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Sample records for nadh-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase

  1. Reduced levels of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase decrease the glutamate content of ripe tomato fruit but have no effect on green fruit or leaves.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Gisela; D'Angelo, Matilde; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Valle, Estela M

    2015-06-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a taste enhancer that contributes to the characteristic flavour of foods. In fruit of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), the Glu content increases dramatically during the ripening process, becoming the most abundant free amino acid when the fruit become red. There is also a concomitant increase in NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity during the ripening transition. This enzyme is located in the mitochondria and catalyses the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate to Glu. To investigate the potential effect of GDH on Glu metabolism, the abundance of GDH was altered by artificial microRNA technology. Efficient silencing of all the endogenous SlGDH genes was achieved, leading to a dramatic decrease in total GDH activity. This decrease in GDH activity did not lead to any clear morphological or metabolic phenotype in leaves or green fruit. However, red fruit on the transgenic plants showed markedly reduced levels of Glu and a large increase in aspartate, glucose and fructose content in comparison to wild-type fruit. These results suggest that GDH is involved in the synthesis of Glu in tomato fruit during the ripening processes. This contrasts with the biological role ascribed to GDH in many other tissues and species. Overall, these findings suggest that GDH has a major effect on the control of metabolic composition during tomato fruit ripening, but not at other stages of development. PMID:25878356

  2. Reduced levels of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase decrease the glutamate content of ripe tomato fruit but have no effect on green fruit or leaves.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Gisela; D'Angelo, Matilde; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Valle, Estela M

    2015-06-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a taste enhancer that contributes to the characteristic flavour of foods. In fruit of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), the Glu content increases dramatically during the ripening process, becoming the most abundant free amino acid when the fruit become red. There is also a concomitant increase in NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity during the ripening transition. This enzyme is located in the mitochondria and catalyses the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate to Glu. To investigate the potential effect of GDH on Glu metabolism, the abundance of GDH was altered by artificial microRNA technology. Efficient silencing of all the endogenous SlGDH genes was achieved, leading to a dramatic decrease in total GDH activity. This decrease in GDH activity did not lead to any clear morphological or metabolic phenotype in leaves or green fruit. However, red fruit on the transgenic plants showed markedly reduced levels of Glu and a large increase in aspartate, glucose and fructose content in comparison to wild-type fruit. These results suggest that GDH is involved in the synthesis of Glu in tomato fruit during the ripening processes. This contrasts with the biological role ascribed to GDH in many other tissues and species. Overall, these findings suggest that GDH has a major effect on the control of metabolic composition during tomato fruit ripening, but not at other stages of development.

  3. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  4. The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Aeromonas caviae ST exhibits NADH-dependent tellurite reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel E; Molina, Roberto; Díaz, Waldo; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2008-10-10

    Potassium tellurite (K(2)TeO(3)) is extremely toxic for most forms of life and only a limited number of organisms are naturally resistant to the toxic effects of this compound. Crude extracts prepared from the environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST catalize the in vitro reduction of TeO32- in a NADH-dependent reaction. Upon fractionation by ionic exchange column chromatography three major polypeptides identified as the E1, E2, and E3 components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex were identified in fractions exhibiting tellurite-reducing activity. Tellurite reductase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities co-eluted from a Sephadex gel filtration column. To determine which component(s) of the PDH complex has tellurite reductase activity, the A. caviae ST structural genes encoding for E1 (aceE), E2 (aceF), and E3 (lpdA) were independently cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and their gene products purified. Results indicated that tellurite reductase activity lies almost exclusively in the E3 component, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. The E3 component of the PDH complex from E. coli, Zymomonas mobilis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus also showed NADH-dependent tellurite reductase in vitro suggesting that this enzymatic activity is widely distributed among microorganisms. PMID:18675788

  5. Optical isopropanol biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH).

    PubMed

    Chien, Po-Jen; Ye, Ming; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    Isopropanol (IPA) is an important solvent used in industrial activity often found in hospitals as antiseptic alcohol rub. Also, IPA may have the potential to be a biomarker of diabetic ketoacidosis. In this study, an optical biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) for IPA measurement was constructed and evaluated. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED, λ=340nm) was employed as the excitation light to excite nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was connected to a two-way branch optical fiber for measuring the fluorescence emitted from the NADH. S-ADH was immobilized on the membrane to catalyze IPA to acetone and reduce NAD(+) to be NADH. This IPA biosensor shows highly sensitivity and selectivity, the calibration range is from 500 nmol L(-1) to 1mmolL(-1). The optimization of buffer pH, temperature, and the enzyme-immobilized method were also evaluated. The detection of IPA in nail related cosmetic using our IPA biosensor was also carried out. The results showed that large amounts of IPA were used in these kinds of cosmetics. This IPA biosensor comes with the advantages of rapid reaction, good reproducibility, and wide dynamic range, and is also expected to use for clinical IPA detections in serum or other medical and health related applications.

  6. Optical isopropanol biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH).

    PubMed

    Chien, Po-Jen; Ye, Ming; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2016-10-01

    Isopropanol (IPA) is an important solvent used in industrial activity often found in hospitals as antiseptic alcohol rub. Also, IPA may have the potential to be a biomarker of diabetic ketoacidosis. In this study, an optical biosensor using NADH-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) for IPA measurement was constructed and evaluated. An ultraviolet light emitting diode (UV-LED, λ=340nm) was employed as the excitation light to excite nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). A photomultiplier tube (PMT) was connected to a two-way branch optical fiber for measuring the fluorescence emitted from the NADH. S-ADH was immobilized on the membrane to catalyze IPA to acetone and reduce NAD(+) to be NADH. This IPA biosensor shows highly sensitivity and selectivity, the calibration range is from 500 nmol L(-1) to 1mmolL(-1). The optimization of buffer pH, temperature, and the enzyme-immobilized method were also evaluated. The detection of IPA in nail related cosmetic using our IPA biosensor was also carried out. The results showed that large amounts of IPA were used in these kinds of cosmetics. This IPA biosensor comes with the advantages of rapid reaction, good reproducibility, and wide dynamic range, and is also expected to use for clinical IPA detections in serum or other medical and health related applications. PMID:27474326

  7. Purification and characterization of an NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida maris for the synthesis of optically active 1-(pyridyl)ethanol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shigeru; Yano, Miho; Hasegawa, Junzo; Yasohara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    A novel (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (AFPDH) produced by Candida maris IFO10003 was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Toyopearl, and Phenyl-Toyopearl, and characterized. The relative molecular mass of the native enzyme was found to be 59,900 by gel filtration, and that of the subunit was estimated to be 28,900 on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the enzyme is a homodimer. It required NADH as a cofactor and reduced various kinds of carbonyl compounds, including ketones and aldehydes. AFPDH reduced acetylpyridine derivatives, β-keto esters, and some ketone compounds with high enantioselectivity. This is the first report of an NADH-dependent, highly enantioselective (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase isolated from a yeast. AFPDH is a very useful enzyme for the preparation of various kinds of chiral alcohols.

  8. Gene transcript accumulation and in situ mRNA hybridization of two putative glutamate dehydrogenase genes in etiolated Glycine max seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dimou, M; Tsaniklidis, G; Aivalakis, G; Katinakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.2) is a multimeric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible amination of α-ketoglutarate to form glutamate. We characterized cDNA clones of two Glycine max sequences, GmGDH1 and GmGDH2, that code for putative α- and β-subunits, respectively, of the NADH dependent enzyme. Temporal and spatial gene transcript accumulation studies using semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization have shown an overlapping gene transcript accumulation pattern with differences in relative gene transcript accumulation in the organs examined. Detection of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity in situ using a histochemical method showed concordance with the spatial gene transcript accumulation patterns. Our findings suggest that although the two gene transcripts are co-localized in roots of etiolated soybean seedlings, the ratio of the two subunits of the active holoenzyme may vary among tissues.

  9. Cloning and overexpression of an NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Candida maris involved in (R)-selective reduction of 5-acetylfuro[2,3-c]pyridine.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Shigeru; Yano, Miho; Hasegawa, Junzo; Yasohara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    5-((R)-1-Hydroxyethyl)-furo[2,3-c]pyridine ((R)-FPH) is a useful chiral building block in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. An NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (AFPDH) isolated from Candida maris catalyzed the reduction of 5-acetylfuro[2,3-c]pyridine (AFP) to (R)-FPH with 100% enantiomeric excess. The gene encoding AFPDH was cloned and sequenced. The AFPDH gene comprises 762 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 27,230 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity to those of other members of the short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. The AFPDH gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the lac promoter. One L of the cultured broth of an E. coli transformant coexpressing AFPDH and the glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) gene reduced 250 g of AFP to (R)-FPH in an organic solvent two-phase system. Under coupling with NADH regeneration using 2-propanol, 1 L of the cultured broth of an E. coli transformant expressing the AFPDH gene reduced 150 g of AFP to (R)-FPH. The optical purity of the (R)-FPH formed was 100% enantiomeric excess under both reaction conditions.

  10. Evidence for synergistic control of glutamate biosynthesis by glutamate dehydrogenases and glutamate in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Stannek, Lorena; Thiele, Martin J; Ischebeck, Till; Gunka, Katrin; Hammer, Elke; Völker, Uwe; Commichau, Fabian M

    2015-09-01

    In the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis glutamate is synthesized by the glutamine synthetase and the glutamate synthase (GOGAT). During growth with carbon sources that exert carbon catabolite repression, the rocG glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene is repressed and the transcription factor GltC activates the expression of the GOGAT encoding gltAB genes. In the presence of amino acids of the glutamate family, the GDH RocG is synthesized and the enzyme prevents GltC from binding to DNA. The dual control of glutamate biosynthesis allows the efficient utilization of the available nutrients. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that, like RocG, also the paralogous GDH GudB can inhibit the transcription factor GltC, thereby controlling glutamate biosynthesis. Contradictory previous observations show that high level of GDH activity does not result in permanent inhibition of GltC. By controlling the intracellular levels of glutamate through feeding with exogenous arginine, we observed that the GDH-dependent control of GltC and thus expression of the gltAB genes inversely correlates with the glutamate pool. These results suggest that the B. subtilis GDHs RocG and GudB in fact act as glutamate sensors. In conclusion, the GDH-mediated control of glutamate biosynthesis seems to depend on the intracellular glutamate concentration. PMID:25711804

  11. Untangling the glutamate dehydrogenase allosteric nightmare.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is found in all living organisms, but only animal GDH is regulated by a large repertoire of metabolites. More than 50 years of research to better understand the mechanism and role of this allosteric network has been frustrated by its sheer complexity. However, recent studies have begun to tease out how and why this complex behavior evolved. Much of GDH regulation probably occurs by controlling a complex ballet of motion necessary for catalytic turnover and has evolved concomitantly with a long antenna-like feature of the structure of the enzyme. Ciliates, the 'missing link' in GDH evolution, might have created the antenna to accommodate changing organelle functions and was refined in humans to, at least in part, link amino acid catabolism with insulin secretion.

  12. A novel glutamate dehydrogenase from bovine brain: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Kim, S W; Cho, S W

    1995-08-01

    A soluble form of novel glutamate dehydrogenase has been purified from bovine brain. The preparation was homogeneous on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and composed of six identical subunits having a subunit size of 57,500 Da. The biochemical properties of glutamate dehydrogenase such as N-terminal amino acids sequences, kinetic parameters, amino acids analysis, and optimum pH were examined in both reductive amination of alpha-ketoglutarate and oxidative deamination of glutamate. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the bovine brain enzyme showed the significant differences in the first 5 amino acids compared to other glutamate dehydrogenases from various sources. These results indicate that glutamate dehydrogenase isolated from bovine brain is a novel polypeptide.

  13. [Features of glutamate dehydrogenase in fetal and adult rumen tissue].

    PubMed

    Kalachniuk, H I; Fomenko, I S; Kalachniuk, L H; Kavai, Sh; Marounek, M; Savka, O H

    2001-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from rumen mucosa of cow fetus, liver and two forms from mucosa (bacterial and tissue) of the adult animal were partly purified and characterized. The activity of the bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase was shown to depend on qualities of a biomass of microbes, adhered on surface of rumen mucosa. All enzymes from tissues (GDHTRF, TRC, TLC), revealed the hypersensibility to increase in the concentration medium of Zn2+, guanosine triphosphate (GTP), acting here in a role of negative modulators, and also adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and leucine, which acted as activators. However, in the same concentrations these effectors do not influence the activity of the bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase. And if all tissues enzymes are highly specific to coenzyme NADH, the bacterial ones almost in 3 times is more active at NADPH use. PMID:11642036

  14. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  15. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor.

  16. Delineation of an in vivo inhibitor for Aspergillus glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Noor, Shahid; Varadarajalu, Lakshmi Prabha; Punekar, Narayan S

    2008-01-01

    NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) along with glutamine synthetase plays a pivotal role in ammonium assimilation. Specific inhibitors were valuable in defining the importance of glutamine synthetase in nitrogen metabolism. Selective in vivo inhibition of NADP-GDH has so far been an elusive desideratum. Isophthalate, a potent in vitro inhibitor of Aspergillus niger NADP-GDH [Noor S, Punekar NS. Allosteric NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase from aspergilli: purification, characterization and implications for metabolic regulation at the carbon-nitrogen interface. Microbiology 2005;151:1409-19], was evaluated for its efficacy in vivo. Dimethyl ester of isophthalate (DMIP), but not isophthalate, inhibited A. niger growth on agar as well as in liquid culture. This was ascribed to the inability of isophthalate to enter fungal mycelia. Subsequent to DMIP addition however, intracellular isophthalate could be demonstrated. Apart from NAD-GDH, no other enzyme including NAD-glutamate synthase was inhibited by isophthalate. A cross-over at NADP-GDH step of metabolism was observed as a direct consequence of isophthalate (formed in vivo from DMIP) inhibiting this enzyme. Addition of ammonium to DMIP-treated A. niger mycelia resulted in intensive vacuolation, retraction of cytoplasm and autolysis. Taken together, these results implicate glutamate dehydrogenase and NADP-GDH in particular, as a key target of in vivo isophthalate inhibition during ammonium assimilation. PMID:22578865

  17. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  18. Theoretical analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase kinetics under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Popova, S V; Reich, J G

    1983-01-01

    A kinetic model of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction has been formulated for the reversible reaction including all seven reactants (substrates and cofactors NAD(H) and NADP(H)). The model parameters have been evaluated from published initial-rate data. Analysis of the model at cofactor concentration near to that in the intact mitochondrion has shown that the competition for active sites between cofactors and substrates simultaneously present in mitochondria diminishes the steady-state rate of the reaction by a factor of 10 to 100 as compared to the maximal reaction rate. The model predicts near-equilibrium of the reaction substrates with NAD+/NADH cofactor pair and off-equilibrium with NADP+/NADPH. Substrate cycling with futile transfer of hydrogen from NADP+-system to NAD+-system has been found to account under in vivo conditions for no more than 2% of the maximal glutamate dehydrogenase activity in the mitochondria.

