. The annual N2O emissions from the fertilized vegetable fields were 1.68-2.38 times higher than that from the maize field, which had an emission value of 2.88 ± 0.10 kg N ha-1 a-1. The N2O emission factor (EF) of manure nitrogen was 0.07% over the whole year, but was 0.11% and 0.02% in the spring cucumber season and the autumn

  8. Partitioning N2O Emissions within the US Corn Belt using an Inverse Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Griffis, T. J.; Millet, D. B.; Wood, J. D.; Lee, X.; Baker, J. M.; Xiao, K.; Turner, P. A.; Chen, M.; Zobitz, J. M.; Wells, K. C.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions within the US Corn Belt have been previously estimated to be 2- to 9-fold larger than predicted by state-of-the-art emission inventories, implying that one or more source categories in bottom-up approaches are underestimated. Here we employ hourly N2O mixing ratios for 2010-2011 from a very tall tower located within the US Corn Belt to better quantify direct and indirect N2O emissions from agriculture. We interpret the observations using a time-inverted transport model driven by a priori N2O emissions from bottom-up inventories and from a land-surface model. Source footprints were computed using the WRF3.5 (Weather Research and Forecasting) and STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) models. The optimization reveals that both agricultural source categories are underestimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) inventory approach. Our a posteriori results show that N2O emissions (direct/indirect) within the US Corn Belt begin to increase after snow melt, with direct emissions peaking in July while indirect emissions peak in June. Both sources then decrease through the end of October. Our optimized agricultural N2O budgets for the Corn Belt are 319±184 (total), 188±66 (direct), and 131±118 Gg-N yr-1 (indirect) in 2010, versus 471±326, 198±80, and 273±246 Gg-N yr-1 in 2011. We attribute the inter-annual differences to varying moisture conditions, with increased precipitation in 2011 amplifying emissions. These findings further support the hypothesis that indirect emissions are presently underestimated in bottom-up inventories. Based on our results, we suggest an indirect emission factor for runoff and leaching ranging from 0.014-0.035 for the Corn Belt, which represents an upward adjustment of 1.9-4.6 times relative to the IPCC and is in agreement with recent bottom-up field studies.

  9. N2O emissions from secondary clarifiers and their contribution to the total emissions of the WWTP.

    PubMed

    Mikola, Anna; Heinonen, Mari; Kosonen, Heta; Leppänen, Maarit; Rantanen, Pirjo; Vahala, Riku

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the emissions of nitrous oxide, N2O, constitute a major part of the carbon footprint of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Denitrification occurring in the secondary clarifier basins has been observed by many researchers, but until now N2O emissions from secondary clarifiers have not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to measure the N2O emissions from secondary clarifiers and weigh the portion they could represent of the overall emissions at WWTPs. Online measurements over several days were carried out at four different municipal WWTPs in Finland in cold weather conditions (March) and in warm weather conditions (June-July). An attempt was made to define the conditions in which N2O emissions from secondary clarifiers may occur. It was evidenced that large amounts of N2O can be emitted from the secondary clarifiers, and that the emissions have long-term variation. It was assumed that part of the N2O released in secondary clarification was originally formed in the activated sludge basin. The emissions from secondary clarification thus seem to be dependent on conditions of the nitrification and denitrification accomplished in the denitrification-nitrification process and on the amount of sludge stored in the secondary clarifiers.

  10. Diet effects on urine composition of cattle and N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, J; Oenema, O; van Groenigen, J W; Spek, J W; van Vuuren, A M; Bannink, A

    2013-06-01

    Ruminant production contributes to emissions of nitrogen (N) to the environment, principally ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) and di-nitrogen (N2) to air, nitrate (NO3 -) to groundwater and particulate N to surface waters. Variation in dietary N intake will particularly affect excretion of urinary N, which is much more vulnerable to losses than is faecal N. Our objective is to review dietary effects on the level and form of N excreted in cattle urine, as well as its consequences for emissions of N2O. The quantity of N excreted in urine varies widely. Urinary N excretion, in particular that of urea N, is decreased upon reduction of dietary N intake or an increase in the supply of energy to the rumen microorganisms and to the host animal itself. Most of the N in urine (from 50% to well over 90%) is present in the form of urea. Other nitrogenous components include purine derivatives (PD), hippuric acid, creatine and creatinine. Excretion of PD is related to rumen microbial protein synthesis, and that of hippuric acid to dietary concentration of degradable phenolic acids. The N concentration of cattle urine ranges from 3 to 20 g/l. High-dietary mineral levels increase urine volume and lead to reduced urinary N concentration as well as reduced urea concentration in plasma and milk. In lactating dairy cattle, variation in urine volume affects the relationship between milk urea and urinary N excretion, which hampers the use of milk urea as an accurate indicator of urinary N excretion. Following its deposition in pastures or in animal houses, ubiquitous microorganisms in soil and waters transform urinary N components into ammonium (NH4 +), and thereafter into NO3 - and ultimately in N2 accompanied with the release of N2O. Urinary hippuric acid, creatine and creatinine decompose more slowly than urea. Hippuric acid may act as a natural inhibitor of N2O emissions, but inhibition conditions have not been defined properly yet. Environmental and soil conditions at the site of

  11. N2O Emissions in Southeastern Amazonia: The Effect of Agricultural Intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, C.; Brando, P. M.; Cerri, C. E.; Coe, M. T.; Davidson, E. A.; Galford, G. L.; Macedo, M.; Neill, C.; Venterea, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon is not only an exceptionally biodiverse and carbon-rich tract of tropical forest, it is also a case study in land use change. Over the last 30 years, Amazonia has been home to extraordinary growth in agricultural production, in part from agricultural expansion, but also due to more intense management on Amazonia's existing croplands. We use a year-long campaign and approximately 500 field chamber measurements to estimate how cropland intensification in Mato Grosso, Brazil affects the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and soil N dynamics. In this system, soybean cropland intensification occurs when double cropping is introduced, in which maize is planted directly after soybean harvest and fertilized twice with inorganic N. We find that dry season N2O emissions in single-cropped (soybean only) fields, double-cropped (soybean/maize) fields and reference tropical forest are uniformly near zero, or ~0-0.5 ngN/cm^2/hr. Surprisingly, wet season emissions rates remain low as well, between 1-4 ngN/cm^2/hr, for both cropland types and reference forest. By contrast, isolated post-fertilization spikes in N2O emissions are large, with a maximum increase of ~800% and a mean increase of ~400%, though these flux increases resolve rapidly and rates return to their low baseline within days. Finally, we explore the role that soil moisture, soil N availability, and soil C availability play in regulating N2O fluxes in reference forest, soybean fields and intensified soybean-maize fields. Open questions surround how the Amazon's land resources can be leveraged to increase agricultural production at the least harm to the environment. Here, we quantify the consequences of land use change on N2O, a powerful greenhouse gas, in a critical ecosystem undergoing novel agricultural intensification. These results may inform both greenhouse gas accounting and our understanding of the effects of Amazonia's changing agricultural landscape on the nitrogen cycle.

  12. Effect of granulated wood ash fertilization on N2O emissions in boreal peat forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liimatainen, Maarit; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Hytönen, Jyrki; Maljanen, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands cover one third of the land surface area in Finland and over half of that are drained for forestry. Natural peatlands are either small sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) or they can also act as a sinks of N2O. When peatlands are drained, oxygen concentration in the peat increases, organic matter decomposition accelerates and N2O emissions may increase significantly, especially in nutrient rich peat soils. Hence drainage and land-use changes can have a big impact on N2O fluxes in peatlands. The annual consumption of wood chips is to be increased to 13.5 M m3 from the present 8.7 M m3 in Finland. This will also increase the amount of wood ash in the power plants. Wood ash contains considerable amounts of mineral nutrients but lacks nitrogen. Therefore, it has been used as a fertilizer in nitrogen rich peatland forests lacking other nutrients. Recycling of ash would also return the nutrients lost during biomass harvesting back to the forests. We studied the effects of granulated wood ash as a fertilizer in peat soils drained for forestry. Ash is nowadays granulated mainly to facilitate its handling and spreading. Granulation also stabilizes the ash decreasing the solubility of most of the nutrients and minimizing harmful effects of ash spread over the vegetation. Granulated wood ash increases soil pH less than loose ash. Drainage of peatland forests increases microbial activity in the soil which is furthermore intensified with the addition of ash promoting organic matter decomposition and possibly affecting N2O emissions. We studied the effect of granulated wood ash on N2O fluxes in three different peat forests in Finland in both field and laboratory experiments. In the field, N2O emissions were not affected by granulated wood ash fertilization but the soil respiration rate increased. However, in the laboratory studies we observed a clear decrease in N2O production due to wood ash addition, although changes in pH values were only minor. We studied what could

  13. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Miller, S.; Kort, E. A.; Santoni, G. W.; Daube, B.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Andrews, A. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Tian, H.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with an atmospheric lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements of atmospheric concentrations. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the Central Valley of California, based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA P-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in May and June, 2010. We coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model to STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) to link our in-situ observations to surface emissions, and then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to extract optimized emission rates from the inversion. Our results support the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. But the spatial distribution of derived surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emissions inventory (EDGAR 4.0), and our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California during the study period was 3 - 4 times larger than EDGAR and other inventories.

  14. Urea Fertilizer Decreases N2O Emissions Compared to Anhydrous Ammonia in Corn Cropping Systems in Minnesota

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantifying nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from corn and soybean fields under different fertilizer regimes is essential to developing national inventories of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The objective of this study was to compare N2O emissions in plots managed for more than 15 yr under continuous ...

  15. Quantifying N2O emissions and production pathways from fresh waste during the initial stage of disposal to a landfill.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, Mingsheng; Zhang, Han; Pan, Songqing; Kao, Chih Ming; Chen, Shaohua

    2016-08-11

    Intensive nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions usually occur at the working face of landfills. However, the specific amounts and contributions of the multiple pathways to N2O emissions are poorly understood. N2O emissions and the mutual conversions of N-species in both open and sealed simulated landfill reactors filled with fresh refuse were examined during a 100-h incubation period, and N2O sources were calculated using (15)N isotope labelling. N2O peak fluxes were above 70μgNkg(-1) waste h(-1) for both treatments. The sealed incubation reactors became a N2O sink when N2O in the ambient environment was sufficient. The total amount of N2O emissions under sealed conditions was 2.15±0.56mgNkg(-1) waste, which was higher than that under open conditions (1.91±0.34mgNkg(-1) waste). The NO2(-) peak appeared prior to the peak in N2O flux. The degree and duration of total nitrogen reduction in open incubations were larger and longer than those of sealed incubations and could possibly be due to oxygen supplementation. Denitrification (DF) was a major source of N2O generation during these incubations. The contribution of the DF pathway decreased from 89.2% to 61.3% during the open incubations. The effects of nitrification (NF) and nitrification-coupled denitrification (NCD) increased during the increasing phase and the decreasing phase of N2O flux, contributing 24.1-37.4% and 31.7-34.4% of total N2O emissions, respectively. In sealed treatments, the DF pathway accounted for more than 90% of the total N2O emission during the entire incubation.

  16. A geostatistical approach to identify and mitigate agricultural nitrous oxide emission hotspots.

    PubMed

    Turner, P A; Griffis, T J; Mulla, D J; Baker, J M; Venterea, R T

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a trace gas with severe environmental costs, are greatest from agricultural soils amended with nitrogen (N) fertilizer. However, accurate N2O emission estimates at fine spatial scales are made difficult by their high variability, which represents a critical challenge for the management of N2O emissions. Here, static chamber measurements (n=60) and soil samples (n=129) were collected at approximately weekly intervals (n=6) for 42-d immediately following the application of N in a southern Minnesota cornfield (15.6-ha), typical of the systems prevalent throughout the U.S. Corn Belt. These data were integrated into a geostatistical model that resolved N2O emissions at a high spatial resolution (1-m). Field-scale N2O emissions exhibited a high degree of spatial variability, and were partitioned into three classes of emission strength: hotspots, intermediate, and coldspots. Rates of emission from hotspots were 2-fold greater than non-hotspot locations. Consequently, 36% of the field-scale emissions could be attributed to hotspots, despite representing only 21% of the total field area. Variations in elevation caused hotspots to develop in predictable locations, which were prone to nutrient and moisture accumulation caused by terrain focusing. Because these features are relatively static, our data and analyses indicate that targeted management of hotspots could efficiently reduce field-scale emissions by as much 17%, a significant benefit considering the deleterious effects of atmospheric N2O.

  17. [Effects of leachate irrigation and cover soil type on N2O emission from municipal solid waste landfill].

    PubMed

    He, Pin-Jing; Chen, Miao; Zhang, Hou-Hu; Shao, Li-Ming

    2008-07-01

    By the method of static chamber, the seasonal and diurnal variations of N2O fluxes in two full-scale municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills covered with sandy and clay soils were measured to study the effects of leachate irrigation and cover soil type on the landfill N2O emission. The results showed that the N2O flux in the MSW landfill covered with sandy soil was (242 +/- 576) microg N2O-N x m(-2) x h(-1) in summer, being 3.2 times (P > 0.05) as high as that in spring [(74.4 +/- 314) microg N2O-N x m(-2) x h(-1), while the N2O flux in the MSW landfill covered with clay soil was (591 +/- 767) microg N2O-N x m(-2) x h(-1) in summer, being 2.2 times (P < 0.05) as high as that in spring [(269 +/- 335) microg N2O-N x m(-2) x h(-1)]. Leachate irrigation promoted the N2O emission from the soil cover of the landfill covered with sandy soil, and the N2O flux in the landfill was 1 time higher than that of the control (P > 0.05). Under leachate irrigation, the average N2O flux in spring and summer in the landfill covered with sand soil was (211 +/- 460) microg N2O-N x m(-2) x h(-1), being only 1/2 of that [(430 +/- 605) microg N2O-N x m(-2) x h(-1)] in the landfill covered with clay soil without leachate irrigation (P > 0.05 ). Therefore, no matter leachate irrigation was conducted or not, the N2O emission from MSW landfill could be minimized by covering with infertile sandy soil.

  18. Comparison of N2O Emissions from Soils at Three Temperate Agricultural Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolking, S. E.; Moiser, A. R.; Ojima, D. S.; Li, C.; Parton, W. J.; Potter, C. S.; Priesack, E.; Stenger, R.; Haberbosch, C.; Dorsch, P.; hide

    1997-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) flux simulations by four models were compared with year-round field measurements from five temperate agricultural sites in three countries. The field sites included an unfertilized, semi-arid rangeland with low N2O fluxes in eastern Colorado, USA; two fertilizer treatments (urea and nitrate) on a fertilized grass ley cut for silage in Scotland; and two fertilized, cultivated crop fields in Germany where N2O loss during the winter was quite high. The models used were daily trace gas versions of the CENTURY model, DNDC, ExpertN, and the NASA-Ames version of the CASA model. These models included similar components (soil physics, decomposition, plant growth, and nitrogen transformations), but in some cases used very different algorithms for these processes. All models generated similar results for the general cycling of nitrogen through the agro-ecosystems, but simulated nitrogen trace gas fluxes were quite different. In most cases the simulated N20 fluxes were within a factor of about 2 of the observed annual fluxes, but even when models produced similar N2O fluxes they often produced very different estimates of gaseous N loss as nitric oxide (NO), dinitrogen (N2), and ammonia (NH3). Accurate simulation of soil moisture appears to be a key requirement for reliable simulation of N2O emissions. All models simulated the general pattern of low background fluxes with high fluxes following fertilization at the Scottish sites, but they could not (or were not designed to) accurately capture the observed effects of different fertilizer types on N2O flux. None of the models were able to reliably generate large pulses of N2O during brief winter thaws that were observed at the two German sites. All models except DNDC simulated very low N2O fluxes for the dry site in Colorado. The US Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET) has provided a mechanism for this model and site intercomparison. Additional intercomparisons are needed with these and other models and additional data

  19. Comparison of N2O Emissions from Soils at Three Temperate Agricultural Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolking, S. E.; Moiser, A. R.; Ojima, D. S.; Li, C.; Parton, W. J.; Potter, C. S.; Priesack, E.; Stenger, R.; Haberbosch, C.; Dorsch, P.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) flux simulations by four models were compared with year-round field measurements from five temperate agricultural sites in three countries. The field sites included an unfertilized, semi-arid rangeland with low N2O fluxes in eastern Colorado, USA; two fertilizer treatments (urea and nitrate) on a fertilized grass ley cut for silage in Scotland; and two fertilized, cultivated crop fields in Germany where N2O loss during the winter was quite high. The models used were daily trace gas versions of the CENTURY model, DNDC, ExpertN, and the NASA-Ames version of the CASA model. These models included similar components (soil physics, decomposition, plant growth, and nitrogen transformations), but in some cases used very different algorithms for these processes. All models generated similar results for the general cycling of nitrogen through the agro-ecosystems, but simulated nitrogen trace gas fluxes were quite different. In most cases the simulated N20 fluxes were within a factor of about 2 of the observed annual fluxes, but even when models produced similar N2O fluxes they often produced very different estimates of gaseous N loss as nitric oxide (NO), dinitrogen (N2), and ammonia (NH3). Accurate simulation of soil moisture appears to be a key requirement for reliable simulation of N2O emissions. All models simulated the general pattern of low background fluxes with high fluxes following fertilization at the Scottish sites, but they could not (or were not designed to) accurately capture the observed effects of different fertilizer types on N2O flux. None of the models were able to reliably generate large pulses of N2O during brief winter thaws that were observed at the two German sites. All models except DNDC simulated very low N2O fluxes for the dry site in Colorado. The US Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET) has provided a mechanism for this model and site intercomparison. Additional intercomparisons are needed with these and other models and additional data

  20. [Quantifying direct N2O emissions from paddy fields during rice growing season in China: model establishment].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Wen; Qin, Yan-Mei; Liu, Shu-Wei

    2009-02-15

    Various water management regimes, such as continuous flooding (F), flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding (F-D-F), and flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding-moist intermittent irrigation but without water logging (F-D-F-M), are currently practiced in paddy rice production in China. These water regimes have incurred a sensitive change in direct N2O emission from rice paddy fields. In order to establish statistical models quantifying the country-specific emission factor and background emission of N2O in paddy fields during the rice growing season, we compiled and statistically analyzed field data on 71 N2O measurements from 17 field studies that were published in peer-reviewed Chinese and English journals. For each field study, we documented the seasonal N2O emission, the type and amount of organic amendment and fertilizer nitrogen application, the water management regime, the drainage duration, the field location and cropping season. Seasonal total N2O was, on average, equivalent to 0.02% of the nitrogen applied in the continuous flooding rice paddies. Under the water regime of F-D-F or the F-D-F-M, seasonal N2O emissions increased with N fertilizer applied in rice paddies. Applying an Ordinary Least Square (OLS) linear regression model resulted in an emission factor of 0.42% for N2O, and in unpronounced background N2 O emission under the water regime of F-D-F. Under the F-D-F-M water regime, N2O emission factor and N2O-N background emission were estimated to be 0.73% and 0.79 kg x hm(-2) during the paddy rice growing season, respectively. After considering three different water regimes in rice paddies in China, the emission factor of N for N2O and N2O-N background emission averaged 0.54% and 0.43 kg x hm(-2). The results of this study suggest that paddy rice relative to upland crop production could have contributed to mitigating N2O emissions from agriculture in China. The emission factor of N for N2O and its background emissions can be directly adopted to develop

  1. Can subsoil denitrification reduce groundwater nitrate pollution and atmospheric N2O emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofizur Rahman Jahangir, Mohammad; Khalil, Mohammad Ibrahim; Cardenas, Laura; Hatch, David; Johnston, Paul; Richards, Karl

    2010-05-01

    Denitrification, a biological nitrate removal pathway, can control the availability of NO3- for leaching to the receptors but it is not only a natural pathway for excess NO3- elimination but also contributes to the emissions of N2O, a potent greenhouse gas. Denitrification potential and N2:N2O+N2 ratios were investigated in intact soil cores collected at 0-10, 45-55 and 120-130 cm soil depths where groundwater table was approximately 2 m below ground level. The soil was a moderately well drained loam to clay loam Gleysol under a grazing pasture in South Eastern Ireland. Three individual experiments were carried out by amending the soil with (i) 90 mg NO3--N as KNO3, (ii) -(i) + 150 mg glucose-C, (iii) -(i) + 150 mg DOC, kg-1 dry soil. An automated laboratory incubation system was used to simultaneously measure N2O and N2 at 15°C at 3% moisture content above field capacity. N2O fluxes differed significantly (p

  2. NO versus N2O emissions from an NH4(+)-amended Bermuda grass pasture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, G. L.; Brams, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    An enclosure technique is used to monitor soil NO and N2O emissions during early summer regrowth of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) on sandy loam in a humid, subtropical region of southern Texas. The evolution of both gases was substantially higher from plots harvested at the beginning of the experiment and fertilized five days later with 52 kg N/ha as (NH4)2SO4 than from plots not harvested or fertilized. Emission of NO, but not N2O, was stimulated by clipping and removing the grass, probably because eliminating the shading provided by the dense grass canopy changed these plots from cooler to warmer than unharvested plots, thereby stimulating the activity of soil microorganisms responsible for NO production. Neither gas flux was significantly affected by application of N until the next rainfall dissolved and moved the surface-applied fertilizer into the soil. Immediately thereafter, emissions of NO and N2O increased dramatically to peaks of 160 and 12 g N/ha/d, respectively, and then declined at rates that closely parallel the nitrification rate of added NH4(+), indicating that the gases resulted from the activity of nitrifying microorganisms, rather than denitrifiers. Nitric oxide emissions during the nine-week measurement period averaged 7.2 times greater than N2O emissions and accounted for 3.2 percent of the added N. The data indicate that humid, subtropical grasslands, which not only have large geographical extent but also have been subject to intense anthropogenic disturbance, contribute significantly to the global atmospheric NO(x) budget.

  3. NO versus N2O emissions from an NH4(+)-amended Bermuda grass pasture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, G. L.; Brams, E. A.

    1992-01-01

    An enclosure technique is used to monitor soil NO and N2O emissions during early summer regrowth of Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon) on sandy loam in a humid, subtropical region of southern Texas. The evolution of both gases was substantially higher from plots harvested at the beginning of the experiment and fertilized five days later with 52 kg N/ha as (NH4)2SO4 than from plots not harvested or fertilized. Emission of NO, but not N2O, was stimulated by clipping and removing the grass, probably because eliminating the shading provided by the dense grass canopy changed these plots from cooler to warmer than unharvested plots, thereby stimulating the activity of soil microorganisms responsible for NO production. Neither gas flux was significantly affected by application of N until the next rainfall dissolved and moved the surface-applied fertilizer into the soil. Immediately thereafter, emissions of NO and N2O increased dramatically to peaks of 160 and 12 g N/ha/d, respectively, and then declined at rates that closely parallel the nitrification rate of added NH4(+), indicating that the gases resulted from the activity of nitrifying microorganisms, rather than denitrifiers. Nitric oxide emissions during the nine-week measurement period averaged 7.2 times greater than N2O emissions and accounted for 3.2 percent of the added N. The data indicate that humid, subtropical grasslands, which not only have large geographical extent but also have been subject to intense anthropogenic disturbance, contribute significantly to the global atmospheric NO(x) budget.

  4. Comparing N2O emissions at varying N rates from irrigated and rainfed corn in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, N.; Kahmark, K.; Basso, B.; Robertson, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Global N2O emissions from agriculture are estimated to be ~2.8 Pg CO2e yr-1 accounting for 60% of total anthropogenic emissions. N2O is the largest contributor to the GHG burden of cropping systems in the US, with annual estimated emissions of ~0.5 Tg primarily due to N fertilizer inputs and other soil management activities. Currently 23 million acres of corn, soybean and wheat are irrigated annually in the US with increased N2O emissions due to the practice likely under-reported in GHG inventories. Here we compare N2O emissions and yield from irrigated and rainfed corn at varying N rates between 0 and 246 kg N ha-1 from the Kellogg Biological Station in SW Michigan. Initial results show that N2O emissions increase with increasing N rate and are significantly higher from irrigated corn compared to rainfed corn at the same N rate. At increasing N rates daily emissions following an irrigation event were between 2.4 - 77.5 g N2O-N ha-1 from irrigated corn and 1.6 - 13.0 g N2O-N ha-1 from rainfed corn. Emissions data from automated and static chambers will be presented and trade-offs between N2O emissions, N fertilizer rate, crop yield and irrigation practice will be evaluated from an environmental and economic standpoint.

  5. N 2O emissions at municipal solid waste landfill sites: Effects of CH 4 emissions and cover soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    Municipal solid waste landfills are the significant anthropogenic sources of N 2O due to the cooxidation of ammonia by methane-oxidizing bacteria in cover soils. Such bacteria could be developed through CH 4 fumigation, as evidenced by both laboratory incubation and field measurement. During a 10-day incubation with leachate addition, the average N 2O fluxes in the soil samples, collected from the three selected landfill covers, were multiplied by 1.75 ( p < 0.01), 3.56 ( p < 0.01), and 2.12 ( p < 0.01) from the soil samples preincubated with 5% CH 4 for three months when compared with the control, respectively. Among the three selected landfill sites, N 2O fluxes in two landfill sites were significantly correlated with the variations of the CH 4 emissions without landfill gas recovery ( p < 0.001). N 2O fluxes were also elevated by the increase of the CH 4 emissions with landfill gas recovery in another landfill site ( p > 0.05). The annual average N 2O flux was 176 ± 566 μg N 2O-N m -2 h -1 ( p < 0.01) from sandy soil-covered landfill site, which was 72% ( p < 0.05) and 173% ( p < 0.01) lower than the other two clay soil covered landfill sites, respectively. The magnitude order of N 2O emissions in three landfill sites was also coincident by the results of laboratory incubation, suggesting the sandy soil cover could mitigate landfill N 2O emissions.

  6. Response of N2O emissions to biochar amendment in a cultivated sandy loam soil during freeze-thaw cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Wang, Quan; Qi, Zhiming; Han, Jiangang; Li, Lanhai

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of studies have reported that soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be reduced by adding biochar. However, the effect of biochar amendment on soil N2O emissions during freeze-thaw cycle (FTC) is still unknown. In this laboratory study, biochar (0%, 2% and 4%, w/w) was added into a cultivated sandy loam soil and then treated with 15 times of FTC (each FTC consisted of freeze at -5/-10 °C for 24 h and thaw at 5/10 °C for 24 h), to test whether biochar can mitigate soil N2O emissions during FTC, and estimate the relationships between N2O emissions and soil inorganic nitrogen contents/microbial biomass content/enzyme activities. The results showed that biochar amendment suppressed soil N2O emissions by 19.9-69.9% as compared to soils without biochar amendment during FTC. However, N2O emissions were only significantly correlated to soil nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N) contents, which decreased after biochar amendment, indicating that the decreased soil nitrification by adding biochar played an important role in mitigating N2O emissions during FTC. Further studies are needed to estimate the effectiveness of biochar amendment on reducing freeze-thaw induced N2O emissions from different soils under field conditions.

  7. Linkage between N2O emission and functional gene abundance in an intensively managed calcareous fluvo-aquic soil

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liuqing; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ju, Xiaotang

    2017-01-01

    The linkage between N2O emissions and the abundance of nitrifier and denitrifier genes is unclear in the intensively managed calcareous fluvo-aquic soils of the North China Plain. We investigated the abundance of bacterial amoA for nitrification and narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ for denitrification by in situ soil sampling to determine how the abundance of these genes changes instantly during N fertilization events and is related to high N2O emission peaks. We also investigated how long-term incorporated straw and/or manure affect(s) the abundance of these genes based on a seven-year field experiment. The overall results demonstrate that the long-term application of urea-based fertilizer and/or manure significantly enhanced the number of bacterial amoA gene copies leading to high N2O emission peaks after N fertilizer applications. These peaks contributed greatly to the annual N2O emissions in the crop rotation. A significant correlation between annual N2O emissions and narG, nirS, and nirK gene numbers indicates that the abundance of these genes is related to N2O emission under conditions for denitrification, thus partly contributing to the annual N2O emissions. These findings will help to draw up appropriate measures for mitigation of N2O emissions in this ‘hotspot’ region. PMID:28233823

  8. Evaluating four N2O emission algorithms in RZWQM2 in response to N rate on an irrigated corn field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from agricultural soils are major contributors to greenhouse gases. Correctly assessing the effects of the interactions between agricultural practices and environmental factors on N2O emissions is required for better crop and nitrogen (N) management. We used an enhanced...

  9. Linkage between N2O emission and functional gene abundance in an intensively managed calcareous fluvo-aquic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liuqing; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ju, Xiaotang

    2017-02-01

    The linkage between N2O emissions and the abundance of nitrifier and denitrifier genes is unclear in the intensively managed calcareous fluvo-aquic soils of the North China Plain. We investigated the abundance of bacterial amoA for nitrification and narG, nirS, nirK, and nosZ for denitrification by in situ soil sampling to determine how the abundance of these genes changes instantly during N fertilization events and is related to high N2O emission peaks. We also investigated how long-term incorporated straw and/or manure affect(s) the abundance of these genes based on a seven-year field experiment. The overall results demonstrate that the long-term application of urea-based fertilizer and/or manure significantly enhanced the number of bacterial amoA gene copies leading to high N2O emission peaks after N fertilizer applications. These peaks contributed greatly to the annual N2O emissions in the crop rotation. A significant correlation between annual N2O emissions and narG, nirS, and nirK gene numbers indicates that the abundance of these genes is related to N2O emission under conditions for denitrification, thus partly contributing to the annual N2O emissions. These findings will help to draw up appropriate measures for mitigation of N2O emissions in this ‘hotspot’ region.

  10. Response of N2O emissions to biochar amendment in a cultivated sandy loam soil during freeze-thaw cycles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Wang, Quan; Qi, Zhiming; Han, Jiangang; Li, Lanhai

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, an increasing number of studies have reported that soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be reduced by adding biochar. However, the effect of biochar amendment on soil N2O emissions during freeze-thaw cycle (FTC) is still unknown. In this laboratory study, biochar (0%, 2% and 4%, w/w) was added into a cultivated sandy loam soil and then treated with 15 times of FTC (each FTC consisted of freeze at −5/−10 °C for 24 h and thaw at 5/10 °C for 24 h), to test whether biochar can mitigate soil N2O emissions during FTC, and estimate the relationships between N2O emissions and soil inorganic nitrogen contents/microbial biomass content/enzyme activities. The results showed that biochar amendment suppressed soil N2O emissions by 19.9–69.9% as compared to soils without biochar amendment during FTC. However, N2O emissions were only significantly correlated to soil nitrate nitrogen (NO3−-N) contents, which decreased after biochar amendment, indicating that the decreased soil nitrification by adding biochar played an important role in mitigating N2O emissions during FTC. Further studies are needed to estimate the effectiveness of biochar amendment on reducing freeze-thaw induced N2O emissions from different soils under field conditions. PMID:27748462

  11. Response of N2O emissions to biochar amendment in a cultivated sandy loam soil during freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Wang, Quan; Qi, Zhiming; Han, Jiangang; Li, Lanhai

    2016-10-17

    In the last decade, an increasing number of studies have reported that soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be reduced by adding biochar. However, the effect of biochar amendment on soil N2O emissions during freeze-thaw cycle (FTC) is still unknown. In this laboratory study, biochar (0%, 2% and 4%, w/w) was added into a cultivated sandy loam soil and then treated with 15 times of FTC (each FTC consisted of freeze at -5/-10 °C for 24 h and thaw at 5/10 °C for 24 h), to test whether biochar can mitigate soil N2O emissions during FTC, and estimate the relationships between N2O emissions and soil inorganic nitrogen contents/microbial biomass content/enzyme activities. The results showed that biochar amendment suppressed soil N2O emissions by 19.9-69.9% as compared to soils without biochar amendment during FTC. However, N2O emissions were only significantly correlated to soil nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) contents, which decreased after biochar amendment, indicating that the decreased soil nitrification by adding biochar played an important role in mitigating N2O emissions during FTC. Further studies are needed to estimate the effectiveness of biochar amendment on reducing freeze-thaw induced N2O emissions from different soils under field conditions.

