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Sample records for na osnove tin

  1. Conversion and Distribution of Lead and Tin in NaOH-NaNO3 Fusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingxin; Guo, Xueyi

    2016-12-01

    Oxidizing alkali fusion process has been studied to extract amphoteric metals. Transformation and distribution behaviors of typical amphoteric metals Pb and Sn in the NaOH-NaNO3 fusion process are systemically studied by theoretical analysis and experimental verification done in this work. Functions of NaOH and NaNO3 in the fusion process were also investigated. The results show the fused products, Na2PbO3 and Na2SnO3, are captured in the flux, and Na2PbO4 is speculated to reduce to Pb(II) in the following leaching process. By measuring solubility data of NaOH-Na2SnO3-PbO-H2O system, a strategy of crystallization is proposed to separate Sn with Pb in concentrated alkaline solution, and slice Na2Sn(OH)6 is obtained as a product.

  2. Conversion and Distribution of Lead and Tin in NaOH-NaNO3 Fusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingxin; Guo, Xueyi

    2017-04-01

    Oxidizing alkali fusion process has been studied to extract amphoteric metals. Transformation and distribution behaviors of typical amphoteric metals Pb and Sn in the NaOH-NaNO3 fusion process are systemically studied by theoretical analysis and experimental verification done in this work. Functions of NaOH and NaNO3 in the fusion process were also investigated. The results show the fused products, Na2PbO3 and Na2SnO3, are captured in the flux, and Na2PbO4 is speculated to reduce to Pb(II) in the following leaching process. By measuring solubility data of NaOH-Na2SnO3-PbO-H2O system, a strategy of crystallization is proposed to separate Sn with Pb in concentrated alkaline solution, and slice Na2Sn(OH)6 is obtained as a product.

  3. An alkaline tin(II) halide compound Na3Sn2F6Cl: Synthesis, structure, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Pifu; Luo, Siyang; Huang, Qian; Yang, Yi; Jiang, Xingxing; Liang, Fei; Chen, Chuangtian; Lin, Zheshuai

    2017-04-01

    A new alkali tin(II) halide compound, Na3Sn2F6Cl, is synthesized by hydrothermal method. This compound crystallizes trigonally in space group of R-3c (167), and processes a zero-dimensional (0D) structure consisted of Na+ cations, Cl- anions and the isolated [SnF3]- trigonal pyramids in which the stereochemically active 5s2 lone pair electrons are attached to the Sn2+ cations. Interestingly, the [SnF3]- trigonal pyramids are parallel arranged in the a-b plane, while oppositely arranged in line with rotation along the c- axis. Moreover, the energy bandgap, thermal stability and electronic structure of Na3Sn2F6Cl are characterized and the results reveal that this compound has and indirect bandgap of 3.88 eV and is stable under 270 °C.

  4. Corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloys coated with TiN by cathodic arc deposition in NaCl and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Altun, Hikmet Sinici, Hakan

    2008-03-15

    Magnesium-based light-metal alloys belong to a class of structural materials with increasing industrial attention. Magnesium alloys show the lowest density among the engineering metallic materials, low cost and large availability. However, the limitations according to mechanical strength and the low corrosion resistance restrict their practical application. In this study, TiN was coated on magnesium-based AZ91 magnesium-aluminium-zinc alloy using cathodic arc PVD process. The corrosion behaviours of uncoated and coated magnesium alloys in 1% NaCl, 3% NaCl and 3% Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions and the influence of the coatings on the corrosion behaviour of the substrate were investigated utilizing potentiodynamic polarization tests. A potentiostat for electrochemical corrosion tests, a cathodic arc physical vapour deposition coating system for coating processes, a scanning electron microscopy for surface examination and elemental analysis of the coatings were used in this study. It was determined that corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys can be increased with TiN coating on the alloys using cathodic arc PVD process.

  5. Formation of crack-free nanoporous tin oxide layers via simple one-step anodic oxidation in NaOH at low applied voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaraska, Leszek; Gilek, Dominika; Gawlak, Karolina; Jaskuła, Marian; Sulka, Grzegorz D.

    2016-12-01

    A simple anodic oxidation of metallic tin in fluoride-free alkaline electrolyte at low potentials was proposed as a new and effective strategy for fabrication of crack-free nanoporous tin oxide layers. A low-purity Sn foil (98.8%) was used as a starting material, and a series of anodizations were performed in 1 M NaOH at different conditions such as anodizing potential, and duration of the process. It was proved for the first time that nanostructured tin oxides with ultra-small nanochannels having diameters of <15 nm can be synthesized by simple anodization of metallic tin at a potential of 2 V in 1 M NaOH electrolyte. Increasing anodizing potential to 3 and 4 V allowed for formation of tin oxide layers with much larger pores (40-50 nm in diameter) which were still free from internal cracks and transversal pores. Applying such low potentials significantly reduces the oxide growth rate and suppresses vigorous oxygen evolution at the anode. As a result mechanical deterioration of the oxide structure is prevented while strongly alkaline electrolyte is responsible for formation of the porous layer with completely open pores even at such low potentials. On the contrary, when anodization was carried out at potentials of 5 and 6 V, much faster formation of anodic layer, accompanied by vigorous oxygen gas formation, was observed. In consequence, as grown oxide layers exhibited typical cracked or even stacked internal structure. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that nanoporous tin oxide layers with segments of different channel sizes can be successfully obtained by simple altering potential during anodization.

  6. Superlative TINs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, R.

    2002-01-01

    TIN is short for 'triangulated irregular network,' which is a piecewise planar model of a surface. If properly constructed, a TIN can be more than 30 times as efficient as a regular triangulation. In our project (a ground combat simulation to support U.S. Army training exercises), the TIN is used to represent the Earth's surface and is used primarily to determine whether line of sight is blocked by terrain. High efficiency requires accurate identification of ridgelines with as few triangles as possible. The work currently in progress is the implementation of a TINning process that we hope will produce superlative TINs. This presentation describes that process.

  7. Influence of Indium-Tin Oxide Additive on the Sintering Process and Conductivity of Na3Zr2Si2PO12 Solid Electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dan; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2017-07-01

    Because of the poor sintering ability and low phase purity limit in the application of a Na3Zr2Si2PO12 solid electrolyte, it is important to find an effective way to obtain a pure and dense Na3Zr2Si2PO12 ceramic at reduced temperature. In this study, high conductive indium-tin oxide (ITO) was innovatively used as the sintering additive to improve the purity and density of the Na3Zr2Si2PO12 ceramic. The influence of ITO additive on density, phase, microstructure and conductivity of the Na3Zr2Si2PO12 ceramic was investigated. Archimedes method, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy and complex impedance spectroscopy were used as experimental techniques to evaluate the effect of the additive. The results show that the ITO sintering additive increases not only the purity and density but also the conductivity of the Na3Zr2Si2PO12 ceramic. The Na3Zr2Si2PO12 ceramic with 3 wt.% ITO additive sintered at 1150°C for 4 h possesses a high density of 3.15 g/cm3 and good conductivity of (3.95 ± 0.12) × 10-4 S/cm.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and tin/copper-nitrogen substitutional effect on photocatalytic activity of honeycomb ordered P2-Na2Ni2TeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadari, Ramaswamy; Velchuri, Radha; Sreenu, K.; Ravi, Gundeboina; Munirathnam, Nagegownivari R.; Vithal, Muga

    2016-11-01

    We have successfully prepared visible light active tin/copper-nitrogen co-doped honeycomb ordered P2-Na2Ni2TeO6 photocatalysts by solid state/ion exchange methods. Powder XRD, TG analysis, SEM, surface area, O-N-H analysis, ICP-OES, FT-IR and UV-DRS measurements are employed to characterize all the samples. All the doped compositions adopted hexagonal lattice with space group P63/mcm. The photocatalytic activity of all the samples was studied against the degradation of methyl violet (MV) and methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. The variation of the photocatalytic activity due to the substitution of cation, anion and co-doping in Na2Ni2TeO6 is investigated. Co-doped samples have exhibited higher activity compared to rest of the materials. The role of reactive intermediate species in the photocatalytic degradation of dyes is also studied using appropriate scavengers.

  9. Structure and ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte interphase layer on tin anodes in Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Liang-Yin; Moradabadi, Ashkan; Huang, Hsin-Fu; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Kaghazchi, Payam

    2017-02-01

    Structure, stability, and ionic conductivity of the SEI layer on Sn anodes in Na-ion batteries (NIBs) are studied using experimental and theoretical methods. Raman spectra show that the SEI layer consists of Na2O and Na2CO3, the latter becoming more dominant close to the discharged state (at 0.3 V). According to our theoretical phase diagrams, Na2O can be stable in the whole voltage range of charge/discharge (from 0.0 V to 1.90 V), but Na2CO3 can decompose under carbon and/or oxygen poor conditions, leading to the formation of Na2O. These findings are in agreement with our experimental cyclic voltammetry and Raman spectra as function of voltage. Both compounds of the SEI layer have very low ionic conductivity close to the discharge state (0.2-0.3 V), but the ionic conductivity of Na2O is much larger than that of Na2CO3 for a wide range of voltages from 0.4 V to the charge state (∼1.5 V). This work suggests that engineered artificial SEI with Na2O or naturally formed SEI in a carbon and/or oxygen poor environment can improve the conductivity of the SEI layer in NIBs.

  10. Tin can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarselli, Michael A.

    2017-05-01

    Tin has been ubiquitous throughout the course of human history, from Bronze Age tools to lithium-ion battery components, yet Michael A. Tarselli warns it should not be deemed pedestrian. Its tendency to linger in human tissues presents a dangerous side that steers researchers towards greener chemistries.

  11. Porous-Nickel-Scaffolded Tin-Antimony Anodes with Enhanced Electrochemical Properties for Li/Na-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiachen; Pu, Jun; Liu, Ziqiang; Wang, Jian; Wu, Wenlu; Zhang, Huigang; Ma, Haixia

    2017-08-02

    The energy and power densities of rechargeable batteries urgently need to be increased to meet the ever-increasing demands of consumer electronics and electric vehicles. Alloy anodes are among the most promising candidates for next-generation high-capacity battery materials. However, the high capacities of alloy anodes usually suffer from some serious difficulties related to the volume changes of active materials. Porous supports and nanostructured alloy materials have been explored to address these issues. However, these approaches seemingly increase the active material-based properties and actually decrease the electrode-based capacity because of the oversized pores and heavy mass of mechanical supports. In this study, we developed an ultralight porous nickel to scaffold with high-capacity SnSb alloy anodes. The porous-nickel-supported SnSb alloy demonstrates a high specific capacity and good cyclability for both Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. Its capacity retains 580 mA h g(-1) at 2 A g(-1) after 100 cycles in Li-ion batteries. For a Na-ion battery, the composite electrode can even deliver a capacity of 275 mA h g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) after 1000 cycles. This study demonstrates that combining the scaffolding function of ultralight porous nickel and the high capacity of the SnSb alloy can significantly enhance the electrochemical performances of Li/Na-ion batteries.

  12. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  13. Tin phosphide-based anodes for sodium-ion batteries: synthesis via solvothermal transformation of Sn metal and phase-dependent Na storage performance

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-Seop; Jung, Kyu-Nam; Jo, Yong Nam; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Hansung; Lee, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    There is a great deal of current interest in the development of rechargeable sodium (Na)-ion batteries (SIBs) for low-cost, large-scale stationary energy storage systems. For the commercial success of this technology, significant progress should be made in developing robust anode (negative electrode) materials with high capacity and long cycle life. Sn-P compounds are considered promising anode materials that have considerable potential to meet the required performance of SIBs, and they have been typically prepared by high-energy mechanical milling. Here, we report Sn-P-based anodes synthesised through solvothermal transformation of Sn metal and their electrochemical Na storage properties. The temperature and time period used for solvothermal treatment play a crucial role in determining the phase, microstructure, and composition of the Sn-P compound and thus its electrochemical performance. The Sn-P compound prepared under an optimised solvothermal condition shows excellent electrochemical performance as an SIB anode, as evidenced by a high reversible capacity of ~560 mAh g−1 at a current density of 100 mA g−1 and cycling stability for 100 cycles. The solvothermal route provides an effective approach to synthesising Sn-P anodes with controlled phases and compositions, thus tailoring their Na storage behaviour. PMID:27189834

  14. Tin in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparoni, Guido

    An experimental technique that uses Re metal capsules as containers for tin-bearing systems has been developed and successfully used in the study of the compositional dependence of SnO2 solubility in silicate melts. These experiments have been performed in the absence of an aqueous fluid phase and oxygen fugacity (fO2) has been established by the addition of tin-metal to SnO2. This approach solves three long-standing problems in the study of SnO 2 solubility in silicate melts: (1) Alloying of noble-metal crucibles and corrosion of ceramic crucibles is avoided; (2) fO 2 is established by direct contact of a metal-oxide oxygen buffer; (3) Gaseous SnO is not lost to the furnace atmosphere. The Re-capsule technique, combined with evacuated silica-tube experiments, has been applied to the study of the system SnO-SiO2 at pressures of 1 atm and 10 kbar. SnO2 solubilities of up to 95 wt% SnO are reported. The system SnO-SiO2 is found to be a pseudo-binary of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2-SiO2. A revised phase diagram for the system SnO-SiO2 at a pressure ≈1 atm is provided, and a new phase diagram for the system SnOSiO2 at a pressure = 10 kbar has been constructed. These results are used to suggest the topology of the ternary system Sn°-SnO2SiO2. The Re-capsule technique has also been applied to the study of the subaluminous haplogranite system (SiO2NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi 3O8) at T = 1100°C, P = 10 kbar and fO 2 at Sn°-SnO2. Solubilities span the range of 41 to 80 wt% SnO. In the haplogranite system, the solubility of SnO2 increases with the proportion of normative SiO2, and SnO is found to expand the stability field of SiO2. In the feldspar join, Na-based melts dissolve a larger proportion of SnO than K-based melts. This effect is lost as SiO2 is progressively added to the feldspar join. Small amounts of F (1 wt%) are found to increase the solubility of SnO 2 by an equivalent 15 wt% normative quartz as shown with the Spor Mountain rhyolite. A comparison of SnO2 solubilities

  15. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  16. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  17. Tinplate and Tin Coating Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, R. R.; Thwaites, C. J.

    1987-08-01

    The application of tin as a coating dates back early into man's metal-working history to when, for example, it was used as a decorative finish to bronze. The most likely reason for this initial application is tin's low melting point coupled with its ability to wet and adhere to other metal surfaces. It was not until the industrial era that engineering uses for tin and tin-alloy coatings were arrived upon. While industry widely acknowledges the existence and application of tin coatings, not as many are aware of the field's scope, which encompasses the complex technology of tinplate manufacture/use as well as an extraordinary variety of coatings that contain metals (apart from tin) and tin compounds. This paper reviews such current tin and tin-alloy applications as coatings, including tinplate, and describes related industrial developments and research.

  18. Pyrochlore-type tin niobate.

    PubMed

    Cruz, L P; Savariault, J M; Rocha, J

    2001-09-01

    A single crystal of Sn(1.59)Nb(1.84)O(6.35) was grown at 1273 K from a mixture of sodium niobate and tin(II) chloride. The structure is of pyrochlore type A(2)B(2)O(7). The tin is partially oxidized to tin(IV) and competes with niobium for the occupation of site B. The stereoactivity of the Sn(2+) lone pair induces displacement of tin towards the O atoms of the tunnel.

  19. Electron Excitation of Tin and Tin ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Lalita; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    There is a great requirement of accurate atomic data of tin and its ions to understand the properties of laser produced tin plasma, one of the sources of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. The constant efforts are being made under various international programs viz., International SEMATECH's EUV Source Program, Intel Lithography Roadmap etc., to improve the efficiency of the EUV sources which can meet the requirements of high volume manufacturing of commercial chips. For optimizing the efficiency of EUV device the plasma modeling should be accurate which in turn, would rely on the accuracy of atomic data used. In this connection we have undertaken the study of electron impact excitation of Sn and Sn+. Since the atomic number of Sn is 50, it is sufficiently heavy atom to manifest relativistic spin - orbit and exchange effects. Therefore, we have used a fully relativistic distorted wave (RDW) theory to calculate results for cross sections corresponding to various transitions as well as polarization of photons due to decay of excited states of Sn and Sn+ In our RDW theory wavefunctions for both, the target electrons and projectile electrons are obtained by solving Dirac equations. Thus the relativistic effects are incorporated in consistent manner to ensure the reliability of the cross section and polarization results which will be presented in detail at the conference. Department of Atomic Energy, Govt. of India (DAE-BRNS).

  20. Mineral of the month: tin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlin Jr., James F.

    2005-01-01

    Tin was one of the first metals discovered by humans and, like most metals, tin is rarely used by itself. Most tin is used as a protective coating or as an alloy with other metals in a diverse range of commercial and defense applications.

  1. Ab initio engineering of materials with stacked hexagonal tin frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Junping; Beaufils, Clément; Kolmogorov, Aleksey N.

    2016-01-01

    The group-IV tin has been hypothesized to possess intriguing electronic properties in an atom-thick hexagonal form. An attractive pathway of producing sizable 2D crystallites of tin is based on deintercalation of bulk compounds with suitable tin frameworks. Here, we have identified a new synthesizable metal distannide, NaSn2, with a 3D stacking of flat hexagonal layers and examined a known compound, BaSn2, with buckled hexagonal layers. Our ab initio results illustrate that despite being an exception to the 8-electron rule, NaSn2 should form under pressures easily achievable in multi-anvil cells and remain (meta)stable under ambient conditions. Based on calculated Z2 invariants, the predicted NaSn2 may display topologically non-trivial behavior and the known BaSn2 could be a strong topological insulator. PMID:27387140

  2. Ab initio engineering of materials with stacked hexagonal tin frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junping; Beaufils, Clément; Kolmogorov, Aleksey N.

    2016-07-01

    The group-IV tin has been hypothesized to possess intriguing electronic properties in an atom-thick hexagonal form. An attractive pathway of producing sizable 2D crystallites of tin is based on deintercalation of bulk compounds with suitable tin frameworks. Here, we have identified a new synthesizable metal distannide, NaSn2, with a 3D stacking of flat hexagonal layers and examined a known compound, BaSn2, with buckled hexagonal layers. Our ab initio results illustrate that despite being an exception to the 8-electron rule, NaSn2 should form under pressures easily achievable in multi-anvil cells and remain (meta)stable under ambient conditions. Based on calculated Z2 invariants, the predicted NaSn2 may display topologically non-trivial behavior and the known BaSn2 could be a strong topological insulator.

  3. Tin resources of Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Max Gregg

    1974-01-01

    Annual tin production in Brazil, most of it from cassiterite placer deposits in Rondonia Territory, amounts to about 4,000 metric tons (4,400 short tons) of concentrate containing 66 percent tin, much of which is consumed by Brazilian industry. Reserves of cassiterite concentrate in the placers of Rondonia district are estimated at about 160,000 (176,000 short tons) containing 66 percent tin. Extensive undiscovered resources of cassiterite possibly exist in southern Rondonia Territory and to the east of the Territory in northern Mato Grosso, southern Amazonas, and southern Para. Numerous occurrences have been reported in these regions and as far to the east as the headwaters of the Tapajos and the Xingo Rivers. Minor deposits or occurrences of cassiterite (or lode deposits about which there is only minimal information available) are located in Para, Amapa, Paraiba, Rio Grande do Norte, Ceara, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Goias, Sao Paulo, and Rio Grande do Sul. All the lode tin deposits are dated or enclosed in rocks that date as Precambrian B (900 to 1,300 m.y.).

  4. Tin and Tin-Resistant Microorganisms in Chesapeake Bay †

    PubMed Central

    Hallas, L. E.; Cooney, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Sediment and water samples from nine stations in Chesapeake Bay were examined for tin content and for microbial populations resistant to inorganic tin (75 mg of Sn liter−1 as SnCl4·5H2O) or to the organotin compound dimethyltin chloride [15 mg of Sn liter−1 as (CH3)2SnCl2]. Tin concentrations in sediments were higher (3.0 to 7.9 mg kg−1) at sites impacted by human activity than at open water sites (0.8 to 0.9 mg kg−1), and they were very high (239.6 mg kg−1) in Baltimore Harbor, which is impacted by both shipping and heavy industry. Inorganic tin (75 mg Sn liter−1) in agar medium significantly decreased viable counts, but its toxicity was markedly reduced in liquid medium; it was not toxic in medium solidified with silica gel. Addition of SnCl4·5H2O to these media produced a tin precipitate which was not involved in the metal's toxicity. The data suggest that a soluble tin-agar complex which is toxic to cells is formed in agar medium. Thus, the toxicity of tin depends more on the chemical species than on the metal concentration in the medium. All sites in Chesapeake Bay contained organisms resistant to tin. The microbial flora was more sensitive to (CH3)2SnCl2 than to SnCl4·5H2O. The elevated level of tin-resistant microorganisms in some aeas not containing unusually high tin concentrations suggests that factors other than tin may participate in the selection for a tin-tolerant microbial flora. PMID:16345719

  5. Holder for Tinning Microcircuit Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, G. G.; Fielder, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    Heat-sinking tool holds microcircuits for lead tinning while protecting circuits from heat of tinning solder. Microcircuit holder dips leads in molten solder. Holder shields microcircuit from solder heat while leads immersed and absorbs heat conducted through leads. Thus keeps microcircuit relatively cool. Application tool was developed for requires tinning not closer than 0.02 in. (0.5 mm) from package body or its glass seals.

  6. Three of a Kind: Genetically Similar Tsukamurella Phages TIN2, TIN3, and TIN4.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Zoe A; Tucci, Joseph; Seviour, Robert J; Petrovski, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Three Tsukamurella phages, TIN2, TIN3, and TIN4, were isolated from activated sludge treatment plants located in Victoria, Australia, using conventional enrichment techniques. Illumina and 454 whole-genome sequencing of these Siphoviridae viruses revealed that they had similar genome sequences, ranging in size between 76,268 bp and 76,964 bp. All three phages shared 74% nucleotide sequence identity to the previously described Gordonia phage GTE7. Genome sequencing suggested that phage TIN3 had suffered a mutation in one of its lysis genes compared to the sequence of phage TIN4, to which it is genetically very similar. Mass spectroscopy data showed the unusual presence of a virion structural gene in the DNA replication module of phage TIN4, disrupting the characteristic modular genome architecture of Siphoviridae phages. All three phages appeared highly virulent on strains of Tsukamurella inchonensis and Tsukamurella paurometabola. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Three of a Kind: Genetically Similar Tsukamurella Phages TIN2, TIN3, and TIN4

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Zoe A.; Tucci, Joseph; Seviour, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Three Tsukamurella phages, TIN2, TIN3, and TIN4, were isolated from activated sludge treatment plants located in Victoria, Australia, using conventional enrichment techniques. Illumina and 454 whole-genome sequencing of these Siphoviridae viruses revealed that they had similar genome sequences, ranging in size between 76,268 bp and 76,964 bp. All three phages shared 74% nucleotide sequence identity to the previously described Gordonia phage GTE7. Genome sequencing suggested that phage TIN3 had suffered a mutation in one of its lysis genes compared to the sequence of phage TIN4, to which it is genetically very similar. Mass spectroscopy data showed the unusual presence of a virion structural gene in the DNA replication module of phage TIN4, disrupting the characteristic modular genome architecture of Siphoviridae phages. All three phages appeared highly virulent on strains of Tsukamurella inchonensis and Tsukamurella paurometabola. PMID:26187971

  8. Sputtering of tin and gallium-tin clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Lill, T.; Calaway, W.F.; Ma, Z.; Pellin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    Tin and gallium-tin clusters have been produced by 4 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline tin and the gallium-tin eutectic alloy and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sputtered neutral species were photoionized with 193 nm (6.4 eV) excimer laser light. Neutral tin clusters containing up to 10 atoms and mixed gallium-tin clusters Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} with n {<=} 4 for the neutrals and N {<=} 3 for the sputtered ionic species have been detected. Laser power density dependent intensity measurements, relative yields, and kinetic energy distributions have been measured. The abundance distributions of the mixed clusters have been found to be nonstatistical due to significant differences in the ionization efficiencies for clusters with equal nuclearity but different number of tin atoms. The results indicate that Ga{sub 2}Sn and Ga{sub 3}Sn like the all-gallium clusters have ionization potentials below 6.4 eV. In the case of Sn{sub 5}, Sn{sub 6}, GaSn and Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} clusters with n=2 to 4 and m>1, the authors detect species that have sufficient internal energy to be one photon ionized despite ionization potentials that are higher 6.4 eV. The tin atom signal that is detected can be attributed to photofragmentation of dimers for both sputtering from polycrystalline tin and from the gallium-tin eutectic alloy.

  9. Cornish Tin Mining and Smelting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how Cornwall was once the world's leading producer of tin. Cornwall's industrial past is now a World Heritage Site alongside the Grand Canyon or the Great Wall of China. A hint is in the Cornish flag, a simple white cross against a black background, also known as Saint Piran's flag. At Geevor Tin Mine, one of…

  10. Cornish Tin Mining and Smelting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how Cornwall was once the world's leading producer of tin. Cornwall's industrial past is now a World Heritage Site alongside the Grand Canyon or the Great Wall of China. A hint is in the Cornish flag, a simple white cross against a black background, also known as Saint Piran's flag. At Geevor Tin Mine, one of…

  11. Extraction and Separation of Tin from Tin-Bearing Secondary Resources: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zijian; Zhang, Yuanbo; Liu, Bingbing; Lu, Manman; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The proven global tin reserves were reported to be approximately 4.7 million tons (Mts) in 2016, and among these resources, only approximately 2.2 Mts can be recovered economically. The original tin deposits will be exhausted in several years, therefore, tin-bearing secondary resources, such as tin alloy, tin anode slime, e-wastes, tin slag and tin-bearing tailings, will become the primary source from which tin can be extracted. Many investigations have been conducted on the recovery of tin from these tin-bearing materials. However, the separation and recovery approaches of tin vary significantly, since the content and phase compositions of tin are totally different in these secondary resources. This paper reviews these methods of extracting and separating tin from different kinds of tin-bearing secondary resources.

  12. Tin and Tin Compounds for Sodium Ion Battery Anodes: Phase Transformations and Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Ding, Jia; Mitlin, David

    2015-06-16

    Sodium ion batteries (NIB, NAB, SIB) are attracting interest as a potentially lower cost alternative to lithium ion batteries (LIB), with readily available and geographically democratic reserves of the metal. Tin is one of most promising SIB anode materials, which alloys with up to 3.75 Na, leading to a charge storage capacity of 847 mAh g(-1). In this Account, we outline the state-of-the-art understanding regarding the sodiation-induced phase transformations and the associated performance in a range of Sn-based systems, treating metallic Sn and its alloys, tin oxide (SnO2), tin sulfide (SnS2/SnS), and tin phosphide (Sn4P3). We first detail what is known about the sodiation sequence in metallic Sn, highlighting the most recent insight into the reactions prior to the terminal equilibrium Na15Sn4 intermetallic. We explain why researchers argue that the equilibrium (phase diagram) series of phase transitions does not occur in this system, and rather why sodiation/desodiation proceeds through a series of metastable crystalline and amorphous structures. We also outline the recent modeling-based insight regarding how this phase transition profoundly influences the mechanical properties of the alloy, progressively changing the bonding and the near neighbor arrangement from "Sn-like" to "Na-like" in the process. We then go on to discuss the sodiation reactions in SnO2. We argue that while a substantial amount of experimental work already exists where the focus is on synthesis and testing of tin oxide-based nanocomposites, the exact sodiation sequence is just beginning to be understood. Unlike in Sn and Sn alloys, where capacities near the theoretical are reached at least early during cycling, SnO2 never quite achieves anything close to the 1398 mAh g(-1) that would be possible with a combination of fully reversible conversion and alloying reactions. We highlight recent work demonstrating that contrary to general expectations, it is the Sn to Na15Sn4 alloying reaction that

  13. Organic derivatives of tin (II/IV): Investigation of their structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szirtes, L.; Megyeri, J.; Kuzmann, E.; Beck, A.

    2011-07-01

    The structures of tin(II)-oxalate, tin(IV)Na-EDTA and tin(IV)Na 8-inositol hexaphosphate were investigated using XRD analysis. Samples were identified using the Mössbauer study, thermal analysis and FTIR spectrometry. The Mössbauer study determined two different oxidation states of tin atoms, and consequently two different tin surroundings in the end products. The tin oxalate was found to be orthorhombic with space group Pnma, a=9.2066(3) Å, b=9.7590(1) Å, c=13.1848(5) Å, V=1184.62 Å 3 and Z=8. SnNa-EDTA was found to be monoclinic with space group P2 1/c 1, a=10.7544(3) Å, b=10.1455(3) Å, c=16.5130(6) Å, β=98.59(2)°, V=1781.50(4) Å 3 and Z=4. Sn(C 6H 6Na 8O 24P 6) was found to be amorphous.

  14. Developments in Alkaline Tin Electrorefining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, A. E.; Afifi, S. E.; El Sherief, A. E.

    1988-08-01

    Although alkaline stannate baths for electrorefining of tin have been used for some time, there is still room for improvement The effects of alkali concentration, current density and temperature on the cathodic current efficiency have been studied, and a bath temperature of 75°C is recommended. To avoid unstable conditions in the bath, a special treatment to the anode and application of an auxiliary cathode are necessary. Many of the metallic impurities present in the crude tin anode go into the slimes in the form of hydroxides, but lead impurities can only be tolerated if concentrations are less than one percent.

  15. Tinning/Trimming Robot System

    SciTech Connect

    Fureigh, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    In a new surface mount assembly area at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), a tinning/trimming robot system tins and trims the gold-plated leads of surface mount technology (SMT) transistors. The KCD-designed system uses a Unimation PUMA 260 robot, a General Production Devices SP-2000 solder pot; water-soluble Blackstone No. 2508 flux; and a Virtual Industries high-temperature, ESD-conductive, miniature suction cup. After the manual cleaning operation, the processed SMT transistors go to the QUADSTAR Automated Component Placement System for a Radar Logic Assembly. The benefits are reductions in the cost of nonconformance, worker fatigue, and standard hours.

  16. 48 CFR 204.7202-3 - TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false TINs. 204.7202-3 Section... OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contractor Identification 204.7202-3 TINs. Requirements for use of TINs are in FAR subpart 4.9....

  17. 48 CFR 204.7202-3 - TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false TINs. 204.7202-3 Section... OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contractor Identification 204.7202-3 TINs. Requirements for use of TINs are in FAR subpart 4.9....

  18. 48 CFR 204.7202-3 - TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TINs. 204.7202-3 Section... OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contractor Identification 204.7202-3 TINs. Requirements for use of TINs are in FAR subpart 4.9....

  19. 48 CFR 204.7202-3 - TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false TINs. 204.7202-3 Section... OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contractor Identification 204.7202-3 TINs. Requirements for use of TINs are in FAR subpart 4.9....

  20. 48 CFR 204.7202-3 - TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false TINs. 204.7202-3 Section... OF DEFENSE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Contractor Identification 204.7202-3 TINs. Requirements for use of TINs are in FAR subpart 4.9....

  1. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; tin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, D.M.; Sabin, A.E.; Reed, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The International Strategic Minerals Inventory tin inventory contains records for 56 major tin deposits and districts in 21 countries. These countries accounted for 98 percent of the 10 million metric tons of tin produced in the period 1934-87. Tin is a good alloying metal and is generally nontoxic, and its chief uses are as tinplate for tin cans and as solder in electronics. The 56 locations consist of 39 lode deposits and 17 placers and contain almost 7.5 million metric tons of tin in identified economic resources (R1E) and another 1.5 million metric tons of tin in other resource categories. Most of these resources are in major deposits that have been known for over a hundred years. Lode deposits account for 44 percent of the R1E and 87 percent of the resources in other categories. Placer deposits make up the remainder. Low-income and middle-income countries, including Bolivia and Brazil and countries along the Southeast Asian Tin Belt such as Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia account for 91 percent of the R1E resources of tin and for 61 percent of resources in other categories. The United States has less than 0.05 percent of the world's tin R1E in major deposits. Available data suggest that the Soviet Union may have about 4 percent of resources in this category. The industrial market economy countries of the United States, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, and the United Kingdom are major consumers of tin, whereas the major tin-producing countries generally consume little tin. The Soviet Union and China are both major producers and consumers of tin. At the end of World War II, the four largest tin-producing countries (Bolivia, the Belgian Congo (Zaire), Nigeria, and Malaysia) produced over 80 percent of the world's tin. In 1986, the portion of production from the four largest producers (Malaysia, Brazil, Soviet Union, Indonesia) declined to about 55 percent, while the price of tin rose from about $1,500 to $18,000 per metric ton. In response to tin shortages

  2. Recent developments in the application of tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampshire, W. B.; Killmeyer, A. J.

    1989-08-01

    As a commodity, tin has weathered a severe drop in its market value, and, at present, tin-producing countries are exporting more of the metal than was originally anticipated. Tin is utilized in a variety of significant applications, including: solder, where it has grown at the expense of lead; tinplate for food cans, where the battle between aluminum and steel is still being waged; coatings, where tin-zinc alloys are more corrosion resistant than zinc alone; and chemical production, where tin is used as a flame retardant and stabilizer in polymers. Fluctuations in tin prices would most adversely influence the fledgling chemical market, where the growth opportunities for tin diminish as the metal's price escalates.

  3. [Tin compounds in pharmacy and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Nagy, L; Szorcsik, A; Kovács, K

    2000-04-01

    The occurrence of tin in plants, animals and humans is discussed, in relation to its abundance in the lithosphere and hydrosphere and the range of the different tin(II) and tin(IV) complexes formed. A reasoned consideration of its essentiality for living species is provided. It is concluded that tin is beneficial, even if not yet proved to be an essential element. After reference to the chemistry of tin compounds, there is a detailed discussion of their toxicity in animals and humans. Feasible routes for tin intake and uptake into humans are described. The past and current use of tin pharmaceuticals is reviewed and the areas for which they are currently permitted for use in humans as dentifrices and mouth washes, as radio-pharmaceuticals and for the treatment of jaundiced newborns are described. A detailed review of tin-containing antitumour agents as representative tin pharmaceuticals is also given. Finally, a list of tin-containing drugs and drug candidates is also shown.

  4. Tin clusters adopt prolate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1999-08-01

    We have characterized the structures of Snn cations up to n=68 using ion mobility measurements. Up to n~35, tin clusters track the prolate growth pattern previously found for Sin and Gen. However, the detailed size-dependent variations start deviating from those observed for Sin above n=14 and Gen above n=21. Over the n~35-65 size range, tin clusters gradually rearrange towards near-spherical geometries, passing through several intermediate structural families. Two or three isomers are resolved for some sizes in the n=18-49 range. The observed geometries are independent of the He buffer gas temperature between 78 and 378 K and are not affected by collisional annealing.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: tin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlin Jr., James F.

    2011-01-01

    Tin was one of the earliest-known metals. Because of its hardening effect on copper, tin was used in bronze implements as early as 3500 B.C. Bronze, a copper-tin alloy that can be sharpened and is hard enough to retain a cutting edge, was used during the Bronze Age in construction tools as well as weapons for hunting and war. The geographical separation between tin-producing and tin-consuming nations greatly influenced the patterns of early trade routes. Historians think that as early as 1500 B.C., Phoenicians traveled by sea to the Cornwall district of England to obtain tin. The pure metal was not used unalloyed until about 600 B.C.

  6. SEPARATION OF TIN FROM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Kattner, W.T.

    1959-08-11

    A process is described for recovering tin from bronze comprising melting the bronze; slowly cooling the melted metal to from 280 to 240 deg C whereby eta- phase bronze crystallizes; separating the eta-bronze crystals from the liquid metal by mechanical means; melting the separated crystals; slowly cooling the melted eta-crystals to a temperature from 520 to 420 deg C whereby crystals of epsilonbronze precipitate; removing said epsilon-crystals from the remaining molten metal; and reintroducing the remaining molten metal into the process for eta-crystallization.

  7. Tin oxide dependence of the CO2 reduction efficiency on tin electrodes and enhanced activity for tin/tin oxide thin-film catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yihong; Kanan, Matthew W

    2012-02-01

    The importance of tin oxide (SnO(x)) to the efficiency of CO(2) reduction on Sn was evaluated by comparing the activity of Sn electrodes that had been subjected to different pre-electrolysis treatments. In aqueous NaHCO(3) solution saturated with CO(2), a Sn electrode with a native SnO(x) layer exhibited potential-dependent CO(2) reduction activity consistent with previously reported activity. In contrast, an electrode etched to expose fresh Sn(0) surface exhibited higher overall current densities but almost exclusive H(2) evolution over the entire 0.5 V range of potentials examined. Subsequently, a thin-film catalyst was prepared by simultaneous electrodeposition of Sn(0) and SnO(x) on a Ti electrode. This catalyst exhibited up to 8-fold higher partial current density and 4-fold higher faradaic efficiency for CO(2) reduction than a Sn electrode with a native SnO(x) layer. Our results implicate the participation of SnO(x) in the CO(2) reduction pathway on Sn electrodes and suggest that metal/metal oxide composite materials are promising catalysts for sustainable fuel synthesis.

  8. Radioecological impacts of tin mining.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Bununu, Yakubu Aliyu

    2015-12-01

    The tin mining activities in the suburbs of Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria, have resulted in technical enhancement of the natural background radiation as well as higher activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides in the topsoil of mining sites and their environs. Several studies have considered the radiological human health risks of the mining activity; however, to our knowledge no documented study has investigated the radiological impacts on biota. Hence, an attempt is made to assess potential hazards using published data from the literature and the ERICA Tool. This paper considers the effects of mining and milling on terrestrial organisms like shrubs, large mammals, small burrowing mammals, birds (duck), arthropods (earth worm), grasses, and herbs. The dose rates and risk quotients to these organisms are computed using conservative values for activity concentrations of natural radionuclides reported in Bitsichi and Bukuru mining areas. The results suggest that grasses, herbs, lichens, bryophytes and shrubs receive total dose rates that are of potential concern. The effects of dose rates to specific indicator species of interest are highlighted and discussed. We conclude that further investigation and proper regulations should be set in place in order to reduce the risk posed by the tin mining activity on biota. This paper also presents a brief overview of the impact of mineral mining on biota based on documented literature for other countries.

  9. Sorption of tin on human teeth.

    PubMed

    Helal, A A; Alian, Gh A; Madbouly, H A

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of tin ions on human teeth from water and other drinks has been studied by the radioactive tracer technique using the isotope 113Sn (T(1/2) = 115.1 d) as a tracer. The tooth holds a minimum amount of tin from coffee and a maximum amount is held from water and from tea with sugar. The same technique was also used to study the desorption of tin already taken up on the teeth. It has been found that sorbed tin is hardly desorbed from the teeth specimens. The high uptake of tin on human teeth from various drinks showed that teeth act as a natural sieve holding trace elements.

  10. Nucleation and growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing; Vianco, Paul T.; Zhang, Bei; Li, James C. M.

    2011-06-01

    Pure tin film of one micron thick was evaporated onto a silicon substrate with chromium and nickel underlayers. The tinned silicon disk was bent by applying a dead load at the center and supported below around the edge to apply biaxial compressive stresses to the tin layer. After 180 C vacuum annealing for 1,2,4,6, and 8 weeks, tin whiskers/hillocks grew. A quantitative method revealed that the overall growth rate decreased with time with a tendency for saturation. A review of the literature showed in general, tin whisker growth has a nucleation period, a growth period and a period of saturation, very similar to recrystallization or phase transformation. In fact we found our data fit Avrami equation very well. This equation shows that the nucleation period was the first week.

  11. Should muffin tin radius vary in different structures of a material?: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Vikas Banger, Suman Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-24

    Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory and a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been used to study the structural properties of YbN. Its predicted unit cell lattice parameter in NaCl (B1) structure is 4.7810Å and in CsCl (B2) structure it is 2.8685Å. In the determination of lattice parameter the muffin tin radius (R{sub MT}) of constituent atoms play important role. In both the structures the muffin tin radius for Yb and N converges to 2.3 and 1.4 a.u., respectively.

  12. Should muffin tin radius vary in different structures of a material?: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Vikas; Banger, Suman; Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory and a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) have been used to study the structural properties of YbN. Its predicted unit cell lattice parameter in NaCl (B1) structure is 4.7810Å and in CsCl (B2) structure it is 2.8685Å. In the determination of lattice parameter the muffin tin radius (RMT) of constituent atoms play important role. In both the structures the muffin tin radius for Yb and N converges to 2.3 and 1.4 a.u., respectively.

  13. Platelet Composite Coatings for Tin Whisker Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-11-01

    Reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  14. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results for several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.

  15. Platelet composite coatings for tin whisker mitigation

    DOE PAGES

    Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; Martin, James E.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, reliable methods for tin whisker mitigation are needed for applications that utilize tin-plated commercial components. Tin can grow whiskers that can lead to electrical shorting, possibly causing critical systems to fail catastrophically. The mechanisms of tin whisker growth are unclear and this makes prediction of the lifetimes of critical components uncertain. The development of robust methods for tin whisker mitigation is currently the best approach to eliminating the risk of shorting. Current mitigation methods are based on unfilled polymer coatings that are not impenetrable to tin whiskers. In this paper we report tin whisker mitigation results formore » several filled polymer coatings. The whisker-penetration resistance of the coatings was evaluated at elevated temperature and high humidity and under temperature cycling conditions. The composite coatings comprised Ni and MgF2-coated Al/Ni/Al platelets in epoxy resin or silicone rubber. In addition to improved whisker mitigation, these platelet composites have enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric constant compared with unfilled polymers.« less

  16. Electronic structure of tin monosulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bletskan, D. I.; Bletskan, M. M.; Glukhov, K. E.

    2017-01-01

    The band structure of three-dimensional and two-dimensional tin monosulfide was calculated by the density functional method in LDA and LDA+U approximations. Group-theoretical analysis of the electronic band structure of SnS crystallized in the orthorhombic structure with space group D2h16- Pcmn is carried out, the symmetry of wave functions of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band is found. The selection rules for direct and indirect optical transitions at different incident light polarization are determined. The group-theoretical analysis of energy states of the three-dimensional and two-dimensional SnS structures explains the formation of the band structure including the Davydov splitting. The calculated total density of states is compared with the known experimental XPS and UPS spectra, providing the assignment of their main features.

  17. Therapeutic tin-117m compositions

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.; Mausner, Leonard F.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2003-01-01

    The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

  18. The inorganic speciation of tin(II) in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports new voltammetric measurements on the interactions between tin(II) and the most important natural inorganic ligands, OH-, Cl-, F-, CO32-, SO42- and PO43-. For a better understanding of tin(II) speciation, an analysis is also given of prior data on the same systems from the literature. The formation constants were determined at t = 25 °C in different ionic media and at different ionic strengths, specifically the following: Sn(OH)q (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaNO3), SnClr and Sn(OH)Cl (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 2.3 in Na(NO3, Cl)), Sn(SO4)r (0.1 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.6 in Na(NO3, SO4)), SnHqCO3 and SnHqPO4 (0.15 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaNO3), where the subscripts r and q represent the stoichiometric coefficients. Concerning the SnFr species, reliable literature values were considered (0.15 ⩽ I/mol L-1 ⩽ 1.0 in NaClO4). Fifteen voltammetric measurements were performed in synthetic seawater; the total seawater binding ability was evaluated by a model in which synthetic seawater is expressed as a single salt, BA. The formation of species between tin(II) and the anion of the marine salt (A) was also proposed, and the corresponding stability constants at different salinities (5 ⩽ S ⩽ 50) were reported. In addition, studies on the solubility of Sn(OH)2(s) were carried out using voltammetry and light scattering measurements. The "extra-stability" of the mixed species with respect to the parent species was evaluated, in particular for Sn(OH)Cl and the corresponding species involving the anion of the marine salt (A). The dependence of the formation constants on ionic strength was analysed using extended Debye-Hückel and Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) type equations. Tin(II) speciation was also evaluated in different natural fluid conditions, where, in all cases, carbonate complexation was predominant, hampering the formation of hydrolytic species throughout the investigated pH range. Moreover, some formation enthalpy changes were calculated

  19. Synthesis of tin-containing polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezzell, S. A.; Taylor, L. T.

    1984-01-01

    A series of tin-containing polyimide films derived from either 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride or pyromellitic dianhydride and 4,4'-oxydianiline have been synthesized and their electrical properties examined. Highest quality materials (i.e., homogeneous, smooth surface, flexible) with the best electrical properties were doped with either SnCl2.2H2O or (n-Bu)2SnCl2. In all cases, extensive reactivity of the tin dopant with water, air or polyamic acid during imidization is observed. Lowered electrical surface resistivities appear to be correlatable with the presence of surface tin oxide on the film surface.

  20. Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

    2004-09-01

    High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

  1. Investigating Sodium Storage Mechanisms in Tin Anodes: A Combined Pair Distribution Function Analysis, Density Functional Theory, and Solid-State NMR Approach

    DOE PAGES

    Stratford, Joshua M.; Mayo, Martin; Allan, Phoebe K.; ...

    2017-05-04

    Here, the alloying mechanism of high-capacity tin anodes for sodium-ion batteries is investigated using a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) and high-throughput screening using a species-swap method provide insights into a range of possible sodium–tin structures. These structures are linked to experiments using both average and local structure probes in the form of operando pair distribution function analysis, X-ray diffraction, and 23Na solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), along with ex situ 119Sn ssNMR. Through this approach, we propose structures for the previously unidentified crystalline and amorphous intermediates. The first electrochemical process of sodium insertionmore » into tin results in the conversion of crystalline tin into a layered structure consisting of mixed Na/Sn occupancy sites intercalated between planar hexagonal layers of Sn atoms (approximate stoichiometry NaSn3). Following this, NaSn2, which is predicted to be thermodynamically stable by AIRSS, forms; this contains hexagonal layers closely related to NaSn3, but has no tin atoms between the layers. NaSn2 is broken down into an amorphous phase of approximate composition Na1.2Sn. Reverse Monte Carlo refinements of an ab initio molecular dynamics model of this phase show that the predominant tin connectivity is chains. Further reaction with sodium results in the formation of structures containing Sn–Sn dumbbells, which interconvert through a solid-solution mechanism. These structures are based upon Na5–xSn2, with increasing occupancy of one of its sodium sites commensurate with the amount of sodium added. ssNMR results indicate that the final product, Na15Sn4, can store additional sodium atoms as an off-stoichiometry compound (Na15+xSn4) in a manner similar to Li15Si4.« less

  2. Space Shuttle Program Tin Whisker Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimi, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of tin whiskers (TW) on space shuttle hardware led to a program to investigate and removal and mitigation of the source of the tin whiskers. A Flight Control System (FCS) avionics box failed during vehicle testing, and was routed to the NASA Shuttle Logistics Depot for testing and disassembly. The internal inspection of the box revealed TW growth visible without magnification. The results of the Tiger Team that was assembled to investigate and develop recommendations are reviewed in this viewgraph presentation.

  3. A novel TMV-induced hot pepper cell wall protein gene (CaTin2) is associated with virus-specific hypersensitive response pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ryoung; Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2003-03-01

    Incompatible plant-pathogen interactions result in the rapid cell death response known as hypersensitive response (HR) and activation of host defense related genes. To understand the cellular mechanism controlling defense response better, a novel pathogenesis-related (PR) gene and putative cell wall protein gene, CaTin2, was isolated through differential screening of a hot pepper cDNA library and characterized. CaTin2 gene was locally and systemically induced in hot pepper plants upon TMV-P0 inoculation which induces HR. However, CaTin2 gene wasn't regulated by bacterial HR-specific signal pathway. The full-length cDNA for CaTin2, which is 864 nucleotides long, contained the open reading frame of 200 amino acids including cell wall targeting sequences of 26 amino acids. CaTin2 gene has no sequence similarity with other cell wall protein genes except the signal sequence and exists as only one copy in hot pepper genome. CaTin2 gene contains repeated helix-turn-helix motif consisting of 39 amino acids. CaTin2 mRNA accumulation was induced in response to various treatments such as ethylene, SA, MeJA, ABA, methyl viologen, NaCl and wounding at early time points. Subcelluar localization of CaTin2 was confirmed in the cell wall in hot pepper leaves by making CaTin2::smGFP fusion protein. The transgenic plants overexpressing CaTin2 cDNA were resistant to TMV and CMV inoculation. From these results, CaTin2 gene may encode a virus-related new cell wall protein member.

  4. Friction and wear of tin and tin alloys from minus 100 C to 150 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with an iron (110) single-crystal pin sliding on single and polycrystalline tin and tin alloys. Specimens were examined at various ambient temperatures from -100 to 150 C. Applied loads varied from 1 to 50 grams, and sliding velocity was constant at 0.7 mm/min. Results indicate that the crystal transformation of tin influences the friction coefficient. Friction was higher for the diamond structure (gray tin) than it was for the body-centered tetragonal structure (white tin). Bismuth arrested the crystal transformation, which resulted in constant friction over the temperature range -100 to 150 C. Both copper and aluminum enhanced the kinetics of transformation, with aluminum producing a nearly twofold change in friction with the crystal transformation.

  5. Effects of heteroatoms and nanosize on tin-based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcántara, Ricardo; Ortiz, Gregorio; Rodríguez, Inés; Tirado, José L.

    Tin-based intermetallic compounds of different compositions and with micro and nano-sized particles are studied as electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Crystalline microsized particles of CoSn x are obtained at high temperatures, while crystalline nano-sized particles are obtained at low-temperature following a one-pot method which is based on TEG solvent and reduction with NaBH 4. The observed capacities of CoSn x compounds in lithium test cells depend on the tin content, electrochemical cycling conditions and crystallite size. The change of the 119Sn Mössbauer isomer shift upon the electrochemical reaction with lithium is more limited for the intermetallic compounds CoSn x than for pure Sn. Nano-sized CoSn x materials show superior specific capacity than microsized CoSn x powders. The maximum observed reversible capacity of nano-Co 3Sn 2 is equal to 544 m Ah g -1 in the first cycle, while 413 m Ah g -1 were observed for nano-CoSn.

  6. Analysis of cell performance and thermal regeneration of a lithium-tin cell having an immobilized fused-salt electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, E. J.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Cell performance and thermal regeneration of a thermally regenerative cell uses lithium and tin and a fused-salt electrolyte. The emf of the Li-Sn cell, as a function of cathode-alloy composition, is shown to resemble that of the Na-Bi cell.