  19. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  20. Glutamate dehydrogenase from pumpkin cotyledons: characterization and isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Chou, K H; Splittstoesser, W E

    1972-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase from pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Pior. cultivar Dickinson Field) cotyledons was found in both soluble and particulate fractions with the bulk of the activity in the soluble fraction. Both enzymes used NAD(H) and NADP(H) but NAD(H) was favored. The enzymes were classified as glutamate-NAD oxidoreductase, deaminating (EC 1.4.1.3). Both enzymes were heat stable, had a pH optimum for reductive amination of 8.0, and were inhibited by high concentrations of NH(4) (+) or alpha-ketoglutarate. The soluble enzyme was more sensitive to NH(4) (+) inhibition and was activated by metal ions after ammonium sulfate fractionation while the solubilized particulate enzyme was not. Inhibition by ethylenediaminetetraacetate was restored by several divalent ions and inhibition by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate was reversed by glutathione. Particulate glutamate dehydrogenase showed a greater activity with NADP. The molecular weights of the enzymes are 250,000. Separation of the enzymes by disc gel electrophoresis showed that during germination the soluble isoenzymes increased from 1 to 7 in number, while only one particulate isoenzyme was found at any time. This particulate isoenzyme was identical with one of the soluble isoenzymes. A number of methods indicated that the soluble isoenzymes were not simply removed from the particulate fraction and that true isoenzymes were found.

  1. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C; Khan, Amir R

    2016-06-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2-4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD(+) versus NADP(+), but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia coli enzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP(+) cofactor from the parent E. coli domain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity. PMID:27303899

  2. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  3. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. PMID:26073813

  4. Glutamate dehydrogenase: structure, allosteric regulation, and role in insulin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine and inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds blocked the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  5. The structure and allosteric regulation of mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2012-03-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. Only in the animal kingdom is this enzyme heavily allosterically regulated by a wide array of metabolites. The major activators are ADP and leucine, while the most important inhibitors include GTP, palmitoyl CoA, and ATP. Recently, spontaneous mutations in the GTP inhibitory site that lead to the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HHS) syndrome have shed light as to why mammalian GDH is so tightly regulated. Patients with HHS exhibit hypersecretion of insulin upon consumption of protein and concomitantly extremely high levels of ammonium in the serum. The atomic structures of four new inhibitors complexed with GDH complexes have identified three different allosteric binding sites. Using a transgenic mouse model expressing the human HHS form of GDH, at least three of these compounds were found to block the dysregulated form of GDH in pancreatic tissue. EGCG from green tea prevented the hyper-response to amino acids in whole animals and improved basal serum glucose levels. The atomic structure of the ECG-GDH complex and mutagenesis studies is directing structure-based drug design using these polyphenols as a base scaffold. In addition, all of these allosteric inhibitors are elucidating the atomic mechanisms of allostery in this complex enzyme.

  6. The structure and allosteric regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been extensively studied for more than 50 years. Of particular interest is the fact that, while considered by most to be a 'housekeeping' enzyme, the animal form of GDH is heavily regulated by a wide array of allosteric effectors and exhibits extensive inter-subunit communication. While the chemical mechanism for GDH has remained unchanged through epochs of evolution, it was not clear how or why animals needed to evolve such a finely tuned form of this enzyme. As reviewed here, recent studies have begun to elucidate these issues. Allosteric regulation first appears in the Ciliates and may have arisen to accommodate evolutionary changes in organelle function. The occurrence of allosteric regulation appears to be coincident with the formation of an 'antenna' like feature rising off the tops of the subunits that may be necessary to facilitate regulation. In animals, this regulation further evolved as GDH became integrated into a number of other regulatory pathways. In particular, mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition result in dangerously high serum levels of insulin and ammonium. Therefore, allosteric regulation of GDH plays an important role in insulin homeostasis. Finally, several compounds have been identified that block GDH-mediated insulin secretion that may be to not only find use in treating these insulin disorders but to kill tumors that require glutamine metabolism for cellular energy.

  7. Demonstration of glutamate dehydrogenase isozymes in beef heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, H; Bosing-Schneider, R; Jenkins, R; Rasched, I; Sund, H

    1986-01-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been purified from beef heart mitochondria and compared with crystalline beef liver GDH. The specific activity of heart GDH was 127 units and of liver GDH 80 units. Heart GDH subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis had a protein corresponding to liver GDH and a smaller molecular weight protein. On agarose gel electrophoresis heart GDH activity was resolved into two fractions (with or without protease inhibitors) while liver had only one fraction. One of the heart fractions moved with liver GDH on electrophoresis. Thermal stability studies showed heart and liver GDH activity differed. Mouse antibodies to liver GDH precipitated both liver and heart GDH on double immunodiffusion. Mouse antibodies to liver GDH identified on nitrocellulose paper the polypeptide band of liver and heart GDH that were the same molecular weight but did not cross-react with the smaller molecular weight polypeptide present in heart GDH. Trypsin digestion of the two major protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified GDH from beef heart mitochondria did not show any overlapping peptides. We conclude beef heart GDH activity is composed of two isozymes. One is the same as beef liver GDH, and the other is a smaller molecular weight protein. We propose the terms GDH-LM for the liver GDH isozyme and GDH-HM for the smaller molecular weight isozyme present in heart mitochondria but not liver.

  8. Mediator-less highly sensitive voltammetric detection of glutamate using glutamate dehydrogenase/vertically aligned CNTs grown on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Azam; Shahrokhian, Saeed; zad, Azam Iraji; Mohajerzadeh, Shamsoddin; Vosoughi, Manouchehr; Darbari, Sara; Sanaee, Zeinab

    2012-01-15

    A sensitive glutamate biosensor is prepared based on glutamate dehydrogenase/vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (GLDH, VACNTs). Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown on a silicon substrate by direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) method. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized VACNTs was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic methods. Glutamate dehydrogenase covalently attached on tip of VACNTs. The electrochemical performance of the electrode for detection of glutamate was investigated by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry. Differential pulse voltammetric determinations of glutamate are performed in mediator-less condition and also, in the presence of 1 and 5 μM thionine as electron mediator. The linear calibration curve of the concentration of glutamate versus peak current is investigated in a wide range of 0.1-500 μM. The mediator-less biosensor has a low detection limit of 57 nM and two linear ranges of 0.1-20 μM with a sensitivity of 0.976 mA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 20-300 μM with a sensitivity of 0.182 mA mM(-1) cm(-2). In the presence of 1 μM thionine as an electron mediator, the prepared biosensor shows a low detection limit of 68 nM and two linear ranges of 0.1-20 with a calibration sensitivity of 1.17 mA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 20-500 μM with a sensitivity of 0.153 mA mM(-1) cm(-2). The effects of the other biological compounds on the voltammetric behavior of the prepared biosensor and its response stability are investigated. The results are demonstrated that the GLDH/VACNTs electrode even without electron mediator is a suitable basic electrode for detection of glutamate. PMID:22040749

  9. Structure of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Michael A.; Oliveira, Tânia F.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD+ and/or NADP+ as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding Domain I followed by a nucleotide binding Domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5Å resolution. Modelling of NADP+ in Domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine residue that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond to the 2’-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP+ recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD+ dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution toward the co-ordination of the 2’-ribose phosphate of NADP+. These studies clarify the sequence/structure relationships in bacterial glutamate dehydrogenases, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual specificity GDHs of animals. PMID:23879525

  10. Bacterial cell-surface displaying of thermo-tolerant glutamate dehydrogenase and its application in L-glutamate assay.

    PubMed

    Song, Jianxia; Liang, Bo; Han, Dongfei; Tang, Xiangjiang; Lang, Qiaolin; Feng, Ruirui; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh) is reported to efficiently display on Escherichia coli cell surface by using N-terminal region of ice the nucleation protein as an anchoring motif. The presence of Gldh was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and enzyme activity assay. Gldh was detected mainly in the outer membrane fraction, suggesting that the Gldh was displayed on the bacterial cell surface. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacteria cell-surface displayed Gldh (bacteria-Gldh) were 70°C and 9.0, respectively. Additionally, the fusion protein retained almost 100% of its initial enzymatic activity after 1 month incubation at 4°C. Transition metal ions could inhibit the enzyme activity to different extents, while common anions had little adverse effect on enzyme activity. Importantly, the displayed Gldh is most specific to l-glutamate reported so far. The bacterial Gldh was enabled to catalyze oxidization of l-glutamate with NADP(+) as cofactor, and the resultant NADPH can be detected spectrometrically at 340nm. The bacterial-Gldh based l-glutamate assay was established, where the absorbance at 340nm increased linearly with the increasing l-glutamate concentration within the range of 10-400μM. Further, the proposed approach was successfully applied to measure l-glutamate in real samples. PMID:25659635

  11. Kinetic studies to determine the mechanism of regulation of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase by nucleotide effectors.

    PubMed

    Cook, P F

    1982-01-01

    A combination of kinetic and isotope effect studies in the presence and absence of the effectors ADP and GTP was used to elucidate the mechanism of regulation of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase. ADP at low concentrations of glutamate competes with TPN for free enzyme. GTP exhibits a similar effect at high concentrations (100 microM and above). When ADP binds at its allosteric site, it increases the off rates of both alpha-ketoglutarate and TPNH from their product complexes. This results in a decrease in V/K for both substrates, an increase in V, and an increase in the deuterium isotope effects for all three parameters so that they are all about 1.3. The rate of release of glutamate from E-TPNH-glutamate is also apparently enhanced since no substrate inhibition by glutamate is observed in the presence of ADP. The effect of GTP is in opposition to that of ADP in that GTP decreases the off rates for both TPN and glutamate from E-TPN-glutamate as well as the off rates for alpha-ketoglutarate and TPNH. This results in an increase in the V/K's for both substrates, a decrease in V, and a decrease in the deuterium isotope effects for all three parameters to a value of 1. Substrate inhibition by glutamate is also eliminated by GTP probably by preventing any significant accumulation of E-TPNH to which glutamate binds as an inhibitor.

  12. Use of immobilized glutamate dehydrogenase to synthesize /sup 13/N-labeled L-amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.J.L.; Gelbard, A.S.

    1981-02-01

    By utilizing glutamate dehydrogenase immobilized onto CNBr-activated Sepharose it is possible to synthesize six L-/sup 13/N-amino acids in high radiochemical yield (5-140 mCi) and in high (> 99%) radiochemical purity. These /sup 13/N-amino acid solutions are potentially suitable for whole body and organ imaging in large animals and man.

  13. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:27467167

  14. Evolution of glutamate dehydrogenase regulation of insulin homeostasis is an example of molecular exaptation.

    PubMed

    Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Fang, Jie; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2004-11-16

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is found in all organisms and catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate. While this enzyme does not exhibit allosteric regulation in plants, bacteria, or fungi, its activity is tightly controlled by a number of compounds in mammals. We have previously shown that this regulation plays an important role in insulin homeostasis in humans and evolved concomitantly with a 48-residue "antenna" structure. As shown here, the antenna and some of the allosteric regulation first appears in the Ciliates. This primitive regulation is mediated by fatty acids and likely reflects the gradual movement of fatty acid oxidation from the peroxisomes to the mitochondria as the Ciliates evolved away from plants, fungi, and other protists. Mutagenesis studies where the antenna is deleted support this contention by demonstrating that the antenna is essential for fatty acid regulation. When the antenna from the Ciliates is spliced onto human GDH, it was found to fully communicate all aspects of mammalian regulation. Therefore, we propose that glutamate dehydrogenase regulation of insulin secretion is a example of exaptation at the molecular level where the antenna and associated fatty acid regulation was created to accommodate the changes in organelle function in the Ciliates and then later used to link amino acid catabolism and/or regulation of intracellular glutamate/glutamine levels in the pancreatic beta cells with insulin homeostasis in mammals.

  15. Effects of aluminum on activity of krebs cycle enzymes and glutamate dehydrogenase in rat brain homogenate.

    PubMed

    Zatta, P; Lain, E; Cagnolini, C

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic agent for animals and humans that has been implicated as an etiological factor in several neurodegenerative diseases and as a destabilizer of cell membranes. Due to its high reactivity, Al3+ is able to interfere with several biological functions, including enzymatic activities in key metabolic pathways. In this paper we report that, among the enzymes that constitute the Krebs cycle, only two are activated by aluminum: alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase. In contrast, aconitase, shows decreased activity in the presence of the metal ion. Al3+ also inhibits glutamate dehydrogenase, an allosteric enzyme that is closely linked to the Krebs cycle. A possible correlation between aluminum, the Krebs cycle and aging processes is discussed.