  12. Assessment of N2O emission from a photobioreactor treating ammonia-rich swine wastewater digestate.

    PubMed

    Mezzari, Melissa P; da Silva, Márcio L B; Nicoloso, Rodrigo S; Ibelli, Adriana M G; Bortoli, Marcelo; Viancelli, Aline; Soares, Hugo M

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the interactions between naturally occurring bacteria and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris within a lab scale photobioreactor treating ammonia-rich swine wastewater digestate effluent. Nitrification and denitrification were assessed by targeting ammonia monoxygenases (amoA), nitrate (narG), nitrite (nirS), nitric oxide (norB) and nitrous oxide (nosZ) reductases genes. Oxygen produced from microalgae photosynthesis stimulated nitrification. Under limiting carbon availability (i.e., <1.44 for mg TOC/mg NO2-N and 1.72 for mg TOC/mg NO3-N), incomplete denitrification led to accumulation of NO2 and NO3. Significant N2O emission (up to 118 μg N2O-N) was linked to NO2 metabolism in Chlorella. The addition of acetate as external carbon source recovered heterotrophic denitrification activity suppressing N2O emission. Effluent methane concentrations trapped within photobioreactor was removed concomitantly with ammonia. Overall, closed photobioreactors can be built to effectively remove nitrogen and mitigate simultaneously greenhouse gases emissions that would occur otherwise in open microalgae-based wastewater treatment systems.

  13. Global trends in terrestrial denitrification and N2O emissions for the period 1900-2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, L.; Beusen, A.; Griffioen, J.; Van Groenigen, J.; Hefting, M.; Oenema, O.; Van Puijenbroek, P.; Seitzinger, S.; Slomp, C. P.; Stehfest, E.

    2012-12-01

    Estimates of global terrestrial denitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission are presented for the period 1900 to 2000 and scenarios for the period 2000-2050 based on the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Soil nitrogen (N) budgets are used in a global distributed flow-path model with 0.5 by 0.5 degree resolution, representing denitrification and N2O emissions from soils, groundwater and riparian zones. Total agricultural and natural N inputs from N fertilizers, animal manure, biological N fixation and N deposition increased from ~155 to ~345 Tg of N yr-1 (Tg = teragram; 1 Tg = 1012 g) between 1900 and 2000; depending on the scenario, inputs will further increase to ~408 to ~510 Tg of N yr-1 in 2050. In the period 1900-2000, the soil N budget surplus (inputs minus withdrawal by plants) increased from 118 to 202 Tg yr-1, and this may remain stable or further increase to 275 Tg per year in 2050, depending on the scenario. Estimates indicate that N2 production from denitrification increased from 52 to 96 Tg yr-1 between 1900 and 2000, and N2O-N emissions from 10 to 12 Tg of N yr-1. The major part (70%) of global N2 and N2O-N (92%) production occurred in soils in 2000. A further increase of denitrification is foreseen to 142 Tg N2-N and 16 Tg of N2O-N yr-1 in 2050. Our results indicate that riparian buffer zones are an important source of N2O. Soils are key sites for denitrification and are much more important than groundwater and riparian zones in controlling the N flow to rivers and the oceans. The total (temporary) storage in deep groundwater between 1900 and 2000 amounts to around 376 Tg of N. Despite the removal of N through denitrification, the N flow from diffuse sources on land to rivers increased from 38 to 65 Tg of N yr-1 between 1900 and 2000, with a further increase of up to 84 Tg of N yr-1 in 2050. The major causes of uncertainty in our estimates are the difficulties associated with measurements and models of denitrification. With the projected increase

  14. [Effects of typical herbicides on soil respiration and N2O emissions from soil added with different nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing; Shi, Chun-Xing; Shi, Kun; Yan, Ru-Bin; Jiang, Jing-Yan; Wu, Yi-Zhong

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the effects of typical herbicides on soil respiration and N2O emissions from soil added with different nitrogen fertilizers, a laboratory incubation experiment was carried out using a modified gas chromatograph (Agilent 4890D) method. The results showed that with (NH4)2SO4 amendment, soil respiration and N2O emissions from the Atrazine and Paraquat treatments had no significant difference in comparison to the control (P > 0.05). Glyphosate significantly inhibited soil respiration by 21.5% (P < 0.05) and had no obvious influence on N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Tribenuron-methyl significantly promoted soil respiration with the increase of 14.3% (P < 0.05) and also had no obvious influence on N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Acetochlor significantly increased soil respiration and N2O emissions (P < 0.05) with the increase of 6.1% and 45.1%, respectively. With urea application, Atrazine and Acetochlor had no significant influence on soil respiration and N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Paraquat increased N2O emissions significantly (P < 0.05)with the increase of 43.5% and had no significant influence on soil respiration ( P > 0.05). Glyphosate significantly inhibited soil respiration by 17.5% (P < 0.05), and had no significant influence on N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Tribenuron-methyl enhanced soil respiration and N2O emissions significantly (P < 0.05), and its soil respiration and N2O emissions were 1.3 and 1.6 times higher than those from the control. Due to the complexity of effects of different herbicides on microbial physiological metabolism, long-term in-situ studies need to be carried out to better understand the effect of various herbicides on greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Verifying the UK N_{2}O emission inventory with tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnell, Ed; Meneguz, Elena; Skiba, Ute; Misselbrook, Tom; Cardenas, Laura; Arnold, Tim; Manning, Alistair; Dragosits, Ulli

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a key greenhouse gas (GHG), with a global warming potential ˜300 times greater than that of CO2. N2O is emitted from a variety of sources, predominantly from agriculture. Annual UK emission estimates are reported, to comply with government commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The UK N2O inventory follows internationally agreed protocols and emission estimates are derived by applying emission factors to estimates of (anthropogenic) emission sources. This approach is useful for comparing anthropogenic emissions from different countries, but does not capture regional differences and inter-annual variability associated with environmental factors (such as climate and soils) and agricultural management. In recent years, the UK inventory approach has been refined to include regional information into its emissions estimates (e.g. agricultural management data), in an attempt to reduce uncertainty. This study attempts to assess the difference between current published inventory methodology (default IPCC methodology) and a revised approach, which incorporates the latest thinking, using data from recent work. For 2013, emission estimates made using the revised approach were 30 % lower than those made using default IPCC methodology, due to the use of lower emission factors suggested by recent projects (www.ghgplatform.org.uk, Defra projects: AC0116, AC0213 and MinNO). The 2013 emissions estimates were disaggregated on a monthly basis using agricultural management (e.g. sowing dates), climate data and soil properties. The temporally disaggregated emission maps were used as input to the Met Office atmospheric dispersion model NAME, for comparison with measured N2O concentrations, at three observation stations (Tacolneston, E England; Ridge Hill, W England; Mace Head, W Ireland) in the UK DECC network (Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change). The Mace Head site, situated on the west coast of Ireland, was

  16. Verifying the UK agricultural N2O emission inventory with tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnell, E. J.; Meneguz, E.; Skiba, U. M.; Misselbrook, T. H.; Cardenas, L. M.; Arnold, T.; Manning, A.; Dragosits, U.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a key greenhouse gas (GHG), with a global warming potential 300 times greater than that of CO2. N2O is emitted from a variety of sources, predominantly from agriculture. Annual UK emission estimates are reported, to comply with government commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The UK N2O inventory follows internationally agreed protocols and emission estimates are derived by applying emission factors to estimates of (anthropogenic) emission sources. This approach is useful for comparing anthropogenic emissions from different countries, but does not capture regional differences and inter-annual variability associated with environmental factors (such as climate and soils) and agricultural management. In recent years, the UK inventory approach has been refined to include regional information into its emissions estimates, in an attempt to reduce uncertainty. This study attempts to assess the difference between current published inventory methodology (default IPCC methodology) and an alternative approach, which incorporates the latest thinking, using data from recent work. For 2013, emission estimates made using the alternative approach were 30 % lower than those made using default IPCC methodology, due to the use of lower emission factors suggested by recent projects (Defra projects: AC0116, AC0213 and MinNO). The 2013 emissions estimates were disaggregated on a monthly basis using agricultural management (e.g. sowing dates), climate data and soil properties. The temporally disaggregated emission maps were used as input to the Met Office atmospheric dispersion model NAME, for comparison with measured N2O concentrations, at three observation stations (Tacolneston, E. England; Ridge Hill, W. England; Mace Head, W. Ireland) in the UK DECC network (Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change). The Mace Head site, situated on the west coast of Ireland, was used to establish baseline concentrations. The

  17. NO and N2O emissions from agricultural fields in the North China Plain: Origination and mitigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Mu, Yujing; Zhou, Yizhen; Tian, Di; Liu, Junfeng; Zhang, Chenglong

    2016-05-01

    Agricultural soil has been recognized as a major source of atmospheric NO and N2O emissions which have important impacts on regional and global environments. Here we comparably investigated the effects of ammonium, nitrate fertilizers and nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) addition on NO and N2O emissions from the agricultural soil in the North China Plain (NCP). Compared with the ammonium fertilizer application, the reductions of NO emissions caused by nitrate fertilizer and DCD addition were 100% and 93%, and of N2O emissions were 54% and 74%, respectively. Remarkable reductions of NO and N2O emissions were also observed from five different agricultural soils in the NCP by replacing ammonium with nitrate fertilizer, indicating that nitrification is the predominant process for the emissions of NO and N2O from the soils in the vast area of NCP. NO emission peaks were found to be several days later than N2O peaks after the application of ammonium fertilizer and flooding irrigation, implying that most of NO initially produced via nitrification process might be fast reduced to N2O under the high soil moisture condition. Interestingly, the relative contribution of denitrification to N2O emission showed obviously time-dependent, e.g., evident N2O emission caused by the application of nitrate was only observed after the basal fertilization for the maize and the topdressing for the wheat. Replacing ammonium with nitrate fertilizer and mixing with the nitrification inhibitor are verified to be effective measures for mitigating NO and N2O emissions from arable soils in the NCP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Crafting biochars to reduce N2O and CO2 emissions while also improving soil quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Jeff; Ippolito, Jim; Spokas, Kurt; Sigua, Gilbert; Kammann, Claudia; Wrage-Monnig, Nicole; Borchard, Nils; Schirrmann, Michael; Estavillo, Jose Maria; Fuertes-Mendizabal, Teresa; Menendez, Sergio; Cayuela, Maria Luz

    2017-04-01

    Biochar used as an amendment has been linked to nitrous oxide (N2O) emission reductions, a decrease in nitrogen (N) leaching, and soil quality improvements (e.g., soil carbon sequestration, pH, etc.). While numerous articles will support these three facts, conversely, there are reports of no to marginal influences. One reason for the mixed biochar performance could be related to applying biochar with incorrect chemical and physical characteristics. As a means to increase biochar efficiency, we introduced the concept of crafting biochars with properties attuned to specific soil deficiencies. Implementing this concept requires a literature review to identify salient biochar characteristics that reduces N2O emissions, impacts N availability, while also improving soil quality. Thus, scientists from the USDA-ARS and through a coalition of European scientists under the FACCE-JPI umbrella have conceived the DesignChar4food (d4f) project. In this project, scientists are working collaboratively to further this concept to match the appropriate biochar for selective soil quality improvement, retain N for crops, and promote greenhouse gas reductions. This presentation will highlight results from the d4f team compromising a meta-analysis of articles on biochar:N2O dynamics, N availability, and how designer biochars can target specific soil quality improvements.

  19. High-Resolution Upscaling of Closed Chamber Fluxes for N2o Emissions from China's Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Shang, Z.; Ciais, P.; Piao, S.; Raymond, P. A.; Tao, S.; Zeng, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Moving from local toward global N2O emissions brings up numerous issues related to data processing, aggregation, tradeoffs between model quality and data quality, and prioritization of data collection and/or compilation efforts. We studied these issues in the context of modelling China's N2O emissions from agricultural soils. We developed a spatially-explicit model (PKU-N2O-Agr model) for high-resolution mapping of N2O emissions based on the idea of Hole-in-the-Pipe Model. We collected 709 site-year records (504 for upland and 205 for paddy) at 106 experimental sites across China from 1994 to 2013 and calibrated the observed N2O flux by using the Bayesian Recursive Regression Tree algorithm. The calibrated PKU-N2O-Agr model is applied to simulate China's N2O emissions from upland and paddy cropland at 1-km spatial resolution and to examine the variable importance and sensitivity for N2O emissions as well as scaling dependence of the effect-response relationships. The N2O emissions in 2008 are 615 GgN2O/yr and ~25% lower than PKU-N2O and EDGAR v4.2 global product sampled over China. The average coefficients of determination between observed and simulated results were 0.91 for upland and 0.92 for paddy cropland, which indicate the using a simplified data-driven approach with data of high resolution could produce accurate and reliable results. Emission factors (considering background emissions) for paddy and upland soils are 0.6% and 0.8% of N inputs, which are 2 times of IPCC default but half of the mean of observations, respectively. SOC is the most important for capturing the variability of N2O emissions from upland, whereas N inflow is the critical factor for paddy cropland. Different with previous works, the marginal sensitivities of environmental factors on agricultural N2O emissions are calculated, which is of great use for verifying process-based simulation model when being applied in China (e.g., DNDC). Both critical factors and the effect

  20. Contributions of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Nitrifiers to Soil NO and N2O Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Tortoso, A. C.; Hutchinson, G. L.

    1990-01-01

    Soil emission of gaseous N oxides during nitrification of ammonium represents loss of an available plant nutrient and has an important impact on the chemistry of the atmosphere. We used selective inhibitors and a glucose amendment in a factorial design to determine the relative contributions of autotrophic ammonium oxidizers, autotrophic nitrite oxidizers, and heterotrophic nitrifiers to nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from aerobically incubated soil following the addition of 160 mg of N as ammonium sulfate kg−1. Without added C, peak NO emissions of 4 μg of N kg−1 h−1 were increased to 15 μg of N kg−1 h−1 by the addition of sodium chlorate, a nitrite oxidation inhibitor, but were reduced to 0.01 μg of N kg−1 h−1 in the presence of nitrapyrin [2-chloro-6-(trichloromethyl)-pyridine], an inhibitor of autotrophic ammonium oxidation. Carbon-amended soils had somewhat higher NO emission rates from these three treatments (6, 18, and 0.1 μg of N kg−1 h−1 after treatment with glucose, sodium chlorate, or nitrapyrin, respectively) until the glucose was exhausted but lower rates during the remainder of the incubation. Nitrous oxide emission levels exhibited trends similar to those observed for NO but were about 20 times lower. Periodic soil chemical analyses showed no increase in the nitrate concentration of soil treated with sodium chlorate until after the period of peak NO and N2O emissions; the nitrate concentration of soil treated with nitrapyrin remained unchanged throughout the incubation. These results suggest that chemoautotrophic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria are the predominant source of NO and N2O produced during nitrification in soil. PMID:16348220

  1. Optimal estimation of regional N2O emissions using a three-dimensional global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Golombek, A.; Prinn, R.

    2004-12-01

    In this study, we use the MATCH (Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry) model and Kalman filtering techniques to optimally estimate N2O emissions from seven source regions around the globe. The MATCH model was used with NCEP assimilated winds at T62 resolution (192 longitude by 94 latitude surface grid, and 28 vertical levels) from July 1st 1996 to December 31st 2000. The average concentrations of N2O in the lowest four layers of the model were then compared with the monthly mean observations from six national/global networks (AGAGE, CMDL (HATS), CMDL (CCGG), CSIRO, CSIR and NIES), at 48 surface sites. A 12-month-running-mean smoother was applied to both the model results and the observations, due to the fact that the model was not able to reproduce the very small observed seasonal variations. The Kalman filter was then used to solve for the time-averaged regional emissions of N2O for January 1st 1997 to June 30th 2000. The inversions assume that the model stratospheric destruction rates, which lead to a global N2O lifetime of 130 years, are correct. It also assumes normalized emission spatial distributions from each region based on previous studies. We conclude that the global N2O emission flux is about 16.2 TgN/yr, with {34.9±1.7%} from South America and Africa, {34.6±1.5%} from South Asia, {13.9±1.5%} from China/Japan/South East Asia, {8.0±1.9%} from all oceans, {6.4±1.1%} from North America and North and West Asia, {2.6±0.4%} from Europe, and {0.9±0.7%} from New Zealand and Australia. The errors here include the measurement standard deviation, calibration differences among the six groups, grid volume/measurement site mis-match errors estimated from the model, and a procedure to account approximately for the modeling errors.

  2. Constraining N2O emissions since 1940 by firn air isotope measurements in both hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopiou, Markella; Martinerie, Patricia; Sapart, Celia; Witrant, Emmanuel; Monteil, Guillaume; Ishijima, Kentaro; Kaiser, Jan; Levin, Ingeborg; Sowers, Todd; Blunier, Thomas; Etheridge, David; Dlugokencky, Ed; van de Wal, Roderik; Röckmann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    N2O is currently the 3rd most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in terms of radiative forcing and its atmospheric mole fraction is rising steadily. To quantify the growth rate and its causes, we performed a multi-site reconstruction of the atmospheric N2O mole fraction and isotopic composition using firn air data collected from Greenland and Antarctica in combination with a firn diffusion and densification model. The multi-site reconstruction showed that while the global mean N2O mole fraction increased from (290±1) nmol mol-1 in 1940 to (322±1) nmol mol-1 in 2008 the isotopic δ values of atmospheric N2O decreased by (- 2.2±0.2) ‰ for δ15Nav, (- 1.0±0.3) ‰ for δ18O, (- 1.3±0.6) ‰ for δ15Nα, and (- 2.8±0.6) ‰ for δ15Nβover the same period. The detailed temporal evolution of the mole fraction and isotopic composition derived from the firn air model was then used in a two-box atmospheric model (comprising a stratospheric and a tropospheric box) to infer changes in the isotopic source signature over time. The precise value of the source strength depends on the choice of the N2O lifetime, which we choose to be 123 a. Adopting this lifetime results in total average source isotopic signatures of (- 7.6±0.8) ‰ (vs. Air-N2) for δ15Nav, (32.2±0.2) ‰ (vs. VSMOW) for δ18O, (- 3.0±1.9) ‰ (vs. Air-N2) for δ15Nα, and (- 11.7±2.3) ‰ (vs. Air-N2) for δ15Nβ over the investigated period. δ15Navand δ15Nβ show some temporal variability while the other source isotopic signatures remain unchanged. The 15N site-preference (= δ15Nα - δ15Nβ) can be used to reveal further information on the source emission origins. Based on the changes in the isotopes we conclude that the main contribution to N2O changes in the atmosphere since 1940 is from soils, with agricultural soils being the principal anthropogenic component, which is in line with previous studies.

  3. Regulation of denitrification at the cellular level: a clue to the understanding of N2O emissions from soils

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, Lars R.; Bergaust, Linda; Liu, Binbin; Frostegård, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Denitrifying prokaryotes use NOx as terminal electron acceptors in response to oxygen depletion. The process emits a mixture of NO, N2O and N2, depending on the relative activity of the enzymes catalysing the stepwise reduction of NO3− to N2O and finally to N2. Cultured denitrifying prokaryotes show characteristic transient accumulation of NO2−, NO and N2O during transition from oxic to anoxic respiration, when tested under standardized conditions, but this character appears unrelated to phylogeny. Thus, although the denitrifying community of soils may differ in their propensity to emit N2O, it may be difficult to predict such characteristics by analysis of the community composition. A common feature of strains tested in our laboratory is that the relative amounts of N2O produced (N2O/(N2+N2O) product ratio) is correlated with acidity, apparently owing to interference with the assembly of the enzyme N2O reductase. The same phenomenon was demonstrated for soils and microbial communities extracted from soils. Liming could be a way to reduce N2O emissions, but needs verification by field experiments. More sophisticated ways to reduce emissions may emerge in the future as we learn more about the regulation of denitrification at the cellular level. PMID:22451108

  4. Estimating CH4 and N2O Emissions Using Tower Measurements in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S.; Zhao, C.; Hsu, Y.; Andrews, A. E.; Bianco, L.; Vaca, P.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Wilczak, J. M.; Fischer, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Based on an inverse modeling approach, we report spatio-temporally-resolved emissions for major non-CO2 greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) in California's Central Valley using measurements from a collaborative tower network. This large dataset, for the first time, allows quantification of the seasonal and inter-annual variations in California emissions, facilitating validation of uncertain state-wide annual emission totals that will be subject to future regulation by AB-32. Seasonally varying regional methane emissions (~100km) are estimated by scaling high-resolution (10-km scale) CH4 emission maps (initially tied to estimated state totals) for major known sources using a Bayesian inversion model to provide optimal agreement with aggregate mixing ratio data measured at the CARB-CEC-LBNL-NOAA 5-tower network. Two years of continuous CH4 measurements from the Walnut Grove (WGC) tall-tower indicate that annual CH4 emissions north of WGC (the southern end of the Sacramento Valley) are 2 - 3 times greater than the un-scaled inventory, with stronger summertime emissions that are likely driven by agriculture. South of WGC (in the Northern San Joaquin Valley) emissions are 0.9 - 1.5 times greater than the un-scaled inventory with small seasonal variation, where dairy emissions are expected to be dominant. Preliminary measurements from the 5-tower network suggest that long term data collected from those sites will greatly increase the ability to quantify and apportion CH4 emissions at 50 - 100 km scales over the entire Valley. Two years of daily N2O flask measurements from WGC indicate that N2O emissions are 2 - 3 times higher than the EDGAR3.2 emission inventory in Central California. Applying these scaling factors to the remainder of the California landscape suggests that total non-CO2 GHG's constitute 15 - 25% of California's total GHG emissions, and hence that mitigation of non-CO2 GHG emissions could meaningfully reduce California's overall GHG burden.

  5. Global metaanalysis of the nonlinear response of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to fertilizer nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbak, Iurii; Millar, Neville; Robertson, G. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that also depletes stratospheric ozone. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate is the best single predictor of N2O emissions from agricultural soils, which are responsible for ∼50% of the total global anthropogenic flux, but it is a relatively imprecise estimator. Accumulating evidence suggests that the emission response to increasing N input is exponential rather than linear, as assumed by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change methodologies. We performed a metaanalysis to test the generalizability of this pattern. From 78 published studies (233 site-years) with at least three N-input levels, we calculated N2O emission factors (EFs) for each nonzero input level as a percentage of N input converted to N2O emissions. We found that the N2O response to N inputs grew significantly faster than linear for synthetic fertilizers and for most crop types. N-fixing crops had a higher rate of change in EF (ΔEF) than others. A higher ΔEF was also evident in soils with carbon >1.5% and soils with pH <7, and where fertilizer was applied only once annually. Our results suggest a general trend of exponentially increasing N2O emissions as N inputs increase to exceed crop needs. Use of this knowledge in GHG inventories should improve assessments of fertilizer-derived N2O emissions, help address disparities in the global N2O budget, and refine the accuracy of N2O mitigation protocols. In low-input systems typical of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, modest N additions will have little impact on estimated N2O emissions, whereas equivalent additions (or reductions) in excessively fertilized systems will have a disproportionately major impact. PMID:24927583

  6. N2O emissions in tropical rainforest and rubber plantation, the indicator from landuse changing in Xishuangbanna, Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjun; Zhu, Jing; Ji, Hong-li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Gao, Jin-Bo; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Zheng, Xunhua

    2017-04-01

    To understand the effects of landuse on N2O emissions and local climate change in the tropics, we measured N2O fluxes from a primary tropical rainforest (TRF, with treatments of litter removal and control) and a fertilized rubber plantation (RP, with treatments of fertilization (75 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and unfertilization) at Xishuangbanna, southwest China since 2012. The results have shown: 1) Fertilized RP N2O emission is bimodel, one peak after dry season fertilizer, another after rainy season fertilizer. Otherwise, the unfertilized RP and TRF have the similar seasonal dynamic with one peak in the middle of rainy season. 2) due to the fertilizer influence, the poaitive correlation between soil temperature/soil moisture and N2O was more significantly in unfertilized RP than fertilized RP respectively litter input changed the dominated controller of N2O emission in TRF: litter carbon input and soil DOC content for control treatment and, soil temperature and soil NO3- -N for litter removal treatment. 3) lab incubation indicated denitrification and nitrification as the main source for N2O emission in TRF and RP, respectively. 4) The N2O emissions from the fertilized and unfertilized plots in RP were 4.0 and 2.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively, from control and litter removal plots in TRF were 0.48 and 0.32 kg N ha-1 yr-1,respectively. 5) 100-year carbon dioxide equivalence of N2O from fertilized RP offsets 5.8% and 31.5% of carbon sink of the rubber plantation and local TRF, respectively. Upscaling it to the whole Xishuangbanna, N2O emissions from fertilized RP offset 17.1% of the tropical rainforest's carbon sink. When tropical rainforests are converted to fertilized rubber plantations, the N2O emission seasonal dynamic and mechanisms changed, the global warming effect is enhanced.

  7. N2O emissions in tropical rainforest and rubber plantation, the indicator from landuse changing in Xishuangbanna, Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Zhu, J.; Ji, H. L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, X.

    2016-12-01

    To understand the effects of landuse on N2O emissions and local climate change in the tropics, we measured N2O fluxes from a primary tropical rainforest (TRF, with treatments of litter removal and control) and a fertilized rubber plantation (RP, with treatments of fertilization (75 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and unfertilization) at Xishuangbanna, southwest China since 2012. The results have shown: 1) Fertilized RP N2O emission is bimodel, one peak after dry season fertilizer, another after rainy season fertilizer. Otherwise, the unfertilized RP and TRF have the similar seasonal dynamic with one peak in the middle of rainy season. 2) due to the fertilizer influence, the poaitive correlation between soil temperature/soil moisture and N2O was more significantly in unfertilized RP than fertilized RP respectively litter input changed the dominated controller of N2O emission in TRF: litter carbon input and soil DOC content for control treatment and, soil temperature and soil NO3- -N for litter removal treatment. 3) lab incubation indicated denitrification and nitrification as the main source for N2O emission in TRF and RP, respectively. 4) The N2O emissions from the fertilized and unfertilized plots in RP were 4.0 and 2.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively, from control and litter removal plots in TRF were 0.48 and 0.32 kg N ha-1 yr-1,respectively. 5) 100-year carbon dioxide equivalence of N2O from fertilized RP offsets 5.8% and 31.5% of carbon sink of the rubber plantation and local TRF, respectively. Upscaling it to the whole Xishuangbanna, N2O emissions from fertilized RP offset 17.1% of the tropical rainforest's carbon sink. When tropical rainforests are converted to fertilized rubber plantations, the N2O emission seasonal dynamic and mechanisms changed, the global warming effect is enhanced.

  8. Global metaanalysis of the nonlinear response of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions to fertilizer nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, Iurii; Millar, Neville; Robertson, G Philip

    2014-06-24

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that also depletes stratospheric ozone. Nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate is the best single predictor of N2O emissions from agricultural soils, which are responsible for ∼ 50% of the total global anthropogenic flux, but it is a relatively imprecise estimator. Accumulating evidence suggests that the emission response to increasing N input is exponential rather than linear, as assumed by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change methodologies. We performed a metaanalysis to test the generalizability of this pattern. From 78 published studies (233 site-years) with at least three N-input levels, we calculated N2O emission factors (EFs) for each nonzero input level as a percentage of N input converted to N2O emissions. We found that the N2O response to N inputs grew significantly faster than linear for synthetic fertilizers and for most crop types. N-fixing crops had a higher rate of change in EF (ΔEF) than others. A higher ΔEF was also evident in soils with carbon >1.5% and soils with pH <7, and where fertilizer was applied only once annually. Our results suggest a general trend of exponentially increasing N2O emissions as N inputs increase to exceed crop needs. Use of this knowledge in GHG inventories should improve assessments of fertilizer-derived N2O emissions, help address disparities in the global N2O budget, and refine the accuracy of N2O mitigation protocols. In low-input systems typical of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, modest N additions will have little impact on estimated N2O emissions, whereas equivalent additions (or reductions) in excessively fertilized systems will have a disproportionately major impact.

  9. N2O and NO emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, S W H; Callens, J; Mampaey, K E; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Volcke, E I P

    2012-01-01

    This contribution deals with NO and N2O emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor. Two possible model scenarios describing this emission by ammonium- oxidizing biomass have been compared in a simulation study of a granular sludge reactor for one-stage partial nitritation--Anammox. No significant difference between these two scenarios was noticed. The influence of the bulk oxygen concentration, granule size, reactor temperature and ammonium load on the NO and N2O emissions has been assessed. The simulation results indicate that emission maxima of NO and N2O coincide with the region for optimal Anammox conversion. Also, most of the NO and N2O are present in the off-gas, owing to the limited solubility of both gases. The size of granules needs to be large enough not to limit optimal Anammox activity, but not too large as this implies an elevated production of N2O. Temperature has a significant influence on N2O emission, as a higher temperature results in a better N-removal efficiency and a lowered N2O production. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there is a strong correlation between nitrite accumulation and N2O production. Further, three regions of operation can be distinguished: a region with high N2O, NO and nitrite concentration; a region with high N2 concentrations and, as such, high removal percentages; and a region with high oxygen and nitrate concentrations. There is some overlap between the first two regions, which is in line with the fact that maximum emission of NO and N2O coincides with the region for optimal Anammox conversion.

  10. Modelling the effect of aggregates on N2O emission from denitrification in an agricultural peat soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolk, P. C.; Hendriks, R. F. A.; Jacobs, C. M. J.; Moors, E. J.; Kabat, P.

    2011-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are highly variable in time, with high peak emissions lasting a few days to several weeks and low background emissions. This temporal variability is poorly understood which hampers the simulation of daily N2O emissions. In structured soils, like clay and peat, aggregates hamper the diffusion of oxygen, which leads to anaerobic microsites in the soil, favourable for denitrification. Diffusion of N2O out of the aggregates is also hampered, which leads to delayed emissions and increased reduction of N2O to N2. In this model simulation study we investigate the effect of aggregates in soils on the N2O emissions. We present a parameterization to simulate the effects of aggregates on N2O production by denitrification and on N2O reduction. The parameterization is based on the mobile-immobile model concept. It was implemented in a field-scale hydrological-biogeochemical model combination. We compared the simulated fluxes with observed fluxes from a fertilized and drained peat soil under grass. The results of this study show that aggregates strongly affect the simulated N2O emissions: peak emissions are lower, whereas the background emissions are slightly higher. Including the effect of aggregates caused a 40% decrease in the simulated annual emissions relative to the simulations without accounting for the effects of aggregates. The new parameterization significantly improved the model performance regarding simulation of observed daily N2O fluxes; r2 and RMSE improved from 0.11 and 198 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1 to 0.41 and 40 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1, respectively. Our analyses of the model results show that aggregates have a larger impact on the reduction than on the production of N2O. Reduction of N2O is more sensitive to changes in the drivers than production of N2O and is in that sense the key to understanding N2O emissions from denitrification. The effects of changing environmental conditions on reduction of N2O relative to N2O production strongly depend on

  11. Effects of Biochar Addition on CO2 and N2O Emissions following Fertilizer Application to a Cultivated Grassland Soil

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Kim, Hyunjin; Yoo, Gayoung

    2015-01-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration potential of biochar should be considered together with emission of greenhouse gases when applied to soils. In this study, we investigated CO2 and N2O emissions following the application of rice husk biochars to cultivated grassland soils and related gas emissions tos oil C and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Treatments included biochar addition (CHAR, NO CHAR) and amendment (COMPOST, UREA, NO FERT). The biochar application rate was 0.3% by weight. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions differed according to biochar addition and amendments. CO2 emissions from the COMPOST soils were significantly higher than those from the UREA and NO FERT soils and less CO2 emission was observed when biochar and compost were applied together during the summer. Overall N2O emission was significantly influenced by the interaction between biochar and amendments. In UREA soil, biochar addition increased N2O emission by 49% compared to the control, while in the COMPOST and NO FERT soils, biochar did not have an effect on N2O emission. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain the higher N2O emissions upon biochar addition to UREA soil than other soils. Labile C in the biochar may have stimulated microbial N mineralization in the C-limited soil used in our study, resulting in an increase in N2O emission. Biochar may also have provided the soil with the ability to retain mineral N, leading to increased N2O emission. The overall results imply that biochar addition can increase C sequestration when applied together with compost, and might stimulate N2O emission when applied to soil amended with urea. PMID:26020941

  12. Effects of Biochar Addition on CO2 and N2O Emissions following Fertilizer Application to a Cultivated Grassland Soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Kim, Hyunjin; Yoo, Gayoung

    2015-01-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration potential of biochar should be considered together with emission of greenhouse gases when applied to soils. In this study, we investigated CO2 and N2O emissions following the application of rice husk biochars to cultivated grassland soils and related gas emissions tos oil C and nitrogen (N) dynamics. Treatments included biochar addition (CHAR, NO CHAR) and amendment (COMPOST, UREA, NO FERT). The biochar application rate was 0.3% by weight. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions differed according to biochar addition and amendments. CO2 emissions from the COMPOST soils were significantly higher than those from the UREA and NO FERT soils and less CO2 emission was observed when biochar and compost were applied together during the summer. Overall N2O emission was significantly influenced by the interaction between biochar and amendments. In UREA soil, biochar addition increased N2O emission by 49% compared to the control, while in the COMPOST and NO FERT soils, biochar did not have an effect on N2O emission. Two possible mechanisms were proposed to explain the higher N2O emissions upon biochar addition to UREA soil than other soils. Labile C in the biochar may have stimulated microbial N mineralization in the C-limited soil used in our study, resulting in an increase in N2O emission. Biochar may also have provided the soil with the ability to retain mineral N, leading to increased N2O emission. The overall results imply that biochar addition can increase C sequestration when applied together with compost, and might stimulate N2O emission when applied to soil amended with urea.