  7. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, F.J.M. )

    1989-03-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust. 27 refs.

  8. Tin in a chondritic interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Submicron platey Sn-rich grains are present in chondritic porous interplanetary dust particle (IDP) W7029 A and it is the second occurrence of a tin mineral in a stratospheric micrometeorite. Selected Area Electron Diffraction data for the Sn-rich grains match with Sn2O3 and Sn3O4. The oxide(s) may have formed in the solar nebula when tin metal catalytically supported reduction of CO or during flash heating on atmospheric entry of the IDP. The presence of tin is consistent with enrichments for other volatile trace elements in chondritic IDPs and may signal an emerging trend toward nonchondritic volatile element abundances in chondritic IDPs. The observation confirms small-scale mineralogical heterogeneity in fine-grained chondritic porous interplanetary dust.

  9. Impact of Sodium Contamination in Tin Sulfide Thin-Film Solar Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Steinmann, Vera; Brandt, Riley E.; Chakraborty, Rupak; ...

    2016-02-12

    Empirical observations show that sodium(Na) is a benign contaminant in some thin-filmsolar cells. Here, we intentionally contaminate thermally evaporated tin sulfide (SnS)thin-films with sodium and measure the SnS absorber properties and solar cellcharacteristics. The carrier concentration increases from 2 × 1016 cm-3 to 4.3 × 1017 cm-3 in Na-doped SnSthin-films, when using a 13 nm NaCl seed layer, which is detrimental for SnS photovoltaic applications but could make Na-doped SnS an attractive candidate in thermoelectrics. We observed trends in carrier concentration and found that it is in good agreement with density functional theory calculations, which predict an acceptor-type NaSn defectmore » with low formation energy.« less

  10. 99M-Technetium labeled tin colloid radiopharmaceuticals

    DOEpatents

    Winchell, Harry S.; Barak, Morton; Van Fleet, III, Parmer

    1976-07-06

    An improved 99m-technetium labeled tin(II) colloid, size-stabilized for reticuloendothelial organ imaging without the use of macromolecular stabilizers and a packaged tin base reagent and an improved method for making it are disclosed.

  11. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, A. C.; Karpov, V. G.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-28

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  12. Synchrotron characterization of functional tin dioxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Domashevskaya, E. P. Chuvenkova, O. A.; Turishchev, S. Yu.

    2015-12-31

    Wire-like crystals of tin dioxide were synthesized by a gas-transport technique. The wires, of mainly nanometric diameters, were characterized by spectroscopy and microscopy techniques with the use of highly brilliant and intense synchrotron radiation. We studied the influence of the surface chemical state and the oxygen vacancies on the atomic and electronic structure of the nanowires. The surface of the nanowires is covered by a few nanometers of tin suboxides. The lack of oxygen over the surface layers leads to specific sub-zone formation in a gap, as shown by synchrotron studies.

  13. Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites

    DOEpatents

    Marcinek, Marek [Warszawa, PL; Kostecki, Robert [Lafayette, CA

    2012-07-17

    A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10230 - Rutile, tin zinc, calcium doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rutile, tin zinc, calcium doped. 721... Substances § 721.10230 Rutile, tin zinc, calcium doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as rutile, tin zinc, calcium-doped (PMN P-06...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10230 - Rutile, tin zinc, calcium doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rutile, tin zinc, calcium doped. 721... Substances § 721.10230 Rutile, tin zinc, calcium doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as rutile, tin zinc, calcium-doped (PMN P-06...

  16. Lithiation of tin oxide: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu

    2014-12-24

    We suggest that the lithiation of pristine SnO forms a layered LiXO structure, while the expelled tin atoms agglomerate into "surface" planes separating the LiXO layers. The proposed lithiation model widely differs from the common assumption that tin segregates into nanoclusters embedded in the lithia matrix. With this model, we are able to account for the various tin bonds that are seen experimentally and explain the three volume expansion phases that occur when SnO undergoes lithiation: (i) at low concentrations Li behaves as an intercalated species inducing small volume increases; (ii) for intermediate concentrations SnO transforms into lithia causing a large expansion; and (iii) finally, as the Li concentration further increases a saturation of the lithia takes place until a layered Li2O is formed. A moderate volume expansion results from this last process. We also report a "zipper" nucleation mechanism that could provide the seed for the transformation from tin oxide to lithium oxide.

  17. Spin current transport in ceramic: TiN thin film

    SciTech Connect

    An, Hongyu; Kanno, Yusuke; Tashiro, Takaharu; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-03-21

    The spin current transport property in a ceramic material TiN has been investigated at room temperature. By attaching TiN thin films on Ni{sub 20}Fe{sub 80} with different thicknesses of TiN, the spin pumping experiment has been conducted, and the spin diffusion length in TiN was measured to be around 43 nm. Spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance has also been taken to investigate the spin Hall angle of TiN, which was estimated to be around 0.0052. This study on ceramic material provides a potential selection in emerging materials for spintronics application.

  18. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  19. Spin current transport in ceramic: TiN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongyu; Kanno, Yusuke; Tashiro, Takaharu; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    The spin current transport property in a ceramic material TiN has been investigated at room temperature. By attaching TiN thin films on Ni20Fe80 with different thicknesses of TiN, the spin pumping experiment has been conducted, and the spin diffusion length in TiN was measured to be around 43 nm. Spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance has also been taken to investigate the spin Hall angle of TiN, which was estimated to be around 0.0052. This study on ceramic material provides a potential selection in emerging materials for spintronics application.

  20. Woodgrain defect on tinned steel Flandres foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkis, A.M.; Robin, A. Souza, V.A.; Suzuki, P.A.

    2011-06-15

    Tin electrocoated steel strip, also referred to as Flandres foil, is largely used for manufacturing food containers. Tinplates must have good corrosion resistance, workability, weldability, as well as a bright appearance. The woodgrain defect, a not yet fully understood defect that occurs on tinplates and accounts for their high scrap rate, consists of alternate bands of bright/dull reflectivity and resembles longitudinally cut wood. Observations of the woodgrain defect by scanning electron microscopy showed that the molten tin spreads irregularly during both the melting and solidification stages. X-ray diffraction analyses showed that the metallic tin tended to crystallize in the (200) direction for coupons with and without the woodgrain defect. Nevertheless, the preferential orientation degree decreased for coupons with the woodgrain defect. The rocking curves, also known as omega-scan, showed that the tin grains were uniformly aligned parallel to the strip surface for coupons with no defects, whereas for tinplates with woodgrain, the tin grains were not uniformly oriented, probably due to the misalignment of the grains in relation to the surface. - Graphical abstract: The woodgrain defect occurs on Flandres tinplates and consists in the formation of alternate bands of different reflectivity (bright/dull), which looks like longitudinally cut wood. X-ray diffractometry showed that the typical bright surface of tinplate is associated to the uniform distribution of aligned (200) Sn grains, whereas in tinplate with the woodgrain defect, the Sn grains were not uniformly oriented, due to the misalignment of the (200) Sn planes relative to the surface. Research highlights: {yields} The bright surface of tinplate is associated to the uniform distribution of aligned (200) Sn grains. {yields} The woodgrain defect on tinplate consists in alternate bands of bright/dull appearance. {yields} In tinplate with the woodgrain defect, the Sn grains were not uniformly oriented, due

  1. Comparative assessment of gastrointestinal irritant potency in man of tin(II) chloride and tin migrated from packaging.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Peter J; Boisset, Michel; Blunden, Steve; Davies, Scot; Ong, Teng Jin; Taverne, Jean-Pierre

    2003-12-01

    Tin is present in low concentrations in most canned foods and beverages, the highest levels being found in products packaged in unlacquered or partially lacquered tinplate cans. A limited number of case-reports of acute gastrointestinal disorders after consumption of food containing 100-500 mg/kg tin have been reported, but these reports suffer many insufficiencies. Controlled clinical studies on acute effects of tin migrated from packaging suggest a threshold concentration for adverse effects (AEs) of >730 mg/kg. Two separate randomised, single-centre, double-blind, crossover studies, enabling comparison of the tolerability of tin added as tin(II) chloride at concentrations of <0.5, 161, 264 and 529 mg/kg in 250 ml tomato juice in 20 volunteers (Study 1) and tin migrated from packaging at concentrations of <0.5, 201 and 267 mg/kg in 250 ml tomato soup in 24 volunteers (Study 2) were carried out. Distribution studies were conducted to get insight in the acute AEs of low molecular weight (<1000 Da) tin species in the soluble fraction of food products. Results show that the chemical form of tin and not the elemental concentration per se determines the severity of AEs. A clear dose-response relationship was only observed when tin was added as tin(II) chloride in tomato juice. No clinically significant AEs were reported in Study 2 and comparison of the incidence of tin-related AEs showed no difference between the dose levels (including control). Tin species of low molecular weight in supernatant represented 31-32% of total tin in canned tomato soup versus 56-61% in juice freshly spiked with tin(II) chloride. Differences in the incidence of AEs following administration of tomato juice with 161 and 264 mg of tin per kg and tomato soup with 201 and 267 mg of tin per kg likely results from differences in the concentration of low molecular weight tin species and in the nature of tin complexes formed. The results of this work demonstrate that tin levels up to 267 mg/kg in

  2. Heterotermetallic indium lithium halostannates: low-temperature single-source precursors for tin-rich indium tin oxides and their application for thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Samedov, Kerim; Aksu, Yilmaz; Driess, Matthias

    2012-06-18

    The syntheses and structural elucidation of dimeric [Sn(OCyHex)(2)] (1), its corresponding (cyclohexoxy)alkalistannates(II) [{M(OCyHex)(3)Sn}(2)] (M = Li (2), Na (3), K (4)), and of the first heteroleptic heterotermetallic Li/In/Sn-haloalkoxide clusters [X(2)In{LiSn(2)(OCyHex)(6)}] (X = Br (5), Cl (6)) with a double seco-norcubane core are reported. They represent suitable precursors for new amorphous indium tin oxide (ITO) materials as transparent conducting oxides with drastically reduced concentrations of expensive indium, while maintaining their high electrical performance. In fact, compounds 5 and 6 were successfully degraded under dry synthetic air at relatively low temperature, resulting in new semiconducting tin-rich ITOs homogeneously dispersed in a tin oxide/lithium oxide matrix. The obtained particles were investigated and characterised by different analytical techniques, such as powder XRD, IR spectroscopy, SEM, TEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The analytical data confirm that the final materials consist of tin-containing indium oxide embedded in an amorphous tin oxide matrix. The typical broadening and shift of the observed indium oxide reflections to higher 2θ values in the powder XRD pattern clearly indicated that tin centres were successfully incorporated into the In(2)O(3) lattice and partially occupied In(3+) sites. Investigations by EDX mapping proved that Sn was homogeneously distributed in the final materials. Thin-film field-effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated by spin-coating of silicon wafers with solutions of 5 in toluene and subsequent calcination under dry air (25-700 °C). The FETs prepared with precursor 5 exhibited excellent performances, as shown by a charge-carrier mobility of 6.36×10(-1)  cm(2)  V(-1)  s (calcination at 250 °C) and an on/off current ratio of 10(6). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of the stability of tin(II) chloride complexes in aqueous solution up to 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.; Seward, T. M.

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the aqueous chemistry of tin at elevated temperatures and pressures. For this purpose, the spectra of chloridotin(II) complexes in the ultraviolet region were measured in acid chloride solutions containing 1.00 × 10 -4 m tin, 1.00 × 10 -2 m HCl and varying NaCl concentrations up to 2.936 m from 25 to 300°C and at the equilibrium saturated vapor pressure of the system. The thermodynamic cumulative and stepwise formation constants of the individual tin(II) chloride species were calculated from the spectrophotometric data using a nonlinear least squares routine. At 25°C, a scheme including five species of SnCl n2-n (0 ≤ n ≤ 4) best fitted the available data. At 300°C however, SnCl 20 and SnCl 3- are the predominant species at total chloride concentrations >0.1 m. The presence of SnCl 42- in concentrated (up to 3 m) chloride solutions was not detected above 150°C. With increasing temperature, chloridotin(II) complex stability is characterized by quite large endothermic enthalpies and large positive entropies of formation. It was concluded that tin(II) chloride complexes could be important in the transport and deposition of tin by hydrothermal ore solutions of moderate to high salinity.

  4. Underpotential deposition of tin(II) on a gold disc electrode and determination of tin in a tin plate sample.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Zhiqing; Shang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Chunming

    2005-04-01

    This work describes a study of the underpotential deposition (UPD) of Sn2+ on a polycrystalline gold disc electrode using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronocoulometry (CC). Sn2+ ions showed well-defined peaks from UPD and UPD stripping (UPD-S) in 1 mol/L HCl solutions, while bulk deposition (BD) and BD stripping (BD-S) of the ions were also observed. The measured UPD shifts, DeltaE(UPD), between the UPD-S and the BD-S peaks were more than 200 mV. The UPD charge and the surface coverage of tin were measured by CC. A new method for determining Sn2+ was therefore developed, based on the excellent electrochemical properties of the Au/Sn UPD system. A plot of the UPD-DPASV (differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry) signal versus the Sn(II) concentration was obtained for [Sn(II)] of 1.98x10(-7) to 3.64x10(-5) M. The method developed here has been applied to determine the tin in a tin plate sample.

  5. Tin oxide nanocluster hydrogen and ammonia sensors.

    PubMed

    Lassesson, A; Schulze, M; van Lith, J; Brown, S A

    2008-01-09

    We have prepared sensitive hydrogen and ammonia sensors from thin films of tin nanoclusters with diameters between 3 and 10 nm. By baking the samples at 200 °C in ambient air the clusters were oxidized, resulting in very stable films of tin oxide clusters with similar diameters to the original Sn clusters. By monitoring the electrical resistance, it is shown that the cluster films are highly responsive to hydrogen and ammonia at relatively low temperatures, thereby making them attractive for commercial applications in which low power consumption is required. Doping of the films by depositing Pd on top of the clusters resulted in much improved sensor response and response times. It is shown that optimal sensor properties are achieved for very thin cluster films (a few monolayers of clusters).

  6. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Jaana Saranya; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Shutthanandan, V.; Varga, Tamas; Flynn, Brendan T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2012-06-12

    Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the effect of deposition and post annealing conditions on film structure, composition, surface contamination, and thin film transistor (TFT) device performance. X-ray diffraction results indicated that the ZTO films remain amorphous even after annealing to 600 °C. We found that the bulk Zn:Sn ratio of the sputter deposited films were slightly tin rich compared to the composition of the ceramic sputter target, and there was a significant depletion of zinc at the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also indicated that residual surface contamination depended strongly on the sample post-annealing conditions where water, carbonate and hydroxyl species were absorbed to the surface. Electrical characterization of ZTO films, using TFT test structures, indicated that mobilities as high as 17 cm2/Vs could be obtained for depletion mode devices.

  7. Development of tin-plated regenerator material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M. Y.; Morie, T.; Tsuchiya, A.

    2017-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of a cryocooler, it is vital to improve the regenerator. In general, the heat capacity of materials decreases as temperature decreases. Thus, when temperature is below 50 K, lead spheres are often used as a regenerator material. However, the pressure drop through a sphere regenerator is larger than that through a screen regenerator. To overcome this dilemma, a new, low pressure loss tin-plated screen is proposed. A comparison test was performed with a two-stage GM cryocooler by replacing part of the first stage regenerator material, bronze screens with tin-plated screens. Compared to a regenerator filled with bronze screens, the cooling capacity of the first stage increased by about 14% at 40 K and 90% at 30 K with such tin-plated screens. The ratio of the wire diameter before and after the deposition was also optimized. An optimum cooling capacity of 53.5 W at 40 K was obtained at a diameter ratio of about 1.4. The detailed experimental results are reported in this paper.

  8. Dating of Malaysian fluvial tin placers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Daud A. F.

    The richest tin placers in Malaysia—fluviatile and piedmont fan placers—formed mainly within the "Boulder Beds" (BB fan facies), "Old Alluvium" (OA alluvial plain facies) and "Transitional Unit" (TU) which are regional lithostratigraphic units that can be correlated throughout western Peninsular Malaysia. Palaeomagnetic studies show that the TU was deposited during the early part of the Brunhes Normal Polarity Epoch (0-0.73 Ma) whereas the OA and BB mainly formed during the Matuyama Reversed Epoch (0.73-2.48 Ma). Present environments are mostly unfavorable for tin placer formation. Economic placers are generally covered on land by Young Alluvium (YA) overburden or are submerged offshore. As many of the rich OA/BB near-source placers are now largely worked out, the transported TU fluvial placers are becoming more important economically. The latest Pliocene to Mid Pleistocene period represented the principal phase of economic tin placer formation. Evidence from palaeomagnetism and the stratigraphic context of placers, and the relationship between sea level change, climatic change and placer genesis, suggest that the bulk of OA placers formed during a Lower Pleistocene interglacial period. A Mid Pleistocene age for TU placers is indicated by vertebrate fossils, palaeomagnetism, and their stratigraphic position below Upper Quaternary YA and above OA which is older than 0.73 Ma.

  9. Theoretical investigations on the hydrolysis pathway of tin verdoheme complexes: elucidation of tin's ring opening inhibition role.

    PubMed

    Davari, Mahdi D; Bahrami, Homayoon; Zahedi, Mansour; Safari, Nasser

    2009-11-01

    In order to obtain a better molecular understanding of inhibitory role of tin metal in the verdoheme ring opening process, hydrolysis of three possibly six, five, and four coordinate verdoheme complexes of tin(IV) and (II) have been studied using DFT method. The results of calculations indicate that, in excellent accord with experimental reports, hydrolysis of different possibly coordinated tin(IV) and (II) verdohemes does not lead to the opening of the macrocycle. Contrary to iron and zinc verdohemes, in five and four coordinate verdoheme complexes of tin(IV) and (II), formation of open ring helical complexes of tin are unfavorable both thermodynamically and kinetically. In these pathways, coordination of hydroxide nucleophile to tin metal due to the highly charged, exclusive oxophilicity nature of the Sn center, and high affinity of Sn to increase coordination state are proposed responsible as inhibiting roles of tin via the ring opening. While, in saturated six coordinate tin(IV) and (II) verdoheme complexes the ring opening of tin verdohemes is possible thermodynamically, but it is not predicted to occur from a kinetics point of view. In the six coordinate pathway, tin plays no coordination role and direct addition of hydroxide nucleophile to the positive oxo-carbon centers and formation of closed ring hydroxy compounds is proposed for preventing the verdoheme ring opening. These key points and findings have been corroborated by the results obtained from atomic charge analysis, geometrical parameters, and molecular orbital calculations. In addition, the results of inhibiting ring opening reaction of tin verdoheme complexes could support the great interest of tin porphyrin analogues as pharmacologic means of chemoprevention of neonatal jaundice by the competitive inhibitory action of tin porphyrins on heme oxygenase.

  10. Electrorheological fluids of polypyrrole-tin oxide nanocomposite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Dae; Yoon, Dae Jeon

    2016-11-01

    The electrorheological (ER) response of polypyrrole(PPy)-tin oxide nanocomposite ER fluids increased with the increase in the tin oxide/pyrrole weight ratio, particle volume fraction, and electric field strength. The dielectric properties and direct current (dc) conductivity of PPy-tin oxide nanocomposite particles and the dielectric properties of PPy-tin oxide nanocomposite ER fluids agreed with the ER behaviors. The ER behavior of PPy-tin oxide nanocomposite ER fluids was well fitted to τ = 0.0248 ϕE 1.5 and showed a transition from that of the polarization model ( τ ˜ E 2) to that of the conduction model ( τ ˜ E 1.5) depending on the tin oxide/pyrrole weight ratio.

  11. Tin recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlin, James F.

    2001-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of tin supply and demand factors for the United States to illustrate the extent of tin recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding the flow of materials from source to ultimate disposition can assist in improving the management of the use of natural resources in a manner that is compatible with sound environmental practices. The quantity of tin recycled in 1998 as a percentage of apparent tin supply was estimated to be about 22%, and recycling efficiency was estimated to be 75%. Of the total tin consumed in products for the U.S. market in 1998, an estimated 12% was consumed in products where the tin was not recyclable (dissipative uses).

  12. Liquid Tin Anode SOFC JP-8 Start-up

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: Sub Contractors (DD882) Inventions (DD882) TECHNICAL REPORT ARMY ARO Liquid Tin Anode SOFC JP-8... REPORT Liquid Tin Anode SOFC JP-8 Start-up 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This program demonstrated the feasibility to use CellTech...2008 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Aug-2008 Liquid Tin Anode SOFC JP-8 Start-up Report Title ABSTRACT This

  13. Preparation of textural lamellar tin deposits via electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaoyu; Pan, Xiaona; Wu, Libin; Li, Ruinan; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Jinqiu; Yang, Peixia

    2017-06-01

    Lamellar tin deposits were prepared by galvanostatical electroplating from the aqueous acidic-sulfate bath, with gelatin and benzalacetone dissolved in ethanol (ABA+EtOH) as additive, and their morphologies were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. Cathodic polarization curves revealed that the absorbability of ABA+EtOH on the cathode surface was higher than that of gelatin. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated preferred orientations of tin growth led to the formation of lamellar structure and distortion of tin lattice. The growth mechanism of lamellar tin was also discussed.

  14. Reductive spectrophotometry of divalent tin sensitization on soda lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejugam, Vinith; Wei, Xingfei; Roper, D. Keith

    2016-07-01

    Rapid and facile evaluation of tin (II) sensitization could lead to improved understanding of metal deposition in electroless (EL) plating. This report used a balanced redox reaction between 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB-HCL) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) to evaluate effects of sensitization conditions (i.e., sensitization time, analyte concentration, aqueous immersion, and acid content) on the accumulated mass of surface-associated divalent tin ion. The accumulated mass of tin (II) increased as the sensitization time increased up to 30 s in proportion to aqueous tin (II) chloride concentrations between 2.6 and 26 mM at a trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) content of 68 mM. The average mass peaked at 7.3 nanomoles (nmol) per cm2 after a 5 s aqueous immersion post-sensitization, and then decreased with increasing aqueous immersion post-sensitization. The total average tin (II) + tin (IV) accumulated on soda lime glass measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) was 17% higher at 30 s sensitization, suggesting a fraction of the tin (II) present may have oxidized to tin (IV). These results indicated that in situ spectrophotometric evaluation of tin (II) could support development of EL plating for electronics, catalysis, and solar cells.

  15. The oxidation of carbon monoxide using tin oxide based catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Christopher F.; Jorgensen, Norman

    1990-01-01

    The preparation conditions for precious metal/tin oxide catalysts were optimized for maximum carbon monoxide/oxygen recombination efficiency. This was achieved by controlling the tin digestion, the peptization to form the sol, the calcination process and the method of adding the precious metals. Extensive studies of the tin oxide structure were carried out over the temperature range 20 to 500 C in air or hydrogen environments using Raman scattering and X ray diffraction. Adsorbed species on tin oxide, generated in an environment containing carbon monoxide, gave rise to a Raman band at about 1600 cm(exp -1) which was assigned to carbonaceous groups, possible carbonate.

  16. Silicon- and tin-based cuprates: now catalytic in copper!

    PubMed

    Weickgenannt, Andreas; Oestreich, Martin

    2010-01-11

    Silicon- and tin-containing molecules are versatile building blocks in organic synthesis. A stalwart method for their preparation relies on the stoichiometric use of silicon- and tin-based cuprates, although a few copper(I)-catalyzed or even copper-free protocols have been known for decades. In this Concept, we describe our efforts towards copper(I)-catalyzed carbon--silicon and also carbon--tin bond formations using soft bis(triorganosilyl) and bis(triorganostannyl) zinc reagents as powerful sources of nucleophilic silicon and tin. Conjugate addition, allylic substitution, and carbon--carbon multiple bond functionalization is now catalytic in copper!

  17. 9. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, Tin Metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, Tin Metal area of building, looking S. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  18. Placer tin deposits in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Robert Mills; Coats, Robert Roy; Payne, Thomas G.

    1963-01-01

    Placer tin, in the form of cassiterite (Sn02) and (or) tinstone (fragments including cassiterite and some vein or rock material), is known or reported in deposits that have been prospected or mined for placer gold in four areas adjacent to the Yukon River in central Alaska, 120 to 240 miles west of Fairbanks. These areas are: the Morelock Creek area, on the north side of the Yukon River about 30 miles upstream from Tanana; the Moran Dome area, about 16 miles north of the Yukon River and 25 miles northwest of Tanana; the Mason Creek area, on the north side of the Yukon River about 36 miles west of Tanana; and the Ruby-Long area, on the south side of the Yukon River near Ruby and about 40 miles east of Galena. The only extensive placer mining in these areas has been in the Ruby-Long area. Other placer deposits including some cassiterite are known in central Alaska but are not discussed in this report. Bedrock in these areas is predominantly schist of various types with some associated greenstone and other metamorphic rocks. Some granite is exposed in the Moran Dome and Ruby-Long areas and in areas close to Morelock and Mason Creeks. Barren, milky quartz veins and veinlets transecting the metamorphic rocks are common. No cassiterite was found in the bedrock, and no bedrock source of the tin has been reported. In the Moran Dome and Mason Creek areas, and in part of the Ruby-Long area, tourmaline is present in the rocks of the tin-bearing drainage basins, and apparently absent elsewhere in these areas. The placer deposits are in both valley floor and bench alluvium, which are predominantly relatively thin, rarely exceeding a thickness of 30 feet. Most of the alluvium deposits are not perennially frozen. In the Morelock Creek area tin-bearing deposits are 5 to 5? miles above the mouth of the creek, and meager evidence indicates that cassiterite and gold are present in Morelock Creek valley and some of the tributaries both upstream and downstream from these deposits. The

  19. The Phuket, Phangnga and Takua Pa tin-field, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakapadungrat, Somchai; Maneenai, Decha

    This paper presents the geology of the granites and their associated SnTa mineralization of the Phuket, Phangnga and Takua Pa tin-field, southern Thailand. The tin-field was producing more than half of all tin mined in Thailand. During 1961 to 1990, more than 400,000 long tons of tin concentrates were produced from this district. Much of the tin is recovered from alluvium (on-shore and off-shore) by dredging and gravel pump methods. A significant amount of tin is also mined from primary deposits, ilmenite, monazite, columbite-tantalite, zircon and wolframite are the chief by-product minerals of the tin mining operation. Tin deposits are associated closely with the granites that were recognized as the Western Tin Province of the Southeast Asian tin belt. The granites have been classified into ten units on the basis of their lithology and mineralogy. Except for the Khao Prathiu granite that has I-type affinity, the other granites have S-type affinities. All granites were emplaced during the Cretaceous, i.e. 78-98 Myr ago. There are three types of tin deposits exposed in the region. The first is the pegmatites which contain minor amounts of cassiterite and associated LiTaNb minerals. The pegmatites are closely related to highly fractionated S-type granites. The second is the argillic dissemination. It is specially associated with highly fractionated S-type granites, i.e. leucocratic granite and the Nok Hook granite. Mineralogically, these granites are characterized by muscovite and tourmaline-muscovite. Endogeneous quartz-cassiterite-wolframite vein swarms are the third significant deposit.

  20. Tool For Tinning Integrated-Circuit Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Gregory N.

    1988-01-01

    As many as eight flatpacks held. Tool made of fiberglass boards. Clamps row of flatpacks by their leads so leads on opposite side of packages dipped. After dipping, nuts on boards loosened, flatpacks turned around, nuts retightened, and untinned leads dipped. Strips of magnetic material grip leads of flatpacks (made of Kovar, magnetic iron/nickel/cobalt alloy) while boards repositioned. Micrometerlike screw used to adjust exposed width of magnetic strip to suit dimensions of flatpacks. Holds flatpack integrated circuits so leads tinned. Accommodates several flatpacks for simultaneous dipping of leads in molten solder. Adjusts to accept flatpacks in range of sizes.

  1. Mocvd of Tin Oxide for Gas Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weglicki, Peter Stanislaw

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Thin films of a wide variety of materials can be produced using an assortment of physical and chemical techniques. Such techniques are reviewed and compared, with particular reference to the deposition of tin oxide films. In the present study, MOCVD (Metal organic chemical vapour deposition) was used to grow thin films of tin oxide from dibutyltin diacetate precursor on a variety of substrates. A series of reactor prototypes were developed in accordance with specific requirements of reproducibility and process control. The evolution of the designs leading to the final working system is detailed. The theory of MOCVD is given with particular reference to the reactor used in this project. The effects of various deposition parameters on tin oxide film growth rates were investigated, and the results are discussed with reference to the deposition kinetics in the system. Films were characterised by optical interferometry, optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering and electrical measurements. The films were generally uniform, conducting and polycrystalline, and were comprised of very small grains, resulting in a high density. A specific application of metal oxide materials is in solid state gas sensors, which are available in various forms and operate according to different mechanisms. These are compared and a detailed account is given on the theory of operation of surface conductivity modulated devices. The application of such devices based on tin oxide in thin film form was investigated in the present work. The prepared sensor samples were comprised of very small grains, resulting in a high density. The observation that preferred (310) orientation occured in thicker films, can be attributed to dendritic growth. The sensors generally showed response to numerous reducing gas ambients, although there was evidence of a degree of selectivity against methane

  2. Multifunctional Indium Tin Oxide Electrode Generated by Unusual Surface Modification

    PubMed Central

    Bouden, Sarra; Dahi, Antoine; Hauquier, Fanny; Randriamahazaka, Hyacinthe; Ghilane, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) material has been widely used in various scientific fields and has been successfully implemented in several devices. Herein, the electrochemical reduction of ITO electrode in an organic electrolytic solution containing alkali metal, NaI, or redox molecule, N-(ferrocenylmethyl) imidazolium iodide, was investigated. The reduced ITO surfaces were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and grazing incident XRD demonstrating the presence of the electrolyte cation inside the material. Reversibility of this process after re-oxidation was evidenced by XPS. Using a redox molecule based ionic liquid as supporting electrolyte leads to fellow electrochemically the intercalation process. As a result, modified ITO containing ferrocenyl imidazolium was easily generated. This reduction process occurs at mild reducing potential around −1.8 V and causes for higher reducing potential a drastic morphological change accompanied with a decrease of the electrode conductivity at the macroscopic scale. Finally, the self-reducing power of the reduced ITO phase was used to initiate the spontaneous reduction of silver ions leading to the growth of Ag nanoparticles. As a result, transparent and multifunctional active ITO surfaces were generated bearing redox active molecules inside the material and Ag nanoparticles onto the surface. PMID:27857192

  3. Multifunctional Indium Tin Oxide Electrode Generated by Unusual Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouden, Sarra; Dahi, Antoine; Hauquier, Fanny; Randriamahazaka, Hyacinthe; Ghilane, Jalal

    2016-11-01

    The indium tin oxide (ITO) material has been widely used in various scientific fields and has been successfully implemented in several devices. Herein, the electrochemical reduction of ITO electrode in an organic electrolytic solution containing alkali metal, NaI, or redox molecule, N-(ferrocenylmethyl) imidazolium iodide, was investigated. The reduced ITO surfaces were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and grazing incident XRD demonstrating the presence of the electrolyte cation inside the material. Reversibility of this process after re-oxidation was evidenced by XPS. Using a redox molecule based ionic liquid as supporting electrolyte leads to fellow electrochemically the intercalation process. As a result, modified ITO containing ferrocenyl imidazolium was easily generated. This reduction process occurs at mild reducing potential around ‑1.8 V and causes for higher reducing potential a drastic morphological change accompanied with a decrease of the electrode conductivity at the macroscopic scale. Finally, the self-reducing power of the reduced ITO phase was used to initiate the spontaneous reduction of silver ions leading to the growth of Ag nanoparticles. As a result, transparent and multifunctional active ITO surfaces were generated bearing redox active molecules inside the material and Ag nanoparticles onto the surface.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V.; Lutz, Victoriya A.; Dontsova, Tatiana A.; Astrelin, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V; Lutz, Victoriya A; Dontsova, Tatiana A; Astrelin, Igor M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated.

  6. Tin mineralization and related geology, Coosa County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, E.L.; Tull, J.F.; Stow, S.H.

    1981-02-01

    The Alabama tin belt was studied to determine the relationship of the tin mineralization to the deformational history and igneous intrusives of the area. Studies included thin section modal analyses, polished section observations, biotite and feldspar mineral separate analyses, whole rock major- and minor-element analyses, quantitative Sn determination in rock and mineral samples, and electron-microprobe mineral analyses. (ACR)

  7. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the <0.5% level at the collector mirror location using the cusp magnetic field alone. Plasma also is rejected using a low argon density (<1x1014cm-3). We have measured the tin ion flow pattern toward the large area annular beam dump. Scaling of the cusp design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  8. Investigation of possibility to fabricate Si3N4-TiN ceramic nanocomposite powder by azide SHS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratieva, L. A.; Kerson, I. A.; Illarionov, A. Yu; Amosov, A. P.; Bichurov, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    The process of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis with use of a powder of sodium azide NaN3 as a nitriding agent (the SHS-Az method) was applied to fabricate a nanocomposite powder Si3N4-TiN. Combustion of the initial mixtures of NaN3 only with precursors that are halides of silicon and titanium: Na2SiF6, (NH4)2SiF6, Na2TiF6, (NH4)2TiF6 did not allow us to synthesize the composite powder of Si3N4-TiN, as the phases of silicon nitride Si3N4 were not formed. After water washing, the ultrafine powdered product of combustion consisted of one target phase of titanium nitride only and a large amount of impurity of side phases. Replacement of the halide salt of one of the elements (Si or Ti) by the powder of this element in the initial mixture of SHS-Az system resulted in formation of silicon nitride together with the titanium nitride and impurities. The least amount of impurities was obtained by burning the initial mixtures of xSi + y(NH4)2TiF6 + zNaN3 system. Only the initial mixture of 9Si + (NH4)2TiF6 + 6NaN3 allowed us to obtain as a result of the SHS-Az process the nanostructured composite powder of Si3N4-TiN without impurities.

  9. Radiolytic preparation of anhydrous tin (2) chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Anhydrous tin (2) chloride (SnCl2) is prepared by radiolysis with high energy electrons of a tin (4) chloride (SnCl4) solution in heptane. The SnCl4 is reduced to insoluble SNCl2. The energy yield, G(SnCl2), molecules of SnCl2, produced per 100 eV, increases with SnCl4 concentration from 1.6 at 0.15 M SnCl4 to 3.1 at 3.0 M SnCl4. Other parameters such as temperature total dose and beam current have little influence on G(SnCl2). The method may be used to prepare other metal halides if the higher valence, more covalent metal halide is soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbons and the lower more ionic metal halide is insoluble. The reaction mechanism is discussed; the radiolysis of both heptane and SnCl4 is involved. At high SnCl4 concentration G(SnCl2) appears to be limited by the yield of SnC13 radicals.

  10. Tin droplets for LPP EUV sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinger, Bob; Bozinova, Luna; Gambino, Nadia; Abhari, Reza S.

    2012-03-01

    The tin droplet generator is a key component of EUV LPP sources. Small tin droplets, when combined with a high power laser, form a regenerative target with high CE. A major challenge associated with today's EUV sources is energy stability, which directly correlates with the stability of the fuel delivery system. The LEC droplet dispenser is now in its 5th generation design, with several years of development, including studies of different nozzle types, excitation mechanisms, thermal management approaches and contamination control systems. The dispenser produces droplets in the frequency range required for both metrology and HVM EUV sources. The two relevant instability modes are drop-to-drop jitter and lateral instabilities. The low frequency content of the lateral droplet displacement is compensated by a newly implemented dispenser positioning system. The drop-to-drop jitter, which is studied over 2000 s, equals 11.2% (3σ) of the mean droplet spacing, which makes individual droplet laser triggering necessary. The lateral instabilities, which are mainly relevant in the plane perpendicular to the laser axis, are determined to be in the range of 7.1% (3σ) of the droplet diameter. The lateral displacements are recorded over 2.2 hrs. The related EUV temporal energy stability (open-loop) is estimated to be 0.35% (3σ) for the worst case scenario, a laser spot size which matches the droplet diameter.

  11. Patterning of Indium Tin Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A relatively rapid, economical process has been devised for patterning a thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) that has been deposited on a polyester film. ITO is a transparent, electrically conductive substance made from a mixture of indium oxide and tin oxide that is commonly used in touch panels, liquid-crystal and plasma display devices, gas sensors, and solar photovoltaic panels. In a typical application, the ITO film must be patterned to form electrodes, current collectors, and the like. Heretofore it has been common practice to pattern an ITO film by means of either a laser ablation process or a photolithography/etching process. The laser ablation process includes the use of expensive equipment to precisely position and focus a laser. The photolithography/etching process is time-consuming. The present process is a variant of the direct toner process an inexpensive but often highly effective process for patterning conductors for printed circuits. Relative to a conventional photolithography/ etching process, this process is simpler, takes less time, and is less expensive. This process involves equipment that costs less than $500 (at 2005 prices) and enables patterning of an ITO film in a process time of less than about a half hour.

  12. [Biological functions of tin and disease].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yasuaki; Tomiyama, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    Tin generates a wide variety of biological functions due to its chemical character. In this article, the modes of the biological functions of tin(especially organotin compounds) are reviewed, with special emphasis on the connection with the immune system, brain nervous system and endocrine system, on the basis of our data. To sum up this article, the biological functions of organotin compounds appear to be due to the following several processes: (1) their incorporation into the cells in vesicle form through fusion or in a similar manner to their incorporation in cationic form; (2) transport to and accumulation in the regions of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not to or in the plasma membrane or nucleus because of their hydrophobicity; (3) inhibition of intracellular phospholipid transport between organelles due to impairment of the structures and functions of the Golgi apparatus and ER; (4) inhibition of the membrane-mediated signal transduction system leading to DNA synthesis via phospholipid turnover and Ca2+ mobilization, as in cell proliferation systems; (5) disturbance of the trace element balance and the localization of certain elements; (6) disorders of membrane-mediated Ca2+ homeostasis via various channel functions including Zn modulation on the plasma and organelle membranes, and protein phosphorylation, as in the signal transduction systems of memory and olfaction; (7) necrosis or apoptosis in vivo or toxic cell death in vitro.

  13. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support the liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  14. Additive effects on tin electrodepositing in acid sulfate electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fa-xin; Shen, Xiao-ni; Ren, Feng-zhang; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2013-05-01

    The effects of additives on the stannous reduction of an acid sulfate bath were investigated using cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and microstructure analysis. In the absence of additives, tin coatings are rough, and the tin electrodepositing is a single-step reduction process accompanied by hydrogen gas evolution. The addition of tartaric acid produces a slight reduction in the peak current of stannous reduction and has an appreciably positive effect on the stability of the acidic tin bath. Both benzylidene acetone and polyoxyethylene octylphenol ether hinder the stannous reduction and greatly suppress the hydrogen gas evolution. Formaldehyde slightly decreases the peak current density of stannous reduction and serves as an auxiliary brightener in the acid sulfate bath. The presence of mixed additives greatly suppresses the stannous reduction and hydrogen gas evolution and consequently produces a significantly smoother and denser tin coating. The (112) crystal face is found to be the dominant and preferred orientation of tin deposits.

  15. Amorphous tin-cadmium oxide films and the production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaonan; Gessert, Timothy A

    2013-10-29

    A tin-cadmium oxide film having an amorphous structure and a ratio of tin atoms to cadmium atoms of between 1:1 and 3:1. The tin-cadmium oxide film may have an optical band gap of between 2.7 eV and 3.35 eV. The film may also have a charge carrier concentration of between 1.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3 and 2.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3. The tin cadmium oxide film may also exhibit a Hall mobility of between 40 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1 and 60 cm.sup.2V.sup.-1 s.sup.-1. Also disclosed is a method of producing an amorphous tin-cadmium oxide film as described and devices using same.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide and zinc tin oxide using tetraethyltin and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Ellis J.; Gladfelter, Wayne L.; Johnson, Forrest; Campbell, Stephen A.

    2015-03-15

    Silicon or glass substrates exposed to sequential pulses of tetraethyltin (TET) and ozone (O{sub 3}) were coated with thin films of SnO{sub 2}. Self-limiting deposition was found using 8 s pulse times, and a uniform thickness per cycle (TPC) of 0.2 nm/cycle was observed in a small, yet reproducible, temperature window from 290 to 320 °C. The as-deposited, stoichiometric SnO{sub 2} films were amorphous and transparent above 400 nm. Interspersing pulses of diethylzinc and O{sub 3} among the TET:O{sub 3} pulses resulted in deposition of zinc tin oxide films, where the fraction of tin, defined as [at. % Sn/(at. % Sn + at. % Zn)], was controlled by the ratio of TET pulses, specifically n{sub TET}:(n{sub TET} + n{sub DEZ}) where n{sub TET} and n{sub DEZ} are the number of precursor/O{sub 3} subcycles within each atomic layer deposition (ALD) supercycle. Based on film thickness and composition measurements, the TET pulse time required to reach saturation in the TPC of SnO{sub 2} on ZnO surfaces was increased to >30 s. Under these conditions, film stoichiometry as a function of the TET pulse ratio was consistent with the model devised by Elliott and Nilsen. The as-deposited zinc tin oxide (ZTO) films were amorphous and remained so even after annealing at 450 °C in air for 1 h. The optical bandgap of the transparent ZTO films increased as the tin concentration increased. Hall measurements established that the n-type ZTO carrier concentration was 3 × 10{sup 17} and 4 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} for fractional tin concentrations of 0.28 and 0.63, respectively. The carrier mobility decreased as the concentration of tin increased. A broken gap pn junction was fabricated using ALD-deposited ZTO and a sputtered layer of cuprous oxide. The junction demonstrated ohmic behavior and low resistance consistent with similar junctions prepared using sputter-deposited ZTO.

  17. Investigation of the characteristics and corrosion resistance of Al 2O 3/TiN coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noli, F.; Misaelides, P.; Hatzidimitriou, A.; Pavlidou, E.; Pogrebnjak, A. D.

    2006-09-01

    Al 2O 3 /TiN double and Al 2O 3/Cr/TiN triple coatings were produced on stainless steel substrates using plasma-detonation techniques. Investigation of the microstructure and characteristics of the coatings after the preparation was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied in several electrolytic solutions (0.5 M H 2SO 4, 1 M HCl, 0.75 M NaCl) using electrochemical techniques (open circuit potential, cyclovoltammetry and potentiodynamic polarization). The obtained results showed, in most of the cases, an improvement of the corrosion resistance, except in NaCl solutions. The effect of the controlled thickness of TiN and Cr layers as well as the additional treatment with a high-current electron beam was also investigated. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied for the characterization of the samples before and after the corrosion experiments.

  18. The tin zone: sediment-hosted hydrothermal tin mineralization at Rooiberg, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozendaal, A.; Misiewicz, J. E.; Scheepers, R.

    1995-04-01

    The Rooiberg tin field, also known as the Rooiberg Fragment, is located within the western lobe of the Bushveld Complex. The fragment is triangular-shaped, consists of early Proterozoic Transvaal Sequence volcano-sedimentary rocks, and is surrounded by granitoid intrusives of the Lebowa Granite Suite. Practically all the significant tin deposits are hosted by arkoses, located towards the transition with shaly arkoses at the stratigraphic top of the Boschoffsberg Quartzite Member. This stratabound distribution of individual deposits gave rise to the concept of a regionally developed continuous stanniferous zone. On regional scale, the individual deposits are broadly similar and are collectively classified as replacement and open space-filling type. Particular styles of mineralization such as tourmaline pockets/orbicules, disseminated cassiterite, steep and flat dipping sulphidic fractures and hydrothermal carbonate breccias appear to dominate each mine. Petrological and geochemical investigations of four mineralized centres, indicated the presence of a 500 600 m thick stratified zone of pervasively altered clastic sedimentary rocks of possible arkosic precursor composition. Alteration displays a distinct zonal distribution consisting of a grey-green sodic (albitized) foot wall, an approximately 80 m transitional sericitized-tourmalinized sulphidic tin zone and red hematitic potassic hanging wall. The observed zonal pattern and localization of economically significant cassiterite, is explained by the evolutionary path of magmatic stanniferous hydrothermal fluids genetically related to the surrounding acid phase of the Bushveld Complex. Areas of high fracture density, the tectonic focal points, acted as conduits for the ascending reactive fluids. Factors such as fluid-lithostatic pressure equilibration, limited fracture evolution and/or impermeable shaly arkose retarded this ascent. As a result accumulation, lateral spreading of fluid and pervasive alteration occurred

  19. Characterization of Sodium Ion Electrochemical Reaction with Tin Anodes: Experiment and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Meisner, Roberta A; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Unocic, Raymond R; Bridges, Craig A; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; Veith, Gabriel M

    2013-01-01

    Tin anodes show a rich structure and reaction chemistry which we have investigated in detail. Upon discharge five plateaus are observed corresponding to -Sn, an unidentified phase (Na/Sn = 0.6), an amorphous phase (Na/Sn = 1.2), a hexagonal R-3m Na5Sn2, and fully sodiated Na15Sn 4. With charging there are six plateaus, which are related to the formation of Na5Sn2 followed by the formation of amorphous phases and -Sn. Upon cycling the formation of metastable Na5Sn2 seems to be suppressed, leading to a single charge plateau at 0.2 V. Theoretical voltages calculated from existing crystal structures using DFT provide a good match with constant current measurements, however, the voltage is more negative compared to quasi-equilibrium measurements (GITT). Search for additional (meta)stable phases using cluster-expansion method predicts many phases lower in energy than the convex hull, including the R-3m Na5Sn2 phase characterized experimentally. The presence of multiple phases in varying lattices with very similar formation energy suggests why the reaction mechanism is non-reversible. Interpretation of M ssbauer spectroscopy data is not yet elucidated due to the very low recoil-free fraction of the materials. The electrode surface is terminated with a SEI layer rich in carbonates such as Na2CO3 and Na alkyl carbonates as evidenced by XPS. After a full charge at 2V, strong evidence for the formation of oxidized Sn4+ is obtained. Subjecting the electrode to a rest after a full charge at 2 V reveals that aging in the electrolyte reduces the oxidized Sn4+ into Sn2+ and Sn0, and concomitantly suppresses the electrolyte decomposition represented by an anomalous discharge plateau at 1.2 V. Thereby, the catalytic decomposition of the electrolyte during discharge is caused by nanosized Sn particles covered by oxidized Sn4+ and not by pure metallic Sn.

  20. (n,{gamma}) Experiments on tin isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Walker, C. L.; Rusev, G.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Dashdorj, D.; Erdenehuluun, B.; Tsend-Ayush, T.

    2013-04-19

    Neutron capture experiments on highly enriched {sup 117,119}Sn isotopes were performed with the DANCE detector array located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The DANCE detector provides detailed information about the multi-step {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture. Analysis of the experimental data provides important information to improve understanding of the neutron capture reaction, including a test of the statistical model, the assignment of spins and parities of neutron resonances, and information concerning the Photon Strength Function (PSF) and Level Density (LD) below the neutron separation energy. Preliminary results for the (n,{gamma}) reaction on {sup 117,119}Sn are presented. Resonance spins of the odd-A tin isotopes were almost completely unknown. Resonance spins and parities have been assigned via analysis of the multi-step {gamma}-ray spectra and directional correlations.

  1. 40 CFR 421.290 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary tin subcategory. 421.290 Section 421.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tin Subcategory § 421.290 Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the production of tin at secondary...

  2. 40 CFR 421.290 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary tin subcategory. 421.290 Section 421.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tin Subcategory § 421.290 Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the production of tin at secondary...

  3. 40 CFR 421.290 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary tin subcategory. 421.290 Section 421.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tin Subcategory § 421.290 Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the production of tin at secondary...

  4. 40 CFR 421.290 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tin subcategory. 421.290 Section 421.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tin Subcategory § 421.290 Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the production of tin at secondary...

  5. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  6. 40 CFR 421.290 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary tin subcategory. 421.290 Section 421.290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tin Subcategory § 421.290 Applicability: Description of the secondary tin subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the production of tin at secondary...

  7. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  8. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  9. PROCESS OF PRODUCING A NIOBIUM-TIN COMPOUND

    DOEpatents

    Zegler, S.T.; Darby, J.B. Jr.

    1963-04-01

    This patent deals with a process of preparing pure Nb/sub 3/Sn. The process comprises heating powders of niobium and excess tin to 900 to 1000 deg C, whereby niobium reacts with the molten tin under the formation of Nb/sub 3/Sn; cooling and powdering the product and immersing the powder in concentrated hydrochloric acid for removal of excessive tin; separating the Nb/sub 3/Sn, rinsing and drying it and sintering it in an inert atmosphere at 900 to 1300 deg C. (AEC)

  10. Porcelain enamelled absorbers, coated by spectral selective tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, F.; Faber, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, C.J.

    1987-02-01

    The use of porcelain enamelled absorbers in flat plate collectors features longevity thanks to the durability and thermal stability of the enamel finish. The porcelain enamel can be made spectral selective by coating with doped tin oxide or indium oxide. The application procedure involves an enamelling step followed by a pyrosol process with tin or indium compounds. The optical properties of tin oxide coated enamel yield values of 0.90-0.92 absorptance and 0.13-0.18 hemispherical emittance. The temperature dependence of the emittance is very small. The thermal stability has been proved up to 400/sup 0/C in air.

  11. Other Oxides Pre-removed from Bangka Tin Slag to Produce a High Grade Tantalum and Niobium Oxides Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, S.; Soedarsono, J. W.; Rustandi, A.; Maksum, A.

    2016-05-01

    Indonesia, as the second largest tin producer in the world, has a byproduct from the production of tin. This byproduct is in the forms of tin slag containing tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) and niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5). This study focuses on the recovery of tantalum pentoxide and niobium pentoxide from the tin slag. In the process, one part of the tin slag sample was sieved only (BTS), and the other was roasted at 900°C, water quenched and then sieved (BTS-RQS). Samples BTS and BTS-RQS were characterized by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray flourence (XRF). One part of BTS-RQS sample was dissolved in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and the other was dissolved in hydrochloric acid (HCl), washed with distilled water, then dissolved into sodium hydroxide (NaOH). Each sample was characterized by using XRF. The BTS sample produced the highest recovery of 0.3807 and 0.6978% for Ta2O5 and Nb2O5, respectively, from the particle size of -1.00+0.71 and a fraction of 47.29%, while BTS-RQS produced the highest recovery of 0.3931 and 0.8994% for Ta2O5 and Nb2O5, respectively, on the particle size of -0.71+0350 and a fraction of 21%. BTS-RQS, dissolved with 8% hydro fluoride acid, yields tantalum pentoxide and niobium pentoxide with a ratio of 2.01 and 2.09, respectively. For the sample BTS-RQS dissolve first with 6M hydrochloric acid, washed with distilled water, then dissolved with sodium hydroxide 10M, the yield ratios are 1.60 and 1.84 for tantalum pentoxide and niobium pentoxide, respectively. In this study, it is found that the dissolution by using hydrofluoric acid 8% yields the best ratio.