  16. Overexpression of NADH-dependent fumarate reductase improves D-xylose fermentation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Salusjärvi, Laura; Kaunisto, Sanna; Holmström, Sami; Vehkomäki, Maija-Leena; Koivuranta, Kari; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Deviation from optimal levels and ratios of redox cofactors NAD(H) and NADP(H) is common when microbes are metabolically engineered. The resulting redox imbalance often reduces the rate of substrate utilization as well as biomass and product formation. An example is the metabolism of D-xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoding genes from Scheffersomyces stipitis. This pathway requires both NADPH and NAD(+). The effect of overexpressing the glycosomal NADH-dependent fumarate reductase (FRD) of Trypanosoma brucei in D-xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae alone and together with an endogenous, cytosol directed NADH-kinase (POS5Δ17) was studied as one possible solution to overcome this imbalance. Expression of FRD and FRD + POS5Δ17 resulted in 60 and 23 % increase in ethanol yield, respectively, on D-xylose under anaerobic conditions. At the same time, xylitol yield decreased in the FRD strain suggesting an improvement in redox balance. We show that fumarate reductase of T. brucei can provide an important source of NAD(+) in yeast under anaerobic conditions, and can be useful for metabolic engineering strategies where the redox cofactors need to be balanced. The effects of FRD and NADH-kinase on aerobic and anaerobic D-xylose and D-glucose metabolism are discussed.

  17. Structure of NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli--reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Oliveira, Tânia F; Engel, Paul C; Khan, Amir R

    2013-09-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs; EC 1.4.1.2-4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, using NAD(+) and/or NADP(+) as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding domain I followed by a nucleotide-binding domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the GDH family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5-Å resolution. Modelling of NADP(+) in domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond with the 2'-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP(+) recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution to the coordination of the 2'-ribose phosphate of NADP(+). These studies clarify the sequence-structure relationships in bacterial GDHs, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual-specificity GDHs of animals.

  18. Structure of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli - reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Michael A.; Oliveira, Tânia F.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2013-09-05

    Glutamate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, using NAD+ and/or NADP+ as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding domain I followed by a nucleotide-binding domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the GDH family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5-Å resolution. Modelling of NADP+ in domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond with the 2'-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP+ recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD+-dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution to the coordination of the 2'-ribose phosphate of NADP+. These studies clarify the sequence–structure relationships in bacterial GDHs, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual-specificity GDHs of animals.

  19. Cellular and subcellular localization of hexokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase in the honeybee drone retina.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, A L; Tsacopoulos, M; Millan de Ruiz, L; Perrottet, P

    1994-05-01

    Subcellular localization of hexokinase in the honeybee drone retina was examined following fractionation of cell homogenate using differential centrifugation. Nearly all hexokinase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction, following a similar distribution as the cytosolic enzymatic marker, phosphoglycerate kinase. The distribution of enzymatic markers of mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, rotenone-insensitive cytochrome c reductase, and adenylate kinase) indicated that the outer mitochondrial membrane was partly damaged, but their distributions were different from that of hexokinase. The activity of hexokinase in purified suspensions of cells was fivefold higher in glial cells than in photoreceptors. This result is consistent with the hypothesis based on quantitative 2-deoxy[3H]glucose autoradiography that only glial cells phosphorylate significant amounts of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. The activities of alanine aminotransferase and to a lesser extent of glutamate dehydrogenase were higher in the cytosolic than in the mitochondrial fraction. This important cytosolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was consistent with the higher activity found in mitochondria-poor glial cells. In conclusion, this distribution of enzymes is consistent with the model of metabolic interactions between glial and photoreceptor cells in the intact bee retina. PMID:8158142

  20. Cellular and subcellular localization of hexokinase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and alanine aminotransferase in the honeybee drone retina.

    PubMed

    Veuthey, A L; Tsacopoulos, M; Millan de Ruiz, L; Perrottet, P

    1994-05-01

    Subcellular localization of hexokinase in the honeybee drone retina was examined following fractionation of cell homogenate using differential centrifugation. Nearly all hexokinase activity was found in the cytosolic fraction, following a similar distribution as the cytosolic enzymatic marker, phosphoglycerate kinase. The distribution of enzymatic markers of mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, rotenone-insensitive cytochrome c reductase, and adenylate kinase) indicated that the outer mitochondrial membrane was partly damaged, but their distributions were different from that of hexokinase. The activity of hexokinase in purified suspensions of cells was fivefold higher in glial cells than in photoreceptors. This result is consistent with the hypothesis based on quantitative 2-deoxy[3H]glucose autoradiography that only glial cells phosphorylate significant amounts of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. The activities of alanine aminotransferase and to a lesser extent of glutamate dehydrogenase were higher in the cytosolic than in the mitochondrial fraction. This important cytosolic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was consistent with the higher activity found in mitochondria-poor glial cells. In conclusion, this distribution of enzymes is consistent with the model of metabolic interactions between glial and photoreceptor cells in the intact bee retina.

  1. CcpA-dependent regulation of Bacillus subtilis glutamate dehydrogenase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2004-06-01

    The Bacillus subtilis rocG gene, encoding catabolic glutamate dehydrogenase, was found to be subject to direct CcpA-dependent glucose repression. The effect of CcpA required the presence of both the HPr and Crh proteins. The primary CcpA binding site was identified by mutational analysis and DNase I footprinting. In the absence of inducers of the Roc pathway, rocG was still expressed at a low level due to readthrough transcription. CcpA-dependent repression of rocG readthrough transcription proved to contribute to the slow growth rate of B. subtilis cells in glucose-glutamate medium. Increased readthrough expression of rocG was shown to be partially responsible for the growth defect of ccpA strains in glucose-ammonium medium.

  2. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  3. A kinetic study of the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus glutamate dehydrogenase using a variety of coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Hornby, D P; Engel, P C

    1984-09-17

    The NAD+-specific glutamate dehydrogenase from Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics in contrast to the enzyme from several other sources, and thus gives linear double-reciprocal plots of initial-rate data. The initial-rate parameters have been determined for this bacterial dehyrogenase in the direction of oxidative deamination. The use of alternative coenzymes leads to some conclusions about the order of substrate addition. An investigation of the pH dependence of this reaction reveals that the binding of oxidised coenzyme is independent of pH over the range 6-9. The kinetic data are consistent with an ordered addition of coenzyme prior to glutamate, the reverse of the mechanism derived with ox glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of ADP.

  4. Modular coenzyme specificity: a domain-swopped chimera of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C

    2009-11-01

    Domain-swopped chimeras of the glutamate dehydrogenases from Clostridium symbiosum (CsGDH) (NAD(+)-specific) and Escherichia coli (EcGDH) (NADP(+)-specific) have been produced, with the aim of testing the localization of determinants of coenzyme specificity. An active chimera consisting of the substrate-binding domain (Domain I) of CsGDH and the coenzyme-binding domain (Domain II) of EcGDH has been purified to homogeneity, and a thorough kinetic analysis has been carried out. Results indicate that selectivity for the phosphorylated coenzyme does indeed reside solely in Domain II; the chimera utilizes NAD(+) at 0.8% of the rate observed with NADP(+), similar to the 0.5% ratio for EcGDH. Positive cooperativity toward L-glutamate, characteristic of CsGDH, has been retained with Domain I. An unforeseen feature of this chimera, however, is that, although glutamate cooperativity occurs only at higher pH values in the parent CsGDH, the chimeric protein shows it over the full pH range explored. Also surprising is that the chimera is capable of catalysing severalfold higher reaction rates (V(max)) in both directions than either of the parent enzymes from which it is constructed.

  5. Temperature dependence of kinetic parameters for hyperthermophilic glutamate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Mohammad W; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2002-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the steady-state kinetic parameters for a glutamate dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix K1 was investigated. The enzyme showed a biphasic kinetic characteristic for L-glutamate and a monophasic one for NADP at 50-90 degrees C. At low concentrations of L-glutamate the Km decreased from 2.02 to 0.56 mM and the catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) markedly increased (4-150 micromol x mg(-1) x mM(-1)) along with the increase of temperature from 50 to 90 degrees C. At high concentrations of the substrate the Km was fairly high and approximately constant (around 225 mM), and the catalytic efficiency was low and its temperature-dependent change was small. The Km (0.039 mM) for NADP did not change with the increase of temperature. In the reductive amination, the Kms for 2-oxoglutarate (1.81 and 9.37 mM at low and high levels of ammonia, respectively) were independent on temperature, but the Kms for ammonia and NADPH rose from 86 to 185 mM and 0.050 to 0.175 mM, respectively.

  6. Purification and properties of NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, P A; White, B A; Mackie, R I

    1992-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (L-glutamate:NADP+ oxidoreductase, deaminating, EC 1.4.1.4) from the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens has been purified and characterized. The native enzyme and subunit are 280 and 48 kDa, respectively, suggesting that the native enzyme is a hexamer. The enzyme requires 0.5 M KCl for optimal activity and has a pH optimum of 6.9 to 7.0. The Kms for ammonia, alpha-ketoglutarate, and glutamate are 19, 0.41, and 62 mM, respectively. The sigmoidal NADPH saturation curve revealed positive cooperativity for the binding of this coenzyme. The first residue in the N-terminal amino acid sequence from R. flavefaciens GDH was alanine, suggesting that the protein may be modified posttranslationally. Comparison of the N-terminal sequence with those of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Clostridium symbiosum revealed only 39% amino acid homologies. The GDH from R. flavefaciens was unique in that its specific activity was highest during ammonia-limited growth but was not affected by ammonia shock treatment (20 mM). Images PMID:1335719

  7. Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is Required by Mycobacterium bovis BCG for Resistance to Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, James L.; Viljoen, Albertus J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Wiid, Ian J. F.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported on our success to generate deletion mutants of the genes encoding glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) in M. bovis BCG, despite their in vitro essentiality in M. tuberculosis. We could use these mutants to delineate the roles of GDH and GOGAT in mycobacterial nitrogen metabolism by using M. bovis BCG as a model for M. tuberculosis specifically. Here, we extended our investigation towards the involvement of GDH and GOGAT in other aspects of M. bovis BCG physiology, including the use of glutamate as a carbon source and resistance to known phagosomal stresses, as well as in survival inside macrophages. We find that gdh is indispensable for the utilization of glutamate as a major carbon source, in low pH environments and when challenged with nitric oxide. On the other hand, the gltBD mutant had increased viability under low pH conditions and was unaffected by a challenge with nitric oxide. Strikingly, GDH was required to sustain M. bovis BCG during infection of both murine RAW 264.7 and bone-marrow derived and macrophages, while GOGAT was not. We conclude that the catabolism of glutamate in slow growing mycobacteria may be a crucial function during infection of macrophage cells and demonstrate a novel requirement for M. bovis BCG GDH in the protection against acidic and nitrosative stress. These results provide strong clues on the role of GDH in intracellular survival of M. tuberculosis, in which the essentiality of the gdh gene complicates knock out studies making the study of the role of this enzyme in pathogenesis difficult. PMID:26824899

  8. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-07-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability.

  9. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability. PMID:25953831

  10. Quantitative determination of glycine in aqueous solution using glutamate dehydrogenase-immobilized glyoxal agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Semra Yilmazer; Keskin, Can Serkan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatic procedure for the determination of glycine (Gly) was developed by using a column containing immobilized glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on glyoxal agarose beads. Ammonia is produced from the enzymatic reactions between Gly and GDH with NAD(+) in phosphate buffer medium. The indophenol blue method was used for ammonia detection based on the spectrophotometric measurements of blue-colored product absorbing at 640 nm. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.1-10 mM of Gly concentrations. The effect of pH, temperature, and time interval was studied to find column stability, and also the interference effects of other amino acids was investigated. The interaction between GDH and glyoxal agarose beads was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the immobilized and non-immobilized agarose beads were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  11. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  12. Characterization of a pyridine nucleotide-nonspecific glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed Central

    Glass, T L; Hylemon, P B

    1980-01-01

    An oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate/oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADP+/NAD+) nonspecific L-glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron was purified 40-fold (NADP+ or NAD+ activity) over crude cell extract by heat treatment, (NH4)2SO2 fractionation, diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, Bio-Gel A 1.5m, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Both NADP+- and NAD+-dependent activities coeluted from all chromatographic treatments. Moreover, a constant ratio of NADP+/NAD+ specific activities was demonstrated at each purification step. Both activities also comigrated in 6% nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. Affinity chromatography of the 40-fold-purified enzyme using Procion RED HE-3B gave a preparation containing both NADP+- and NAD+-linked activities which showed a single protein band of 48,5000 molecular weight after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. The dual pyridine nucleotide nature of the enzyme was most readily apparent in the oxidative direction. Reductively, the enzyme was 30-fold more active with reduced NADP than with reduced NAD. Nonlinear concave 1/V versus 1/S plots were observed for reduced NADP and NH4Cl. Salts (0.1 M) stimulated the NADP+-linked reaction, inhibited the NAD+-linked reaction, and had little effect on the reduced NADP-dependent reaction. The stimulatory effect of salts (NADP+) was nonspecific, regardless of the anion or cation, whereas the degree of NAD+-linked inhibition decreased in the order to I- greater than Br- greater than Cl- greater than F-. Both NADP+ and NAD+ glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also detected in cell extracts from representative strains of other bacteroides deoxyribonucleic acid homology groups. Images PMID:7364728

  13. Structural insights into domain movement and cofactor specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2015-04-10

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of amino acids by converting glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, and vice versa. To investigate the molecular mechanism of GDH, we determined a crystal structure of the Corynebacterium glutamicum-derived GDH (CgGDH) in complex with its NADP cofactor and α-ketoglutarate substrate. CgGDH functions as a hexamer, and each CgGDH monomer comprises 2 separate domains; a Rossmann fold cofactor-binding domain and a substrate-binding domain. The structural comparison between the apo- and cofactor/substrate-binding forms revealed that the CgGDH enzyme undergoes a domain movement during catalysis. In the apo-form, CgGDH exists as an open state, and upon binding of the substrate and cofactor the protein undergoes a conformation change to a closed state. Our structural study also revealed that CgGDH has cofactor specificity for NADP, but not NAD, and this was confirmed by GDH activity measurements. Residues involved in the stabilization of the NADP cofactor and the α-ketoglutarate substrate were identified, and their roles in substrate/cofactor binding were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  14. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  15. The structure of apo human glutamate dehydrogenase details subunit communication and allostery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Schmidt, Timothy; Fang, Jie; Wu, Jane; Siuzdak, Gary; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-05-01

    The structure of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been determined in the absence of active site and regulatory ligands. Compared to the structures of bovine GDH that were complexed with coenzyme and substrate, the NAD binding domain is rotated away from the glutamate-binding domain. The electron density of this domain is more disordered the further it is from the pivot helix. Mass spectrometry results suggest that this is likely due to the apo form being more dynamic than the closed form. The antenna undergoes significant conformational changes as the catalytic cleft opens. The ascending helix in the antenna moves in a clockwise manner and the helix in the descending strand contracts in a manner akin to the relaxation of an extended spring. A number of spontaneous mutations in this antenna region cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome by decreasing GDH sensitivity to the inhibitor, GTP. Since these residues do not directly contact the bound GTP, the conformational changes in the antenna are apparently crucial to GTP inhibition. In the open conformation, the GTP binding site is distorted such that it can no longer bind GTP. In contrast, ADP binding benefits by the opening of the catalytic cleft since R463 on the pivot helix is pushed into contact distance with the beta-phosphate of ADP. These results support the previous proposal that purines regulate GDH activity by altering the dynamics of the NAD binding domain. Finally, a possible structural mechanism for negative cooperativity is presented.