  13. Improved global estimation of N2O emission from nitrification using a process-based model and meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatomi, M. I.; Hajima, T.; Ito, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is recognized as one of the important anthropogenic greenhouse gases and also stratospheric ozone-depleting substances. Natural soil and fertilizer in croplands are large sources of N2O to the atmosphere, and so their global estimation is of great importance for prediction and mitigation. Two major processes of N2O production, i.e. nitrification and denitrification, were identified and parameterized using the leaky-pipe scheme. However, their biogeochemical mechanisms are very complicated and it is difficult to fully include them into process-based models, leading to substantial estimation uncertainty. In croplands, estimation is even more difficult because it depends on the amount, composition, and timing of nitrogenous fertilizer input. In this study, we focused on N2O emission from nitrification, which can play a dominant role in aerobic soils. In the present terrestrial nitrogen cycle models, fractionation of nitrogen in gross nitrification is parameterized in very simplified manner. First, we conducted a meta-analysis of the fraction of N2O emission from gross nitrification in relation to temperature, moisture (water-filled pore space), and pH, for a wide variety of soils including arable lands. We obtained typical values of N2O emission ratio from gross nitrification for different soil textures. Second, we assessed sensitivity of N2O emission to the assumption of nitrification fractionation, using a process-based model VISIT. We changed the value of N2O fraction in gross nitrification in different manners: default constant ratio, meta-analysis-based ratio, and parameterizations used in other models (DNDC and DLEM). We investigate how much the assumption of nitrification N2O emission affects global estimation of N2O budget and other parts of nitrogen cycle.

  14. Source portioning of N_{2}O emissions after long term elevation of soil temperature in a permanent grassland soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen-Willems, Anne; Lanigan, Gary; Clough, Timothy; Andresen, Louise; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Several methods, such as source portioning, have been used to quantify the contributions of individual N pools to N2O emissions. These methods however, assume the absence of hybrid reactions such as co-denitrification, which were previously identified as important. A straight forward method portioning N2O fluxes into four different production processes, including a hybrid reaction, was therefore developed. This method portioned the N2O fluxes in nitrification, denitrification, oxidation of organic matter and co-denitrification, using data on 45R and 46R of the N2O flux and the 15N content of the NO3- and NH4+ in the soil. This newly developed method was used to analyse the N2O emissions from incubated soil, which was previously subjected to 6 years of elevated soil temperature of +0, +1, +2 or +3 ° C. N2O emissions were measured and analysed at four time points in the six days following, NO315NH4 Gly or 15NO3NH4 Gly, label addition. The oxidation of organic N was found to be the main source of N2O fluxes at all sampling dates, comprising between 63 and 85% of the total N2O flux. The percentage contribution made by organic N to N2O fluxes increased over the sampling period, rising from a minimum of 40% in the control treatment, to virtually 100% across all treatments by Day 6. Compared to the control treatment, denitrification contributed less to N2O from soil subjected to +2 and +3 ° C warming (p <0.0001 and p=0.002, respectively). Co-denitrification only contributed to the N2O flux during the first day after substrate addition. The highest amount of N2O produced via co-denitrification was found under the control treatment. From soil subjected to +2 and +3 ° C treatments, the contribution of co-denitrification was minor. However, these differences in co-denitrification were not significant. This research showed the importance of the oxidation of organic N in N2O emissions. It should therefore not be omitted as a potential source in source portioning. Emissions

  15. Minimizing N2O emissions and carbon footprint on a full-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caballero, A; Aymerich, I; Marques, Ricardo; Poch, M; Pijuan, M

    2015-03-15

    A continuous, on-line quantification of the nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a full-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) placed in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was performed in this study. In general, N2O emissions from the biological wastewater treatment system were 97.1 ± 6.9 g N2O-N/Kg [Formula: see text] consumed or 6.8% of the influent [Formula: see text] load. In the WWTP of this study, N2O emissions accounted for over 60% of the total carbon footprint of the facility, on average. Different cycle configurations were implemented in the SBR aiming at reaching acceptable effluent values. Each cycle configuration consisted of sequences of aerated and non-aerated phases of different time length being controlled by the ammonium set-point fixed. Cycles with long aerated phases showed the largest N2O emissions, with the consequent increase in carbon footprint. Cycle configurations with intermittent aeration (aerated phases up to 20-30 min followed by short anoxic phases) were proven to effectively reduce N2O emissions, without compromising nitrification performance or increasing electricity consumption. This is the first study in which a successful operational strategy for N2O mitigation is identified at full-scale.

  16. Historical Pattern and Future Trajectories of Terrestrial N2O Emission driven by Multi-factor Global Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Tian, H.; Yang, J.; Zhang, B.; Xu, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is among the most important greenhouse gases only next to carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) due to its long life time and high radiative forcing (with a global warming potential 265 times as much as CO2 at 100-year time horizon). The Atmospheric concentration of N2O has increased by 20% since pre-industrial era, and this increase plays a significant role in shaping anthropogenic climate change. However, compared to CO2- and CH4-related research, fewer studies have been performed in assessing and predicting the spatiotemporal patterns of N2O emission from natural and agricultural soils. Here we used a coupled biogeochemical model, DLEM, to quantify the historical and future changes in global terrestrial N2O emissions resulting from natural and anthropogenic perturbations including climate variability, atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, land use and land cover changes, and agricultural land management practices (i.e., synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use, manure application, and irrigation etc.) over the period 1900-2099. We focused on inter-annual variation and long-term trend of terrestrial N2O emission driven by individual and combined environmental changes during historical and future periods. The sensitivity of N2O emission to climate, atmospheric composition, and human activities has been examined at biome-, latitudinal, continental and global scales. Future projections were conducted to identify the hot spots and hot time periods of global N2O emission under two emission scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5). It provides a modeling perspective for understanding human-induced N2O emission growth and developing potential management strategies to mitigate further atmospheric N2O increase and climate warming.

  17. Constraining N2O emissions since 1940 using firn air isotope measurements in both hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopiou, Markella; Martinerie, Patricia; Sapart, Célia J.; Witrant, Emmanuel; Monteil, Guillaume; Ishijima, Kentaro; Bernard, Sophie; Kaiser, Jan; Levin, Ingeborg; Blunier, Thomas; Etheridge, David; Dlugokencky, Ed; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Röckmann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    N2O is currently the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in terms of radiative forcing and its atmospheric mole fraction is rising steadily. To quantify the growth rate and its causes over the past decades, we performed a multi-site reconstruction of the atmospheric N2O mole fraction and isotopic composition using new and previously published firn air data collected from Greenland and Antarctica in combination with a firn diffusion and densification model. The multi-site reconstruction showed that while the global mean N2O mole fraction increased from (290 ± 1) nmol mol-1 in 1940 to (322 ± 1) nmol mol-1 in 2008, the isotopic composition of atmospheric N2O decreased by (-2.2 ± 0.2) ‰ for δ15Nav, (-1.0 ± 0.3) ‰ for δ18O, (-1.3 ± 0.6) ‰ for δ15Nα, and (-2.8 ± 0.6) ‰ for δ15Nβ over the same period. The detailed temporal evolution of the mole fraction and isotopic composition derived from the firn air model was then used in a two-box atmospheric model (comprising a stratospheric box and a tropospheric box) to infer changes in the isotopic source signature over time. The precise value of the source strength depends on the choice of the N2O lifetime, which we choose to fix at 123 years. The average isotopic composition over the investigated period is δ15Nav = (-7.6 ± 0.8) ‰ (vs. air-N2), δ18O = (32.2 ± 0.2) ‰ (vs. Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water - VSMOW) for δ18O, δ15Nα = (-3.0 ± 1.9) ‰ and δ15Nβ = (-11.7 ± 2.3) ‰. δ15Nav, and δ15Nβ show some temporal variability, while for the other signatures the error bars of the reconstruction are too large to retrieve reliable temporal changes. Possible processes that may explain trends in 15N are discussed. The 15N site preference ( = δ15Nα - δ15Nβ) provides evidence of a shift in emissions from denitrification to nitrification, although the uncertainty envelopes are large.

  18. [Annual dynamics of CO2, CH4, N2O emissions from freshwater marshes and affected by nitrogen fertilization].

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-chun; Zhang, Li-hua; Wang, Yi-yong; Zhao, Zhi-chun

    2006-12-01

    Annual dynamics of CO2, CH4, N2O emissions from freshwater marshes and affected by nitrogen fertilization were studied in situ in Sanjiang Plain of Northeast China from June 2002 to December 2004, using the static opaque chamber-GC techniques. The results showed that there was significant seasonal and annual variation in the CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions. The ecosystem emission of CO2 reached a maximum of 779.33- 965.40 mg x (mxh)(-1) in July and August, CH4 reached a maximum of 19.19-30.52 mg x (mxh)(-1) in August, N2O reached a maximum of 0.072-0.15 mgx (mxh)(-1) in May and September, respectively. While the minimum of the CO2, CH4, N2O emission was 2.36-18.73 mg x (mxh)(-1), - 0.35 - 0.59 mg x (mxh)(-1), - 0.032- 0.009 mg (mxh)(-1), respectively, which occurs in winter. The freshwater marsh was the sink of N2O in winter. Temperature was a primary factor, controlling greenhouse gas seasonal emissions in freshwater marshes; while the precipitation and floodwater depth were the dominating influencing factors, affecting the greenhouse gas annual variations. Especially, the influence of precipitation on CH4 emissions was more obvious, comparing with the CO2 and N20 emissions. And the summer higher CH4 emission was mainly induced by the ice and snow thawing water in winter. Respiration of the ecosystem and CH4 emission were exponentially dependent on soil temperature of 5cm depth, while the N2O emission was not related to the soil temperature and water depth. The greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4, N2O) emissions were significantly influenced by nitrogen fertilization in Sanjiang Plain. The CO2, CH4, N2O flux of fertilization increased 34% , 145% , 110% , respectively, comparing to the control treatment.

  19. Using stable isotopes to follow excreta N dynamics and N2O emissions in animal production systems.

    PubMed

    Clough, T J; Müller, C; Laughlin, R J

    2013-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the dominant anthropogenic stratospheric ozone-depleting emission. The tropospheric concentration of N2O continues to increase, with animal production systems constituting the largest anthropogenic source. Stable isotopes of nitrogen (N) provide tools for constraining emission sources and, following the temporal dynamics of N2O, providing additional insight and unequivocal proof of N2O source, production pathways and consumption. The potential for using stable isotopes of N is underutilised. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of what these tools are and demonstrate where and how these tools could be applied to advance the mitigation of N2O emissions from animal production systems. Nitrogen inputs and outputs are dominated by fertiliser and excreta, respectively, both of which are substrates for N2O production. These substrates can be labelled with 15N to enable the substrate-N to be traced and linked to N2O emissions. Thus, the effects of changes to animal production systems to reduce feed-N wastage by animals and fertiliser wastage, aimed at N2O mitigation and/or improved animal or economic performance, can be traced. Further 15N-tracer studies are required to fully understand the dynamics and N2O fluxes associated with excreta, and the biological contribution to these fluxes. These data are also essential for the new generation of 15N models. Recent technique developments in isotopomer science along with stable isotope probing using multiple isotopes also offer exciting capability for addressing the N2O mitigation quest.

  20. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on CH4 and N2O emissions from paddy fields].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongjun; Zheng, Xunhua; Wang, Yuesi; Han, Shenghui; Huang, Yao; Zhu, Jianguo

    2002-10-01

    Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on CH4 and N2O emissions during the paddy rice-growing season were examined in a FACE (free-air carbon dioxide enrichment) study. The emission fluxes of CH4 and N2O from paddy rice fields were measured using methods based on static opaque-chamber and gas chromatography techniques. Synthetic fertilizer N was amended for the rice-growing season at two rates, 150 and 250 kgN.hm-2 and the atmospheric CO2 was enriched by 200 mumol.mol-1. At both N levels, the preliminary results indicate that no significant effect of CO2 enrichment on CH4 and N2O emissions from the rice paddy fields was detected. The result on CH4 emissions is inconsistent with the most literatures, and the result on N2O emissions is consistent with the most literatures.

  1. Projections of oceanic N2O emissions in the 21st century using the IPSL Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Rey, J.; Bopp, L.; Gehlen, M.; Tagliabue, A.; Gruber, N.

    2015-07-01

    The ocean is a substantial source of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, but little is known about how this flux might change in the future. Here, we investigate the potential evolution of marine N2O emissions in the 21st century in response to anthropogenic climate change using the global ocean biogeochemical model NEMO-PISCES. Assuming nitrification as the dominant N2O formation pathway, we implemented two different parameterizations of N2O production which differ primarily under low-oxygen (O2) conditions. When forced with output from a climate model simulation run under the business-as-usual high-CO2 concentration scenario (RCP8.5), our simulations suggest a decrease of 4 to 12 % in N2O emissions from 2005 to 2100, i.e., a reduction from 4.03/3.71 to 3.54/3.56 TgN yr-1 depending on the parameterization. The emissions decrease strongly in the western basins of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, while they tend to increase above the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), i.e., in the eastern tropical Pacific and in the northern Indian Ocean. The reduction in N2O emissions is caused on the one hand by weakened nitrification as a consequence of reduced primary and export production, and on the other hand by stronger vertical stratification, which reduces the transport of N2O from the ocean interior to the ocean surface. The higher emissions over the OMZ are linked to an expansion of these zones under global warming, which leads to increased N2O production, associated primarily with denitrification. While there are many uncertainties in the relative contribution and changes in the N2O production pathways, the increasing storage seems unequivocal and determines largely the decrease in N2O emissions in the future. From the perspective of a global climate system, the averaged feedback strength associated with the projected decrease in oceanic N2O emissions amounts to around -0.009 W m-2 K-1, which is comparable to the potential increase from terrestrial N2O sources. However

  2. Partitioning Residue-derived and Residue-induced Emissions of N2O Using 15N-labelled Crop Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, R. E.; Carverhill, J.; Lemke, R.; Knight, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of N2O emissions in Canada indicate that 17% of all agriculture-based emissions are associated with the decomposition of crop residues. However, research specific to the western Canadian prairies (including Saskatchewan) has shown that the N2O emission factor for N sources in this region typically ranges between 0.2 and 0.6%, which is well below the current IPCC default emission factor of 1.0%. Thus, it stands to reason that emissions from crop residues should also be lower than those calculated using the current IPCC emission factor. Current data indicates that residue decomposition, N mineralization and N2O production are affected by a number of factors such as C:N ratio and chemical composition of the residue, soil type, and soil water content; thus, a bench-scale incubation study was conducted to examine the effects of soil type and water content on N2O emissions associated with the decomposition of different crop residues. The study was carried out using soils from the Black, Dark Brown, Brown, and Gray soil zones and was conducted at both 50% and 70% water-filled pore space (WFPS); the soils were amended with 15N-labeled residues of wheat, pea, canola, and flax, or with an equivalent amount of 15N-labeled urea; 15N2O production was monitored using a Picarro G5101-i isotopic N2O analyzer. Crop residue additions to the soils resulted in both direct and indirect emissions of N2O, with residue derived emissions (RDE; measured as 15N2O) generally exceeding residue-induced emissions (RIE) at 50% WFPS—with RDEs ranging from 42% to 88% (mean = 58%) of the total N2O. Conversely, at 70% WFPS, RDEs were generally lower than RIEs—ranging from 21% to 83% (mean = 48%). Whereas both water content and soil type had an impact on N2O production, there was a clear and consistent trend in the emission factors for the residues; i.e., emissions were always greatest for the canola residue and lowest for the wheat residue and urea fertilizer; and intermediate for pea

  3. Micrometeorological measurements of N2O and CH4 emissions from a municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    McBain, Matthew C; Warland, Jon S; McBride, Raymond A; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia

    2005-10-01

    Micrometeorological measurements of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were made at the decommissioned Park Road Landfill in Grimsby, Ontario, Canada between June and August 2002. The influence of precipitation, air temperature, wind speed and barometric pressure on the temporal variability of landfill biogas emissions was assessed. Gas flux measurements were obtained using a micrometeorological mass balance measurement technique [integrated horizontal flux (IHF)] in conjunction with two tunable diode laser trace gas analyser (TDLTGA) systems. This method allows for continuous, non-intrusive measurements of gas flux at high temporal resolution. Mean fluxes of N2O were negligible over the duration of the study (-0.23 to 0.02 microg m(-2) s(-1)). In contrast, mean emissions of CH4 were much greater (80.4 to 450.8 microg m(-2) s(-1)) and varied both spatially and temporally. Spatial variations in CH4 fluxes were observed between grass kill areas (biogas 'hot spots') and the densely grass-covered areas of the landfill. Temporal variations in CH4 fluxes were also observed, due at least in part to barometric pressure, wind speed and precipitation effects.

  4. Huge N2O emission from drained organic soil is related to seasonally mobile oxic-anoxic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander; Malte, Winther; Anders, Priemé; Thomas, Blunier; Søren, Christensen

    2017-04-01

    N2O emission from soil is often regulated by the more or less sporadic occurrence of small anoxic volumes which makes the process highly variable at the microscale. In a search for situations where variation in N2O emission was at the mesoscale rather than at the microscale we selected a drained and nitrogen rich organic soil on a slope. In this situation we would expect a spatially more uniform distribution of anoxic volumes due to a widespread decomposition of soil organic matter at the increased oxygen availability. We did find such gradients in N2O emission at the mesoscale in the 10 meter range. Massive N2O emissions did occur at an interface likely defined by oxic conditions upslope producing nitrate from mineralizing organic nitrogen and anoxic conditions downslope converting the nitrate into N2O. This N2O producing interface moved uphill in the wet season and downhill in the dry season so the clear mesoscale pattern also had a clear temporal component. One hectare soil encompassing such an interface emitted 73 kg N in N2O annually which makes it relevant to look for such interface sites on slopes of drained organic soils elsewhere

  5. Evaluating Observational Constraints on N2O Emissions via Information Content Analysis Using GEOS-Chem and its Adjoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Steele, P.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 300 times that of CO2, and plays a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Human perturbation of the nitrogen cycle has led to a rise in atmospheric N2O, but large uncertainties exist in the spatial and temporal distribution of its emissions. Here we employ a 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to derive new constraints on the space-time distribution of global land and ocean N2O fluxes. Based on an ensemble of global surface measurements, we find that emissions are overestimated over Northern Hemisphere land areas and underestimated in the Southern Hemisphere. Assigning these biases to particular land or ocean regions is more difficult given the long lifetime of N2O. To quantitatively evaluate where the current N2O observing network provides local and regional emission constraints, we apply a new, efficient information content analysis technique involving radial basis functions. The technique yields optimal state vector dimensions for N2O source inversions, with model grid cells grouped in space and time according to the resolution that can actually be provided by the network of global observations. We then use these optimal state vectors in an analytical inversion to refine current top-down emission estimates.

  6. Effects of flooding cycles in the Pantanal on the turnover of soil nitrogen pools and emission of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liengaard, L.; Nielsen, L. P.; Revsbech, N. P.; Elberling, B.; Priemé, A.; Prast, A. E.; Kühl, M.

    2011-06-01

    The global nitrous oxide (N2O) budget remains unbalanced. Currently, ~25 % of the global N2O emission is ascribed to uncultivated tropical soils, but the exact locations and controlling mechanisms are not clear. In this study, we present the first detailed study of the dynamics of soil nitrogen pools and flux of N2O from the world's largest wetland Pantanal, South America. At three long-term measurement sites we measured porewater pH, NO3-, NH4+ , N2O and O2 as well as N2O dynamics in soil slurry, and in situ fluxes of N2O and CO2. The pool of inorganic nitrogen changed (7.1-92 μg NH4+-N g dw-1, and 0.1-201 μg NO3--N g dw-1) with the seasonal flooding and drying cycles, indicating dynamic shifts between ammonification, nitrification and denitrification. In the field, O2 penetrated to a depth of 60 cm in dry soil, but O2 was rapidly depleted in response to precipitation. Soil pH fluctuated from pH 7-7.5 in flooded soil to pH 3.5-4.5 in the same drained soil. Microsensor measurements showed rapid N2O accumulation reaching >500-1000 Pa in soil slurries due to incomplete denitrification. In situ fluxes of N2O were comparable to heavily fertilized forest or agricultural soils. The dominating parameter affecting N2O emission rate was precipitation inducing peak emissions of >3 mmol N2O m-2 d-1, while the mean daily flux was 0.43 mmol N2O m-2 d-1. Single measurement based screening of in situ activity at 10 Pantanal sites during dry conditions averaged 0.39 mmol N2O m-2 d-1. The in situ N2O fluxes were only weakly correlated (r2 = 0.177) with NO3- and pH value, showing a tendency (p = 0.063) for NO3- concentration to be positively correlated with the in situ N2O flux and a weaker tendency (p = 0.138) for the pH value to be negatively correlated with the in situ N2O flux. Over 170 days of the drained period we estimated non-wetted drained soil to contribute 70.0 mmol N2O m-2, while rain induced peak events contributed 9.2 mmol N2O m-2, resulting in a total N2O emission

  7. [An investigation of the CH4 and N2O emission factors of light-duty gasoline vehicles].

    PubMed

    He, Li-qiang; Song, Jing-hao; Hu, Jing-nan; Xie, Shu-xia; Zu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    In China, most of the studies of vehicular greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been focused on CO2 emissions. The investigation of non-CO2 GHGs, e.g. CH4 and N2O, are mainly carried out based on models developed in Europe and the US, and there are few vehicle emission tests for CH4 and N2O. In this study, 22 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) were selected for tailpipe CH4 and N2O tests using chassis dynamometer, and their emission factors were obtained based on the NEDC driving cycle. The results showed that the CH4 emission factors of China I to China IV LDGVs were 0.048 g x km(-1), 0.048 g x km(-1), 0.038 g x km(-1) and 0.028 g x km(-1), respectively. For N2O, the emission factors of China I to China IV were 0.045 g x km(-1), 0.039 g x km(-1), 0.026 g x km(-1) and 0.021 g x km(-1), respectively. In the GHGs emissions (in terms of CO2 Eq.) per LDGV, the percentage of CH4 and N2O emissions decreased gradually with tightening of emission standards. The contribution of CH4 emissions was lower than 0.5% in the total emissions, and N2O share rate was between 3.03% and 6.35%. Therefore, tightening emission standards can effectively reduce the CH4 and N2O emissions, to mitigate the greenhouse effects caused by vehicle emissions.

  8. Reducing N2O and NO emissions while sustaining crop productivity in a Chinese vegetable-cereal double cropping system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhisheng; Yan, Guangxuan; Zheng, Xunhua; Wang, Rui; Liu, Chunyan; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2017-09-06

    High nitrogen (N) inputs in Chinese vegetable and cereal productions played key roles in increasing crop yields. However, emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) and atmospheric pollutant nitric oxide (NO) increased too. For lowering the environmental costs of crop production, it is essential to optimize N strategies to maintain high crop productivity, while reducing the associated N losses. We performed a 2 year-round field study regarding the effect of different combinations of poultry manure and chemical N fertilizers on crop yields, N use efficiency (NUE) and N2O and NO fluxes from a Welsh onion-winter wheat system in the North China Plain. Annual N2O and NO emissions averaged 1.14-3.82 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) (or 5.54-13.06 g N kg(-1) N uptake) and 0.57-1.87 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) (or 2.78-6.38 g N kg(-1) N uptake) over all treatments, respectively. Both N2O and NO emissions increased linearly with increasing total N inputs, and the mean annual direct emission factors (EFd) were 0.39% for N2O and 0.19% for NO. Interestingly, the EFd for chemical N fertilizers (N2O: 0.42-0.48%; NO: 0.07-0.11%) was significantly lower than for manure N (N2O: 1.35%; NO: 0.76%). Besides, a negative power relationship between yield-scaled N2O, NO or N2O + NO emissions and NUE was observed, suggesting that improving NUE in crop production is crucial for increasing crop yields while decreasing nitrogenous gas release. Compared to the current farmers' fertilization rate, alternative practices with reduced chemical N fertilizers increased NUE and decreased annual N2O + NO emissions substantially, while crop yields remained unaffected. As a result, annual yield-scaled N2O + NO emissions were reduced by > 20%. Our study shows that a reduction of current application rates of chemical N fertilizers by 30-50% does not affect crop productivity, while at the same time N2O and NO emissions would be reduced significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of different vegetation zones on CH4 and N2O emissions in coastal wetlands: a model case study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Lixin; Bao, Shumei; Liu, Huamin; Yu, Junbao; Wang, Yu; Shao, Hongbo; Ouyang, Yan; An, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    The coastal wetland ecosystems are important in the global carbon and nitrogen cycle and global climate change. For higher fragility of coastal wetlands induced by human activities, the roles of coastal wetland ecosystems in CH4 and N2O emissions are becoming more important. This study used a DNDC model to simulate current and future CH4 and N2O emissions of coastal wetlands in four sites along the latitude in China. The simulation results showed that different vegetation zones, including bare beach, Spartina beach, and Phragmites beach, produced different emissions of CH4 and N2O in the same latitude region. Correlation analysis indicated that vegetation types, water level, temperature, and soil organic carbon content are the main factors affecting emissions of CH4 and N2O in coastal wetlands.

  10. Effects of Different Vegetation Zones on CH4 and N2O Emissions in Coastal Wetlands: A Model Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Lixin; Bao, Shumei; Liu, Huamin; Yu, Junbao; Wang, Yu; Shao, Hongbo; Ouyang, Yan; An, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    The coastal wetland ecosystems are important in the global carbon and nitrogen cycle and global climate change. For higher fragility of coastal wetlands induced by human activities, the roles of coastal wetland ecosystems in CH4 and N2O emissions are becoming more important. This study used a DNDC model to simulate current and future CH4 and N2O emissions of coastal wetlands in four sites along the latitude in China. The simulation results showed that different vegetation zones, including bare beach, Spartina beach, and Phragmites beach, produced different emissions of CH4 and N2O in the same latitude region. Correlation analysis indicated that vegetation types, water level, temperature, and soil organic carbon content are the main factors affecting emissions of CH4 and N2O in coastal wetlands. PMID:24892044

  11. Controlling factors of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions at the field-scale in an agricultural slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilain, Guillaume; Garnier, Josette; Tallec, Gaëlle; Tournebize, Julien; Cellier, Pierre; Flipo, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Agricultural practices widely contribute to the atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration increase and are the major source of N2O which account for 24% of the global annual emission (IPCC, 2007). Soil nitrification and denitrification are the microbial processes responsible for the production of N2O, which also depends on soil characteristics and management. Besides their control by various factors, such as climate, soil conditions and management (content of NO3- and NH4+, soil water content, presence of degradable organic material…), the role of topography is less known although it can play an important role on N2O emissions (Izaurralde et al., 2004). Due to the scarcity of data on N2O direct vs. indirect emission rate from agriculture in the Seine Basin (Garnier et al., 2009), one of the objectives of the study conducted here was to determine the N2O emission rates of the various land use representative for the Seine Basin, in order to better assess the direct N2O emissions, and to explore controlling factor such as meteorology, topography, soil properties and crop successions. The main objective of this study was at the same time to characterize N2O fluxes variability along a transect from an agricultural plateau to a river and to analyze the influence of landscape position on these emissions. We conducted this study in the Orgeval catchment (Seine basin, France; between 48°47' and 48°55' N, and 03°00' and 03°55' E) from May 2008 to August 2009 on two agricultural fields cropped with wheat, barley, oats, corn. N2O fluxes were monitored from weekly to bimonthly using static manual chambers placed along the chosen transect in five different landscape positions from the plateau to the River. This study has shown that soil moisture (expressed as Water Filled Pore Space) and NO3- soil concentrations explained most of the N2O flux variability during the sampling period. Most of N2O was emitted directly after N fertilization application during a relatively

  12. Natural and Anthropogenic Controls over Global Terrestrial N2O Emission Growth at a Century-Long Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Tian, H.; Kamaljit, K.; Zhang, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Atmospheric concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) has increased by 20% relative to pre-industrial level. It has attracted growing attention since N2O has long life time and radiative forcing 265 times higher than CO2 at 100-year time horizon. Global N2O emission from terrestrial ecosystem is among the most important contributors to the increase of atmospheric N2O. However, compared to CO2- and CH4-related research, less intensive studies have been performed in assessing the spatiotemporal patterns of terrestrial N2O emission and attributing its changes to both natural and anthropogenic disturbances across the globe. Here we integrated gridded time-series data of climate variability, atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, land use and land cover changes, and agricultural land management practices (i.e., synthetic nitrogen fertilizer use, manure application, and irrigation etc.) to a process-based land ecosystem model, DLEM, for answering the above questions. During 1900-2010, the inter-annual variation and long-term trend of terrestrial N2O emission driven by individual and combined environmental changes have been examined. Through this, we distinguished and quantified the relative contributions of changes in climate, atmospheric composition, and human activities to N2O emission growth at biome-, latitudinal, continental and global scales. The impacts of climate variability, and increasing nitrogen input, particularly nitrogen fertilizer use along with enhanced food production, have been paid special attention. Hot spots and hot time periods of global N2O emission are identified in this study. It provides clue for scientific community and policy makers to develop potential management strategies for mitigating atmospheric N2O increase and climate warming.

  13. A review on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions during biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater and sludge reject water.

    PubMed

    Massara, Theoni Maria; Malamis, Simos; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan Antonio; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Katsou, Evina

    2017-10-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important pollutant which is emitted during the biological nutrient removal (BNR) processes of wastewater treatment. Since it has a greenhouse effect which is 265 times higher than carbon dioxide, even relatively small amounts can result in a significant carbon footprint. Biological nitrogen (N) removal conventionally occurs with nitrification/denitrification, yet also through advanced processes such as nitritation/denitritation and completely autotrophic N-removal. The microbial pathways leading to the N2O emission include hydroxylamine oxidation and nitrifier denitrification, both activated by ammonia oxidizing bacteria, and heterotrophic denitrification. In this work, a critical review of the existing literature on N2O emissions during BNR is presented focusing on the most contributing parameters. Various factors increasing the N2O emissions either per se or combined are identified: low dissolved oxygen, high nitrite accumulation, low chemical oxygen demand to nitrogen ratio, slow growth of denitrifying bacteria, uncontrolled pH and temperature. However, there is no common pattern in reporting the N2O generation amongst the cited studies, a fact that complicates its evaluation. When simulating N2O emissions, all microbial pathways along with the potential contribution of abiotic N2O production during wastewater treatment at different dissolved oxygen/nitrite levels should be considered. The undeniable validation of the robustness of such models calls for reliable quantification techniques which simultaneously describe dissolved and gaseous N2O dynamics. Thus, the choice of the N-removal process, the optimal selection of operational parameters and the establishment of validated dynamic models combining multiple N2O pathways are essential for studying the emissions mitigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. N2O and NO2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks with Advanced Emission Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preble, C.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2014-12-01

    Diesel engines are the largest source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions nationally, and also a major contributor to the black carbon (BC) fraction of fine particulate matter (PM). Recently, diesel particle filter (DPF) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) emission control systems that target exhaust PM and NOx have become standard equipment on new heavy-duty diesel trucks. However, the deliberate catalytic oxidation of engine-out nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in continuously regenerating DPFs leads to increased tailpipe emission of NO2. This is of potential concern due to the toxicity of NO2 and the resulting increases in atmospheric formation of other air pollutants such as ozone, nitric acid, and fine PM. While use of SCR reduces emissions of both NO and NO2, it may lead to increased emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. Here we report results from on-road measurements of heavy-duty diesel truck emissions conducted at the Port of Oakland and the Caldecott Tunnel in the San Francisco Bay Area. Emission factors (g pollutant per kg of diesel) were linked via recorded license plates to individual truck attributes, including engine model year and installed emission control equipment. Between 2009 and 2013, the fraction of DPF-equipped trucks at the Port of Oakland increased from 2 to 99%, and median engine age decreased from 11 to 6 years. Over the same period, fleet-average emission factors for black carbon and NOx decreased by 76 ± 22% and 53 ± 8%, respectively. However, direct emissions of NO2 increased, and consequently the NO2/NOx emission ratio increased from 0.03 ± 0.02 to 0.18 ± 0.03. Older trucks retrofitted with DPFs emitted approximately 3.5 times more NO2 than newer trucks equipped with both DPF and SCR. Preliminary data from summer 2014 measurements at the Caldecott Tunnel suggest that some older trucks have negative emission factors for N2O, and that for newer trucks, N2O emission factors have changed sign and

  15. Emissions of N2O, CH4 and CO2 from tropical forest soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Michael; Kaplan, Warren A.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1986-01-01

    Emissions of nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide were measured at diverse locations in tropical forests of Brazil, Ecuador, and Puerto Rico using a static open chamber technique. Mean fluxes to the atmosphere were 1.7 x 10 to the 10th, -0.7 x 10 to the 10th, and 1.5 x 10 to the 14th molecules/sq cm per s for N2O, CH4, and CO2, respectively. The data indicate that tropical forests contribute a significant fraction of the global source for atmospheric N2O, about 40 percent of the current source, and possibly 75 percent of the preindustrial source. Methane is consumed by soils on average, but the sink is an insignificant part (less than 5 percent) of the atmospheric cycle for the gas. Emissions of CO2 from forest soils are higher at equatorial sites than at middle or high latitudes, as expected from ecological considerations. Soils emit CO2 at rates more than twice as large as the rate of carbon infall in litter; hence much of the emitted CO2 must arise from root metabolism.