  12. Tin-graphite materials prepared by reduction of SnCl 4 in organic medium: Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical lithiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, L.; Schneider, R.; Willmann, P.; Billaud, D.

    Tin-graphite materials were prepared by chemical reduction of SnCl 4 by t-BuONa-activated NaH. TEM imaging showed that the crude material is composed of an amorphous organic matrix containing tin present either as nanosized particles deposited on the graphite surface or as free aggregates. Subsequent washings with ethanol and water allow removal of side products as well as most part of the organic matrix. Electrochemical insertion of lithium occurred in graphite and in tin. The initial reversible massic capacity of 630 mAh g -1 decayed to a stable value of 415 mAh g -1 after 12 cycles. This capacity value was lower than the expected maximum one of 650 mAh g -1 corresponding to a Sn/12C molar composition and assuming the formation of LiC 6 and Li 22Sn 5. Even if this massic capacity is not much improved by comparison with that of graphite, it must be pointed out that the volume capacity of this graphite/Sn material is much larger (2137 mAh cm -3) than that corresponding to graphite (837 mAh cm -3). It was hypothesized that the part of tin bound to graphite could be responsible for the stable reversible capacity. To the contrary, graphite unsupported tin aggregates would contribute to the observed gradual decline in the storage capacity. Therefore, the improvement in cycleability, compared to that of massive metals, could be attributed both to the nanoscale dimension of the metal particles and to interactions between graphite and metal the nature of which remaining to be precised.

  13. Diffusion Coefficient of Tin(II) Methanesulfonate in Ionic Liquid and Methane Sulfonic Acid (MSA) Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kok Kee; Mahmoudian, M. R.; Ebadi, Mehdi; Koay, Hun Lee; Basirun, Wan Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    Voltammetry and chronoamperometry for the electrodeposition of tin from Tin(II) methane sulfonate mixed with ionic liquid and methane sulfonate acid at room temperature was studied. Cyclic voltammetry shows redox waves of Tin(II), which proves that the electrodeposition of tin from Tin(II) methane sulfonate is a diffusion-controlled process. The diffusion coefficient of Tin(II) ions in the solvent mixture showed good agreement from both voltammetry and chronoamperometry results. The diffusion coefficient of Tin(II) in the mixture was much smaller than in aqueous solution, and it depends on the anion of the ionic liquid.

  14. Determination of inorganic tin in biological samples by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry after silica gel cleanup.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, T; Wada, M; Aoki, S; Matsui, Y

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of inorganic tin in biological samples by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). A sample is extracted with ethyl acetate after addition of HCl and NaCl. The concentrated extract is passed through a silica gel column. The column is washed with ethanol, water, and 0.2N HCl successively, and then inorganic tin is eluted with 2N HCl and measured by HG-AAS. Recoveries from fish muscle spiked with 0.1 micrograms/g Sn4+ are 78.9 +/- 4.2% (average +/- standard deviation, n = 5). The detection limit is 0.01 micrograms/g as Sn.

  15. Process for making a noble metal on tin oxide catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quantity of reagent grade tin metal or compound, chloride-free, and high-surface-area silica spheres are placed in deionized water, followed by deaerating the mixture by boiling and adding an oxidizing agent, such as nitric acid. The nitric acid oxidizes the tin to metastannic acid which coats the spheres because the acid is absorbed on the substrate. The metastannic acid becomes tin oxide upon drying and calcining. The tin-oxide coated silica spheres are then placed in water and boiled. A chloride-free precious metal compound in aqueous solution is then added to the mixture containing the spheres, and the precious metal compound is reduced to a precious metal by use of a suitable reducing agent such as formic acid. Very beneficial results were obtained using the precious metal compound tetraammine platinum(II) hydroxide.

  16. Method of manufacturing tin-doped indium oxide nanofibers

    DOEpatents

    Ozcan, Soydan; Naskar, Amit K

    2017-06-06

    A method of making indium tin oxide nanofibers includes the step of mixing indium and tin precursor compounds with a binder polymer to form a nanofiber precursor composition. The nanofiber precursor composition is co-formed with a supporting polymer to form a composite nanofiber having a precursor composition nanofiber completely surrounded by the supporting polymer composition. The supporting polymer composition is removed from the composite nanofiber to expose the precursor composition nanofiber. The precursor composition nanofiber is then heated in the presence of oxygen such as O.sub.2 to form indium tin oxide and to remove the binder polymer to form an indium tin oxide nanofiber. A method of making metal oxide nanofibers is also disclosed.

  17. Tin-silver-bismuth solders for electronics assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1995-08-08

    A lead-free solder alloy is disclosed for electronic assemblies composed of a eutectic alloy of tin and silver with a bismuth addition, x, of 0tin effective to depress the melting point of the tin-silver composition to a desired level. Melting point ranges from about 218 C down to about 205 C depending an the amount of bismuth added to the eutectic tin-silver alloy as determined by DSC analysis, 10 C/min. A preferred alloy composition is 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi (weight percent based on total alloy weight). 4 figs.

  18. Tin-silver-bismuth solders for electronics assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, Paul T.; Rejent, Jerome A.

    1995-01-01

    A lead-free solder alloy for electronic assemblies composed of a eutectic alloy of tin and silver with a bismuth addition, x, of 0tin effective to depress the melting point of the tin-silver composition to a desired level. Melting point ranges from about 218.degree. C. down to about 205.degree. C. depending an the amount of bismuth added to the eutectic tin-silver alloy as determined by DSC analysis, 10.degree. C./min. A preferred alloy composition is 91.84Sn-3.33Ag-4.83Bi (weight percent based on total alloy weight).

  19. 2ND FLOOR HALLWAY LOOKING EAST, NOTE PRESSED TIN CEILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2ND FLOOR HALLWAY LOOKING EAST, NOTE PRESSED TIN CEILING - New York State Soldiers & Sailors Home, Building No. 29, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 76 Veterans Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  20. Diffuse scattering in metallic tin polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Wehinger, Björn; Bosak, Alexeï; Piccolboni, Giuseppe; Refson, Keith; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Alexandre; Rumiantsev, Alexander; Krisch, Michael

    2014-03-19

    The lattice dynamics of the metallic tin β and γ polymorphs has been studied by a combination of diffuse scattering, inelastic x-ray scattering and density functional perturbation theory. The non-symmorphic space group of the β-tin structure results in unusual asymmetry of thermal diffuse scattering. Strong resemblance of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in β and γ-tin were observed, reflecting the structural relationship between the two phases and revealing the qualitative similarity of the underlying electronic potential. The strong influence of the electron subsystem on inter-ionic interactions creates anomalies in the phonon dispersion relations. All observed features are described in great detail by the density functional perturbation theory for both β- and γ-tin at arbitrary momentum transfers. The combined approach delivers thus a complete picture of the lattice dynamics in harmonic description.

  1. 13. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, tin metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Building 105, Facilities Engineering Building, 1830, interior, tin metal shop area, showing construction of window and part of ceiling, E wall of building. - Watervliet Arsenal, Building 105, South Broadway, on Hudson River, Watervliet, Albany County, NY

  2. 11. Interior view, second floor, tin shop area looking southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Interior view, second floor, tin shop area looking southwest, showing laminated plank arched roof trusses. - Larrabee & Hingston Company, Main Shop Building, 19 Howley Street, Peabody, Essex County, MA

  3. 43. HANDOPERATED OTIS ELEVATOR, PARTS, AND TIN WORKING AREA (L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. HAND-OPERATED OTIS ELEVATOR, PARTS, AND TIN WORKING AREA (L TO R)-LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - W. A. Young & Sons Foundry & Machine Shop, On Water Street along Monongahela River, Rices Landing, Greene County, PA

  4. Further Observations on Tin Pest Formation in Solder Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumbridge, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    The most recent observations of the response of bulk samples of several commercial solder alloys, exposed to temperatures below the allotropic transition for tin (13°C) for extended periods, are reported. Damage associated with tin pest development has been arbitrarily graded into six levels, and the formation of visible α-phase warts used for comparative purposes. Since the previous examination, some 2 years ago, tin pest has been observed for the first time in the traditional Sn-37Pb solder alloy after exposure at -18°C and -40°C, and actual warts were apparent in as-cast Sn-0.5Cu stored at -40°C and in as-cast Sn-3.5Ag after exposure at -18°C. No tin pest was detected in Sn-Zn-3Bi after exposure for periods up to 6 years. Tin pest continued to develop in those lead-free alloys in which it had previously been observed, indicating the probability that all would eventually disintegrate in time. In general, prior thermal or mechanical treatment accentuated tin pest formation. The influence of exposure temperature was unclear, since some alloys (Sn-0.5Cu and Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu) experienced more damage at -18°C, but others (Sn-37Pb and Sn-3.5Ag) were more susceptible at -40°C. From a consideration of the findings and other published information, it is contended that impurity levels below 0.1 mass% (1000 ppm) play a vital role in determining whether tin pest develops in realistic timescales. A major factor in the absence of tin pest, to date, on actual joints may be simply the mismatch between the timescales experienced in service and those in long-duration laboratory tests.

  5. Traycans: Tinplate vs. Tin-Free Steel. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    AD-A236 686 TECHNICAL REPORT NATICK/ TR-91 / 030 AD TRAYCANS: TINPLATE VS TIN-FREE STEEL PHASE I By Jeanne M. Ross DTICELECTE May 1991 NO5 SEU B D...inspected both internally and externally for aberrations after predetermined periods of storage. Test results slxwed that tinplate did proivide improved...extended by converting the current traycan from tin-free steel to tinplated steel. To acoamplish this, an optimal traycan had to be developed composed of

  6. Stille couplings catalytic in tin: a "Sn-F" approach.

    PubMed

    Maleczka, R E; Gallagher, W P

    2001-12-27

    A new tin recycling method for Stille couplings catalytic in tin is reported. PMHS made hypercoordinate by KF((aq)) allows Me(3)SnH to be efficiently recycled during a Pd(0)-catalyzed hydrostannation/Stille cascade. Relative to previously disclosed protocols, reaction times are shorter and because this process is believed to proceed through a Me(3)SnF intermediate the hazards and problems associated with trimethyltins are also diminished.[reaction: see text

  7. Recent Observations on Tin Pest Formation in Solder Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumbridge, W. J.

    2008-02-01

    The most recent observations of the response of bulk samples of several lead-free solder alloys, exposed to temperatures below the allotropic transition for tin for extended periods, are reported. Tin pest has been observed in Sn-0.5Cu, Sn-3.5Ag, Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu, and Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu alloys at both -18°C and -40°C. The process is slow and inconsistent, usually requiring several years, but may eventually result in complete disintegration of the sample. No tin pest was detected in Sn-Zn-3Bi or in the traditional Sn-37Pb solder alloy after exposure for up to 4 and 10 years, respectively. It is suggested that nucleation is affected by local composition and that extremely small amounts of either intentional solute or impurity are influential. Growth of tin pest is accompanied by a large volume change, and it is likely that stress relaxation ahead of the expanding grey tin front is a controlling factor. A stronger matrix would be more resistant in this case, and at the temperatures of exposure Sn-37Pb is stronger than either Sn-3.5Ag or Sn-0.5Cu. The absence of tin pest, to date, on actual joints is attributed to their restricted free surface area and the greater strength associated with very small samples.

  8. Nature of active tin species and promoting effect of nickle in silica supported tin oxide for dehydrogenation of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoren; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiuyi; Li, Chunyi

    2017-06-01

    Different with Wang et. al.'s study, we found that polymeric Si-O-Sn2+ rather than Ni-Sn alloy and metallic Sn are active species in silica-supported tin oxide catalysts for dehydrogenation of propane. The results showed that high surface area of mesoporous silica brought about high dispersion of tin oxide species, as a result, catalytic activity and stability were both improved. DRUV-vis, XPS, TPR and XRD studies of fresh and reduced catalysts indicated that the deactivation was related to the reduction of active species rather than the coke formation since active tin species cannot maintain its oxidation state at reaction conditions (high temperature and reducing atmosphere). The formed Ni3Sn2 alloy after reduction just functioned as promoter which accelerated the desorption of H2 and regeneration of active site. A synergy effect between active tin species and Ni3Sn2 alloy were observed.

  9. In situ observation of oxidation of liquid droplets of tin and melting behavior of a tin particle covered with a tin oxide layer.

    PubMed

    Mima, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Hironori; Arai, Shigeo; Kishita, Keisuke; Kuroda, Kotaro; Saka, Hiroyasu

    2009-03-01

    Oxidation of a liquid droplet of tin (Sn) was observed using an in situ specimen heating holder in an oxygen environment. The surface of the Sn liquid droplet was covered with a tin oxide layer, Sn(3)O(4), the thickness of which depended on the oxygen pressure and temperature. Subsequent cooling of the droplet resulted in the formation of a solid Sn particle covered with a Sn(3)O(4) layer. The solid Sn particle was then heated above the melting temperature of Sn, and the melting behavior of Sn was observed.

  10. The toxicology of indium tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Bomhard, Ernst M

    2016-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a technologically important semiconductor. An increasing number of cases of severe lung effects (characterized by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and/or interstitial fibrosis) in ITO-exposed workers warrants a review of the toxicological hazards. Short- and long-term inhalation studies in rats and mice revealed persistent alveolar proteinosis, inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs down to concentrations as low as 0.01mg/m(3). In rats, the incidences of bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas were significantly increased at all concentrations. In mice, ITO was not carcinogenic. A few bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas occurring after repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters have to be interpreted as treatment-related. In vitro and in vivo studies on the formation of reactive oxygen species suggest epigenetic effects as cause of the lung tumor development. Repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters slightly affected the male sexual organs, which might be interpreted as a secondary effect of the lung damage. Epidemiological and medical surveillance studies, serum/blood indium levels in workers as well as data on the exposure to airborne indium concentrations indicate a need for measures to reduce exposure at ITO workplaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA adsorption by indium tin oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-01-01

    The high conductivity and optical transparency of indium tin oxide (ITO) has made it a popular material in the electronic industry. Recently, its application in biosensors is also explored. To understand its biointerface chemistry, we herein investigate its interaction with fluorescently labeled single-stranded oligonucleotides using ITO nanoparticles (NPs). The fluorescence of DNA is efficiently quenched after adsorption, and the interaction between DNA and ITO NPs is strongly dependent on the surface charge of ITO. At low pH, the ITO surface is positively charged to afford a high DNA adsorption capacity. Adsorption is also influenced by the sequence and length of DNA. For its components, In2O3 adsorbs DNA more strongly while SnO2 repels DNA at neutral pH. The DNA adsorption property of ITO is an averaging result from both components. DNA adsorption is confirmed to be mainly by the phosphate backbone via displacement experiments using free phosphate or DNA bases. Last, DNA-induced DNA desorption by forming duplex DNA is demonstrated on ITO, while the same reaction is more difficult to achieve on other metal oxides including CeO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4 because these particles adsorb DNA more tightly.

  12. Tin isotope fractionation in terrestrial cassiterites

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, N.J. ); Rosman, K.J.R. )

    1991-02-01

    The isotopic composition of tin has been measured in a range of cassiterites and pure reagents to assess the extent to which this element is isotopically fractionated in natural processes. Only two samples showed evidence of isotopic fractionation, and it is concluded that natural Sn isotope fractionation is small and uncommon. This feature reflects the world dominance of Sn-oxide ores Sn-sulfide ores, and the highly efficient processes of Sn dissolution and precipitation which negate equilibrium and kinetic fractionation of Sn isotopes, respectively. The two samples which show slight fractionation are a highly purified and cassiterite from the Archaean Greenbushes pegmatite, Western Australia. The latter Sn is 0.15{per thousand} per mass unit heavier than the authors laboratory standard, whereas the former is 0.12{per thousand} per mass unit lighter. Although the cassiterite fractionation is considered to result from natural geological processes, the fractionation of purified Sn may be either natural or relate to the purification process, the fractionation of this magnitude has a negligible effect on the current best estimate of the atomic weight of Sn, but it does place a lower limit on its associated accuracy.

  13. Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A.; Camurri, Carlos G.; Carrasco, Claudia A.; Colas, Rafael

    2012-02-15

    Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

  14. Tinned fruit consumption and mortality in three prospective cohorts.

    PubMed

    Aasheim, Erlend T; Sharp, Stephen J; Appleby, Paul N; Shipley, Martin J; Lentjes, Marleen A H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Brunner, Eric; Key, Tim J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Dietary recommendations to promote health include fresh, frozen and tinned fruit, but few studies have examined the health benefits of tinned fruit. We therefore studied the association between tinned fruit consumption and mortality. We followed up participants from three prospective cohorts in the United Kingdom: 22,421 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort (1993-2012), 52,625 participants from the EPIC-Oxford cohort (1993-2012), and 7440 participants from the Whitehall II cohort (1991-2012), all reporting no history of heart attack, stroke, or cancer when entering these studies. We estimated the association between frequency of tinned fruit consumption and all cause mortality (primary outcome measure) using Cox regression models within each cohort, and pooled hazard ratios across cohorts using random-effects meta-analysis. Tinned fruit consumption was assessed with validated food frequency questionnaires including specific questions about tinned fruit. During 1,305,330 person years of follow-up, 8857 deaths occurred. After adjustment for lifestyle factors and risk markers the pooled hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of all cause mortality compared with the reference group of tinned fruit consumption less often than one serving per month were: 1.05 (0.99, 1.12) for one to three servings per month, 1.10 (1.03, 1.18) for one serving per week, and 1.13 (1.04, 1.23) for two or more servings per week. Analysis of cause-specific mortality showed that tinned fruit consumption was associated with mortality from cardiovascular causes and from non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes. In a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts from the United Kingdom self-reported tinned fruit consumption in the 1990s was weakly but positively associated with mortality during long-term follow-up. These findings raise questions about the evidence underlying dietary recommendations to promote tinned fruit consumption

  15. Tinned Fruit Consumption and Mortality in Three Prospective Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Aasheim, Erlend T.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Appleby, Paul N.; Shipley, Martin J.; Lentjes, Marleen A. H.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Brunner, Eric; Key, Tim J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary recommendations to promote health include fresh, frozen and tinned fruit, but few studies have examined the health benefits of tinned fruit. We therefore studied the association between tinned fruit consumption and mortality. We followed up participants from three prospective cohorts in the United Kingdom: 22,421 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort (1993–2012), 52,625 participants from the EPIC-Oxford cohort (1993–2012), and 7440 participants from the Whitehall II cohort (1991–2012), all reporting no history of heart attack, stroke, or cancer when entering these studies. We estimated the association between frequency of tinned fruit consumption and all cause mortality (primary outcome measure) using Cox regression models within each cohort, and pooled hazard ratios across cohorts using random-effects meta-analysis. Tinned fruit consumption was assessed with validated food frequency questionnaires including specific questions about tinned fruit. During 1,305,330 person years of follow-up, 8857 deaths occurred. After adjustment for lifestyle factors and risk markers the pooled hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of all cause mortality compared with the reference group of tinned fruit consumption less often than one serving per month were: 1.05 (0.99, 1.12) for one to three servings per month, 1.10 (1.03, 1.18) for one serving per week, and 1.13 (1.04, 1.23) for two or more servings per week. Analysis of cause-specific mortality showed that tinned fruit consumption was associated with mortality from cardiovascular causes and from non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes. In a pooled analysis of three prospective cohorts from the United Kingdom self-reported tinned fruit consumption in the 1990s was weakly but positively associated with mortality during long-term follow-up. These findings raise questions about the evidence underlying dietary recommendations to promote tinned fruit

  16. A Study of Melt Inclusions in Tin-Mineralized Granites From Zinnwald, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sookdeo, C. A.; Webster, J. D.; Eschen, M. L.; Tappen, C. M.

    2001-12-01

    We have analyzed silicate melt inclusions from drill core samples from the eastern Erzgebirge region, Germany, to investigate magmatic-hydrothermal and mineralizing processes in compositionally evolved, tin-bearing granitic magmas. Silicate melt inclusions are small blebs of glass that are trapped or locked within phenocrysts and may contain high concentrations of volatiles that usually leave magma via degassing. Quartz phenocrysts were carefully hand picked from crushed samples of albite-, zinnwaldite- +/- lepidolite-bearing granitic dikes from Zinnwald and soaked in cold dilute HF to remove any attached groundmass. The cleaned phenocrysts were loaded into precious metal capsules with several drops of immersion oil to create a reducing environment at high temperature. The quartz-bearing capsules were inserted into quartz glass tubes, loaded into a furnace for heating at temperatures of 1025\\deg and 1050\\deg C (1atm) for periods of 20 to 30 hours, and subsequently the inclusions were quenched to glass. The inclusions were analyzed for major and minor elements (including F, Cl, and P) by electron microprobe and for H2O, trace elements, and ore elements by ion microprobe. The melt inclusion compositions are similar to that of the whole-rock sample from which the quartz separates were extracted. The average melt inclusion and whole-rock compositions are peraluminous, high in silica and rare alkalis, and low in MgO, CaO, FeO, MnO, and P2O5. Unlike the whole-rock sample, the melt inclusions contain from 0.5 to more than 4 wt.% F. The Cl contents of the inclusions are variable and range from hundreds of ppm to several thousand ppm. The variable and strong enrichments in F of the melt inclusions may correlate with (Na2O/Na2O+K2O) in the inclusions which is consistent with crystal fractionation of feldspars which drives the residual melt to increasing Na contents. Overall, the compositions of these melt inclusions are different from melt inclusions extracted from the

  17. Geochemistry of tin (Sn) in Chinese coals.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qinyuan; Liu, Guijian; Sun, Ruoyu; Kang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Based on 1625 data collected from the published literature, the geochemistry of tin (Sn) in Chinese coals, including the abundance, distribution, modes of occurrence, genetic types and combustion behavior, was discussed to make a better understanding. Our statistic showed the average Sn of Chinese coal was 3.38 mg/kg, almost two times higher than the world. Among all the samples collected, Guangxi coals occupied an extremely high Sn enrichment (10.46 mg/kg), making sharp contrast to Xinjiang coals (0.49 mg/kg). Two modes of occurrence of Sn in Chinese coals were found, including sulfide-bounded Sn and clay-bounded Sn. In some coalfields, such as Liupanshui, Huayingshan and Haerwusu, a response between REEs distribution and Sn content was found which may caused by the transportation of Sn including clay minerals between coal seams. According to the responses reflecting on REEs patterns of each coalfield, several genetic types of Sn in coalfields were discussed. The enrichment of Sn in Guangxi coals probably caused by Sn-rich source rocks and multiple-stage hydrothermal fluids. The enriched Sn in western Guizhou coals was probably caused by volcanic ashes and sulfide-fixing mechanism. The depletion of Sn in Shengli coalfield, Inner Mongolia, may attribute to hardly terrigenous input and fluids erosion. As a relative easily volatilized element, the Sn-containing combustion by-products tended to be absorbed on the fine particles of fly ash. In 2012, the emission flux of Sn by Chinese coal combustion was estimated to be 0.90 × 10(9) g.

  18. Epigenetic lead, zinc, silver, antimony, tin, and gold veins in Boulder Basin, Blaine and Custer counties, Idaho; potential for economic tin mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratchford, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    Boulder Basin is in a northwest-trending belt of allochthonous Paleozoic rocks in the Boulder Mountains of central Idaho. Regional Tertiary extension resulted in widespread normal faulting and coeval emplacement of shallow-level intrusions and extrusive rocks of the Challis Volcanic Group. Epigenetic lead-zinc-silver-antimony-tin-gold vein deposits formed during Tertiary extension and are hosted within Paleozoic strata. The major orebodies are in the lower plate of the Boulder Basin thrust fault, in massive quartzite of the Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Wood River Formation. Anomalous concentrations of tin are present in the base-metal mineral assemblage of the Boulder Basin ore deposits. The tin-bearing veins in Boulder Basin are strikingly similar to Bolivian tin deposits. The deposit model for Bolivian tin deposits identifies buried tin porphyry below the tin-bearing vein system.

  19. Tin Nitride as an Earth Abundant Photoanode for Water Splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caskey, Christopher; Ma, Ming; Stephanovic, Vladan; Laney, Stephan; Ginley, David; Richards, Ryan; Smith, Wilson; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2014-03-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting-the conversion of water to hydrogen and oxygen using light-is an attractive route to the chemical storage of solar energy. We demonstrate that spinel tin nitride (Sn3N4) has conduction and valence bands that straddle the redox potentials of water and we study it as a photoannode material. Sn3N4 thin films have been grown on glass at ambient temperature by reactive sputtering of tin in a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting materials were n-type semiconductors. Carrier concentration, carrier mobility, work function, and optical properties were measured. Results indicate that tin nitride has a band gap of ~ 1.7 eV aligned around water's redox potentials. GW-corrected DFT-surface calculations that take into account water surface dipole interactions are consistent with experiment. Early PEC devices were made from Sn3N4 on fluorinated tin oxide with cobalt oxide catalysts and show a small but promising photoresponse (~ 0.1 mA/cm2 at 1.23 V vs. RHE) under AM 1.5 illumination in 0.1 M potassium phosphate (pH= 7.25). Further work will focus on increasing the photocurrent in tin nitride devices by increasing film quality and identifying the proper catalyst. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), VENI scheme.

  20. Influence of Fretting Wear on Lifetime of Tin Plated Connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hirosaka; Ito, Tetsuya; Sawada, Shigeru; Hattori, Yasuhiro; Saitoh, Yasushi; Tamai, Terutaka; Iida, Kazuo

    Due to the recent increase in electronic devices mounted on automobiles, a large number of connectors, especially low-cost tin plated connectors are being used. As a result, their contact reliability has become problematic. Furthermore, for the connectors which are subjected to fretting wear caused by heat cycle and vibrations, the contact resistance increases because of wear of tin and deposition of oxides, which generates problems of poor contact. This study is intended to analyze the change in contact resistance of tin plated connectors from the start of fretting wear to the end of their lifetime from the viewpoint of practical reliability, and to observe the trace and the characteristics of fretting wear microscopically. This study found that wear and oxidation of tin plated connectors start immediately with fretting wear, and thus accumulation of abrasion powder on fretting areas causes connectors to reach to the end of their useful lifetime quickly. Especially, it was demonstrated that amplitude of fretting has a considerable influence on a connector's lifetime. It is made clear that air-tightness, so-called “gas-tight” of tin in a fretting area influences fretting wear considerably.

  1. Investigation of Surface Phenomena in Shocked Tin in Converging Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Margolin, Len G.; Griego, Jeffrey Randall; Reinovsky, Robert Emil; Turchi, Peter John

    2015-08-06

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface is adjacent to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release.

  2. DEM Based Modeling: Grid or TIN? The Answer Depends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, F. L.; Moreno, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    The availability of petascale supercomputing power has enabled process-based hydrological simulations on large watersheds and two-way coupling with mesoscale atmospheric models. Of course with increasing watershed scale come corresponding increases in watershed complexity, including wide ranging water management infrastructure and objectives, and ever increasing demands for forcing data. Simulations of large watersheds using grid-based models apply a fixed resolution over the entire watershed. In large watersheds, this means an enormous number of grids, or coarsening of the grid resolution to reduce memory requirements. One alternative to grid-based methods is the triangular irregular network (TIN) approach. TINs provide the flexibility of variable resolution, which allows optimization of computational resources by providing high resolution where necessary and low resolution elsewhere. TINs also increase required effort in model setup, parameter estimation, and coupling with forcing data which are often gridded. This presentation discusses the costs and benefits of the use of TINs compared to grid-based methods, in the context of large watershed simulations within the traditional gridded WRF-HYDRO framework and the new TIN-based ADHydro high performance computing watershed simulator.

  3. Investigation of Surface Phenomena in Shocked Tin in Converging Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Griego, Jeffrey Randall; Turchi, Peter John; Reinovsky, Robert Emil; Bradley, Joseph Thomas; Cheng, Baolian; Freeman, Matthew Stouten; Patten, Austin Randall

    2016-03-21

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the Richtmyer- Meshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface is adjacent to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release. A conceptual cylindrical liner and target is shown in Figure 1.

  4. First-principle studies of the optoelectronic properties of ASnF3 (A = Na, K, Rb and Cs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Imad; Shehzad, Nasir; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ali, Zahid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we communicate a new type of Auger-free luminescence (AFL) compounds, alkali tin fluorides ASnF3 (A = Na, K, Rb and Cs). The luminescence in these compounds originates due to the electron transition from the top valence band (VB) of tin-s orbital to the outermost core levels of halogen, i.e., halogen-p orbital (s-p transitions). The AFL of these compounds is expected to be of L-type. Furthermore, the electronic band structures and optical properties such as dielectric functions, refractive index and energy loss function are also investigated using ab initio calculations.

  5. Strategies to Reduce Tin and Other Metals in Electronic Cigarette Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Williams, Monique; To, An; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Talbot, Prue

    2015-01-01

    Metals are present in electronic cigarette (EC) fluid and aerosol and may present health risks to users. The objective of this study was to measure the amounts of tin, copper, zinc, silver, nickel and chromium in the aerosol from four brands of EC and to identify the sources of these metals by examining the elemental composition of the atomizer components. Four brands of popular EC were dissected and the cartomizers were examined microscopically. Elemental composition of cartomizer components was determined using integrated energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and the concentrations of the tin, copper, zinc silver, nickel, and chromium in the aerosol were determined for each brand using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. All filaments were made of nickel and chromium. Thick wires were copper coated with either tin or silver. Wires were joined to each other by tin solder, brazing, or by brass clamps. High concentrations of tin were detected in the aerosol when tin solder joints were friable. Tin coating on copper wires also contributed to tin in the aerosol. Tin concentrations in EC aerosols varied both within and between brands. Tin in aerosol was reduced by coating the thick wire with silver rather than tin, placing stable tin solder joints outside the atomizing chamber, joining wires with brass clamps or by brazing rather than soldering wires. These data demonstrate the feasibility of removing tin and other unwanted metals from EC aerosol by altering designs and using materials of suitable quality.

  6. Strategies to Reduce Tin and Other Metals in Electronic Cigarette Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monique; To, An; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Talbot, Prue

    2015-01-01

    Background Metals are present in electronic cigarette (EC) fluid and aerosol and may present health risks to users. Objective The objective of this study was to measure the amounts of tin, copper, zinc, silver, nickel and chromium in the aerosol from four brands of EC and to identify the sources of these metals by examining the elemental composition of the atomizer components. Methods Four brands of popular EC were dissected and the cartomizers were examined microscopically. Elemental composition of cartomizer components was determined using integrated energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and the concentrations of the tin, copper, zinc silver, nickel, and chromium in the aerosol were determined for each brand using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Results All filaments were made of nickel and chromium. Thick wires were copper coated with either tin or silver. Wires were joined to each other by tin solder, brazing, or by brass clamps. High concentrations of tin were detected in the aerosol when tin solder joints were friable. Tin coating on copper wires also contributed to tin in the aerosol. Conclusions Tin concentrations in EC aerosols varied both within and between brands. Tin in aerosol was reduced by coating the thick wire with silver rather than tin, placing stable tin solder joints outside the atomizing chamber, joining wires with brass clamps or by brazing rather than soldering wires. These data demonstrate the feasibility of removing tin and other unwanted metals from EC aerosol by altering designs and using materials of suitable quality. PMID:26406602

  7. Electrocatalytic oxidation of formaldehyde on nickel ion implanted-modified indium tin oxide electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanan; Su, Wen; Yuan, Mengwei; Fu, Yingyi; Hu, Jingbo

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation on a novel nickel ion implanted-modified indium tin oxide electrode (NiNPs/ITO). The modified electrode exhibits high electrochemical activity with Ni ions at the fluences of 10 × 1016 ions cm-2. The size of nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) is in the range of 15-40 nm determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The electrochemical behaviors of the modified electrode are characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). In alkaline medium (i.e. NaOH 0.1 M), a good redox behavior of Ni(III)/Ni(II) couple at the surface of modified electrodes can be observed. Electrochemical performances are measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometric. The NiNPs/ITO electrode shows prominent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of formaldehyde with long-term stability, which can be a suitable electrode material in formaldehyde fuel cells.

  8. Preparation, Characterization, and Device Applications of Zinc Tin Nitride and Zinc Tin Oxynitride Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shenglin

    This dissertation presents a comprehensively theoretical and experimental study on zinc tin nitride and zinc tin oxynitride materials. The purposes of this combinatorial study are to understand the fundamental properties of these two materials, and to examine the potential of these two materials for future optoelectronic applications. These fundamental properties are crystal structure, surface morphology, chemical composition, band structures, and optical as well as electrical properties. Zinc tin nitride (ZnSnN2) thin films have been synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates and (0001) GaN templates by the reactive radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method. The properties are investigated by theoretical calculations and experimental results. In terms of theoretical calculation, the lattice constants a, b and c are calculated by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. These constants are comparable to our experimental results as well as previous calculations. In the case of experimental results, the impacts of substrate temperatures and the ratios of N2/(N 2+Ar) on films' properties are fully characterized by using various kinds of techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Hall effect measurement, and UV-Vis-NIR spectrometry. By optimizing the growth conditions, ZnSnN2 thin films with an average grain size larger than reported results have been obtained. Additionally, for the first time, the valence band structure of ZnSnN2 has been investigated by XPS analysis. The result is consistent with our calculated density of states (DOS). The vibrational modes of ZnSnN2 are also studied by Raman spectroscopy. The Schottky-behavior diodes with a structure of ZnSnN2/GaN heterojunctions have been successfully fabricated, using the standard fabricating process for semiconductor devices. Standard electrical measurements such as C

  9. Solidification mechanism of highly undercooled metal alloys. [tin-lead and nickel-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Y.; Chu, M. G.; Macisaac, D. G.; Flemings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on metal droplet undercooling, using Sn-25wt%Pb and Ni-34wt%Sn alloys. To achieve the high degree of undercooling, emulsification treatments were employed. Results show the fraction of supersaturated primary phase is a function of the amount of undercooling, as is the fineness of the structures. The solidification behavior of the tin-lead droplets during recalescence was analyzed using three different hypotheses; (1) solid forming throughout recalescence is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; (2) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature, and solid forming thereafter is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; and (3) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature with solid forming thereafter that is of the maximum thermodynamically metastable composition that is possible. The T sub o temperature is calculated from the equal molar free energies of the liquid solid using the regular solution approximation.

  10. Stabilized tin-oxide-based oxidation/reduction catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Gulati, Suresh T. (Inventor); Summers, Jerry C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The invention described herein involves a novel approach to the production of oxidation/reduction catalytic systems. The present invention serves to stabilize the tin oxide reducible metal-oxide coating by co-incorporating at least another metal-oxide species, such as zirconium. In one embodiment, a third metal-oxide species is incorporated, selected from the group consisting of cerium, lanthanum, hafnium, and ruthenium. The incorporation of the additional metal oxide components serves to stabilize the active tin-oxide layer in the catalytic process during high-temperature operation in a reducing environment (e.g., automobile exhaust). Moreover, the additional metal oxides are active components due to their oxygen-retention capabilities. Together, these features provide a mechanism to extend the range of operation of the tin-oxide-based catalyst system for automotive applications, while maintaining the existing advantages.

  11. Tin Whisker Electrical Short Circuit Characteristics Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.; Asfour, Shihab S.; Bayliss, Jon A.; Ludwib, Lawrence L.; Zapata, Maria C.

    2007-01-01

    Existing risk simulations make the assumption that when a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors, the result is an electrical short circuit. This conservative assumption is made because shorting is a random event that has a currently unknown probability associated with it. Due to contact resistance electrical shorts may not occur at lower voltage levels. In this experiment, we study the effect of varying voltage on the breakdown of the contact resistance which leads to a short circuit. From this data we can estimate the probability of an electrical short, as a function of voltage, given that a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors. In addition, three tin whiskers grown from the same Space Shuttle Orbiter card guide used in the aforementioned experiment were cross-sectioned and studied using a focused ion beam (FIB).

  12. Thermal analysis on the realization of the tin fixed point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, S. F.

    2013-09-01

    A study on the thermal analysis of a new tin fixed-point open cell within a new three-zone furnace was carried out. The stability at the setting temperatures of liquid-solid coexisting together with some degree Celsius lower and higher than the tin fixed point; and the axial uniformity of furnace while tin is still in solid phase were investigated and analyzed. The impurities effect on the depression in temperature was investigated in terms of ΔT (Tobserved-T1/F=0) and the inverse of the melted fraction (1/F) relationship during the melting and the following freezing realizations at various temperature settings of furnace. These thermal analysis results were also compared with those estimated by the CCT-WG1 recommended SIE (sum of individual estimates) method, which leads to a temperature correction along with a corresponding uncertainty through the individual impurity content detected by GDMS (glow discharge mass spectrometry).

  13. Tin nanoparticles as an effective conductive additive in silicon anodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, L.; Beaudette, C.; Guo, J.; Bozhilov, K.; Mangolini, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have found that the addition of tin nanoparticles to a silicon-based anode provides dramatic improvements in performance in terms of both charge capacity and cycling stability. Using a simple procedure and off-the-shelf additives and precursors, we developed a structure in which the tin nanoparticles are segregated at the interface between the silicon-containing active layer and the solid electrolyte interface. Even a minor addition of tin, as small as ∼2% by weight, results in a significant decrease in the anode resistance, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This leads to a decrease in charge transfer resistance, which prevents the formation of electrically inactive “dead spots” in the anode structure and enables the effective participation of silicon in the lithiation reaction. PMID:27484849

  14. Synthesis and conductivity of indium-doped tin pyrophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Fernando H; Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized indium-doped tin pyrophosphates as high-temperature anhydrous proton conductors. The ratio of tin to indium was varied using two different synthetic methods. The first is a high-temperature reaction in which a paste containing the reactants in excess phosphoric acid was heated for various amounts of time at various temperatures. The second method is a solution precipitation procedure followed by calcination, which offers several advantages over traditional synthetic techniques. These advantages inc 1 ude better stoichiometric control, lower temperature requirements, and chemically uniform products. Several phosphate sources were investigated, including phosphoric acid, pyrophosphoric acid, and potassium pyrophosphate. The resulting indium-doped tin pyrophosphates had good proton conductivity over a wide temperature range with no humidification.

  15. Recovery of antimony-125 from tin-124 irradiated by neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Krasnikov, L. V.; Galkin, B. Ya.; Besnosyuk, V. I.

    2003-01-01

    Separation of 125Sb from tin using highly basic, medium-basic, and weakly basic ion-exchangers was studied. The best results were obtained for AN-31 weakly basic anion exchanger. The yield of 125Sb was 95-98% of the initial activity, the yield of tin, 98±0.5% of the initial amount. The separation coefficient is 106-107 for one cycle. A procedure based on ion exchange was developed. Extraction procedures of separation of 125Sb from tin were studied. Isoamyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, and di- n-butyl ether were used as extracting agents. The most efficient extracting agent is di- n-butyl ether. Carrier-free radiochemically pure sample of 125Sb was produced. More than 20 mCi of the target product was recovered. The extraction recovery procedure of 125Sb has been developed.

  16. States of antimony and tin atoms in lead chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Nemov, S. A.; Marchenko, A. V.; Zaiceva, A. V.; Kozhokar, M. Yu.; Seregin, P. P.

    2011-04-15

    It is shown by Moessbauer spectroscopy of the {sup 119}Sb({sup 119m}Sn) isotope that impurity antimony atoms in PbS, PbSe, and PbTe lattices are distributed between cation and anion sublattices. In n-type samples, the greatest part of antimony is located in the anion sublattice; in hole ones, in the cation sublattice. The tin atoms formed as a result of radioactive decay of {sup 119}Sb (antisite state) are electrically inactive in the anion sub-lattice of PbS and PbSe, while, in the cation sublattice, they form donor U{sup -} centers. Electron exchange between the neutral and doubly ionized tin U{sup -} centers via the allowed band states is observed. The tin atoms formed after radioactive decay of {sup 119}Sb are electrically inactive in the anion and cation sublattices of PbTe.

  17. Photoelectrochemical salt water splitting using ternary silver-tin-selenide photoelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kong-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Chiu, Ting-Hsuan

    2016-03-01

    Ternary AgSnSe2 and Ag8SnSe6 semiconductor photoelectrodes are prepared on various substrates via the selenization of thermally evaporation of silver-tin metal precursors. The structural, optical and electrical properties of ternary AgSnSe2 and Ag8SnSe6 samples are investigated as a function of the [Ag]/[Ag + Sn] molar ratio in the metal precursors. X-ray diffraction patterns of samples show that the phases of samples change from cubic AgSnSe2 to cubic Ag8SnSe6 phase at a selenization temperature of 410 °C when the molar ratio of [Ag]/[Ag + Sn] in silver-tin metal precursors increase from 0.51 to 0.68. The images obtained from a field-emission scanning electron microscopy show that the surface microstructures of samples change from plate-like microstructures with some pinholes to polygonal microstructures with increasing [Ag]/[Ag + Sn] molar ratios in samples. The energy bang gaps, carrier concentrations and mobilities of the samples are in the ranges of 0.86-1.19 eV, 1.27 × 1011-2.39 × 1012 cm-3 and 238-655 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. The highest photo-enhanced current densities of the samples in aqueous Na2S + K2SO3 and NaCl solutions are 3.34 and 0.61 mA cm-2 at an applied voltage of 0 and + 0.4 V vs. an Ag/AgCl electrode under 100 mW cm-2 light illumination from a Xe lamp source, respectively.

  18. One step internal tin Nb3Sn superconductor fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marancik, W.

    1985-03-01

    The object of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a Nb3Sn superconductor in a single extrusion process with a large number of filaments with internal tin. The technique chosen uses .010' diameter Nb and tin plated Cu wires formed into a solenoid. The solenoid is covered with tin plated copper foil and isostatically compacted to a pressure of 17,000 psi. The solenoid is slit along its length. This results in a ribbon about 40 inches long by about 5 inches wide, with the Nb wires running across the 5 inch width. The ribbon is then rolled up (Jelly Roll) around a 0.5 inch diameter Ta covered copper rod to produce a composite of about 1.5 inches in diameter by 5 inches long. The composite geometry is now a cylindrical bundle of 0.010 inch diameter Nb wire separated from each other by tin plated copper. Each Nb wire is aligned with the axis of cylinder. The cylinder is slid into a Ta lines copper extrusion can which is evacuated and sealed. The can is extruded at a low temperature and drawn to final wire size without intermediate annealing. The advantage of the process is that it is an internal tin process with the tin uniformly distributed through the matrix. The Nb is in a relatively soft state having been fully annealed at 0.020 inch diameter. Only one extrusion is required since the bundling technique allows a large number of wires to be precisely aligned and spaced in the matrix.

  19. X-ray TV study of the penetration of tin into a steel melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A. V.; Panfilov, A. M.; Semenova, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    A technique is developed and an X-ray TV study is performed to investigate the penetration of spherical tin samples into the steel 40Kh melt at a temperature of 1550°C. Cold spherical tin particles 1-2 in weight are found to dissolve in the tin-free steel at an initial rate of 180 ± 50 mol/(m2 s). A sample dissolves fully in less than 2 s. When a sample reaches the steel-gas phase interface, its dissolution rate decreases by many times. Separation with the formation of a two-phase system occurs at 1.6-1.9 mol % tin in steel. The density of the iron-based alloy is lower than that of the tin-based alloy. Pure tin and the saturated solution of iron in tin wet Al2O3-based refractory ceramic better than pure iron or its alloy with tin.

  20. Ovonic type switching in tin selenide thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxter, C. R.; Mclennan, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Amorphous tin selenide thin films which possess Ovonic type switching properties are fabricated using vacuum deposition techniques. The devices are fabricated in a planar configuration and consist of amorphous tin selenide deposited over silver contacts. Results obtained indicate that Ovonic type memory switching does occur in these films with the energy density required for switching from a high impedance to a low impedance state being dependent on the spacing between the electrodes of the device. There is also a strong implication that the switching is a function of the magnitude of the applied voltage pulse.

  1. Cardiac damage secondary to occupational exposure to tin vapor.

    PubMed

    Gunay, Nurullah; Aksoy, Mehmet; Davutoglu, Vedat; Yildirim, Cuma; Ege, Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    Tin is commonly used as a coating on copper kitchen appliances, and "tinsmithing" as a trade is common in many non-Western countries, where cooking utensils are re-tinned when the cooking surface wears thin. Tinsmiths, or "tinkers," are commonly exposed to the following fumes during their work: stannic [tin(IV)] oxide, ammonium chloride, and hydrochloric acid. In this study we assessed workers from tinsmith workshops of our province for signs, symptoms, and laboratory evidence of cardiac end-organ damage. Between June 2002 and March 2003, researchers went to the main tinsmith workshop area of our province to interview tinsmiths in their workplaces and to gather addresses of their "traveling tinker" colleagues, who work with portable equipment. All workers were interviewed and underwent a complete physical examination, blood testing for lipid parameters, and echocardiography. Twenty-six tin workers (mean age 49+/- 10 y) and 25 control patients (convenience sample of hospital employees) were included in the study. Tobacco use, incidence of hypertension, and serum lipid parameters were not significantly different between the two groups (p < .05). The differences in myocardial performance index, systolic function, and mitral flow A velocity were also nonsignificant. However, the mitral inflow E velocity in the tinsmiths was significantly less than in controls (0.71+/- 0.1 vs. 0.95+/- 0.1 m/s, p < .001). The mitral deceleration time was also much longer in the tinsmith group (216+/- 71 ms vs. 143+/- 14 ms, p < .001). Eleven of the tinkers (23%) were found to have aortic valve sclerosis (severe in one, moderate in another, mild in the other nine), but aortic valve sclerosis was found in none of the control subjects. One tinsmith was found to have three-vessel coronary disease on angiogram. Another tinker with "myocarditis" in the past, and slow flow on angiography, had normalization of his cardiac tests after refraining from tin exposure for 6 mo. Thus, occupational

  2. Tin oxide-carbon nanotube composite for NOx sensing.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong Mi; Jung, Hyuck; Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Kim, Dojin; Hong, Soon-Ku; Kim, Hyojin

    2012-02-01

    Tin oxide-single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nano composites are synthesized for gas sensor application. The fabrication includes deposition of porous SWCNTs on thermally oxidized SiO2 substrates followed by rheotaxial growth of Sn and thermal oxidation at 300, 400, 500, and 600 degrees C in air. The effects of oxidation temperature on morphology, microstructure, and gas sensing properties are investigated for process optimization. The tin monoxide oxidized at 400 degrees C showed the highest response at the operating temperature of 200 degrees C. Under the optimized test condition, the composite structure showed better response than both structures of SWCNTs and thin film SnO.

  3. The first barium tin(II) bromide fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dénès, Georges; Merazig, Hocine; Muntasar, Abdualhafeed; Porterfield, Robyn

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to prepare barium tin(II) bromide fluorides for the first time, possibly similar to the chloride fluorides obtained earlier in our laboratory, precipitation reactions were carried out by mixing aqueous solutions of SnF2 and of BaBr2.2H2O. In contrast with the chloride fluoride system, a single powdered phase was obtained throughout the SnF2 - BaBr2 system, with the yield being maximum at X ≈ 0.25, where X is the molar fraction of barium bromide in the reaction mixture. Phase identification with the JCPDS database failed to produce a match, confirming that a new phase had been produced. The exact chemical composition of the new compound has not been obtained yet. Based on the X value for the maximum yield, the Sn/Ba ratio is likely to be 3/1 or 2/1. The Mössbauer spectrum at ambient conditions shows that bonding to tin(II) is covalent, therefore with the tin lone pair being stereoactive. The Mössbauer parameters ( δ = 3.68 mm/s, Δ = 0.99 mm/s) are similar to those of SnBrF and of Sn2BrF5, thereby showing that tin is bonded to both fluorine and bromine. The larger isomer shift and lower quadrupole splitting than in tin(II) fluorides show that the stereoactivity of the tin lone pair is lower than in the fluorides. The Mössbauer parameters fit well the linear correlation of the quadrupole splitting versus the isomer shift" that has been shown to be present in other series of tin(II) compounds. The linear decrease on this correlation shows that the contribution of non-spherical orbitals ( p and d) to the lone pair is a much larger contributor to the quadrupole splitting than lattice distortions. The structure is likely made of Ba2+ cations and tin(II) fluoride bromide polyatomic anions, with covalent bonding withinthe anions.

  4. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  5. Tin-containing fluoride solutions as anti-erosive agents in enamel: an in vitro tin-uptake, tissue-loss, and scanning electron micrograph study.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, Nadine; Hardt, Martin; Lussi, Adrian; Engelmann, Frank; Klimek, Joachim; Ganss, Carolina

    2009-08-01

    Tin-containing fluoride solutions can reduce erosive tissue loss, but the effects of the reaction between tin and enamel are still not clear. During a 10-d period, enamel specimens were cyclically demineralized (0.05 M citric acid, pH 2.3, 6 x 5 min d(-1)) and remineralized (between the demineralization cycles and overnight). In the negative-control group, no further treatment was performed. Three groups were treated (2 x 2 min d(-1)) with tin-containing fluoride solutions (400, 1,400 or 2,100 ppm Sn2+, all 1,500 ppm F-, pH 4.5). Three additional groups were treated with test solutions twice daily, but without demineralization. Tissue loss was determined profilometrically. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to measure the tin content on and within three layers (10 mum each) beneath the surface. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was conducted. All test preparations significantly reduced tissue loss. Deposition of tin on surfaces was higher without erosion than with erosion, but no incorporation of tin into enamel was found without demineralization. Under erosive conditions, both highly concentrated solutions led to the incorporation of tin up to a depth of 20 mum; the less-concentrated solution led to small amounts of tin in the outer 10 mum. The efficacy of tin-containing solutions seems to depend mainly on the incorporation of tin into enamel.

  6. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles. 189... lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one or both sides with a thin layer of tin. Tin-coated lead foil has been used as a capsule (i.e., as a...