  16. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  17. A marriage full of surprises: forty-five years living with glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2011-09-01

    Detailed kinetic studies of bovine glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH] from the 1960s revealed complexities that remain to be fully explained. In the absence of heterotropic nucleotide regulators the enzyme follows a random pathway of substrate addition but saturation with ADP enforces a compulsory-order mechanism in which glutamate is the leading substrate. The rate dependence on NAD(P)(+) concentration is complex and is probably only partly explained by negative binding cooperativity. Bovine GDH eluded successful analysis by crystallographers for 30 years but the final structural solution presented in this symposium at last provides a comprehensible framework for much of the heterotropic regulation, focussing attention on an antenna region in the C-terminal tail, a structure that is missing in the slightly smaller hexameric GDHs of lower organisms. Nonetheless, our studies with one such smaller (clostridial) GDH reveal that even without the antenna the underlying core structure still mediates homotropic cooperativity, and the ability to generate a variety of mutants has made it possible to start to dissect this machinery. In addition, this short personal review discusses a number of unresolved issues such as the significance of phospholipid inhibition and of specific interaction with mRNA, and above all the question of why it is necessary to regulate an enzyme reputedly maintaining its reactants at equilibrium and whether this might be in some way related to its coexistence with an energy-linked transhydrogenase.

  18. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, Mario J; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A; Falconieri, Veronica; Subramaniam, Sriram; Milne, Jacqueline L S

    2016-06-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an "open" or "closed" state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes.

  19. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Borgnia, Mario J.; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A.; Falconieri, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an “open” or “closed” state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes. PMID:27036132

  20. Green tea polyphenols control dysregulated glutamate dehydrogenase in transgenic mice by hijacking the ADP activation site.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2011-09-30

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic β-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  1. Using Cryo-EM to Map Small Ligands on Dynamic Metabolic Enzymes: Studies with Glutamate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Borgnia, Mario J; Banerjee, Soojay; Merk, Alan; Matthies, Doreen; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Earl, Lesley A; Falconieri, Veronica; Subramaniam, Sriram; Milne, Jacqueline L S

    2016-06-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) methods are now being used to determine structures at near-atomic resolution and have great promise in molecular pharmacology, especially in the context of mapping the binding of small-molecule ligands to protein complexes that display conformational flexibility. We illustrate this here using glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), a 336-kDa metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Dysregulation of GDH leads to a variety of metabolic and neurologic disorders. Here, we report near-atomic resolution cryo-EM structures, at resolutions ranging from 3.2 Å to 3.6 Å for GDH complexes, including complexes for which crystal structures are not available. We show that the binding of the coenzyme NADH alone or in concert with GTP results in a binary mixture in which the enzyme is in either an "open" or "closed" state. Whereas the structure of NADH in the active site is similar between the open and closed states, it is unexpectedly different at the regulatory site. Our studies thus demonstrate that even in instances when there is considerable structural information available from X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM methods can provide useful complementary insights into regulatory mechanisms for dynamic protein complexes. PMID:27036132

  2. The simultaneous determination of NAD(H) and NADP(H) utilization by glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2010-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from vertebrates is unusual among NAD(P)H-dependent dehydrogenases in that it can use either NAD(H) or NADP(H) as cofactor. In this study, we measure the rate of cofactor utilization by bovine GDH when both cofactors are present. Methods for both reaction directions were developed, and for the first time, to our knowledge, the GDH activity has been simultaneously studied in the presence of both NAD(H) and NADP(H). Our data indicate that NADP(H) has inhibitory effects on the rate of NAD(H) utilization by GDH, a characteristic of GDH not previously recognized. The response of GDH to allosteric activators in the presence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) suggests that ADP and leucine moderate much of the inhibitory effect of NADP(H) on the utilization of NAD(H). These results illustrate that simple assumptions of cofactor preference by mammalian GDH are incomplete without an appreciation of allosteric effects when both cofactors are simultaneously present.

  3. Mechanism of hyperinsulinism in short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency involves activation of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Chen, Pan; Palladino, Andrew; Narayan, Srinivas; Russell, Laurie K; Sayed, Samir; Xiong, Guoxiang; Chen, Jie; Stokes, David; Butt, Yasmeen M; Jones, Patricia M; Collins, Heather W; Cohen, Noam A; Cohen, Akiva S; Nissim, Itzhak; Smith, Thomas J; Strauss, Arnold W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Bennett, Michael J; Stanley, Charles A

    2010-10-01

    The mechanism of insulin dysregulation in children with hyperinsulinism associated with inactivating mutations of short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD) was examined in mice with a knock-out of the hadh gene (hadh(-/-)). The hadh(-/-) mice had reduced levels of plasma glucose and elevated plasma insulin levels, similar to children with SCHAD deficiency. hadh(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to oral amino acid with decrease of glucose level and elevation of insulin. Hypersensitivity to oral amino acid in hadh(-/-) mice can be explained by abnormal insulin responses to a physiological mixture of amino acids and increased sensitivity to leucine stimulation in isolated perifused islets. Measurement of cytosolic calcium showed normal basal levels and abnormal responses to amino acids in hadh(-/-) islets. Leucine, glutamine, and alanine are responsible for amino acid hypersensitivity in islets. hadh(-/-) islets have lower intracellular glutamate and aspartate levels, and this decrease can be prevented by high glucose. hadh(-/-) islets also have increased [U-(14)C]glutamine oxidation. In contrast, hadh(-/-) mice have similar glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity compared with controls. Perifused hadh(-/-) islets showed no differences from controls in response to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, even with addition of either a medium-chain fatty acid (octanoate) or a long-chain fatty acid (palmitate). Pull-down experiments with SCHAD, anti-SCHAD, or anti-GDH antibodies showed protein-protein interactions between SCHAD and GDH. GDH enzyme kinetics of hadh(-/-) islets showed an increase in GDH affinity for its substrate, α-ketoglutarate. These studies indicate that SCHAD deficiency causes hyperinsulinism by activation of GDH via loss of inhibitory regulation of GDH by SCHAD.

  4. Urease-glutamic dehydrogenase biosensor for screening heavy metals in water and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Belen Bello; Bolbot, John A; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2004-09-01

    A screen-printed three-electrode amperometric biosensor based on urease and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH)-glutamic dehydrogenase system was developed and applied to the screening of heavy metals in environmental samples. The development of an amperometric sensor for the monitoring of urease activity was feasible by coupling the urea breakdown reaction catalysed by urease to the reductive ammination of ketoglutarate catalysed by glutamic dehydrogenase (GLDH). The ammonia provided by the urea conversion is required for the conversion of ketoglutarate to glutamate with the concomitant oxidation of the NADH cofactor. NADH oxidation is monitored amperometrically at 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) after urease immobilization onto the screen-printed three-electrode configuration. Immobilization of urease on the surface of screen-printed electrodes was performed by entrapment in alginate gel and adsorption on the electrode in a nafion film. Low sensitivity to inactivation by metals was recorded after urease entrapment in alginate gel with detection limits of 2.9 and 29.8 mg L(-1) for Hg(II) and Cu(II), respectively. The use of the negatively charged nafion film created a more concentrated environment of cations in proximity to the enzyme, thus enhancing the urease inhibition when compared to gel entrapment. The calculated detection limits were 63.6 and 55.3 microg L(-1) for Hg(II) and Cu(II), respectively, and 4.3 mg L(-1) for Cd(II). A significant urease inactivation was recorded in the presence of trace amounts of metals (microg L(-1)) when the enzyme was used free in solution. Analysis of water and soil samples with the developed nafion-based sensor produced inhibition on urease activity according to their metal contents. The obtained results were in agreement with the standard methods employed for sample analysis. Nevertheless, the use of the amperometric assay (with free urease) proved more feasible for the screening of trace amounts of metals in polluted

  5. NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in Penicillium chrysogenum is involved in regulation of beta-lactam production.

    PubMed

    Thykaer, Jette; Rueksomtawin, Kanchana; Noorman, Henk; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-04-01

    The interactions between the ammonium assimilatory pathways and beta-lactam production were investigated by disruption of the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene (gdhA) in two industrial beta-lactam-producing strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. The strains used were an adipoyl-7-ADCA- and a penicillin-producing strain. The gdhA gene disruption caused a decrease in maximum specific growth rate of 26 % and 35 % for the adipoyl-7-ADCA-producing strain and the penicillin-producing strain, respectively, compared to the corresponding reference strains. Interestingly, no beta-lactam production was detected in either of the DeltagdhA strains. Supplementation with glutamate restored growth but no beta-lactam production was detected for the constructed strains. Cultures with high ammonium concentrations (repressing conditions) and with proline as nitrogen source (de-repressed conditions) showed continued beta-lactam production for the reference strains whereas the DeltagdhA strains remained non-productive under all conditions. By overexpressing the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, the specific growth rate could be restored, but still no beta-lactam production was detected. The results indicate that the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase may be directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of beta-lactam production in industrial strains of P. chrysogenum.

  6. Modulation of activity of Bacillus subtilis regulatory proteins GltC and TnrA by glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2004-06-01

    The Bacillus subtilis gltAB operon, encoding glutamate synthase, requires a specific positive regulator, GltC, for its expression and is repressed by the global regulatory protein TnrA. The factor that controls TnrA activity, a complex of glutamine synthetase and a feedback inhibitor, such as glutamine, is known, but the signal for modulation of GltC activity has remained elusive. GltC-dependent gltAB expression was drastically reduced when cells were grown in media containing arginine or ornithine or proline, all of which are inducers and substrates of the Roc catabolic pathway. Analysis of gltAB expression in mutants with various defects in the Roc pathway indicated that rocG-encoded glutamate dehydrogenase was required for such repression, suggesting that the substrates or products of this enzyme are the real effectors of GltC. Given that RocG is an enzyme of glutamate catabolism, the main regulatory role of GltC may be prevention of a futile cycle of glutamate synthesis and degradation in the presence of arginine-related amino acids or proline. In addition, high activity of glutamate dehydrogenase was incompatible with activity of TnrA.

  7. High protein diet induces pericentral glutamate dehydrogenase and ornithine aminotransferase to provide sufficient glutamate for pericentral detoxification of ammonia in rat liver lobules.

    PubMed

    Boon, L; Geerts, W J; Jonker, A; Lamers, W H; Van Noorden, C J

    1999-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in nitrogen metabolism. Nitrogen enters the liver as free ammonia and as amino acids of which glutamine and alanine are the most important precursors. Detoxification of ammonia to urea involves deamination and transamination. By applying quantitative in situ hybridization, we found that mRNA levels of the enzymes involved are mainly expressed in periportal zones of liver lobules. Free ammonia, that is not converted periportally, is efficiently detoxified in the small rim of hepatocytes around the central veins by glutamine synthetase preventing it from entering the systemic circulation. Detoxification of ammonia by glutamine synthetase may be limited due to a shortage of glutamate when the nitrogen load is high. Adaptations in metabolism that prevent release of toxic ammonia from the liver were studied in rats that were fed diets with different amounts of protein, thereby varying the nitrogen load of the liver. We observed that mRNA levels of periportal deaminating and transaminating enzymes increased with the protein content in the diet. Similarly, mRNA levels of pericentral glutamate dehydrogenase and ornithine aminotransferase, the main producers of glutamate in this zone, and pericentral glutamine synthetase all increased with increasing protein levels in the diet. On the basis of these changes in mRNA levels, we conclude that: (a) glutamate is produced pericentrally in sufficient amounts to allow ammonia detoxification by glutamine synthetase and (b) in addition to the catalytic role of ornithine in the periportally localized ornithine cycle, pericentral ornithine degradation provides glutamate for ammonia detoxification.