  16. Emissions of N2O, CH4 and CO2 from tropical forest soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Michael; Kaplan, Warren A.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    1986-01-01

    Emissions of nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide were measured at diverse locations in tropical forests of Brazil, Ecuador, and Puerto Rico using a static open chamber technique. Mean fluxes to the atmosphere were 1.7 x 10 to the 10th, -0.7 x 10 to the 10th, and 1.5 x 10 to the 14th molecules/sq cm per s for N2O, CH4, and CO2, respectively. The data indicate that tropical forests contribute a significant fraction of the global source for atmospheric N2O, about 40 percent of the current source, and possibly 75 percent of the preindustrial source. Methane is consumed by soils on average, but the sink is an insignificant part (less than 5 percent) of the atmospheric cycle for the gas. Emissions of CO2 from forest soils are higher at equatorial sites than at middle or high latitudes, as expected from ecological considerations. Soils emit CO2 at rates more than twice as large as the rate of carbon infall in litter; hence much of the emitted CO2 must arise from root metabolism.

  17. Mitigation of soil N2O emission by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Itakura, Manabu; Shimomura, Yumi; Wang, Yong; Yamamoto, Akinori; Tago, Kanako; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural soil is the largest source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. Soybean is an important leguminous crop worldwide. Soybean hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules. In soybean ecosystems, N2O emissions often increase during decomposition of the root nodules. Our previous study showed that N2O reductase can be used to mitigate N2O emission from soybean fields during nodule decomposition by inoculation with nosZ++ strains [mutants with increased N2O reductase (N2OR) activity] of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. Here, we show that N2O emission can be reduced at the field scale by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous nosZ+ strains of B. diazoefficiens USDA110 group isolated from Japanese agricultural fields. Our results also suggested that nodule nitrogen is the main source of N2O production during nodule decomposition. Isolating nosZ+ strains from local soybean fields would be more applicable and feasible for many soybean-producing countries than generating mutants. PMID:27633524

  18. Influence of biofilm thickness on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from denitrifying fluidized bed bioreactors (DFBBRs).

    PubMed

    Eldyasti, Ahmed; Nakhla, George; Zhu, Jesse

    2014-12-20

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a significant anthropogenic greenhouse gas emitted from biological nutrient removal (BNR) processes. This study tries to get a deeper insight into N2O emissions from denitrifying fluidized bed bioreactors (DFBBRs) and its relationship to the biofilm thickness, diffusivity, and reaction rates. The DFBBR was operated at two different organic and nitrogen loading rates of 5.9–7 kg COD/(m3 d) and 1.2–2 kg N/(m3 d), respectively. Results showed that the N2O conversion rate from the DFBBR at a biofilm thickness of 680 μm was 0.53% of the total influent nitrogen loading while at the limited COD and a biofilm thickness of 230 μm, the N2O conversion rate increased by 196–1.57% of the influent nitrogen loading concomitant with a sevenfold increase in liquid nitrite concentration. Comparing the N2O emissions at different biofilm thickness showed that the N2O emission decreased exponentially with biofilm thickness due to the retention of slow growth denitrifiers and the limited diffusivity of N2O.

  19. Mitigation of soil N2O emission by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Itakura, Manabu; Shimomura, Yumi; Wang, Yong; Yamamoto, Akinori; Tago, Kanako; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    Agricultural soil is the largest source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. Soybean is an important leguminous crop worldwide. Soybean hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules. In soybean ecosystems, N2O emissions often increase during decomposition of the root nodules. Our previous study showed that N2O reductase can be used to mitigate N2O emission from soybean fields during nodule decomposition by inoculation with nosZ++ strains [mutants with increased N2O reductase (N2OR) activity] of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. Here, we show that N2O emission can be reduced at the field scale by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous nosZ+ strains of B. diazoefficiens USDA110 group isolated from Japanese agricultural fields. Our results also suggested that nodule nitrogen is the main source of N2O production during nodule decomposition. Isolating nosZ+ strains from local soybean fields would be more applicable and feasible for many soybean-producing countries than generating mutants.

  20. Denitrifier communities in tank bromeliads and prospected N2O emissions from tank substrate upon increasing N-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, Marcel; Brandt, Franziska; Brenzinger, Kristof; Martinson, Guntars; Braker, Gesche

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that tropical rainforest soils with total emissions of 1.34 Tg N/yr from the tropics, play a significant role in the global N2O emissions scenarios. Significant contributions were reported particularly for tropical rainforest soils in South and Central America due to the large areas covered by rainforest in this region. In tropical rainforests of the Americas tank bromeliads constitute a prominent group of plants and were shown to significantly contribute to the production of the greenhouse gas methane from tropical forests. It is, however, essentially unknown whether and how bromeliads may contribute to the production of N2O, another important greenhouse gas. It is also unknown whether N2O emissions relate to atmospheric N-deposition and whether an increase in emissions is to be expected upon the prospected increase in N-deposition. We studied the propensity of tank substrate of the bromeliad Werauhia gladioliflora to emit N2O and how this potential is related to the underlying denitrifier communities. In tropical forests of Costa Rica Werauhia gladioliflora is very abundant with 9.85 specimen m-2. Incubation of the tank substrate with increasing amounts of fertilizer to reflect predicted N-deposition scenarios resulted in proportionally increasing net N2O production. Based on the abundance of Werauhia gladioliflora we estimated annual emissions of 395 µg N2O-N m-2 day-1 for N-deposition levels to date which is in the range of tropical soils. At a surplus of N 70% of N2O produced were not reduced leading to accumulation of N2O which agreed well with the finding that 95% of the denitrifiers detected lacked a gene encoding a N2O-reductase and are therefore unable to reduce N2O to dinitrogen. Generally, denitrifiers were highly abundant and ready to denitrify immediately after provision of a nitrogen source because carbon is non-limiting in tank substrate. Our results suggest that tank bromeliad substrate may be a significant source of N2O in

  1. CH4 and N2O emissions embodied in international trade of meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, Dario; LoPresti, Anna; Davis, Steven J.; Bastianoni, Simone; Caldeira, Ken

    2014-11-01

    Although previous studies have quantified carbon dioxide emissions embodied in products traded internationally, there has been limited attention to other greenhouse gases such as methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Following IPCC guidelines, we estimate non-CO2 emissions from beef, pork and chicken produced in 237 countries over the period 1990-2010, and assign these emissions to the country where the meat is ultimately consumed. We find that, between 1990 and 2010, an average of 32.8 Mt CO2-eq emissions (using 100 year global warming potentials) are embodied in beef, pork and chicken traded internationally. Further, over the 20 year period, the quantity of CO2-eq emissions embodied in traded meat increased by 19%. The largest trade flows of emissions embodied in meat were from Brazil and Argentina to Russia (2.8 and 1.4 Mt of CO2-eq, respectively). Trade flows within the European region are also substantial: beef and pork exported from France embodied 3.3 Mt and 0.4 Mt of CO2-eq, respectively. Emissions factor of meat production (i.e. CO2-eq emissions per kg of meat) produced depend on ambient temperature, development level, livestock category (e.g. cattle, pork, and chicken) and livestock management practices. Thus, trade may result in an overall increase of GHG emissions when meat-consuming countries import meat from countries with a greater emissions intensity of meat production rather than producing the meat domestically. Comparing the emissions intensity of meat production of trading partners, we assess trade flows according to whether they tend to reduce or increase global emissions from meat production.

  2. Characterizing CH4 and N2O emissions from an intensive dairy operation in summer and fall in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Gaodi; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Zhiling; Ma, Wenqi; Li, Jianguo; Cai, Zhenjiang

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of the global warming potential of the dairy industry both in China and globally necessitates reliable characterization of CH4 and N2O emissions. However, CH4 and N2O emissions from dairy operations differ with feeds, herd structures and manure management practices, and the lack of N2O and CH4 emission measurements for China, especially for intensive dairy operations, causes substantial uncertainty in accounting for GHGs from dairy operation both in China and globally. In this study, CH4 and N2O emissions during summer to fall period from an intensive feedlot in China were characterized to fill the data gap. The diurnal CH4 emission patterns for milking cows and heifers were driven by the feeding activities and the diurnal N2O patterns by the diurnal changes in temperature. The CH4 emission rates of 397 g head-1 d-1 (23.63 L CH4 kg-1 milk) (in summer) and 279 g head-1 d-1 (in fall) for milking cows and heifers accounted for 5.17% and 7.68% of their daily gross energy intakes, whereas the N2O emission rates of 36.7 g head-1 d-1 (0.85 L N2O kg-1 milk) for milking cows and 24.2 g head-1 d-1 for heifers accounted for 4.25% and 6.86% of the daily feed N intake. The CH4 conversion factor and CH4 emission intensity in the measurement season for intensive dairy operations in China are lower than those for collective operations in China, and the CH4 emission intensity is similar to those in developed countries.

  3. Subsurface N cycling under variable paddy flood management: what role does it play in N2O emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Pierreux, Sofie; Decock, Charlotte; Romani, Marco; Sleutel, Steven; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing pressure to grow rice with less water in order to save water and mitigate methane (CH4) emissions. However, there is frequently a trade-off with yield declines and increased nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, potentially increasing the global warming potential of the system. A field trial in Northern Italy was established with two water regimes: continuously flooded (flooded) and alternate wetting and drying (AWD), to investigate the impact of such water management on N2O emissions and N cycling along a depth profile. Surface gas fluxes were complimented by depth profile measurements of soil gas, inorganic N, DOC, dissolved gas concentrations, redox potential and moisture. Sampling was concentrated around two periods during the 2015 growing season which were hypothesized to show significant variation in N dynamics; a fertilization event and final season drainage. For N cycling and N2O emissions, stable isotope measurements were taken to obtain process-level information in situ. During the first field campaign, maximum mean daily N2O emissions did not peak at fertilization but rather a week earlier, demonstrating a greater response to soil conditions (i.e. higher redox and lower moisture) than inorganic N concentrations. This was especially the case in the AWD treatment where emissions peaked at 82.3 ± 126.0 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1 relative to a peak of 2.83 ± 1.1 g N2O-N ha-1 d-1 in the flooded treatment. Considering the upper depths (0-15 cm), peak emissions corresponded well to higher redox potentials in the AWD treatment (72-406 mV versus -100 to -12 mV for AWD and flooded treatments, respectively). These emissions also correlated well to pore space N2O concentrations at 5 and 12.5 cm, suggesting important production of N2O at these depths and subsequent diffusion to the soil surface. Pore space and dissolved N2O concentrations were much lower in the flooded treatment and no such spikes were observed. No significant N2O emissions were observed in

  4. Mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2 O) emission from swine wastewater treatment in an aerobic bioreactor packed with carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Yamamoto-Ikemoto, Ryoko; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Hirofumi; Ogino, Akifumi; Osada, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2 O) emission from swine wastewater treatment was demonstrated in an aerobic bioreactor packed with carbon fibers (CF reactor). The CF reactor had a demonstrated advantage in mitigating N2 O emission and avoiding NOx (NO3  + NO2 ) accumulation. The N2 O emission factor was 0.0003 g N2 O-N/gTN-load in the CF bioreactor compared to 0.03 gN2 O-N/gTN-load in an activated sludge reactor (AS reactor). N2 O and CH4 emissions from the CF reactor were 42 g-CO2 eq/m(3) /day, while those from the AS reactor were 725 g-CO2 eq/m(3) /day. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in the CF reactor removed an average of 156 mg/L of the NH4 -N, and accumulated an average of 14 mg/L of the NO3 -N. In contrast, the DIN in the AS reactor removed an average 144 mg/L of the NH4 -N and accumulated an average 183 mg/L of the NO3 -N. NO2 -N was almost undetectable in both reactors.

  5. Biochar reduces efficiency of nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dymethylpyrazole phospate (DMPP) mitigating N2O emissions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuertes-Mendizábal, Teresa; Huérfano, Ximena; Menéndez, Sergio; González-Murua, Carmen; Begoña González-Moro, Mª; Ippolito, James; Kamann, Claudia; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Borchard, Nils; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Spokas, Kurt; Sigua, Gilbert; Novak, Jeff; Estavillo, José Mª

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is the strongest greenhouse gas associated with agricultural soils. Current agricultural practices, based on the use of N fertilizers, can lead to environmental N losses, with some losses occurring as N2O emissions. Among the strategies suggested by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to decrease N losses through agriculture is the utilization of nitrification inhibitors, such as DMPP (3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate). This compound inhibits nitrification, thus reducing N2O emissions. However, the efficiency of DMPP might be affected by soil amendments. One soil amendment is biochar, which typically increases soil C, can reduce N2O emissions, affect the retention of water, and alter the C and N cycle. Nevertheless, these effects are not uniformly observed across varying soil types, N fertilization schemes and biochar properties. Assuming that both DMPP and biochars with C/N > 30 ratios are presumably able to reduce soil N2O emissions, the aim of this study was to evaluate the synergic effect of a woody biochar applied in combination with DMPP on N2O emissions. For this purpose, a laboratory incubation study was conducted with a silt loam grassland soil and a biochar obtained from Pinus taeda at 500°C. The experimental design consisted of an arrangement including two biochar levels (0 and 2% (w/w)), three fertilization levels (unfertilized, fertilized and fertilized+DMPP) and two soil water content levels (40% and 80% of water filled pore space, WFPS), giving rise to 12 different individual treatments with four replications of each treatment. Soil N2O emissions were monitored over the incubation period (163 days). Results showed that DMPP reduced N2O emissions to levels comparable to the unfertilized controls. Biochar showed ability to mitigate N2O emissions only at the low soil water content (40% WFPS). However, when DMPP was applied to the biochar amended soil, a counteracting effect was observed, since the reduction in N2O emissions

  6. Effect of fertilizer and water content on N2O emission from three plantation soils in south China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-an; Zou, Bi; Xia, Han-ping; Ding, Yong-zhen; Tan, Wan-neng; Ma, Zhen-rong

    2005-01-01

    The effects of fertilizers and water content on N2O emission were studied using the three most typical plantation soils. Soil incubations were performed and fertilization and water content treatments were designed. At 25% of saturated water content(SWC), N2O emissions from the soil treated with urea, KNO3, (NH4)2 SO4 and KH2 PO4 were compared at application rates of 0, 100, 200, 300 and 500 kg/hm2. At 80% of SWC, similar experiments were carried out but at only one application rate(500 kg/hm2). N2O emissions at various water contents(20%, 35%, 50%, 65%, 80% and 100% of SWC) were studied. At low water content(25% of SWC), neither nitrogen nor phosphorus(or potassium) fertilizers led to a high level of N2O emission, which generally ranged from 2.03 to 29.02 microg/(m2 x h). However, at high water content(80% SWC), the fertilizers resulted in much greater N2O emission irregardless of soil tested. The highest N2O emission rates after 24 h of water addition were 1233 microg/(m2 x h) for S. superba soil, 1507 microg/(m2 x h) for P. elliottii soil and 1869 microg/ (m2 x h) for A. mangium soil respectively. N2O emission from soils treated with urea, (NH4)2 SO4 and KH2 PO4 immediately dropped to a low level but steadily increased to a very high level for the soil treated with KNO3. High NO3- content was a basis of high level of N2O emission. N2O emission rates from soils peaked shortly after flooding, rapidly dropping to a very low level in soil from non-legume plantations, but lasting for a relatively long period in soil from legume plantations. When soil water content increased equaling to or higher than 65%, the accumulated N2O emission over a period of 13 d ranged from 20.21-29.78 mg/m2 for S. superba, 30.57-70.12 mg/m2 for P. elliottii and 300.89-430.51 mg/m2 for A. mangium. The critical water content was 50% of SWC, above which a high level of N2O emission could be expected, and below which very little N2O emissions were detected. The results suggest that, at low

  7. On-road measurement of NH3 and N2O emissions from a Euro V heavy-duty vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Bertoa, Ricardo; Mendoza-Villafuerte, Pablo; Bonnel, Pierre; Lilova, Velizara; Hill, Leslie; Perujo, Adolfo; Astorga, Covadonga

    2016-08-01

    The use of selective catalytic reduction systems (SCR) to abate NOx vehicular emissions brings new concerns on the emissions of the byproducts NH3 and N2O. Therefore, NH3 and N2O on-road emissions from a Euro V truck equipped with a SCR were measured in real time using a QCL-IR. Results bring to light possibility to perform this kind of real time measurements for other pollutants besides, hydrocarbons, NOx, CO and CO2. The capability to measure NH3 and N2O in a second-by-second basis will allow applying the currently agreed regulatory emissions evaluation for gaseous compounds. Average N2O emission factors calculated applying the current PEMS-based data analysis to all available windows from the tests ranged from 0.063 g/kWh to 0.139 g/kWh. Average NH3 concentrations ranged from 0.9 ppm to 5.7 ppm. Although calculated average N2O and NH3 emissions were within current limits, NOx emissions were substantially higher than Euro V limits under the studied conditions.

  8. Affect of dairy cow manure, urine, and slurry on N<2>O, CO<2>, and CH<4> emissions from Pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorich, C.; Varner, R. K.; Contosta, A.; Li, C.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture is responsible for roughly 25% of total anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) globally. These agricultural emissions are primarily in the form of methane (CH<4>) and nitrous oxide (N<2>O) where they account for roughly 40 and 80 percent of anthropogenic emissions of their gas, respectively. Measuring and modeling of these gases has remained difficult however as management varies between farms and N<2>O fluxes have been difficult to link to climate and site conditions. Most of these N<2>O fluxes occur during soil freeze-thaw and wetting-drying cycles as well as fertilizer addition moments, all of which are difficult to measure and harder yet to model. Thus the N<2>O flux remains poorly understood and may be underestimated in literature. This provides a problem in agriculture emissions as N use efficiency has been suggested as a proxy for farm scale emissions. On a farm scale these large fluxes of N<2>O from soil "hot moments" can account for up to 60% of the total GHG emissions and thus it is essential to capture the full flux. At the University of New Hampshire Agriculture Experiment Station's (NHAES) organic dairy farm a manure fertilizer experiment was conducted. Manure, urine, and slurry from the UNH dairy farms were collected, analyzed, and applied to pasture plots in May 2012 in order to examine N<2>O flux hot moments. Sites were measured at least bi-weekly with manual static flux chambers taken with soil temperature and moisture along with measurements for soil inorganic N, soil C:N, plant biomass and C:N, and soil pH. Gas samples were analyzed for CO<2>, CH<4>, and N<2>O. Emissions were compared with other fluxes from the farm ecosystem including; corn silage, free stall bedding, composting and solid manure, and a manure slurry tank.

  9. Wetting-induced pulses produced unexpectedly high emissions of N2O and NOx in a desert ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberwein, J. R.; Carey, C.; Aronson, E. L.; Jenerette, D.

    2015-12-01

    Approximately one third of Earth's land surface is subjected to arid conditions, and aridland soils have the potential for significant feedbacks to global climate change drivers, such as anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. This study examined wetting-induced pulses of N2O and NOx along a nitrogen deposition gradient in the Colorado Desert of southern California. Measurements were made before and following water (to simulate a 2 cm rain event) and nitrogen plus water additions (30 kg NH4NO3 ha-1) at 15 minutes, 12 hours and 24 hours post-wetting. We found nitrogenous fluxes that were substantially higher than expected. N2O fluxes, in particular were remarkably high reaching up to 200 ng N2O-N m-2 s-1, similar to agriculture levels and in the range of peat bog emissions. There was a clear transition between N2O emissions, which peaked 15 minutes after wetting, and NOx emissions, which peaked at the 12 hour timepoint. NOx emissions were also considerable, reaching as high as 350 ng NOx-N m-2 s-1. Both N2O and NOx fluxes responded strongly to water additions, demonstrating a clear wetting-induced pulse response. While N2O was not affected by nitrogen additions, NOx fluxes demonstrated a significant increase with nitrogen plus water over water alone (p=0.016). These results suggest that gaseous nitrogen export, particularly N2O emissions, is a greater form of nitrogen loss in arid systems than is currently assumed. This potential for high nitrogen emissions and the capacity for anthropogenic nitrogen deposition to increase these emissions present serious implications for local air quality and significant soil feedbacks to climate change.

  10. Global trends and uncertainties in terrestrial denitrification and N2O emissions

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, A. F.; Beusen, A. H. W.; Griffioen, J.; Van Groenigen, J. W.; Hefting, M. M.; Oenema, O.; Van Puijenbroek, P. J. T. M.; Seitzinger, S.; Slomp, C. P.; Stehfest, E.

    2013-01-01

    Soil nitrogen (N) budgets are used in a global, distributed flow-path model with 0.5° × 0.5° resolution, representing denitrification and N2O emissions from soils, groundwater and riparian zones for the period 1900–2000 and scenarios for the period 2000–2050 based on the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Total agricultural and natural N inputs from N fertilizers, animal manure, biological N2 fixation and atmospheric N deposition increased from 155 to 345 Tg N yr−1 (Tg = teragram; 1 Tg = 1012 g) between 1900 and 2000. Depending on the scenario, inputs are estimated to further increase to 408–510 Tg N yr−1 by 2050. In the period 1900–2000, the soil N budget surplus (inputs minus withdrawal by plants) increased from 118 to 202 Tg yr−1, and this may remain stable or further increase to 275 Tg yr−1 by 2050, depending on the scenario. N2 production from denitrification increased from 52 to 96 Tg yr−1 between 1900 and 2000, and N2O–N emissions from 10 to 12 Tg N yr−1. The scenarios foresee a further increase to 142 Tg N2–N and 16 Tg N2O–N yr−1 by 2050. Our results indicate that riparian buffer zones are an important source of N2O contributing an estimated 0.9 Tg N2O–N yr−1 in 2000. Soils are key sites for denitrification and are much more important than groundwater and riparian zones in controlling the N flow to rivers and the oceans. PMID:23713114

  11. [Effects of conservation tillage on soil CO2 and N2O emission during the following winter-wheat season].

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Hu, Zheng-Hu; Wu, Yang-Zhou; Sun, Yin-Yin; Sheng, Lu; Chen, Shu-Tao; Xiao, Qi-Tao

    2014-07-01

    In order to study the effect of conservation tillage on soil CO2 and N2O emissions in the following crop-growing season, field experiments were conducted in the winter wheat-growing season. Four treatments were conventional tillage (T), no-tillage with no straw cover (NT), no-tillage with straw cover (NTS), and conventional tillage with straw incorporation (TS), respectively. The CO2 and N2O fluxes were measured using a static chamber-gas chromatograph technique. The results showed that in the following winter wheat-growing season, conservation tillage did not change the seasonal pattern of CO2 and N2O emission fluxes from soil, and had no significant effect on crop biomass. Conservation tillage significantly reduced the accumulative amount of CO2 and N2O. Compared with the T treatment, the accumulative amount of CO2 under TS, NT, and NTS treatments were reduced by 5.95% (P = 0.132), 12.94% (P = 0.007), and 13.91% (P = 0.004), respectively, and the accumulative amount of N2O were significantly reduced by 31.23% (P = 0.000), 61.29% (P = 0.000), and 33.08% (P = 0.000), respectively. Our findings suggest that conservation tillage significantly reduced CO2 and N2O emission from soil in the following winter wheat-growing season.

  12. Biochar and denitrification in soils: when, how much and why does biochar reduce N2O emissions?

    PubMed Central

    Cayuela, Maria Luz; Sánchez-Monedero, Miguel Angel; Roig, Asunción; Hanley, Kelly; Enders, Akio; Lehmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural soils represent the main source of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Recently, interactions of black carbon with the nitrogen cycle have been recognized and the use of biochar is being investigated as a means to reduce N2O emissions. However, the mechanisms of reduction remain unclear. Here we demonstrate the significant impact of biochar on denitrification, with a consistent decrease in N2O emissions by 10–90% in 14 different agricultural soils. Using the 15N gas-flux method we observed a consistent reduction of the N2O/(N2 + N2O) ratio, which demonstrates that biochar facilitates the last step of denitrification. Biochar acid buffer capacity was identified as an important aspect for mitigation that was not primarily caused by a pH shift in soil. We propose the function of biochar as an “electron shuttle” that facilitates the transfer of electrons to soil denitrifying microorganisms, which together with its liming effect would promote the reduction of N2O to N2. PMID:23615819

  13. Analysis of N2O isotopic composition at a tall tower in central Switzerland to identify emission sources and hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibraim, E.; Mohn, J.; Harris, E. J.; Henne, S.; Eyer, S.; Denk, T.; Wolf, B.; Tuzson, B.; Emmenegger, L.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Six, J.

    2015-12-01

    The isotopic composition of nitrous oxide (N2O) provides important information on N2O sources, because microbial processes exhibit characteristic isotopic signatures [1]. Therefore, quasi-continuous measurements of ambient N2O concentration and isotopic composition in combination with atmospheric modelling can be used to identify local and regional emission hotspots and disentangle production pathways [2]. Quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in combination with preconcentration allows simultaneous and high-precision analysis of the four main stable N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O and 14N14N18O) at ambient mixing ratios [3]. In the presented project, we will initiate quasi-continuous measurements of N2O isotopologues at the Beromünster tall tower in Central Switzerland [4]. For the two inlet heights 12 and 212 m, maximum changes in the N2O mixing ratios of 50 and 10 ppb are anticipated, which would result in delta value changes in the order of 3 and 0.6 ‰, assuming a 20 ‰ depletion in delta values for the main source processes. To resolve differences in N2O isotopic composition at the highest inlet the repeatability of delta value measurements has to be improved to < 0.1 ‰. In an ongoing laboratory phase we significantly enhanced the long-term stability of the laser spectrometer by reducing the dependency of cell temperature on ambient temperature changes from 100 mK K-1 to 10 mK K-1. Thereby, the required precision level is maintained for a 10 times longer period, which results in an accuracy of < 0.1‰ for the targeted isotope ratios. In addition, a novel preconcentration device [5] was set up and optimized with respect to temporal resolution. First results from the Beromünster tall tower, which are anticipated for fall 2015, will be presented and followed by atmospheric transport simulations and a biogeochemical soil model developed at IMK-IFU to simulate N2O isotopomer surface fluxes. References[1] S. Toyoda et al

  14. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions in Wheat and Canola Crops under Fertigation Management in the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, L.; Hernandez Ramirez, G.; Dyck, M. F.; Pauly, D.; Kryzanowski, L.; Middleton, A.; Powers, L. A.; Lohstraeter, G.; Werk, D.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from agricultural soils contribute significantly to the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere every year. Farming practices, such as fertigation in which nitrogen fertilizer is added to crops through irrigation water, could increase the risk for N2O losses. To assess the effect of N fertigation rates on N2O production, field chambers were used to collect weekly gas samples throughout the 2015 growing season in wheat (Triticum aestivum) and canola (Brassica Napus) plots in southern Alberta, Canada. Synthetic fertilizer was either added at seeding or both added at seeding and through irrigation water at one early crop growth stage. The 6 fertilizer treatments were: 60, 90 and 120 kg N ha-1 added at seeding in early May, and 30, 60 and 90 kg N ha-1 at seeding plus another 30 kg N ha-1 added through fertigation in mid-June. Controls with no fertilizer were also evaluated, and each treatment was replicated 4 times. In the wheat plots at a fertilization rate of 120 kg N ha-1, irrespective of single or split application, a larger N2O flux was produced compared to the control (P = 0.024). Similarly, in canola, a total N addition of 90 kg N ha-1 also led to larger N2O fluxes than the control (P = 0.035). The use of fertigation to split the N application had no effect on the N2O emissions in canola; however, in wheat, there was a statistical difference between emissions from 90 kg N ha-1 added all at seeding versus 90 kg N ha-1 split between seeding (60) and fertigation (30); splitting the fertilizer resulted in a 62% decrease in the overall N2O emissions (324 g vs. 524 g N2O-N ha-1; P = 0.039). No other N rates resulted in statistically different N2O emissions when N application was split. These results suggest that fertigation can reduce N2O emissions, but only at moderate N rates (90 kg ha-1 yr-1); conversely, when lower (60) or higher (120) rates are split, emissions remain unaffected.

  15. Potential N2O Emissions from the Tanks of Bromeliads Suggest an Additional Source of N2O in the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Marcel; Brandt, Franziska B; Brenzinger, Kristof; Martinson, Guntars O; Braker, Gesche

    2016-12-06

    We studied the propensity of the tank bromeliad Werauhia gladioliflora to emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) at current and at increased N deposition levels in the range of predicted future scenarios. Potential production rates and net accumulation of N2O from tank substrate corresponded to N availability. N2O was produced in excess at all N levels due to a low level of N2O reductase activity which agreed well with a low abundance of N2O reducers compared to nitrite reducers. Transcriptional activation, however, indicated that expression of denitrification genes may be enhanced with increasing N supply eventually leading to more efficient N2O turnover with potential for adaptation of denitrifier communities to higher N levels. Our findings indicate that tank bromeliads may constitute a novel source of N2O in Neotropical forest canopies but further studies are required to understand the size and significance of in situ N2O fluxes from tank bromeliads to the environment.

  16. Nitrogen management in a maize-groundnut crop rotation of humid tropics: effect on N2O emission.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M I; Rosenani, A B; Van Cleemput, O; Fauziah, C I; Shamshuddin, J

    2001-12-12

    Development of appropriate land management techniques to attain sustainability and increase the N use efficiency of crops in the tropics has been gaining momentum. The nitrous oxides (N2Os) affect global climate change and its contribution from N and C management systems is of great significance. Thus, N transformations and N2O emission during maize-groundnut crop rotation managed with various N sources were studied. Accumulation of nitrate (NO3- ) and its disappearance happened immediately after addition of various N sources, showing liming effect. The mineral N retained for 2-4 weeks depending on the type and amount of N application. The chicken manure showed rapid nitrification in the first week after application during the fallow period, leading to a maximum N2O flux of 9889 g N2O-N m(-2) day(-1). The same plots showed a residual effect by emitting the highest N2O (4053 microg N2O-N m(-2) day(-1)) during maize cultivation supplied with a half-rate of N fertilizer. Application of N fertilizer only or in combination with crop residues exhibited either lowered fluxes or caused a sink during the groundnut and fallow periods due to small availability of substrates and/or low water-filled pore space (<40%). The annual N2O emission ranged from 1.41 to 3.94 kg N2O-N ha(-1); the highest was estimated from the chicken manure plus crop residues and half-rate of inorganic N-amended plots. Results indicates a greater influence of chicken manure on the N transformations and thereby N2O emission.

  17. Modeling N2O Emissions From Temperate Agroecosystems: A Literature Review Using Monte Carlo Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonitto, C.