  7. A review of tin oxide-based catalytic systems: Preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the important aspects of the preparation, characterization and catalytic behavior of tin oxide-based catalytic systems including doped tin oxide, mixed oxides which contain tin oxide, Pt supported on tin oxide and Pt/Sn supported on alumina. These systems have a broad range of applications and are continually increasing in importance. However, due to their complex nature, much remains to be understood concerning how they function catalytically.

  8. An Investigation of the Electrical Short Circuit Characteristics of Tin Whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, an empirical model to quantify the probability of occurrence of an electrical short circuit from tin whiskers as a function of voltage was developed. This model can be used to improve existing risk simulation models FIB and TEM images of a tin whisker confirm the rare polycrystalline structure on one of the three whiskers studied. FIB cross-section of the card guides verified that the tin finish was bright tin.

  9. An Empirical Model for Estimating the Probability of Electrical Short Circuits from Tin Whiskers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim; Wright, Clara; Asfour, Shihab; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon; Ludwig, Larry

    2009-01-01

    In this experiment, an empirical model to quantify the probability of occurrence of an electrical short circuit from tin whiskers as a function of voltage was developed. This empirical model can be used to improve existing risk simulation models. FIB and TEM images of a tin whisker confirm the rare polycrystalline structure on one of the three whiskers studied. FIB cross-section of the card guides verified that the tin finish was bright tin.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10231 - Rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped. 721... Substances § 721.10231 Rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped (PMN P-06-37...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10231 - Rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped. 721... Substances § 721.10231 Rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as rutile, tin zinc, sodium-doped (PMN P-06-37...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as phosphoric acid, tin (2...

  13. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: roles for distinctTIN2-containing complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-Ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Campisi, Judith

    2006-11-07

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins, TRF1, TRF2 and POT1, and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. These and two other proteins form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere-maintenance complex. It is not clear whether subcomplexes exist or function in vivo. Here, we provide evidence for two TIN2 subcomplexes with distinct functions in human cells. TIN2 ablation by RNA interference caused telomere uncapping and p53-independent cell death in all cells tested. However, we isolated two TIN2 complexes from cell lysates, each selectively sensitive to a TIN2 mutant (TIN2-13, TIN2-15C). In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN215C more than TIN2-13 caused genomic instability and cell death. Thus, TIN2 subcomplexes likely have distinct functions in telomere maintenance, and may provide selective targets for eliminating cells with mutant p53.

  14. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: Roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2007-10-02

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA binding proteins (TRF1, TRF2 and POT1), and several associated factors. One factor, TIN2, binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether sub-complexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 sub-complexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 sub-complexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13, TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist, and that TIN2-15C-sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53.

  15. Telomere dysfunction and cell survival: roles for distinct TIN2-containing complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sahn-ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Heo, Seok-Jin; Rodier, Francis; Zou, Ying; Beausejour, Christian; Kaminker, Patrick; Yannone, Steven M.; Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are maintained by three DNA-binding proteins (telomeric repeat binding factor 1 [TRF1], TRF2, and protector of telomeres 1 [POT1]) and several associated factors. One factor, TRF1-interacting protein 2 (TIN2), binds TRF1 and TRF2 directly and POT1 indirectly. Along with two other proteins, TPP1 and hRap1, these form a soluble complex that may be the core telomere maintenance complex. It is not clear whether subcomplexes also exist in vivo. We provide evidence for two TIN2 subcomplexes with distinct functions in human cells. We isolated these two TIN2 subcomplexes from nuclear lysates of unperturbed cells and cells expressing TIN2 mutants TIN2-13 and TIN2-15C, which cannot bind TRF2 or TRF1, respectively. In cells with wild-type p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere uncapping and eventual growth arrest. In cells lacking p53 function, TIN2-15C was more potent than TIN2-13 in causing telomere dysfunction and cell death. Our findings suggest that distinct TIN2 complexes exist and that TIN2-15C–sensitive subcomplexes are particularly important for cell survival in the absence of functional p53. PMID:18443218

  16. 78 FR 52802 - Tin T. Win, M.D., Dismissal of Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... Enforcement Administration Tin T. Win, M.D., Dismissal of Proceeding On February 27, 2013, I, the... Registration to Tin T. Win, M.D. (hereinafter, Registrant), of Lake Havasu, Arizona. GX 10, at 1. Among various... Immediate Suspension of Registration issued to Tin T. Win, M.D., be, and it hereby is, dismissed. This...

  17. 40 CFR 471.10 - Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. 471.10 Section 471.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lead-Tin-Bismuth Forming Subcategory § 471.10 Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  18. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Tin Whisker (and Other Metal Whisker) Homepage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay; Sampson, Mike; Leidecker, Henning; Kadesch, Jong

    2004-01-01

    This website provides information about tin whiskers and related research. The independent research performed during the past 50+ years is so vast that it is impractical to cover all aspects of tin whiskers in this one resource. Therefore, the absence of information in this website about a particular aspect of tin whiskers should NOT be construed as evidence of absence.

  19. 26 CFR 31.3406(j)-1 - Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching... Number (TIN) matching program. (a) The matching program. Under section 3406(i), the Commissioner has the authority to establish Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching programs. The Commissioner...

  20. 40 CFR 471.10 - Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. 471.10 Section 471.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lead-Tin-Bismuth Forming Subcategory § 471.10 Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  1. 26 CFR 31.3406(j)-1 - Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching... Number (TIN) matching program. (a) The matching program. Under section 3406(i), the Commissioner has the authority to establish Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching programs. The Commissioner...

  2. 40 CFR 471.10 - Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. 471.10 Section 471.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lead-Tin-Bismuth Forming Subcategory § 471.10 Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  3. 26 CFR 31.3406(j)-1 - Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching... Number (TIN) matching program. (a) The matching program. Under section 3406(i), the Commissioner has the authority to establish Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching programs. The Commissioner...

  4. 26 CFR 31.3406(j)-1 - Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching... Number (TIN) matching program. (a) The matching program. Under section 3406(i), the Commissioner has the authority to establish Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) matching programs. The Commissioner...

  5. 40 CFR 471.10 - Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. 471.10 Section 471.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Lead-Tin-Bismuth Forming Subcategory § 471.10 Applicability; description of the lead-tin-bismuth forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  6. Low gravity solidification structures in the tin-15 wt pct lead and tin-3 wt pct bismuth alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. H.; Parr, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The tin-15 wt pct lead and tin-3 wt pct bismuth alloys have been solidified in the low-gravity environment provided by the Space Processing Applications Rocket (SPAR), on the KC-135 airplane, and at high 'g' levels in a centrifuge furnace. In each case the resultant cast structure was significantly different from that obtained in ground based experiments. Earlier low-gravity studies with the metal-model system NH4Cl-H2O presaged these results. This paper presents and discusses the influence of changes in the gravity force on the grain structure of these materials.

  7. Properties of TiN and TiN deposited by CVD on graphite for pyrochemical applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P. S.; Moon, B. M.

    1997-12-17

    High-density TiN (>98% of theoretical) has been prepared by hot pressing TiN powder with 2-4 wt.% Li{sub 2}C0{sub 3} at temperatures between 1150-1550 C and pressures of {approx}40-50 MPa. The Li{sub 2}C0{sub 3} served as a fugitive sintering aid, enabling attainment of high density at low temperatures without adversely affecting the inherently good properties. Variation in processing variables and TiN powder characteristics resulted in material with various porosities. Measurement of mechanical properties such as flexural strength and fracture toughness showed that the high-density material has mechanical properties that are superior to those of several oxide ceramics. We have also quantified the effects of porosity on mechanical properties. In addition, adhesion and chemical stability tests were used to investigate graphite coated with TiN by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Pin-pull tests were used to determine coating adhesion and failure stresses were analyzed by Weibull statistics. All pin-pull tests resulted in fracture of the graphite substrate, rather than separation at the TiN/graphite interface. The data showed a good fit to the two-parameter Weibull expression, with a failure strength of 16.4 MPa and Weibull modulus of 9.3. Both the high-density TiN and the TiN coating on the graphite were exposed to a corrosive molten salt CaCl{sub 2}-7 wt.% CaO and a liquid metal alloy (Zn-10 wt.% Mg) at 800 C for 168 h to determine chemical interactions. No reaction was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Thus, graphite coated with TiN by CVD combines the thermodynamic stability of TiN when exposed to reactive molten metals and salts, with the excellent machinability of graphite, and hence is promising for use in container vessels for pyrochemical processing of certain rare-earth and nuclear metals, where chemical inertness and good matching of thermal expansion coefficients are required.

  8. On the low-lying states of TiN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A series of CAS SCF and multi-reference CI calculations are used to describe the lowest states of TiN. The bonding in all states is described as a triple bond involving the Ti 3d orbitals. The system has some ionic character as seen from both population analysis and dipole moment. The origins of the excited states are discussed.

  9. Electrochemical Studies of the TIN(4)-Pyrocatechol Violet System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    34Preconcentratlon of Environmental Tin and Its Determination Using Catechol Violet," Analyst, Vol. 107 (1982), pp. 654-58. 12. W. D. Wakley and L. P. Varga ...1) Code 5131, M. H. Salazar (1) 2 Naval Ordnance Station, Indian Head 8Code E, Pollution Abatement Program Masager (1) Technical LUbrary (1) 3 Naval

  10. 3. ONTARIO MINE. ADIT ENTRANCE WITH TIN ROOF. TIP TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ONTARIO MINE. ADIT ENTRANCE WITH TIN ROOF. TIP TOP IS LOCATED IN LINE WITH 'Y' BRANCH AND THE TAILING PILE FOR TIP TOP IS VISIBLE JUST TO RIGHT OF IT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Ontario Mine, Northwest side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  11. A CityGML Extension for Handling Very Large Tins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K.; Ledoux, H.; Stoter, J.

    2016-10-01

    In addition to buildings, the terrain forms an important part of a 3D city model. Although in GIS terrains are usually represented with 2D grids, TINs are also increasingly being used in practice. One example is 3DTOP10NL, the 3D city model covering the whole of the Netherlands, which stores the relief with a constrained TIN containing more than 1 billion triangles. Due to the massive size of such datasets, the main problem that arises is: how to efficiently store and maintain them? While CityGML supports the storage of TINs, we argue in this paper that the current solution is not adequate. For instance, the 1 billion+ triangles of 3DTOP10NL require 686 GB of storage space with CityGML. Furthermore, the current solution does not store the topological relationships of the triangles, and also there are no clear mechanisms to handle several LODs. We propose in this paper a CityGML extension for the compact representation of terrains. We describe our abstract and implementation specifications (modelled in UML), and our prototype implementation to convert TINs to our CityGML structure. It increases the topological relationships that are explicitly represented, and allows us to compress up to a factor of ∼ 25 in our experiments with massive real-world terrains (more than 1 billion triangles).

  12. One Step Internal Tin Nb3Sn Superconductor Fabrication.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    34" TABLE. OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE I INTRODUCTION 1 11 TIN PLATING LINEI III RIBBON FABRICATION2 IV EXTRUSION2 V WIRE DRAWING VI HEAT TREATMENT VII...8217 "> >; i ; ,’’ \\>,/ ; -2 ; "--; i > . . .? :-. -. -. .-.- - .. . - I" SECTION V WIRE DRAWING The extruded rod was cut into approximately 15 cm long pieces

  13. An electrochemical investigation of gold, tin and titanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sawtelle, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the electron transfer properties of gold, tin, and titanium compounds using electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical techniques is the focus of this dissertation. The investigations of the gold compounds include the determination of the properties of Au[PR[sub 3

  14. Complete combustion of methane over indium tin oxides catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Fu, Huijing; Fu, Lixin; Hao, Jiming

    2006-10-15

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) catalysts with different In/Sn ratios have been prepared by the co-precipitation method. The catalysts were evaluated for methane combustion at different temperatures (673-873 K) with a space velocity of 30 000 h(-1). The results showed that methane could be completely oxidized at 873 K with ITO catalysts. Doping an appropriate amount of tin into In2O3 could greatly improve its activity, while the performances of Indium-doped tin oxides were worse than that of SnO2. A significant improvement of the activity was obtained on the catalyst In8Sn2, which contains 80 wt. % of indium oxide and 20 wt. % of tin oxide. Crystal defection and the amount of oxygen vacancy caused by doping were the main factors that would affect catalytic activity of ITO catalysts. The catalytic activity is strongly inhibited by the presence of a large amount of water vapor at the entire temperature range, while only the activity at low temperature (under 823 K) decreased in the presence of sulfur dioxide. By doping Sn into In2O3, its tolerance to SO2 could be enhanced due to the higher resistance of SnO2.

  15. Evaluation of Tin Plating for Multi Canister Overpack Seals

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, C.E.

    2000-12-07

    The Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) incorporates plated seals for use with (1) the port cover plates, (2) process valves of the shield plug, and (3) test plug ofthe cover cap. These seals are required to maintain leakage rates as low as 10{sup -7} scc/atm-sec. in the cover cap to test plug seal. The seals are manufactured by EG&G division of Perkin Elmer. Currently, the MCO design calls for use of silver or gold plated seals in these locations. The seal plating materials are deposited on Inconel 718 or X-750 substrates. Some of these seals are reused several times in service on the MCO. The MCO manufacturer has built several MCOs and is in the leak testing stage and has had great difficulty obtaining acceptable leakage rates at their plant in Camden, New Jersey. The seal manufacturer was called in to evaluate the situation and now the seal manufacturer recommends tin plated seals. This evaluation examines the Corrosion resistance and thermal stability of tin plating on the seals. The use of tin plating on MCO seals was evaluated for corrosion resistance and thermal stability. The corrosion resistance of tin in the expected MCO environments is acceptable. The effect of radiation hardening will offset creep deformation results. However, a low melting point indicates unsuitability at significantly elevated temperatures.

  16. 12. Detail of boxedin column capital and covered tin ceiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail of boxed-in column capital and covered tin ceiling in first floor library reading room - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, Ward Memorial Building, Franklin Avenue, southeast of Intersection with Rowland Avenue, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  17. Micro/nano-scale investigation on tin alloys and tin dioxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong

    Tin (Sn) and its alloys have been at people's service since 3000 BC when bronze (alloy of tin and copper) was produced in large scale. They have unique properties and find applications in various engineering fields. Correspondingly, there is abundant information waiting to be clarified surrounding these Sn-related materials. As the key element used for solder alloys, the properties of Sn alloys have been of great interest to the electronic packaging community. At the same time, the intriguing phenomenon of spontaneous Sn whisker growth from Sn / Sn-alloy thin films have bothered, yet also inspired materials scientists for over 60 years. The most commonly seen Sn-containing compound, SnO 2, is in high demand as well due to its exceptional electronic and chemical properties. In addition, nanostructures of SnO2 are intensively studied for their potential applications as solid-state sensors, transparent conducting materials, lithium-ion batteries, high-efficiency solar cell and recently, supercapacitors. The objective of this proposed research is to explore the amazing properties of Sn and Sn-alloys from several different perspectives. Firstly, ever since the banish of lead in solder alloys, lead-free alloys such as Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) has been put under the spotlight. We intend to use our expertise in nanomechanics to give an in-depth and thorough investigation on a popular SAC387 alloy. The mechanical properties of each phase and the local deformation mechanisms have been considered. Secondly, the Sn whisker growth phenomenon is to be re-visited. With the aid of digital image correlation (DIC) techniques, it was found that magnitude of the strain gradient plays an important role in whisker growth. Moreover, DIC helps to visualize the dynamic growth process in which the alteration of strain field has been identified to cause growth of subsequent whiskers. Last but not least, the performance of SnO2 nanowires is to be evaluated in several aspects including mechanical

  18. Effects of Conformal Coat on Tin Whisker Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadesch, Jong S.; Leidecker, Henning; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A whisker from a tin plated part was blamed for the loss of a commercial spacecraft in 1998. Although pure tin finishes are prohibited by NASA, tin plated parts, such as hybrids, relays and commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts, are something discovered to have been installed in NASA spacecraft. Invariably, the assumption is that a conformal coat will prevent the growth of, or short circuits caused by, tin whiskers. This study measures the effect a Uralane coating has on the initiation and growth of tin whiskers, on the ability of this coating to prevent a tin whisker from emerging from the coating, and on the ability to prevent shorting. A sample of fourteen brass substrates (1 inch by 4 inches by 1/16 inch) were plated by two separate processes: half of the specimens were 'bright' tin plated directly over the brass substrate and half received a copper flash over the brass substrate prior to 'bright' tin plating. Each specimen was coated on one half of the substrate with three bi-directional sprays of Uralane 5750 to a nominal thickness of 25 to 75 micrometers (1 to 3 mils). Several specimens of both types, Cu and non-Cu flashed, were placed in an oven maintained at 50 C as others' work suggests that this is the optimal temperature for whisker formation. The remaining specimens were maintained at room ambient conditions. The surfaces of each specimen have been regularly inspected using both optical (15 to 400x power) and Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM). Many types of growths, including needle-like whiskers, first appeared approximately three months after plating on the non-conformally coated sides of all specimens. At four months, 4 to 5 times more growth sites were observed on the coated side; however, the density of growth sites on the non-conformally coated side has since increased rapidly, and now, at one year, is about the same for both sides. The density of growth sites is estimated at 90/sq mm with 30 percent of the sites growing whiskers (needle

  19. Biosorption of inorganic tin and methyltin compounds by estuarine macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.J.; Weber, J.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Biosorption kinetics of total recoverable inorganic tin (TRISn), MeSn{sup 3+}, Me{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+}, and Me{sub 3}Sn{sup +} compounds onto tissue from the macroalga Fucus vesiculosus and onto a mixed community of Enteromorpha spp. (a filamentous genus) showed that after 48-h accumulation of tin compounds followed the trend TRISn {approximately} MeSn{sup 3+} > Me{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+} > Me{sub 3}Sn{sup +}. Uptake of tin compounds onto F. vesiculosus consisted of three phases: rapid phase 1, intermediate phase 2 (modeled by first-order kinetics). Uptake of tin compounds by Enteromorpha spp. occurred in rapid phase 1 and intermediate, saturating phase 2, which was complete in 3 h for TRISn and MeSn{sup 3+} and in 18 h for Me{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+} and Me{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+} and Me{sub 3}Sn{sup +}. After 24 h, (TRISn) and (MeSn{sup 3+}) in dark-incubated plants, suggesting active uptake processes during phase 3. Enteromorpha spp. incubated in the dark for 1 h contained significantly less TRISn and MeSn{sup 3+}, but not less Me{sub 2}Sn{sup 2+} and Me{sub 3}Sn{sup +}, than light-incubated plants. Interactions with different compartments of the algal thallus account for differences in amounts of biosorbed tin compounds. Initial phase 1 biosorption by both algae was probably adsorption onto the thallus surface.

  20. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  1. Evidence for direct observation by Mössbauer spectroscopy of surface tin atoms in platinum tin particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, J.-P.; Roisin, E.; Basset, J.-M.; Uzio, D.; Morin, S.; Fischer, L.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.-C.

    2005-09-01

    119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy at 77 K was used to observe surface tin atoms on PtSnx/SiO2 catalysts. Two families of PtSnx/SiO2 catalysts with fully reduced Pt(0) and Sn(0) atoms were prepared following the Surface Organo-metallic Chemistry on Metal strategy. These two families of catalysts exhibit about the same Sn/Pt composition, but very different metallic particle diameters, each with narrow particle size distribution, so that, the ratio between surface tin atoms and “bulk” tin atoms was significantly different for the two families. In addition to the well known “Pt Sn” bulk alloy with small quadripole splitting, a new Pt Sn species with large quadripole splitting and isomer shift in the range of Sn(0) was observed. The relative proportion of this species with respect to “Pt Sn” bulk alloy is greater for small particles than for the larger ones, which suggests that this species is a surface tin atom present in a “Pt Sn” alloy.

  2. Synthesis, structure, and biocompatibility of pulsed laser-deposited TiN nanowires for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Mainul K; Darkwa, Kwadwo M; Watson, Christa Y; Waterman, Jenora T; Kumar, Dhananjay

    2012-07-01

    A bottom-up based pulsed laser deposition technique has been used to grow titanium nitride (TiN) nanowires on single crystalline substrates. The first step of this method is the dissolution of laser ablated gaseous TiN material in the nanodimensional catalytic gold (Au) liquid islands located on the substrate surfaces. The continuous dissolution of TiN results in the supersaturation of liquid Au with TiN followed by extrusion of solid TiN material in the nanowire form at the liquid/solid interface. The growth of TiN nanowires continues as long as its dissolution rate into the catalyst Au matches the extrusion rate of solid TiN. This bottom-up approach gives rise to a one-dimensional TiN nanowire structures (length: 200-300 nm and diameter: 20-30 nm) capped with Au. The ascent of Au nanodots to the top of TiN nanowires can be explained based on breaking of weaker bonds and building of stronger bonds. The TiN nanowires are provided vertical alignment by selecting a plane of the substrate that provides the least lattice mismatching to the (111) plane of TiN which has lower surface energy than its other planes: (100) or (110). After the successful formation and structural characterization, a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay has been used to confirm the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these nanowires. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Abhurite, a new tin hydroxychloride mineral, and a comparative study with a synthetic basic tin chloride.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, J.J.; Evans, H.T.; Mrose, M.E.; Aruscavage, P.

    1985-01-01

    Abhurite is a new mineral species found in blister-like protuberances on the surface of tin ingots submerged at a depth of 35 m in the Red Sea. It forms 1.5 mm diameter hexagonal plates bounded by the negative rhombohedron (0115); is colourless, transparent with opalescent lustre, white streak, hackly fracture, with no cleavage, and H.approx 2; D(calc) 4.34, D(meas) 4.29 g/cm3; epsilon approx 2.11, omega 2.06. Chemical analysis gave 73.4 wt.% Sn, 15.7 Cl, 11.0 0 and 0.4 H. leading to the formula Sn3O(OH)2Cl2. DTA shows release of H2O at 235oC and SnCl2 at 525oC. Indexed XRD powder data are tabulated; prominent lines 2.5313(100), 2.8915(70), 4.139(50), 3.404(50), 2.8175(50) A; a 10.0175(3), c 44.014(2) A; space group R3m, R3m or R32; Z = 21. Comparison is made with a hexagonal synthetic dimorph. The name refers to the geographical origin, an arm of the Red Sea known as Sharm Abhur.-L.T.T.

  4. Metallic tin quantum sheets confined in graphene toward high-efficiency carbon dioxide electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Fengcai; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yongfu; Xu, Jiaqi; Liu, Katong; Liang, Liang; Yao, Tao; Pan, Bicai; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Ultrathin metal layers can be highly active carbon dioxide electroreduction catalysts, but may also be prone to oxidation. Here we construct a model of graphene confined ultrathin layers of highly reactive metals, taking the synthetic highly reactive tin quantum sheets confined in graphene as an example. The higher electrochemical active area ensures 9 times larger carbon dioxide adsorption capacity relative to bulk tin, while the highly-conductive graphene favours rate-determining electron transfer from carbon dioxide to its radical anion. The lowered tin-tin coordination numbers, revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, enable tin quantum sheets confined in graphene to efficiently stabilize the carbon dioxide radical anion, verified by 0.13 volts lowered potential of hydroxyl ion adsorption compared with bulk tin. Hence, the tin quantum sheets confined in graphene show enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability. This work may provide a promising lead for designing efficient and robust catalysts for electrolytic fuel synthesis.

  5. Evaluation of tin plating systems for a high-noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Imbery, T A; Davis, R D

    1993-01-01

    The tensile bond strength of Panavia EX to a high-noble alloy prepared by abrasive spraying and tin plating was measured. Two different intraoperatory tin plating systems were compared. Disk-shaped specimens were cast in type III gold, abrasive sprayed with aluminum oxide, and divided into three groups of 30 specimens each. Specimens in one group were tin plated by using a Kura Ace Mini unit, those in the second group were tin plated by using a Micro Tin unit, and those in the third group were not tin plated and served as the control group. Disks within each group were luted to each other with Panavia EX. The specimens were thermocycled and tested in tension. There was no significant difference between the two tin plated groups; however, the luting bond of both experimental groups was significantly stronger than was that of the control (P < .05).

  6. First-principles molecular dynamics study of deuterium diffusion in liquid tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Zheng, Daye; Ren, Xinguo; He, Lixin; Chen, Mohan

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the retention of hydrogen isotopes in liquid metals, such as lithium and tin, is of great importance in designing a liquid plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. However, experimental diffusivity data of hydrogen isotopes in liquid metals are still limited or controversial. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to predict diffusion coefficients of deuterium in liquid tin at temperatures ranging from 573 to 1673 K. Our simulations indicate faster diffusion of deuterium in liquid tin than the self-diffusivity of tin. In addition, we find that the structural and dynamic properties of tin are insensitive to the inserted deuterium at temperatures and concentrations considered. We also observe that tin and deuterium do not form stable solid compounds. These predicted results from simulations enable us to have a better understanding of the retention of hydrogen isotopes in liquid tin.

  7. 78 FR 16048 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for e-Services Registration TIN Matching-Application and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...--Application and Screens for TIN Matching Interactive AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... screens for TIN matching interactive. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before May 13, 2013... INFORMATION: Title: e-Services Registration TIN Matching--Application and Screens for TIN Matching Interactive...

  8. 75 FR 5854 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for e-Services Registration TIN Matching-Application and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ...--Application and Screens for TIN Matching Interactive AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... Screens for TIN Matching Interactive. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before April 5... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: e-Services Registration TIN Matching--Application and Screens for TIN Matching...

  9. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... must include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. The TIN of the second-named coowner...

  10. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... must include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. The TIN of the second-named coowner...

  11. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... must include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. The TIN of the second-named coowner...

  12. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... must include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. The TIN of the second-named coowner...

  13. 31 CFR 351.43 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of a definitive Series EE savings bond? 351.43 Section 351.43 Money... Definitive Series EE Savings Bonds § 351.43 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... must include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. The TIN of the second-named coowner...

  14. Charge–discharge properties of tin dioxide for sodium-ion battery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinsoo; Park, Jin-Woo; Han, Jeong-Hui; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Ki-Young; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Kim, Ki-Won; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The electrochemical reaction of SnO2 as an anode for Na-ion batteries was studied. • The SnO2 electrode delivered the initial discharge capacity of 747 mAh/g. • Alarge irreversible capacity (597 mAh/g)was observedin the first cycle. • The in-plain crack in the electrode caused the incompletereduction of SnO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Tin dioxide was investigated as an anode material for sodium-ion batteries. The Na/SnO{sub 2} cell delivered a first discharge capacity of 747 mAh/g, but the first charge capacity was 150 mAh/g. The irreversible capacity in the first cycle was examined through characterization by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the SnO{sub 2} active material was not reduced fully to metallic Sn. Furrows and wrinkles were formed on the electrode surface owing to the volumetric expansion upon first discharge, which led to a deterioration of the electrode structure and a loss of electrical contact between the active materials. The analysis is summarized in the schematic drawing.

  15. Comparison of alpha and beta tin for lithium, sodium, and magnesium storage: An ab initio study including phonon contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Legrain, F.; Manzhos, S.; Malyi, O. I.; Persson, C.

    2015-11-28

    We present a comparative ab initio study of Li, Na, and Mg storage in tin, including phononic effects and phase competition between α and β Sn. Mg doping at low concentration is found to stabilize the β phase. On the contrary, Li and Na doping is shown to reverse the stability of the phases at room temperature: Li/Na-doped α-Sn is more stable than Li/Na-doped β-Sn up to a temperature of around 380/400 K. This may rationalize the formation of α-Sn upon lithiation and delithiation of β-Sn anodes reported in experimental studies. The changes in phase stability with Li/Na/Mg doping are directly related to the intercalation energies of Li/Na/Mg in one phase versus the other: at 300 K, Li/Na is easier intercalated in α-Sn (−0.37/−0.08 eV) than in β-Sn (0.06/0.49 eV), while Mg intercalation energy is, although positive (i.e., unfavored intercalation), lower in β-Sn (0.53 eV) than in α-Sn (0.66 eV). The temperature effect is found to affect significantly the intercalation energy, by up to 0.13 eV at 300 K. Analysis of diffusion barriers shows that Li, Na, and Mg diffusion in β-Sn is anisotropic with migration barriers along the (001) direction (respectively, 0.01, 0.22, and 0.07 eV) significantly lower than those in α-Sn (respectively, 0.20, 0.52, and 0.40 eV)

  16. Efficient photovoltaic heterojunctions of indium tin oxides on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubow, J. B.; Sites, J. R.; Burk, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction diodes of indium tin oxide films sputtered on to p-silicon using ion-beam techniques display significant photovoltaic effects when exposed to sunlight. Galvanomagnetic and optical measurements confirm that the oxide films are highly degenerate transparent semiconductors. At a tin oxide concentration of 10%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.51 V was observed along with a short-circuit current of 32 mA/sq cm, a fill factor of 0.70, and a conversion efficiency of 12%. As the concentration was raised to 70%, the voltage remained steady, the current fell to 27 mA/sq cm, and the fill factor fell to 0.60

  17. Reductive Precipitation of Metals Photosensitized by Tin Protoporphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    ABDELOUAS,A.; GONG,W.L.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-01-18

    For the first time, we show that redox-sensitive metals, which are highly soluble in the oxidized state can be reduced and precipitated from aqueous solution using tin protoporphyrin and light in the presence of an electron donor. Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} were reduced to the metallic state, and Ub{sup 6+} precipitated as oxide with very low volubility, suggesting that removal of these metals via reductive photoreduction and precipitation may be an innovative way for wastewater treatment. Ag{sup 2+} and Au{sup 2+} were reduced to the metallic state and precipitated as nanoparticles. Finally, using tin porphyrins and light for a variety of purposes involving reactions that require a low redox potential may be a good step toward energy conservation and environmentally benign processing.

  18. Development of the copper-tin diffusion-brazing process

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, S.P.S.; Jacobson, D.M.; Peacock, A.T.

    1998-10-01

    The copper-tin diffusion-brazing process has been studied with the objective of applying it to the joining of plasma-facing beryllium tiles to copper-based heat sinks in a nuclear-fusion reactor. The process is silver-free -- an essential requirement for this application -- and can be carried out at temperatures below 700 C (1,292 F). This approach produces thin joints of essentially pure copper of high thermal conductance with the requisite strength. Satisfactory conditions for achieving robust joints under the constraints demanded by the nuclear-fusion application have been established. The roles of the process parameters -- thickness of the filler metal tin, the compressive loading applied to the components during the brazing cycle and the brazing temperature -- have been assessed.

  19. Tin oxide coating of aluminous porcelain by reactive ion plating.

    PubMed

    McCrory, P V; Tinston, S; Piddock, V; Kelly, P; Combe, E C; Arnell, R D

    1991-06-01

    Alumina reinforced dental porcelain has been coated directly with tin oxide by reactive ion plating. Samples were prepared at different distances from the tin source in the ion plating rig. Tensile bond strengths of treated and untreated porcelain discs to a commercially available phosphate-methacrylate based dental cement were determined. Bond strengths of certain coated samples were found to be in excess of the cohesive strength of the porcelain substrates (greater than 7.8 MPa), whereas untreated porcelain achieved an average bond strength of only 3.4 MPa. The microstructures of coatings produced under conditions similar to those which yielded the maximum bond strength were examined in a scanning electron microscope and were found to be approximately 0.5 microns thick. It is believed that ion plating has great potential for rendering inert ceramic surfaces capable of direct bonding to dental cements.

  20. Direct reaction experimental studies with beams of radioactive tin ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L. Ayres, A.; Bey, A.; Burcher, S.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Beene, J. R.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Radford, D. C.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; and others

    2015-10-15

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at {sup 100}Sn, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at {sup 132}Sn out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich {sup 130}Sn. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of γ rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  1. Efficient photovoltaic heterojunctions of indium tin oxides on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubow, J. B.; Sites, J. R.; Burk, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction diodes of indium tin oxide films sputtered on to p-silicon using ion-beam techniques display significant photovoltaic effects when exposed to sunlight. Galvanomagnetic and optical measurements confirm that the oxide films are highly degenerate transparent semiconductors. At a tin oxide concentration of 10%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.51 V was observed along with a short-circuit current of 32 mA/sq cm, a fill factor of 0.70, and a conversion efficiency of 12%. As the concentration was raised to 70%, the voltage remained steady, the current fell to 27 mA/sq cm, and the fill factor fell to 0.60

  2. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.H.; Allmond, James M; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Beene, James R; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C. R.; Cartegni, L.; Chae, K. Y.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Howard, Meredith E; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Matos, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Padgett, S; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Pain, Steven D; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J; Schmitt, Kyle; Smith, Michael Scott; Stracener, Daniel W; Stroberg, S.; Tostevin, Jeffrey A; Varner Jr, Robert L; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  3. Tin Whiskers: A History of Documented Electrical System Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Brusse, Jay

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history of tin and other metal whiskers, and the damage they have caused equipment. There are pictures of whiskers on various pieces of electronic equipment, and microscopic views of whiskers. There is also a chart with information on the documented failures associated with metal whiskers. There are also examples of on-orbit failures believed to be caused by whiskers.

  4. Atomic absorption determination of tin in foods: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Elkins, E R; Sulek, A

    1979-09-01

    Samples of green beans, applesauce, and a fruit juice were fortified with tin at 3 levels. Collaborators were asked to digest the samples, using HNO3-H2SO4, add methanol to enhance the absorption signal, and aspirate directly, using a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Results were received from 8 laboratories including 4 from Europe. However, only 6 laboratories used the prescribed methodology. All results were considered acceptable. The method has been adopted as interim official first action.

  5. Structure Characterization of Semiconducting Tin and Tungsten Mixed Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, J. L.; Frantti, J.; Lantto, V.; Häggström, L.; Wikner, M.

    Mixed-oxide powders of tin and tungsten were made by heating various mixtures of SnO and WO3 powders, corresponding to the nominal formula SnxWO3+x with x between 0.5 and 2.0, in an argon atmosphere at 600°C for 15 hours. The α-SnWO4 phase was the result of heating of an equi-molar mixture of SnO and WO3 powders. In addition to 119Sn Mössbauer experiments, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the phase structures of the mixed-oxide powders. Mössbauer spectra from all samples show a small peak at ∽0mm/s from phase(s) like rutile SnO2, and a larger peak doublet centred at ∽3.4mm/s from the α-SnWO4 phase, where tin is in the form Sn4+ and Sn2+, respectively. Another peak doublet centred at ∽3.0mm/s was needed to obtain reasonable fits for samples with x≥1.3. This doublet originates from an undocumented phase where tin is also in the divalent form Sn2+. 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy made it possible to reveal the relative amounts of the two valence states of tin in the mixed-oxide structures. Raman spectroscopy as the other probe for ``local'' structures was insensitive to reveal the changes in the phase structures between different mixed-oxide samples up to x=1.72, but an extra peak at ∽890cm-1 in the Raman spectrum from the sample with x=2.0 indicates also the presence of the undocumented phase.

  6. Gravitational macrosegregation in unidirectionally solidified lead-tin alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.; Laxmanan, V.; Wallace, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    Nine small samples of binary lead-tin alloys were solidifed unidirectionally upward, with both cooling rate and thermal gradient being closely controlled. Results presented include thermal measurements, chemical composition measurements, and microstructural characterization. In the six Pb-15 wt pct Sn ingots, normal macrosegregation was observed, with Sn content being highest at the top of the ingot. No significant macrosegretation was noted in the three ingots of nominal composition Sn-15 wt pct Sn.

  7. A characterization study of a hydroxylated polycrystalline tin oxide surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.; Grogan, Austin L., Jr.; Asbury, Douglas A.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    In this study Auger electron spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) have been used to examine a polycrystalline tin oxide surface before and after annealing in vacuum at 500 C. Features due to surface hydroxyl groups are present in both the ESCA and ESD spectra, and ESD shows that several chemical states of hydrogen are present. Annealing at 500 C causes a large reduction in the surface hydrogen concentration but not complete removal.

  8. Cadmium-Tin Oxide Transparent Conductive Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapinski, T.; Leja, E.; Marszalek, K.

    1986-09-01

    Cadmium-tin oxide (CTO) films have been prepared by d.c. reactive sputtering of Cd-Sn alloy targets in Ar-02 gas mixture. The electrical, optical and structural properties as well as the chemical composition of transparent conducting CTO films were found to depend on sputtering conditions. The value of optical band gap, optical constants, effective mass and relaxation time of electrons have been determined.

  9. A characterization study of a hydroxylated polycrystalline tin oxide surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.; Grogan, Austin L., Jr.; Asbury, Douglas A.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    In this study Auger electron spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) have been used to examine a polycrystalline tin oxide surface before and after annealing in vacuum at 500 C. Features due to surface hydroxyl groups are present in both the ESCA and ESD spectra, and ESD shows that several chemical states of hydrogen are present. Annealing at 500 C causes a large reduction in the surface hydrogen concentration but not complete removal.

  10. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  11. Radionuclides' Content Speciation and Fingerprinting of Nigerian Tin Mining Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olise, F. S.; Oladejo, O. F.; Owoade, O. K.; Almeida, S. M.; Ho, M. D.; Olaniyi, H. B.

    2012-04-01

    Sediment and process-waste samples rich in cassiterite, monazite and zircon, which are of industrial interest, were analysed for the natural series radionuclides, 232Th and 238U and the non-series radionuclide, 40K using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique. The natural radionuclides' radioactivity in the samples from the tin-rich areas of Jos, Nigeria was determined using K0-INAA. The obtained results have a high degree of reliability judging from the techniqués accuracy, precision and its non-dependence on secular equilibrium and density correction problems inherent in gamma spectrometry as well as rigorous contamination-prone sample preparation requirements of other methods. Radionuclides speciation and ratios, giving radionuclide fingerprinting of the tin mining tailings is reported. The measured radionuclides activity levels are several orders of magnitude higher than UNSCEAR reference values, revealing the pollution potential of the tin mining and process activities on the surrounding areas, vis-à-vis heavy particulate matter load, leaching into various water channels and direct exposure to gamma rays emitted from the houses and facilities built from the generated wastes. The observed activity levels reflects possible worst scenario situation and the data would not only be of use to the government in its remediation plan for the study area but will also serve as important information for the nuclear science and technology programme about to be embarked upon. Methods of checking exposure have also been suggested.

  12. Chemical state of vanadium in tin-based yellow pigment

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiyoshi, Kaichi; Yokoyama, Hisanori ); Ren, Feng; Ishida, Shingo . Dept. of Chemistry and Materials Technology)

    1993-04-01

    Vanadium-tin composite oxides are rather widely used as, for example, yellow pigments for coloring glazes and selective oxidation catalysts for hydrocarbons. Physicochemical states of vanadium in V-doped SnO[sub 2] were studied to clarify the origin of the color of vanadium-tin yellow pigment and its color instability when fired with glaze material. Precision measurements of lattice parameters of V-doped SnO[sub 2] revealed that vanadium was dissolved as V[sup 4+] and its solubility limit was 0.9 wt% as V[sub 2]O[sub 5]. It was found that the color of vanadium-tin yellow was produced by two types of undissolved vanadium on SnO[sub 2] grains. One is poorly crystallized vanadium oxide (v), (V[sub 2]O[sub 5])[prime], having a yellow color, and the other is orange-colored crystalline V[sub 2]O[sub 5]. The structure of (V[sub 2]O[sub 5])[prime] was discussed in connection with its color.

  13. Tin Whisker Electrical Short Circuit Characteristics. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.; Asfour, Shihab S.; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon A.; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wright, Maria C.

    2009-01-01

    Existing risk simulations make the assumption that when a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors, the result is an electrical short circuit. This conservative assumption is made because shorting is a random event that has an unknown probability associated with it. Note however that due to contact resistance electrical shorts may not occur at lower voltage levels. In our first article we developed an empirical probability model for tin whisker shorting. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive empirical model using a refined experiment with a larger sample size, in which we studied the effect of varying voltage on the breakdown of the contact resistance which leads to a short circuit. From the resulting data we estimated the probability distribution of an electrical short, as a function of voltage. In addition, the unexpected polycrystalline structure seen in the focused ion beam (FIB) cross section in the first experiment was confirmed in this experiment using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FIB was also used to cross section two card guides to facilitate the measurement of the grain size of each card guide's tin plating to determine its finish.

  14. Tunable Near-Infrared Luminescence in Tin Halide Perovskite Devices.

    PubMed

    Lai, May L; Tay, Timothy Y S; Sadhanala, Aditya; Dutton, Siân E; Li, Guangru; Friend, Richard H; Tan, Zhi-Kuang

    2016-07-21

    Infrared emitters are reasonably rare in solution-processed materials. Recently, research into hybrid organo-lead halide perovskite, originally popular in photovoltaics,1-3 has gained traction in light-emitting diodes (LED) due to their low-cost solution processing and good performance.4-9 The lead-based electroluminescent materials show strong colorful emission in the visible region, but lack emissive variants further in the infrared. The concerns with the toxicity of lead may, additionally, limit their wide-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate tunable near-infrared electroluminescence from a lead-free organo-tin halide perovskite, using an ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3Sn(Br1-xIx)3/F8/Ca/Ag device architecture. In our tin iodide (CH3NH3SnI3) LEDs, we achieved a 945 nm near-infrared emission with a radiance of 3.4 W sr(-1) m(-2) and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 0.72%, comparable with earlier lead-based devices. Increasing the bromide content in these tin perovskite devices widens the semiconductor bandgap and leads to shorter wavelength emissions, tunable down to 667 nm. These near-infrared LEDs could find useful applications in a range of optical communication, sensing and medical device applications.

  15. LIDAR data filtering and classification with TIN and assistant plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qihong; Mao, Jianhua; Li, Xianhua; Liu, Xuefeng

    2007-06-01

    LIDAR is a new promising technique in obtaining instantly 3D point cloud data representing the earth surface information. In order to extract valuable earth surface feature information for further application, 3D sub-randomly spatial distributed LIDAR point cloud should be filtered and classified firstly. In this article, a new LIDAR data filtering and classification algorithm is presented. First, the points' neighboring relation and height-jump situation in TIN (triangulated irregular network) model for 3D LIDAR point cloud are analyzed. After that, the filtering algorithm based on TIN neighboring relation and height-jump is presented. Third, an assistant plane is designed in TIN neighborhood filtering algorithm in order to yield more effective filtering result. Then, the LIDAR points are classified into bare ground points, building points and vegetation points using the above filtering algorithms. The experiment is performed using the airborne LIDAR data, and the result shows that this method has better effect on filtering and classification of LIDAR point cloud data.

  16. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Vinayak Umarji, Arun

    2015-03-15

    Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide – carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ∼7 nm and ∼95 m{sup 2}/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO{sub 2} thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  17. Intramolecular N→Sn coordination in tin(II) and tin(IV) compounds based on enantiopure ephedrine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zöller, Thomas; Iovkova-Berends, Ljuba; Berends, Thorsten; Dietz, Christina; Bradtmöller, Gerrit; Jurkschat, Klaus

    2011-09-05

    The syntheses and molecular structures of the intramolecularly coordinated tin(II) compounds {CH(2)N(Me)CH(Me)CH(Ph)O}(2)SnL (2, L = lone pair; 4, L = W(CO)(5); 5, L = Cr(CO)(5)) and of the related hydroxido-substituted tin(IV) compound [{CH(2)N(Me)CH(Me)CH(Ph)O}(2)Sn(OH)](2)O, 6a, are reported. Also reported are the molecular structures of the enantiopure N,N'-ethylenebis-(1R,2S)-ephedrine, {CH(2)N(Me)CH(Me)CH(Ph)OH}(2) (1), and its hydrobromide {CH(2)N(Me)CH(Me)CH(Ph)OH}(2)·HBr (1a).

  18. Performance improvement of tin-doped zinc oxide thin-film transistor by novel channel modulation layer of indium tin oxide/tin zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuofa; Han, Dedong; Zhao, Nannan; Wu, Jing; Cong, Yingying; Dong, Junchen; Zhao, Feilong; Zhang, Shengdong; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yi; Liu, Lifeng

    2015-04-01

    By applying a novel active modulation layer of indium tin oxide/tin zinc oxide (ITO/TZO), we have successfully fabricated high-performance bottom-gate-type dual-active-layer thin-film transistors (TFTs) on a glass substrate at a low temperature by a simple process. The as-fabricated dual-active-layer ITO/TZO TFTs exhibited excellent electrical properties compared with single-active-layer TZO TFTs. We found that the dual-layer ITO/TZO TFT with an optimized stack structure of ITO (5 nm)/TZO (45 nm) as the channel layer exhibits excellent properties, namely, a high saturation mobility of 204 cm2 V-1 s-1, a steep subthreshold slope of 219 mV/dec, a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, and a high on-off current ratio of 4.3 × 107. A physical mechanism for the electrical improvement is also deduced. Owing to its advantages, namely, a low processing temperature, a high electrical performance, a simple process, and a low cost, this novel active modulation layer is highly promising for the manufacture of oxide semiconductor TFT and transparent displays.

  19. Reduced Graphene Oxide/Tin-Antimony Nanocomposites as Anode Materials for Advanced Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liwen; Zhou, Weidong; Chabot, Victor; Yu, Aiping; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2015-11-11

    Reduced graphene oxides loaded with tin-antimony alloy (RGO-SnSb) nanocomposites were synthesized through a hydrothermal reaction and the subsequent thermal reduction treatments. Transmission electron microscope images confirm that SnSb nanoparticles with an average size of about 20-30 nm are uniformly dispersed on the RGO surfaces. When they were used as anodes for rechargeable sodium (Na)-ion batteries, these as-synthesized RGO-SnSb nanocomposite anodes delivered a high initial reversible capacity of 407 mAh g(-1), stable cyclic retention for more than 80 cycles and excellent cycle stability at ultra high charge/discharge rates up to 30C. The significantly improved performance of the synthesized RGO-SnSb nanocomposites as Na-ion battery anodes can be attributed to the synergetic effects of RGO-based flexible framework and the nanoscale dimension of the SnSb alloy particles (<30 nm). Nanosized intermetallic SnSb compounds can exhibit improved structural stability and conductivity during charge and discharge reactions compared to the corresponding individuals (Sn and Sb particles). In the meantime, RGO sheets can tightly anchor SnSb alloy particles on the surfaces, which can not only effectively suppress the agglomeration of SnSb particles but also maintain excellent electronic conduction. Furthermore, the mechanical flexibility of the RGO phase can accommodate the volume expansion and contraction of SnSb particles during the prolonged cycling, therefore, improve the electrode integrity mechanically and electronically. All of these contribute to the electrochemical performance improvements of the RGO-SnSb nanocomposite-based electrodes in rechargeable Na-ion batteries.

  20. Composition of nanocomposites based on thin layers of tin on porous silicon formed by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenshin, A. S.; Kashkarov, V. M.; Domashevskaya, E. P.; Seredin, P. V.; Ryabtsev, S. V.; Bel'tyukov, A. N.; Gil'mutdinov, F. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the features of morphology and peculiarities of the surface composition of nanocomposites made of thin tin layers by magnetron sputtering formed on porous silicon with pores size of 50-150 nm. Porous silicon was obtained on n-type conductivity crystalline silicon substrate. The obtained nanocomposites were found differ between themselves by the ratio of the main phases: tin dioxide, sub-oxide and metal tin in a dependence on the thickness of the deposited tin layer. Fraction of the oxidized tin in the phase composition of composites was reduced from the surface to the bulk of the sample. Moreover, it was determined that the deposition of tin nanolayers did not result in a considerable change of the phase composition of porous silicon substrate.

  1. Effect of doping of tin on optoelectronic properties of indium oxide: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath

    2015-06-24

    Indium tin oxide is widely used transparent conductor. Experimentally observed that 6% tin doping in indium oxide is suitable for optoelectronic applications and more doping beyond this limit degrades the optoelectronic property. The stoichiometry (In{sub 32-x}Sn{sub x}O{sub 48+x/2}; x=0-6) is taken to understand the change in lattice parameter, electronic structure, and optical property of ITO. It is observed that lattice parameter increases and becomes constant after 6% tin doping that is in good agreement of the experimental observation. The electronic structure calculation shows that the high tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the dispersive nature of the bottom of conduction band of pure indium oxide and decreases the carrier mobility. Optical calculations show that transmittance goes down upto 60% for the tin concentration more than 6%. The present paper shows that how more than 6% tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the optoelectronic property of ITO.

  2. Comparison of several analytical methods for the determination of tin in geochemical samples as a function of tin speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Evans, J.R.; Jackson, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate and precise determinations of tin in geological materials are needed for fundamental studies of tin geochemistry, and for tin prospecting purposes. Achieving the required accuracy is difficult because of the different matrices in which Sn can occur (i.e. sulfides, silicates and cassiterite), and because of the variability of literature values for Sn concentrations in geochemical reference materials. We have evaluated three methods for the analysis of samples for Sn concentration: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HGA-AAS) following iodide extraction, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. Two of these methods (HGA-AAS and ICP-OES) required sample decomposition either by acid digestion or fusion, while the third (EDXRF) was performed directly on the powdered sample. Analytical details of all three methods, their potential errors, and the steps necessary to correct these errors were investigated. Results showed that similar accuracy was achieved from all methods for unmineralized samples, which contain no known Sn-bearing phase. For mineralized samples, which contain Sn-bearing minerals, either cassiterite or stannous sulfides, only EDXRF and fusion ICP-OES methods provided acceptable accuracy. This summary of our study provides information which helps to assure correct interpretation of data bases for underlying geochemical processes, regardless of method of data collection and its inherent limitations. ?? 1989.

  3. Tin anode for sodium-ion batteries using natural wood fiber as a mechanical buffer and electrolyte reservoir.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Jia, Zheng; Chen, Yuchen; Weadock, Nicholas; Wan, Jiayu; Vaaland, Oeyvind; Han, Xiaogang; Li, Teng; Hu, Liangbing

    2013-07-10

    Sodium (Na)-ion batteries offer an attractive option for low cost grid scale storage due to the abundance of Na. Tin (Sn) is touted as a high capacity anode for Na-ion batteries with a high theoretical capacity of 847 mAh/g, but it has several limitations such as large volume expansion with cycling, slow kinetics, and unstable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation. In this article, we demonstrate that an anode consisting of a Sn thin film deposited on a hierarchical wood fiber substrate simultaneously addresses all the challenges associated with Sn anodes. The soft nature of wood fibers effectively releases the mechanical stresses associated with the sodiation process, and the mesoporous structure functions as an electrolyte reservoir that allows for ion transport through the outer and inner surface of the fiber. These properties are confirmed experimentally and computationally. A stable cycling performance of 400 cycles with an initial capacity of 339 mAh/g is demonstrated; a significant improvement over other reported Sn nanostructures. The soft and mesoporous wood fiber substrate can be utilized as a new platform for low cost Na-ion batteries.