  8. Deamination role of inducible glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 7 in Brassica napus leaf protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami; Yumi, Ohnishi; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Kaori; Kamachi, Kazunari; Ratcliffe, R George

    2011-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate to glutamate. In Brassica napus, GDH isoenzymes 1 and 7 are hexamers of β and α subunits, respectively and the isoenzyme profile in leaves is known to change on wounding. Here, parallels were sought between the effects of wounding and protoplast isolation because of the possible relevance of changes in GDH activity to the perturbed metabolism in recalcitrant B. napus protoplasts. When leaf protoplasts of B. napus were isolated, GDH7 isoforms predominated. Transcription of GDH2, which encodes the GDH α subunit, was activated and translation of the GDH2 mRNA was also activated to synthesize α subunit polypeptides. When detached leaves absorbed either acidic 5mM jasmonic acid or salicylic acid solutions via petioles, GDH7 isoenzymes were activated and the GDH isoenzyme patterns were similar to those of protoplasts. Salicylic acid β-glycosides were generated soon after treatment with the pectinase-cellulase enzyme solution and peaked at 1h. NMR spectroscopic analysis of protoplasts and unstressed leaves incubated with 5mM (15)NH(4)Cl showed that the change in GDH isoenzyme profile had no effect on ammonium assimilation. Protoplast isolation changed the redox state with NAD(P)H and oxidized glutathione levels increasing, and ascorbate, dehydroascorbate, NAD(P) and glutathione decreasing. ATP content in protoplasts declined to 2.6% of that in leaves, while that in wounded leaves increased by twofold. It is concluded that GDH7 does not support net amination in vivo and it is suggested that the increase in GDH7 activity is a response to oxidative stress during protoplast isolation.

  9. E1 of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase defends Mycobacterium tuberculosis against glutamate anaplerosis and nitroxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Maksymiuk, Christina; Balakrishnan, Anand; Bryk, Ruslana; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Nathan, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes of central carbon metabolism (CCM) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) make an important contribution to the pathogen’s virulence. Evidence is emerging that some of these enzymes are not simply playing the metabolic roles for which they are annotated, but can protect the pathogen via additional functions. Here, we found that deficiency of 2-hydroxy-3-oxoadipate synthase (HOAS), the E1 component of the α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) dehydrogenase complex (KDHC), did not lead to general metabolic perturbation or growth impairment of Mtb, but only to the specific inability to cope with glutamate anaplerosis and nitroxidative stress. In the former role, HOAS acts to prevent accumulation of aldehydes, including growth-inhibitory succinate semialdehyde (SSA). In the latter role, HOAS can participate in an alternative four-component peroxidase system, HOAS/dihydrolipoyl acetyl transferase (DlaT)/alkylhydroperoxide reductase colorless subunit gene (ahpC)-neighboring subunit (AhpD)/AhpC, using α-KG as a previously undescribed source of electrons for reductase action. Thus, instead of a canonical role in CCM, the E1 component of Mtb’s KDHC serves key roles in situational defense that contribute to its requirement for virulence in the host. We also show that pyruvate decarboxylase (AceE), the E1 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC), can participate in AceE/DlaT/AhpD/AhpC, using pyruvate as a source of electrons for reductase action. Identification of these systems leads us to suggest that Mtb can recruit components of its CCM for reactive nitrogen defense using central carbon metabolites. PMID:26430237

  10. Diagnostic test accuracy of glutamate dehydrogenase for Clostridium difficile: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Jun; Horita, Nobuyuki; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Takashi, Nonaka; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-07-15

    We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) based on the hierarchical model. Two investigators electrically searched four databases. Reference tests were stool cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and stool toxigenic culture (TC). To assess the overall accuracy, we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) using a DerSimonian-Laird random-model and area the under hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics (AUC) using Holling's proportional hazard models. The summary estimate of the sensitivity and the specificity were obtained using the bivariate model. According to 42 reports consisting of 3055 reference positive comparisons, and 26188 reference negative comparisons, the DOR was 115 (95%CI: 77-172, I(2) = 12.0%) and the AUC was 0.970 (95%CI: 0.958-0.982). The summary estimate of sensitivity and specificity were 0.911 (95%CI: 0.871-0.940) and 0.912 (95%CI: 0.892-0.928). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 10.4 (95%CI 8.4-12.7) and 0.098 (95%CI 0.066-0.142), respectively. Detecting GDH for the diagnosis of CDI had both high sensitivity and specificity. Considering its low cost and prevalence, it is appropriate for a screening test for CDI.

  11. Diagnostic test accuracy of glutamate dehydrogenase for Clostridium difficile: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Jun; Horita, Nobuyuki; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Takashi, Nonaka; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) based on the hierarchical model. Two investigators electrically searched four databases. Reference tests were stool cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and stool toxigenic culture (TC). To assess the overall accuracy, we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) using a DerSimonian-Laird random-model and area the under hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics (AUC) using Holling’s proportional hazard models. The summary estimate of the sensitivity and the specificity were obtained using the bivariate model. According to 42 reports consisting of 3055 reference positive comparisons, and 26188 reference negative comparisons, the DOR was 115 (95%CI: 77–172, I2 = 12.0%) and the AUC was 0.970 (95%CI: 0.958–0.982). The summary estimate of sensitivity and specificity were 0.911 (95%CI: 0.871–0.940) and 0.912 (95%CI: 0.892–0.928). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 10.4 (95%CI 8.4–12.7) and 0.098 (95%CI 0.066–0.142), respectively. Detecting GDH for the diagnosis of CDI had both high sensitivity and specificity. Considering its low cost and prevalence, it is appropriate for a screening test for CDI. PMID:27418431

  12. Expression and in vitro assembly of recombinant glutamate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed Central

    Diruggiero, J; Robb, F T

    1995-01-01

    The gdhA gene, encoding the hexameric glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, was expressed in Escherichia coli by using the pET11-d system. The recombinant GDH was soluble and constituted 15% of the E. coli cell extract. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the recombinant protein was identical to the sequence of the P. furiosus enzyme, except for the presence of an initial methionine which was absent from the enzyme purified from P. furiosus. By molecular exclusion chromatography we showed that the recombinant GDH was composed of equal amounts of monomeric and hexameric forms. Heat treatment of the recombinant protein triggered in vitro assembly of inactive monomers into hexamers, resulting in increased GDH activity. The specific activity of the recombinant enzyme, purified by heat treatment and affinity chromatography, was equivalent to that of the native enzyme from P. furiosus. The recombinant GDH displayed a slightly lower level of thermostability, with a half-life of 8 h at 100 degrees C, compared with 10.5 h for the enzyme purified from P. furiosus. PMID:7887598

  13. Identification of lysine residue involved in inactivation of brain glutamate dehydrogenase isoproteins by o-phthalaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J Y; Choi, S; Cho, S W

    1999-12-01

    Incubation of two types of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) isoproteins from bovine brain with o-phthalaldehyde resulted in a time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. The inactivation was partially prevented by preincubation of the GDH isoproteins with 2-oxoglutarate or NADH. Spectrophotometric studies indicated that the inactivation of GDH isoproteins with o-phthalaldehyde resulted in isoindole derivatives characterized by typical fluorescence emission spectra with a stoichiometry of one isoindole derivative per molecule of enzyme subunit. There were no differences between the two GDH isoproteins in sensitivities to inactivation by o-phthalaldehyde indicating that the microenvironmental structures of the GDH isoproteins are very similar to each other. Tryptic peptides of the isoproteins, modified with and without protection, identified a selective modification of one lysine as in the region containing the sequence L-Q-H-G-S-I-L-G-F-P-X-A-K for both GDH isoproteins. The symbol X indicates a position for which no phenylthiohydantoin-amino acid could be assigned. The missing residue, however, can be designated as an o-phthalaldehyde-labeled lysine since the sequences including the lysine residue in question have a complete identity with those of the other mammalian GDHs. Also, trypsin was unable to cleave the labeled peptide at this site. Both amino acid sequencing and compositional analysis identified Lys-306 as the site of o-phthalaldehyde binding within the brain GDH isoproteins. PMID:10607407

  14. Coimmobilization of l-methioninase and glutamate dehydrogenase: Novel approach for L-homoalanine synthesis.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S A; Yassin, Marwa A; Ibrahim, Hend

    2015-01-01

    L-Homoalanine, a nonnatural amino acid that is rarely found in human and microorganisms, is used in the synthesis of various medically pivotal antiepileptic drugs and antituberculosis compounds. l-Homoalanine can be synthesized by different enzymatic approaches. In this article, the synthesis of l-homoalanine from l-methionine was explored by coimmobilization of Aspergillus flavipes l-methioninase (AfMETase) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on polyacrylamide and chitosan. Polyacrylamide coimmobilized AfMETase and GDH displayed a maximum reactivity for the synthesis of homoalanine from l-methionine. The chitosan-coimmobilized AfMETase and GDH retain about 70% of their initial activity of l-homoalanine production by the fifth catalytic reusability cycle as compared with 50% for polyacrylamide coimmobilizate. Catalytic conditions were optimized for the maximum yield of homoalanine. Homoalanine was purified by cationic and anionic chromatographs and the proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) analysis of the lyophilized sample displayed a unique chemical structure identical to the authentic homoalanine. Using dependable dual action of AfMETase and GDH immobilized on a solid support is a novel approach for in vitro enzymatic synthesis of l-homoalanine from l-methionine, and the immobilized enzymes can be reused many times without any significant loss of their activities. PMID:25273833

  15. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    PubMed Central

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide. PMID:12232322

  16. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutamine Synthetase in Avocado Fruit during Development and Ripening.

    PubMed

    Loulakakis, K. A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, K. A.; Kanellis, A. K.

    1994-09-01

    The activity, protein, and isoenzymic profiles of glutamate de-hydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were studied during development and ripening of avocado (Percea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit. During fruit development, the activity and protein content of both GDH and GS remained relatively constant. In contrast, considerable changes in these enzymes were observed during ripening of avocado fruit. The specific activity of GDH increased about 4-fold, coincident with a similar increase in GDH protein content and mRNA levels. On the other hand, GS specific activity showed a decline at the end of the ripening process. On the isoenzymic profile of GDH, changes in the prevalence of the seven isoenzymes were found, with a predominance of the more cathodal isoenzymes in the unripe and of the most anodal isoenzymes in the ripe fruit. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that avocado fruit GDH consists of two subunits whose association gives rise to seven isoenzymes. The results support the view that the predominance of the more anodal isoenzymes in the overripe fruit was due to the accumulation of the [alpha]-polypeptide.

  17. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  18. Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity in Relation to Carbon Limitation and Protein Catabolism in Carrot Cell Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sharon A.; Stewart, George R.; Phillips, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity and function have been studied in cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L. cv Chantenay) in response to carbon and nitrogen supply in the culture medium. The specific activity of GDH was derepressed in sucrose-starved cells concomitant with protein catabolism, ammonium excretion, and the accumulation of metabolically active amino acids. The addition of sucrose led to a rapid decrease in GDH specific activity, an uptake of ammonium from the medium, and a decrease in amino acid levels. The extent of GDH derepression was correlated positively with cellular glutamate concentration. These findings strengthen the view that the function of GDH is the catabolism of glutamate, which under conditions of carbon stress provides carbon skeletons for tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. PMID:16668745

  19. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid from glucose by introduction of synthetic scaffolds between isocitrate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamate decarboxylase in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-08-10

    Escherichia coli were engineered for the direct production of gamma-aminobutyric acid from glucose by introduction of synthetic protein scaffold. In this study, three enzymes consisting GABA pathway (isocitrate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamate decarboxylase) were connected via synthetic protein scaffold. By introduction of scaffold, 0.92g/L of GABA was produced from 10g/L of glucose while no GABA was produced in wild type E. coli. The optimum pH and temperature for GABA production were 4.5 and 30°C, respectively. When competing metabolic network was inactivated by knockout mutation, maximum GABA concentration of 1.3g/L was obtained from 10g/L glucose. The recombinant E. coli strain which produces GABA directly from glucose was successfully constructed by introduction of protein scaffold.

  20. The kinetic mechanism of ox liver glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of the allosteric effector ADP. The oxidative deamination of L-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hornby, D P; Aitchison, M J; Engel, P C

    1984-10-01

    In steady-state kinetic studies of ox liver glutamate dehydrogenase in 0.11 M-potassium phosphate buffer, pH7, at 25 degrees C, the concentration of ADP was varied from 0.5 to 1000 microM. Inhibition was observed except when the concentrations of both glutamate and coenzyme were high, when activation was seen. With NAD+ or NADP+ as coenzyme, 200 microM-ADP was sufficient to saturate the enzyme with respect to the major effect of this nucleotide. In the presence of 210 microM-ADP, widely varied concentrations of coenzyme give linear Lineweaver-Burk plots, in marked contrast with results obtained previously for kinetics without ADP. This has allowed evaluation for the reaction with NAD+, NADP+ and acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide (315 microM-ADP in the last case) of all four initial rate parameters, i.e. the phi coefficients in the equation: (Formula: see text) where A is coenzyme and B is glutamate. The relative constancy of phi B and of phi AB/phi A with the different coenzymes point to a compulsory-order mechanism with glutamate as the leading substrate. This conclusion, though unexpected, agrees well with various previous observations on the binding of oxidized coenzyme.

  1. Adaptation of methods for glutamate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities to a centrifugal analyser: assessment of their clinical use in anoxic states of the liver.