    2006-12-01

    In this work, we model annual N2O flux based on field experiments in temperate agroecosystems reported in the literature. Understanding potential N2O flux as a consequence of ecosystem management is important for mitigating global change. While loss of excess N as N2 has no environmental consequences, loss as N2O contributes to the greenhouse effect; over a 100 year time horizon N2O has 310 times the global warming potential (GWP) of CO2. Nitrogen trace gas flux remains difficult to accurately quantify under field conditions due to temporal and spatial limitations of sampling. Trace gas measurement techniques often rely on small chambers sampled at regular intervals. This measurement scheme can undersample stochastic events, such as high precipitation, which correspond to periods of high N trace gas flux. We apply Monte Carlo sampling of field measurements to project N2O losses under different crops and soil textures. Three statistical models are compared: 1) annual N2O flux as a function of process rates derived from temporally aggregated field observations, 2) annual N2O flux incorporating the probability of precipitation events, and 3) annual N2O flux as a function of crop growth. Using the temporally aggregated model, predicted annual N2O flux was highest for corn and wheat, which receive higher fertilizer inputs relative to barley and ryegrass. Within a cropping system, clayey soil textures resulted in the highest N2O flux. The incorporation of precipitation events in the model has the greatest effect on clayey soils. Relative to the aggregated model the inclusion of precipitation events changed predicted mean annual N2O flux from 31 to 49 kg N ha-1 for corn grown on clay loam and shifted the 75% confidence interval (CI) from 20-42 to 38-61 kg N ha-1. In contrast, comparisons between the aggregated and precipitation event models resulted in indistinguishable predictions of mean annual N2O loss for corn grown on silty loam and loam soils. Similarly, application

  18. 40 CFR Table Jj-7 to Subpart Jj of... - Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) JJ Table JJ-7 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) Manure management system component N2O emission factor Uncovered anaerobic lagoon 0...

  19. Bioenergy residues applied as soil amendments: N2O emissions and C sequestration potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayuela, M.; Kuikman, P.; Oenema, O.; Bakker, R.; van Groenigen, J.

    2009-12-01

    most stable residues with the lowest CO2 loss between 0.5 and 5.8 % of total added C. Regarding N2O emissions, first generation biofuel residues led to the highest total N2O emissions (between 2.5 - 6.0% of added N). Second generation biofuel residues emitted between 1.0-2.0% of added N, whereas anaerobic digestates led to emissions lower than 1% of added N. The two biochars used in this study led to negative N2O emissions, i.e. lower than the blank soil. We conclude that, at least in the short term, the effects of biofuel residues on the combined greenhouse gas balance of the soil ranges from beneficial (biochar) via mixed (digestates, second generation biofuels) to manifestly detrimental (first generation biofuels). These effects should be taken into account in life cycle analyses of biofuel production.

  20. Footprint methods to separate N2O emission rates from adjacent paddock areas.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandipan; McMillan, Andrew M S; Sturman, Andrew P; Harvey, Mike J; Laubach, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    Using micrometeorological techniques to measure greenhouse gas emissions from differently treated adjacent plots is a promising avenue to verify the effect of mitigation strategies at the field scale. In pursuing such an approach, it is crucial to accurately characterize the source area of the fluxes measured at each sampling point. Hence, a comprehensive footprint analysis method is required so that emission rates can be obtained for a specific field within a biochemically heterogeneous area. In this study, a footprint analysis method is developed to estimate the emission for an experiment where the flux of N2O is measured from several control and treated plots. The emission rate of an individual plot is estimated using an inverse footprint fraction approach where the footprint fractions are obtained from an analytical footprint model. A numerical solution for obtaining the background flux for such a multiplot measurement system is also provided. Results of the footprint analysis method are assessed, first, by comparing footprint fractions obtained from both an analytical footprint model and a "forward" simulation of a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model; and second, by comparing the emission rates of a control plot obtained from the footprint analysis method and from the "backward" simulation of the bLs model. It is found that the analytical footprint fractions compare well with the values obtained from the bLs model (correlation coefficient of 0.58 and 0.66 within p value <0.001). An average of 4.3 % of the measured fluxes is found to be contributed by sources outside the measured area and, excluding this outside area contribution to the measured flux, footprint corrected emission rates within the defined domain are found to increase by 2.1 to 5.8 % of the measured flux. Also, the proposed method of emission rate estimation is found to work well under a wide range of atmospheric stability.

  1. Footprint methods to separate N2O emission rates from adjacent paddock areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sandipan; McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Sturman, Andrew P.; Harvey, Mike J.; Laubach, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    Using micrometeorological techniques to measure greenhouse gas emissions from differently treated adjacent plots is a promising avenue to verify the effect of mitigation strategies at the field scale. In pursuing such an approach, it is crucial to accurately characterize the source area of the fluxes measured at each sampling point. Hence, a comprehensive footprint analysis method is required so that emission rates can be obtained for a specific field within a biochemically heterogeneous area. In this study, a footprint analysis method is developed to estimate the emission for an experiment where the flux of N2O is measured from several control and treated plots. The emission rate of an individual plot is estimated using an inverse footprint fraction approach where the footprint fractions are obtained from an analytical footprint model. A numerical solution for obtaining the background flux for such a multiplot measurement system is also provided. Results of the footprint analysis method are assessed, first, by comparing footprint fractions obtained from both an analytical footprint model and a "forward" simulation of a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model; and second, by comparing the emission rates of a control plot obtained from the footprint analysis method and from the "backward" simulation of the bLs model. It is found that the analytical footprint fractions compare well with the values obtained from the bLs model (correlation coefficient of 0.58 and 0.66 within p value <0.001). An average of 4.3 % of the measured fluxes is found to be contributed by sources outside the measured area and, excluding this outside area contribution to the measured flux, footprint corrected emission rates within the defined domain are found to increase by 2.1 to 5.8 % of the measured flux. Also, the proposed method of emission rate estimation is found to work well under a wide range of atmospheric stability.

  2. Evaluation of new flux attribution methods for mapping N2O emissions at the landscape scale from EC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossel, Agnes; Bureau, Jordan; Loubet, Benjamin; Laville, Patricia; Massad, Raia; Haas, Edwin; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Guimbaud, Christophe; Hénault, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate an attribution method based on a combination of Eddy Covariance (EC) and chamber measurements to map N2O emissions over a 3-km2 area of croplands and forests in France. During 2 months of spring 2015, N2O fluxes were measured (i) by EC at 15 m height and (ii) punctually with a mobile chamber at 16 places within 1-km of EC mast. The attribution method was based on coupling the EC measurements, information on footprints (Loubet et al., 20101) and emission ratios based on crops and fertilizations, calculated based on chamber measurements. The results were evaluated against an independent flux dataset measured by automatic chambers in a wheat field within the area. At the landscape scale, the method estimated a total emission of 114-271 kg N-N2O during the campaign. This new approach allowed estimating continuously N2O emission and better accounting for the spatial variability of N2O emission at the landscape scale.

  3. Tracing changes of N2O emission pathways in a permanent grassland under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenflo, Andre; Moser, Gerald; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Neill; Clough, Tim; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The increase of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere is of concern due to its effect on global temperatures. Nitrous oxide (N2O) with a Global Warming Potential of 298 over a 100 year period is of particular concern because strong feedback effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on N2O emissions have been observed. However, so far the changes in processes which are responsible for such a feedback effect are only poorly understood. Our study was carried out in situ in a long-term Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) study on permanent grassland at atmospheric CO2 concentrations 20% above ambient which expected at the middle of this century. We performed an in situ 15N tracing with differentially labelled NH4NO3 to trace the main N2O emission pathways. Over a period of more than one year we monitored at least weakly the N2O emissions with the closed chamber technique and analyzed the 15N signature of the N2O. The observed gaseous emissions under ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 were associated with the observed gross N transformations and the microbial activities to identify the main emission pathways under ambient and elevated CO2.

  4. Constraining N2O emissions over the last century by firn air isotope measurements in both hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopiou, Markella; Sapart, Celia; Martinerie, Patricia; Witrant, Emmanuel; Ishijima, Kentaro; Magand, Sophie; Kaiser, Jan; van de Wal, Roderik; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    N2O is a greenhouse gas that it is responsible for increased radiative forcing of the climate system. In addition to this, it is primarily destroyed in the stratosphere providing an important source of NOx, which in turn plays an important role in ozone depletion. Large uncertainties remain as to the actual strength of the individual sources of N2O. Knowledge of the historical record, of the temporal evolution of N2O emissions, can provide insight on how its sources and sinks altered during the industrial period. Data from air trapped in firn enables us to better determine the source/sink strength emissions over time. In this study we analyze firn measurements on 15N, 18O and position dependent 15N isotopic composition of N2O, from both hemispheres, combining new and previously published data, in order to constrain the N2O budget. From the Northern Hemisphere we use data from North Greenland Ice core Project (NGRIP) and North Eemian Ice core Project (NEEM) and for the Southern Hemisphere we use data from Berkner Island (BI), Dronning Maud Land (DML) and Dome Concordia (DOME C). Results show that the isotopic composition of 15N, 18O of N2O is presently more depleted which indicates a strong depleting source contribution probably originating from agricultural activities. The LGGE-GIPSA firn air diffusion model allows single site reconstructions, as well as using all data together in a multi-site inversion, in order to reconstruct the temporal evolution of N2O and its isotopic composition. We investigate the consistency between the different datasets and present a best-guess isotope history based on the firn air data. A simple two-box atmospheric model is applied in order to simulate the N2O atmospheric contribution from different sources and sinks.

  5. Evidence for Involvement of Gut-Associated Denitrifying Bacteria in Emission of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) by Earthworms Obtained from Garden and Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Matthies, Carola; Grießhammer, Anja; Schmittroth, Martina; Drake, Harold L.

    1999-01-01

    Earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa, Lumbricus rubellus, and Octolasion lacteum) obtained from nitrous oxide (N2O)-emitting garden soils emitted 0.14 to 0.87 nmol of N2O h−1 g (fresh weight)−1 under in vivo conditions. L. rubellus obtained from N2O-emitting forest soil also emitted N2O, which confirmed previous observations (G. R. Karsten and H. L. Drake, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:1878–1882, 1997). In contrast, commercially obtained Lumbricus terrestris did not emit N2O; however, such worms emitted N2O when they were fed (i.e., preincubated in) garden soils. A. caliginosa, L. rubellus, and O. lacteum substantially increased the rates of N2O emission of garden soil columns and microcosms. Extrapolation of the data to in situ conditions indicated that N2O emission by earthworms accounted for approximately 33% of the N2O emitted by garden soils. In vivo emission of N2O by earthworms obtained from both garden and forest soils was greatly stimulated when worms were moistened with sterile solutions of nitrate or nitrite; in contrast, ammonium did not stimulate in vivo emission of N2O. In the presence of nitrate, acetylene increased the N2O emission rates of earthworms; in contrast, in the presence of nitrite, acetylene had little or no effect on emission of N2O. In vivo emission of N2O decreased by 80% when earthworms were preincubated in soil supplemented with streptomycin and tetracycline. On a fresh weight basis, the rates of N2O emission of dissected earthworm gut sections were substantially higher than the rates of N2O emission of dissected worms lacking gut sections, indicating that N2O production occurred in the gut rather than on the worm surface. In contrast to living earthworms and gut sections that produced N2O under oxic conditions (i.e., in the presence of air), fresh casts (feces) from N2O-emitting earthworms produced N2O only under anoxic conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that gut-associated denitrifying bacteria are responsible for

  6. Emission of CO2, CH4 and N2O from freshwater marsh in northeast of China.

    PubMed

    Song, Changchun; Zhang, Jinbo; Wang, Yiyong; Wang, Yaosi; Zhao, Zhichun

    2008-08-01

    The wetlands play an important role in carbon storage, especially at high latitudes, at which they store nearly one-third of global soil carbons. However, few studies have investigated the emissions of CO(2), CH(4) and N(2)O in the long-term, especially effects of freeze-thaw cycles on these gases emissions in freshwater marsh ecosystems. In this paper, we collected greenhouse gas emission data from a freshwater marsh area in China for 4 years, evaluated their release variables and speculated on their potential atmospheric impact. For this paper, we report on the CO(2), CH(4) and N(2)O emission rates recorded from June 2002 to November 2005 in the Sanjiang Plain of northeast China. We measured their interannual variations and fluctuations, as well as factors affecting their emissions, and estimated their regulation and freeze-thaw cycle impacts. Our results revealed obvious CO(2) and CH(4) emission fluctuations during the winter months, and during the freeze-thaw cycle, and a strong interannual variation during the growing season. Overall, we documented a close relationship between the CO(2) and CH(4) emissions, implicating some regulatory commonality. We determined that the marsh was a N(2)O sink during the winter, but a significant source of N(2)O during the freeze-thaw cycle as the temperature increased, especially in early summer. During the thaw-freeze period, the N(2)O levels were positively correlated with the water depth. Additionally, water depth greatly governed the interannual variation of the N(2)O emissions from the marshes during the thaw-freeze period.

  7. CO2 and N2O emissions from Lou soils of greenhouse tomato fields under aerated irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huijing; Chen, Hui; Cai, Huanjie; Yang, Fan; Li, Dan; Wang, Fangtong

    2016-05-01

    The change of O2 content in soil caused by aerated irrigation (AI) must inevitably affect the production and emissions of CO2 and N2O from soils. This paper described in-situ observation of CO2 and N2O emissions from AI soils with static chamber-GC technique, in order to reveal the effects of AI on CO2 and N2O emissions from soils of greenhouse tomato fields in autumn-winter season. CO2 and N2O emissions from AI soils mainly concentrated in the blooming and fruit setting period compared to other periods. AI increased cumulative emissions of CO2 and N2O by 11.8% (p = 0.394) and 10.0% (p = 0.480), respectively, compared to the control. The integrative global warming potential of CO2 and N2O on a 100-year horizon for the AI treatment was 6430.60 kg ha-1, increased by 11.7% compared with that for the control (p = 0.356). Both the emissions of CO2 and N2O from AI soils had the exponential positive correlation with soil water-filled pore space (WFPS). The highest peak of CO2 and N2O fluxes from AI soils was observed at 46.7% and 47.5% WFPS, with WFPS ranging from 43.3% to 51.5% and from 45.6% to 52.3% during the whole growth stage, respectively. In addition, the average yield for the AI treatment (34.52 t ha-1) was significantly greater (17.4%) compared with that of the control (p = 0.018). These results suggest that AI do not significantly increase the integrative greenhouse effect caused by CO2 and N2O from soils of greenhouse tomato fields, but significantly increase the tomato yield. The research results provide certain theoretical foundation and scientific basis for accurately evaluating the farmland ecological effect of AI technique.

  8. Mechanism study on the influence of in situ SOx removal on N2O emission in CFB boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingnan; Qin, Wu; Hu, Xiaoying; Dong, Changqing; Yang, Yongping

    2015-04-01

    The influence of in situ deSOx process on N2O emission in CFB boiler was studied using density functional theory calculations. The competitive adsorption of SO2 and N2O on pure CaO (1 0 0) surface was first studied and the reaction priority was determined. Results showed that SO2 was more likely to adsorb on CaO (1 0 0) surface O anion site, which hindered the catalytic decomposition of N2O on CaO (1 0 0) surface and sulfurized the CaO (1 0 0) surface under reducing atmosphere. Then a partially sulfurized CaO (1 0 0) surface was established to study the catalytic activity of deSOx reaction intermediate on N2O decomposition. The O atom transfer process and the surface recovery process were two key steps for N2O decomposition and the rate-determining step was the latter one. The sulfurization of the surface could deactivate its catalytic activity on N2O decomposition compared with pure CaO (1 0 0) surface but it was still better than that of pure CaS (1 0 0) surface. The free Gibbs energy was calculated to incorporate the temperature dependence of respective reactions. When temperature was higher than 373 K, the surface recovery was more likely to proceed via the LH route.

  9. Mechanistic approach to understand increased N2O emission followed by biochar application to the organic poor field soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, G.; Lee, Y.; Seo, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar, which is a by-product of pyrolysis, is widely accepted as a climate change mitigation strategy if it is applied to soils. A lot of researches have reported that application of biochar reduced the emission of N2O due to better aeration and increased pH. However, in the dry, organic poor, and heavily fertilized Korean field soil, we observed rather an increase in N2O emission in our previous researches. To explain this inconsistent trend, we conducted a research investigating the mechanisms of N2O emission. The main mechanisms of N2O emission from soils are nitrification and denitrification, among which we exclude the possibility of denitrification process because the soil water condition at our sampling dates was dry. To confirm our assumption that the increased N2O emission from the soil is mainly from the enhanced nitrification due to biochar addition, we used the nitrification inhibitor (DCD: Dicyandiamide). The experiment was performed in the pepper field located in Gyeonggi-do, Korea where we already observed an increase in N2O emission followed by biochar amendment in the previous year. Treatments include the control, biochar treatment (BC, 2 ton ha-1), DCD treatment (DCD, 10% of N fertilizer w/w), and biochar and DCD co-treatment (BC+DCD). All the treatments were received with N:P2O5:K2O (225 : 112 : 149 kg ha-1). Daily average of N2O emission rate was increased in the BC treatment by 154% and the emission was reduced to the control level in the BC+DCD treatment. From this result, we could confirm that the increased N2O emission from the biochar application is from the nitrification process. The field experiment will be prolonged to Aug 2015 and for the further analysis, the basic soil physicochemical parameters (TC, TN, pH, hot water extractable C, available N) and microbial parameters (fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis assay, microbial biomass C, and assay of nitrifiers) will be measured.

  10. Post-harvest N2O emissions were not affected by various types of oilseed straw incorporated into soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köbke, Sarah; Senbayram, Mehmet; Hegewald, Hannes; Christen, Olaf; Dittert, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Oilseed rape post-harvest N2O emissions are seen highly critical as so far they are considered as one of the most crucial drawbacks in climate-saving bioenergy production systems. N2O emissions may substantially counterbalance the intended savings in CO2 emissions. Carbon-rich crop residues in conjunction with residual soil nitrate are seen as a key driver since they may serve as energy source for denitrification and, they may alter soil-borne N2O emissions. As oilseed rape straw is known to have high N/C ratio compared to other crop residues, its soil incorporation may specifically trigger post-harvest N2O emissions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine post-harvest N2O emissions in soils amended with various types of oilseed rape straw (with different N/C ratio) and barley straw in field and incubation experiments. In the incubation experiment, oilseed rape or 15N labelled barley straw were mixed with soil at a rate of 1.3 t DM ha-1 and studied for 43 days. Treatments consisted of non-treated control soil (CK), 15N labelled barley straw (BST), oilseed rape straw (RST), 15N labelled barley straw + N (BST+N), or oilseed rape straw + N (RST+N). N fertilizer was applied to the soil surface as ammonium-nitrate at a rate of 100 kg N ha-1 and soil moisture was adjusted to 80% water-holding capacity. In the field experiment, during the vegetation period 15N labelled fertilizer (15NH415NO3) was used to generate 15N labelled oilseed rape straw (up to 5 at%). Here, the three fertilizer treatments consisted of 5 kg N ha-1 (RST-5), 150 kg N ha-1 (RST-150) and 180 kg N ha-1 (RST-180). Post-harvest N2O emissions were determined during the period of August 2013 to February 2014 by using static flux chambers. In the incubation trial, cumulative N2O emissions were 5, 29, 40 g N2O-N ha-1 148 days-1 in non-fertilized control, BST and RST treatments, respectively. Here, emissions were slightly higher in RST than BST (p

  11. [N2O emission from an intensively managed greenhouse vegetable field in Nanjing suburb, Jiangsu Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Jia, Jun-Xiang; Zhang, Man; Xiong, Zheng-Qin; Li, Ye

    2012-03-01

    By using static opaque chamber and gas chromatography, this paper studied the dynamic changes of N2O fluxes and their relationships with soil temperature, soil moisture content, and soil nitrate and ammonium contents in an intensively managed greenhouse celery-Tung choy-Bok choy-amaranth rotation field and in a bare fallow land in Nanjing suburb. The cumulative N2O emission from the rotation vegetable field was as high as 137.2 kg N x hm(-2), being significantly higher than that from the bare fallow land (29.2 kg N x hm(-2)), and the N2O-N emission factor of the rotation vegetable field ecosystem was up to 4.6%. In the rotation field, the planting of Tung choy had the greatest contribution to the annual cumulative N2O emission, occupying 53.5% of the total, followed by the planting of Bok choy (31.9%), celery field (4.5%), and amaranth (4.8%). The N2O flux of the rotation field had significant positive correlation with soil temperature, the Q10 being 2.80, but no significant correlations with soil moisture content and soil nitrate and ammonium contents.

  12. Shallow tillage generates higher N2O emissions: results of continuous chamber-based measurement in a winter wheat field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broux, François; Lognoul, Margaux; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Bodson, Bernard; Heinesch, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture is one of the most important contributors to GHG emission, notably through fertilized croplands. Though, few publications have studied simultaneously and through continuous measurement the N2O and CO2 emissions in cultivated lands. We conducted this study to assess the effect of farming practices and climate on both N2O and CO2 emissions from a winter wheat crop. The experiment was held in an experimental field in the loamy region in Belgium from March 2016 till crop harvest in August 2016. The fluxes were measured on two nearby parcels in a winter wheat field with restitution of the residues from previous crop. For the past 8 years, one parcel was subjected to a shallow tillage (ST, 10 cm depth) and the other one to a conventional tillage (CT, 25 cm depth). On each parcel, the emissions are assessed with homemade automated closed chambers. Measurement continuity and good temporal resolution (one mean flux every 4 hours) of the system allowed a fine detection and quantification of the emission peaks which usually represent the major part of N2O fluxes. In addition to gas fluxes, soil water content and temperature were measured continuously. Soil samples were taken regularly to determine soil pH, soil organic carbon and nitrogen pools (total, NO3- and NH4+) and study microbial diversity and nitrification/denitrification gene expression. Unexpectedly, results showed N2O emissions twice as large in the ST parcel as in the CT parcel. On the contrary, less important CO2 emissions were observed under ST. Several emission peaks of N2O were observed during the measurement period. The peaks occurred after fertilization events and seemed to be triggered by an elevation of soil water content. Interesting links could be made between soil NH4-N and NO3-N pools and N2O emissions. Nitrification being the main process originating the fluxes was suggested on the one hand by the temporal evolution of nitrogen pools and N2O emissions and on the other hand by the relation

  13. Nitrification inhibitor's effect on mitigating N2O emissions was weakened by urease inhibitor in calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zichao; Wu, Di; Bol, Roland; Shi, Yuefeng; Guo, Yanbin; Meng, Fanqiao; Wu, Wenliang

    2017-10-01

    The application of nitrification or urease inhibitors together with nitrogen (N) fertilizer has been proposed to reduce N losses, including nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, from agricultural soils. We measured N2O fluxes, crop yield and plant N content over 3 years (2012-2015) to evaluate the long-term effects of nitrification and/or urease inhibitors on N2O emissions, crop production and N use efficiency (NUE) in an intensively farmed wheat-maize system in northern China. The experiment consisted of the following five treatments: 1) CK, no N fertilizer; 2) U, urea; 3) NI, urea with 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP); 4) UI, urea with N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT); and 5) NIUI, urea with combined DMPP and NBPT. Compared with the U treatment, the NI, NIUI and UI treatments mitigated cumulative N2O emissions by 55%, 40% and 21% in the maize season, respectively, and 47%, 40% and 33% in the wheat season, respectively. The annual direct emission factors of N2O for the U, NI, UI and NIUI treatments were 0.4%, 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.2%, respectively. The NIUI, NI and UI treatments increased the annual crop yield (7%, 6% and 4%) and the NUE (15%, 10% and 7%) relative to the U treatment. The NI treatment showed the best effect on mitigating N2O emissions, but its efficacy was reduced when applied together with UI. This indicates that more studies are required focusing on the performances and mechanisms of these two inhibitors in alkaline and low organic carbon soils.

  14. Improving estimates of N2O emissions for western and central Europe using a Bayesian inversion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Gerbig, C.; Roedenbeck, C.; Heimann, M.

    2009-04-01

    The nitrous oxide (N2O) mixing ratio has been increasing in the atmosphere since the industrial revolution, from 270 ppb in 1750 to 320 ppb in 2007 with a steady growth rate of around 0.26% since the early 1980's. The increase in N2O is worrisome for two main reasons. First, it is a greenhouse gas; this means that its atmospheric increase translates to an enhancement in radiative forcing of 0.16 ± 0.02 Wm-2 making it currently the fourth most important long-lived greenhouse gas and is predicted to soon overtake CFC's to become the third most important. Second, it plays an important role in stratospheric ozone chemistry. Human activities are the primary cause of the atmospheric N2O increase. The largest anthropogenic source of N2O is from the use of N-fertilizers in agriculture but fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes, such as adipic and nitric acid production, are also important. We present a Bayesian inversion approach for estimating N2O fluxes over central and western Europe using high frequency in-situ concentration data from the Ochsenkopf tall tower (50 °01′N, 11 °48′, 1022 masl). For the inversion, we employ a Lagrangian-type transport model, STILT, which provides source-receptor relationships at 10 km using ECMWF meteorological data. The a priori flux estimates used were from IER, for anthropogenic, and GEIA, for natural fluxes. N2O fluxes were retrieved monthly at 2 x 2 degree spatial resolution for 2007. The retrieved N2O fluxes showed significantly more spatial heterogeneity than in the a priori field and considerable seasonal variability. The timing of peak emissions was different for different regions but in general the months with the strongest emissions were May and August. Overall, the retrieved flux (anthropogenic and natural) was lower than in the a priori field.

  15. Optimum sampling time and frequency for measuring N2O emissions from a rain-fed cereal cropping system.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Steven; Wang, Weijin

    2015-10-15

    Annual cumulative nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soil have historically been calculated from intermittent data measured manually via the static chamber method. The temporal variability in emissions, both diurnally and between days, introduces uncertainty into the up-scaling of static chamber data. This study assessed the most appropriate time of the day to sample and the best sampling frequency to ensure reliable estimates of annual cumulative emissions. Sub-daily N2O emissions were measured using automatic gas sampling chambers over three years in a sub-tropical cereal crop system. The sub-daily dataset was divided into eight time periods per day to assess the best sampling time of the day. Daily mean N2O emissions were subsampled from the dataset to simulate different sampling frequencies, including pre-set and rainfall-based scenarios. Annual cumulative N2O emissions were calculated for these scenarios and compared to the 'actual' annual cumulative emissions. The results demonstrated that manual sampling between mid-morning (09:00) and midday (12:00), and late evening (21:00) and midnight (24:00) best approximated the daily mean N2O emission. Factoring in the need to sample during daylight hours, gas sampling from mid-morning to midday was the most appropriate sampling time. Overall, triweekly sampling provided the most accurate estimate (± 4% error) of annual cumulative N2O emissions, but was undesirable due to its labour intensive high sampling frequency. Weekly sampling with triweekly sampling in the two weeks following rainfall events was the most efficient sampling schedule, as it had similar accuracy (± 5% error) to the triweekly sampling, the smallest variability in outcomes and approximately half the sampling times of triweekly sampling. Inter-annual rainfall variability affected the accuracy and variability of estimations of annual cumulative emissions, but did not affect the overall trends in sampling frequency accuracy. This study demonstrated

  16. Nitrous oxide emission budgets and land-use-driven hotspots for organic soils in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppelt, T.; Dechow, R.; Gebbert, S.; Freibauer, A.; Lohila, A.; Augustin, J.; Drösler, M.; Fiedler, S.; Glatzel, S.; Höper, H.; Järveoja, J.; Lærke, P. E.; Maljanen, M.; Mander, Ü.; Mäkiranta, P.; Minkkinen, K.; Ojanen, P.; Regina, K.; Strömgren, M.

    2014-12-01

    Organic soils are a main source of direct emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), an important greenhouse gas (GHG). Observed N2O emissions from organic soils are highly variable in space and time, which causes high uncertainties in national emission inventories. Those uncertainties could be reduced when relating the upscaling process to a priori-identified key drivers by using available N2O observations from plot scale in empirical approaches. We used the empirical fuzzy modelling approach MODE to identify main drivers for N2O and utilize them to predict the spatial emission pattern of European organic soils. We conducted a meta-study with a total amount of 659 annual N2O measurements, which was used to derive separate models for different land use types. We applied our models to available, spatially explicit input driver maps to upscale N2O emissions at European level and compared the inventory with recently published IPCC emission factors. The final statistical models explained up to 60% of the N2O variance. Our study results showed that cropland and grasslands emitted the highest N2O fluxes 0.98 ± 1.08 and 0.58 ± 1.03 g N2O-N m-2 a-1, respectively. High fluxes from cropland sites were mainly controlled by low soil pH value and deep-drained groundwater tables. Grassland hotspot emissions were strongly related to high amount of N-fertilizer inputs and warmer winter temperatures. In contrast, N2O fluxes from natural peatlands were predominantly low (0.07 ± 0.27 g N2O-N m-2 a-1) and we found no relationship with the tested drivers. The total inventory for direct N2O emissions from organic soils in Europe amount up to 149.5 Gg N2O-N a-1, which also included fluxes from forest and peat extraction sites and exceeds the inventory calculated by IPCC emission factors of 87.4 Gg N2O-N a-1. N2O emissions from organic soils represent up to 13% of total European N2O emissions reported in the European Union (EU) greenhouse gas inventory of 2011 from only 7% of the EU area

  17. Use of Stable Isotope Techniques to Differentiate Between Processes Contributing to N2O Emissions From Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggs, E. M.; Wrage, N.; Richter, M.; Shaw, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    N2O is produced biologically in soils during denitrification, nitrification, nitrifier denitrification and dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium (DNRA). These processes may occur simultaneously in different microsites of the same soil but there is often uncertainty associated with which process is predominantly contributing to measured emissions. Recent advances in stable isotope techniques facilitating direct measurement of 15N-N2O and natural abundance 15N218O allows determination of the source of N2O and an accurate quantification (15N enrichment) or estimation in natural systems (natural abundance) of emissions from each source. Here we will introduce the techniques we have developed and present selected results from studies where they have been applied. We are able to directly determine the respective contributions of nitrification and denitrification in soil by measurement of 15N-N2O after application of (a) 15NH415NO3 and (b) 14NH415NO3 (10 atom % excess 15N) to different replicates, where 15N-N2O measured from (b) replicates are attributed to denitrification and 15N-N2O measured from (a) replicates minus 15N-N2O from (b) replicates are attributed to nitrification, provided that dissimilatory 15NO3- reduction or immobilisation and remineralisation of 15NO3- are negligible. Addition of C2H2 (0.01 % v/v) to inhibit autotrophic ammonia oxidation enables us to differentiate between autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrified N2O. We have shown heterotrophic nitrification to be contributing to N2O emissions from a clay loam soil at 50 % water-filled pore space (WFPS) and evidence for aerobic denitrification at 20 % WFPS after application of 200 kg N ha-1. We have further developed this technique to determine the contribution of nitrifier denitrification by addition of 100 kPa O2 to inhibit anaerobic processes, and derivation of the nitrifier denitrification emission on a difference basis. In culture studies we have quantified 15N-N2O production during

  18. Modelling site-specific N2O emission factors from Austrian agricultural soils for targeted mitigation measures (NitroAustria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Barbara; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kasper, Martina; Foldal, Cecilie; Schiefer, Jasmin; Kitzler, Barbara; Schwarzl, Bettina; Zethner, Gerhard; Anderl, Michael; Sedy, Katrin; Gaugitsch, Helmut; Dersch, Georg; Baumgarten, Andreas; Haas, Edwin; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Results from a previous project "FarmClim" highlight that the IPCC default emission factor is not able to reflect region specific N2O emissions from Austrian arable soils. The methodology is limited in identifying hot spots and hot moments of N2O emissions. When estimations are based on default emission factors no recommendations can be given on optimisation measures that would lead to a reduction of soil N2O emissions. The better the knowledge is about Nitrogen and Carbon budgets in Austrian agricultural managed soils the better the situation can be reflected in the Austrian GHG emission inventory calculations. Therefore national and regionally modelled emission factors should improve the evidence for national deviation from the IPCC default emission factors and reduce the uncertainties. The overall aim of NitroAustria is to identify the drivers for N2O emissions on a regional basis taking different soil types, climate, and agricultural management into account. We use the LandscapeDNDC model to update the N2O emission factors for N fertilizer and animal manure applied to soils. Key regions in Austria were selected and region specific N2O emissions calculated. The model runs at sub-daily time steps and uses data such as maximum and minimum air temperature, precipitation, radiation, and wind speed as meteorological drivers. Further input data are used to reflect agricultural management practices, e.g., planting/harvesting, tillage, fertilizer application, irrigation and information on soil and vegetation properties for site characterization and model initialization. While at site scale, arable management data (crop cultivation, rotations, timings etc.) is obtained by experimental data from field trials or observations, at regional scale such data need to be generated using region specific proxy data such as land use and management statistics, crop cultivations and yields, crop rotations, fertilizer sales, manure resulting from livestock units etc. The farming

  19. Flooding-related increases in CO2 and N2O emissions from a temperate coastal grassland ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, Amanuel W.; Osborne, Bruce; Orr, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Given their increasing trend in Europe, an understanding of the role that flooding events play in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will be important for improved assessments of local and regional GHG budgets. This study presents the results of an analysis of the CO2 and N2O fluxes from a coastal grassland ecosystem affected by episodic flooding that was of either a relatively short (SFS) or long (LFS) duration. Compared to the SFS, the annual CO2 and N2O emissions were 1.4 and 1.3 times higher at the LFS, respectively. Mean CO2 emissions during the period of standing water were 144 ± 18.18 and 111 ± 9.51 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1, respectively, for the LFS and SFS sites. During the growing season, when there was no standing water, the CO2 emissions were significantly larger from the LFS (244 ± 24.88 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1) than the SFS (183 ± 14.90 mg CO2-C m-2 h-1). Fluxes of N2O ranged from -0.37 to 0.65 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1 at the LFS and from -0.50 to 0.55 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1 at the SFS, with the larger emissions associated with the presence of standing water at the LFS but during the growing season at the SFS. Overall, soil temperature and moisture were identified as the main drivers of the seasonal changes in CO2 fluxes, but neither adequately explained the variations in N2O fluxes. Analysis of total C, N, microbial biomass and Q10 values indicated that the higher CO2 emissions from the LFS were linked to the flooding-associated influx of nutrients and alterations in soil microbial populations. These results demonstrate that annual CO2 and N2O emissions can be higher in longer-term flooded sites that receive significant amounts of nutrients, although this may depend on the restriction of diffusional limitations due to the presence of standing water to periods of the year when the potential for gaseous emissions are low.