  4. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perring, Loïc; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99+/-5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given.

  5. Effect of preparation conditions on physic-chemical properties of tin-doped nanocrystalline indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, T. D.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zhek, V. V.; Nefedov, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of phase formation and change of concentration of free electrons (Ne) in indium tin oxide system during heat treatment of coprecipitated hydroxides of indium and tin from nitric and hydrochloric solutions and also, for comparison melts of salts nitrates by an alkaline reactant (NH4OH) are considered.The performed investigation allowed to set the optimal condition of preparation of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide with maximal electron concentration.

  6. Rapid Fabrication of Low-Density Porous Tin Monolith via Hydrogen Bulb Dynamics Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbo; Zhu, Jiayi; Bi, Yutie; Xu, Yewei; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ni

    Low-density porous tin monolith with the pteridophyta leaf-like structure was fast fabricated by a facile route via the electrochemical deposition process via hydrogen bulb dynamics templates within less than 1min. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and so on. The results indicated that the deposited tin porous structure could be easily controlled to form film or monolith by adjusting the tin precursor concentration and surfactant content.

  7. Nonequilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics determination of Ti monovacancy migration rates in B 1 TiN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, D.; Sangiovanni, D. G.; Alling, B.; Abrikosov, I. A.

    2017-09-01

    We use the color diffusion (CD) algorithm in nonequilibrium (accelerated) ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine Ti monovacancy jump frequencies in NaCl-structure titanium nitride (TiN), at temperatures ranging from 2200 to 3000 K. Our results show that the CD method extended beyond the linear-fitting rate-versus-force regime [Sangiovanni et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 094305 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.094305] can efficiently determine metal vacancy migration rates in TiN, despite the low mobilities of lattice defects in this type of ceramic compound. We propose a computational method based on gamma-distribution statistics, which provides unambiguous definition of nonequilibrium and equilibrium (extrapolated) vacancy jump rates with corresponding statistical uncertainties. The acceleration-factor achieved in our implementation of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics increases dramatically for decreasing temperatures from 500 for T close to the melting point Tm, up to 33 000 for T ≈0.7 Tm .

  8. Estimating the Probability of Electrical Short Circuits from Tin Whiskers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.; Asfour, Shihab S.; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon A.; Ludwig, Larry L.; Wright, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    To comply with lead-free legislation, many manufacturers have converted from tin-lead to pure tin finishes of electronic components. However, pure tin finishes have a greater propensity to grow tin whiskers than tin-lead finishes. Since tin whiskers present an electrical short circuit hazard in electronic components, simulations have been developed to quantify the risk of said short circuits occurring. Existing risk simulations make the assumption that when a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors, the result is an electrical short circuit. This conservative assumption is made because shorting is a random event that had an unknown probability associated with it. Note however that due to contact resistance electrical shorts may not occur at lower voltage levels. In our first article we developed an empirical probability model for tin whisker shorting. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive empirical model using a refined experiment with a larger sample size, in which we studied the effect of varying voltage on the breakdown of the contact resistance which leads to a short circuit. From the resulting data we estimated the probability distribution of an electrical short, as a function of voltage. In addition, the unexpected polycrystalline structure seen in the focused ion beam (FIB) cross section in the first experiment was confirmed in this experiment using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FIB was also used to cross section two card guides to facilitate the measurement of the grain size of each card guide's tin plating to determine its finish .

  9. Influence of Direct Current Electric Field on Corrosion Behavior of Tin Under a Thin Electrolyte Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. L.; Bu, F. R.; Tian, J.; Liu, D.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of a direct current electric field (DCEF) on corrosion behavior of tin under a thin electrolyte layer was investigated based on an array electrode technology by polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and surface analysis. The experimental results indicate that the corrosion rate of tin near the positive plate of DCEF increases with increased electric field intensity, which could be attributed to the acceleration of the migration of ions, the removal of corrosion products under DCEF and the damage of tin surface oxide film. Furthermore, tin at different positions in a DCEF exhibits different corrosion behavior, which could be ascribed to the difference of the local corrosion environment caused by the DCEF.

  10. Measurement of Sound Velocities in Shock-Compressed Tin Under Pressures up to 150 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernokletov, M. V.; Kovalev, A. E.; Komissarov, V. V.; Zocher, M. A.; Cherne, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    Sound velocity in shock-compressed tin was measured over the pressure range of 31-138 GPa by the overtake method with using indicator liquids. Photodiode-based optical gauges were used to record luminescence of the liquid indicators. For shock compressions of 5-18 GPa, the sound velocity in tin was measured with manganin gauges by determining the oncoming release wave in the tin. The experimental data were compared to calculated results and data obtained by other authors. According to data obtained in this work, tin melts on the hugoniot between ˜63-90 GPa.

  11. Safety assessment of Tin(IV) oxide as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Wilbur; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    Tin(IV) oxide functions as an abrasive, bulking, and opacifying agent in cosmetic products and is used at concentrations up to 0.4% in rinse-off products and up to 1.3% in leave-on products. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) noted that tin(IV) oxide is a water-insoluble inorganic metal compound and should not be percutaneously absorbed; therefore, systemic exposure is not likely. Studies of dermal application of tin(IV) oxide were considered to determine toxicity at the site of application. The Panel concluded that tin(IV) oxide is safe in the present practices of use and concentration.

  12. [Corrosion resistance and wear resistance of Ni-Cr alloy after coating titanium nitride (TiN) in oral containing fluorine environment].

    PubMed

    Weng, Wei-Min; Yu, Wei-Qiang; Shan, Wei-Lan; Zhang, Fu-Qiang

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the corrosion resistance and wear resistance of Ni-Cr alloy after coating titanium nitride (TiN) in oral containing fluorine environment. Physical vapor deposition was established to coat titanium nitride (TiN) on the surface of dental cast Ni-Cr alloy to form TiN/Ni-Cr compound. Both Ni-Cr alloy and TiN/Ni-Cr compound were exposed to 37 degrees centigrade, artificial saliva containing 0.24% NaF. The polarization curves of the specimens were measured by PARSTAT 2273 electrochemical station to investigate its corrosion resistance. Vicker's hardness was measured by HXD-1000TMC/LCD micro-hardness tester to investigate its wear resistance. Statistical analysis was performed by SAS 8.2 software package for Student's t methods. The corrosion potential of Ni-Cr alloy was -362.407 mV, the corrosion current density was 1.568μAcm(-2),the blunt-breaking potential was 426 mV bofor TiN coating. The corrosion potential of TiN/Ni-Cr compound was -268.638 mV, the corrosion current density was 0.114μAcm(-2),the blunt-breaking potential was 1142 mV after TiN coating. Polarization curves showed TiN/Ni-Cr compound improved the corrosion potential and blunt-breaking potential, decreased the corrosion current density. The Vicker's hardness of Ni-Cr alloy was 519.75±27.27 before TiN coating, the Vicker's hardness of TiN/Ni-Cr compound was 803.24±24.64, the D-value between them was 283.49±39.34. The difference of Vicker's harnesses between Ni-Cr alloy and TiN/Ni-Cr compound had significant (P<0.01). The results demonstrate that the TiN coating can improve the corrosion resistant to F-and the surface hardness of Ni-Cr alloy. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.08DZ2271100), Shanghai Leading Academic Discipline Project (Grant No.S30206 ) and Research Fund of Health Bureau of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.2009074).

  13. Fundamental studies of tin whiskering in microelectronics finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinol, Lesly Agnes

    Common electronics materials, such as tin, copper, steel, and brass, are ambient reactive under common use conditions, and as such are prone to corrosion. During the early 1940s, reports of failures due to electrical shorting of components caused by 'whisker' (i.e., filamentary surface protrusion) growth on many surface types---including the aforementioned metals---began to emerge. Lead alloying of tin (3--10% by weight, typically in the eutectic proportion) eliminated whiskering risk for decades, until the July 2006 adoption of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive was issued by the European Union. This directive, which has since been adopted by California and parts of China, severely restricted the use of lead (<1000 ppm) in all electrical and electronics equipment being placed on the EU market, imposing the need for developing reliable new "lead-free" alternatives to SnPb. In spite of the abundance of modern-day anecdotes chronicling whisker-related failures in satellites, nuclear power stations, missiles, pacemakers, and spacecraft navigation equipment, pure tin finishes are still increasingly being employed today, and the root cause(s) of tin whiskering remains elusive. This work describes a series of structured experiments exploring the fundamental relationships between the incidence of tin whiskering (as dependent variable) and numerous independent variables. These variables included deposition method (electroplating, electroless plating, template-based electrochemical synthesis, and various physical vapor deposition techniques, including resistive evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and sputtering), the inclusion of microparticles and organic contamination, the effects of sample geometry, and nanostructuring. Key findings pertain to correlations between sample geometry and whisker propensity, and also to the stress evolution across a series of 4"-diameter silicon wafers of varying thicknesses with respect to the degree of post

  14. The slag-metal equilibrium in tin smelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    An equilibrium study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the CaO/SiO2 and Fe/SiO2 ratios and the SnO and Al2O3 contents of slags on the distribution of Fe and Sn between slag and metal in tin smelting. The experiments were performed at 1200 °C by equilibrating Sn-Fe alloys with silicate slags under reducing conditions in closed crucibles. The slag and metal analyses were used to calculate the γSnO/γFeO ratio in the slags and a multiple-linear regression on these values indicated that, in the range of slag compositions investigated, γSnO/γFeO is a function only of the CaO/SiO2 ratio. At 1200 °C, γSnO/γFeO varies from about 1.1 for CaO-free slags to 3.6 for slags in which the CaO/SiO2 ratio is 1.0. In practical applications, the slag-metal equilibrium in tin smelting is usually discussed in terms of the variation of the distribution coefficient, k, with the Fe content of the metal, where k is defined as k = [pct Sn]/[pct Fe] · (pct Fe)/(pct Sn). An equation for k was derived in terms of the atom fraction of iron in the metal, the γSnO/γFeO in the slag, and the temperature. This equation was used to construct graphs of k as a function of the iron content over the slag compositions and at temperatures which cover the range of tin smelting practice.

  15. Leaching studies for tin recovery from waste e-scrap.

    PubMed

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Choubey, Pankaj Kumar; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumari, Archana; Lee, Jae-Chun; Kumar, Vinay; Jeong, Jinki

    2012-10-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the most essential components of all electrical and electronic equipments, which contain noteworthy quantity of metals, some of which are toxic to life and all of which are valuable resources. Therefore, recycling of PCBs is necessary for the safe disposal/utilization of these metals. Present paper is a part of developing Indo-Korean recycling technique consists of organic swelling pre-treatment technique for the liberation of thin layer of metallic sheet and the treatment of epoxy resin to remove/recover toxic soldering material. To optimize the parameters required for recovery of tin from waste PCBs, initially the bench scale studies were carried out using fresh solder (containing 52.6% Sn and 47.3% Pb) varying the acid concentration, temperature, mixing time and pulp density. The experimental data indicate that 95.79% of tin was leached out from solder material using 5.5M HCl at fixed pulp density 50 g/L and temperature 90°C in mixing time 165 min. Kinetic studies followed the chemical reaction controlled dense constant size cylindrical particles with activation energy of 117.68 kJ/mol. However, 97.79% of tin was found to be leached out from solder materials of liberated swelled epoxy resin using 4.5M HCl at 90°C, mixing time 60 min and pulp density 50 g/L. From the leach liquor of solder materials of epoxy resin, the precipitate of sodium stannate as value added product was obtained at pH 1.9. The Pb from the leach residue was removed by using 0.1M nitric acid at 90°C in mixing time 45 min and pulp density 10g/L. The metal free epoxy resin could be disposed-of safely/used as filling material without affecting the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immune stimulation following dermal exposure to unsintered indium tin oxide

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Kristie; Anderson, Stacey E.; Lukomska, Ewa; Long, Carrie; Anderson, Katie; Marshall, Nikki; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several types of pulmonary pathology, including alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis, and emphysema, have been reported in workers in the indium industry. To date, there remains no clear understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Pulmonary toxicity studies in rats and mice have demonstrated the development of mediastinal lymph node hyperplasia and granulomas of mediastinal lymph nodes and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues following exposure to indium tin oxide. Given the association between exposure to other metals and the development of immune-mediated diseases, these studies were undertaken to begin to investigate the immuno-modulatory potential of unsintered indium tin oxide (uITO) in a mouse model. Using modifications of the local lymph node assay, BALB/c mice (five animals/group) were exposed topically via intact or breached skin or injected intradermally at the base of the ear pinnae with either vehicle or increasing concentrations 2.5–10% uITO (90:10 indium oxide/tin oxide, particle size <50 nm). Dose-responsive increases in lymphocyte proliferation were observed with a calculated EC3 of 4.7% for the intact skin study. Phenotypic analysis of draining lymph node cells following intradermal injection with 5% uITO yielded a profile consistent with a T-cell-mediated response. These studies demonstrate the potential for uITO to induce sensitization and using lymphocyte proliferation as a biomarker of exposure, and demonstrate the potential for uITO to penetrate both intact and breached skin. PMID:24164313

  17. Immune stimulation following dermal exposure to unsintered indium tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Brock, Kristie; Anderson, Stacey E; Lukomska, Ewa; Long, Carrie; Anderson, Katie; Marshall, Nikki; Meade, B Jean

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several types of pulmonary pathology, including alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis, and emphysema, have been reported in workers in the indium industry. To date, there remains no clear understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Pulmonary toxicity studies in rats and mice have demonstrated the development of mediastinal lymph node hyperplasia and granulomas of mediastinal lymph nodes and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissues following exposure to indium tin oxide. Given the association between exposure to other metals and the development of immune-mediated diseases, these studies were undertaken to begin to investigate the immuno-modulatory potential of unsintered indium tin oxide (uITO) in a mouse model. Using modifications of the local lymph node assay, BALB/c mice (five animals/group) were exposed topically via intact or breached skin or injected intradermally at the base of the ear pinnae with either vehicle or increasing concentrations 2.5-10% uITO (90:10 indium oxide/tin oxide, particle size <50 nm). Dose-responsive increases in lymphocyte proliferation were observed with a calculated EC3 of 4.7% for the intact skin study. Phenotypic analysis of draining lymph node cells following intradermal injection with 5% uITO yielded a profile consistent with a T-cell-mediated response. These studies demonstrate the potential for uITO to induce sensitization and using lymphocyte proliferation as a biomarker of exposure, and demonstrate the potential for uITO to penetrate both intact and breached skin.

  18. Beryllium resources of the tin-spodumene belt, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, Wallace R.

    1954-01-01

    Pegmatite dikes in the tin-spodumene belt of North and South Carolina uniformly contain about 0.05 percent BeO. The most abundant minerals in the pegmatite contain from 0. 0001 to 0.01 percent BeO. Beryl, having 12.0 to 12.3 percent BeO, is the only beryllium-rich mineral and contains more than 80 percent of the total beryllium in the rock. Beryl-bearing pegmatite crops out on hillsides near streams that flow through the pegmatite belt. Much of the pegmatite contains spodumene, feldspar, mica, cassiterite, and columbite, as well as beryl, but separating these minerals will require milling. The minable spodumene ore in the Kings Mountain area, above a depth of 300 feet contains about 40,000 tons of beryl, equivalent to 6, 000 tons of BeO, if 80 percent of the BeO is assumed to be in beryl. Other pegmatite in that area contains an additional 238,000 tons of beryl, or 35, 900 tons of BeO. On the basis of the same assumptions the spodumene ore above a depth of 300 feet 1 in the Beaverdam Creek area contains 6, 000 tons of beryl, or 800 tons of BeO, and all other pegmatite in that area contains an additional 13, 000 tons of beryl, or 1, 700 tons of BeO. The entire tin-spodumene belt contains 823, 000 tons of beryl, equivalent to 122,800 tons of BeO. Little beryllium was found in the Piedmont province outside of the tin-spodumene belt.

  19. Leaching studies for tin recovery from waste e-scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Choubey, Pankaj Kumar; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumari, Archana; Lee, Jae-chun; Kumar, Vinay; Jeong, Jinki

    2012-10-15

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the most essential components of all electrical and electronic equipments, which contain noteworthy quantity of metals, some of which are toxic to life and all of which are valuable resources. Therefore, recycling of PCBs is necessary for the safe disposal/utilization of these metals. Present paper is a part of developing Indo-Korean recycling technique consists of organic swelling pre-treatment technique for the liberation of thin layer of metallic sheet and the treatment of epoxy resin to remove/recover toxic soldering material. To optimize the parameters required for recovery of tin from waste PCBs, initially the bench scale studies were carried out using fresh solder (containing 52.6% Sn and 47.3% Pb) varying the acid concentration, temperature, mixing time and pulp density. The experimental data indicate that 95.79% of tin was leached out from solder material using 5.5 M HCl at fixed pulp density 50 g/L and temperature 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 165 min. Kinetic studies followed the chemical reaction controlled dense constant size cylindrical particles with activation energy of 117.68 kJ/mol. However, 97.79% of tin was found to be leached out from solder materials of liberated swelled epoxy resin using 4.5 M HCl at 90 Degree-Sign C, mixing time 60 min and pulp density 50 g/L. From the leach liquor of solder materials of epoxy resin, the precipitate of sodium stannate as value added product was obtained at pH 1.9. The Pb from the leach residue was removed by using 0.1 M nitric acid at 90 Degree-Sign C in mixing time 45 min and pulp density 10 g/L. The metal free epoxy resin could be disposed-of safely/used as filling material without affecting the environment.

  20. Peroxide induced tin oxide coating of graphene oxide at room temperature and its application for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Sladkevich, S; Gun, J; Prikhodchenko, P V; Gutkin, V; Mikhaylov, A A; Novotortsev, V M; Zhu, J X; Yang, D; Hng, H H; Tay, Y Y; Tsakadze, Z; Lev, O

    2012-12-07

    We describe a new, simple and low-temperature method for ultra-thin coating of graphene oxide (GO) by peroxostannate, tin oxide or a mixture of tin and tin oxide crystallites by different treatments. The technique is environmentally friendly and does not require complicated infrastructure, an autoclave or a microwave. The supported peroxostannate phase is partially converted after drying to crystalline tin oxide with average, 2.5 nm cassiterite crystals. Mild heat treatment yielded full coverage of the reduced graphene oxide by crystalline tin oxide. Extensive heat treatment in vacuum at >500 °C yielded a mixture of elemental tin and cassiterite tin oxide nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The usefulness of the new approach was demonstrated by the preparation of two types of lithium ion anodes: tin oxide-rGO and a mixture of tin oxide and tin coated rGO composites (SnO(2)-Sn-rGO). The electrodes exhibited stable charge/discharge cyclability and high charging capacity due to the intimate contact between the conductive graphene and the very small tin oxide crystallites. The charging/discharging capacity of the anodes exceeded the theoretical capacity predicted based on tin lithiation. The tin oxide coated rGO exhibited higher charging capacity but somewhat lower stability upon extended charge/discharge cycling compared to SnO(2)-Sn-rGO.

  1. Further studies of the anodic dissolution in sodium chloride electrolyte of aluminium alloys containing tin and gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestoridi, Maria; Pletcher, Derek; Wharton, Julian A.; Wood, Robert J. K.

    As part of a programme to develop a high power density, Al/air battery with a NaCl brine electrolyte, the high rate dissolution of an aluminium alloy containing tin and gallium was investigated in a small volume cell. The objective was to define the factors that limit aluminium dissolution in condition that mimic a high power density battery. In a cell with a large ratio of aluminium alloy to electrolyte, over a range of current densities the extent of dissolution was limited to ∼1000 C cm -2 of anode surface by a thick layer of loosely bound, crystalline deposit on the Al alloy anode formed by precipitation from solution. This leads to a large increase in impedance and acts as a barrier to transport of ions.

  2. TIN based image segmentation for man-made feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanshou; Xie, Junfeng

    2005-10-01

    Traditionally, the splitting and merging algorithm of image segmentation is based on quad tree data structure, which is not convenient to express the topography of regions, the line segments and other information. A new framework is discussed in this paper. It is "TIN based image segmentation and grouping", in which edge information and region information are integrated directly. Firstly, the constrained triangle mesh is constructed with edge segments extracted by EDISON or other algorithm. And then, region growing based on triangles is processed to generate a coarse segmentation. At last, the regions are combined further with perceptual organization rule.

  3. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  4. Pretreatment of Platinum/Tin Oxide-Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.; Paulin, Patricia A.; Miller, Irvin M.; Schryer, David R.; Sidney, Barry D.; Wood, George M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Addition of CO to He pretreatment doubles catalytic activity. In sealed, high-energy, pulsed CO2 laser, CO and O2 form as decomposition products of CO2 in laser discharge zone. Products must be recombined, because oxygen concentration of more than few tenths of percent causes rapid deterioration of power, ending in unstable operation. Promising low-temperature catalyst for combining CO and O2 is platinum on tin oxide. New development increases activity of catalyst so less needed for recombination process.

  5. Structural and optical properties of Tin sulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Akkari, A.; Ben Nasr, T.; Kamoun, N.

    2007-09-19

    Tin sulphide SnS thin films were deposited on glass substrates using the chemical bath deposition technique (CBD). By investigating the influence of triethanolamine (TEA) concentration on the properties of deposited films, we obtained the optimum deposition parameter. These films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and spectrophotometric measurements. The obtained thin films exhibit the orthorhombic structure and the direct band gap energy is found to be about 1.65 eV, for films prepared at TEA concentration films equal to 13.5 M.

  6. Nanohardness and Residual Stress in TiN Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Luis Carlos; Ponce, Luis; Fundora, Abel; López, Enrique; Pérez, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    TiN films were prepared by the Cathodic arc evaporation deposition method under different negative substrate bias. AFM image analyses show that the growth mode of biased coatings changes from 3D island to lateral when the negative bias potential is increased. Nanohardness of the thin films was measured by nanoindentation, and residual stress was determined using Grazing incidence X ray diffraction. The maximum value of residual stress is reached at −100 V substrate bias coinciding with the biggest values of adhesion and nanohardness. Nanoindentation measurement proves that the force-depth curve shifts due to residual stress. The experimental results demonstrate that nanohardness is seriously affected by the residual stress.

  7. Platinum/Tin Oxide/Silica Gel Catalyst Oxidizes CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Davis, Patricia P.; Schryer, David R.; Miller, Irvin M.; Brown, David; Van Norman, John D.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1991-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalyst of platinum, tin oxide, and silica gel combines small concentrations of laser dissociation products, CO and O2, to form CO22 during long times at ambient temperature. Developed as means to prevent accumulation of these products in sealed CO2 lasers. Effective at ambient operating temperatures and installs directly in laser envelope. Formulated to have very high surface area and to chemisorb controlled quantities of moisture: chemisorbed water contained within and upon its structure, makes it highly active and very longlived so only small quantity needed for long times.

  8. Low-temperature measurements on shock loaded tin.

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Payton, J. R.; Rodriguez, P.; Obst, A. W.; Turley, D.; Grover, M.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to understand the influence of different surface finishes and the effect of ejecta mass on free surface temperature measurements, we performed a series of high-explosively (HE) shocked tin experiments. In this series of experiments the surface finish (i.e, specular, shallow grooves (16 {mu}inch), deep grooves (200 {mu}inch) and 'ball-rolled' surfaces) and the ambient atmosphere (from 1.2 torr, to atmospheric air, as well as 1 atm helium) were varied. With a {approx}180 kbar shock pressure the temperature results agreed for all but the very deep groove (>200 {mu}inch) surfaces investigated.

  9. Low-Temperature Measurements on Shock Loaded Tin

    SciTech Connect

    A. Seifter; M. Grover; D.B. Holtkamp; J.R. Payton; P. Rodriguez; D. Turley; A.W. Obst

    2004-09-01

    In an effort to understand the influence of different surface finishes and the effect of ejecta mass on free surface temperature measurements, we performed a series of high-explosively shocked tin experiments. In this series of experiments the surface finish (i.e., specular, shallow grooves, deep grooves, and ''ball-rolled'' surfaces) and the ambient atmosphere (from 1.2 torr, to atmospheric air, as well as 1 atm helium) were varied. With {approx}180 kbar shock pressure the temperature results agreed for all but the very deep groove surfaces investigated.

  10. Electrical properties of varistors based on tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielcarek, W.; Prociów, K.; Warycha, J.

    2016-02-01

    Tin oxide varistors may be an alternative for zinc based ones. The comparative analysis of both materials showed that, after adding suitable dopants, SnO2 has similar semiconducting properties as ZnO. SnO2 varistors were made in two versions: low- and high- added. The distinction lied in the added barium-bismuth compound in an amount of 0.3% and 0.8% respectively. Other metal oxides commonly used in varistors were added as well. Varistors were created using conventional ceramic technology applying sintering temperature 1250 oC.

  11. Study of indium tin oxide films exposed to atomic axygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Coutts, T. J.; Li, X.

    1989-01-01

    A qualitative simulation of the effects of atomic oxygen has been conducted on indium tin oxide (ITO) films prepared by dc sputtering onto room-temperature substrates, by exposing them to an RF-excited oxygen plasma and characterizing the resulting changes in optical, electrical, and structural properties as functions of exposure time with ellipsometry, spectrophotometry, resistivity, and X-ray measurements. While the films thus exposed exhibit reduced resistivity and optical transmission; both of these effects, as well as partial crystallization of the films, may be due to sample heating by the plasma. Film resistivity is found to stabilize after a period of exposure.

  12. Solvent free tin oxide nanoparticle for gas sensing application

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Pranay; Thakur, Ajay D.

    2016-05-06

    A new modified technique of synthesizing tin oxide nanoparticles with crystallite size of 2 nm to 6 nm has been developed. Surface area of the nanoparticle has been increased as we approached towards the Debye length. Such a techniques for approaching the Debye length is expected to bring remarkable changes in the properties of resistive based gas sensors. The technique used here is less toxic, economical and has high yield. Phase purity, size, shape and composition has been investigated using x-ray diffraction, micro Raman, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x ray spectroscopy. While surface area has been calculated through Brunaur-Emmett-Teller (BET).

  13. Electron beam irradiation stiffens zinc tin oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zang, Jianfeng; Bao, Lihong; Webb, Richard A; Li, Xiaodong

    2011-11-09

    We report a remarkable phenomenon that electron beam irradiation (EBI) significantly enhances the Young's modulus of zinc tin oxide (ZTO) nanowires (NWs), up to a 40% increase compared with the pristine NWs. In situ uniaxial buckling tests on individual NWs were conducted using a nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope. We propose that EBI results in substantial atomic bond contraction in ZTO NWs, accounting for the observed mechanically stiffening. This argument is supported by our experimental results that EBI also reduces the electrical conductivity of ZTO NWs.

  14. Electron loss study of the native oxide of tin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevolo, A. J.; Verhoeven, J. D.; Noack, M.

    1982-01-01

    Using electron loss spectroscopy in combination with ion beam depth profiling, it has been established that the oxide of tin formed by electropolishing followed by room temperature aging is metal free and composed of a mixture of SnO2 and SnO. In a fresh oxide layer, the SnO2 is confined to the outer portion of the predominantly SnO oxide. In an aged oxide layer, SnO2 is present up to the oxide/metal interface with an ever decreasing concentration as the interface is approached.

  15. Reactivation of a tin oxide-containing catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Hess, Robert V. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Sidney, Barry D. (Inventor); Wood, George M. (Inventor); Paulin, Patricia A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method for the reactivation of a tin oxide-containing catalyst of a CO.sub.2 laser is provided. First, the catalyst is pretreated by a standard procedure. When the catalyst experiences diminished activity during usage, the heated zone surrounding the catalyst is raised to a temperature which is the operating temperature of the laser and 400.degree. C. for approximately one hour. The catalyst is exposed to the same laser gas mixture during this period. The temperature of the heated zone is then lowered to the operating temperature of the CO.sub.2 laser.

  16. Study of indium tin oxide films exposed to atomic axygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Coutts, T. J.; Li, X.

    1989-01-01

    A qualitative simulation of the effects of atomic oxygen has been conducted on indium tin oxide (ITO) films prepared by dc sputtering onto room-temperature substrates, by exposing them to an RF-excited oxygen plasma and characterizing the resulting changes in optical, electrical, and structural properties as functions of exposure time with ellipsometry, spectrophotometry, resistivity, and X-ray measurements. While the films thus exposed exhibit reduced resistivity and optical transmission; both of these effects, as well as partial crystallization of the films, may be due to sample heating by the plasma. Film resistivity is found to stabilize after a period of exposure.

  17. Nanometric size effects on irradiation of tin oxide powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelot, A.; Hémon, S.; Gourbilleau, F.; Dufour, C.; Dooryhée, E.; Paumier, E.

    1998-12-01

    A nanometric powder of tin oxide (SnO2) has been irradiated with lead ions. The same grains have been observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) before and after irradiation at a fluence of 5×1012 Pb cm-2. The shape of largest grains strongly changes while the smallest ones disappear. This phenomenon has been explained by using the thermal spike model. It appears that the irradiation induces an increase of the internal pressure in the grains leading to their explosion. In the smallest grains, the calculated maximal temperatures exceed the boiling point so that these grains disappear.

  18. Crystal structure of tin(II) perchlorate trihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Köhler, Martin; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, [Sn(H2O)3](ClO4)2, was synthesized by the redox reaction of copper(II) perchlorate hexa­hydrate and metallic tin in perchloric acid. Both the trigonal–pyramidal [Sn(H2O)3]2+ cations and tetra­hedral perchlorate anions lie on crystallographic threefold axes. In the crystal, the cations are linked to the anions by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating (001) sheets. PMID:25552969

  19. High dislocation density of tin induced by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yi-Han; Liang, Chien-Lung; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Wu, Albert T.

    2015-12-15

    A dislocation density of as high as 10{sup 17} /m{sup 2} in a tin strip, as revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscope, was induced by current stressing at 6.5 x 10{sup 3} A/ cm{sup 2}. The dislocations exist in terms of dislocation line, dislocation loop, and dislocation aggregates. Electron Backscattered Diffraction images reflect that the high dislocation density induced the formation of low deflection angle subgrains, high deflection angle Widmanstätten grains, and recrystallization. The recrystallization gave rise to grain refining.

  20. Cathodic deposition and characterization of tin oxide coatings on graphite for electrochemical supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengqiang; Zhang, Liping; Wang, Dongmei; Xiao, Chao; Zhang, Shuren

    Amorphous tin oxide (SnO x) was cathodically deposited onto graphite electrode in a bath containing 0.1 M stannous chloride (SnCl 2), 0.5 M sodium nitrate (NaNO 3), and 0.4 M nitric acid (HNO 3) in an aqueous solution of 50% (v/v) ethanol. The SnO x coatings grown on graphite were characterized as typical capacitive behaviors by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometric (CP) in 0.5 M KCl. Specific capacitance (in milli-farad per square centimeter, C a) changes linearly with the deposition charge up to 4.5 C cm -2, and a maximum of as high as 355 mF cm -2 was obtained with the SnO x coating grown at around 5 C cm -2. For the SnO x coating deposited at 0.2 C cm -2, a maximum specific capacitance (in farad per gram, C m) of 298 and 125 F g -1 was achieved from CVs at a scan rate of 10, and 200 mV s -1, respectively. The value of C m significantly gets lower from 265 to around 95 F g -1 when the deposition charge increases from 0.2 to around 6.0 C cm -2. The long cycle-life and stability of the SnO x coatings on graphite via the presented cathodic deposition were also demonstrated.

  1. Copper-Zinc-Tin-Sulfide Thin Films via Annealing of Ultrasonic Spray Deposited Nanocrystal Coatings.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryce A; Trejo, Nancy D; Wu, Albert; Holgate, Collin S; Francis, Lorraine F; Aydil, Eray S

    2017-06-07

    Thin polycrystalline films of the solar absorber copper-zinc-tin-sulfide (CZTS) were formed by annealing coatings deposited on molybdenum-coated soda lime glass via ultrasonic spraying of aerosol droplets from colloidal CZTS nanocrystal dispersions. Production of uniform continuous nanocrystal coatings with ultrasonic spraying requires that the evaporation time is longer than the aerosol flight time from the spray nozzle to the substrate such that the aerosol droplets still have low enough viscosity to smooth the impact craters that form on the coating surface. In this work, evaporation was slowed by adding a high boiling point cosolvent, cyclohexanone, to toluene as the dispersing liquid. We analyzed, quantitatively, the effects of the solvent composition on the aerosol and coating drying dynamics using an aerosol evaporation model. Annealing coatings in sulfur vapor converts them into polycrystalline films with micrometer size grains, but the grains form continuous films only when Na is present during annealing to enhance grain growth. Continuous films are easier to form when the average nanocrystal size is 15 nm: using larger nanocrystals (e.g., 20 nm) sacrifices film continuity.

  2. The Toxicology of Organic Compounds of Tin (A Survey of the Literature) (Toksikologiya Organicheskikh Soedienii Olova (Obzor Literatury)),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TIN COMPOUNDS, TOXICITY), (*TIN, ORGANIC COMPOUNDS), DOSAGE, RESPIRATION, BIOASSAY, RESPIRATORY SYSTEM, PATHOLOGY, MORTALITY RATES , PATHOLOGY...HISTOLOGY, MORTALITY RATES , LUNG, KIDNEYS, EDEMA, SKIN(ANATOMY), NERVOUS SYSTEM, HEMOPOIETIC SYSTEM, PHYSIOLOGY, ENZYMES, INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, USSR

  3. 77 FR 32998 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... COMMISSION Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to... from Japan: Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review). By order of the Commission. Issued: May 29...

  4. 76 FR 14902 - Certain Tin Mill Products From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Tin Mill Products From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty... Japan. The period of review is August 1, 2009, through July 31, 2010. Based on the withdrawal of request... antidumping duty order on certain tin mill products from Japan. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order...

  5. 77 FR 5767 - Certain Tin Mill Products From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Tin Mill Products From Japan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty... Japan. The period of review is August 1, 2010, through July 31, 2011. Based on the withdrawal of request... antidumping duty order on certain tin mill products from Japan. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order...

  6. Estimating the Probability of Electrical Short Circuits from Tin Whiskers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.; Asfour, Shihab S.; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon A.; Ludwig, Larry L.; Wright, Maria C.

    2009-01-01

    To comply with lead-free legislation, many manufacturers have converted from tin-lead to pure tin finishes of electronic components. However, pure tin finishes have a greater propensity to grow tin whiskers than tin-lead finishes. Since tin whiskers present an electrical short circuit hazard in electronic components, simulations have been developed to quantify the risk of said short circuits occurring. Existing risk simulations make the assumption that when a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors, the result is an electrical short circuit. This conservative assumption is made because shorting is a random event that had an unknown probability associated with it. Note however that due to contact resistance electrical shorts may not occur at lower voltage levels. In our first article we developed an empirical probability model for tin whisker shorting. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive empirical model using a refined experiment with a larger sample size, in which we studied the effect of varying voltage on the breakdown of the contact resistance which leads to a short circuit. From the resulting data we estimated the probability distribution of an electrical short, as a function of voltage.

  7. Optical and chemical methods of metal ash analysis and tin recovery.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sabir

    2007-07-01

    'Metal ash' presents a waste disposal problem in most of the developing countries as the industries employ obsolete technologies. In this paper we describe analysis of tin ash, zinc ash and aluminium ash by means of optical methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), electron probe micro analysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical methods. The results of tin ash obtained by XRD method matched well with the cassiterite, a naturally occurring mineral of tin. ICP-MS studies reveal the presence of a large number of tracer metals, which may cause pollution by tertiary dispersion and this aspect is discussed. Conversely, the data generated by chemical methods are limited. However, the methods are simple and cost-effective. Then, they can easily be adopted by low-budget industries. Simple and cost-effective process to recover tin from tin ash is described. It is based on heating tin ash with sodium cyanide to about 900 degrees C to separate tin component from the metal ash. The process recovers good quality tin and offers a very high yield. The process can be scaled up to small pilot plant.

  8. Heteroepitaxial growth of TiN film on MgO (100) by reactive magnetron sputtering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    TiN thin films were deposited on MgO (100) substrates at different substrate temperatures using rf sputtering with Ar/N2 ratio of about 10. At 700°C, the growth rate of TiN was approximately 0.05 μm/h. The structural and electrical properties of TiN thin films were characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Hall measurements. For all deposition conditions, XRD results show that the TiN films can be in an epitaxy with MgO with cube-on-cube orientation relationship of (001)TiN // (001)MgO and [100]TiN // [100]MgO. TEM with selected-area electron diffraction pattern verifies the epitaxial growth of the TiN films on MgO. SEM and AFM show that the surface of the TiN film is very smooth with roughness approximately 0.26 nm. The minimum resistivity of the films can be as low as 45 μΩ cm. PMID:25324706

  9. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10140 - Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10140 Phosphoric acid, tin (2+) salt (2:3). (a) Chemical substance and...+) salt (2:3) (PMN P-06-33, CAS No. 15578-32-2) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  13. Characterisation of baroque tin amalgam mirrors of the historical Green Vault in Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zywitzki, O.; Nedon, W.; Kopte, T.; Modes, T.

    2008-07-01

    The historical Green Vault, one of Europe’s most sumptuous treasure chambers, has reopened in September 2006 in the Dresden Royal Palace. For the baroque presentation of the artworks the special properties of tin amalgam mirrors are of great importance. A comprehensive analytic characterisation was necessary for restoration and reconstruction. The different original casting glasses were analysed in respect of chemical composition, roughness, waviness and optical properties like chromaticity coordinates and transmittance. The microstructure of the tin amalgam layers were investigated on metallographic cross-sections and by X-ray diffraction. The investigations reveal that the tin amalgam layers are composed of γ-HgSn6-10 phase with a grain size between 5 and 50 μm surrounded by a thin mercury phase with about 2 wt. % tin. However the most important property of the baroque tin amalgam mirrors is a relative low reflectivity of about 59% which is drastically lower than for silver mirrors with a reflectivity of about 96%. According to the characterisation results a suitable glass for reconstruction was selected. The mirror layers were produced by historical tin amalgam technology for the rooms not destroyed by bombarding of Dresden in February 1945. For the completely destroyed Jewel Room pure tin layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering. The results show that this new technology enables an adequate substitute for the original tin amalgam layers.

  14. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one... covering applied over the cork and neck areas) on wine bottles to prevent insect infestation, as a barrier...

  15. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one... covering applied over the cork and neck areas) on wine bottles to prevent insect infestation, as a barrier...

  16. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... lead foil capsules for wine bottles. (a) Tin-coated lead foil is composed of a lead foil coated on one... covering applied over the cork and neck areas) on wine bottles to prevent insect infestation, as a barrier...

  17. 21 CFR 189.301 - Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine bottles... Addition to Human Food Through Food-Contact Surfaces § 189.301 Tin-coated lead foil capsules for wine... and neck areas) on wine bottles to prevent insect infestation, as a barrier to oxygen, and for...

  18. Tin--a toxic heavy metal? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, S G; Femfert, U

    1984-03-01

    A tolerable limit for tin concentration in canned food of 250 ppm (Fritsch et al., 1977) is generally accepted. However, biochemical effects attributable to tin have been observed even after oral administration of 1 and 3 mg Sn/kg body wt (Yamaguchi et al., 1980). These doses reflect 10 and 30 ppm tin in the diet. The experiments of de Groot (1973) showed that hemoglobin concentrations in the blood of rats decreased significantly feeding a diet containing 150 ppm tin. The absorption of iron was diminished after simultaneous administration of 0.8 mumol Sn(II) and iron, reflecting a tin dose of 95 ppm tin, by injection into jejunal loops of rats (Schäfer and Forth, 1983). In general, however, canned food usually plays a secondary role in daily nutrition. Fortunately, concentrations of about 2000 ppm tin as reported by Warburton et al. (1962) and Barker and Runte (1972) are not found in canned food, but values between 50 and 500 ppm are not unusual (Piscator, 1979). If a large amount of canned food is eaten daily over a long period, disturbances of gastric acid secretion and a reduction in iron absorption or heme metabolism cannot be excluded. The storage of food, especially acid foods, in opened cans should be avoided as this practice increases the amount of tin in the food when it is consumed.

  19. Tin--a toxic heavy metal. A review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, S.G.; Femfert, U.

    1984-03-01

    A tolerable limit for tin concentration in canned food of 250 ppm (Fritsch et al., 1977) is generally accepted. However, biochemical effects attributable to tin have been observed even after oral administration of 1 and 3 mg Sn/kg body wt (Yamaguchi et al., 1980). These doses reflect 10 and 30 ppm tin in the diet. The experiments of de Groot (1973) showed that hemoglobin concentrations in the blood of rats decreased significantly feeding a diet containing 150 ppm tin. The absorption of iron was diminished after simultaneous administration of 0.8 mumol Sn(II) and iron, reflecting a tin dose of 95 ppm tin, by injection into jejunal loops of rats (Schaefer and Forth, 1983). In general, however, canned food usually plays a secondary role in daily nutrition. Fortunately, concentrations of about 2000 ppm tin as reported by Warburton et al. (1962) and Barker and Runte (1972) are not found in canned food, but values between 50 and 500 ppm are not unusual (Piscator, 1979). If a large amount of canned food is eaten daily over a long period, disturbances of gastric acid secretion and a reduction in iron absorption or heme metabolism cannot be excluded. The storage of food, especially acid foods, in opened cans should be avoided as this practice increases the amount of tin in the food when it is consumed.

  20. Tin pest in Sn-0.5 wt.% Cu lead-free solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, Yoshiharu; Williams, Naomi; Gagg, Colin; Plumbridge, William

    2001-06-01

    Tin pest (the product of the allotropic transformation of β-tin into α-tin at temperatures below 286 K) has been observed in a Sn-0.5 wt.% Cu solder alloy. Some 40 percent of the specimen surface was transformed into gray tin after aging at 255K for 1.5 years, and after 1.8 years, the proportion increased to about 70 percent. The degree of transformation in work-hardened areas is much higher than in other areas, suggesting residual stress might provide an additional driving force for the transformation into α-tin. The allotropic change results in a 26 percent increase in volume, and cracks are initiated to accommodate the changes in volume. Results indicate that tin pest could lead to total disintegration of micro-electronic solder joints. The tin-copper eutectic system may become a prominent lead-free solder, and tin pest could have major ramifications on service lifetime of electronic assemblies.

  1. Silicon-tin oxynitride glassy composition and use as anode for lithium-ion battery

    DOEpatents

    Neudecker, Bernd J.; Bates, John B.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions which are especially useful in the construction of anode material for thin-film electrochemical devices including rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, electrochromic mirrors, electrochromic windows, and actuators. Additional applications of silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions include optical fibers and optical waveguides.

  2. Heteroepitaxial growth of TiN film on MgO (100) by reactive magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chun; Peng, Chun-Yen; Chang, Li

    2014-01-01

    TiN thin films were deposited on MgO (100) substrates at different substrate temperatures using rf sputtering with Ar/N2 ratio of about 10. At 700°C, the growth rate of TiN was approximately 0.05 μm/h. The structural and electrical properties of TiN thin films were characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Hall measurements. For all deposition conditions, XRD results show that the TiN films can be in an epitaxy with MgO with cube-on-cube orientation relationship of (001)TiN // (001)MgO and [100]TiN // [100]MgO. TEM with selected-area electron diffraction pattern verifies the epitaxial growth of the TiN films on MgO. SEM and AFM show that the surface of the TiN film is very smooth with roughness approximately 0.26 nm. The minimum resistivity of the films can be as low as 45 μΩ cm.

  3. Sol gel synthesis and characterization of tin oxide and doped-tin oxide nanosized materials used for gas-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongmei

    SnO2-based gas sensors have been shown to be convenient tools for detecting inflammable or toxic gases diluted in air. Grain size reduction and mixed tin oxidation states are two of the main factors enhancing sensor properties of undoped and doped tin oxides. Two tin(II) halide precursors were utilized along with variations in solvent, aging times, drying atmosphere and annealing temperatures to synthesize SnO, SnO2 or the SnO/SnO2 mixed powders by a modified sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction and UV-Visible Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy were the primary techniques used to characterize powder structure and properties. It has been found that SnCl2 is a suitable precursor for synthesis of nanocrystalline mixed Sn(II)/Sn(IV) oxide powders. The ratio of SnO to SnO2 can be adjusted by sintering/annealing of the SnO/SnO 2 mixture in air. A rarely observed form of Sn3O4 and another intermediate phase, orthorhombic SnO2, can be generated at the range of 500--600°C. SnBr2 and SnBr4 can be used as precursors for an efficient low-temperature, atmospheric pressure vapor deposition of nanocrystalline SnO2, most likely via a partially hydrolyzed Sn(IV) bromide intermediate. As vapor-deposited, the average SnO 2 crystallite size is approximately 3 nm, and can be increased systematically from 3 nm to 16 nm by annealing in air. The presence of amorphous material and the remaining hydroxyl groups in the SnO2 crystals are possible causes of the crystalline deformation of SnO/SnO2 materials precipitated from SnCl2. SnO 2 obtained from the SnO/SnO2 mixture are more disordered than that from tin(H) oxyhydroxide and from SnO2 gel heated at the same sintering temperature. The more disordered material has lower band gaps and bigger Urbach energies. Coprecipitation of a second metal, such as Cr, Fe, Zn, Co, K and Cu, results in variations in SnO2 crystallite growth patterns, depending on identity of the added dopant. Metal oxide materials mixed with polypyrrole were tested as composite

  4. Growth of YBCO Thin Films on TiN(001) and CeO2-Coated TiN Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    substrates. Thin CeO2 (~200 nm thick) and YBCO (~300 nm thick) layers were grown on TiN-coated MgO substrates, using pulsed laser deposition. While YBCO ...and YBCO (300 nm thick) layers were grown on TiN-coated MgO substrates, using pulsed laser deposition. While YBCO grown directly on TiN was of poor...grown on the TiN-coated MgO and then an 300 nm thick YBCO layers was subsequently depos- ited. For other samples, YBCO deposition directly on the

  5. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3–group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3. PMID:26964636

  6. Superconductivity of novel tin hydrides (SnnHm) under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdi Davari Esfahani, M.; Wang, Zhenhai; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Huafeng; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Shengnan; Rakitin, Maksim S.; Zhou, Xiang-Feng

    2016-03-01

    With the motivation of discovering high-temperature superconductors, evolutionary algorithm USPEX is employed to search for all stable compounds in the Sn-H system. In addition to the traditional SnH4, new hydrides SnH8, SnH12 and SnH14 are found to be thermodynamically stable at high pressure. Dynamical stability and superconductivity of tin hydrides are systematically investigated. Im2-SnH8, C2/m-SnH12 and C2/m-SnH14 exhibit higher superconducting transition temperatures of 81, 93 and 97 K compared to the traditional compound SnH4 with Tc of 52 K at 200 GPa. An interesting bent H3-group in Im2-SnH8 and novel linear H in C2/m-SnH12 are observed. All the new tin hydrides remain metallic over their predicted range of stability. The intermediate-frequency wagging and bending vibrations have more contribution to electron-phonon coupling parameter than high-frequency stretching vibrations of H2 and H3.

  7. Periodic macroporous nanocrystalline antimony-doped tin oxide electrode.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Eric; Soheilnia, Navid; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2011-04-26

    Optically transparent and electrically conductive electrodes are ubiquitous in the myriad world of devices. They are an indispensable component of solar and photoelectrochemical cells, organic and polymer light emitting diodes, lasers, displays, electrochromic windows, photodetectors, and chemical sensors. The majority of the electrodes in such devices are made of large electronic band-gap doped metal oxides fashioned as a dense low-surface-area film deposited on a glass substrate. Typical transparent conducting oxide materials include indium-, fluorine-, or antimony-doped tin oxides. Herein we introduce for the first time a transparent conductive periodic macroporous electrode that has been self-assembled from 6 nm nanocrystalline antimony-doped tin oxide with high thermal stability, optimized electrical conductivity, and high quality photonic crystal properties, and present an electrochemically actuated optical light switch built from this electrode, whose operation is predicated on its unique combination of electrical, optical, and photonic properties. The ability of this macroporous electrode to host active functional materials like dyes, polymers, nanocrystals, and nanowires provides new opportunities to create devices with improved performance enabled by the large area, spatially accessible and electroactive internal surface.

  8. Recent Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Radioactive Tin Beams

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z = 50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, Nmore » = 82, and neutron-deficient, N = 50, regions. Here, we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in Sn-131 from across the N = 82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient Sn-106,108Sn. In conclusion, In both cases, measurements of γ rays in coincidence with charged particles proved to be invaluable.« less

  9. Transparent conducting aerogels of antimony-doped tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Correa Baena, Juan Pablo; Agrios, Alexander G

    2014-11-12

    Bulk antimony-doped tin oxide aerogels are prepared by epoxide-initiated sol-gel processing. Tin and antimony precursors are dissolved in ethanol and water, respectively, and propylene oxide is added to cause rapid gelation of the sol, which is then dried supercritically. The Sb:Sn precursor mole ratio is varied from 0 to 30% to optimize the material conductivity and absorbance. The materials are characterized by electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen physisorption analysis, a four-point probe resistivity measurement, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The samples possess morphology typical of aerogels without significant change with the amount of doping. Calcination at 450 °C produces a cassiterite crystal structure in all aerogel samples. Introduction of Sb at 15% in the precursor (7.6% Sb by XPS) yields a resistivity more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than an undoped SnO2 aerogel. Calcination at 800 °C reduces the resistivity by an additional 2 orders of magnitude to 30 Ω·cm, but results in a significant decrease in surface area and pore volume.

  10. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of the tin isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wisshak, K.; Voss, F.; Theis, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Guber, K.; Kazakov, L.; Kornilov, N.; Reffo, G.