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, M D; Penberthy, L A; Berry, M N

    1987-01-01

    Sensitive, precise, and rapid methods for the measurement of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were developed on the Cobas Bio centrifugal analyser. The optimal pH for ADH in caucasians was 9.8. Non-linearity of ADH enzyme activity was observed when samples were diluted in saline; linearity was restored when inactivated serum was used as diluent. ADH was shown to be a sensitive index of liver anoxia due to cardiorespiratory disturbance (clinical sensitivity 90%) and generalised anoxia. GDH exhibited sensitivity equal to that of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) but was inferior to gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) in the detection of specific liver disease. Both ADH and GDH were sensitive indicators of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:2890662

  2. The maximum activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, glycerol phosphate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, nucleoside diphosphatekinase, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and arginine kinase in relation to carbohydrate utilization in muscles from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase in muscles from marine invertebrates indicates that they can be divided into three groups. First, the activities of the three enzymes are low in coelenterate muscles, catch muscles of molluscs and muscles of echinoderms; this indicates a low rate of carbohydrate (and energy) utilization by these muscles. Secondly, high activities of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase relative to those of hexokinase are found in, for example, lobster abdominal and scallop snap muscles; this indicates that these muscles depend largely on anaerobic degradation of glycogen for energy production. Thirdly, high activities of hexokinase are found in the radular muscles of prosobranch molluscs and the fin muscles of squids; this indicates a high capacity for glucose utilization, which is consistent with the high activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in these muscles [Alp, Newsholme & Zammit (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 689-700]. 2. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase were measured in order to provide a qualitative indication of the importance of different processes for oxidation of glycolytically formed NADH. The muscles are divided into four groups: those that have a high activity of lactate dehydrogenase relative to the activities of phosphofructokinase (e.g. crustacean muscles); those that have high activities of octopine dehydrogenase but low activities of lactate dehydrogenase (e.g. scallop snap muscle); those that have moderate activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase (radular muscles of prosobranchs), and those that have low activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase, but which possess activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (oyster adductor muscles). It is

  3. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  4. Affinity chromatography of the Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase, its mutational variants and hybrid hexamers.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, D H; Wootton, J C

    1977-01-01

    The synthesis of an affinity adsorbent, 8-(6-aminohexyl)aminoadenosine 2'-phosphate-Sepharose 4B, is described. The assembly of the 2'-AMP ligand and the hexanediamide spacer arm was synthesized in free solution before its attachment to the Sepharose matrix. This adsorbent retarded the hexameric NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa, showing a capacity for this enzyme similar to that of comparable coenzyme-analogue adsorbents for other dehydrogenases. The enzyme was eluted either at pH 6.8 in a concentration gradient of NADP+, or at pH 8.5 in the presence of NADP+ in concentration gradients of either dicarboxylates or NaCl. Anomalous effects of dicarboxylates in facilitating elution are discussed. 2'-AMP and its derivatives, 8-bromoadenosine 2'-phosphate and 8-(l-aminohexyl)aminoadenosine 2'-phosphate, which were used in the synthesis of the adsorbent, all acted as enzyme inhibitors competitive with NADP+. The chromatographic properties of the wild-type enzyme were compared with those of mutationally modified variants containing defined amino acid substitutions. This approach was used to assess the biospecificity of adsorption and elution and the contribution of non-specific binding. The adsorbent showed a low capacity for the enzyme from mutant am1 (Ser-336 replaced by Phe), a variant that has a localized defect in NADP binding, but an otherwise almost normal conformation, suggesting that non-specific interactions are at most weak. The enzyme from mutant am3, a variant modified in a conformational equilibrium, was fully retarded by the adsorbent, but showed a significantly earlier elution position than the wild-type enzyme. This is consistent with measurements in free solution that showed the am3 enzyme to have a higher Ki for 2'-AMP than the wild-type enzyme. The enzyme from mutant am19 was eluted as two distinct peaks at both pH 6.8 and 8.5. The adsorbent was used to separate hybrid hexamers constructed in vitro by a freeze-thaw procedure

  5. Organ-specific expression of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) subunits in yellow lupine.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Dabert, Mirosława; Nowak, Witold

    2011-07-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.2-4) is present in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus cv. Juno) in many isoforms. The number and banding pattern of isoenzymes varies with respect to plant organ and developmental stage. To better understand the complex nature of GDH regulation in plants, the levels of GDH transcripts, enzyme activity and isoenzyme patterns in germinating seeds and roots of yellow lupine were examined. The analysis of GDH cDNA sequences in lupine revealed three mRNA types, of which two encoded the β-GDH subunit and one encoded the α-GDH subunit (corresponding to the GDH1(GDH3) and GDH2 genes, respectively). The relative expression of GDH1 and GDH2 genes was analyzed in various lupine organs by using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results indicate that different mRNA types were differently regulated depending on organ type. Although both genes appeared to be ubiquitously expressed in all lupine tissues, the GDH1 transcripts evidently predominated over those of GDH2. Immunochemical analyses confirmed that, during embryo development, varied expression of two GDH subunits takes place. The α-GDH subunit (43kDa) predominated in the early stages of germinating seeds, while the β-GDH subunit (44kDa) was the only GDH polypeptide present in lupine roots. These results firmly support the hypothesis that isoenzyme variability of GDH in yellow lupine is associated with the varied expression of α and β subunits into the complexes of hexameric GDH forms. The presence of several isogenes of GDH in yellow lupine may explain the high number (over 20) of its molecular forms in germinating lupine.

  6. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of an extremely thermostable glutamate dehydrogenase from the archaeon Pyrococcus woesei.

    PubMed

    Knapp, S; Karshikoff, A; Waldkötter, K; Rüdiger, A; Antranikian, G; Ladenstein, R

    1995-05-01

    The extremely heat-stable glutamate dehydrogenase (GluDH) from Pyrococcus woesei was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals suitable for X-ray crystallographic investigations were obtained using polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 and ammonium acetate as precipitating agents. The crystals obtained diffract to a resolution of 2.8 A, have a prismatic shape and grow up to 0.5 mm in their maximal dimension. They belong to the triclinic system (space group P1; a = 90.9, b = 92.8, c = 107.1 A, alpha = 69.1, beta = 80.7, Vgamma = 65.0 degrees ) with a unit-cell volume of 765052 A(3) which accommodates one GluDH hexamer of 276 kDa. The averaged density of the crystal determined by Ficoll-gradient centrifugation is 1.15 g cm(-3), which corresponds to a molecular mass of 255 kDa in the unit cell. A native data set has been collected on an MAR image-plate system using Cu Kalpha radiation. The completeness of the data set in the range 316-3 A is 74%, and contains 64% of the data in the outer shell (3.4-2.8 A), with an average R(merge) value of 9%. Calculation of self-rotation functions revealed the 32 symmetry of the hexamer; 3 non-crystallographic twofold axes were found at a distance of 120 degrees in a plane perpendicular to the non-crystallographic threefold axis. PMID:15299309

  7. Regulation of accumulation and turnover of an inducible glutamate dehydrogenase in synchronous cultures of Chlorella.

    PubMed Central

    Israel, D W; Gronostajski, R M; Yeung, A T; Schmidt, R R

    1977-01-01

    Earlier studies indicated that the gene of an ammonium-inducible glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was inducible throughout the cell cycle and was expressible shortly after replication early in the S-phase in synchronous Chlorella cells growing at a rate of 13% per h in the absence of inducer. In the present study, synchronous cells cultured at the same growth rate in the continuous presence of inducer accumulated this enzyme in a linear manner, with a positive rate change observed late instead of early in the S-phase. At a growth rate of 26% per h, the positive rate change appeared to be displaced to 1.5 h before the S-phase in the next cell cycle. With 2'-deoxyadenosine, an in vivo inhibitor of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, the magnitude of the positive rate change was shown to be proportional to the relative increase in DNA in the previous cell cycle. Collectively, these data support the idea that expression of newly replicated genes of this enzyme can be delayed into the subsequent cell cycle in cells in the continuous presence of inducer. Studies with cycloheximide indicated that the inducible GDH and another GDH isozyme were stable in fully induced cells in the absence of protein synthesis. However, after ammonium was removed from the culture medium, the activity of the inducible GDH decreased rapidly in vivo, with a half-time of 5 to 10 min at 38.5 degrees C, whereas the rate of accumulation of the other GDH isozyme did not change. Addition of cycloheximide, at the time of inducer removal, prevented this loss in activity of the inducible GDH. The inability to rescue the activity of the inducible GDH, by readdition of ammonium during the deinduction period, indicates that this enzyme probably underwent irreversible inactivation and/or proteolytic degradation. PMID:45486

  8. Purification and side chain selective chemical modifications of glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yinyun; Wang, Jiale; Qian, Bingjun; Song, Guangyan; Yao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Jian-hua

    2014-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and hydroxyapatite (HA) affinity chromatography. The GDH was purified 34-fold, with a yield of 41 % of total activity and a specific activity of 34.29 U/mg proteins. The molecular weight (Mr) of was measured at 47 kDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 264 kDa with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The optimum pH and temperature for the deammoniation reaction were measured to be 7.5 and 30 °C, respectively. The active-site amino acid residues of GDH were investigated by chemical modification. The compounds 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS), phenylglyoxal (PG), and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) were used to modify lysine, arginine, and serine active site residues, respectively. After treatment with modifying reagents at concentrations of 1 mM, GDH activity fell to 10.7 % with TNBS, 83.3 % with PG, and 12.8 % with PMSF. However, with substrate protection, there was almost no loss in GDH activity following treatment with any modifying reagent. The kinetic parameters K m and V max were determined in each case. K m values for native GDH, 50 % TNBS-inactivated GDH, and 50 % PMSF-inactivated GDH were 0.037, 0.104, and 0.017 mM, respectively. V max values were 0.048, 0.022, and 0.031 mM/s, respectively. These results suggest that the active site contains one or more lysine residues that play a role in substrate binding and one or more serine residues that may maintain the enzyme conformation. However, arginine residues played less of a role in the activity of GDH. PMID:24557956

  9. Characterization of the glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Gigantocotyle explanatum and Gastrothylax crumenifer (Trematoda: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Abidi, S M A; Khan, P; Saifullah, M K

    2009-12-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) (EC 1.4.1.3) is a ubiquitous enzyme, which is present at the protein and carbohydrate metabolism crossroads. The enzyme activity was investigated in biliary and rumen amphistomes, Gigantocotyle explanatum and Gastrothylax crumenifer, respectively, infecting the Indian water buffalo Bubalus bubalis. The enzyme activity was consistently higher in G. explanatum as compared to G. crumenifer, where NAD(H) was utilized as coenzyme and the pH optima was recorded at 8. The K(m) and V(max) values for α-ketoglutarate were 2.1 mM and 9.09 units in G. explanatum, whereas 3.03 mM and 1.90 units in G. crumenifer, respectively. Among the allosteric modulator nucleotides, AMP, ADP, ATP, GMP, CMP and UMP, only AMP enhanced GLDH activity in G. crumenifer while ADP was stimulatory in G. explanatum. The amino acid leucine stimulated the GLDH activity in both the amphistomes while alanine was stimulatory only in G. crumenifer. Pronounced interspecific differences in response to different metabolic inhibitors like diethyldithiocarbamate, semicarbazide hydrochloride and mercurial ions were also observed. The osmotic stress alters the enzyme activity, particularly in hypertonic saline the GLDH activity increased significantly (p < 0.01) in G. explanatum, while insignificant effects were observed in rumen dwelling G. crumenifer. Histoenzymology revealed region/tissue specific distribution of GLDH with prominent staining in tissues like vitellaria, lymph system and tegument/subtegument, thus showing specific distribution of GLDH indicating differential metabolic state. Such intergeneric differences in GLDH activity could also be a consequence of occupying different microenvironments within the same host.

  10. α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Work in Tandem To Modulate the Antioxidant α-Ketoglutarate during Oxidative Stress in Pseudomonas fluorescens▿

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Singh, Ranji; Brewer, Guy; Auger, Christopher; Lemire, Joseph; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2009-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (KG) is a crucial metabolite in all living organisms, as it participates in a variety of biochemical processes. We have previously shown that this keto acid is an antioxidant and plays a key role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In an effort to further confirm this intriguing phenomenon, Pseudomonas fluorescens was exposed to menadione-containing media, with various amino acids as the sources of nitrogen. Here, we demonstrate that KG dehydrogenase (KGDH) and NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) work in tandem to modulate KG homeostasis. While KGDH was sharply decreased in cells challenged with menadione, GDH was markedly increased in cultures containing arginine (Arg), glutamate (Glu), and proline (Pro). When ammonium (NH4) was utilized as the nitrogen source, both KGDH and GDH levels were diminished. These enzymatic profiles were reversed when control cells were incubated in menadione media. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and high-performance liquid chromatography studies revealed how KG was utilized to eliminate ROS with the concomitant formation of succinate. The accumulation of KG in the menadione-treated cells was dependent on the redox status of the lipoic acid residue in KGDH. Indeed, the treatment of cellular extracts from the menadione-exposed cells with dithiothreitol, a reducing agent, partially restored the activity of KGDH. Taken together, these data reveal that KG is pivotal to the antioxidative defense strategy of P. fluorescens and also point to the ROS-sensing role for KGDH. PMID:19376872

  11. Purification of glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes and characterization of their substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Godson O; Braithwaite, Cleantis; Fordjour, Kusi; Madu, Wenceslaus C; Beyene, Asefa; Roberts, Paul S; Wright, Victor

    2003-02-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) isoenzymes were purified from control, and ribonucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-treated peanut seedlings. GDH purification was by preparative-scale, free solution isoelectric focusing, followed by native PAGE, and the cryoelectrophoretic elution of the isoenzymes from the gel. SDS-PAGE of the purified GDH isoenzymes, followed by either silver staining of the gel, or western analysis using anti-GDH antibody, gave identical GDH polypeptide (a, alpha, and b) bands, thus, confirming the purity of the isoenzymes. The substrate specificities in the aminating activity of the GDH isoenzymes, or disaggregated polypeptides were determined by photometry, but the substrate specificities in the RNA synthesis activity were determined in cocktails containing 0.06-0.8 mM of each of UTP, ATP, GTP, and CTP, 0-100.0 mM NH4Cl, 0-50.0 mM alpha-ketoglutaratr (alpha-KG), 0-0.2 mM NADH, 0-10.0 mM CaCl2 5 units of DNase 1, antibiotics, and approximately 5 microg pure GDH isoenzymes or polypeptides at pH 8.0, and overnight at 16 degrees C. The GDH polypeptides were active only in amination reaction, but the GDH isoenzymes were active in both amination and RNA synthesis. Whereas, NADH, NH4Cl and alpha-KG served as the substrates for the amination reaction, and as modulators in the RNA synthetic reaction, ATP, GTP, UTP, and CTP served as substrates for theisoenzymes in RNA synthesis reaction. The product RNA was up to 2 microg microg(-1) GDH, and consisted of RNA species in the size ranges of 26, 16, and 5 S rRNAs. DNAse 1 in the assay cocktail ruled out transcription as the mechanism of the RNA synthesis. Addition of [alpha-32P] NTP led to the production of labeled RNA, thus confirming the specificity of NTPs as substrates, and that the RNA was not pre-existing in the reaction cocktail.