  20. Is biochar-manure co-compost a better solution for soil health improvement and N2O emissions mitigation?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land application of compost has been a promising remediation strategy for soil health and environmental quality, but substantial emissions of greenhouse gases, especially N2O, need to be controlled during making and using compost. Biochar as a bulking agent for composting has bee...

  1. Anhydrous ammonia injection depth does not affect N2O emissions in a silt loam over two growing seasons

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anhydrous ammonia (AA) is a major fertilizer source in North America and can promote greater emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) compared to other N fertilizer sources. Equipment for applying AA at shallower depths has become commercially available, but impacts of shallow versus deep AA application on ...

  2. N loss to drain flow and N2O emissions from a corn-soybean rotation with winter rye

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthropogenic perturbation of the global nitrogen cycle and its effects on the environment such as hypoxia in coastal regions and increased N2O emissions is of increasing, cross-disciplinary, worldwide concern, and agricultural production is a major contributor. Only limited studies, however, have s...

  3. Legumes or nitrification inhibitors to reduce N2O emissions in subtropical cereal cropping systems? A simulation study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The DAYCENT biogeochemical model was used to investigate how the use of fertilisers coated with nitrification inhibitors and the introduction of legumes in the crop rotation can affect subtropical cereal production and N2O emissions. The model was validated using comprehensive multi-seasonal, high-f...

  4. Soil water content drives spatiotemporal patterns of CO2 and N2O emissions from a Mediterranean riparian forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poblador, Sílvia; Lupon, Anna; Sabaté, Santiago; Sabater, Francesc

    2017-09-01

    Riparian zones play a fundamental role in regulating the amount of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) that is exported from catchments. However, C and N removal via soil gaseous pathways can influence local budgets of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and contribute to climate change. Over a year, we quantified soil effluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) from a Mediterranean riparian forest in order to understand the role of these ecosystems on catchment GHG emissions. In addition, we evaluated the main soil microbial processes that produce GHG (mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification) and how changes in soil properties can modify the GHG production over time and space. Riparian soils emitted larger amounts of CO2 (1.2-10 g C m-2 d-1) than N2O (0.001-0.2 mg N m-2 d-1) to the atmosphere attributed to high respiration and low denitrification rates. Both CO2 and N2O emissions showed a marked (but antagonistic) spatial gradient as a result of variations in soil water content across the riparian zone. Deep groundwater tables fueled large soil CO2 effluxes near the hillslope, while N2O emissions were higher in the wet zones adjacent to the stream channel. However, both CO2 and N2O emissions peaked after spring rewetting events, when optimal conditions of soil water content, temperature, and N availability favor microbial respiration, nitrification, and denitrification. Overall, our results highlight the role of water availability on riparian soil biogeochemistry and GHG emissions and suggest that climate change alterations in hydrologic regimes can affect the microbial processes that produce GHG as well as the contribution of these systems to regional and global biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Potential impact of atmospheric N deposition on soil N2O emission varies with different soil N regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Yi, M.; Koike, T.

    2011-12-01

    Future increases in nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to change belowground nutrient dynamics, especially N cycle, and thereby can alter the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O) which is one of the major greenhouse gases. Moreover, we considered that their effect on soil N2O emission varies with different soil N levels because N2O is a by-product of the biological nitrification process in aerobic soil environments and of the biological denitrification process in anaerobic soil environments. To understand the changes in soil N2O flux under different soil N, we carried out simulated N addition experiment in three-year-old hybrid larch F1 (F1: Larix gmelinii var. japonica × Larix kaempferi) plantation during two growing seasons 2008 - 2009. The hybrid larch F1 was developed to make up for several problems of larch species, e.g. a high susceptibility to disease or grazing damage by insects and fungi, and a large number of this seedlings are planted recently in northern Japan. Based on soil analysis, we selected two sites which have different soil N concentration, i.e. low-N and high-N concentrations. Nitrogen input was initiated at the onset of our experiment, and included four treatments with four replications: Low-N soil + Zero-N control, Low-N soil + 50 kg-N addition, High-N soil + Zero-N control and High-N soil + 50 kg-N addition. The N was added as ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) solution distributed in four occasions during each growing season. Gas and soil samples were taken from each plot on ten occasions at a time during each growing season. Collected N2O concentrations were determined by a gas chromatograph (GC-14B; Shimadzu, Kyoto, Japan) equipped with an electron capture detector, while total-N and inorganic-N concentrations were obtained by a NC analyzer (Sumigraph NC-1000; Sumica Chemical Analysis Service Ltd., Osaka, Japan) and an auto analyzer (AACS-4; BL-TEC Inc., Osaka, Japan), respectively. Before the N addition, initial total-N in High

  6. N2O and N2 emissions from contrasting soil environments - interactive effects of soil nitrogen, hydrology and microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Elberling, Bo; Ribbons, Relena; Hedo, Javier; José Fernández Alonso, Maria; Krych, Lukasz; Sandris Nielsen, Dennis; Kitzler, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) in the environment has doubled relative to the natural global N cycle with consequences for biogeochemical cycling of soil N. Also, climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns and increase soil temperatures which in Arctic environments may accelerate permafrost thawing. The combination of changes in the soil N cycle and hydrological regimes may alter microbial transformations of soil N with unknown impacts on N2O and N2 emissions from temperate and Arctic soils. We present the first results of soil N2O and N2 emissions, chemistry and microbial communities over soil hydrological gradients (upslope, intermediate and wet) across a global N deposition gradient. The global gradient covered an N-limited high Arctic tundra (Zackenberg-ZA), a pacific temperate rain forest (Vancouver Island-VI) and an N saturated forest in Austria (Klausenleopoldsdorf-KL). The N2O and N2 emissions were measured from intact cores at field moisture in a He-atmosphere system. Extractable NH4+ and NO3-, organic and microbial C and N and potential enzyme-activities were determined on soil samples. Soil genomic DNA was subjected to MiSeq-based tag-encoded 16S rRNA and ITS gene amplicon sequencing for the bacterial and fungal community structure. Similar soil moisture levels were observed for the upslope, intermediate and wet locations at ZA, VI and KL, respectively. Extractable NO3- was highest at the N rich KL and lowest at ZA and showed no trend with soil moisture similar to NH4+. At ZA and VI soil NH4+ was higher than NO3- indicating a tighter N cycling. N2O emissions increased with soil moisture at all sites. The N2O emissions for the wet locations ranked similarly to NO3- with the largest response to soil moisture at KL. N2 emissions were remarkably similar across the sites and increased with soil wetness. Microbial C and N also increased with soil moisture and were overall lowest at the N rich KL site. The potential activity of protease enzyme was site

  7. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions... and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based emissions factors (kg/mmBtu HHV) Kraft lime kilns CH4 N2O Kraft calciners CH4 N2O Residual Oil 0.0003 Distillate...

  8. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions... and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based emissions factors (kg/mmBtu HHV) Kraft lime kilns CH4 N2O Kraft calciners CH4 N2O Residual Oil 0.0003 Distillate...

  9. 40 CFR Table Aa-2 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kraft Lime Kiln and Calciner Emissions... and Calciner Emissions Factors for Fossil Fuel-Based CH4 and N2O Fuel Fossil fuel-based emissions factors (kg/mmBtu HHV) Kraft lime kilns CH4 N2O Kraft calciners CH4 N2O Residual Oil 0.0003 Distillate...

  10. Genetic potential for N2O emissions from the sediment of a free water surface constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    García-Lledó, Arantzazu; Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Trias, Rosalia; Hallin, Sara; Bañeras, Lluís

    2011-11-01

    Removal of nitrogen is a key aspect in the functioning of constructed wetlands. However, incomplete denitrification may result in the net emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O) resulting in an undesired effect of a system supposed to provide an ecosystem service. In this work we evaluated the genetic potential for N(2)O emissions in relation to the presence or absence of Phragmites and Typha in a free water surface constructed wetland (FWS-CW), since vegetation, through the increase in organic matter due to litter degradation, may significantly affect the denitrification capacity in planted areas. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses of genes in the denitrification pathway indicating capacity to produce or reduce N(2)O were conducted at periods of different water discharge. Genetic potential for N(2)O emissions was estimated from the relative abundances of all denitrification genes and nitrous oxide reductase encoding genes (nosZ). nosZ abundance was invariably lower than the other denitrifying genes (down to 100 fold), and differences increased significantly during periods of high nitrate loads in the CW suggesting a higher genetic potential for N(2)O emissions. This situation coincided with lower nitrogen removal efficiencies in the treatment cell. The presence and the type of vegetation, mainly due to changes in the sediment carbon and nitrogen content, correlated negatively to the ratio between nitrate and nitrite reducers and positively to the ratio between nitrite and nitrous oxide reducers. These results suggest that the potential for nitrous oxide emissions is higher in vegetated sediments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Soil biochemical characteristics in different ecological systems and their relationships with soil respiration and N2O emission].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Fan, Hui; Jiang, Jing-Yan

    2014-08-01

    The biochemical characteristics of soil in different ecological system and their effects on soil respiration (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission were investigated by an indoor incubation method. The results showed that the biochemical characteristics of soils in the different ecosystems and CO2 and N2O emissions from different soils greatly varied with each other. In general, the highest abundance of bacteria was found in the orchard soil, the highest abundance of actinomycetes occurred in the meadows and the highest abundance of fungi appeared in the woodlands. The abundance of bacteria or actinomycetes in the bamboo soil was the lowest among all soils, and the orchard soil had the lowest content of fungi. The contents of soil microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen generally followed the order of orchard soil > woodland > cropland. Moreover, cumulative CO2 and N2O emissions from the different soils followed the order of orchard soil > bamboo soil > farmland > woodland > grassland and farmland > orchard > grassland > woodland > bamboo soil, respectively. Correlation analysis indicated that there was positive correlations between the abundance of soil bacteria and the contents of microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, as well as between the abundance of soil fungi and the soil total nitrogen content (P < 0.05), while the abundance of soil actinomycosis was positively correlated with soil organic carbon and total nitrogen contents (P < 0.01). The soil bacteria, microbial carbon and nitrogen had a significant positive impact on soil respiration (P < 0.05), and soil bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and ammonium nitrogen had the same impact on N2O emissions (P < 0.05). Stepwise regression analysis suggested that soil respiration could be quantitatively determined by a linear combination of soil bacteria and soil pH, while N2O emission was mainly dependent on the values of soil bacteria and ammonium nitrogen.

  12. Development of an Open-Path N2O Flux Measurement System for Understanding Agricultural and Soil Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Silver, J.; Massick, S.; Ochoa, E.; Stanton, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide is the third most important greenhouse gas, with an atmospheric lifetime of ~114 years and a global warming impact ~300 times greater than that of CO2. The main cause of nitrous oxide's atmospheric increase is anthropogenic emissions, and over 80% of the current global anthropogenic flux is related to agriculture, including associated land-use change. An accurate assessment of N2O emissions from agriculture is vital not only for understanding the global N2O balance and its impact on climate and also for designing crop systems with lower GHG emissions. This work focuses on the early development of an open path N2O instrument for field deployment, based on quantum cascade laser absorption. With a targeted precision of 0.1 ppb at 10 Hz, this instrument will enable eddy covariance measurements to determine vertical fluxes of N2O. Details of the instrument design, which emphasizes ruggedness and high thermal stability, will be presented along with initial results from outdoor testing of the instrument.

  13. Induction of indirect N2O and NO emissions by atmospheric nitrogen deposition in (semi-)natural ecosystems in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühlmann, Tobias; Hiltbrunner, Erika; Körner, Christian; Rihm, Beat; Achermann, Beat

    2015-02-01

    During the past century atmospheric nitrogen deposition increased dramatically due to human activities worldwide. Currently, it exceeds the critical load for nitrogen (CLN) in over 90% of the Swiss forest area and raised bogs, in 80% of all fens and in 30% of species-rich grassland areas in Switzerland. Indirect gaseous nitrogen losses (HNO2, NO, N2O, N2) from these soils induced by atmospheric nitrogen deposition are likely to be substantial. However, the approaches to estimate these indirect N emissions provided by the international organisations (UNFCCC, IPCC; UNECE, EMEP/EEA) are based on agricultural data only. They may not be suitable to estimate the indirect emissions from (semi-)natural ecosystems such as forests, extensively used grassland, and wetlands. The present study aims at calculating ecosystem-specific annual indirect N2O and NO emissions of (semi-)natural ecosystems in Switzerland for the years 1990, 2000, 2007 and 2010 using a simple linear model similar to the international guidelines. The approach here is based on empirical data for (semi-)natural ecosystems, derived from a literature survey, is driven by atmospheric nitrogen deposition and is ecosystem-specific with a high spatial resolution of 100 m × 100 m. Our results show that such ecosystems represent a strong source of indirect N emissions induced by atmospheric nitrogen deposition and emitted 1.61 ± 0.32 Gg N2O-N and 2.51 ± 0.53 Gg NO-N into the atmosphere in Switzerland in the year 2010, corresponding to 21% of the total Swiss N2O emissions and 10% of the NOx emissions. Thanks to the reduction of N emissions and thereby reduced atmospheric N deposition, the indirect N2O and NO emissions from (semi-)natural ecosystems are estimated to have been both reduced by c. 20% from 1990 to 2010. We conclude that the source strength for N2O and NO emissions of (semi-)natural ecosystems have been underestimated by the current approaches of IPCC and EMEP/EEA by a factor of 4.4 and 17

  14. Effect of different agronomic practises on greenhouse gas emissions, especially N2O and nutrient cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koal, Philipp; Schilling, Rolf; Gerl, Georg; Pritsch, Karin; Munch, Jean Charles

    2014-05-01

    In order to achieve a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, management practises need to be adapted by implementing sustainable land use. At first, reliable field data are required to assess the effect of different farming practises on greenhouse gas budgets. The conducted field experiment covers and compares two main aspects of agricultural management, namely an organic farming system and an integrated farming system, implementing additionally the effects of diverse tillage systems and fertilisation practises. Furthermore, the analysis of the alterable biological, physical and chemical soil properties enables a link between the impact of different management systems on greenhouse gas emissions and the monitored cycle of matter, especially the nitrogen cycle. Measurements were carried out on long-term field trials at the Research Farm Scheyern located in a Tertiary hilly landscape approximately 40 km north of Munich (South Germany). The long-term field trials of the organic and integrated farming system were started in 1992. Since then, parcels in a field (each around 0,2-0,4 ha) with a particular interior plot set-up have been conducted. So the 20 years impacts of different tillage and fertilisation practises on soil properties including trace gases were examined. Fluxes of CH4, N2O and CO2 are monitored since 2007 for the integrated farming system trial and since 2012 for the organic farming system trial using an automated system which consists of chambers (per point: 4 chambers, each covering 0,4 m2 area) with a motor-driven lid, an automated gas sampling unit, an on-line gas chromatographic analysis system, and a control and data logging unit (Flessa et al. 2002). Each chamber is sampled 3-4 times in 24 hours. The main outcomes are the analysis of temporal and spatial dynamics of greenhouse gas fluxes as influenced by management practice events (fertilisation and tillage) and weather effects (drying-rewetting, freezing-thawing, intense rainfall and dry periods

  15. Effects of Eriophorum vaginatum on N_{2}O emissions at a restored peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummell, Martin; Lazcano, Cristina; Strack, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Restoration of peatlands extracted for horticultural peat production includes both deliberate and accidental introduction of a wide range of plant species, including vascular plants and bryophytes. The roots of vascular plants provide a channel for the movement of greenhouse gases (GHG) including N2O in many soil ecosystems, and may stimulate production of N2O or have other effects via the release of root exudates that are then taken up by soil microorganisms such as heterotrophic denitrifiers. Here we carried out a field study in order to evaluate the effects of Eriophorum vaginatum, an abundant sedge at the harvested peatland at Seba Beach, Alberta, Canada, (53° 27'17.2"N 114° 52'52.0"W) where restoration efforts began in late 2012, and is the dominant ground cover in some areas. We hypothesized that E. vaginatum would increase net N2O production from peat compared to areas of bare peat or moss. We measured net GHG exchange for CO2, CH4, and N2O over one growing season (May-September 2015) using static chambers within this peatland to compare between plots containing E. vaginatum and plots lacking vascular plants. Plots were located along a transect of increasing water table, in order to discriminate between the effects of E. vaginatum and the prevailing hydrological conditions on N2O fluxes. Net fluxes of N2O from the peat to the atmosphere were observed throughout the experimental area, as well as fluxes in the opposite direction, in which the peat removed N2O from the atmosphere inside the chamber. Non-zero fluxes were highly variable in both occurrence and magnitude, though a small number of plots accounted for the majority of measured fluxes. Neither aboveground biomass of E. vaginatum nor its presence in a plot was correlated with either frequency or direction of N2O flux measurements. Other factors, such as water table fluctuations and temperature may be stronger drivers of these microbially-mediated processes than vegetation at this stage of the

  16. Global N2O cycles--terrestrial emissions, atmospheric accumulation and biospheric effects.

    PubMed

    Banin, A; Lawless, J G; Whitten, R C

    1984-01-01

    Tropospheric nitrous oxide concentration has increased by 0.2-0.4% per year over the period 1975 to 1982, amounting to net addition to the atmosphere of 2.8-5.6 Tg N2O-N per year. This perturbation, if continued into the future, will affect stratospheric chemical cycles, and the thermal balance of the Earth. In turn it will have direct and indirect global effects on the biosphere. Though the budget and cycles of N2O on Earth are not yet fully resolved, accumulating information and recent modelling efforts enable a more complete evaluation and better definition of gaps in our knowledge.

  17. Scheduling fertilizer applications as a simple mitigation option for reducing N2O emission in intensively managed mown grassland systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Calanca, Pierluigi; Felber, Raphael; Grant, Robert; Conen, Franz

    2014-05-01

    A general principle in all proposed N2O mitigation options is the fertilization according to plants' requirements. Meanwhile the amount of N fertilization allowed is regulated in many countries. Due to the high pressure from food security and the need for economic efficiency the given limits are generally used up. In mown grassland systems a simple mitigation option is to optimize the timing of the fertilizer applications. Application of fertilizer, both organic manure and mineral fertilizer, is generally scheduled after each cut in a narrow time window. In practice, the delay between cut and fertilizer application is determined by weather conditions, management conditions and most important by the planning and experience of the individual farmer. Many field experiments have shown that enhanced N2O emissions tend to occur after cuts but before the application of fertilizer, especially when soils are characterized by a high WFPS. These findings suggest that the time of fertilizer application has an important implications for the N2O emission rate and that scheduling fertilization according to soil conditions might be a simple, cheap and efficient measure to mitigate N2O emissions. In this paper we report on results from a sensitivity analysis aiming at quantifying the effects of the timing of the fertilizer applications on N2O emissions from intensively managed, mown grasslands. Simulations for different time schedules were carried out with the comprehensive ecosystem model "ECOSYS" . To our knowledge this aspect has not been systematically investigated from a scientific point of view, but might have been always there within the experiences of attentive environmentally concerned farmers.

  18. Effects of agricultural practices on greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CH4 and CO2) from corn fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, D.; Wang, J.; Jima, T.; Dennis, S.; Stockert, C.; Smart, D.; Bhattarai, S.; Brown, K.; Sammis, T.; Reddy, C.

    2012-12-01

    The United States is, by far, the largest producer of corn (Zea mays L.) in the world. Recent increases in fertilizer cost and concerns over global climate change have farmers and others interested in more efficient fertilization management and greenhouse gas emissions reductions. To seek the best management practices, we conducted field experiments during the 2012 growing season at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. Six treatments were applied including regular URAN application [2 times], multiple URAN applications [4 times], denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application, and chicken litter plus regular URAN application in no-tilled plots, and URAN application plus bio-char in tilled plots, all compared to regular URAN application in conventional tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated six times (blocks). We measured N2O, CO2 and CH4 emissions using a closed chamber method after rainfall events, fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during the gas sampling. Plant physiology and growth were measured about every two weeks. While preliminary results indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural practices on some days, particularly after rainfall events, CH4 flux was not influenced by the treatments during most of the days. Plots with bio-char showed significantly lower N2O emissions. We also measured N2O flux in a commercial corn field using the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique to ground verify the chamber based N2O emissions at the field scale. Results obtained with the EC technique seem comparable with the chamber method.

  19. Emissions of N2O from organic soils managed by agriculture in North Western Denmark (Possible production and reduction spots)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Elsgaard, Lars; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Clough, Tim J.; Petersen, Søren O.

    2017-04-01

    In North Western Denmark, organic soils are extensively under agricultural management for cereal and high-value cash crop production or as grazing land. The area (overlying raised seabed) has been classified as potentially acid sulfate soil. Drainage and tillage of organic soil is known to promote emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), but a previous monitoring program found annual N2O emissions from adjacent fields with rotational grass and potato that were, respectively, 3 and 5 times higher than default values proposed by The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2014). In order to study underlying mechanisms, the same two sites and two new reference sites along an East-West transect were investigated during 2015. The four sites (i.e. two with rotational grass and two sites with a potato crop) were equipped for weekly monitoring of soil surface N2O emissions and sub-soil N2O concentrations to 1 m depth during spring and autumn 2015. Also, various environmental variables (precipitation, air and soil temperature, soil moisture, groundwater level, and soil mineral N) were monitored. In April and August 2015, intact cores to 1 m depth were collected at the paired grassland and potato sites and analysed for pH, EC, nitrite, reactive Fe, acid volatile S (AVS) and chromium-reducible S (CRS). Nitrous oxide concentrations in the soil profile showed strong temporal dynamics reflecting water table changes, as well as precipitation and in some cases fertilization. At the paired site concentrations in the potato field (reaching 2000 μL N2O L-1) were much higher than in the adjacent grassland (up to 20 μL N2O L-1). Soil pH averaged 4.9 at the two paired sites. The difference was confirmed at reference sites. Accumulated emissions of N2O during monitoring periods (in total 151-174 d) corresponded to 18 and 48 kg N ha-1 at potato sites, but only 3 and 4 kg N ha-1 at the grassland sites. Nitrous oxide accumulated at depth in the soil during phases of declining water

  20. Intergenomic Comparisons Highlight Modularity of the Denitrification Pathway and Underpin the Importance of Community Structure for N2O Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Daniel R. H.; Jones, Christopher M.; Hallin, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and the predominant ozone depleting substance. The only enzyme known to reduce N2O is the nitrous oxide reductase, encoded by the nosZ gene, which is present among bacteria and archaea capable of either complete denitrification or only N2O reduction to di-nitrogen gas. To determine whether the occurrence of nosZ, being a proxy for the trait N2O reduction, differed among taxonomic groups, preferred habitats or organisms having either NirK or NirS nitrite reductases encoded by the nirK and nirS genes, respectively, 652 microbial genomes across 18 phyla were compared. Furthermore, the association of different co-occurrence patterns with enzymes reducing nitric oxide to N2O encoded by nor genes was examined. We observed that co-occurrence patterns of denitrification genes were not randomly distributed across taxa, as specific patterns were found to be more dominant or absent than expected within different taxonomic groups. The nosZ gene had a significantly higher frequency of co-occurrence with nirS than with nirK and the presence or absence of a nor gene largely explained this pattern, as nirS almost always co-occurred with nor. This suggests that nirS type denitrifiers are more likely to be capable of complete denitrification and thus contribute less to N2O emissions than nirK type denitrifiers under favorable environmental conditions. Comparative phylogenetic analysis indicated a greater degree of shared evolutionary history between nosZ and nirS. However 30% of the organisms with nosZ did not possess either nir gene, with several of these also lacking nor, suggesting a potentially important role in N2O reduction. Co-occurrence patterns were also non-randomly distributed amongst preferred habitat categories, with several habitats showing significant differences in the frequencies of nirS and nirK type denitrifiers. These results demonstrate that the denitrification pathway is highly modular, thus underpinning the

  1. Plant species diversity reduces N2O but not CH4 emissions from constructed wetlands under high nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenjuan; Shi, Mengmeng; Chang, Jie; Ren, Yuan; Xu, Ronghua; Zhang, Chongbang; Ge, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been widely used for treating wastewater. CWs also are the sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) due to high pollutant load. It has been reported that plant species diversity can enhance nitrogen (N) removal efficiency in CWs for treating wastewater. However, the influence of plant species diversity on GHG emissions from CWs in habitats with high N levels still lack research. This study established four species richness levels (1, 2, 3, 4) and 15 species compositions by using 75 simulated vertical flow CWs microcosms to investigate the effects of plant species diversity on the GHG emissions and N removal efficiency of CWs with a high N level. Results showed plant species richness reduced nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and N (NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N, and TIN) concentrations in wastewater, but had no effect on methane (CH4) emission. Especially, among the 15 compositions of plant species, the four-species mixture emitted the lowest N2O and had under-depletion of N (DminTIN < 0). The presence of Oenanthe javanica had a significantly negative effect on the N2O emission but had no effect on N removal efficiency. The presence of Rumex japonicus significantly reduced the N (NO3(-)-N and TIN) concentrations in wastewater but had no effect on the N2O and CH4 emissions. The N concentrations and GHG emissions in the community of R. japonicus × Phalaris arundinacea were as low as those in the four-species mixture. Assembling plant communities with relatively high species richness (four-species mixture) or particular composition (R. japonicus × P. arundinacea) could enhance the N removal efficiency and reduce the GHG emissions from CWs for treating wastewater with a high N level.

  2. Effect of fertilization on N2O emissions from a marginal soil used for perennial grass bioenergy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Karim, Imtiaz; Mason, Cedric; Tadipatri, Dhanya; Cary, Ian; Crawford, Ryan; Hansen, Julie; Crawford, Jamie; Mayton, Hilary; Steenhuis, Tammo; Richards, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Marginal lands constitute the primary land base available for development of bioenergy feedstocks in New York and the northeastern USA. Many of these soils are marginal because seasonal wetness prevents profitable row crop cultivation, but they are potentially suitable for perennial bioenergy feedstocks like switchgrass. Using these frequently wet soils for bioenergy production has multiple environmental and socio-economic benefits, yet little is known about how sustainable this practice is regarding greenhouse gas emissions - particularly in relation to the application of fertilizers. In a 2.2-ha field study near Ithaca, NY, USA, we are therefore monitoring greenhouse gas production from marginal silty clay loam soils cultivated with switchgrass. Here, we present results of our 2013 monitoring campaign, in which we assessed the effect of surface-applied granular ammonium sulfate-fertilizer (0, 56 and 112 kg N/ha) on N2O emissions along a natural catena from organic matter-rich wet lowland soil to drier midslope and upslope soils with higher rock fragment content. Sampling was done at 1 /2-week intervals around fertilization in June extending to 3-week intervals around harvest in September, giving a total of 15 sampling events. Emissions were sampled in a factorial design using four replicate static chambers per plot, and soil moisture, soil temperature and perched water table depth was assessed likewise. As expected, N2O emissions increased with N-fertilizer application. This effect of fertilization was much stronger than the effect of soil type or slope position. The greatest N2O fluxes were observed a few days after fertilization; we will explore and present the effects of rainfall, air temperature, soil moisture and soil temperature as potential drivers of smaller peaks occurring post-fertilization. Since the non-fertilized plots had negligible N2O emissions while still producing switchgrass at 6 Mg/ha, unfertilized switchgrass production is naturally most

  3. Synthetic fertilizer management for China's cereal crops has reduced N2O emissions since the early 2000s.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjuan; Huang, Yao

    2012-01-01

    China has implemented a soil testing and fertilizer recommendation (STFR) program to reduce the over-usage of synthetic nitrogen (N) fertilizer on cereal crops since the late 1990 s. Using province scale datasets, we estimated an annual reduction rate of 2.5-5.1 kg N ha(-1) from 1998 to 2008 and improving grain yields, which were attributed to the balanced application of phosphate and potassium fertilization. Relative to the means for 1998-2000, the synthetic N fertilizer input and the corresponding N-induced N(2)O production in cereal crops were reduced by 22 ± 0.7 Tg N and 241 ± 4 Gg N(2)O-N in 2001-2008. Further investigation suggested that the N(2)O emission related to wheat and maize cultivation could be reduced by 32-43 Gg N(2)O-N per year in China (26%-41% of the emissions in 2008) if the STFR practice is implemented universally in the future.

  4. Soil trace gas emissions (CH4 and N2O) offset the CO2 uptake in poplar short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gelfand, Iya; Gielen, Bert; camino serrano, Marta; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    The need for renewable energy sources will lead to a considerable expansion in the planting of dedicated fast-growing biomass crops across Europe. Among them poplar (Populus spp) is the most widely planted as short rotation coppice (SRC) and an increase in the surface area of large-scale SRC poplar plantations might thus be expected. In this study we report the greenhouse gas fluxes (GHG) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) measured using the eddy covariance technique in a SRC plantation for bioenergy production during the period 2010-2013. The plantation was established in April 2010 on 18.4 ha of former agricultural land with a density of 8000 plants ha-1; the above-ground biomass was harvested on February 2012 and 2014.The whole GHG balance of the four years of the study was 1.90 (± 1.37) Mg CO2eq ha-1; this indicated that soil trace gas emissions offset the CO2 uptake by the plantation. CH4 and N2O almost equally contributed to offset the CO2 uptake of -5.28 (±0.67) Mg CO2eq ha-1 with an overall emission of 3.56 (± 0.35) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of N2O and of 3.53 (± 0.85) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of CH4. N2O emissions mostly occurred during a single peak a few months after the site was converted into SRC and represented 44% of the entire N2O loss during the entire study. Accurately capturing these emission events proved to be critical for correct estimates of the GHG balance. The self-organizing map (SOM) technique graphically showed the relationship between the CO2 fluxes and the principal environmental variables but failed to explain the variability of the soil trace gas emissions. The nitrogen content in the soil and the water table depth were the two drivers that best explained the variability in N2O and CH4 respectively. This study underlines the importance of the "non-CO2 GHG" on the overall balance as well as the impact of the harvest on the CO2 uptake rate. Further long-term investigations of soil trace gas emissions should also monitor the N

  5. CO2 uptake is offset by CH4 and N2O emissions in a poplar short-rotation coppice

    DOE PAGES

    Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gelfand, Ilya; ...