    1996-09-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 114}Sn, {sup 115}Sn, {sup 116}Sn, {sup 117}Sn, {sup 118}Sn, and {sup 120}Sn were measured in the energy range from 3 to 225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.75 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. Neutrons were produced via the {sup 7}Li({ital p},{ital n}){sup 7}Be reaction using a pulsed proton beam. Capture events were registered with the Karlsruhe 4{pi} barium fluoride detector. The experiment was complicated by the small ({ital n},{gamma}) cross sections of the proton magic tin isotopes and by the comparably low enrichment of the rare isotopes {sup 114}Sn and {sup 115}Sn. Despite significant corrections for capture of scattered neutrons and for isotopic impurities, the high efficiency and the spectroscopic quality of the BaF{sub 2} detector allowed the determination of the cross-section ratios with overall uncertainties of 1{endash}2{percent}, five times smaller compared to existing data. Based on these results, Maxwellian averaged ({ital n},{gamma}) cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between {ital kT}=10 and 100 keV. These data are used for a discussion of the solar tin abundance and for an improved determination of the isotopic {ital s}- and {ital r}-process components. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Tin-porphyrin-assisted formation of coordination frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titi, Hatem M.

    2016-09-01

    Novel 3D networks synthesized by two different methods are reported in this article. Structure 1 {[CdL2]·(solvent)}n consists of CdII-single metallic nodes held together by coordinated isonicotinate ligands (L) to form a 3D chiral framework (P41212). The resulting structure exhibits threefold-interpenetrated dia coordination networks. After a few weeks the crystals were re-measured to form 1a {[Cd(L)2(H2O)]·DMF}n with two interpenetrated dia nets which is thermodynamically more stable. On the other hand, the addition of the tin(IV)-porphyrin to the same reaction mixture led to the formation of 3D pseudo-isostructures, based on oxo-centered CdII and MnII/III cluster nodes, 2 {[Cd3(OH)L4(H2O)3](ClO4)}n and 3 {[Mn3(O)L4(DMF)3](ClO4)}n. These structures represent topologically bcg nets. Possible synthetic mechanism was proposed to emphasize the role of the tin(IV)-porphyrin that led to the construction of oxo-centered trinuclear clusters in 2 and 3.

  12. The interstellar abundances of tin and four other heavy elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Welty, D. E.; Morton, D. C.; Spitzer, L.; York, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra recorded at 1150-1600 A with an instrumental resolution near 16 km/s were obtained with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph on board the HST. The gaseous interstellar abundances of five heavy elements along the light paths to 23 Ori, 15 Mon, 1 Sco, Pi Sco, and Pi Aqr were determined from the observations. The 1400.450 A line of Sn II was detected and identified toward three stars; at Z = 50, tin is the first element from the fifth row of the periodic table to be identified in the interstellar medium. One spectral line of each of Cu II (Z = 29) and Ga II (Z = 31), three lines of Ge II (Z = 32), and two lines of Kr I (Z = 36) were also detected toward some or all of the five stars. The depletions of these five heavy elements generally decrease monotonically with increasing atomic number toward each of the six stars, and tin is generally undepleted within the observational errors. The depletions of 26 elements from the interstellar gas in an average dense interstellar cloud appear to correlate with the elemental 'nebular' condensation temperatures more closely than with the first ionization potentials.

  13. The interstellar abundances of tin and four other heavy elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Welty, D. E.; Morton, D. C.; Spitzer, L.; York, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra recorded at 1150-1600 A with an instrumental resolution near 16 km/s were obtained with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph on board the HST. The gaseous interstellar abundances of five heavy elements along the light paths to 23 Ori, 15 Mon, 1 Sco, Pi Sco, and Pi Aqr were determined from the observations. The 1400.450 A line of Sn II was detected and identified toward three stars; at Z = 50, tin is the first element from the fifth row of the periodic table to be identified in the interstellar medium. One spectral line of each of Cu II (Z = 29) and Ga II (Z = 31), three lines of Ge II (Z = 32), and two lines of Kr I (Z = 36) were also detected toward some or all of the five stars. The depletions of these five heavy elements generally decrease monotonically with increasing atomic number toward each of the six stars, and tin is generally undepleted within the observational errors. The depletions of 26 elements from the interstellar gas in an average dense interstellar cloud appear to correlate with the elemental 'nebular' condensation temperatures more closely than with the first ionization potentials.

  14. Electron-Beam Induced Transformations of Layered Tin Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Sutter, E; Huang, Y; Komsa, H-P; Ghorbani-Asl, M; Krasheninnikov, A V; Sutter, P

    2016-07-13

    By combining high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and associated analytical methods with first-principles calculations, we study the behavior of layered tin dichalcogenides under electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate that the controllable removal of chalcogen atoms due to electron irradiation, at both room and elevated temperatures, gives rise to transformations in the atomic structure of Sn-S and Sn-Se systems so that new phases with different properties can be induced. In particular, rhombohedral layered SnS2 and SnSe2 can be transformed via electron beam induced loss of chalcogen atoms into highly anisotropic orthorhombic layered SnS and SnSe. A striking dependence of the layer orientation of the resulting SnS-parallel to the layers of ultrathin SnS2 starting material, but slanted for transformations of thicker few-layer SnS2-is rationalized by a transformation pathway in which vacancies group into ordered S-vacancy lines, which convert via a Sn2S3 intermediate to SnS. Absence of a stable Sn2Se3 intermediate precludes this pathway for the selenides, hence SnSe2 always transforms into basal plane oriented SnSe. Our results provide microscopic insights into the transformation mechanism and show how irradiation can be used to tune the properties of layered tin chalcogenides for applications in electronics, catalysis, or energy storage.

  15. Recent Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Radioactive Tin Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Ahn, S.; Allmond, J. M.; Ayres, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Bey, A.; Bingham, C.; Cartegni, L.; Cerizza, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Cizewski, J. A.; Gade, A.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garcia-Ruiz, R. F.; Grzywacz, R.; Howard, M. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; McDaniel, S.; Miller, D.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Padgett, S.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, D. C.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Shore, A.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tostevin, J.; Varner, R. L.; Weisshaar, D.; Wimmer, K.; Winkler, R.

    2015-01-01

    Direct reaction techniques are powerful tools to study the single-particle nature of nuclei. Performing direct reactions on short-lived nuclei requires radioactive ion beams produced either via fragmentation or the Isotope Separation OnLine (ISOL) method. Some of the most interesting regions to study with direct reactions are close to the magic numbers where changes in shell structure can be tracked. These changes can impact the final abundances of explosive nucleosynthesis. The structure of the chain of tin isotopes is strongly influenced by the Z = 50 proton shell closure, as well as the neutron shell closures lying in the neutron-rich, N = 82, and neutron-deficient, N = 50, regions. Here, we present two examples of direct reactions on exotic tin isotopes. The first uses a one-neutron transfer reaction and a low-energy reaccelerated ISOL beam to study states in Sn-131 from across the N = 82 shell closure. The second example utilizes a one-neutron knockout reaction on fragmentation beams of neutron-deficient Sn-106,108Sn. In conclusion, In both cases, measurements of γ rays in coincidence with charged particles proved to be invaluable.

  16. Amorphous nickel incorporated tin oxide thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen; Ren, Jinhua; Lin, Dong; Han, Yanbing; Qu, Mingyue; Pi, Shubin; Fu, Ruofan; Zhang, Qun

    2017-09-01

    Nickel as a dopant has been proposed to suppress excess carrier concentration in n-type tin oxide based thin film transistors (TFTs). The influences of Ni content on nickel doped tin oxide (TNO) thin films and their corresponding TFTs were investigated with experimental results showing that the TNO thin films are amorphous. Through the comparison of the transfer characteristic curves of the TNO TFTs with different Ni contents, it was observed that Ni doping is useful to improve the performance of SnO2-based TFTs by suppressing the off-state current and shifting the threshold voltage to 0 V. The amorphous TNO TFT with 3.3 at.% Ni content shows optimum performance, with field effect mobility of 8.4 cm2 V-1 s-1, saturation mobility of 6.8 cm2 V-1 s-1, subthreshold swing value of 0.8 V/decade, and an on-off current ratio of 2.1  ×  107. Nevertheless, the bias stress stability of SnO2-based TFTs deteriorate.

  17. Accommodation of tin in tetragonal ZrO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B. D. C.; Grimes, R. W.; Wenman, M. R.; Murphy, S. T.; Burr, P. A.

    2015-02-28

    Atomic scale computer simulations using density functional theory were used to investigate the behaviour of tin in the tetragonal phase oxide layer on Zr-based alloys. The Sn{sub Zr}{sup ×} defect was shown to be dominant across most oxygen partial pressures, with Sn{sub Zr}{sup ″} charge compensated by V{sub O}{sup ••} occurring at partial pressures below 10{sup −31 }atm. Insertion of additional positive charge into the system was shown to significantly increase the critical partial pressure at which Sn{sub Zr}{sup ″} is stable. Recently developed low-Sn nuclear fuel cladding alloys have demonstrated an improved corrosion resistance and a delayed transition compared to Sn-containing alloys, such as Zircaloy-4. The interaction between the positive charge and the tin defect is discussed in the context of alloying additions, such as niobium and their influence on corrosion of cladding alloys.

  18. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  19. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  20. Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process

    DOEpatents

    Heckman, R.A.

    1980-12-19

    A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

  1. Sol-gel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic tin oxide based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ribot, F.O.; Banse, F.; Sanchez, C.

    1994-12-31

    RSn(OAm{sup t}){sub 3} with R = n-butyl, n-butenyl or para-styryl, which are monomeric precursors, have been hydrolyzed. The so-obtained products have been characterized mainly by {sup 119}Sn NMR. In every case, tin expands its coordination from 4 to 5 and 6, and hydrolysis yields tin oxo-hydroxo species of small size. For n-butyl and n-butenyl, a cage-like tin oxo-hydroxo cluster, {l_brace}(RSn){sub 12}({mu}{sub 3}-O){sub 14}({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 6}{r_brace}{sup 2+}, was evidenced as the major compound formed. Organic polymerization of the unsaturated organic groups linked to tin was initiated on the hydrolysis products and yielded hybrid systems which can be pictured as tin oxo-hydroxo oligomers attached together by polymeric chains.

  2. NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage http://nepp.nasa.gov/whisker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry

    2000-01-01

    The NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage provides general information and GSFC Code 562 experimentation results regarding the well known phenomenon of tin whisker formation from pure tin plated substrates. The objective of this www site is to provide a central repository for information pertaining to this phenomenon and to provide status of the GSFC experiments to understand the behavior of tin whiskers in space environments. The Tin Whisker www site is produced by Code 562. This www site does not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in this www site is at the level of that produced by industry and university researchers and is published at international conferences.

  3. NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage http://nepp.nasa.gov/whisker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Harry

    2000-01-01

    The NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage provides general information and GSFC Code 562 experimentation results regarding the well known phenomenon of tin whisker formation from pure tin plated substrates. The objective of this www site is to provide a central repository for information pertaining to this phenomenon and to provide status of the GSFC experiments to understand the behavior of tin whiskers in space environments. The Tin Whisker www site is produced by Code 562. This www site does not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in this www site is at the level of that produced by industry and university researchers and is published at international conferences.

  4. A multi-phase Equation of State diagnostic applied to the study of shock loaded tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenton-Taylor, Caroline; Glauser, Antony; Ota, Thomas; Price, Ed

    2011-06-01

    The accurate detection of shock driven material phase transitions demands a multiple diagnostic capable of simultaneously measuring temperature, emissivity, pressure and velocity. By combining optical pyrometry with reflectivity based emissivity diagnostics we report shock loaded tin temperatures from 820 K to 1780 K with associated probable errors down to +/- 12.8 K. In addition simultaneous Class 4 laser heterodyne velocimetry recorded the tin surface velocity as viewed through a LiF anvil. Constraining the tin pressure with lithium fluoride generated microsecond experiment time durations; thermal diffusion models identified the tin/glue/LiF layer as advantageous for temperature measurement. Across a range of pressures, the emissivity corrected temperature data were found to be well aligned with a single tin Equation of State model. AWE Crown Owned Copyright (2011).

  5. Pre-tinning and flux considerations on the reliability of solder surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J. ); Morris, J.W. Jr. ); Lucey, G.K. )

    1991-07-01

    The kinetics of wetting were studied on several different prepared surfaces of copper (Cu) to simulate the microstructure observed in pre-tinned Cu-clad printed circuit boards. The results illustrate the effectiveness of pre-tinning in maintaining the solderability of Cu surfaces. Pre-tinning with Pb-rich solder (95Pb-5Sn) is particularly effective since solderability is preserved even after a relatively long aging treatment. On the other hand, pre-tinning with eutectic solder risks the loss of solderability during aging or baking due to surface exposure of an {var epsilon}-phase intermetallic with poor wetting properties. The results also confirm the presence of carbon in pre-tinned specimens due to the use of flux. The effect of carbon on solderability is not yet known. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Assessment of organotin and tin-free antifouling paints contamination in the Korean coastal area.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Ri-Nae; Kim, Un-Jung; Lee, In-Seok; Choi, Minkyu; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2015-10-15

    Twelve organotins (methyl-, octyl-, butyl-, and phenyl-tin), and eight tin-free antifouling paints and their degradation products were measured in marine sediments from the Korean coastal area, and Busan and Ulsan bays, the largest harbor area in Korea. The total concentration of tin-free antifouling paints was two- to threefold higher than the total concentration of organotins. Principal component analysis was used to identify sites with relatively high levels of contamination in the inner bay area of Busan and Ulsan bays, which were separated from the coastal area. In Busan and Ulsan bays, chlorothalonil and DMSA were more dominant than in the coastal area. However, Sea-Nine 211 and total diurons, including their degradation products, were generally dominant in the Korean coastal area. The concentrations of tin and tin-free compounds were significantly different between the east and west coasts.

  7. Combined Tin-Containing Fluoride Solution and CO2 Laser Treatment Reduces Enamel Erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Witulski, Nadine; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Apel, Christian; Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of combined CO2 laser and tin-containing fluoride treatment on the formation and progression of enamel erosive lesions. Ninety-six human enamel samples were obtained, stored in thymol solution and, after surface polishing, randomly divided into 6 different surface treatment groups (n = 16 in each group) as follows: no treatment, control (C); one CO2 laser irradiation (L1); two CO2 laser irradiations (L2); daily application of fluoride solution (F); combined daily fluoride solution + one CO2 laser irradiation (L1F), and combined daily fluoride solution + two CO2 laser irradiations (L2F). Laser irradiation was performed at 0.3 J/cm2 (5 µs/226 Hz/10.6 µm) on day 1 (L1) and day 6 (L2). The fluoride solution contained AmF/NaF (500 ppm F), and SnCl2 (800 ppm Sn) at pH 4.5. After surface treatment the samples were submitted to an erosive cycling over 10 days, including immersion in citric acid (2 min/0.05 M/pH = 2.3) 6 times daily and storage in remineralization solution (≥1 h) between erosive attacks. At the end of each cycling day, the enamel surface loss (micrometers) was measured using a 3D laser profilometer. Data were statistically analyzed by means of a 2-level mixed effects model and linear contrasts (α = 0.05). Group F (-3.3 ± 2.0 µm) showed significantly lower enamel surface loss than groups C (-27.22 ± 4.1 µm), L1 (-18.3 ± 4.4 µm) and L2 (-16.3 ± 5.3 µm) but higher than L1F (-1.0 ± 4.4 µm) and L2F (1.4 ± 3.2 µm, p < 0.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, the tin-containing fluoride solution caused 88% reduction of enamel surface loss, while its combination with CO2 laser irradiation at 0.3 J/cm2 hampered erosive loss almost completely. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Site distortions created by the stereoactive lone pair of Tin(II) in highly symmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dénès, Georges; Madamba, M. Cecilia; Merazig, Hocine; Muntasar, Abdualhafed; Zhu, Zhimeng

    2016-10-01

    Several fluoride compounds containing divalent tin that have a fluorite (CaF2-type) unit cell have been prepared and studied. Some are stoichiometric compounds while others are solid solutions. The cubic symmetry of the unit-cell (no lattice distortion and no superstructure) and the unique metal ion site of the fluorite structure make it that tin and the other metal have to be disordered on the normal metal site of the fluorite unit-cell. However, that site has the m3m-Oh point symmetry, and the metal ion is located in the center of a cube having fluoride ions in all its corners. Therefore, the same coordination should apply to tin. However, tin(II) possesses a non-bonding pair of electrons called a "lone pair", and in order for tin(II) to have a cubic symmetry, its lone pair has to be located on the unhybridized 5s orbital, that is spherical and thus does not distort the coordination. In such a case, the lone pair is said to be "non-stereoactive". This would make tin present in the form of the Sn2+ stannous ion, and therefore Sn-F bonding must be ionic. However, tin(II) fluorides are known to be always covalent with a hybridized lone pair on tin, which has therefore a reduced coordination number and therefore a highly distorted polyhedron of coordination. Such a hybridized lone pair is said to be "stereoactive". Tin-119 Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to probe the bonding type and it showed that bonding is covalent, the lone pair is hybridized and the tin coordination is dramatically distorted. A model based on a double disorder was made that accounts for the apparent contradiction between the crystallographic and the Mössbauer results.

  9. 76 FR 60001 - Certain Tin Mill Products From Japan; Final Results of the Second Expedited Sunset Review of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Tin Mill Products From Japan; Final Results of the Second Expedited...) initiated the second sunset review of the antidumping duty order on certain tin mill products from Japan... duty order on certain tin mill products from Japan pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act. See...

  10. Ion-chromatographic determination of chloride and fluoride in electrolyte from the halogen tin-plating process.

    PubMed

    Korth, W; Ellis, J

    1984-06-01

    A simple and rapid procedure is proposed for the determination of chloride and free fluoride in tin electroplating fluid. Suppressor-column ion-chromatography is used after oxidation of hexafluorostannate(II) to hexafluorostannate(IV) with hydrogen peroxide. Concurrent determination of tin(II) and total tin then allows calculation of the concentrations of fluoride, hexafluorostannate(II) and hexafluorostannate(IV).

  11. 31 CFR 359.53 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? 359.53 Section 359.53 Money and... Savings Bonds § 359.53 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  12. 31 CFR 359.53 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? 359.53 Section 359.53 Money and... Savings Bonds § 359.53 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  13. 31 CFR 359.53 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? 359.53 Section 359.53 Money and... Savings Bonds § 359.53 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  14. 31 CFR 256.13 - Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? 256.13 Section 256.13 Money and... BILLS Requesting Payments § 256.13 Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? Yes, agencies must include a valid TIN on all requests...

  15. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  16. 31 CFR 359.28 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I savings bonds? 359.28 Section 359.28 Money... Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.28 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. If the bond was purchased as a gift or award and...

  17. 31 CFR 359.28 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I savings bonds? 359.28 Section 359.28 Money... Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.28 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. If the bond was purchased as a gift or award and...

  18. 31 CFR 359.28 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I savings bonds? 359.28 Section 359.28 Money... Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.28 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. If the bond is being purchased as a gift or award...

  19. 31 CFR 359.53 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? 359.53 Section 359.53 Money and... Savings Bonds § 359.53 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series I savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  20. 31 CFR 256.13 - Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? 256.13 Section 256.13 Money and... BILLS Requesting Payments § 256.13 Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? Yes, agencies must include a valid TIN on all requests...

  1. 31 CFR 256.13 - Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? 256.13 Section 256.13 Money and... BILLS Requesting Payments § 256.13 Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? Yes, agencies must include a valid TIN on all requests...

  2. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... EE Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required...

  3. 31 CFR 256.13 - Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? 256.13 Section 256.13 Money and... BILLS Requesting Payments § 256.13 Are agencies required to supply a taxpayer identification number (TIN) when submitting a request for payment? Yes, agencies must include a valid TIN on all requests...

  4. 31 CFR 359.28 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I savings bonds? 359.28 Section 359.28 Money... Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.28 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. If the bond is being purchased as a gift or award...

  5. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  6. 31 CFR 359.28 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for the registration of definitive Series I savings bonds? 359.28 Section 359.28 Money... Definitive Series I Savings Bonds § 359.28 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for the... include the TIN of the owner or first-named coowner. If the bond was purchased as a gift or award and...

  7. 31 CFR 351.68 - Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? 351.68 Section 351.68 Money and... Savings Bonds § 351.68 Are taxpayer identification numbers (TINs) required for registration of book-entry Series EE savings bonds? The TIN of each person named in the registration is required to purchase a...

  8. A HIgh Current Density Low Cost Niobium 3 Tin Titanium Doped Conductor Utilizing A Novel Internal Tin Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A Zeitlin

    2005-02-23

    An internal tin conductor has been developed using a Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) with an integral Nb barrier surrounding the Nb filaments. High current densities of 3000 A/mm2+ at 12 T and 1800 A/mm2 at 15 T have been achieved in conductors as small as 0.152 mm with the use of Nb7.5Ta filaments and Ti in the Sn core. In contrast, conductors with pure Nb and Ti in the Sn achieved 2700 A/mm2 at 12 T. Two internal fins, developed and patented on the project, were introduced into the filament array and reduced the effective filament diameter (Deff) by 38%. Additional fins will further reduce Deff The conductor was produced from 152.4 mm diameter billets to produce wire as small as 0.152 mm. The process promises be scaleable to 304 mm diameter billets yielding wire of 0.304 mm diameter. The MEIT process wire was easy to draw with relatively few breaks. The cost of this conductor in large production quantities based on the cost model presented could meet the 1.5 $/kilo amp meter(KAM) target of the HEP community

  9. From toothpaste to topological insulators and materials for valleytronics: The journeys of fluorinated tin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Rivero, Pablo; Yan, Jia-An; Garcia-Suarez, Victor Manuel; Ferrer, Jaime

    2015-03-01

    Tin fluoride has a vast literature. This material is stable in bulk form at room temperature and has commercial applications that include fluorinated toothpaste. Bulk tin fluoride has a pair of fluorine atoms bridging two tin atoms. In the recent past the electronic properties of 2D tin with honeycomb structure have been discussed thus generating a wealth of literature that emphasizes its non-topologically-trivial electronic properties due to the combination of a Dirac-like dispersion and a strong spin-orbit coupling given its large atomic mass. Nevertheless the stability of such freestanding structures has been contested recently. As it turns out, the most stable form of fluorinated tin does not possess a graphane-like structure either. In the most stable phase to be discussed here, fluorine atoms tilt away from (graphane-like) positions over/below tin atoms; in an atomistic arrangement similar to the one seen on their parent bulk structure. Electronic properties depend on atomistic coordination, and the most stable form of fluorinated tin does not possess non-trivial topological properties. Nevertheless it represents a new paradigm for valleytronics in 2D.

  10. Changes in tin smelting efficiency seen through the eyes of UK slag.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farthing, D. J.

    2009-05-01

    The efficiency of a smelting operation is clearly demonstrated by the purity of the product and the quantity of the product as compared to the original ore quantity used in the smelting operation. Slag, smelting's byproduct, can also give insight into the effectiveness of a given smelting operation. Samples of tin slag from the UK provide an opportunity to show how slag can indicate the effectiveness of a metal extraction operation. In the UK, tin was originally smelted in blast furnaces. Thin sections of the slag show that the glassy blast furnace byproduct is much more enriched in tin prills compared to the slag generated in the more modern reverberatory furnaces. In some cases, the reverberatory slag contains no metallic tin prills but instead contains prills of metallic iron. The overall bulk chemistry of the two types of slag also makes it clear that the reverberatory furnace provided a more efficient smelting option to the UK tin industry. Trace element chemistry of the slags indicates that not only did the more modern process separate out the tin better, it also stripped from the final metal product elements that might have originally gone into the tin ingot in the older blast furnace processing. Though the trace element differences might also be due to the ability for smelters to use less pure ore when operating reverberatory furnaces compared to the older blast furnaces.

  11. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  12. Recording of Phase Transition in Tin in Shock and Release Waves Using Laser Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finyushin, Stanislav; Fedorov, Alexey; Mikhailov, Anatoliy; Nazarov, Dmitriy; Chudakov, Evgeniy; Kalashnikov, Denis; Trunin, Ivan; Tereshkina, Irina

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the authors present results of experiments, concerning the recording of free surface velocity and particle velocity of tin/LiF window interface of tin sample at the dynamic pressure in the range 10 to 70 GPa, using laser interferometry methods Fabry-Perot and PDV. The features of recorded velocity histories interpreted the polymorphous transitions (the direct β - γ phase transition, the reverse γ - β phase transition) and some points on tin melting curve. The tin samples were loaded by impactor accelerated by explosion products of HE cartridge (the wave with the rectangular profile) or by direct detonation wave of HE layer (the wave with the decaying profile). With the help of PDV method, velocity of particles cloud was recorded with the free surface velocity at the moment when the shock wave front arrived to the tin free surface with the pressure amplitude of P >= 19 GPa. This could is corresponded to appearing of the liquid-solid phase at the release wave. The tin melting in the shock wave is recorded at the loading pressure of P >= 51 GPa. The pressure and temperature numerical simulations were performed for shock compression and the further releasing of tin.

  13. Factors Affecting the Toxic Effect of Tin on Estuarine Microorganisms †

    PubMed Central

    Hallas, Laurence E.; Thayer, John S.; Cooney, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    Inorganic tin (SnCl4·H2O) is toxic to microbial populations obtained from estuarine sediments plated on nutrient medium solidified with either agar or purified agar. The use of gelatin as a gelling agent decreased the apparent toxicity of tin, and toxicity was markedly reduced in medium solidified with silica gel. There was no evidence that toxic agar-tin complexes were involved. Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn exhibited similar toxicity patterns; therefore, toxicity levels determined in the laboratory should be extrapolated to the environment with caution. The addition of cysteine to the medium had no effect on tin toxicity. Serine or 3-hydroxyflavone enhanced toxicity, while humic acids or gelatin inhibited toxicity. Replacement of SO42− with NO3− did not alter tin toxicity, but replacement of Cl− with NO3− decreased tin toxicity. Thus, the toxic effect(s) of tin depend as much on the chemical speciation of the metal as on the total concentration of the metal in the medium. PMID:16346055

  14. Preparation of Macro-Porous Tin Oxide for Sensing of Sulfur Compound.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Hoon; Sung, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Lee, Tae Jin

    2016-03-01

    Macro-porous tin oxide was prepared as an enhanced sensing material for sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide. Poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) was used as a template for the formation of macro-pores. Tin chloride was used as a precursor for the synthesis of tin oxide, and was impregnated over PMMA beads using a rotary vacuum evaporator. The solid Sn/PMMA material was treated thermally for 4 h at 600 degrees C. The porous morphology of tin oxide prepared in this study was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The surface area of this material measured by the nitrogen adsorption method was approximately 56 m2/g. The crystal structure of the porous material analyzed by XRD was a typical structure of tin oxide. The response of macro-porous tin oxide as a chemical gas sensor was measured using an I-V source meter and the change in signal was observed with the repeated injection of hydrogen sulfide and air. The sensing tests for macro-porous tin oxide were carried out at 200 degrees C and the fast response of macro-porous sensing material was also confirmed.

  15. Alkali Silicate Glass Coatings for Mitigating the Risks of Tin Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Dave; Wilcoxon, Ross; Lower, Nate; Grossman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Alkali silicate glass (ASG) coatings were investigated as a possible method for inhibiting tin whisker initiation and growth. The aqueous-based ASG formulations used in this study were deposited with equipment and conditions that are typical of those used to apply conventional conformal coatings. Processes for controlling ASG coating properties were developed, and a number of ASG-based coating combinations were applied to test components with pure tin surfaces. Coatings were applied both in a laboratory environment at Rockwell Collins and in a manufacturing environment at Plasma Ruggedized Solutions. Testing in elevated humidity/temperature environments and subsequent inspection of the test articles identified coating combinations that inhibited tin whisker growth as well as other material combinations that actually accelerated tin whisker growth. None of the coatings evaluated in this study, including conventional acrylic and Parylene conformal coatings, completely prevented the formation of tin whiskers. Two of the coatings were particularly effective at reducing the risks of whisker growth, albeit through different mechanisms. Parylene conformal coating almost, but not completely, eliminated whisker formation, and only a few tin whiskers were found on these surfaces during the study. A composite of ASG and alumina nanoparticles inhibited whisker formation to a lesser degree than Parylene, but did disrupt whisker growth mechanisms so as to inhibit the formation of long, and more dangerous, tin whiskers. Additional testing also demonstrated that the conformal coatings had relatively little effect on the dielectric loss of a stripline test structure operating at frequencies over 30 GHz.

  16. Optoelectric biosensor using indium-tin-oxide electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Kihm, Kenneth D.; English, Anthony E.

    2007-06-01

    The use of an optically thin indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode is presented for an optoelectric biosensor simultaneously recording optical images and microimpedance to examine time-dependent cellular growth. The transmittance of a 100nm thick ITO electrode layer is approximately the same as the transmittance of a clean glass substrate, whereas the industry-standard Au(47.5nm)/Ti(2.5nm) electrode layer drops the transmittance to less than 10% of that of the glass substrate. The simultaneous optoelectric measurements permit determining the correlation of the cell-covered area increase with the microimpedance increase, and the example results obtained for live porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells delineate the quantitative and comprehensive nature of cellular attachment and spreading to the substrate, which has not been clearly perceived before.

  17. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.S.

    2010-05-03

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  18. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.S.; Chu, J.-H.; Toney, M.F.; Geballe, T.H.; Fisher, I.R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  19. Tunable morphologies of indium tin oxide nanostructures using nanocellulose templates

    DOE PAGES

    Aytug, Tolga; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Ozcan, Soydan; ...

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures have emerged as an important family of materials for various device applications. The performance is highly dependent on the morphology of the metal oxide nanostructures. Here we report a completely green approach to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles using only water and cellulose nanofibril (CNF) in addition to the ITO precursor. Surface hydroxyl groups of the CNFs allow for efficient conjugation of ITO precursors (e.g., metal ions) in aqueous solution. The resulting CNF film allows for controllable spatial arrangement of metal oxide precursors, which results in tunable particle morphology (e.g., nanowires, nanospheres, and octahedral nanoparticles). Thesemore » ITO nanoparticles can also form conductive and transparent ITO films. This study opens a new perspective on developing metal oxide nanostructures.« less

  20. Tunable morphologies of indium tin oxide nanostructures using nanocellulose templates

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan; Poole, II, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures have emerged as an important family of materials for various device applications. The performance is highly dependent on the morphology of the metal oxide nanostructures. Here we report a completely green approach to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles using only water and cellulose nanofibril (CNF) in addition to the ITO precursor. Surface hydroxyl groups of the CNFs allow for efficient conjugation of ITO precursors (e.g., metal ions) in aqueous solution. The resulting CNF film allows for controllable spatial arrangement of metal oxide precursors, which results in tunable particle morphology (e.g., nanowires, nanospheres, and octahedral nanoparticles). These ITO nanoparticles can also form conductive and transparent ITO films. This study opens a new perspective on developing metal oxide nanostructures.

  1. Light emission from silicon with tin-containing nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Roesgaard, Søren; Chevallier, Jacques; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Jensen, Pia Bomholt; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Balling, Peter; Julsgaard, Brian; Gaiduk, Peter I.; Svane, Axel

    2015-07-15

    Tin-containing nanocrystals, embedded in silicon, have been fabricated by growing an epitaxial layer of Si{sub 1−x−y}Sn{sub x}C{sub y}, where x = 1.6 % and y = 0.04 % on a silicon substrate, followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 650 {sup ∘}C to 900 {sup ∘}C. The nanocrystal density and average diameters are determined by scanning transmission-electron microscopy to ≈10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and ≈5 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the light emission is very pronounced for samples annealed at 725 {sup ∘}C, and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry shows that the nanocrystals are predominantly in the diamond-structured phase at this particular annealing temperature. The origin of the light emission is discussed.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet patterning of tin-oxo cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haitjema, Jarich; Zhang, Yu; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Kazazis, Dimitrios; Ekinci, Yasin; Brouwer, Albert M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) patterning performance of tin-oxo cages: molecular building blocks that are known to turn insoluble upon EUV exposure, thus having the properties of a negative tone photoresist. In this work, we focus on contrast curves of the materials using open-frame EUV exposures and their patterning capabilities using EUV interference lithography. It is shown that baking steps, such as post-exposure baking (PEB) can significantly affect both the sensitivity and contrast in the open-frame experiments as well as the patterning experiments. In addition, we show that the exchange of the anions of the cage can make a difference in terms of their physical properties. Our results demonstrate the significance of process optimization while evaluating the resist performance of novel molecular materials.

  3. Calculation of tin atomic data and plasma properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V.; Tolkach, V.; Hassanein, A.

    2005-08-26

    This report reviews the major methods and techniques we use in generating basic atomic and plasma properties relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications. The basis of the work is the calculation of the atomic energy levels, transitions probabilities, and other atomic data by various methods, which differ in accuracy, completeness, and complication. Later on, we calculate the populations of atomic levels and ion states in plasmas by means of the collision-radiation equilibrium (CRE) model. The results of the CRE model are used as input to the thermodynamic functions, such as pressure and temperature from the internal energy and density (equation of state), electric resistance, thermal conduction, and other plasma properties. In addition, optical coefficients, such as emission and absorption coefficients, are generated to resolve a radiation transport equation (RTE). The capabilities of our approach are demonstrated by generating the required atomic and plasma properties for tin ions and plasma within the EUV region near 13.5 nm.

  4. Construction of an open tin cell at Inmetro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R.; Teixeira, R. N.

    2013-09-01

    For the last decade, the Thermometry Laboratory of the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (INMETRO) has been developing its own primary standards. In late 2010, a brand new fixed point cell containing high purity tin (99.9999 %) was constructed as the continuation of a project for constructing metal fixed-point cells in the positive range, in accordance with the temperature fixed-points described by the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) [1]. This is the fourth temperature fixed-point constructed by the laboratory team, which enables the performance of some calibrations without having to rely solely on commercially available cells. The materials and their preparation, the design, the procedures for the construction of the cell, the equipment, the investigation on its performance and its results will be detailed in the present paper. In addition, it is worth mentioning that this cell has recently taken part in a bilateral comparison with the National Physical Laboratory - NPL.

  5. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    1981-01-01

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  6. Growth of lead-tin telluride crystals under high gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regel, L. L.; Turchaninov, A. M.; Shumaev, O. V.; Bandeira, I. N.; An, C. Y.; Rappl, P. H. O.

    1992-04-01

    The influence of high gravity environment on several growth habits of lead-tin telluride crystals began to be investigated. Preliminary experiments with Pb 0.8Sn 0.2te grown by the Bridgman technique had been made at the centrifuge facilities of the Y.A. Gagarin Cosmonauts Center in the USSR, using accelerations of 5 g, 5.2 g and 8 g. The Sn distribution for these crystals was compared with that obtained for growth at normal gravity and the results show the existence of significant compositional inhomogeneities along the axial direction. Convection currents at high gravity seem to help multiple nucleation and subsequent random orientation of growth. Analyses of carrier concentrations as well as morphological characteristics were also made.

  7. High angular sensitivity thin film tin oxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Davinder; Madaan, Divya; Sharma, V. K.; Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present theoretical anlaysis of a thin film SnO2 (Tin Oxide) sensor for the measurement of variation in the refractive index of the bulk media. It is based on lossy mode resonance between the absorbing thin film lossy modes and the evanescent wave. Also the addition of low index dielectric matching layer between the prism and the lossy waveguiding layer future increase the angular sensitivity and produce an efficient refractive index sensor. The angular interrogation is done and obtained sensitivity is 110 degree/RIU. Theoretical analysis of the proposed sensor based on Fresnel reflection coefficients is presented. This enhanced sensitivity will further improve the monitoring of biomolecular interactions and the higher sensitivity of the proposed configurations makes it to be a much better option to be employed for biosensing applications.

  8. Isothermal fatigue of low tin lead based solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayman, Semyon; Fine, Morris E.; Jeannotte, Dexter A.

    1988-04-01

    Low tin lead based solder fails by intergranular and/or transgranular modes depending upon experimental conditions. At low frequency and in tests with hold times separation of grains is the main mode of fracture. In the 5 to 100 °C temperature range at high frequency (> 10-2 Hz) and at high total strain range (0.75 pct) the failure mode is mixed transgranular-intergranular; at a low total strain range (0.3 pct) the mode of failure is intergranular. Change in failure mode leads to a bend in the Coffin-Manson plot. Tensile hold time and combined tensile and compressive hold times are found to reduce dramatically the fatigue cycles to failure of this solder. A simple mathematical relation between the fatigue life of the solder and ramp time, tensile, and compressive hold times is developed.

  9. Infrared plasmonics with indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi Qiang; Guo, Peijun; Zhang, Lingxiao; Zhou, Wei; Odom, Teri W; Seideman, Tamar; Ketterson, John B; Chang, Robert P H

    2011-11-22

    This article reports the study of infrared plasmonics with both random and periodic arrays of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) nanorods (NR). A description is given on the synthesis, patterning, and characterization of physical properties of the ITO NR arrays. A classical scattering model, along with a 3-D finite-element-method and a 3-D finite-difference-time-domain numerical simulation method has been used to interpret the unique light scattering phenomena. It is also shown that the intrinsic plasma frequency can be varied through careful postsynthesis processing of the ITO NRs. Examples are given on how coupled plasmon resonances can be tuned through patterning of the ITO NR arrays. In addition, environment dielectric sensing has been demonstrated through the shift of the resonances as a result of index change surrounding the NRs. These initial results suggest potential for further improvement and opportunities to develop a good understanding of infrared plasmonics using ITO and other transparent conducting oxide semiconducting materials.

  10. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    1981-01-01

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  11. Theoretical analysis of tin incorporated group IV alloy based QWIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Prakash; Das, Mukul K.; Kumar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Detailed theoretical investigation on the frequency response, responsivity and detectivity of tin incorporated GeSn based quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) is presented in this paper. Rate equation and continuity equation in the well are solved simultaneously to obtained photo generated current. Quantum mechanical carrier transport like carrier capture in QW, escape of carrier from the well due to thermionic emission and tunneling are considered in this calculation. Impact of Sn composition in the GeSn well on the frequency response, bandwidth, responsivity and detectivity are studied. Results show that Sn concentration and applied bias have important role on the performance of the device. Significant bandwidth is obtained at low reverse bias voltage, e.g., 150 GHz is obtained at 0.14 V bias for single Ge0.83Sn0.17 layer. Detectivity, in the range of 107 cm Hz1/2 W-1 is obtained for particular choice of Sn-composition and bias.

  12. Genotoxicity of indium tin oxide by Allium and Comet tests.

    PubMed

    Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Liman, Recep; Özgül, Emre; Konuk, Muhsin

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic effects of indium tin oxide (ITO) were investigated on root cells of Allium cepa by employing both Allium and Comet assays. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of ITO at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm) for 4 h. Exposure of ITO significantly increased mitotic index, and total chromosomal aberrations by the Allium test. While chromosome laggards, stickiness, disturbed anaphase-telophase and anaphase bridges were observed in anaphase-telophase cells, c-metaphase and binuclear cells were observed in other cells. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of ITO by the Comet assay. These results indicate that ITO exhibits genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  13. Hematite Surface Activation by Chemical Addition of Tin Oxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Waldemir M; Souza, Flavio L

    2016-09-05

    In this study, the effect of tin (Sn(4+) ) modification on the surface of hematite electrodes synthesized by an aqueous solution route at different times (2, 5, 10, 18, and 24 h) is investigated. As confirmed from X-ray diffraction results, the as-synthesized electrode exhibits an oxyhydroxide phase, which is converted into a pure hematite phase after being subjected to additional thermal treatment at 750 °C for 30 min. The tin-modified hematite electrode is prepared by depositing a solution of Sn(4+) precursor on the as-synthesized electrode, followed by thermal treatment under the same abovementioned conditions. This modification results in an enhancement of the photocurrent response for all hematite electrodes investigated and attains the highest values of around 1.62 and 2.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 and 1.4 V versus RHE, respectively, for electrodes obtained in short synthesis times (2 h). Contact angle measurements suggest that the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode provides a more hydrophilic surface, which favors a chemical reaction at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte. This result generates new perspectives for understanding the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode surface, which is in contrast with several studies previously reported; these studies state that the enhancement in photocurrent density is related to either the induction of an increased donor charge density or shift in the flat-band potential, which favors charge separation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Low-LER tin carboxylate photoresists using EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Re, Ryan; Sortland, Miriam; Pasarelli, James; Cardineau, Brian; Ekinci, Yasin; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Neisser, Mark; Freedman, Daniel; Brainard, Robert L.

    2015-03-01

    Pure thin films of organotin compounds have been lithographically evaluated using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, 13.5 nm). Twenty-one compounds of the type R2Sn(O2CR')2 were spin-coated from solutions in toluene, exposed to EUV light, and developed in organic solvents. Exposures produced negative-tone contrast curves and dense-line patterns using interference lithography. Contrast-curve studies indicated that the Emax values were linearly related to molecular weight when plotted separately depending upon the hydrocarbon group bound directly to tin (R = butyl, phenyl and benzyl). Additionally, Emax was found to be linearly related to free radical stability of the hydrocarbon group bound directly to tin. Dense-line patterning capabilities varied, but two resists in particular show exceptionally good line edge roughness (LER). A resist composed of an amorphous film of (C6H5CH2)2Sn(O2CC(CH3)3)2 (13) achieved 1.4 nm LER at 22 nm half-pitch patterning and a resist composed of (C6H5CH2)2Sn(O2CC6H5)2 (14) achieved 1.1 nm LER at 35 nm half-pitch at high exposure doses (600 mJ/cm2). Two photoresists that use olefin-based carboxylates, (C6H5CH2)2Sn(O2CCH=CH2)2 (11) and (C6H5CH2)2Sn(O2CC(CH3)=CH2)2 (12), demonstrated much improved photospeeds (5 mJ/ cm2 and 27 mJ/cm2) but with worse LER.

  15. Synthesis of tin nanocrystals in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Le Vot, Steven; Dambournet, Damien; Groult, Henri; Ngo, Anh-tu; Petit, Christophe; Rizzi, Cécile; Salzemann, Caroline; Sirieix-Plenet, Juliette; Borkiewicz, Olaf J; Raymundo-Piñero, Encarnación; Gaillon, Laurent

    2014-12-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the synthesis of tin nanoparticles (NPs) or tin/carbon composites, in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), that could be used as structured anode materials for Li-ion batteries. An innovative route for the synthesis of Sn nanoparticles in such media is successfully developed. Compositions, structures, sizes and morphologies of NPs were characterized by high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Our findings indicated that (i) metallic tetragonal β-Sn was obtained and (ii) the particle size could be tailored by tuning the nature of the RTILs, leading to nano-sized spherical particles with a diameter ranging from 3 to 10 nm depending on synthesis conditions. In order to investigate carbon composite materials for Li-ion batteries, Sn nanoparticles were successfully deposited on the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Moreover, electrochemical properties have been studied in relation to a structural study of the nanocomposites. The poor electrochemical performances as a negative electrode in Li-ion batteries is due to a significant amount of RTIL trapped within the pores of the nanotubes as revealed by XPS investigations. This dramatically affected the gravimetric capacity of the composites and limited the diffusion of lithium. The findings of this work however offer valuable insights into the exciting possibilities for synthesis of novel nano-sized particles and/or alloys (e.g. Sn-Cu, Sn-Co, Sn-Ni, etc.) and the importance of carbon morphology in metal pulverization during the alloying/dealloying process as well as prevention of ionic liquid trapping.

  16. High temperature hydrogen sulfide removal with tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Karpuk, M.E.; Copeland, R.J.; Feinberg, D.; Wickham, D.; Windecker, B.; Yu, J.

    1993-09-01

    The system is based on the absorption of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) by stannic (tin) oxide. Two sorbents are required, the first sorbent is tin oxide and the second sorbent is a zinc oxide based material (i.e., zinc ferrite or zinc titanate) which is regenerated by air producing SO{sub 2}. TDA`s process carries out a modified Claus reaction to reduce the SO{sub 2} from the second sorbent generation to elemental sulfur. In this case the sulfided stannic oxide forms stannous sulfide (SnS) which reduces the SO{sub 2}. The absorption by SnO{sub 2} could remove over 90% of the H{sub 2}S from typical coal gas streams, but we use zinc ferrite (or zinc titanate), (a) to reduce H{sub 2}S to less than 20 ppM and (b) as a source of SO{sub 2} in regeneration. Due to stoichiometry of regeneration we want to remove half of the H{sub 2}S by SnO{sub 2} and the remainder by the second sorbent. The reactions with stannic oxide minimize the heat released during H{sub 2}S removal and regeneration. The absorption by SnO{sub 2} is slightly endothermic and cools the gas stream by less that 5{degrees}F (2.8{degrees}C) during absorption. Regeneration with SO{sub 2} is exothermic but releases only 11% of the heat that is liberated in regenerating the ZnO. For a nominal 6.5:1 steam to air the regeneration of ZnO increases the temperature by {approx_equal}400{degrees}F. The regeneration of SnO{sub 2} increases the temperature by less than 50{degrees}F (28{degrees}C) in the same gas flow.

  17. Technical problems associated with the production of technetium Tc 99m tin(II) pyrophosphate kits

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, R.J.; Dalton, D.R.

    1981-11-01

    The amount of tin(II) required for adequate reduction, complexation, and stability of technetium Tc 99m pertechnetate in radiopharmaceutical kits, and methods of preventing the loss of tin(II) during formulation of these lyophilized kits are investigated. Tin(II) loss from stannous chloride solutions was studied under several conditions, including room air versus nitrogen atmospheres, during vial filling in a laminar-flow hood with samples frozen on dry ice versus samples at room temperature, during lyophilization, and during storage under refrigerated, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Various amounts of stannous chloride, ranging from 5 to 1000 microgram/ml, were used in formulating sodium pertechnetate Tc 99m kits containing 100 mCi technetium Tc 99m and 0.4 microgram total technetium. Samples were removed at various times; hydrolyzed technetium, pertechnetate, and technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate were isolated on instant thin-layer chromatography-silica gel and quantified with a scintillation counter. The time necessary to deoxygenate distilled water by nitrogen purging was measured. Several sources of stannous chloride were assayed for tin(II) content. Tin(II) loss occurs rapidly in solution (15% in one hour) unless continuously protected with nitrogen, and during vial filling in a laminar-flow hood unless frozen with dry ice. No substantial loss of tin(II) was detected during lyophilization or during storage of lyophilized product at any of the three temperatures. A minimum of 400 microgram tin(II) was required to provide 90% technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate at six hours after preparation. Adequate deoxygenation of small quantities (450 ml) of water was accomplished in less than one hour. Some stannous chloride salts were highly oxidized in the dry state, and only high-purity elemental tin wire gave acceptable yields of tin(II).

  18. Technical problems associated with the production of technetium Tc 99m tin(II) pyrophosphate kits.

    PubMed

    Kowalsky, R J; Dalton, D R

    1981-11-01

    The amount of tin(II) required for adequate reduction, complexation, and stability of technetium Tc 99m pertechnetate in radiopharmaceutical kits, and methods of preventing the loss of tin(II) during formulation of these lyophilized kits are investigated. Tin(II) loss from stannous chloride solutions was studied under several conditions, including room air versus nitrogen atmospheres, during vial filling in a laminar-flow hood with samples frozen on dry ice versus samples at room temperature, during lyophilization, and during storage under refrigerated, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Various amounts of stannous chloride, ranging from 5 to 1000 microgram/ml, were used in formulating sodium pertechnetate Tc 99m kits containing 100 mCi technetium Tc 99m and 0.4 microgram total technetium. Samples were removed at various times; hydrolyzed technetium, pertechnetate, and technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate were isolated on instant thin-layer chromatography-silica gel and quantified with a scintillation counter. The time necessary to deoxygenate distilled water by nitrogen purging was measured. Several sources of stannous chloride were assayed for tin(II) content. Tin(II) loss occurs rapidly in solution (15% in one hour) unless continuously protected with nitrogen, and during vial filling in a laminar-flow hood unless frozen with dry ice. No substantial loss of tin(II) was detected during lyophilization or during storage of lyophilized product at any of the three temperatures. A minimum of 400 microgram tin(II) was required to provide 90% technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate at six hours after preparation. Adequate deoxygenation of small quantities (450 ml) of water was accomplished in less than one hour. Some stannous chloride salts were highly oxidized in the dry state, and only high-purity elemental tin wire gave acceptable yields of tin(II).

  19. Electrospun carbon-tin oxide composite nanofibers for use as lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Bonino, Christopher A; Ji, Liwen; Lin, Zhan; Toprakci, Ozan; Zhang, Xiangwu; Khan, Saad A

    2011-07-01

    Composite carbon-tin oxide (C-SnO(2)) nanofibers are prepared by two methods and evaluated as anodes in lithium-ion battery half cells. Such an approach complements the long cycle life of carbon with the high lithium storage capacity of tin oxide. In addition, the high surface-to-volume ratio of the nanofibers improves the accessibility for lithium intercalation as compared to graphite-based anodes, while eliminating the need for binders or conductive additives. The composite nanofibrous anodes have first discharge capacities of 788 mAh g(-1) at 50 mA g(-1) current density, which are greater than pure carbon nanofiber anodes, as well as the theoretical capacity of graphite (372 mAh g(-1)), the traditional anode material. In the first protocol to fabricate the C-SnO(2) composites, tin sulfate is directly incorporated within polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers by electrospinning. During a thermal treatment the tin salt is converted to tin oxide and the polymer is carbonized, yielding carbon-SnO(2) nanofibers. In the second approach, we soak the nanofiber mats in tin sulfate solutions prior to the final thermal treatment, thereby loading the outer surfaces with SnO(2) nanoparticles and raising the tin content from 1.9 to 8.6 wt %. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm the formation of conversion of tin sulfate to tin oxide. Furthermore, analysis with Raman spectroscopy reveals that the additional salt soak treatment from the second fabrication approach increases in the disorder of the carbon structure, as compared to the first approach. We also discuss the performance of our C-SnO(2) compared with its theoretical capacity and other nanofiber electrode composites previously reported in the literature.

  20. Investigation of electroless tin deposition from acidic thiourea-type bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araźna, A.; Bieliński, J.