  12. Differential levels of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1) in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice and the effects of overexpression of the Glud1 gene on glutamate release in striatum

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Bao, Xiaodong; Hascup, Erin R; Hui, Dongwei; Xu, Wenhao; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that overexpression of the Glud1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) gene in neurons of C57BL/6 mice results in increased depolarization-induced glutamate release that eventually leads to selective neuronal injury and cell loss by 12 months of age. However, it is known that isogenic lines of Tg (transgenic) mice produced through back-crossing with one strain may differ in their phenotypic characteristics from those produced using another inbred mouse strain. Therefore, we decided to introduce the Glud1 transgene into the Balb/c strain that has endogenously lower levels of GLUD1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) enzyme activity in the brain as compared with C57BL/6. Using an enzyme-based MEA (microelectrode array) that is selective for measuring glutamate in vivo, we measured depolarization-induced glutamate release. Within a discrete layer of the striatum, glutamate release was significantly increased in Balb/c Tg mice compared with wt (wild-type) littermates. Furthermore, Balb/c mice released approx. 50–60% of the amount of glutamate compared with C57BL/6 mice. This is similar to the lower levels of endogenous GLUD1 protein in Balb/c compared with C57BL/6 mice. The development of these Glud1-overexpressing mice may allow for the exploration of key molecular events produced by chronic exposure of neurons to moderate, transient increases in glutamate release, a process hypothesized to occur in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21446915

  13. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  14. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants' growth and yield-even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD⁺ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  15. Construction of a dimeric form of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pasquo, A; Britton, K L; Stillman, T J; Rice, D W; Cölfen, H; Harding, S E; Scandurra, R; Engel, P C

    1996-10-17

    By using site-directed mutagenesis, Phe-187, one of the amino-acid residues involved in hydrophobic interaction between the three identical dimers comprising the hexamer of Clostridium symbiosum glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), has been replaced by an aspartic acid residue. Over-expression in Escherichia coli led to production of large amounts of a soluble protein which, though devoid of GDH activity, showed the expected subunit M(r) on SDS-PAGE, and cross-reacted with an anti-GDH antibody preparation in Western blots. The antibody was used to monitor purification of the inactive protein. F187D GDH showed altered mobility on non-denaturing electrophoresis, consistent with changed size and/or surface charge. Gel filtration on a calibrated column indicated an M(r) of 87000 +/- 3000. The mutant enzyme did not bind to the dye column routinely used in preparing wild-type GDH. Nevertheless suspicions of major misfolding were allayed by the results of chemical modification studies: as with wild-type GDH, NAD+ completely protected one-SH group against modification by DTNB, implying normal coenzyme binding. A significant difference, however, is that in the mutant enzyme both cysteine groups were modified by DTNB, rather than C320 only. The CD spectrum in the far-UV region indicated no major change in secondary structure in the mutant protein. The near-UV CD spectrum, however, was less intense and showed a pronounced Phe contribution, possibly reflecting the changed environment of Phe-199, which would be buried in the hexamer. Sedimentation velocity experiments gave corrected coefficients S20,W of 11.08 S and 5.29 S for the wild-type and mutant proteins. Sedimentation equilibrium gave weight average molar masses M(r,app) of 280000 +/- 5000 g/mol. consistent with the hexameric structure for the wild-type protein and 135000 +/- 3000 g/mol for F187D. The value for the mutant is intermediate between the values expected for a dimer (98000) and a trimer (147000). To investigate the

  16. Characterization of an NADH-dependent haem-degrading system in ox heart mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, R K; Maines, M D

    1987-01-01

    We report the identification of an NADH-dependent haem-degrading system in ox heart mitochondria. The activity was localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane, specifically associated with complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). The mitochondrial NADH-dependent haem-degradation activity was highly effective and displayed a rate nearly 60% higher than that of the microsomal activity. The following observations suggested the enzymic nature of the activity: (i) haem degradation by complex I did not proceed upon exposure to elevated temperature and extremes of pH; (ii) it displayed substrate specificity; (iii) it was inhibited by a substrate analogue; and (iv) it showed a cofactor requirement. Moreover, the activity was distinctly different from the ascorbate-mediated haem-degradation activity. Also, complex I differed from the microsomal NADPH:cytochrome c (P-450) reductase inasmuch as the formation of an effective interaction with the microsomal haem oxygenase could not be detected. Addition of purified haem oxygenase to complex I neither influenced the rate of haem degradation nor resulted in the formation of biliverdin IX alpha. In contrast, addition of haem oxygenase to NADPH:cytochrome c (P-450) reductase enhanced the rate of haem degradation by nearly 8-fold, and more than 60% of the degraded haem could be accounted for as biliverdin IX alpha. The haem-degrading activity of complex I appeared to involve the activity of H2O2, as the reaction was inhibited by nearly 90% by catalase, and propentdyopents were detected as reaction products. Intact haemoproteins such as cytochrome c and myoglobin were not effective substrates. However, the haem undecapeptide of cytochrome c was degraded at a rate equal to that observed for haem. Haematohaem was degraded at a rate 50% lower than that observed for haem. It is suggested that the NADH-dependent haem-degradation system may have a biological role in the regulation of the concentration of respiratory haemoproteins and

  17. Use of primary deuterium and /sup 15/N isotope effects to deduce the relative rates of steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.M.; Chen, C.Y.; Cleland, W.W.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-06-28

    The authors have used deuterium and /sup 15/N isotope effects to study the relative rates of the steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases. The proposed chemical mechanisms for these enzymes involve carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and reduction of the imine to the amino acid. These steps are almost equally rate limiting for V/K/sub ammonia/ with alanine dehydrogenase, while with glutamate dehydrogenase carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and release of glutamate after hydride transfer provide most of the rate limitation of V/K/sub ammonia/. Release of oxidized nucleotide is largely rate limiting for V/sub max/ for both enzymes. When ..beta..-hydroxypyruvate replaces pyruvate, or 3-acetylpyridine NADH (Acpyr-NADH) or thio-NADH replaces NADH with alanine dehydrogenase, nucleotide release no longer limits V/sub max/, and hydride transfer becomes more rate limiting. With glutamate dehydrogenase, replacement of ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate by ..cap alpha..-ketovalerate makes hydride transfer more rate limiting. Use of Acpyr-NADPH has a minimal effect with ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate but causes an 8-fold decrease in V/sub max/ with ..cap alpha..-ketovalerate, with hydride transfer the major rate-limiting step. In contrast, thio-NADPH with either ..cap alpha..-keto acid causes carbinolamide formation to become almost completely rate limiting. These studies show the power of multiple isotope effects in deducing details of the chemistry and changes in rate-limiting step(s) in complicated reaction mechanisms such as those of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases.

  18. Transgenic Expression of Glud1 (Glutamate Dehydrogenase 1) in Neurons: In Vivo Model of Enhanced Glutamate Release, Altered Synaptic Plasticity, and Selective Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaodong; Pal, Ranu; Hascup, Kevin N.; Wang, Yongfu; Wang, Wen-Tung; Xu, Wenhao; Hui, Dongwei; Agbas, Abdulbaki; Wang, Xinkun; Michaelis, Mary L.; Choi, In-Young; Belousov, Andrei B.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of lifelong, moderate excess release of glutamate (Glu) in the CNS have not been previously characterized. We created a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of lifelong excess synaptic Glu release in the CNS by introducing the gene for glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Glud1) under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter. Glud1 is, potentially, an important enzyme in the pathway of Glu synthesis in nerve terminals. Increased levels of GLUD protein and activity in CNS neurons of hemizygous Tg mice were associated with increases in the in vivo release of Glu after neuronal depolarization in striatum and in the frequency and amplitude of miniature EPSCs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Despite overexpression of Glud1 in all neurons of the CNS, the Tg mice suffered neuronal losses in select brain regions (e.g., the CA1 but not the CA3 region). In vulnerable regions, Tg mice had decreases in MAP2A labeling of dendrites and in synaptophysin labeling of presynaptic terminals; the decreases in neuronal numbers and dendrite and presynaptic terminal labeling increased with advancing age. In addition, the Tg mice exhibited decreases in long-term potentiation of synaptic activity and in spine density in dendrites of CA1 neurons. Behaviorally, the Tg mice were significantly more resistant than wild-type mice to induction and duration of anesthesia produced by anesthetics that suppress Glu neurotransmission. The Glud1 mouse might be a useful model for the effects of lifelong excess synaptic Glu release on CNS neurons and for age-associated neurodegenerative processes. PMID:19890003

  19. Abiotic Stress Generates ROS That Signal Expression of Anionic Glutamate Dehydrogenases to Form Glutamate for Proline Synthesis in Tobacco and Grapevine[W

    PubMed Central

    Skopelitis, Damianos S.; Paranychianakis, Nikolaos V.; Paschalidis, Konstantinos A.; Pliakonis, Eleni D.; Delis, Ioannis D.; Yakoumakis, Dimitris I.; Kouvarakis, Antonios; Papadakis, Anastasia K.; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) may be a stress-responsive enzyme, as GDH exhibits considerable thermal stability, and de novo synthesis of the α-GDH subunit is induced by exogenous ammonium and senescence. NaCl treatment induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular ammonia, expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) gdh-NAD;A1 encoding the α-subunit of GDH, increase in immunoreactive α-polypeptide, assembly of the anionic isoenzymes, and in vitro GDH aminating activity in tissues from hypergeous plant organs. In vivo aminating GDH activity was confirmed by gas chromatorgraphy–mass spectrometry monitoring of 15N-Glu, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Pro in the presence of methionine sulfoximine and amino oxyacetic acid, inhibitors of Gln synthetase and transaminases, respectively. Along with upregulation of α-GDH by NaCl, isocitrate dehydrogenase genes, which provide 2-oxoglutarate, are also induced. Treatment with menadione also elicits a severalfold increase in ROS and immunoreactive α-polypeptide and GDH activity. This suggests that ROS participate in the signaling pathway for GDH expression and protease activation, which contribute to intracellular hyperammonia. Ammonium ions also mimic the effects of salinity in induction of gdh-NAD;A1 expression. These results, confirmed in tobacco and grape (Vitis vinifera cv Sultanina) tissues, support the hypothesis that the salinity-generated ROS signal induces α-GDH subunit expression, and the anionic iso-GDHs assimilate ammonia, acting as antistress enzymes in ammonia detoxification and production of Glu for Pro synthesis. PMID:17041150

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Prem; Walvekar, Adhish S.; Punekar, Narayan S.; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the NAD-dependent or NADP-dependent oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate and ammonia. This important reversible reaction establishes the link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. In this study, Aspergillus niger NADP-GDH (AnGDH) has been overexpressed and purified. Purified AnGDH, with a high specific activity of 631.1 units per milligram of protein, was crystallized and the crystal diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution using a home X-ray source. Preliminary analysis of the X-ray diffraction data showed that the crystal belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 173.8, c = 241.5 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The crystals exhibited an unusually high solvent content (83.0%) and had only one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Initial phases were obtained by molecular replacement, and model building and structure refinement of AnGDH are in progress. PMID:25372818

  1. Insights into the In Vivo Regulation of Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Foot Muscle of an Estivating Land Snail

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ryan A. V.; Dawson, Neal J.; Storey, Kenneth B.

    2012-01-01

    Land snails, Otala lactea, survive in seasonally hot and dry environments by entering a state of aerobic torpor called estivation. During estivation, snails must prevent excessive dehydration and reorganize metabolic fuel use so as to endure prolonged periods without food. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was hypothesized to play a key role during estivation as it shuttles amino acid carbon skeletons into the Krebs cycle for energy production and is very important to urea biosynthesis (a key molecule used for water retention). Analysis of purified foot muscle GDH from control and estivating conditions revealed that estivated GDH was approximately 3-fold more active in catalyzing glutamate deamination as compared to control. This kinetic difference appears to be regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation, as indicated by ProQ Diamond phosphoprotein staining and incubations that stimulate endogenous protein kinases and phosphatases. The increased activity of the high-phosphate form of GDH seen in the estivating land snail foot muscle correlates well with the increased use of amino acids for energy and increased synthesis of urea for water retention during prolonged estivation. PMID:22536484

  2. Evidence for the Degradation of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Candida utilis During Rapid Enzyme Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, Brian A.