    2015-04-18

    The need for renewable energy sources will lead to a considerable expansion in the planting of dedicated fast-growing biomass crops across Europe. These are commonly cultivated as short-rotation coppice (SRC), and currently poplar (Populus spp.) is the most widely planted. In this study, we report the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) measured using eddy covariance technique in an SRC plantation for bioenergy production. Measurements were made during the period 2010–2013, that is, during the first two rotations of the SRC. The overall GHG balance of the 4 years of the studymore » was an emission of 1.90 (±1.37) Mg CO2eq ha-1; this indicated that soil trace gas emissions offset the CO2 uptake by the plantation. CH4 and N2O contributed almost equally to offset the CO2 uptake of -5.28 (±0.67) Mg CO2eq ha-1 with an overall emission of 3.56 (±0.35) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of N2O and of 3.53 (±0.85) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of CH4. N2O emissions mostly occurred during one single peak a few months after the site was converted to SRC; this peak comprised 44% of the total N2O loss during the two rotations. Accurately capturing emission events proved to be critical for deriving correct estimates of the GHG balance. The nitrogen (N) content of the soil and the water table depth were the two drivers that best explained the variability in N2O and CH4, respectively. Here, this study underlines the importance of the ‘non-CO2 GHGs’ on the overall balance. Further long-term investigations of soil trace gas emissions should monitor the N content and the mineralization rate of the soil, as well as the microbial community, as drivers of the trace gas emissions.« less

  6. DMPP-added nitrogen fertilizer affects soil N2O emission and microbial activity in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Luca; De Marco, Anna; Maglione, Giuseppe; Polimeno, Franca; Di Tommasi, Paul; Magliulo, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Arable sites contributes to global N2O emission due to massive utilization of nitrogen fertilizers. N2O derives from the biological processes such as nitrification and denitrification influenced by soil nitrogen availability. The use of nitrogen fertilizers added with nitrification inhibitors represents one among the proposed strategy to reduce soil N2O emission form arable sites. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 3,4-dimethylphyrazole phosphate (DMPP), a nitrification inhibitor, on N2O emission and microbial activity of a soil cropped to potato in Southern Italy. The experiment was a randomized block design with two treatments applied and three replicates: control (C) and DMPP (Entec®, K+S Nitrogen) plots, both supplied with the same amount of ammonium nitrate. The nitrogen fertilizer was supplied in three events: at 0 Day After Sowing (DAS; 100 kg N ha-1), at 57 DAS (30 kg N ha-1), and at 71 DAS (30 kg N ha-1). Soil N2O emission was monitored by both dynamic and static chambers. Static chambers were located both on hills and furrows whereas dynamic chambers were located on furrows. Air samples were collected from chambers at different times and analysed by a gas chromatograph (SRI 8610C, Gas Chromatograph). Fluxes were estimated as a linear interpolation of N2O changes over a 30 min time. Microbial biomass and basal respiration were determined as CO2 evolution, analysed by means of an IRGA (Li6200, Licor), on 2 g of fresh soil over a 4h incubation time. Microbial biomass was determined by Substrate Induced Respiration method. Data show no statistical differences in N2O fluxes measured with either dynamic chambers between C and DMPP plots in studied period. However, after the first fertilization event, when the fertilizer was applied as 100 kg N ha-1, the average N2O fluxes measured with static chambers were higher in DMPP plots compared to C plots. In the same period, the microbial biomass significantly decreased in DMPP plots as compared to C

  7. Greenhouse Gas (CH4, CO2 and N2O) Emission Levels by Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) Ponds in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossete, A. L. M.; Sundefeld Junior, G.; Aparicio, C.; Baldi, G. G.; Montes, C. R.; Piveli, R. P.; Melfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study measured greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by Facultative Ponds on Wastewater Treatment Plants. The most studied GHGs include CO2, CH4and N2O. The level of GHG (CO2, CH4 and N2O) emissions by WWTPs in Australian-type stabilization ponds was measured in the city of Lins (22º21'S, 49º50'W), state of São Paulo (SP), Brazil. GHG collection was carried outusing a collection chamber installed at the center of the facultative pond's final third. The effluent's pH and temperature (ET) were registered by probes, and meteorological information regarding air temperature (AT) and solar radiation (SR) were obtained from INMET, Brazil. GHG collection was carried out for 72 consecutive hours in June 2014, on an hourly basis, once every 5 minutes, for the first 30 minutes, and once every 10 minutes from 30 to 50 minutesand subsequently analyzed by gas chromatograph (GC).After three days of data collection, the average AT, SR, ET and pH values were, respectively, 18oC, 2583kJm-2, 23oC and 8.2. Average values for GHG emission levels (CH4, CO2 and N2O) were 79.01; 100.65 and 0.0 mg m-2 h-1, respectively. GHG emission levels were divided into light periods (morning, afternoon and evening)in order to verify the periods with the highest GHG emissions.The highest CH4 emission levels were measured between morning and early afternoon. The maximum CO2 emissions were observed from evening to early morning. N2O emissions were constant and values were close to the ones found in the atmosphere, which shows the emission of N2O by facultative ponds does not contribute to greenhouse gases emissions.The results enabled us to characterize and quantify GHG emission levels per Facultative Pond on Wastewater Treatment Plant. Acknowledgment to FAPESP and SABESP, Brazil.

  8. Phosphorus addition mitigates N2O and CH4 emissions in N-saturated subtropical forest, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Longfei; Wang, Yihao; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Dörsch, Peter; Mulder, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Chronically elevated nitrogen (N) deposition has led to severe nutrient imbalance in forest soils. Particularly in tropical and subtropical forest ecosystems, increasing N loading has aggravated phosphorus (P) limitation of biomass production, and has resulted in elevated emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and reduced uptake of methane (CH4), both of which are important greenhouse gases. Yet, the interactions of N and P and their effects on greenhouse gas emissions remain elusive. Here, we report N2O and CH4 emissions together with soil N and P data for a period of 18 months following a single P addition (79 kg P ha-1, as NaH2PO4 powder) to an N-saturated, Masson pine-dominated forest soil at TieShanPing (TSP), Chongqing, south-western (SW) China. We observed a significant decline in both nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in soil water (5 and 20 cm depths) and in soil N2O emissions, following P application. We hypothesise that enhanced N uptake by plants in response to P addition, resulted in less available NO3- for denitrification. By contrast to most other forest ecosystems, TSP is a net source of CH4. P addition significantly decreased CH4 emissions and turned the soil from a net source into a net sink. Based on our observation and previous studies in South America and China, we believe that P addition relieves N inhibition of CH4 oxidation. Within the 1.5 years after P addition, no significant increase of forest growth was observed and P stimulation of forest N uptake by understorey vegetation remains to be confirmed. Our study indicates that P fertilisation of N-saturated, subtropical forest soils may mitigate N2O and CH4 emissions, in addition to alleviating nutrient imbalances and reducing losses of N through NO3- leaching.

  9. Impact of biochar on soil N2O emissions under different biochar-carbon/fertilizer-nitrogen ratios at a constant moisture condition on a silt loam soil.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhengjun; Zhu, Lizhong

    2017-04-15

    Biochar amendment has been proposed as a potential solution for improving soil quality and suppressing greenhouse gas emission. Considering the serious nitrogen fertilizer overuse problem in China, it is important to investigate the effect of biochar on soil with excess nitrogen fertilizer. Therefore, two sets of soil column experiments were conducted to explore the effect of biochar on N2O emission from nitrogen fertilizer-overused soil. Three types of biochar (biochars pyrolzed at 300, 500 and 700°C, respectively) and one type of nitrogen fertilizer (ammonium sulfate) were investigated at varying application rates. It was found that N2O emission was related to both biochar and N-fertilizer application rates, and increased N2O emission was negatively correlated with the TC/IN ratio (the ratio of total carbon to inorganic nitrogen) after biochar application. The soil TC/IN ratio determined the ammonium utilization pathway, affecting the intensity of nitrification and N2O emission. When the TC/IN ratio was relatively high (>60), suppressed nitrification led to the suppression of N2O emission. Conversely, enhanced nitrification when the TC/IN ratio was relatively low (<45) caused the promotion of N2O emission. In conclusion, biochar's suppression of soil N2O emission was conditional and biochar should be applied in a proper ratio to nitrogen fertilizer to avoid excessive N2O emission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nitrogen loss from high N-input vegetable fields - a) direct N2O emissions b) Spatiotemporal variability of N species (N2O, NH4+, NO3-) in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfab, H.; Ruser, R.; Palmer, I.; Fiedler, S.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous oxide is a climate relevant trace gas. It contributes 7.9 % to the total anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission and it is also involved in stratospheric ozone depletion. Approximately 85 % of the anthropogenic N2O emissions result from agricultural activities, more than 50 % are produced during microbial N-turnover processes in soils. Especially soils with high N-input (N-fertilizer and high amount of N in plant residues) like vegetable cropped soils are assumed to cause high N2O losses. The aims of the study presented were (i) to quantify the N2O loss from a vegetable field (lettuce-cauliflower crop rotation), (ii) to calculate an emission factor for the study site in Southwest Germany and to compare this factor with the default value provided by the IPCC (2006) and (iii) to test the emission reduction potential (Ammonium Sulfate Nitrate fertilizer, ASN either by reduced N-fertilization) in comparison with common N doses used for good agricultural practice or by the use of a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), a banded N-application (lettuce) or a depot fertilization measure (pseudo-CULTAN in order to suppress nitrification). N2O fluxes determined with the closed chamber method were highly variable in time with strongly increased flux rates after N-fertilization in combination with rainfall or irrigation measures and after the incorporation of cauliflower crop residues. Using the mean soil nitrate contents of the top soil of our investigated treatments (0-25 cm depth), we could explain approximately 60 % of the variability of the cumulative N2O losses during the vegetation period of lettuce and cauliflower. The cumulative N2O emissions ranged between 0,99 kg N2O-N ha-1 from the unfertilized control plots (vegetation period) and 6,81 kg N2O-N ha-1 from the plots with the highest N-dose. Based on the guidelines of the IPCC (2006), we calculated an emission factor around 0,9 % for the cropping season. This value is in good agreement with the default value of the

  11. The Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) colony as a "hot spot" of nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizota, Chitoshi; Noborio, Kosuke; Mori, Yoshiaki

    2012-09-01

    Unusual high soil fluxes up to ca. 500 mg N2O m-2 h-1 emission were associated with a continued breeding/roosting colony of Great Cormorant in central Japan. This flux is nearly two-orders of magnitude higher than those hitherto documented. The flux was markedly dependent upon the soil surface temperature, i.e., higher in April-October during the prevailing high air temperatures, as compared with November to March. Integrated input of fecal N at rearing and fledging stages of chicks followed by coupled mineralization, nitrification and subsequently denitrification processes under humid and temperate regimes is responsible for such an unusual flux. The Great Cormorant colony serves as a "hot spot" of N2O emission of natural origin.

  12. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil N2O emissions and soil respiration in temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Qi, Y.; Peng, Q.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen addition to soil can play a vital role in influencing nitrogen balance and the losses of soil carbon by respiration in N-deficient terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of different levels of nitrogen fertilization (HN:200 kg N ha-1y-1, MN:100 kg N ha-1y-1 and LN:50 kg N ha-1y-1) on soil N2O emissions and soil respiration compared with non-fertilization(CK, 0 kg N ha-1y-1), from July 2007 to September 2008, in temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia, China. Several N fertilizer forms were included(CAN:calcium ammonium nitrate, AS:ammonium sulphate and NS:sodium nitrate) and a static closed chamber method was used as gas fluxes measurement. Our data showed that peak N2O fluxes induced by N treatments were concentrated in short periods (2 to 3 weeks) after fertilization in summer and in soil thawing periods in early spring; there were similarly low N2O fluxes from all treatments in the remaining seasons of the year. The three N levels increased annual N2O emissions significantly(P<0.05) in the order of MN>HN>LN compared with the CK(control) treatment in year 1; in year 2, the elevation of annual N2O emissions was significant (P<0.05) by HN and MN treatments but was insignificant by LN treatments (P>0.05). The three N forms also had strong effects on N2O emissions. Significantly (P<0.05) higher annual N2O emissions were observed in the soils of CAN and AS fertilizer treatments than in the soils of NS fertilizer treatments in both measured years, but the difference between CAN and AS was not significant (P>0.05). Annual N2O emission factors (EF) ranged from 0.060 to 0.298% for different N fertilizer treatments in the two observed years, with an overall EF value of 0.125%. The EF values were by far less than the mean default EF proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change(IPCC). Our results also showed that N fertilization did not change the seasonal patterns of soil respiration, which were mainly controlled by soil

  13. N2O emissions from an intermittently aerated semi-aerobic aged refuse bioreactor: Combined effect of COD and NH4(+)-N in influent leachate.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihua; Sun, Yingjie; Bian, Rongxing; Wang, Huawei; Zhang, Dalei

    2017-08-12

    The carbon-nitrogen ratio (COD/NH4(+)-N) is an important factor affecting nitrification and denitrification in wastewater treatment; this factor also influences nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. This study investigated two simulated intermittently aerated semi-aerobic aged refuse bioreactors (SAARB) filled with 8-year old aged refuse (AR). The research analyzed how differences in and the combination of influent COD and NH4(+)-N impact N2O emissions in leachate treatment. Experimental results showed that N2O emissions increased as the influent COD/NH4(+)-N decreased. The influent COD had a greater effect on N2O emissions than NH4(+)-N at the same influent ratios of COD/NH4(+)-N (2.7 and 8.0, respectively). The maximum N2O emission accounted for 8.82±2.65% of the total nitrogen removed from the influent leachate; the maximum level occurred when the COD was 2000mg/L. An analysis of differences in influent carbon sources at the same COD/NH4(+)-N ratios concluded that the availability of biodegradable carbon substrates (i.e. glucose) is an important factor affecting N2O emissions. At a low influent COD/NH4(+)-N ratio (2.7), the N2O conversion rate was greater when there were more biodegradable carbon substrates. Although the SAARB included the N2O generation and reduction processes, N2O reduction mainly occurred later in the process, after leachate recirculation. The maximum N2O emission rate occurred in the first hour of single-period (24h) experiments, as leachate contacted the surface AR. In practical SAARB applications, N2O emissions may be reduced by measures such as reducing the initial recirculation loading of NH4(+)-N substrates, adding a later supplement of biodegradable carbon substrates, and/or prolonging hydraulic retention time (HRT) of influent leachate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. [Effect of organic material incorporation in rice season on N2O emissions from following winter wheat growing season].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-wen; Huang, Yao; Zong, Liang-gang; Zheng, Xun-hua; Wang, Yue-si

    2006-07-01

    In a field experiment, five fertilizer treatments including chemical fertilizer (CF), rapeseed cake + chemical fertilizer (RC + CF), wheat straw + chemical fertilizer (WS + CF), cow manure + chemical fertilizer (CM + CF), and pig manure + chemical fertilizer (PM + CF), were dedicated to examine the effect of organic materials incorporation in the rice season on N2O emissions from the following winter wheat season and to assess the climatic impacts from CH4 and N2O emissions in a rice-wheat rotation. Organic material was incorporated at the same rate (225 g x m(-2)) for organic treatments at the depth of 10 cm in the soil as the basal fertilizer just before rice transplanting. An identical synthetic nitrogen fertilizer was adopted for all treatments. Results show that the seasonal amount of N20 emissions from the following wheat season differed with organic material applied in rice season. No pronounced difference in N20 emissions was found between the CF and RC + CF treatments. In contrast with the CF treatment, however, N2O emission was decreased by 15% for the WS + CF treatment, but increased by 29% and 16% for the CM + CF and PM + CF treatments, respectively. Over the entire annual rotation cycle, N2O amount was increased by 17% for the CM + CF treatment, 7% for the PM + CF treatment, and 6% for the RC + CF treatment, but decreased by 16% for the WS + CF treatment in comparison with the CF treatment. Based on total emissions of CH4 in rice season and N2O over the entire rotation cycle, the estimation of combined Global Warming Potentials (GWPs) for CH4 and N20 shows that over a 20 years horizon or a 500 years horizon, the value of annual total GWPs was ranked in the order of RC + CF > WS + CF > CM + CF > PM + CF > CF or RC + CF > CM + CF > PM + CF > WS + CF > CF. The highest, middle and the lowest value of the GWPs per unit crop grain yield occurred for the crop residue, farmyard manure and pure synthetic fertilizer treatments, respectively. Compared to the

  15. Predicting field N2O emissions and controlling factors in a Swiss grassland using a mid-infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juhwan; Six, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Infrared reflectance spectroscopy, alternative to conventional analysis methods, is used to analyze soil physical and chemical properties. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopic technique to determine the spatial and temporal changes and variability in controlling factors of soil N2O emissions under various management practices. In this study, we selected an intensively managed grassland in Chamau, Switzerland as a pilot site. The perennial grassland is situated in the pre-alpine lowlands of Switzerland at 400 m a.s.l., and managed for forage production. Management practices include 4 to 6 times mowing per year. One to two weeks after mowing, the grassland is fertilized with cattle slurry. Gas and soil (0-20 cm depth) samples were collected from April to September 2013. The soil samples were air-dried and ball-milled for spectrum measurements in the MIR (= 4000-400 cm-1). We developed and tested a site-specific calibration model to quantify soil factors affecting daily N2O emissions, namely mineral N concentrations, dissolved organic carbon, pH, and gravimetric water content. Soil MIR databases could be applied to large-scale biogeochemical modeling of N2O emissions to improve our understanding of related mechanisms, encompassing its high spatial and temporal variation. We also discuss potential MIR spectroscopy applications in regional soil assessment and GHG accounting under climate change.

  16. Solar UV irradiation-induced production of N2O from plant surfaces - low emissions rates but all over the world.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, T. N.; Bruhn, D.; Ambus, P.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important long-lived greenhouse gas and precursor of stratospheric ozone depleting mono-nitrogen oxides. The atmospheric concentration of N2O is persistently increasing; however, large uncertainties are associated with the distinct source strengths. Here we investigate for the first time N2O emission from terrestrial vegetation in response to natural solar ultra violet radiation. We conducted field site measurements to investigate N2O atmosphere exchange from grass vegetation exposed to solar irradiance with and without UV-screening. Further laboratory tests were conducted with a range of species to study the controls and possible loci of UV-induced N2O emission from plants. Plants released N2O in response to natural sunlight at rates of c. 20-50 nmol m-2 h-1, mostly due to the UV component. The emission rate is temperature dependent with a rather high activation energy indicative for an abiotic process. The prevailing zone for the N2O formation appears to be at the very surface of leaves. However, only c. 26% of the UV-induced N2O appears to originate from plant-N. Further, the process is dependent on atmospheric oxygen concentration. Our work demonstrates that ecosystem emission of the important greenhouse gas, N2O, may be up to c. 30% higher than hitherto assumed.

  17. Estimating agricultural N2O emissions in France: comparison of a spatialized agro-ecosytem model (CERES-EGC) and a terrestrial biosphere model (O-CN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massad, R. S.; Prieur, V.; Boukari, E.; Lehuger, S.; Chaumartin, F.; Schultz, M.; Gabrielle, B.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a major greenhouse gas and air pollutant. Considered over a 100 year period, it has 298 times more impact 'per unit weight' (Global warming potential) than carbon dioxide. The parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including France, are committed to estimate their national nitrous oxide (N2O) budgets and to establish regional programmes of N2O emissions reductions. Agricultural activities are gradually coming into focus as a major GHG emission sector; precise regional estimates of current N2O emissions from arable land are being needed, along with possible means for mitigating emissions. The use of biogeochemical simulation models to estimate N2O fluxes from agricultural soils has obvious benefits. These models provide a unique potential to mechanistically predict N2O emissions from arable soils on both the plot-scale and the regional/national scale on daily time resolutions. In this study we apply two biogeochemical simulation models: CERES-EGC and O-CN all over France for the year 2007 in the perspective of producing an inventory of N2O emissions from croplands. Simulated total N2O emissions from agricultural soils sum up to 20.4 Gg N-N2O/yr with the CERES-EGC model and to 95.1 Gg N-N2O/yr with the O-CN model. Even though the total emissions are largely different between the two models, the temporal and spatial distributions are comparable. When compared to the EDGAR 4.2 emission database we note that O-CN overestimates the annual emissions by approximately a factor of two, whereas CERES-EGC underestimates those emissions. These differences can be explained to a certain extent by the difference in land-use types considered in each of the models and the inventories.

  18. Hormesis, hotspots and emissions trading.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Jonathan B

    2004-06-01

    Instrument choice--the comparison of technology standards, performance standards, taxes and tradable permits--has been a major topic in environmental law and environmental economics. Most analyses assume that emissions and health effects are positively and linearly related. If they are not, this complicates the instrument choice analysis. This article analyses the effects of a nonlinear dose-response function on instrument choice. In particular, it examines the effects of hormesis (high-dose harm but low-dose benefit) on the choice between fixed performance standards and tradable emissions permits. First, the article distinguishes the effects of hormesis from the effects of local emissions. Hormesis is an attribute of the dose-response or exposure-response relationship. Hotspots are an attribute of the emissions-exposure relationship. Some pollutants may be hormetic and cause local emissions-exposure effects; others may be hormetic without causing local emissions-exposure effects. It is only the local exposure effects of emissions that pose a problem for emissions trading. Secondly, the article shows that the conditions under which emissions trading would perform less well or even perversely under hormesis, depend on how stringent a level of protection is set. Only when the regulatory standard is set at the nadir of the hormetic curve would emissions trading be seriously perverse (assuming other restrictive conditions as well), and such a standard is unlikely. Moreover, the benefits of the overall programme may justify the risk of small perverse effects around this nadir. Thirdly, the article argues that hotspots can be of concern for two distinct reasons, harmfulness and fairness. Lastly, the paper argues that the solution to these problems may not be to abandon market-based incentive instruments and their cost-effectiveness gains, but to improve them further by moving from emissions trading and emissions taxes to risk trading and risk taxes. In short, the article

  19. Partitioning N2O emissions within the U.S. Corn Belt using an inverse modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zichong; Griffis, Timothy J.; Millet, Dylan B.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Xuhui; Baker, John M.; Xiao, Ke; Turner, Peter A.; Chen, Ming; Zobitz, John; Wells, Kelley C.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions within the US Corn Belt have been previously estimated to be 200-900% larger than predictions from emission inventories, implying that one or more source categories in bottom-up approaches are underestimated. Here we interpret hourly N2O concentrations measured during 2010 and 2011 at a tall tower using a time-inverted transport model and a scale factor Bayesian inverse method to simultaneously constrain direct and indirect agricultural emissions. The optimization revealed that both agricultural source categories were underestimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) inventory approach. However, the magnitude of the discrepancies differed substantially, ranging from 42 to 58% and from 200 to 525% for direct and indirect components, respectively. Optimized agricultural N2O budgets for the Corn Belt were 319 ± 184 (total), 188 ± 66 (direct), and 131 ± 118 Gg N yr-1 (indirect) in 2010, versus 471 ± 326, 198 ± 80, and 273 ± 246 Gg N yr-1 in 2011. We attribute the interannual differences to varying moisture conditions, with increased precipitation in 2011 amplifying emissions. We found that indirect emissions represented 41-58% of the total agricultural budget, a considerably larger portion than the 25-30% predicted in bottom-up inventories, further highlighting the need for improved constraints on this source category. These findings further support the hypothesis that indirect emissions are presently underestimated in bottom-up inventories. Based on our results, we suggest an indirect emission factor for runoff and leaching ranging from 0.014 to 0.035 for the Corn Belt, which represents an upward adjustment of 1.9-4.6 times relative to the IPCC and is in agreement with recent bottom-up field studies.

  20. CO(2) and N(2)O emissions in a soil chronosequence at a glacier retreat zone in Maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Thomazini, A; Mendonça, E S; Teixeira, D B; Almeida, I C C; La Scala, N; Canellas, L P; Spokas, K A; Milori, D M B P; Turbay, C V G; Fernandes, R B A; Schaefer, C E G R

    2015-07-15

    Studies of C cycle alterations are extremely important to identify changes due to climate change, especially in the polar ecosystem. The objectives of this study were to (i) examine patterns of soil CO2-C and N2O-N emissions, and (ii) evaluate the quantity and quality of soil organic matter across a glacier retreat chronosequence in the Maritime Antarctica. Field measurements were carried out during January and February 2010 (summer season) along a retreating zone of the White Eagle Glacier, at King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. Soil samples (0-10cm) were collected along a 500-m transect at regular intervals to determine changes in soil organic matter. Field CO2-C emission measurements and soil temperature were carried out at regular intervals. In addition, greenhouse gas production potentials were assessed through 100days laboratory incubations. Soils exposed for a longer time tended to have greater concentrations of soluble salts and possess sandier textures. Total organic C (3.59gkg(-1)), total N (2.31gkg(-1)) and labile C (1.83gkg(-1)) tended to be lower near the glacier front compared with sites away from it, which is correlated with decreasing degree of humification of the soil organic matter with exposure time. Soil CO2-C emissions tended to increase with distance from the glacier front. On average, the presence of vegetation increased CO2-C emissions by 440%, or the equivalent of 0.633g of CO2-C m(-2)h(-1). Results suggest that newly exposed landsurfaces undergo soil formation with increasing labile C input from vegetation, accompanied by increasing soil CO2-C emissions. Despite the importance of exposure time on CO2-C production and emissions, there was no similar trend in soil N2O-N production potentials as a function of glacial retreat. For N2O, instead, the maximum production occurred in sites with the first stages of vegetation growth.

  1. The influence of N-fertilization regimes on N2O emissions and denitrification in rain-fed cropland during the rainy season.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhixin; Zhu, Bo; Zeng, Zebin

    2014-11-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilization regimes on N2O emissions and denitrification rates were evaluated by in situ field incubation experiments with intact soil cores and the acetylene block technique. Intact soil cores were collected from long-term field experiments involving several N fertilization regimes, including single synthetic N fertilizer (N), organic manure (OM), synthetic N, P, K fertilizer (NPK), organic manure with synthetic fertilizer (OMNPK), crop straw residue with synthetic fertilizer (SRNPK) and no nitrogen fertilizer (NF). N2O was sampled from the head space of the cylinders to determine the daily N2O emission and denitrification rate. The results showed that the N2O emissions were greatly influenced by the specific fertilization regime even when the same nitrogen rate was applied. The mean N2O emissions and denitrification rates from the N, OM, NPK, OMNPK and SRNPK treatment were 2.22, 2.66, 1.94, 2.53, 1.67 and 4.63, 5.96, 4.15, 5.41, 3.65 mg per m(2) per day, respectively. The application of OM significantly increased the N2O emission and denitrification compared to the application of NPK because of the high soil organic carbon (SOC) content of OM. However, SRNPK increased the SOC content and decreased the N2O emissions significantly compared to the OM and OMNPK treatments because the addition of crop straw with a high C/N ratio to soil with a low inorganic N content induced N immobilization. The contents of soil nitrate and ammonium were the main limiting factors for N2O emissions in a positive regression as follows: Ln (N2O) = 2.511 + 1.258 × Ln ([NH4(+)] + [NO3(-)]). Crop straw residue combined with synthetic fertilizer is recommended as an optimal strategy for mitigating N2O emissions and denitrification-induced N loss in rain-fed croplands.

  2. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbially-mediated processes. Soil amended with biochar has been demonstrated to reduce N2O emissions in the field and in laboratory experiments. Although N2O emission mitigation following soil biochar amendment has been reported frequently the underlying processes and specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in decreasing soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. To investigate the impact of biochar on the microbial community of nitrogen-transforming microorganisms we performed a microcosm study with arable soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature wood derived biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative real-time PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil.

  3. Investigating the microbial community responsible for unusually high soil N2O and NOx emissions in the Colorado Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberwein, J. R.; Carey, C.; Aronson, E. L.; Jenerette, D.

    2016-12-01

    Although the importance of soil nitrogenous emissions are well accepted in terms of local and global ecological relevance, there remain considerable knowledge gaps concerning the mechanisms regulating production, particularly in arid systems. This study aimed to connect desert soil trace gas emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) with compositional changes in the microbial community. We quantified real-time soil trace gas emissions at two sites in the Colorado Desert experiencing contrasting anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition loads (<5 and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1). Measurements were made through 48 hours following water (to simulate a 2 cm rain event) and N additions (at 30 kg NH4NO3 ha-1). In conjunction with flux measurements, soil samples were collected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the soil microbial community. N2O fluxes reached as high as 1200 ng N2O-N m-2 s-1, well above most published emissions, but returned to pre-wetting conditions within 12 hours. NOx emissions reached as high as 350 ng NOx-N m-2 s-1 and remained elevated past 24 hours post-wetting. Results from the 16S analysis indicate distinct differences in the microbial community composition between the high and low N deposition sites, with less than 50% of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in common between sites. N addition had a significant effect on the soil microbial community at the low deposition site, but not at the high deposition site. Furthermore, significant shifts in the bacterial community occurred after wetting, with only one third of the community remaining constant between time points. These results suggest that gaseous N export, particularly N2O emission, is a greater form of nitrogen loss in this system than is currently assumed. Experimental N additions and anthropogenic N deposition show potential for shifting soil microbial community composition, with implications for soil N emissions. Furthermore, shifts in the microbial community can occur as

  4. Emissions of N2O from tropical forest soils - Response to fertilization with NH4(+), NO3(-), and PO4(3-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, M.; Kaplan, W. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Da Costa, Jose Maria

    1988-01-01

    Undisturbed oxisols in a central Amazon tropical forest were fertilized with ammonium, nitrate, or phosphate. Enhanced emissions of N2O were observed for all treatments within one day of fertilization, with the response NO3(-) much greater than NH4(+) much greater than PO4(3-). Approximately, 0.5 percent of applied NO3(-) was converted to N2O within two weeks after application, with less than 0.1 percent of the NH4(+) converted to N2O. These experiments reveal a potentially large source of N2O from microbial reduction of NO3(-) in the clay soils of Amazonia.

  5. Emissions of N2O from tropical forest soils - Response to fertilization with NH4(+), NO3(-), and PO4(3-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, M.; Kaplan, W. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Da Costa, Jose Maria

    1988-01-01

    Undisturbed oxisols in a central Amazon tropical forest were fertilized with ammonium, nitrate, or phosphate. Enhanced emissions of N2O were observed for all treatments within one day of fertilization, with the response NO3(-) much greater than NH4(+) much greater than PO4(3-). Approximately, 0.5 percent of applied NO3(-) was converted to N2O within two weeks after application, with less than 0.1 percent of the NH4(+) converted to N2O. These experiments reveal a potentially large source of N2O from microbial reduction of NO3(-) in the clay soils of Amazonia.

  6. [Effects of no-tillage and fertilization on paddy soil CH4 and N2O emissions and their greenhouse effect in central China].

    PubMed

    Dai, Guang-zhao; Li, Cheng-fang; Cao, Cou-gui; Zhan, Ming; Tong, Le-ga; Mei, Shao-hua; Zhai, Zhong-bing; Fan, Duan-yang

    2009-09-01

    By using static chamber-gas chromatographic techniques, the CH4 and N2O emissions from the paddy soil in southeast Hubei were measured. Four treatments were installed, i.e., no-tillage plus no-fertilization (NT0), conventional tillage plus no-fertilization (CT0), no-tillage plus fertilization (NTC), and conventional tillage plus fertilization (CTC). In all treatments, the CH4 emission had a seasonal variation of increasing first and decreasing then, while the N2O emission had no significant seasonal variation. Fertilization increased the CH4 and N2O emissions significantly. NT0 increased the CH4 emission and decreased the N2O emission significantly, compared with CT0; NTC only decreased the CH4 emission and increased the N2O emission slightly, compared with CTC. The analysis on the integrated greenhouse effect of CH4 and N2O showed that NT0 increased the effect by 25.9%, compared with CT0, while NTC decreased the effect by 10.1%, compared with CTC. Therefore, a reasonable arrangement of fertilization and no-tillage could reduce the integrated greenhouse effect of CH4 and N2O from paddy field.

  7. Effects of soil temperature, flooding, and organic matter addition on N2O emissions from a soil of Hongze Lake wetland, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Hongwen

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the effects of soil temperature, flooding, and raw organic matter input on N2O emissions in a soil sampled at Hongze Lake wetland, Jiangsu Province, China. The treatments studied were-peat soil (I), peat soil under flooding (II), peat soil plus raw organic matter (III), and peat soil under flooding plus organic matter. These four treatments were incubated at 20°C and 35°C. The result showed that temperature increase could enhance N2O emissions rate and cumulative emissions significantly; moreover, the flooded soil with external organic matter inputs showed the lowest cumulative rise in N2O emissions due to temperature increment. Flooding might inhibit soil N2O emissions, and the inhibition was more pronounced after organic matter addition to the original soil. Conversely, organic matter input explained lower cumulative N2O emissions under flooding. Our results suggest that complex interactions between flooding and other environmental factors might appear in soil N2O emissions. Further studies are needed to understand potential synergies or antagonisms between environmental factors that control N2O emissions in wetland soils.