    2006-10-01

    The constant tendency of miniaturization in electronic products and developments in surface assembly techniques creates requirement to prepare new techniques and processes also in the range of metallic coatings. An additional factor which influences the evolution of preservatives coatings technology is the necessity to adapt Polish law to European directive. From 1 st July 2006 there will be an obligatory RoHS directive banning applying lead in electronics. Electroless tin deposition is one of an alternative for Sn/Pb lead free preservative films on copper surface in PCB technology. Electroless deposition of tin coatings on copper can be made in two ways: from an alkaline bath - the process disproportionation of Sn(II) compounds and from acidic bath contain complex compound such as thiourea - the displacement of copper by tin in Sn(II). Alkaline baths are not used in printed circuit board technology because it has destructive influence on resists. Besides acidic baths complex compounds contain additional stability solution composition which modify structure of obtained tin film. Quality and thickness tin layer are fundamental parameters which determine its protective character. The research test were done in thiourea-type electroless tin bath. The influence of different parameters on n rate of tin deposition and thickness of Sn coating were determined: temperature of the bath, Sn(II)-salt, thiourea and HCl concentration. Tin layers were depositioned on electrolytical copper foil. The thickness of Sn coating was determined by coulometry in 2M HCl. The rate deposition process depends mainly on the thiourea and HCl concentrations in solution. The temperature is also a very important parameter. The thickness of tin layer grows when the temperature increase. Although above 70°C appear undesirable thiourea decomposition. The results of the investigation show that further investigations are necessary for this solution.

  1. Effect of Manganese Sulphide Size on the Precipitation of Tin Heterogeneous Nucleation in as-Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guilin; Song, Bo; Tao, Sufen; Cai, Zeyun

    2015-05-01

    Tramp elements in steels such as tin have been thought harmful because of the hot brittleness at grain boundaries and will be enriched in new steels because of difficulty of removal. It has been an important and difficult matter for metallurgist to use these elements. In the present paper, the as-cast steel containing high concentration of tin is prepared in laboratory and tin precipitates at the manganese sulphide inclusions have been found. A theoretical model is established to calculate the size of manganese sulphide inclusions acted as the heterogeneous nucleation site of tin precipitation. The results show that the inclusions with the smaller contact angle between tin precipitate is more advantageous to be the nucleus of tin heterogeneous nucleation. In this experiment, the manganese sulphide inclusions whose size is 2~4 μm in diameter can act as the nuclei of the nucleation of tin precipitation.

  2. Electrochemical fabrication and optical properties of porous tin oxide films with structural colors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hua; Shu, Shiwei; Lee, Chris; Zeng, Shanshan; Lu, Zhouguang; Lu, Jian E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk; Li, Yang Yang E-mail: yangli@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-10-21

    Photonic crystals with porous features not only provide the capability to control light but also enable structural colors that are environmentally sensitive. Here, we report a novel kind of tin oxide-based photonic crystal featuring periodically arranged air pores fabricated by the periodic anodization of tin foil. The existence of a photonic band gap in the fabricated structure is verified by its vivid color, and its reflective spectra which are responsive to environmental stimuli. Furthermore, the sample colors (i.e., the photonic band gap positions) can be easily adjusted by manipulating the anodization parameters. The theoretical modeling results of these tin oxide photonic crystals agree well with the reported experimental ones.

  3. Temperature dependence of inductively coupled plasma assisted growth of TiN thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W. J.; Curtis, T. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.

    1999-11-01

    The use of low pressure high density plasmas to assist the synthesis of ceramic thin film materials is in its infancy. Using an inductively coupled plasma assisted magnetron sputtering system, we examine the dependence of plasma-assisted growth of TiN thin films on growth temperature at different ratios of ion flux to neutral atom flux. Our results indicate that a temperature independent densification of TiN films occurs above a certain ion to neutral atom flux ratio. As an example of this temperature independent densification, we demonstrate the formation of dense B1 TiN crystalline thin films at growth temperatures down to {approx}100 K.

  4. Structural and physical properties of tin oxide thin films for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su-Shia; Tsai, Yung-Shiang; Bai, Kai-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Tin oxide films were deposited on glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. At a lower sputtering pressure, the tin oxide film comprised nanocrystalline orthorhombic SnO with a (110) orientation, greater p-type conductivity and better hydrophobicity. Increasing substrate temperature resulted in the coexistence of nanocrystalline orthorhombic SnO and tetragonal SnO2 in the deposited film, favoring hydrophilicity, changing the p-type conductivity to n-type conductivity, and reducing resistivity. As the sputtering pressure or substrate temperature increased, the tin oxide film exhibited a lower surface roughness, a larger optical energy gap, and higher optical transmission.

  5. An infinite square lattice of super-supertetrahedral T(6)-like tin oxyselenide clusters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qipu; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-04-21

    A new super-supertetrahedral cluster, resembling a coreless supertetrahedral T6 cluster, was made as a tin oxyselenide by integrating hard and soft Lewis bases (O(2-) and Se(2-)) into the tetravalent system. Its hierarchical architecture, built from supertetrahedral T3-[Sn10O4Se20] and Sn2Se6 clusters, represents a new level of complexity in the cluster-based construction. Compared to pure tin selenides, the new tin oxyselenide material in this work shows much enhanced stability and size-dependent band energy level.

  6. Exploration computer applications to primary dispersion halos: Kougarok tin prospect, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, Jeffrey C.

    1989-01-01

    Computer processing and high resolution graphics display of geochemical data were used to quickly, accurately, and efficiently obtain important decision-making information for tin (cassiterite) exploration, Seward Peninsula, Alaska (USA). Primary geochemical dispersion patterns were determined for tin-bearing intrusive granite phases of Late Cretaceous age with exploration bedrock lithogeochemistry at the Kougarok tin prospect. Expensive diamond drilling footage was required to reach exploration objectives. Recognition of element distribution and dispersion patterns was useful in subsurface interpretation and correlation, and to aid location of other holes.

  7. Water bath synthesis of tin oxide nanostructure coating for a molecular sensor.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yoshitake; Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-03-01

    Tin oxide nanostructures were fabricated using a water bath technique. The structures were modified with dye-labeled DNAs for a molecular sensor. Sensing mechanism of the sensor was based on a photoelectric conversion effect. Photoluminescence intensities from the tin oxide nanostructures reached to 16 times larger than that from SnO2:F films. High photocurrent of 5.5 x 10(-6) A and high signal-to-noise ratio of 29 were achieved in this system. Photoelectric conversion on a combination of the dye-labeled DNA and the tin oxide was an essence of the sensing system. Surface nanospaces were effectively utilized to increase photoluminescence and photocurrent.

  8. Self-assembly of tin wires via phase transformation of heteroepitaxial germanium-tin on germanium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Lingzi; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-06-01

    This work demonstrates and describes for the first time an unusual strain-relaxation mechanism by the formation and self-assembly of well-ordered tin wires during the thermal annealing of epitaxial Ge0.83Sn0.17-on-Ge(001) substrate. Fully strained germanium-tin alloys (Ge0.83Sn0.17) were epitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The morphological and compositional evolution of Ge0.83Sn0.17 during thermal annealing is studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy. Under certain annealing conditions, the Ge0.83Sn0.17 layer decomposes into two stable phases, and well-defined Sn wires that are preferentially oriented along two orthogonal ⟨100⟩ azimuths are formed. The formation of the Sn wires is related to the annealing temperature and the Ge0.83Sn0.17 thickness, and can be explained by the nucleation of a grain with Sn islands on the outer front, followed by grain boundary migration. The Sn wire formation process is found to be thermally activated, and an activation enthalpy (Ec) of 0.41 eV is extracted. This thermally activated phase transformation, i.e., 2D epitaxial layer to 3D wires, occurs via a mechanism akin to "cellular precipitation." This synthesis route of Sn wires opens new possibilities for creation of nanoscale patterns at high-throughput without the need for lithography.

  9. Self-assembly of tin wires via phase transformation of heteroepitaxial germanium-tin on germanium substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Lingzi; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Tok, Eng Soon

    2015-06-14

    This work demonstrates and describes for the first time an unusual strain-relaxation mechanism by the formation and self-assembly of well-ordered tin wires during the thermal annealing of epitaxial Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}-on-Ge(001) substrate. Fully strained germanium-tin alloys (Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}) were epitaxially grown on Ge(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The morphological and compositional evolution of Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} during thermal annealing is studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy. Under certain annealing conditions, the Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} layer decomposes into two stable phases, and well-defined Sn wires that are preferentially oriented along two orthogonal 〈100〉 azimuths are formed. The formation of the Sn wires is related to the annealing temperature and the Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} thickness, and can be explained by the nucleation of a grain with Sn islands on the outer front, followed by grain boundary migration. The Sn wire formation process is found to be thermally activated, and an activation enthalpy (E{sub c}) of 0.41 eV is extracted. This thermally activated phase transformation, i.e., 2D epitaxial layer to 3D wires, occurs via a mechanism akin to “cellular precipitation.” This synthesis route of Sn wires opens new possibilities for creation of nanoscale patterns at high-throughput without the need for lithography.

  10. Genesis of the Silsilah tin deposit, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamilli, Robert J.; Criss, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Silsilah tin deposit (lat 25 degrees 06' N, long 42 degrees 40' E) consists of a group of pervasively greisenized, flat-topped granite cupolas within a 12-km-diam ring complex. The greisens contain varying amounts of disseminated cassiterite and wolframite. Several types of quartz veins are peripheral to the greisens; some of these contain minor wolframite. The deposit is genetically associated with a highly differentiated, peraluminous alkali-feldspar granite (587 + or - 8 Ma) that is part of a mostly peralkaline, igneous ring complex intruded into Late Proterozoic, immature sandstones of the Murdama Group. We recognize four distinct phases of the peraluminous granite. Only the smallest, most highly differentiated cupolas contain significant tin greisen mineralization. Greisens developed beneath aplitic carapaces that overlie the granite and created impermeable barriers to rising volatiles. The geometry of a cupola correlates strongly with the intensity of alteration; cupolas with the smallest cross sectional areas and steepest marginal contacts have the most intensely greisenized apexes. The paragenetic sequence can be divided into five stages: pegmatite formation, locally pervasive albitization, locally pervasive greisenization and deposition of cassiterite, deposition of quartz-wolframite veins, and deposition of quartz veins with minor base metal sulfides. Pressure-corrected fluid inclusion filling temperatures indicate that the hydrothermal system generally cooled as it evolved and that the delta 18O values of the hydrothermal quartz increased from 10.8 to 15.7 per mil. Calculated delta 18O values of the hydrothermal fluid varied concomitantly from the pegmatite stage (delta 18O fluid approximately 8.6ppm; T [asymp] 550 degrees C) to the greisen stage (5.4 and 5.6[ppm; T [asymp] 360 degrees C), the quartz-wolframite vein stage (6.3 and 7.5ppm; T [asymp] 390 degrees C), and the late vein stage (4.0 and 5.1ppm; T [asymp] 270 degrees C). This evolution

  11. Determination of tin in poly(vinyl chloride) by atomic-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Anwar, J; Marr, I L

    1982-10-01

    A simple procedure is described for the determination of tin in PVC by atomic-absorption spectroscopy with an air-hydrogen flame, after wet digestion of the sample with sulphuric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Effects of Tin on Enzyme Activity in Holothuria grisea (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tatiana Miura; Mattar, Lívia Pôncio; Pereira, Edgar Rocha; Merçon, Julia; da Silva, Ary Gomes; Cruz, Zilma Maria Almeida

    2016-11-30

    This study evaluated the effect of tin exposure on enzyme activity in the sea cucumber (Holothuria grisea Selenka, 1867). After exposure to 0 (control), 0.04, 0.08, or 0.12 mg L(-1) tin, we tested the activities of total cholinesterase in longitudinal muscles, acid phosphatase in gonads and the respiratory tree, as well as alkaline phosphatase in the intestines during a 96-h bioassay. Regression analyses showed that all enzyme activities declined with increasing tin concentrations, except for acid phosphatase in the respiratory tree, which were similarly, inhibited at all tin concentrations. These results indicate that H. grisea is a potential bioindicator for seascape habitat monitoring programs, as its biochemical markers show sensitivity to trace elements that can indicate a rise in pollution levels.

  13. Filtrates & Residues: Experimental Work with Tin (II) Chloride in a High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Manuela Martin

    1988-01-01

    Presents a high school chemistry lab experiment using tin (II) chloride to explore the concepts of hydrolysis, Le Chatelier's principle, and electrolysis. Presents methodology and the chemistry involved. Offers questions for the students. (MVL)

  14. Filtrates & Residues: Experimental Work with Tin (II) Chloride in a High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Manuela Martin

    1988-01-01

    Presents a high school chemistry lab experiment using tin (II) chloride to explore the concepts of hydrolysis, Le Chatelier's principle, and electrolysis. Presents methodology and the chemistry involved. Offers questions for the students. (MVL)

  15. Effects of tin plating on base metal alloy-ceramic bond strength.

    PubMed

    Değer, S; Caniklioglu, M B

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the metal-ceramic bonding of treated metal surfaces. The study was divided into two parts. In Part I, the depth of tin diffusion from a tin-plated bone metal alloy surface was measured using an energy-dispersive spectrometer. In Part II the metal-ceramic bond strength was determined using a shear test. The weakest bonding was observed in the directly tin-plated group, and the strongest metal-ceramic bonding was maintained in the tin-diffused group. A controlled oxidation produced the greatest bond strengths. With the base metal alloys tested, diffusion under the argon environment was conducive to a stronger metal-ceramic bond. The metal oxidation rate should approximate the ceramic vitrification rate, and the diffusion rate of the metal elements should be slower than the vitrification rate to obtain the strongest metal-ceramic bond.

  16. [Phase transition analysis of ancient bronze mirror surface tin amalgam in heating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-yun; Qin, Ying

    2010-10-01

    Taking advantage of theta-theta scanning (vertical goniometer) sealed and ceramic X-ray tube full-automatic diffractometer, which can be heated and detected at the same time when the temperature is between normal temperature and 1200 degrees C, and X-ray fluorescence, and combining surface feature with character, high tin bronze mirror which had been daubed "tin amalgam" was detected and analyzed. It can prove that phase with Hg will disappear gradually when the sample is heated to the temperature higher than the boiling point of Hg; It indicates that bronze surface cannot be as a proof of "tin amalgam" used whether it contains Hg, moreover, it is not necessary that bronze mirror is covered with "tin amalgam" in terms of application.

  17. Facile Synthesis and Characterization of Two Dimensional Layered Tin Disulfide Nanowalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Zafer; Shahrezaei, Sina; Temiz, Selcuk; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2016-04-01

    Two dimensional layered metal chalcogenides, especially tin sulfides, have recently received great interest due to their enticing physical and chemical properties and hold promise for various applications. We report on synthesis of phase-pure two dimensional tin disulfide nanowalls by a facile vapor-phase synthesis method on insulator substrates such as silicon dioxide and magnesium oxide using tin dioxide and sulfur powders as precursors. The synthesized tin disulfide nanowalls have been characterized to study their fundamental properties by using various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The synthesized films have an open network structure constituted of very uniform interconnected nanowalls with high crystallinity.

  18. TIN2, a new regulator of telomere length in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sahn-Ho

    1999-11-05

    Telomeres are DNA-protein structures that cap linear chromosomes and are essential for maintaining genomic stability and cell phenotype. The authors identified a novel human telomere-associated protein, TIN2, by interaction cloning using the telomeric DNA binding protein TRF1 as a bait. TIN2 interacted with TRF1 in vitro and in cells, and co-localized with TRF1 in nuclei and metaphase chromosomes. A TIN2 mutant that lacks N-terminal sequences markedly elongated human telomeres in a telomerase-dependent manner. These findings suggest that TRF1 is insufficient for telomere length control in human cells, and that TIN2 is an essential mediator of TRF1 function.

  19. TiN nanoparticles: small size-selected fabrication and their quantum size effect

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Size-selected TiN nanoclusters in the range of 4 to 20 nm have been produced by an ionized cluster beam, which combines a glow-discharge sputtering with an inert gas condensation technique. With this method, by controlling the experimental conditions, it was possible to produce nanoparticles with a high control in size. The size distribution of TiN nanoparticles was determined before deposition by mass spectroscopy and confirmed by atomic force microscopy. The size distribution was also analyzed using a high-resolution transmission electron micrograph. The photoluminescence [PL] spectra of TiN nanoparticles at different sizes were also experimentally investigated. We reported, for the first time, the strong visible luminescence of TiN nanoparticles on Si (111) wafer due to the reduced size. We also discussed the PL intensity as a function of the nanoparticle size distribution. PMID:22252375

  20. Fabrication of ion conductive tin oxide-phosphate amorphous thin films by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Suk Won; Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Jun Woo; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-07-15

    This work reports the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tin oxide-phosphate films using tetrakis(dimethylamino)tin and trimethyl phosphate as precursors. The growth rates were 1.23–1.84 Å/cycle depending upon the deposition temperature and precursor combination. The ionic conductivity of the ALD tin oxide-phosphate films was evaluated by cross-plane impedance measurements in the temperature range of 50–300 °C under atmospheric air, with the highest conductivity measured as 1.92 × 10{sup −5} S cm{sup −1} at 300 °C. Furthermore, high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy exhibited two O1s peaks that were classified as two subpeaks of hydroxyl ions and oxygen ions, revealing that the quantity of hydroxyl ions in the ALD tin oxide-phosphate films influences their ionic conductivity.

  1. Selection of materials for tokamak plasma facing elements based on a liquid tin capillary pore system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyublinski, I. E.; Vertkov, A. V.; Zharkov, M. Yu; Sevryukov, O. N.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Shumskiy, V. A.; Ivannikov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Capillary-Pore Systems (CPS) filled by liquid metals are considered as an alternative solution of materials choice for plasma facing component of tokamak reactor. Tin is viewed as one of the candidates for CPS because it has lower corrosiveness than gallium and lower saturated vapour pressure compared to lithium. The corrosion resistance of Mo, Nb and W in pure liquid tin was investigated. The corrosion tests were carried out in the static isothermal conditions at a temperature up to 1050°C. As a result of the corrosion study, it was found that Mo does not corrode in liquid Sn, as opposed to Nb and is compatible with liquid tin in temperatures of up to approx. 1000°C. This allows considering Mo as an alloy base material of the in-vessel tokamak elements based on liquid tin capillary pore systems.

  2. Tin oxide nanosheet assembly for hydrophobic/hydrophilic coating and cancer sensing.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yoshitake; Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2012-03-01

    Tin oxide nanosheets were crystallized on transparent conductive oxide substrates of fluorine-doped tin oxide in aqueous solutions. The nanosheets had chemical ratio of Sn:O:F = 1:1.85:0.076, suggesting fluorine doping into SnO(2). They were hydrophobic surfaces with contact angle of 140°. They were converted to hydrophilic surfaces with contact angle of below 1° by light irradiation. The simple water process will be applied to surface coating of polymers, metals, biomaterials, papers, etc. Furthermore, the tin oxide nanosheets were modified with dye-labeled monoclonal antibody. Monoclonal antibody reacts with human alpha-fetoprotein in blood serum of hepatocellular cancer patient. Photoluminescence and photocurrent were obtained from the nanosheets under excitation light. Photoelectric conversion was an essence in the sensing system. The tin oxide nanosheets with dye-labeled prostate specific antigen will be used for electrodes of prostate cancer sensors.

  3. Tin Bider: A Complex Impact Crater in the Central Saharan Platform (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhai, D. B.; Sahoui, R. S.

    2014-09-01

    The circular structure of Tin Bider is located in the northeast of the Tadmaït (Algeria), This structure about 6000 m in diameter, shows three main concentric rings and a central peak in cretaceous target rocks.

  4. Vapor explosions during the impact of molten tin droplets into a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouraytem, Nadia; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2014-11-01

    High-speed video imaging is used to study the impact of a molten tin droplet into a liquid pool. Three different regimes have been identified as nucleation boiling, film boiling or vapor explosion. The latter generally comprises two stages; during the first stage, vapor gets entrapped into the molten tin drop and then, at a second stage, the vapor is superheated by the tin material, creating a violent expansion (explosion). It was observed that the addition of surfactant to the fluid pool could promote the explosion and make it occur at a lower temperature. Furthermore, other parameters such as the pool liquid surface tension, boiling temperature, viscosity and molten tin temperature have been varied to examine the explosion dynamics.

  5. Anodic stripping tin titration: a method for the voltammetric determination of platinum at trace levels.

    PubMed

    Giussani, Barbara; Roncoroni, Simone; Nemenyi, Anna; Dal Santo, Vladimiro; Monticelli, Damiano; Recchia, Sandro

    2014-07-01

    We propose here a novel voltammetric method for the determination of platinum at trace levels. The method is based on the interference that platinum generates on the anodic stripping signal of tin acidic solutions: in appropriate conditions platinum uses the intermediate formation of tin(II) ions, taking place during the tin cathodic reduction, to reduce itself and to form mixed Pt(II)-Sn(II) chloro-complexes. From the analysis of the anodic stripping plots obtained after subsequent additions of tin in a Pt-containing solution, it is possible to quantify accurately and precisely the Pt concentration from 3 ppb to more than 10 ppm. This novel method is validated for the analysis of Pt in heterogeneous catalysts, but in principle could be extended to other matrixes.

  6. Tin induced a-Si crystallization in thin films of Si-Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Neimash, V. E-mail: oleks.goushcha@nuportsoft.com; Poroshin, V.; Goushcha, A. O. E-mail: oleks.goushcha@nuportsoft.com; Shepeliavyi, P.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Melnyk, V.; Kuzmich, A.; Makara, V.

    2013-12-07

    Effects of tin doping on crystallization of amorphous silicon were studied using Raman scattering, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence techniques. Formation of silicon nanocrystals (2–4 nm in size) in the amorphous matrix of Si{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x}, obtained by physical vapor deposition of the components in vacuum, was observed at temperatures around 300 °C. The aggregate volume of nanocrystals in the deposited film of Si{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} exceeded 60% of the total film volume and correlated well with the tin content. Formation of structures with ∼80% partial volume of the nanocrystalline phase was also demonstrated. Tin-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon occurred only around the clusters of metallic tin, which suggested the crystallization mechanism involving an interfacial molten Si:Sn layer.

  7. Effect of TiN powder mixed in Electrical Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttamara, A.; Mesee, J.

    2016-11-01

    Many trials were studied about powder mixed in Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM). The experiments were carried for improving surface characteristics and related to the surface modification. The experiment was carried out using a copper tool electrode and EDMed in titanium nitride (TiN) powder mixed in dielectric fluid. In this research, to obtain the even modified layer, the effects of EDMed conditions were investigated. The EDMed surfaces were observed by SEM. Under the suitable discharge conditions in TiN powder mixed kerosene, the stable thick TiN layer adhered on the workpiece surface. The microcrack length per unit area treated in TiN mixed kerosene was greater than that treated in normal kerosene. Titanium carbon nitride (TiCN) was found on the modified layer by XRD analysis. The effect of the diffusion of carbon during cooling on the characteristics of the recast layer was discussed.

  8. Niobium carbide and tin precipitation in continuously cast microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Julian

    With high yield strength, toughness and good weldability, microalloyed steels are widely used in the automotive, pipeline and transportation industries. Microalloying elements such as niobium (Nb), titanium (Ti) and vanadium (V) in concentrations of less than 0.1 wt. pct. are typical. For optimal benefits in the final product, it is usually desired for Ti to form fine precipitates during and after solidification and for Nb to be in solution prior to hot-rolling. Vanadium precipitates at lower temperatures and is less involved in the solidification/casting process. In one aspect of the investigation, the effects of cooling rate on the titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation size distribution were investigated in a Ti-added low-carbon steel. Prior research reported an inverse relationship between the average TiN precipitation size and the post-solidification cooling rate and the present work was undertaken to examine this behavior over a wider range of cooling rates. Using the GleebleRTM 3500's casting simulation capabilities along with controlled cooling rates, the TiN precipitation behavior in thick-slab, thin-slab and thin-strip material was simulated using a commercially produced 0.04C, 1.23Mn steel with near-stoichiometric Ti and N levels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of carbon extraction replicas was carried out to characterize the influence of cooling rates on precipitate size distributions. Decreasing particle sizes with increasing cooling rates were found. Average particle sizes as low as 6.7 nm were present in thin-strip simulations and might be of interest, as fine particles could contribute to strengthening of rapidly cooled steels. In a second aspect of the investigation, niobium carbide (NbC) precipitation during the compact strip production (CSP) process was investigated in two Nb-added low-carbon steels. Instead of industrial sampling, the GleebleRTM was used for casting simulations using two CMn(Nb) steels with high and low- Nb

  9. Electrodeposition of lustrous tin-lead alloys in acidic electrolytes with organic additives

    SciTech Connect

    Selivanova, G.A.; Maksimenko, S.A.; Tyutina, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Galvanic coatings based on tin-lead alloys are mainly used in radio-engineering and electronic industries to prepare certain products, including printed-circuit boards, for soldering. To improve ecological safety of the proces, the authors studied a new electrolyte for depositing a tin-lead alloy based on nontoxic and abundant perchloric acid, as well as electrolytes based on mono- and trichloroacetic acids.

  10. Evaluation of employee exposure to organic tin compounds used as stabilizers at PVC processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Boraiko, Carol; Batt, John

    2005-02-01

    Organic tin compounds are primary substances used as heat stabilizers by the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry. The use of these compounds in the PVC industry is generally well controlled, usually by automated processes. This study was conducted to provide an overview of worker exposure to organic tin compounds at PVC processing facilities and to verify that these exposures are below the threshold limit value (TLV((R))) set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists for organic tin. The basis of the TLV indicates the principal concern is to minimize adverse effects on immune function and the central nervous system from airborne exposure to organic tin. The TLV has a skin designation based on the potential for percutaneous absorption; the TLVs for inhalation exposures are based on the presumption that there is no concurrent exposure via the skin and oral ingestion routes. Personal exposure monitoring was conducted following the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) 5504 sampling method and a modified version of the NIOSH analytical method. The results were reported as"total tin."The data indicated no average exposure levels for individual tasks exceeded the organic tin TLV, and 96%of results the samples were less than 20%of the TLV. Only 1 sample of 102 exceeded the TLV, and the individual was wearing appropriate respiratory protection. Subsequent investigation indicated the highest exposures occurred while the operators were conducting tasks that included manual handling of the organic tin compounds. These data suggest manual operations may have a greater potential for organic tin exposure.

  11. Recent research situation in tin dioxide nanomaterials: synthesis, microstructures, and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Wen; Shek, Chan-Hung; Wu, C. M. Lawrence; Lai, Joseph K. L.

    2013-09-01

    This review article summarizes the new research in solid-state physical chemistry understanding of the microstructure characteristics of semiconductor tin oxide thin films made in the last years in our group. The work mainly focuses on the fabrication technology of semiconductor tin oxides thin films by using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) as well as the application of this technology on new micro- and nanostructured materials. It is an interdisciplinary work that integrates the areas of physics, chemistry and materials science.

  12. Optical spectroscopy using mass-separated beams: Nuclear properties of unstable indium and tin isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, T.; Kirchner, R.; Klepper, O.; Marx, D.; Dinger, U.; Eberz, J.; Huber, G.; Lochmann, H.; Menges, R.; Ulm, G.

    1987-05-01

    Collinear fast-beam laser-spectroscopy has been used to measure the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of several indium and tin isotopes. The related experimental techniques are described, including the preparation of mass-separated beams of neutron-deficient indium and tin isotopes at the GSI on-line mass separator following fusion-evaporation reactions. The deviation of the observed dependence of the charge radii upon the neutron number from the expected behaviour is briefly discussed.

  13. Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1980-01-01

    Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

  14. Tin-carrier minerals in metaluminous granites of the western Nanling Range (southern China): Constraints on processes of tin mineralization in oxidized granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru Cheng; Xie, Lei; Chen, Jun; Yu, Apeng; Wang, Lubin; Lu, Jianjun; Zhu, Jinchu

    2013-09-01

    Huashan, Guposhan and Qitianling are three similar and representative metaluminous A-type tin granites in the western Nanling Range, China. They all have a high oxidization state with magnetite as the dominant Fe-Ti oxide. This study presents an understanding of systematic mineralogy of Sn-bearing minerals (biotite, titanite, magnetite and cassiterite) in the three granites. Biotite has an annite composition and both electron-microprobe and LA-ICP-MS analyses indicate trace amounts of tin in biotite (approximately 100-20 ppm). Chloritization of biotite is accompanied by formation of Sn-rich rutile and cassiterite. Titanite has a long history of crystallization from the early-magmatic stage through the late-magmatic stage to the hydrothermal stage. Owing to its solid-solution relationship with malayaite (CaSnSiO5), titanite always contains tin to various extents. Early-magmatic titanite contains about 0.5 wt.% SnO2, while the late-magmatic titanite is markedly enriched in tin (on average 14.8 and 3.4 SnO2 in titanite from the Qitianling and Huashan granites, respectively). Magnetite grains typically display a trellis structure with ilmenite lamellae, where microinclusions of cassiterite (<1 μm in size) are present. This is likely consistent with features of the "oxy-exsolution" process of Sn-bearing titanomagnetite precursor. Cassiterite may be observed as late-magmatic phase, but most commonly appears as an alteration product of other primary minerals. All tin-bearing minerals in the three granites record a complete process of tin mineralization in granite. The features of tin in primary biotite, titanite and magnetite reflect an initial enrichment during the early stage of magmatic crystallization of the Huashan, Guposhan and Qitianling granites. Association of interstitial Sn-titanite and cassiterite suggests further tin enrichment related to fractional crystallization of granitic magmas. Fluids and alteration of primary minerals play an important role in the

  15. Combustion synthesis of tin dioxide nanocomposites for gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakrania, Smitesh Dhirajlal

    The current work focuses on understanding the mechanisms controlling tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticle morphology in combustion synthesis systems and how nanoarchitecture affects performance of solid-state gas sensors. A range of analytical methods (including transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nitrogen absorption, and XEDS) were used to characterize the materials properties as a function of the combustion synthesis conditions. A novel method of generating tin dioxide materials was developed which provides a new degree of control over SnO2 morphology; including spherical, nanorod and encapsulated particle architectures. A simplified model for particle formation based on characteristic times was developed to identify the physical and chemical processes affecting the morphologies observed using transmission electron microscope imaging. The SnO2 nanoparticles evolve from primary particles sizes of 7 nm to 14 nm through the synthesis region, and the results indicate interparticle collision and sintering are the dominant mechanisms in determining particle size and morphology for the flame conditions studied. Metal acetates were used to create metal/SnO 2 nanocomposite materials, and the processes controlling gold acetate decomposition in particular were explored. The results of the studies suggest a relationship between the precursor crystallite size and the product nanoparticles. The well-characterized SnO2 particles were evaluated as the active materials for gas-sensing. Sensor sensitivity and time response to carbon monoxide in dry air was used to investigate microstructure-performance links. Excellent sensitivity (3 7, based on the ratio of the resistance of the sensor in air to the resistance in the target gas) and time response (4--20 seconds) were demonstrated for the thin film gas sensors. Fabrication studies demonstrated the sensor performance was a strong function of the film deposition method. A novel method for manufacturing

  16. Computing LS factor by runoff paths on TIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, Petr; Krasa, Josef; Bek, Stanislav

    2013-04-01

    The article shows results of topographic factor (the LS factor in USLE) derivation enhancement focused on detailed Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) based DEMs. It describes a flow paths generation technique using triangulated irregular network (TIN) for terrain morphology description, which is not yet established in soil loss computations. This technique was compared with other procedures of flow direction and flow paths generation based on commonly used raster model (DEM). These overland flow characteristics together with therefrom derived flow accumulation are significant inputs for many scientific models. Particularly they are used in all USLE-based soil erosion models, from which USLE2D, RUSLE3D, Watem/Sedem or USPED can be named as the most acknowledged. Flow routing characteristics are also essential parameters in physically based hydrological and soil erosion models like HEC-HMS, Wepp, Erosion3D, LISEM, SMODERP, etc. Mentioned models are based on regular raster grids, where the identification of runoff direction is problematic. The most common method is Steepest descent (one directional flow), which corresponds well with the concentration of surface runoff into concentrated flow. The Steepest descent algorithm for the flow routing doesn't provide satisfying results, it often creates parallel and narrow flow lines while not respecting real morphological conditions. To overcome this problem, other methods (such as Flux Decomposition, Multiple flow, Deterministic Infinity algorithm etc.) separate the outflow into several components. This approach leads to unrealistic diffusion propagation of the runoff and makes it impossible to be used for simulation of dominant morphological features, such as artificial rills, hedges, sediment traps etc. The modern methods of mapping ground elevations, especially ALS, provide very detailed models even for large river basins, including morphological details. New algorithms for derivation a runoff direction have been developed as

  17. The influence of temperature and humidity on the wettability of immersion tin coated printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, U.; Artaki, I.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-12-31

    This paper investigates the merits and drawbacks of immersion tin coatings as potential printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes. Immersion tin films applied in various thicknesses (0.2 to 2 {mu}m) to different copper substrates were characterized relative to thermal stability and shelflife. Thermal excursions included those typical in mixed technology assembly processes. Exposure to temperature/humidity was varied from near ambient (35{degree}C/85%RH) to harsh (steam aging). A minimum thickness of {approximately}60{mu}in (1.5{mu}m) was determined to be critical for assembly operations involving multiple thermal excursions. Even though formation of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMC) is facile, at the copper-tin interface, these compounds do not adversely affect the soldering performance, as long as the IMC phase is protected by a tin surface layer. Immersion tin finishes are relatively stable to thermal exposure, but are readily oxidized in the presence of humidity. This oxide growth is directly responsible for solderability degradation. The underlying copper substrate was also found to have a significant impact on the thermal stability of tin films. An electroless copper substrate caused significantly more intermetallic formation, that resulted in poor solderability even under moderate temperature, humidity conditions.

  18. Anticorrosion properties of tin oxide coatings for carbonaceous bipolar plates of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinumoto, Taro; Nagano, Keita; Yamamoto, Yuji; Tsumura, Tomoki; Toyoda, Masahiro

    2014-03-01

    An anticorrosive surface treatment of a carbonaceous bipolar plate used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) was demonstrated by addition of a tin oxide surface coating by liquid phase deposition (LPD), and its effectiveness toward corrosion prevention was determined. The tin oxide coating was deposited by immersion in tin fluoride and boric acid solutions, without any observable decrease in the bipolar plate electrical conductivity. Anticorrosion properties of a flat carbonaceous bipolar plate were investigated in an aqueous HClO4 electrolyte solution (10 μmol dm-3) at 80 °C. CO2 release due to corrosion was significant for the bare specimen above 1.3 V, whereas no CO2 release was noted for the tin-oxide-coated specimen, even approaching 1.5 V. Moreover, minimal changes in contact angle against a water droplet before and after treatment indicated suppressed corrosion of the surface-coated specimen. Anticorrosion properties were also confirmed for a model bipolar plate having four gas flow channels. The tin oxide layer remained on the channel surfaces (inner walls, corners and intersections) after durability tests. Based on these results, tin-oxide-based surface coatings fabricated by LPD show promise as an anticorrosion technique for carbonaceous bipolar plates for PEMFCs.

  19. Morphology and Gas-Sensing Properties of Tin Oxide Foams with Dual Pore Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kyungju; Kim, Hyeong-Gwan; Choi, Hyelim; Park, Hyeji; Kang, Jin Soo; Sung, Yung-Eun; Lee, Hee Chul; Choe, Heeman

    2017-01-01

    Tin oxide is a commonly used gas-sensing material, which can be applied as an n- or p-type gas sensor. To improve the gas-sensing performance of tin oxide, we successfully synthesized tin oxide foam via an ice-templating or freeze-casting method. The tin oxide foam samples showed different morphological features depending on the major processing parameters, which include sintering temperature, sintering time, and the amount of added powder. Based on scanning electron microscopy images, we could identify dual pore structure of tin oxide foam containing `wall' pores ranging from 5.3 μm to 10.7 μm, as well as smaller secondary pores (a few micrometers in size) on the wall surfaces. Gas-sensing performance tests for the synthesized tin oxide foams reveal a sensitivity of 13.1, a response time of 192 s, and a recovery time of 160 s at an ethanol gas concentration of 60 ppm at 300°C. This is a remarkable result given that it showed p-type semiconductor behavior and was used without the addition of any catalyst.

  20. Morphology and Gas-Sensing Properties of Tin Oxide Foams with Dual Pore Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kyungju; Kim, Hyeong-Gwan; Choi, Hyelim; Park, Hyeji; Kang, Jin Soo; Sung, Yung-Eun; Lee, Hee Chul; Choe, Heeman

    2017-06-01

    Tin oxide is a commonly used gas-sensing material, which can be applied as an n- or p-type gas sensor. To improve the gas-sensing performance of tin oxide, we successfully synthesized tin oxide foam via an ice-templating or freeze-casting method. The tin oxide foam samples showed different morphological features depending on the major processing parameters, which include sintering temperature, sintering time, and the amount of added powder. Based on scanning electron microscopy images, we could identify dual pore structure of tin oxide foam containing `wall' pores ranging from 5.3 μm to 10.7 μm, as well as smaller secondary pores (a few micrometers in size) on the wall surfaces. Gas-sensing performance tests for the synthesized tin oxide foams reveal a sensitivity of 13.1, a response time of 192 s, and a recovery time of 160 s at an ethanol gas concentration of 60 ppm at 300°C. This is a remarkable result given that it showed p-type semiconductor behavior and was used without the addition of any catalyst.

  1. Hydrogenated ultra-thin tin films predicted as two-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Quan; Chou, Bo-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Using thickness-dependent first-principles electronic structure calculations, we predict that hydrogenated ultra-thin films of tin harbor a new class of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs). A single bilayer (BL) tin film assumes a 2D-TI phase, but it transforms into a trivial insulator after hydrogenation. In contrast, tin films with 2 and 3 BLs are found to be trivial insulators, but hydrogenation of 2 to 4 BL films results in a non-trivial TI phase. For 1 to 3 BLs, H-passivation converts the films from being metallic to insulating. Moreover, we examined iodine-terminated tin films up to 3 BLs, and found these to be non-trivial, with the films becoming semi-metallic beyond 1 BL. In particular, the large band gap of 340 meV in an iodine-terminated tin bilayer is not sustained in the iodine-terminated 2BL and 3BL tin films.

  2. Hydrogenated ultra-thin tin films predicted as two-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Bo-Hung; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Liu, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    2014-11-01

    Using thickness-dependent first-principles electronic structure calculations, we predict that hydrogenated ultra-thin films of tin harbor a new class of two-dimensional (2D) topological insulators (TIs). A single bilayer (BL) tin film assumes a 2D-TI phase, but it transforms into a trivial insulator after hydrogenation. In contrast, tin films with 2 and 3 BLs are found to be trivial insulators, but hydrogenation of 2 to 4 BL films results in a non-trivial TI phase. For 1 to 3 BLs, H-passivation converts the films from being metallic to insulating. Moreover, we examined iodine-terminated tin films up to 3 BLs, and found these to be non-trivial, with the films becoming semi-metallic beyond 1 BL. In particular, the large band gap of 340 meV in an iodine-terminated tin BL is not sustained in the iodine-terminated 2 BL and 3 BL tin films.

  3. Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

  4. Effect of microstructure on the breakage of tin bronze machining chips during pulverization via jet milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Elham; Ghambari, Mohammad; Farhangi, Hasan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, jet milling was used to recycle tin bronze machining chips into powder. The main purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the microstructure of tin bronze machining chips on their breakage behavior. An experimental target jet mill was used to pulverize machining chips of three different tin bronze alloys containing 7wt%, 10wt%, and 12wt% of tin. Optical and electron microscopy, as well as sieve analysis, were used to follow the trend of pulverization. Each alloy exhibited a distinct rate of size reduction, particle size distribution, and fracture surface appearance. The results showed that the degree of pulverization substantially increased with increasing tin content. This behavior was attributed to the higher number of machining cracks as well as the increased volume fraction of brittle δ phase in the alloys with higher tin contents. The δ phase was observed to strongly influence the creation of machining cracks as well as the nucleation and propagation of cracks during jet milling. In addition, a direct relationship was observed between the mean δ-phase spacing and the mean size of the jet-milled product; i.e., a decrease in the δ-phase spacing resulted in smaller particles.

  5. Metallic tin quantum sheets confined in graphene toward high-efficiency carbon dioxide electroreduction

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Fengcai; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yongfu; Xu, Jiaqi; Liu, Katong; Liang, Liang; Yao, Tao; Pan, Bicai; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin metal layers can be highly active carbon dioxide electroreduction catalysts, but may also be prone to oxidation. Here we construct a model of graphene confined ultrathin layers of highly reactive metals, taking the synthetic highly reactive tin quantum sheets confined in graphene as an example. The higher electrochemical active area ensures 9 times larger carbon dioxide adsorption capacity relative to bulk tin, while the highly-conductive graphene favours rate-determining electron transfer from carbon dioxide to its radical anion. The lowered tin–tin coordination numbers, revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, enable tin quantum sheets confined in graphene to efficiently stabilize the carbon dioxide radical anion, verified by 0.13 volts lowered potential of hydroxyl ion adsorption compared with bulk tin. Hence, the tin quantum sheets confined in graphene show enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability. This work may provide a promising lead for designing efficient and robust catalysts for electrolytic fuel synthesis. PMID:27585984

  6. Tin amalgam mirrors: investigation by XRF, SEM-EDS, XRD and EPMA-WDS mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizio, E.; Orsega, E. F.; Sommariva, G.; Falcone, R.

    2013-06-01

    Ancient mirrors were constituted by a tin-mercury amalgam layer superimposed to a glass sheet. This was the only one method used until the nineteenth century, when the wet silvering process was invented. The tin amalgam is a binary alloy of tin and mercury constituted by two different phases: a mercury-rich liquid phase and a tin-rich solid phase. The amalgam alteration produces mercury loss and a general growth of the solid crystalline phase. In addition, tin dioxide and monoxide are formed with a consequent decrease of the amalgam adhesion to the glass. These degradation phenomena led to reduction or disappearance of the mirror reflective power. The aim of this study was the characterization of the amalgam layers of eight mirror samples dating during the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and by a Scanning Electron Microscope with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and for the first time on this type of alloy by X-ray Fluorescence and EPMA-WDS (Electron Probe Micro Analysis with Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry) elemental mapping. The contents of tin, mercury, and some trace elements in the amalgam layers have been determined. The investigation of the superficial patterns of the amalgam by SEM, EPMA-WDS mapping, and SEM-EDS allowed a first understanding of some morphologies and processes of the degradation of the amalgam layer.

  7. Wear Behavior of Fiber Laser Textured TiN Coatings in a Heavy Loaded Sliding Regime

    PubMed Central

    Vandoni, Laura; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara; Lecis, Nora; Ugues, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    In heavy loaded mating components, such as sliders and sliding bearings, guaranteeing the efficiency of lubricant films for long times during severe service conditions is very complicated. In this work, the benefits deriving from the use of fiber laser sources for surface texturing of very thin TiN coatings in severe wear working conditions were demonstrated. Evaluations of the laser textured dimples shape, geometry and density are given. Wear performance of the fiber laser textured surfaces was evaluated in discontinuous oil lubricated conditions with a flat contact. High normal load and low sliding speed were applied. Comparison tests were also performed on commercial TiN and WC/C coatings. In terms of average wear volume and maximum wear depth, Laser Surface Texturing of TiN provided respectively a 70% and a 45% reduction if compared to plain TiN. If compared to WC/C the wear resistance gains were lower but LST TiN maintained such benefits for longer wear runs. SEM analysis also revealed that the laser interaction provided a localized thermal cracking to the TiN coating. However, the sliding action caused very limited and localized coating fragmentation or delamination.

  8. Cassiterite exsolution with ilmenite lamellae in magnetite from the Huashan metaluminous tin granite in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru Cheng; Yu, A.-Peng; Chen, Jun; Xie, Lei; Lu, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jin-Chu

    2012-05-01

    Sn4+ is generally the dominant form of tin in magnetite-series granites as shown by the presence of cassiterite or its incorporation into Ti-bearing minerals such as biotite and titanite. Little is known about the behavior of tin in magnetite. The Huashan granite is an oxidized tin granite in the Nanling Range, southern China, where it contains magnetite as the dominant Fe oxide mineral. It is included in biotite as an early phase and also as interstitial grains spatially associated with ilmenite, cassiterite, Sn-rich titanite (SnO2 up to 5.9 wt.%), fluorite and apatite. This association indicates that tin enrichment occurred during the late stage of magma crystallization. Ilmenite lamellae display a trellis structure consistent with features of the "oxy-exsolution" process of Sn-bearing titanomagnetite precursor. Micro-inclusions of cassiterite (<1 μm in size) are found only within ilmenite lamellae. This suggests that magnetite with cassiterite inclusions is likely an indicator mineral of oxidized tin granites. Although rare in nature, Sn-bearing magnetite from weathered granites where concentrated in stream sediments, may serve as a strategic tracer for tin exploration in granite districts and in placer deposits, in general.

  9. Cell Cycle Regulated Phosphorylation of the Telomere-Associated Protein TIN2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuqun; Counter, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The protein TIN2 is a member of telomere-binding protein complex that serves to cap and protect mammalian chromosome ends. As a number of proteins in this complex are phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, we investigated whether TIN2 is modified by phosphorylation as well. We performed phospho-proteomic analysis of human TIN2, and identified two phosphorylated residues, serines 295 and 330. We demonstrated that both these sites were phosphorylated during mitosis in human cells, as detected by Phos-tag reagent and phosphorylation-specific antibodies. Phosphorylation of serines 295 and 330 appeared to be mediated, at least in part, by the mitotic kinase RSK2. Specifically, phosphorylation of TIN2 at both these residues was increased upon expression of RSK2 and reduced by an inhibitor of the RSK family of kinases. Moreover, RSK2 phosphorylated TIN2 in vitro. The identification of these specifically timed post-translational events during the cell cycle suggests a potential mitotic regulation of TIN2 by phosphorylation. PMID:23977114

  10. Multifunctional TiN nanowires for wide band absorption in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdi, Sara; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2017-02-01

    One of the key issues limiting the efficiency of organic solar cells is the narrow absorption band of the polymer active layer. Thus, a huge amount of the incident sunlight is lost. Here, a new structure is theoretically proposed achieving wide band absorption in organic solar cells using multifunctional TiN nanowires. In addition to the plasmonic properties of TiN, it was reported that TiN has the capability to produce free carriers upon light absorption. Thus, the structure is based on the ability to collect these photo-generated carriers. Using the combination of TiN and polymer significantly broadened the absorption band due to the ability of TiN to localize light inside P3HT:PC70BM in addition to its ability to absorb light at longer wavelengths. The optimized structure enhanced the absorbed power by 95% and the optimal short circuit current by 123% over the same structure without the TiN nanowires. Electric field distribution is studied at different wavelengths to gain further insight on the localization of light inside the structure.

  11. Excimer laser micromachining of TiN films from chromium and copper sacrificial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, A. J.; Ghantasala, M. K.; Hayes, J. P.; Harvey, E. C.; Doyle, E. D.

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents results on the laser micromachining of TiN films. Machining performance was evaluated in terms of patterning quality and the ability to remove TiN with minimal interference with an underlying sacrificial layer. TiN was arc-deposited onto (100) silicon substrate with chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) sacrificial layers. Films were also deposited onto bare silicon substrates under the same conditions. These films were analysed for their composition and structure using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction techniques. Laser micromachining was performed using a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. The effect of fluence and number of shots on the machined features has been investigated in detail. The patterned features were examined using optical, confocal and scanning electron microscopes. The characteristics observed were analysed and compared in all three sets of samples. The results showed selective removal of TiN films from Cr and Cu sacrificial layers under different conditions. The machining of TiN from (100) silicon showed relatively poor definition of patterned features. The analysis of these results indicated that laser machining of TiN from Cr and Cu layers is best explained using the explosion mechanism of removal.

  12. The application and research status of tin whisker formation in electric usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Heng; Liu, Qing-bin; Lan, Yuan-pei; Wang, Hua; Yao, Da-wei

    2017-05-01

    `Hair Like' crystalline structure grows from most pure tin or zinc finishes. Usually, the diameter of tin whisker is up to 10 mm and the length of tin whisker is typically 1 µm. In detail, the questions for tin whisker formation are classified into 6 categories: 1. Residual stress with in the tin plating; 2. Intermetallic Formation; 3. Externally Applied Compressive Stress; 4. Bending and Stretching; 5. Scratches and Nicks; 6. Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Mismatches. The result shows that, whisker formation could causes electrical short circuit (High current of whisker melting), debris contamination (Sensitive Optical and Micro Electrical Mechanical System) and metal vapor (Vaporize Damage). Thus, it is suggested that environmental tests and standards (Whisker Shape, Temperature, Pressure, Moisture, Thermal Cycling, and Electrical Field) are required for suppressing whisker formation. Nowadays, the new standards committee of Europe Union acts RoHS (Restriction of certain Hazardous Substances) and WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) to restrict Pb usage. Thus, new compounds adding to alloys to suppress whiskers are required in electronic application area. In summary, the tin whisker formation is largely influenced by compositions and precipitations.

  13. Search for technetium in natural tin metallurgical residues

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, C.W.

    1996-07-01

    Possible instability of baryons inside the nuclei might result in accumulation of rare isotopes in natural ores. In this respect, isotopes of technetium have certain advantages that can be useful in the search for technetium in nonradioactive ores by chemical methods. In this paper, we review the history of technetium research and discuss a new approach to the search for natural technetium associated with tin ores which appears to offer a rare possibility of discovering a smelting operation by-product such as flue dust, in which the volatile technetium heptoxide (Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7}), like rhenium heptoxide (Re{sub 2}O{sub 7}), would be expected to concentrate. Our concept of a search for technetium in these materials would be based on the assumption that traces of rhenium could occur in the ore and could be traced most easily by neutron activation of small samples. Such a procedure would confirm that an enrichment from the ore to the flue dust actually occurs with the rhenium and therefore should occur with technetium. Furthermore, this occurrence should identify the best location to search for technetium.

  14. Highly efficient and durable TiN nanofiber electrocatalyst supports.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Cho, Min Kyung; Kwon, Jeong An; Jeong, Yeon Hun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Kim, Min Jung; Yoo, Sung Jong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Nam, Suk Woo; Lim, Dong-Hee; Cho, EunAe; Lee, Kwan-Young; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-11-28

    To date, carbon-based materials including various carbon nanostructured materials have been extensively used as an electrocatalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications due to their practical nature. However, carbon dissolution or corrosion caused by high electrode potential in the presence of O2 and/or water has been identified as one of the main failure modes for the device operation. Here, we report the first TiN nanofiber (TNF)-based nonwoven structured materials to be constructed via electrospinning and subsequent two-step thermal treatment processes as a support for the PEMFC catalyst. Pt catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on the TNFs (Pt/TNFs) were electrochemically characterized with respect to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability in an acidic medium. From the electrochemical tests, the TNF-supported Pt catalyst was better and more stable in terms of its catalytic performance compared to a commercially available carbon-supported Pt catalyst. For example, the initial oxygen reduction performance was comparable for both cases, while the Pt/TNF showed much higher durability from an accelerated degradation test (ADT) configuration. It is understood that the improved catalytic roles of TNFs on the supported Pt NPs for ORR are due to the high electrical conductivity arising from the extended connectivity, high inertness to the electrochemical environment and strong catalyst-support interactions.

  15. Patterning cells on optically transparent indium tin oxide electrodes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunny; Revzin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The ability to exercise precise spatial and temporal control over cell-surface interactions is an important prerequisite to the assembly of multi-cellular constructs serving as in vitro mimics of native tissues. In this study, photolithography and wet etching techniques were used to fabricate individually addressable indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes on glass substrates. The glass substrates containing ITO microelectrodes were modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) silane to make them protein and cell resistive. Presence of insulating PEG molecules on the electrode surface was verified by cyclic voltammetry employing potassium ferricyanide as a redox reporter molecule. Importantly, the application of reductive potential caused desorption of the PEG layer, resulting in regeneration of the conductive electrode surface and appearance of typical ferricyanide redox peaks. Application of reductive potential also corresponded to switching of ITO electrode properties from cell non-adhesive to cell-adhesive. Electrochemical stripping of PEG-silane layer from ITO microelectrodes allowed for cell adhesion to take place in a spatially defined fashion, with cellular patterns corresponding closely to electrode patterns. Micropatterning of several cell types was demonstrated on these substrates. In the future, the control of the biointerfacial properties afforded by this method will allow to engineer cellular microenvironments through the assembly of three or more cell types into a precise geometric configuration on an optically transparent substrate.

  16. Orientation dependent tribological behavior of TiN coatings.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, S; Yıldız, B; Ürgen, M

    2016-04-06

    The preferred growth direction of cathodic arc physical vapor deposition-produced TiN coatings changes from (1 1 1) to (2 2 0) with high voltage pulsed bias application in the presence of Ar gas. In this study, tribological properties of these coatings were investigated via reciprocating wear tests against an inert counterbody for observing the role of orientation on tribological properties. Friction coefficients and wear of (2 2 0) oriented coatings were observed to be significantly lower compared to (1 1 1) oriented coatings. Micro-Raman investigations of the wear debris formed during tribotest revealed clear differences between (1 1 1) and (2 2 0) oriented films. Wear debris obtained from (2 2 0) oriented coatings consisted of nc TiO2 phases (anatase and rutile) whereas (1 1 1) oriented coatings produced amorphous Ti oxides. This behavior is attributed to the orientation dependent oxidation kinetics of the coatings as verified with isothermal oxidation tests. A mechanism for improved tribological behavior is proposed based on the obtained results.

  17. Crumpled indium-tin-oxide electrodes for transparency tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hui-Yng; Shrestha, Milan; Lau, Gih Keong

    2016-04-01

    Optical transparency of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film depends on its topography. Wrinkling of ITO thin film can reduce normal transmittance or visibility by scattering the incident light away. In this paper, we study topography change of ITO thin film and its effect on normal transmittance of light. Coating of ITO thin film on adhesive poly-acrylate elastomer forms wrinkles and folds when subjected to mechanical compression and surface buckling. At excessive compression, such as 25% equi-biaxial, folds of the ITO thin film are so deep and convoluted like crumpling of a piece of paper. This crumpled form of ITO thin film can well obscure the light passing even though a flat ITO thin film is transparent. Surprisingly, the crumpled ITO thin film remains continuous and conductive even with 25% equi-biaxial compression despite the fact that ITO is known to be brittle. These crumpled ITO thin films were subsequently used to make compliant electrodes for Dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). These crumpled ITO thin film can be reversibly unfolded through the DEA's areal expansion. This DEA with 14.2% equi-biaxially crumpled ITO thin films can produce 37% areal expansion and demonstrate an optical transmittance change from 39.14% to 52.08% at 550nm wavelength.

  18. Detection of chlorinated methanes by tin oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Son, Y C; Shaw, B R; Creasy, K E; Suib, S L

    2001-08-01

    Tin oxide thin films prepared by thermal oxidation of Sn films were used for the detection of chlorinated methanes (CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CCl4). This resulted in better chemical selectivity, sensitivity, response speed and detection limit than seen with previous detectors. The temperature dependence of the sensing of 1% CCl4 gas was studied and the best sensing behavior was observed at 300 degrees C. The films showed different chemical selectivity in both speed and direction of sensing response to each gas and were stable for more than 3 weeks under operating conditions. The films showed rapid gas sensing (<40 s to reach 90% of full response) and low detection limits (< 4 ppm CCl4). The role of oxygen in the detection of chlorinated methanes and in resistance changes without chlorinated methanes was also studied. The changes at the surface of the film after gas sensing were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry.

  19. Sublimation TiN Coating of RF Power Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorkiewicz, J.; Kula, J.; Pszona, S.; Sobczak, J.; Bilinski, A.

    2008-03-01

    Titanium evaporation in a reactive atmosphere of ammonia has been chosen to deposit thin (up to 10 nm) protective surface layers containing titanium nitride and titanium oxinitrides which suppress secondary electron emission. The coating procedure, applied by the author in DESY (Hamburg) for TESLA couplers anti-multipactor protection, has been recently implemented in The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ) where a new coating device is used, equipped with a special titanium sublimation setup in a 100 1 vacuum chamber. Several arrays of cylindrical and coaxial RF coupler windows have been coated so far after optimizing the processing parameters. A check of the obtained surface layers ability to attenuate secondary electron emission has been performed; measurements of the secondary electron yield from TiN layers deposited on alumina samples were done in IPJ on as-delivered coated samples, then after vacuum bake-out and finally after additional electron bombardment of their surfaces. Also chemical composition of the surface layers has been studied using XPS in the Institute of Physical Chemistry (IChF).

  20. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Carter, C. Barry; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature with no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.

  1. Broadband resonances in indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shi-Qiang E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H. E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu

    2015-07-20

    There is currently much discussion within the nanophotonics community regarding the origin of wavelength selective absorption/scattering of light by the resonances in nanorod arrays. Here, we report a study of resonances in ordered indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays resulting from waveguide-like modes. We find that with only a 2.4% geometrical coverage, micron-length nanorod arrays interact strongly with light across a surprisingly wide band from the visible to the mid-infrared, resulting in less than 10% transmission. Simulations show excellent agreement with our experimental observations. The field profile in the vicinity of the rods obtained from simulations shows that the electric field is mainly localized on the surfaces of the nanorods for all resonances. Based on our analysis, the resonances in the visible are different in character from those in the infrared. When light is incident on the array, part of it propagates in the space between the rods and part of it is guided within the rods. The phase difference (interference) at the ends of the rods forms the basis for the resonances in the visible region. The resonances in the infrared are Fabry-Perot-like resonances involving standing surface waves between the opposing ends of the rods. Simple analytical formulae predict the spectral positions of these resonances. It is suggested that these phenomena can be utilized for wavelength-selective photodetectors, modulators, and nanorod-based solar cells.

  2. Tin Whisker Growth and Mitigation with a Nanocrysytalline Nickel Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, Szymon

    Tin whiskers are a problem in the electronics industry since the EU banned the use of lead in Pb-Sn solders as part of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS). The biggest concern with Sn whiskers is their ability to short-circuit electronics. High reliability applications such as the aerospace, defense, healthcare, and automotive industries are at most risk. This project explores Sn whisker mitigation and prevention with the use of nanocrystalline nickel coating over Sn surfaces. Sn was plated onto a pure Cu substrate using electroplating. A high temperature and high humidity condition, at 85°C and 85% RH, was effective at growing whiskers. A nNi coating was plated over Sn/Cu coupons. After subjecting the nNi/ Sn/Cu samples through 85°C/85% RH testing conditions, no whiskers were observed penetrating the surface. These results make nNi a viable material to use as a coating to prevent the growth of Sn whiskers in electronic assemblies.

  3. Chemical and Lattice Stability of the Tin Sulfides

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The tin sulfides represent a materials platform for earth-abundant semiconductor technologies. We present a first-principles study of the five known and proposed phases of SnS together with SnS2 and Sn2S3. Lattice-dynamics techniques are used to evaluate the dynamical stability and temperature-dependent thermodynamic free energy, and we also consider the effect of dispersion forces on the energetics. The recently identified π-cubic phase of SnS is found to be metastable with respect to the well-known orthorhombic Pnma/Cmcm equilibrium. The Cmcm phase is a low-lying saddle point between Pnma local minima on the potential-energy surface and is observed as an average structure at high temperatures. Bulk rocksalt and zincblende phases are found to be dynamically unstable, and we show that whereas rocksalt SnS can potentially be stabilized under a reduction of the lattice constant the hypothetical zincblende phase proposed in several previous studies is extremely unlikely to form. We also investigate the stability of Sn2S3 with respect to SnS and SnS2 and find that both dispersion forces and vibrational contributions to the free energy are required to explain its experimentally observed resistance to decomposition. PMID:28652889

  4. Broadband resonances in indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Qiang; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2015-07-01

    There is currently much discussion within the nanophotonics community regarding the origin of wavelength selective absorption/scattering of light by the resonances in nanorod arrays. Here, we report a study of resonances in ordered indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays resulting from waveguide-like modes. We find that with only a 2.4% geometrical coverage, micron-length nanorod arrays interact strongly with light across a surprisingly wide band from the visible to the mid-infrared, resulting in less than 10% transmission. Simulations show excellent agreement with our experimental observations. The field profile in the vicinity of the rods obtained from simulations shows that the electric field is mainly localized on the surfaces of the nanorods for all resonances. Based on our analysis, the resonances in the visible are different in character from those in the infrared. When light is incident on the array, part of it propagates in the space between the rods and part of it is guided within the rods. The phase difference (interference) at the ends of the rods forms the basis for the resonances in the visible region. The resonances in the infrared are Fabry-Perot-like resonances involving standing surface waves between the opposing ends of the rods. Simple analytical formulae predict the spectral positions of these resonances. It is suggested that these phenomena can be utilized for wavelength-selective photodetectors, modulators, and nanorod-based solar cells.

  5. TEM in situ lithiation of tin nanoneedles for battery applications

    DOE PAGES

    Janish, Matthew T.; Mackay, David T.; Liu, Yang; ...

    2015-08-12

    Materials such as tin (Sn) and silicon that alloy with lithium (Li) have attracted renewed interest as anode materials in Li-ion batteries. Although their superior capacity to graphite and other intercalation materials has been known for decades, their mechanical instability due to extreme volume changes during cycling has traditionally limited their commercial viability. This limitation is changing as processes emerge that produce nanostructured electrodes. The nanostructures can accommodate the repeated expansion and contraction as Li is inserted and removed without failing mechanically. Recently, one such nano-manufacturing process, which is capable of depositing coatings of Sn “nanoneedles” at low temperature withmore » no template and at industrial scales, has been described. The present work is concerned with observations of the lithiation and delithiation behavior of these Sn nanoneedles during in situ experiments in the transmission electron microscope, along with a brief review of how in situ TEM experiments have been used to study the lithiation of Li-alloying materials. Individual needles are successfully lithiated and delithiated in solid-state half-cells against a Li-metal counter-electrode. Furthermore the microstructural evolution of the needles is discussed, including the transformation of one needle from single-crystal Sn to polycrystalline Sn–Li and back to single-crystal Sn.« less

  6. Etching of germanium-tin using ammonia peroxide mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yuan; Ong, Bin Leong; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiao; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng; Tok, Eng-Soon

    2015-12-28

    The wet etching of germanium-tin (Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}) alloys (4.2% < x < 16.0%) in ammonia peroxide mixture (APM) is investigated. Empirical fitting of the data points indicates that the etch depth of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} is proportional to the square root of the etch time t and decreases exponentially with increasing x for a given t. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that increasing t increases the intensity of the Sn oxide peak, whereas no obvious change is observed for the Ge oxide peak. This indicates that an accumulation of Sn oxide on the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surface decreases the amount of Ge atoms exposed to the etchant, which accounts for the decrease in etch rate with increasing etch time. Atomic force microscopy was used to examine the surface morphologies of the Ge{sub 0.918}Sn{sub 0.082} samples. Both root-mean-square roughness and undulation periods of the Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} surface were observed to increase with increasing t. This work provides further understanding of the wet etching of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} using APM and may be used for the fabrication of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}-based electronic and photonic devices.

  7. Detection of Smoldering Fire Using Tin Oxide Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashino, Tsubasa; Sawada, Ayako; Oyabu, Takashi; Takei, Yoshinori; Nanto, Hidehito; Toko, Kiyoshi

    Detecting technique of smoldering fire was examined using tin oxide gas sensors. Eight sensors were installed in a room. They were same type. Four kinds of materials were adopted as a fire-source material. The materials were cotton cloth, wallpaper, curtain cloth and woodchip, which were main smoldering fire-source materials in an indoor environment. The sensor outputs to gases evolved upon the smoldering fire of the materials were measured. The differential characteristic of the output was derived to analyze. As for the results, it became obvious that the sensor locating at higher position had a higher sensitivity and it could sense the fire instantaneously. It is thought that the generated gases rise up directly toward the ceiling and reflect downward. A small type of electric cooking stove was used as a fire-source. The surface temperature of the stove plate arrived at 340 °C. A bar was adopted to set the sensors freely. In this experiment, three bars were adopted and the heights of the sensor position were 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm from the floor. It is effective to locate the sensor at higher position in detecting a smoldering fire. The sensor characteristics were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The system could discriminate source materials among wallpaper, woodchip and curtain for smoldering fire by utilizing the result of PCA. But, the smoldering fire of cotton cloth could not be distinguished from that of curtain by this system. Each fire could be identified in four minutes.

  8. Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA plans to use a number of onboard viewing ports to measure lunar regolith in situ and to monitor robotic and human activities on the lunar or Martian surface. Because of the size and abundance of dust particles on these bodies, the potential for dust to occlude viewing ports and windows is high enough to threaten system lifetime and reliability, especially when activities rely on relaying video to either a habitat module or controllers on Earth. This project uses a technology being developed by KSC's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory to remove dust from windowlike surfaces. The technology applies an alternating electric potential to interlaced electrodes. In this application, we use indium tin oxide (ITO) to create various electrode patterns in order to determine the most reliable pattern for dust removal. This technology has application to systems where optical clarity is important. Specifically, this project considers the in situ resource utilization (ISRU) application of a viewing port for Raman spectroscopy, where the electrode pattern on glass would be coated with a scratch-resistant sapphire film (Al2O3).

  9. Serial evaluations at an indium-tin oxide production facility.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Kristin J; Suarthana, Eva; Edwards, Nicole; Liang, Xiaoming; Stanton, Marcia L; Day, Gregory A; Saito, Rena; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2013-03-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of workplace changes to prevent indium lung disease, using 2002-2010 surveillance data collected by an indium-tin oxide production facility. We assessed pulmonary function using lower limits of normal. Blood indium concentration and personal air sampling data were used to estimate exposure. Abnormalities were uncommon at hire. After hire, prevalence of spirometric restriction was 31% (n = 14/45), about fourfold higher than expected. Excessive decline in FEV1 was elevated at 29% (n = 12/41). Half (n = 21/42) had blood indium ≥5 µg/l. More recent hires had fewer abnormalities. There was a suggestion that abnormalities were more common among workers with blood indium ≥5 µg/l, but otherwise an exposure-response relationship was not evident. Peak dust concentrations were obscured by time averaging. Evolving lung function abnormalities consistent with subclinical indium lung disease appeared common and merit systematic investigation. Traditional measures of exposure and response were not illustrative, suggesting fresh approaches will be needed. Workplace changes seemed to have had a positive though incomplete impact; novel preventive interventions are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reaction of mercury with silver-tin dental amalgam alloy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J R; Miller, D R; Netherway, D J

    1982-09-01

    Electron diffraction evidence confirming the ordered orthorhombic crystal structure of the gamma phase of the silver-tin system has been obtained, and it has been established by optical metallography that an alloy with a composition corresponding to the dental amalgam alloy formula Ag3Sn (i.e., 26.85 wt % Sn) lies outside the single gamma phase field and in the duplex (gamma + Sn) phase field adjacent to it. Studies of the mechanism of the hardening reaction of single crystals of homogeneous gamma phase alloys with mercury were carried out using both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mercury attack occurred preferentially along well-defined planes in the single crystals. Using electron channeling and trace analysis techniques these planes of preferential attack were found to be [010] and [011], and from transmission electron microscopy of thin foils these were shown to be slip bands and deformation twins, respectively. In bicrystals of gamma phase material, preferential attack also occurred along grain boundaries. Similar preferential mercury attack, leading to the development of deep planar intrusions into the gamma phase material, was observed in an experimental dental amalgam prepared from a lathe-cut homogeneous gamma phase amalgam alloy. It is believed that the presence of such features would have important implications for the clinical performance of dental amalgam.

  11. Design of Metastable Tin Titanium Nitride Semiconductor Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Bikowski, Andre; Siol, Sebastian; Gu, Jing; ...

    2017-07-07

    Here, we report on design of optoelectronic properties in previously unreported metastable tin titanium nitride alloys with spinel crystal structure. Theoretical calculations predict that Ti alloying in metastable Sn3N4 compound should improve hole effective mass by up to 1 order of magnitude, while other optical bandgaps remains in the 1–2 eV range up to x ~ 0.35 Ti composition. Experimental synthesis of these metastable alloys is predicted to be challenging due to high required nitrogen chemical potential (ΔμN ≥ +1.0 eV) but proven to be possible using combinatorial cosputtering from metal targets in the presence of nitrogen plasma. Characterization experimentsmore » confirm that thin films of such (Sn1–xTix)3N4 alloys can be synthesized up to x = 0.45 composition, with suitable optical band gaps (1.5–2.0 eV), moderate electron densities (1017 to 1018 cm–3), and improved photogenerated hole transport (by 5×). Overall, this study shows that it is possible to design the metastable nitride materials with properties suitable for potential use in solar energy conversion applications.« less

  12. Dissolution rate measurements of TiN in Ti-6242

    SciTech Connect

    Bewlay, B.P.; Gigliotti, M.F.X.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the dissolution rate of nitrided Ti sponge and monolithic TiN rod in molten Ti-6242. The dissolution rate is described in terms of an interface recession rate that was 2.2 {micro}m/s for a Ti-6242 temperature of 1,725 C and dissolution times between 1 and 100 min. Similar dissolution rates were measured for nitrided sponge and monolithic rod. This report also descries the microstructural and chemical interdiffusion phenomena that occur during dissolution of solid {delta}TiN in molten Ti-6242. There is a N-containing solid {alpha}Ti layer and a N-solidified {beta}Ti layer between the solid {delta}TiN and liquid Ti-6242 during dissolution. Microprobe measurements indicate that diffusion of Al, Zr, Sn and Mo into {delta}TiN did not occur. Steep N concentration profiles were observed in the {alpha}Ti layer. Al, Zr, Sn and Mo were observed in the N-solidified {beta}Ti layer contained <1% N. Similar microstructural and interdiffusional behaviors were observed during dissolution of nitrided sponge and monolithic {delta}TiN rod in molten Ti-6242.

  13. First principles study of 2D layered organohalide tin perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccarollo, Alberto; Canti, Lorenzo; Marchese, Leonardo; Cossi, Maurizio

    2017-06-01

    This article describes the structure and the electronic properties of a series of layered perovskites of a general formula (A+)2(SnX4)-2 where X = I, Br and A+ is an organic cation, either formamidinium, 1-methylimidazolium, or phenylethylammonium. For each system, two conformations are considered, with eclipsed or staggered stacking of the adjacent inorganic layers. Geometry optimizations are performed at the density functional theory level with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functional and semiempirical correction for dispersion energies; band profiles and bandgaps are computed including both spin orbit coupling (SOC) and correlation (GW) effects through an additive scheme. The theoretical procedures are validated by reproducing the experimental data of a well known 3D tin iodide perovskite. The results, combined with the calculations previously reported on PbI4 analogues, allow us to discuss the effect of cation, metal, and halide substitution in these systems and in particular to explore the possibility of changing the electronic bandgap as required by different applications. The balance of SOC and GW effects depends on the chemical nature of the studied perovskites and strongly influences the value of the simulated bandgap.

  14. Sources and historical record of tin and butyl-tin species in a Mediterranean bay (Toulon Bay, France).

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Frédérique; Schäfer, Jörg; Dutruch, Lionel; Garnier, Cédric; Tessier, Erwan; Dang, Duc Huy; Lanceleur, Laurent; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Lenoble, Véronique; Blanc, Gérard

    2014-05-01

    Concentrations of inorganic tin (Sn(inorg)), tributyltin (TBT) and its degradation products dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) were measured in surface sediments and in two cores from the Toulon Bay, hosting the major French military harbour. Anticipating planned dredging, the aim of the present work is to map and evaluate for the first time the recent and historic contamination of these sediments by inorganic and organic Sn species derived from antifouling paints used for various naval domains including military, trade, tourism and leisure. Tin and butyl-Sn concentrations in the bay varied strongly (4 orders of magnitude), depending on the site, showing maximum values near the shipyards. The concentrations of total Sn (1.3-112 μg g(-1)), TBT (<0.5-2,700 ng g(-1)), DBT (<0.5-1,800 ng g(-1)) and MBT (0.5-1,000 ng g(-1)) generally decreased towards the open sea, i.e. as a function of both distance from the presumed main source and bottom currents. Progressive degradation state of the butyl-Sn species according to the same spatial scheme and the enrichment factors support the scenario of a strongly polluted bay with exportation of polluted sediment to the open Mediterranean. Low degradation and the historical records of butyl-Sn species in two (210)Pb-dated sediment cores, representative of the Northern Bay, are consistent with the relatively recent use of TBT by military shipyards and confirm maximum pollution during the 1970s, which will persist in the anoxic sediments for several centuries. The results show that (a) degradation kinetics of butyl-Sn species depend on environmental conditions, (b) the final degradation product Sn(inorgBT) is by far the dominant species after 10-12 half-life periods and (c) using recent data to reliably assess former TBT contamination requires the use of a modified butyl-Sn degradation index BDI(mod). Resuspension of extremely contaminated subsurface sediments by the scheduled dredging will probably result in mobilization of

  15. Water-soluble copper phthalocyanine for optimization of gas-sensor characteristics of tin dioxide upon adsorption of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolov, A. S.; Lazneva, E. F.; Gerasimova, N. B.; Zimina, M. V.; Si, P.; Panina, Yu. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation into the electrical conductivity of thin films based on tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles, a film consisting of copper phthalocyanine-3,4',4″,4‴-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (CuPc-4SO3Na) molecules, and a composite film based on a mixture of equal parts by volume of the two materials upon adsorption of ammonia. The adsorption experiments have been carried out in a vacuum at room temperature with an increase in the ammonia pressure to 3 × 103 Pa from the residual gas base pressure of 5 × 10-1 Pa. It has been found that, in the case of a single-component film based on SnO2 nanoparticles, an increase in the electrical conductivity reaches 100% and is not completely reversible at room temperature after evacuation of the gas. For the single-component CuPc-4SO3Na film and the composite CuPc-4SO3Na/SnO2 film, the electrical conductivities increase by a factor of 400 and 150, respectively. Upon evacuation of ammonia to the base pressure, the electrical conductivity decreases to the initial values for 1 s. The mechanism of the influence of adsorbed ammonia molecules on the electrical conductivity of the composite material under investigation has been discussed using the model of the formation of the composite sample, according to which the organic component is located in voids between the SnO2 nanoparticles.

  16. Randomised in situ study on the efficacy of a tin/chitosan toothpaste on erosive-abrasive enamel loss.

    PubMed

    Schlueter, N; Klimek, J; Ganss, C

    2013-01-01

    Tin is a notable anti-erosive agent, and the biopolymer chitosan has also shown demineralisation-inhibiting properties. Therefore, the anti-erosive/anti-abrasive efficacy of the combination of both compounds was tested under in situ conditions. Twenty-seven volunteers were included in a randomised, double-blind, three-cell crossover in situ trial. Enamel specimens were recessed on the buccal aspects of mandibular appliances, extraorally demineralised (6 × 2 min/day) and intraorally treated with toothpaste slurries (2 × 2 min/day). Within the slurry treatment time, one-half of the specimens received additional intraoral brushing (5 s, 2.5 N). The tested toothpastes included a placebo toothpaste, an experimental NaF toothpaste (1,400 ppm F(-)) and an experimental F/Sn/chitosan toothpaste (1,400 ppm F(-), 3,500 ppm Sn(2+), 0.5% chitosan). The percentage reduction of tissue loss (slurry exposure/slurry exposure + brushing) compared to placebo was 19.0 ± 47.3/21.3 ± 22.4 after use of NaF and 52.5 ± 30.9/50.2 ± 34.3 after use of F/Sn/chitosan. F/Sn/chitosan was significantly more effective than NaF (p ≤ 0.001) and showed good efficacy against erosive and erosive-abrasive tissue loss. This study suggests that the F/Sn/chitosan toothpaste could provide good protection for patients who frequently consume acidic foodstuffs.

  17. Effect of tin addition on the microstructure development and corrosion resistance of sintered 304L stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.F.

    1999-12-01

    The effect of tin powder addition on the microstructure development during sintering and corrosion resistance of the 304L-Sn metallurgical system was investigated. Specimens containing 1 to 4 wt% Sn were sintered in hydrogen at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1,300 C. During sintering at temperatures below 1,000 C, most of the liquid phase was retained at the site originally occupied by the tin powder. At temperatures above 1,050 C, the tin-base liquid phase spread and uniformly distributed among the 304L solid particles. Adding tin powder and the resultant liquid phase led 304L powder compacts to expand during sintering. An immersion test in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and metallographic observation showed that pitting always initiated at the spots with lower tin content, and the tin atom enrichment had the beneficial effect of improving the corrosion resistance of sintered 304L stainless steels.

  18. A facile high-yield solvothermal route to tin phosphide Sn{sub 4}P{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kovnir, Kirill A. . E-mail: kovnir@cpfs.mpg.de; Kolen'ko, Yury V.; Ray, Sugata; Li Jinwang; Watanabe, Tomoaki; Itoh, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Shevelkov, Andrei V.

    2006-12-15

    An effective method of synthesis of tin phosphide Sn{sub 4}P{sub 3} starting from metallic tin and amorphous red phosphorus by a low-temperature (200 {sup o}C) solvothermal reaction in ethylenediamine is offered. The key parameters of this process - duration, temperature, and the ratio of initial components (Sn/P) are studied. The structure, phase composition, and morphology of the products are investigated using powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Different synthetic ways for tin phosphide are discussed and compared with the proposed one. The mechanism of solvothermal preparation of tin phosphide in ethylenediamine is discussed. It is shown that the proposed solvothermal method opens up the possibility of preparing other metal-rich phosphides. - Graphical abstract: SEM microphotograph of the sample of layered tin phosphide Sn{sub 4}P{sub 3}, which can be simply solvothermally synthesized from metallic tin and red phosphorus.

  19. Density functional study of the electronic structure of NaNiO_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskine, Hakime; Satpathy, S.

    2003-03-01

    It is well known that the two compounds LiNiO2 and NaNiO_2, in spite of being isovalent and structurally similar, exhibit different magnetic and electronic properties. While NaNiO2 is antiferromagnetic exhibiting ferrodistortive orbital ordering, LiNiO2 has no long-range order. We study the electronic structure of these compounds from density functional calculations using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method, focusing in particular, on the effect of the Jahn-Teller distortion of the NiO6 octahedron on the electronic and magnetic structure.

  20. Tin in canned food: a review and understanding of occurrence and effect.

    PubMed

    Blunden, Steve; Wallace, Tony

    2003-12-01

    Tinplate is light gauge, steel sheet or strip, coated on both sides with commercially pure tin and has been used for well over a hundred years as a robust form of food packaging. Altogether, about 25,000 million food cans are produced and filled in Europe per annum, about 20% of these having plain internal (unlacquered) tin-coated steel bodies. Worldwide, the total for food packaging is approximately 80,000 million cans. Tinplate is also extensively used for the production of beverage cans. Europe produces and fills over 15,000 million tinplate beverage cans per annum all of which are internally lacquered. The use of tinplate for food and beverage packaging, will result in some tin dissolving into the food content, particularly when plain uncoated internal surfaces are used. The Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake for tin is 14 mg/kg body weight and recommended maximum permissible levels of tin in food are typically 250 mg/kg (200 mg/kg UK) for solid foods and 150 mg/kg for beverages. However, the question arises as to whether evidence exists that such elevated levels of tin in food in any way constitute a risk to human health. This review considers the factors affecting the dissolution of tin, the reported measurements/surveys of actual levels of tin in canned foods and the studies and reports of acute (short term) toxicity relating to the ingestion of elevated levels of tin in food products. Chronic studies are mentioned, but are not covered in detail, since the review is mainly concerned with possible effects from the ingestion of single high doses. From published data, there appears to be a small amount of evidence suggesting that consumption of food or beverages containing tin at concentrations at or below 200 ppm has caused adverse gastrointestinal effects in an unknown but possibly small proportion of those exposed. However, the evidence supporting this assertion is derived from reports of adverse effects which offer data that are limited, incomplete or of

  1. Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees; Feinerman, Alan; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2014-01-15

    In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1 ± 0.01 nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300 °C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3 Ω cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

  2. TEM Characterization of a Titanium Nitride (TiN) Inclusion in a Fe-Ni-Co Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descotes, Vincent; Migot, Sylvie; Robaut, Florence; Bellot, Jean-Pierre; Perrin-Guérin, Valérie; Witzke, Sylvain; Jardy, Alain

    2015-07-01

    A TEM observation of a TiN inclusion associated to a spinel (MgAl2O4) and calcium sulfide germs is reported. It shows an orientation relationship between these three phases, indicating an epitaxial growth of the TiN over the spinel and CaS. This observation strengthens the hypothesis of a heterogeneous nucleation of TiN particles during the solidification of a maraging steel.

  3. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer; Porto, Arilza de Oliveira; Magela de Lima, Geraldo; Paniago, Roberto; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ► Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ► Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ► Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  4. Ultrathin Vein-Like Iridium-Tin Nanowires with Abundant Oxidized Tin as High-Performance Ethanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meiwu; Shao, Qi; Pi, Yecan; Guo, Jun; Huang, Bin; Qian, Yong; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2017-09-01

    Iridium (Ir) holds great promise for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), while its practical applications suffer from the limited shape-controlled synthesis due to its low-energy barrier for nucleation. To overcome this limitation, the preparation of a new class of ultrathin vein-like Ir-tin nanowires (IrSn NWs) with abundant oxidized Sn is reported. By tuning the ratio of Ir to Sn, the optimized Ir67 Sn33 /C exhibits the highest mass density of 95.6 mA mg(-1) Ir for EOR at low potential (0.04 V), which is 4.1-fold and 20-fold higher than that of Ir/C and the commercial Pt/C, respectively. It also exhibits the smallest Tafel slope of 153 mV dec(-1) and superior stability after 2 h chronoamperometric measurement. Electrochemical measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectra results confirm that the abundant oxidized Sn promotes a complete oxidization of ethanol into CO2 at low potential. This work highlights the importance of non-noble metal on enhancing the EOR performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Differentiation of kidney stones using dual-energy CT with and without a tin filter.

    PubMed

    Fung, George S K; Kawamoto, Satomi; Matlaga, Brian R; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Zhou, Xiaodong; Fishman, Elliot K; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the capability of three protocols of dual-energy CT imaging in distinguishing calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid kidney stones. A total of 48 calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, and uric acid human kidney stone samples were placed in individual containers inside a cylindric water phantom and imaged with a dual-energy CT scanner using the following three scanning protocols of different combinations of tube voltage, with and without a tin filter: 80 and 140 kVp without a tin filter, 100 and 140 kVp with a tin filter, and 80 and 140 kVp with a tin filter. The mean attenuation value (in Hounsfield units) of each stone was recorded in both low- and high-energy CT images in each protocol. The dual-energy ratio of the mean attenuation values of each stone was computed for each protocol. For all three protocols, the uric acid stones were significantly different (p < 0.001) from the calciferous stones according to their dual-energy ratio values. For differentiating calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate stones, the difference between their dual-energy ratio values was statistically significant, with different degrees of significance (range, p < 0.001 to p = 0.03) for all three protocols. On the basis of the values of the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of calcified stone differentiation, the three protocols were ranked in the following order: the 80- and 140-kVp tin filter protocol (AUC, 0.996), the 100- and 140-kVp tin filter protocol (AUC, 0.918), and the 80- and 140-kVp protocol (AUC, 0.871). The tin filter added to the high-energy tube and the use of a wider dual-energy difference are important for improving the stone differentiation capability of dual-energy CT imaging.

  6. Two-dimensional tin selenide nanostructures for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunli; Yin, Huanhuan; Han, Min; Dai, Zhihui; Pang, Huan; Zheng, Yulin; Lan, Ya-Qian; Bao, Jianchun; Zhu, Jianmin

    2014-04-22

    Due to their unique electronic and optoelectronic properties, tin selenide nanostructures show great promise for applications in energy storage and photovoltaic devices. Despite the great progress that has been achieved, the phase-controlled synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) tin selenide nanostructures remains a challenge, and their use in supercapacitors has not been explored. In this paper, 2D tin selenide nanostructures, including pure SnSe2 nanodisks (NDs), mixed-phase SnSe-SnSe2 NDs, and pure SnSe nanosheets (NSs), have been synthesized by reacting SnCl2 and trioctylphosphine (TOP)-Se with borane-tert-butylamine complex (BTBC) and 1,3-dimethyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2(1H)-pyrimidinone. Utilizing the interplay of TOP and BTBC and changing only the amount of BTBC, the phase-controlled synthesis of 2D tin selenide nanostructures is realized for the first time. Phase-dependent pseudocapacitive behavior is observed for the resulting 2D nanostructures. The specific capacitances of pure SnSe2 NDs (168 F g(-1)) and SnSe NSs (228 F g(-1)) are much higher than those of other reported materials (e.g., graphene-Mn3O4 nanorods and TiN mesoporous spheres); thus, these tin selenide materials were used to fabricate flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitors. Devices fabricated with these two tin selenide materials exhibited high areal capacitances, good cycling stabilities, excellent flexibilities, and desirable mechanical stabilities, which were comparable to or better than those reported recently for other solid-state devices based on graphene and 3D GeSe2 nanostructures. Additionally, the rate capability of the SnSe2 NDs device was much better than that of the SnSe NS device, indicating that SnSe2 NDs are promising active materials for use in high-performance, flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitors.

  7. Corrosion resistance of siloxane-poly(methyl methacrylate) hybrid films modified with acetic acid on tin plate substrates: Influence of tetraethoxysilane addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunst, S. R.; Cardoso, H. R. P.; Oliveira, C. T.; Santana, J. A.; Sarmento, V. H. V.; Muller, I. L.; Malfatti, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of hybrid films. Tin plate was coated with a siloxane-poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid film prepared by sol-gel route with covalent bonds between the organic (PMMA) and inorganic (siloxane) phases obtained by hydrolysis and polycondensation of 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl) methacrylate (TMSM) and polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a thermic initiator. Hydrolysis reactions were catalyzed by acetic acid solution avoiding the use of chlorine or stronger acids in the film preparation. The effect of the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on the protective properties of the film was evaluated. The hydrophobicity of the film was determined by contact angle measurements, and the morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry. The local nanostructure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrochemical behavior of the films was assessed by open circuit potential monitoring, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in a 0.05 M NaCl solution. The mechanical behavior was evaluated by tribology. The results highlighted that the siloxane-PMMA hybrid films modified with acetic acid are promising anti-corrosive coatings that acts as an efficient diffusion barrier, protecting tin plates against corrosion. However, the coating properties were affected by the TEOS addition, which contributed for the thickness increase and irregular surface coverage.

  8. Effect of precursor concentration and bath temperature on the growth of chemical bath deposited tin sulphide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayasree, Y.; Chalapathi, U.; Uday Bhaskar, P.; Sundara Raja, V.

    2012-01-01

    SnS is a promising candidate for a low-cost, non-toxic solar cell absorber layer. Tin sulphide thin films have been deposited by chemical bath deposition technique from a solution containing stannous chloride, thioacetamide, ammonia and triethanolamine (TEA). The effects of concentration of tin salt, triethanolamine and bath temperature on the growth of tin sulphide films have been investigated in order to optimize the growth conditions to obtain tin monosulphide (SnS) films. SnS films obtained under optimized conditions were found to be polycrystalline in nature with orthorhombic structure. The optical band gap of these films was found to be 1.5 eV.

  9. Effect of pretreatment on a platinized tin oxide catalyst used for low-temperature CO-oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawdy, Jean E.; Hoflund, Gar B.; Gardner, Steven D.; Yngvadottir, Eva; Schryer, David R.

    1990-01-01

    A commercial platinized tin oxide catalyst used for low-temperature CO oxidation has been characterized using ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) before and after reduction in 40 Torr of CO for 1 hour at various temperatures from 75 to 175 C. The reduction results in loss of surface oxygen, formation of metallic tin, conversion of platinum oxides to Pt-O-Sn and Pt(OH)2 and a small amount of metallic Pt which alloys with the tin. These results should be useful in understanding how the pretreatment temperature affects the catalytic activity of platinized tin oxide toward CO oxidation.

  10. Developing an Empirical Model for Estimating the Probability of Electrical Short Circuits from Tin Whiskers. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courey, Karim J.; Asfour, Shihab S.; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon A.; Ludwig, Larry L.; Wright, Maria C.

    2009-01-01

    To comply with lead-free legislation, many manufacturers have converted from tin-lead to pure tin finishes of electronic components. However, pure tin finishes have a greater propensity to grow tin whiskers than tin-lead finishes. Since tin whiskers present an electrical short circuit hazard in electronic components, simulations have been developed to quantify the risk of said short circuits occurring. Existing risk simulations make the assumption that when a free tin whisker has bridged two adjacent exposed electrical conductors, the result is an electrical short circuit. This conservative assumption is made because shorting is a random event that had an unknown probability associated with it. Note however that due to contact resistance electrical shorts may not occur at lower voltage levels. In our first article we developed an empirical probability model for tin whisker shorting. In this paper, we develop a more comprehensive empirical model using a refined experiment with a larger sample size, in which we studied the effect of varying voltage on the breakdown of the contact resistance which leads to a short circuit. From the resulting data we estimated the probability distribution of an electrical short, as a function of voltage. In addition, the unexpected polycrystalline structure seen in the focused ion beam (FIB) cross section in the first experiment was confirmed in this experiment using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FIB was also used to cross section two card guides to facilitate the measurement of the grain size of each card guide's tin plating to determine its finish.

  11. Highly efficient and durable TiN nanofiber electrocatalyst supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun; Cho, Min Kyung; Kwon, Jeong An; Jeong, Yeon Hun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Kim, Min Jung; Yoo, Sung Jong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Nam, Suk Woo; Lim, Dong-Hee; Cho, Eunae; Lee, Kwan-Young; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-11-01

    To date, carbon-based materials including various carbon nanostructured materials have been extensively used as an electrocatalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications due to their practical nature. However, carbon dissolution or corrosion caused by high electrode potential in the presence of O2 and/or water has been identified as one of the main failure modes for the device operation. Here, we report the first TiN nanofiber (TNF)-based nonwoven structured materials to be constructed via electrospinning and subsequent two-step thermal treatment processes as a support for the PEMFC catalyst. Pt catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on the TNFs (Pt/TNFs) were electrochemically characterized with respect to oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability in an acidic medium. From the electrochemical tests, the TNF-supported Pt catalyst was better and more stable in terms of its catalytic performance compared to a commercially available carbon-supported Pt catalyst. For example, the initial oxygen reduction performance was comparable for both cases, while the Pt/TNF showed much higher durability from an accelerated degradation test (ADT) configuration. It is understood that the improved catalytic roles of TNFs on the supported Pt NPs for ORR are due to the high electrical conductivity arising from the extended connectivity, high inertness to the electrochemical environment and strong catalyst-support interactions.To date, carbon-based materials including various carbon nanostructured materials have been extensively used as an electrocatalyst support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications due to their practical nature. However, carbon dissolution or corrosion caused by high electrode potential in the presence of O2 and/or water has been identified as one of the main failure modes for the device operation. Here, we report the first TiN nanofiber (TNF)-based nonwoven structured materials to be constructed via

  12. Characterization of reliability of printed indium tin oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Jong-Woong; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2013-11-01

    Recently, decreasing the amount of indium (In) element in the indium tin oxide (ITO) used for transparent conductive oxide (TCO) thin film has become necessary for cost reduction. One possible approach to this problem is using printed ITO thin film instead of sputtered. Previous studies showed potential for printed ITO thin films as the TCO layer. However, nothing has been reported on the reliability of printed ITO thin films. Therefore, in this study, the reliability of printed ITO thin films was characterized. ITO nanoparticle ink was fabricated and printed onto a glass substrate followed by heating at 400 degrees C. After measurement of the initial values of sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the printed ITO thin films, their reliabilities were characterized with an isothermal-isohumidity test for 500 hours at 85 degrees C and 85% RH, a thermal shock test for 1,000 cycles between 125 degrees C and -40 degrees C, and a high temperature storage test for 500 hours at 125 degrees C. The same properties were investigated after the tests. Printed ITO thin films showed stable properties despite extremely thermal and humid conditions. Sheet resistances of the printed ITO thin films changed slightly from 435 omega/square to 735 omega/square 507 omega/square and 442 omega/square after the tests, respectively. Optical transmittances of the printed ITO thin films were slightly changed from 84.74% to 81.86%, 88.03% and 88.26% after the tests, respectively. These test results suggest the stability of printed ITO thin film despite extreme environments.

  13. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  14. Formation and Reactivity of Organo-Functionalized Tin Selenide Clusters.

    PubMed

    Rinn, Niklas; Eußner, Jens P; Kaschuba, Willy; Xie, Xiulan; Dehnen, Stefanie

    2016-02-24

    Reactions of R(1) SnCl3 (R(1) =CMe2 CH2 C(O)Me) with (SiMe3 )2 Se yield a series of organo-functionalized tin selenide clusters, [(SnR(1) )2 SeCl4 ] (1), [(SnR(1) )2 Se2 Cl2 ] (2), [(SnR(1) )3 Se4 Cl] (3), and [(SnR(1) )4 Se6 ] (4), depending on the solvent and ratio of the reactants used. NMR experiments clearly suggest a stepwise formation of 1 through 4 by subsequent condensation steps with the concomitant release of Me3 SiCl. Furthermore, addition of hydrazines to the keto-functionalized clusters leads to the formation of hydrazone derivatives, [(Sn2 (μ-R(3) )(μ-Se)Cl4 ] (5, R(3) =[CMe2 CH2 CMe(NH)]2 ), [(SnR(2) )3 Se4 Cl] (6, R(2) =CMe2 CH2 C(NNH2 )Me), [(SnR(4) )3 Se4 ][SnCl3 ] (7, R(4) =CMe2 CH2 C(NNHPh)Me), [(SnR(2) )4 Se6 ] (8), and [(SnR(4) )4 Se6 ] (9). Upon treatment of 4 with [Cu(PPh3 )3 Cl] and excess (SiMe3 )2 Se, the cluster fragments to form [(R(1) Sn)2 Se2 (CuPPh3 )2 Se2 ] (10), the first discrete Sn/Se/Cu cluster compound reported in the literature. The derivatization reactions indicate fundamental differences between organotin sulfide and organotin selenide chemistry.

  15. SIGNUM: A Matlab, TIN-based landscape evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refice, A.; Giachetta, E.; Capolongo, D.

    2012-08-01

    Several numerical landscape evolution models (LEMs) have been developed to date, and many are available as open source codes. Most are written in efficient programming languages such as Fortran or C, but often require additional code efforts to plug in to more user-friendly data analysis and/or visualization tools to ease interpretation and scientific insight. In this paper, we present an effort to port a common core of accepted physical principles governing landscape evolution directly into a high-level language and data analysis environment such as Matlab. SIGNUM (acronym for Simple Integrated Geomorphological Numerical Model) is an independent and self-contained Matlab, TIN-based landscape evolution model, built to simulate topography development at various space and time scales. SIGNUM is presently capable of simulating hillslope processes such as linear and nonlinear diffusion, fluvial incision into bedrock, spatially varying surface uplift which can be used to simulate changes in base level, thrust and faulting, as well as effects of climate changes. Although based on accepted and well-known processes and algorithms in its present version, it is built with a modular structure, which allows to easily modify and upgrade the simulated physical processes to suite virtually any user needs. The code is conceived as an open-source project, and is thus an ideal tool for both research and didactic purposes, thanks to the high-level nature of the Matlab environment and its popularity among the scientific community. In this paper the simulation code is presented together with some simple examples of surface evolution, and guidelines for development of new modules and algorithms are proposed.

  16. Electrical Conductivity of Tin Oxide Films in Ethanol Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Soon

    1995-01-01

    Porous ultrafine SnO_2 -based ethanol gas sensors in the shape of a thin film were successfully fabricated from tin alkoxide by the sol-gel dip coating technique. For the first time, the influences of film thickness, microstructure, and additives on the ethanol gas sensing properties of the sol-gel derived SnO _2 thin films were investigated. The equilibrium density of ionosorbed oxygens seemed to be maximum at 300^circC. This seemed to be the reason the sensitivity was maximum at 300^circC. Theoretically it was expected that the sensitivity would increase monotonically with decreasing the thickness, but the results were totally different from the prediction below the thickness of 700 A. The sensitivity increased down to the thickness of 700 A, but below 700 A it suddenly decreased. The sudden decrease seemed to be due to the sudden decrease of porosity, that is, the sudden decrease of the surface area for the oxidation reaction of rm C_2H_5 OH. Thus, it seemed that below 700 A, the sensitivity was governed by the microstructure, that is, porosity (surface area) rather than the thickness. The sensitivity was markedly increased by loading with rm La_2O _3 and Pt. The increased response time caused by loading with rm La_2O_3 was completely removed by loading with Pt. On the other hand, the sensitivity decreased with increasing relative humidity. The reason for this and the methods to decrease the humidity effect will be discussed. However, the Pt-La_2O_3-SnO _2 thin film sensors had strong dependence of the sensitivity on ethanol concentration, and the sensitivity at 70 ppm rm C_2H_5OH was as high as 28, being sensitive enough to be a breath alcohol checker and a monitor for alcohol vapor in air.

  17. On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W.

    2006-11-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are

  18. The Surface Resistance of Superconducting A15 Niobium-Tin Films at 8.6 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Laura Henrietta

    A calorimetric technique for measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance of high-T(,c) superconducting thin films at 8.6 GHz has been developed. The technique has been applied to study electron-beam, co-deposited films of the A15 phase of Niobium-Tin with the goal of optimizing the microwave losses of the material. In addition, films of sputtered Niobium-Tin, a Niobium-Zirconium alloy, and Niobium-Nitride were also studied. For the evaporated Niobium-Tin films, carefully controlled deposition temperatures of greater than 900 C are necessary to obtain the lowest losses. A sharp transition is observed for stoichiometric material (25 percent Tin), but for the understoichiometric compositions the transitions are wider, yielding excessive losses in the material. Films prepared by magnetron sputtering behave similarly. A procedure, phase-locking, for preparing the stoichiometric composition which does not require exact control of the deposition rates has been developed and successfully demonstrated with the evaporated films. The experimental data are compared with two theoretical predictions: one for the superconducting state based on the BCS theory and a normal-state calculation in the classical skin-depth limit. When the residual losses (10 micro-ohms) are subtracted from the data, the behavior predicted for the superconducting state is observed. The normal-state losses, however, are anomalously large for the Niobium -Tin films. Possible explanations of this result are discussed. Reduced gaps are also obtained for the samples from their low temperature surface resistance. Values obtained for the Niobium-Tin films are lower than those from other measurements and may be due to poor material near the substrate interface. Even at the present level of material development, the prognosis for the application of Niobium-Tin films to microwave devices appears favorable. When compared with Niobium, the most common material choice, Niobium -Tin films as

  19. Corrosion resistance appraisal of TiN, TiCN and TiAlN coatings deposited by CAE-PVD method on WC-Co cutting tools exposed to artificial sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A. A.; Pencea, I.; Branzei, M.; Trancă, D. E.; Ţepeş, G.; Sfăt, C. E.; Ciovica (Coman), E.; Gherghilescu, A. I.; Stanciu, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new advanced sintered composite cutting tool has been developed based on tungsten carbide matrix ligated with cobalt (WC-Co) additivated with tantalum carbide (TaC), titanium carbide (TiC) and niobium carbide (NbC) as grain growth inhibitors. Titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbonitride (TiCN) and titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) coatings were deposited on these tools by CAE-PVD technique to find out the best solution to improve the corrosion resistance of this tool in marine environment. The electrochemical behaviours of the specimens in 3.5% NaCl water solution were estimated by potentiodynamic polarization measurements i.e. the open circuit potential (Eoc), corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current density (icorr). Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), optical microscopy (OM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations have been carried on tested and untested specimens to substantiate the corrosion resistance of the tested specimens. Based on the open circuit potential (Eoc) and corrosion potential (Ecorr) results, the tested specimens were ranked as TiN, TiAlN, TiCN and WC-Co while on corrosion current density (icorr) and protective efficiency (P) values they have been ranked as TiN, TiAlN, WC-Co and TiCN. The WAXD, MO and AFM results unambiguously show that the corrosion resistance depends on the nature and morphology of the coating.

  20. Aqueous phase deposition of dense tin oxide films with nano-structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yoshitake Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    Dense tin oxide films were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. The pH of the solutions was controlled to pH 1.3 by addition of HCl. Precise control of solution condition and crystal growth allowed us to obtain dense tin oxide films. Concave–convex surface of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates was entirely-covered with the continuous films. The films were about 65 nm in thickness and had nano-structured surfaces. Morphology of the films was strikingly different from our previous reported nano-sheet assembled structures. The films were not removed from the substrates by strong water flow or air blow to show strong adhesion strength. The aqueous solution process can be applied to surface coating of various materials such as nano/micro-structured surfaces, particles, fibers, polymers, metals or biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. They had nano-structured surfaces. Concave-convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films. - Highlights: • Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. • They had nano-structured surfaces. • Concave–convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films.