  8. Effects of Soil Temperature, Flooding, and Organic Matter Addition on N2O Emissions from a Soil of Hongze Lake Wetland, China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Xu, Hongwen

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the effects of soil temperature, flooding, and raw organic matter input on N2O emissions in a soil sampled at Hongze Lake wetland, Jiangsu Province, China. The treatments studied were—peat soil (I), peat soil under flooding (II), peat soil plus raw organic matter (III), and peat soil under flooding plus organic matter. These four treatments were incubated at 20°C and 35°C. The result showed that temperature increase could enhance N2O emissions rate and cumulative emissions significantly; moreover, the flooded soil with external organic matter inputs showed the lowest cumulative rise in N2O emissions due to temperature increment. Flooding might inhibit soil N2O emissions, and the inhibition was more pronounced after organic matter addition to the original soil. Conversely, organic matter input explained lower cumulative N2O emissions under flooding. Our results suggest that complex interactions between flooding and other environmental factors might appear in soil N2O emissions. Further studies are needed to understand potential synergies or antagonisms between environmental factors that control N2O emissions in wetland soils. PMID:25133216

  9. Quantitative importance of denitrification and N2O emission in an N-saturated subtropical forest catchment, southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Dörsch, P.; Mulder, J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic emission of nitrogen in the environment has increased rapidly, due to fast economic growth. This has resulted in increased deposition rates of reactive nitrogen, primarily as NOx (from fossil fuel combustion) and NH3 (from fertilizer production and animal husbandry). In response, temperate and boreal forests may develop nitrogen saturation, characterized by increased leaching of nitrate. In addition, elevated emission of N2 and N2O, due to nitrification and denitrification, may occur. To date, few studies exist quantifying the nitrogen balance, including N2 and N2O production, in nitrogen-saturated, monsoonal, sub-tropical forest ecosystems in south-west China. Since nitrate contributes to the eutrophication of stream water, and N2O is a potent greenhouse gas, it is important to quantitatively understand the role of nitrification and denitrification in the nitrogen cycle. Several subtropical forests in southwest China, receiving elevated nitrogen deposition (30-73 kg N ha-1 a-1; Zhang. et al., 2008), are characterized by high temperature and soil moisture content in much of the growing season. This may cause a much stronger intensity of denitrification compared with that in temperate and boreal forests. In turn this may lead to decreased nitrate leaching and a higher potential of N2O emission. In my PhD project, I will investigate the nitrogen cycle in a forest catchment (TieShanPing; TSP), which is near one of the biggest cities, Chongqing, in southwest China. Previous research suggests high nitrogen deposition (3.52 gN m-2 a-1), but low nitrogen flux (0.57 gN m-2 a-1) in runoff (Chen & Mulder, 2007). Tree growth, and thus plant N uptake, is limited and nitrate fluxes below the root zone are relatively large, suggesting ‘N-saturation'. Based on this, we hypothesize that significant amounts of nitrogen are emitted as gases, with denitrification playing an important role, and N2 and N2O (especially N2) being major components of the emitted gases

  10. Pulse increase of soil N2O emission in response to N addition in a temperate forest on Mt Changbai, northeast China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Edith; Li, Wei; Li, Shanlong; Sun, Jianfei; Peng, Bo; Dai, Weiwei; Jiang, Ping; Han, Shijie

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition has increased significantly globally since the industrial revolution. Previous studies on the response of gaseous emissions to N deposition have shown controversial results, pointing to the system-specific effect of N addition. Here we conducted an N addition experiment in a temperate natural forest in northeastern China to test how potential changes in N deposition alter soil N2O emission and its sources from nitrification and denitrification. Soil N2O emission was measured using closed chamber method and a separate incubation experiment using acetylene inhibition method was carried out to determine denitrification fluxes and the contribution of nitrification and denitrification to N2O emissions between Jul. and Oct. 2012. An NH4NO3 addition of 50 kg N/ha/yr significantly increased N2O and N2 emissions, but their "pulse emission" induced by N addition only lasted for two weeks. Mean nitrification-derived N2O to denitrification-derived N2O ratio was 0.56 in control plots, indicating higher contribution of denitrification to N2O emissions in the study area, and this ratio was not influenced by N addition. The N2O to (N2+N2O) ratio was 0.41-0.55 in control plots and was reduced by N addition at one sampling time point. Based on this short term experiment, we propose that N2O and denitrification rate might increase with increasing N deposition at least by the same fold in the future, which would deteriorate global warming problems.

  11. Riverine N2O concentrations, exports to estuary and emissions to atmosphere from the Changjiang River in response to increasing nitrogen loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weijin; Yang, Libiao; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jianing; Ma, Pei

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated the variations of dissolved N2O and emissions over diurnal and seasonal temporal scales in 2009, as well as the time series of riverine N2O export to estuary and emission to atmosphere in response to increasing anthropogenic nitrogen loads in the Changjiang River. For the diurnal study, N2O concentrations ranged from 0.26 to 0.34 and from 0.44 to 0.52 μg N-N2O L-1 in August and October 2009, respectively. The dissolved N2O was supersaturated with a mean value of 197%. Studies on N2O emissions, also taken in August and October, ranged from 2.67 to 11.6 and from 6.72 to 15.2 μg N-N2O m-2 h-1, respectively. For the seasonal study (June through December 2009), N2O concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 0.72 μg N-N2O L-1 and were supersaturated in all the samples (average 212%). N2O emissions ranged from 1.87 to 40.8 μg N-N2O m-2 h-1. Our study found no significant differences in diurnal patterns of N2O saturation but detected significant difference in seasonal patterns of N2O saturation: higher during summer while lower during autumn and winter. We found a significant relationship between dissolved N2O and river nitrate, which can predict the variation of N2O concentrations in the River. The net production of N2 ranged from 0.01 to 0.47 mg N-N2 L-1. These excess N2 values were significantly correlated to the N2O production and are suggestive of denitrification in the river. Applying the Global News model to the river system using measures taken during the 1970 to 2002 period, we estimated N2O emissions to atmosphere increased from 330 to 3650 ton N-N2O yr-1. During that same 1970-2002 period, N2O exports to estuary increased from 91 to 470 ton N-N2O yr-1. Taken together, the findings reported here suggest that both the river N2O concentrations and emissions would increase in response to rising anthropogenic nitrogen loads. Our study showed that the mean emission factor based on the ratio of the total N2O flux to NO3- flux is four times greater

  12. 40 CFR Table Jj-7 to Subpart Jj of... - Nitrous Oxide Emission Factors (kg N2O-N/kg Kjdl N)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) 0.07 Deep bedding for cattle and swine (no mix) 0.01 Manure Composting (in vessel) 0.006 Manure... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management... N2O-N/kg Kjdl N) Manure management system component N2O emission factor Uncovered anaerobic lagoon...

  13. Biogenic emissions of CO2 and N2O at multiple depths increase exponentially during a simulated soil thaw for a northern prairie Mollisol

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil respiration occurs at depths below the surface, but belowground data are lacking to support multilayer models of soil CO2 and N2O emissions. In particular, Q10s for CO2 and N2O within soil profiles are needed to determine if temperature sensitivities calculated at the surface are similar to th...

  14. Effects of water regime during rice-growing season on annual direct N(2)O emission in a paddy rice-winter wheat rotation system in southeast China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuwei; Qin, Yanmei; Zou, Jianwen; Liu, Qiaohui

    2010-01-15

    Annual paddy rice-winter wheat rotation constitutes one of the typical cropping systems in southeast China, in which various water regimes are currently practiced during the rice-growing season, including continuous flooding (F), flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding (F-D-F), and flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding and moisture but without waterlogging (F-D-F-M). We conducted a field experiment in a rice-winter wheat rotation system to gain an insight into the water regime-specific emission factors and background emissions of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) over the whole annual cycle. While flooding led to an unpronounced N(2)O emission during the rice-growing season, it incurred substantial N(2)O emission during the following non-rice season. During the non-rice season, N(2)O fluxes were, on average, 2.61 and 2.48 mg N(2)O-Nm(-)(2) day(-1) for the 250 kg N ha(-1) applied plots preceded by the F and F-D-F water regimes, which are 56% and 49% higher than those by the F-D-F-M water regime, respectively. For the annual rotation system experienced by continuous flooding during the rice-growing season, the relationship between N(2)O emission and nitrogen input predicted the emission factor and background emission of N(2)O to be 0.87% and 1.77 kg N(2)O-Nha(-1), respectively. For the plots experienced by the water regimes of F-D-F and F-D-F-M, the emission factors of N(2)O averaged 0.97% and 0.85%, with background N(2)O emissions of 2.00 kg N(2)O-Nha(-1) and 1.61 kg N(2)O-Nha(-1) for the annual rotation system, respectively. Annual direct N(2)O-N emission was estimated to be 98.1 Gg yr(-1) in Chinese rice-based cropping systems in the 1990s, consisting of 32.3 Gg during the rice-growing season and 65.8 Gg during the non-rice season, which accounts for 25-35% of the annual total emission from croplands in China.

  15. Factors Related with CH4 and N2O Emissions from a Paddy Field: Clues for Management implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun; Lai, Derrick Y. F.; Sardans, Jordi; Wang, Weiqi; Zeng, Congsheng; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Paddy fields are major sources of global atmospheric greenhouse gases, including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). The different phases previous to emission (production, transport, diffusion, dissolution in pore water and ebullition) despite well-established have rarely been measured in field conditions. We examined them and their relationships with temperature, soil traits and plant biomass in a paddy field in Fujian, southeastern China. CH4 emission was positively correlated with CH4 production, plant-mediated transport, ebullition, diffusion, and concentration of dissolved CH4 in porewater and negatively correlated with sulfate concentration, suggesting the potential use of sulfate fertilizers to mitigate CH4 release. Air temperature and humidity, plant stem biomass, and concentrations of soil sulfate, available N, and DOC together accounted for 92% of the variance in CH4 emission, and Eh, pH, and the concentrations of available N and Fe3+, leaf biomass, and air temperature 95% of the N2O emission. Given the positive correlations between CH4 emission and DOC content and plant biomass, reduce the addition of a carbon substrate such as straw and the development of smaller but higher yielding rice genotypes could be viable options for reducing the release of greenhouse gases from paddy fields to the atmosphere. PMID:28081161

  16. Factors Related with CH4 and N2O Emissions from a Paddy Field: Clues for Management implications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Lai, Derrick Y F; Sardans, Jordi; Wang, Weiqi; Zeng, Congsheng; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Paddy fields are major sources of global atmospheric greenhouse gases, including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). The different phases previous to emission (production, transport, diffusion, dissolution in pore water and ebullition) despite well-established have rarely been measured in field conditions. We examined them and their relationships with temperature, soil traits and plant biomass in a paddy field in Fujian, southeastern China. CH4 emission was positively correlated with CH4 production, plant-mediated transport, ebullition, diffusion, and concentration of dissolved CH4 in porewater and negatively correlated with sulfate concentration, suggesting the potential use of sulfate fertilizers to mitigate CH4 release. Air temperature and humidity, plant stem biomass, and concentrations of soil sulfate, available N, and DOC together accounted for 92% of the variance in CH4 emission, and Eh, pH, and the concentrations of available N and Fe3+, leaf biomass, and air temperature 95% of the N2O emission. Given the positive correlations between CH4 emission and DOC content and plant biomass, reduce the addition of a carbon substrate such as straw and the development of smaller but higher yielding rice genotypes could be viable options for reducing the release of greenhouse gases from paddy fields to the atmosphere.

  17. Anthropogenic effects on greenhouse gas (CH4 and N2O) emissions in the Guadalete River Estuary (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Burgos, M; Sierra, A; Ortega, T; Forja, J M

    2015-01-15

    Coastal areas are subject to a great anthropogenic pressure because more than half of the world's population lives in its vicinity causing organic matter inputs, which intensifies greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolved concentrations of CH4 and N2O have been measured seasonally during 2013 in the Guadalete River Estuary, which flows into the Cadiz Bay (southwestern Spanish coast). It has been intensely contaminated since 1970. Currently it receives wastewater effluents from cities and direct discharges from nearby agriculture crop. Eight sampling stations have been established along 18 km of the estuary. CH4 and N2O were measured using a gas chromatograph connected to an equilibration system. Additional parameters such as organic matter, dissolved oxygen, nutrients and chlorophyll were determinate as well, in order to understand the relationship between physicochemical and biological processes. Gas concentrations increased from the River mouth toward the inner part, closer to the wastewater treatment plant discharge. Values varied widely within 21.8 and 3483.4 nM for CH4 and between 9.7 and 147.6 nM for N2O. Greenhouse gas seasonal variations were large influenced by the precipitation regime, masking the temperature influence. The Guadatete Estuary acted as a greenhouse gas source along the year, with mean fluxes of 495.7 μmol m(-2)d(-1) and 92.8 μmol m(-2)d(-1) for CH4 and N2O, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of N2O emission and associated bacterial communities from the gut of wood-feeding termite Nasutitermes voeltzkowi.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Muhammad Zeeshan; Miambi, Edouard; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Brauman, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Xylophagous termites rely on nitrogen deficient foodstuff with a low C/N ratio. Most research work has focused on nitrogen fixation in termites highlighting important inflow and assimilation of atmospheric nitrogen into their bodies fundamentally geared up by their intestinal microbial symbionts. Most of termite body nitrogen is of atmospheric origin, and microbially aided nitrification is the principal source of this nitrogen acquisition, but contrarily, the information regarding potent denitrification process is very scarce and poorly known, although the termite gut is considered to carry all favorable criteria necessary for microbial denitrification. Therefore, in this study, it is hypothesized that whether nitrification and denitrification processes coexist in intestinal milieu of xylophagous termites or not, and if yes, then is there any link between the denitrification product, i.e., N2O and nitrogen content of the food substrate, and moreover where these bacterial communities are found along the length of termite gut. To answer these questions, we measured in vivo N2O emission by Nasutitermes voeltzkowi (Nasutitermitinae) maintained on different substrates with varying C/N ratio, and also, molecular techniques were applied to study the diversity (DGGE) and density (qPCR) of bacterial communities in anterior and posterior gut portions. Rersults revealed that xylophagous termites emit feeble amount of N2O and molecular studies confirmed this finding by illustrating the presence of an ample density of N2O-reductase (nosZ) gene in the intestinal tract of these termites. Furthermore, intestinal bacterial communities of these termites were found more dense and diverse in posterior than anterior portion of the gut.

  19. Effects of temperature change and tree species composition on N2O and NO emissions in acidic forest soils of subtropical China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shenqiang; Cai, Zucong; Wang, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Tree species and temperature change arising from seasonal variation or global warming are two important factors influencing N2O and NO emissions from forest soils. However, few studies have examined the effects of temperatures (5-35°C) on the emissions of forest soil N2O and NO in typical subtropical region. A short-term laboratory experiment was carried out to investigate the influence of temperature changes (5-35°C) on soil N2O and NO emissions under aerobic conditions in two contrasting (broad-leaved and coniferous) subtropical acidic forest types in China. The results showed that the temporal pattern of N2O and NO emissions between the three lower temperatures (5°C, 15°C, and 25°C) and 35°C was significantly different for both broad-leaved and coniferous forest soils. The effects of temperature on soil N2O and NO emission rates varied between broad-leaved and coniferous forest soils. Both N2O and NO emissions increased exponentially with an increase in temperature in the broad-leaved forest soil. However, N2O and NO emissions in the coniferous forest soil were not sensitive to temperature change between 5°C and 25°C. N2O and NO emission rates were significantly higher in the broad-leaved forest soil as compared with the coniferous forest soil at all incubation temperatures except 5°C. These results suggest that the broad-leaved forest could contribute more N2O and NO emissions than the coniferous forest for most of the year in the subtropical region of China. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantification method of N2O emission from full-scale biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment plant by laboratory batch reactor analysis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yesul; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2014-08-01

    This study proposes a simplified method for the quantification of N2O emission from a biological nutrient removal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The method incorporates a laboratory-scale batch reactor which had almost the same operational (wastewater and sludge flow rates) condition of a unit operation/process of the WWTP. Cumulative N2O emissions from the batch reactor at the corresponding hydraulic retention times of the full-scale units (primary and secondary clarifiers, pre-anoxic, anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic basins) were used for the quantification of N2O emission. The analysis showed that the aerobic basin emitted 95% of the total emission and the emission factor (yield) reached 0.8% based on the influent nitrogen load. The method successfully estimated N2O emission from the WWTP and it has shown advantages in measurement time and cost over the direct field measurement (floating chamber) method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduction and prediction of N2O emission from an Anoxic/Oxic wastewater treatment plant upon DO control and model simulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shichang; Bao, Zhiyuan; Li, Ruoyu; Sun, Dezhi; Geng, Haihong; Huang, Xiaofei; Lin, Junhao; Zhang, Peixin; Ma, Rui; Fang, Lin; Zhang, Xianghua; Zhao, Xuxin

    2017-11-01

    In order to make a better understanding of the characteristics of N2O emission in A/O wastewater treatment plant, full-scale and pilot-scale experiments were carried out and a back propagation artificial neural network model based on the experimental data was constructed to make a precise prediction of N2O emission. Results showed that, N2O flux from different units followed a descending order: aerated grit tank>oxic zone≫anoxic zone>final clarifier>primary clarifier, but 99.4% of the total emission of N2O (1.60% of N-load) was monitored from the oxic zone due to its big surface area. A proper DO control could reduce N2O emission down to 0.21% of N-load in A/O process, and a two-hidden-layers back propagation model with an optimized structure of 4:3:9:1 could achieve a good simulation of N2O emission, which provided a new method for the prediction of N2O emission during wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Emission and control of N2O and composition of ash derived from cattle manure combustion using a pilot-scale fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Oshita, Kazuyuki; Kawaguchi, Koji; Takaoka, Masaki; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Fujimori, Takashi; Fujiwara, Taku

    2015-10-06

    This study investigates the emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) and discusses the reduction of N2O emissions during the 24-h combustion of cattle manure using a pilot-scale fluidized bed incinerator under various experimental conditions. The results of these experiments were then validated against previously reported data. In addition, the characteristics of cattle manure incineration ash and their changes under different combustion conditions were estimated. In incineration experiments with composted cattle manure, N2O concentrations using multi-stage combustion were 75% lower than the concentrations resulting from normal combustion without additional auxiliary fuel, since N2O could be decomposed in the high-temperature zone formed by the inlet of the secondary combustion air. The N2O emission factor under normal combustion conditions (800°C) was 6.0% g-N2O-N/g-N. This result is similar to the values found in previous studies at the same temperature. The N2O emission factor was decreased to 1.6% g-N2O-N/g-N using a multi-stage combustion procedure. The current Japanese N2O emission factor of 0.1% g-N2O-N/g-N is an underestimate for some conditions and should be uniquely specified for each condition. Finally, cattle manure ash contains ample fertilizer elements, little Fe, Al and Zn, but abundant Cl. Therefore if Cl could be removed by some kind of pretreatment, cattle manure ash could be used as a favourable fertilizer.

  3. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community.

    PubMed

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbiological processes (that is, nitrification and denitrification). Soil amended with biochar (charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass) has been demonstrated to increase crop yield, improve soil quality and affect greenhouse gas emissions, for example, reduce N2O emissions. Despite several studies on variations in the general microbial community structure due to soil biochar amendment, hitherto the specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in mitigating soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. We performed a microcosm study with a water-saturated soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil.

  4. Urbanisation-related land use change from forest and pasture into turf grass modifies soil nitrogen cycling and increases N2O emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Delden, Lona; Rowlings, David W.; Scheer, Clemens; Grace, Peter R.

    2016-11-01

    Urbanisation is becoming increasingly important in terms of climate change and ecosystem functionality worldwide. We are only beginning to understand how the processes of urbanisation influence ecosystem dynamics, making peri-urban environments more vulnerable to nutrient losses. Brisbane in South East Queensland has the most extensive urban sprawl of all Australian cities. This research estimated the environmental impact of land use change associated with urbanisation by examining soil nitrogen (N) turnover and subsequent nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions using a fully automated system that measured emissions on a sub-daily basis. There was no significant difference in soil N2O emissions between the native dry sclerophyll eucalypt forest and an extensively grazed pasture, wherefrom only low annual emissions were observed amounting to 0.1 and 0.2 kg N2O ha-1 yr-1, respectively. The establishment of a fertilised turf grass lawn increased soil N2O emissions 18-fold (1.8 kg N2O ha-1 yr-1), with highest emissions occurring in the first 2 months after establishment. Once established, the turf grass lawn presented relatively low N2O emissions for the rest of the year, even after fertilisation and rain events. Soil moisture was significantly higher, and mineralised N accumulated in the fallow plots, resulting in the highest N2O emissions (2.8 kg N2O ha-1 yr-1) and significant nitrate (NO3-) losses, with up to 63 kg N ha-1 lost from a single rain event due to reduced plant cover removal. The study concludes that urbanisation processes creating peri-urban ecosystems can greatly modify N cycling and increase the potential for losses in the form of N2O and NO3-.

  5. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbiological processes (that is, nitrification and denitrification). Soil amended with biochar (charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass) has been demonstrated to increase crop yield, improve soil quality and affect greenhouse gas emissions, for example, reduce N2O emissions. Despite several studies on variations in the general microbial community structure due to soil biochar amendment, hitherto the specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in mitigating soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. We performed a microcosm study with a water-saturated soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil. PMID:24067258

  6. [Dynamics of CO2, CH4 and N2O emission fluxes from mires during freezing and thawing season].

    PubMed

    Song, Chang-Chun; Wang, Yi-Yong; Wang, Yue-Si; Zhao, Zhi-Chun

    2005-07-01

    In the Sanjiang Plain, the freezing and thawing phase have 7 - 8 months and play important role in the greenhouse gases emission. The characters of the greenhouse gases emission during freezing and thawing season in the Sanjiang Plain were studied, using the static chamber and gas chromatogram method. The results observed show that there were obvious CH4 and CO2 emissions in winter and the CH4 emission made a relatively large contribution to the total CH4 flux from the different type mires during the winter in the Sanjiang Plain. And there were significantly CH4 and CO2 emission peak values during thawing time. The CH4 and CO2 emissions fluxes from seasonal flooded mire were larger than that from continuously flooded mire during thawing time. On the contrary, the CH4 and CO2 emissions from continuously flooded mire were larger than that from seasonal flooded mire in winter. During thawing, there was exponential relationship between CO2 fluxes and the soil temperature (5cm) (R2 = 0.912, p< 0.001). Meanwhile, CO2 fluxes was obviously correlated with the CH4 emission fluxes (R2 = 0.751, p < 0.001). The mires are N2O sink in winter and gradually become N2O source, with increasing temperature during thawing time. The characters of the greenhouse gases emission, during freezing and thawing in the Sanjiang Plain respond to the microbial activity in winter and the effects of thawing on soil carbon mineralization, nitrification and denitrification.

  7. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions factors...

  8. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions factors...

  9. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions factors...

  10. 40 CFR Table Aa-1 to Subpart Aa of... - Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kraft Pulping Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O AA Table AA-1 to Subpart AA of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Liquor Emissions Factors for Biomass-Based CO2, CH4, and N2O Wood furnish Biomass-based emissions factors...

  11. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions.

    PubMed

    Case, Sean D C; Gómez-Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood. This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal drying process (input temperature 95 °C, thermal fluid circuit temperature 200 °C, 95 % dry matter content). The drying process reduced the ammonium content of the biosolids and reduced it further at higher drying temperatures. These findings were attributed to ammonia volatilisation. The percentage of mineralisable organic N fraction (min-N) in the biosolids, and nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) production were analysed 120 days after addition to soil. When incubated at soil field capacity (pF 2), none of the dried biosolids had a greater min-N than the AD biosolids (46.4 %). Min-N was lowest in biosolids dried at higher temperatures (e.g. 19.3 % at 250 °C vs 35.4 % at 70 °C). Considering only the dried biosolids, min-N was greater in WWTP-dried biosolids (50.5 %) than all of the laboratory-dried biosolids with the exception of the 70 °C-dried biosolids. Biosolid carbon mineralisation (CO2 release) and N2O production was also the lowest in treatments of the highest drying temperature, suggesting that this material was more recalcitrant. Overall, thermal drying temperature had a significant influence on N availability from the AD biosolids, but drying did not improve the N availability of these biosolids in any case.

  12. [NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 emissions from growing process of caged broilers].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Kai; Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Dong, Hong-Min; Chen, Yong-Xing; Shang, Bin

    2013-06-01

    To obtain Ammonia and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors of caged broilers, ammonia (NH3), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of broilers aged 0 d to 42 days were monitored in caged broilers production systems located in Shandong province. Gas concentrations of incoming and exhaust air streams were measured by using INNOVA 1312 multi-gas monitor with multi-channel samplers. Building ventilation rates were determined by on site FANS (Fan Assessment Numeration System) measurement systems. The NH3 emission factors showed a trend of increase at the beginning and then decreased with the broiler ages. The NH3 emission rates were 8.5 to 342.1 mg x (d x bird)(-1) and the average daily emission rate was 137.9 mg x (d x bird)(-1) [48.6 g x (d x AU)(-1)] over the 42-d period. The GHGs emission rates were 19.5-351.9 mg x (d x bird)(-1) with an average of 154.5 mg x (d x bird)(-1) [54.4 g x (d x AU)(-1)] for CH4, and 2.2- 152.9 g x (d x bird)(-10 with an average of 65.9 g x (d x bird)(-1) [23.2 kg x (d x AU)(-1)] for CO2. No emission of N2O was observed. The CH4 and CO2 emission rates increased with the increase of broilers ages. The total NH3 emission over the 42 d growing period averaged (5.65 +/- 1.02) g x (bird x life cycle)(-1). The NH3 emission contribution in different growth phase to the total emission were 33.6% in growth phase 1 (0-17 day, GP1), 36.4% in GP2 (18-27 days), and 29.9% in GP3 (28-42 days), respectively. The NH3 emission in GP2 was significantly higher than emission in GP1 and GP3. CH4 and CO2 cumulative emission rates were (6.30 +/- 0.16) g x (bird(-1) x life cycle)(-1) and (2.68 +/- 0.18) kg x (bird x life cycle)(-1), respectively. The cumulative emission rates of CH4 and CO2 in GP3 were significantly higher than emission rates in GP2 and in GP1, accounting for 50% of total emissions. The results of this study could provide the data support for mitigation of gas emission from broilers production.

  13. N2O Emission and Hydroxylamine Oxidase (HAO) Activity in a Nitrogen Removal Process Based on Activated Sludge with Three COD/NH4(+) Ratios.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi-Xian; Yuan, Lin-Jiang; Wei, Yi-Ni; Nan, Ya-Ping

    2017-05-01

      This study dealt with nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and hydroxylamine oxidase (HAO) activity of waste sludge in a nitrification and denitrification process employing three carbon nitrogen (C/N) ratios in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental results indicated that N2O emission increased dramatically after the C/N ratio in the sludge increased from 6.5 to 9.3, which was greater than the N2O emission at two other C/N ratios (3.5, 6.5). The HAO activity in the anoxic period was higher with all three C/N ratios than in the aerobic period. The results suggest that N2O was produced primarily in the aerobic period and the main source of the N2O emission resulted from denitrification by nitrifying bacteria and aerobic hydroxylamine oxidation. When a relatively deficient carbon source existed, the N2O emission under anoxic conditions was affected by the HAO activity and vice versa. When the HAO activity was relatively high, it was found that more N2O was released.

  14. Nitrogen loss from high N-input vegetable fields: a) Direct N2O emissions b) Spatiotemporal variability of N species (N2O, NH4+, NO3-) in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, I.; Pfab, H.; Ruser, R.; Fiedler, S.

    2009-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas contributing to stratospheric ozone depletion. Soils are considered to be the major (70%) source for atmospheric N2O. Agriculture in general accounts for about 85% of the anthropogenic N2O emissions. Whereas 80% of these, are emitted from ag-riculturally used soils. Such estimations of N2O fluxes are associated with a high degree of uncertainties. Uncertainty of source strength estimates mainly results from local scale variability of known and unknown sources. It is not known how much uncertainty is due to unmeasured sources. For example, considerations of N2O fluxes from soils used for intensive vegetable production within inventories are still missing. We speculate that these types of arable soils act as ‚hot spots' for N2O. Given conditions (1) high N-input due to fertilization in concert with (2) easily mineralizable harvest residues should pro-mote disproportional high reaction rates in N-cycling and enhance N2O production as a by-product of nitrification and denitrification. Our investigation focused on the influence of: (1) N-input level (Ammonium Sulfate Nitrate (ASN)) below and above common N doses used for "good agricultural practice". (2) Application of modified fertilizers including nitrification inhibitor DMPP (Dimethylpyrazolphosphate, ENTEC®) and depot fertilization (pseudo-CULTAN) in comparison to non-fertilized control and common ASN application. (3) Effects of plant residues on N-cycling and (4) the deduction of mitigation strategies to reduce the potential N-loss from theses sites. The study was carried out during summer and autumn 2008 on a field cropped with cauliflower, located at the "Heidfeldhof" (South-West Germany; MAT 10.5°C, MAP 660 mm). Three different N-species (N2O; within gaseous soil phase, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) extracted from bulk soil) were measured weekly in three different soil depths (0-25 cm; 25-50 cm and 50-75 cm) in a fully randomized field design. At same depths water

  15. Stimulation of N2 O emission by manure application to agricultural soils may largely offset carbon benefits: a global meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghua; Zhu, Bo; Wang, Shijie; Zhu, Xinyu; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    Animal manure application as organic fertilizer does not only sustain agricultural productivity and increase soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, but also affects soil nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions. However, given that the sign and magnitude of manure effects on soil N2 O emissions is uncertain, the net climatic impact of manure application in arable land is unknown. Here, we performed a global meta-analysis using field experimental data published in peer-reviewed journals prior to December 2015. In this meta-analysis, we quantified the responses of N2 O emissions to manure application relative to synthetic N fertilizer application from individual studies and analyzed manure characteristics, experimental duration, climate, and soil properties as explanatory factors. Manure application significantly increased N2 O emissions by an average 32.7% (95% confidence interval: 5.1-58.2%) compared to application of synthetic N fertilizer alone. The significant stimulation of N2 O emissions occurred following cattle and poultry manure applications, subsurface manure application, and raw manure application. Furthermore, the significant stimulatory effects on N2 O emissions were also observed for warm temperate climate, acid soils (pH < 6.5), and soil texture classes of sandy loam and clay loam. Average direct N2 O emission factors (EFs) of 1.87% and 0.24% were estimated for upland soils and rice paddy soils receiving manure application, respectively. Although manure application increased SOC stocks, our study suggested that the benefit of increasing SOC stocks as GHG sinks could be largely offset by stimulation of soil N2 O emissions and aggravated by CH4 emissions if, particularly for rice paddy soils, the stimulation of CH4 emissions by manure application was taken into account. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Organically treated biochar increases plant production and reduces N2O emissions: mechanistic insights by 15N tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammann, Claudia; Messerschmidt, Nicole; Clough, Tim; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Marhan, Sven; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Steffens, Diedrich; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (biochar) offers considerable potential for carbon capture and soil storage (CCSS) compared to other, less recalcitrant soil-C additives. Recent meta-analysis demonstrated that it can significantly reduce agricultural N2O emissions. Freshly produced biochars, however, do not always have yield-improving effects, i.e. there is no immediate economic incentive for using it. Hence, combining biochar with organic nutrient-rich amendments may be a promising agricultural strategy to accelerate CCSS, but it is unclear if biochar still reduces N2O emissions, in particular when it may act as nutrient carrier. We explored the potential of biochar to improve the GHG-cost/yield ratio and thereby its socio-economic value as soil amendment in two subsequent studies under controlled conditions: (1) A proof-of-concept study where the effects of untreated biochar were compared to those of co-composted biochar combined with stepwise improved nutritional regimes (+/- compost; +/- mineral-N application), and (2) a 15N-labeling-tracing study to unravel N exchange on biochar particles and N2O production and reduction mechanisms. Both studies were carried out in nutrient-poor sandy soils, the most likely initial target soils for biochar-CCSS strategies. While the untreated biochar reduced plant growth under N-limiting conditions, or at best did not reduce it, the co-composted biochar always significantly stimulated plant growth. The relative stimulation was largest with the lowest nutrient additions (305% versus 61% of control with untreated biochar). Electro-ultra-filtration analyses revealed that the co-composted but not the untreated biochar carried considerable amounts of easily extractable as well as more strongly sorbed plant nutrients, in particular nitrate and phosphorus. The subsequent 15N labelling-tracing study revealed that the co-composted biochar still (i) acted as a mineral-N exchange site for nitrate and ammonium despite its N-preloading, (ii) reduced N2O

  17. Ecological Controls on N2O Emission in Surface Litter and Near-surface Soil of a Managed Grassland: Modelling and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Robert; Neftel, Albrecht; Calanca, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    Large variability in N2O emissions from managed grasslands may occur because most emissions originate in surface litter or near-surface soil where variability in soil water content (q) and temperature (Ts) is greatest. To determine whether temporal variability in q and Ts of surface litter and near-surface soil could explain that in N2O emissions, a simulation experiment was conducted with ecosys, a comprehensive mathematical model of terrestrial ecosystems in which processes governing N2O emissions