    1978-01-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) from the food yeast Candida utilis was found to be rapidly inactivated when cultures were starved of a carbon source. The addition of glutamate or alanine to the starvation medium stimulated the rate of inactivation. Loss of enzyme activity was irreversible since the reappearance of enzyme activity, following the addition of glucose to carbon-starved cultures, was blocked by cycloheximide. A specific rabbit antibody was prepared against the NADP-GDH from C. utilis and used to quantitate the enzyme during inactivation promoted by carbon starvation. The amount of precipitable antigenic material paralleled the rapid decrease of enzyme activity observed after transition of cells from NH4+-glucose to glutamate medium. No additional small-molecular-weight protein was precipitated by the antibody as a result of the inactivation, suggesting that the enzyme is considerably altered during the primary steps of the inactivation process. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of the reappearance of enzyme activity after enzyme inactivation showed that increase of NADP-GDH activity was almost totally due to de novo synthesis, ruling out the possibility that enzyme activity modulation is achieved by reversible covalent modification. Enzyme degradation was also measured during steady-state growth and other changes in nitrogen and carbon status of the culture media. In all instances so far estimated, the enzyme was found to be very stable and not normally subject to high rates of degradation. Therefore, the possibility that inactivation was caused by a change in the ratio of synthesis to degradation can be excluded. Images PMID:24041

  3. Amino acid residues involved in the catalytic mechanism of NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pomares, F; Ferrer, J; Camacho, M; Pire, C; LLorca, F; Bonete, M J

    1999-02-01

    The pH dependence of kinetic parameters for a competitive inhibitor (glutarate) was determined in order to obtain information on the chemical mechanism for NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum. The maximum velocity is pH dependent, decreasing at low pHs giving a pK value of 7.19+/-0.13, while the V/K for l-glutamate at 30 degrees C decreases at low and high pHs, yielding pK values of 7.9+/-0.2 and 9.8+/-0.2, respectively. The glutarate pKis profile decreases at high pHs, yielding a pK of 9. 59+/-0.09 at 30 degrees C. The values of ionization heat calculated from the change in pK with temperature are: 1.19 x 10(4), 5.7 x 10(3), 7 x 10(3), 6.6 x 10(3) cal mol-1, for the residues involved. All these data suggest that the groups required for catalysis and/or binding are lysine, histidine and tyrosine. The enzyme shows a time-dependent loss in glutamate oxidation activity when incubated with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC). Inactivation follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 53 M-1min-1. The pKa of the titratable group was pK1=6.6+/-0.6. Inactivation with ethyl acetimidate also shows pseudo-first-order kinetics as well as inactivation with TNM yielding second-order constants of 1.2 M-1min-1 and 2.8 M-1min-1, and pKas of 8.36 and 9.0, respectively. The proposed mechanism involves hydrogen binding of each of the two carboxylic groups to tyrosyl residues; histidine interacts with one of the N-hydrogens of the l-glutamate amino group. We also corroborate the presence of a conservative lysine that has a remarkable ability to coordinate a water molecule that would act as general base.

  4. Control of carbon flux to glutamate excretion in Klebsiella pneumoniae: the role of the indigenous plasmid and its encoded isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    El-Mansi, Mansi; Trappey, Francois; Clark, Ewan; Campbell, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (NCTC, CL687/80) harbors a large indigenous plasmid (p(C3)), which in addition to encoding for citrate utilization, proline synthesis and glutamate excretion, it uniquely carries the structural gene (icd); encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). Flux analysis revealed that ICDH, despite its role in the generation of NADPH required for glutamate dehydrogenase, is not rate-limiting (controlling) in central metabolism as evidenced by a negative flux control coefficient and an adverse effect of overexpression (14-fold) on glutamate excretion. More significantly, however, this paper presents, for the first time, clear evidence that the accumulation of glutamate and its subsequent excretion is associated with the C3 plasmid-encoded regulatory elements, which trigger a shift-down in the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, both in the K. pneumoniae parental strain as well as in the E. coli exconjugants strains. This finding opens the door for the exploitation of regulatory elements as a tool for manipulating flux in microbial cell factories.

  5. Fasciola gigantica: enzymes of the ornithine-proline-glutamate pathway--characterization of delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Mohamed, Tarek M; Fahmy, Afaf S; El-Badry, Mohamed O; Abdel-Gany, Somia S

    2008-01-01

    Ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), proline oxidase (PO), Delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR), and Delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CD) were assessed in Fasciola gigantica. All enzymes are involved in the conversion of ornithine into glutamate and proline. High levels of P5CD suggest that the direction of the metabolic flow from ornithine is more toward glutamate than proline. F. gigantica P5CD1 and P5CD2 were separated from the majority of contaminating proteins in crude homogenate using a CM-cellulose column. A Sephacryl S-200 column was employed for P5CD2 to obtain pure enzyme with increased specific activity. The molecular mass of P5CD2 was estimated to be 50kDa using a Sephacryl S-200 column and SDS-PAGE. It migrated as a single band on SDS-PAGE, indicating a monomeric enzyme. P5CD2 had Km values of 1.44mM and 0.37mM for NAD and P5C, respectively. P5CD2 oxidized a number of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes, where the aromatic compounds had higher affinity toward the enzyme. All amino acids examined had partial inhibitory effects on the enzyme. While 3mM AMP caused 31% activation of enzyme, 3mM ADP and ATP inhibited activity by 18% and 23%, respectively. Apart from Cu2+, the divalent cations that were studied caused partial inhibitory effects on the enzyme. PMID:17655846

  6. Side-chain interactions in the regulatory domain of human glutamate dehydrogenase determine basal activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Sundaram, Shobana; Providaki, Maria; Petraki, Zoe; Kokkinidis, Michael; Zaganas, Ioannis; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) is central to the metabolism of glutamate, a major excitatory transmitter in mammalian central nervous system (CNS). hGDH1 is activated by ADP and L-leucine and powerfully inhibited by GTP. Besides this housekeeping hGDH1, duplication led to an hGDH2 isoform that is expressed in the human brain dissociating its function from GTP control. The novel enzyme has reduced basal activity (4-6% of capacity) while remaining remarkably responsive to ADP/L-leucine activation. While the molecular basis of this evolutionary adaptation remains unclear, substitution of Ser for Arg443 in hGDH1 is shown to diminish basal activity (< 2% of capacity) and abrogate L-leucine activation. To explore whether the Arg443Ser mutation disrupts hydrogen bonding between Arg443 and Ser409 of adjacent monomers in the regulatory domain ('antenna'), we replaced Ser409 by Arg or Asp in hGDH1. The Ser409Arg-1 change essentially replicated the Arg443Ser-1 mutation effects. Molecular dynamics simulation predicted that Ser409 and Arg443 of neighboring monomers come in close proximity in the open conformation and that introduction of Ser443-1 or Arg409-1 causes them to separate with the swap mutation (Arg409/Ser443) reinstating their proximity. A swapped Ser409Arg/Arg443Ser-1 mutant protein, obtained in recombinant form, regained most of the wild-type hGDH1 properties. Also, when Ser443 was replaced by Arg443 in hGDH2 (as occurs in hGDH1), the Ser443Arg-2 mutant acquired most of the hGDH1 properties. Hence, side-chain interactions between 409 and 443 positions in the 'antenna' region of hGDHs are crucial for basal catalytic activity, allosteric regulation, and relative resistance to thermal inactivation. PMID:25620628

  7. External mitochondrial NADH-dependent reductase of redox cyclers: VDAC1 or Cyb5R3?

    PubMed

    Nikiforova, Anna B; Saris, Nils-Erik L; Kruglov, Alexey G

    2014-09-01

    It was reported that VDAC1 possesses an NADH oxidoreductase activity and plays an important role in the activation of xenobiotics in the outer mitochondrial membrane. In the present work, we evaluated the participation of VDAC1 and Cyb5R3 in the NADH-dependent activation of various redox cyclers in mitochondria. We show that external NADH oxidoreductase caused the redox cycling of menadione ≫ lucigenin>nitrofurantoin. Paraquat was predominantly activated by internal mitochondria oxidoreductases. An increase in the ionic strength stimulated and suppressed the redox cycling of negatively and positively charged acceptors, as was expected for the Cyb5R3-mediated reduction. Antibodies against Cyb5R3 but not VDAC substantially inhibited the NADH-related oxidoreductase activities. The specific VDAC blockers G3139 and erastin, separately or in combination, in concentrations sufficient for the inhibition of substrate transport, exhibited minimal effects on the redox cycler-dependent NADH oxidation, ROS generation, and reduction of exogenous cytochrome c. In contrast, Cyb5R3 inhibitors (6-propyl-2-thiouracil, p-chloromercuriobenzoate, quercetin, mersalyl, and ebselen) showed similar patterns of inhibition of ROS generation and cytochrome c reduction. The analysis of the spectra of the endogenous cytochromes b5 and c in the presence of nitrofurantoin and the inhibitors of VDAC and Cyb5R3 demonstrated that the redox cycler can transfer electrons from Cyb5R3 to endogenous cytochrome c. This caused the oxidation of outer membrane-bound cytochrome b5, which is in redox balance with Cyb5R3. The data obtained argue against VDAC1 and in favor of Cyb5R3 involvement in the activation of redox cyclers in the outer mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24945955

  8. Biochemical characterization and substrate profiling of a new NADH-dependent enoate reductase from Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiuzhen; Ren, Jie; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2012-06-10

    Carbon-carbon double bond of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds can be reduced by enoate reductase (ER), which is an important reaction in fine chemical synthesis. A putative enoate reductase gene from Lactobacillus casei str. Zhang was cloned into pET-21a+ and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) host cells. The encoded enzyme (LacER) was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and treatment in an acidic buffer. This enzyme was identified as a NADH-dependent enoate reductase, which had a K(m) of 0.034 ± 0.006 mM and k(cat) of (3.2 ± 0.2) × 10³ s⁻¹ toward NADH using 2-cyclohexen-1-one as the substrate. Its K(m) and k(cat) toward substrate 2-cyclohexen-1-one were 1.94 ± 0.04 mM and (8.4 ± 0.2) × 10³ s⁻¹, respectively. The enzyme showed a maximum activity at pH 8.0-9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 50-55°C, and LacER was relatively stable below 60 °C. The enzyme was active toward aliphatic alkenyl aldehyde, ketones and some cyclic anhydrides. Substituted groups of cyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones and its ring size have positive or negative effects on activity. (R)-(-)-Carvone was reduced to (2R,5R)-dihydrocarvone with 99% conversion and 98% (diasteromeric excess: de) stereoselectivity, indicating a high synthetic potential of LacER in asymmetric synthesis. PMID:22579387

  9. Characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. pseudotuberculosis by electrophoretic polymorphism of acid phosphatase, esterases, and glutamate and malate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Goullet, P; Picard, B

    1988-02-01

    Acid phosphatase, esterases, and glutamate and malate dehydrogenases of 192 strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. frederiksenii, Y. kristensenii and Y. pseudotuberculosis were analysed by horizontal polyacrylamide agarose gel electrophoresis and by isoelectrofocusing in thin-layer polyacrylamide gels. The six species were clearly separated from each other by their distinct enzyme electrophoretic polymorphism. For Y. enterocolitica, the strains of biotype 5 were differentiated from the other biotypes by the mobility of glutamate dehydrogenase. For Y. frederiksenii, six zymotypes were delineated by pI and by the mobility of the enzymes. Variation in number or mobility of esterases within each species could represent a marker for epidemiological and ecological analyses. A linear relationship was obtained between the mean genetic diversity coefficient of enzymes and the mean percentage DNA-DNA relatedness of Y. intermedia, Y. aldovae, Y. enterocolitica and Y. frederiksenii.

  10. Chicken liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) demonstrates a histone H3 specific protease (H3ase) activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Jogeswar S; Tomar, Raghuvir S; Panigrahi, Anil K; Pandey, Shashibhal M; Singh, Divya; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific proteolysis of the N or C-terminus of histone tails has emerged as a novel form of irreversible post-translational modifications assigned to histones. Though there are many reports describing histone specific proteolysis, there are very few studies on purification of a histone specific protease. Here, we demonstrate a histone H3 specific protease (H3ase) activity in chicken liver nuclear extract. H3ase was purified to homogeneity and identified as glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) by sequencing. A series of biochemical experiments further confirmed that the H3ase activity was due to GDH. The H3ase clipped histone H3 products were sequenced by N-terminal sequencing and the precise clipping sites of H3ase were mapped. H3ase activity was only specific to chicken liver as it was not demonstrated in other tissues like heart, muscle and brain of chicken. We assign a novel serine like protease activity to GDH which is specific to histone H3. PMID:23856561

  11. Trehalose and sorbitol alter the kinetic pattern of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase during drying in levitated microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    A single-droplet acoustic levitator was used to determine the drying rate and the kinetics of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of added trehalose or sorbitol. The solution was also spray dried under the same process condition of drying gas temperature on a bench-top machine. Both trehalose and sorbitol delay the point of onset of enzyme inactivation which lies after the critical point of drying. Both carbohydrates also reduce the apparent rate constant of inactivation calculated during the subsequent inactivation phase. The carbohydrates stabilise, therefore, the enzyme during droplet drying and particle formation mainly during the falling rate drying period. There is no difference between the stabilising effects of the two carbohydrates when examined as levitated single droplets. This suggests the importance of water replacement as a stabilising mechanism in the levitated droplets/particles. On spray drying, the trehalose stabilises the enzyme better than does the sorbitol at a drying gas (outlet) temperature of 60°C. This suggests glass formation with the trehalose but not the sorbitol during the very rapid drying process of small-atomised droplets in the spray dryer.

  12. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase in beta-cells abolishes part of the insulin secretory response not required for glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carobbio, Stefania; Frigerio, Francesca; Rubi, Blanca; Vetterli, Laurène; Bloksgaard, Maria; Gjinovci, Asllan; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Herrera, Pedro L; Reith, Walter; Mandrup, Susanne; Maechler, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Insulin exocytosis is regulated in pancreatic ss-cells by a cascade of intracellular signals translating glucose levels into corresponding secretory responses. The mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is regarded as a major player in this process, although its abrogation has not been tested yet in animal models. Here, we generated transgenic mice, named betaGlud1(-/-), with ss-cell-specific GDH deletion. Our results show that GDH plays an essential role in the full development of the insulin secretory response. In situ pancreatic perfusion revealed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced by 37% in betaGlud1(-/-). Furthermore, isolated islets with either constitutive or acute adenovirus-mediated knock-out of GDH showed a 49 and 38% reduction in glucose-induced insulin release, respectively. Adenovirus-mediated re-expression of GDH in betaGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored glucose-induced insulin release. Thus, GDH appears to account for about 40% of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and to lack redundant mechanisms. In betaGlud1(-/-) mice, the reduced secretory capacity resulted in lower plasma insulin levels in response to both feeding and glucose load, while body weight gain was preserved. The results demonstrate that GDH is essential for the full development of the secretory response in beta-cells. However, maximal secretory capacity is not required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis in normo-caloric conditions.

  13. Over-expression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase (fucO) for increasing furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Elliot N.; Zhang, Xueli; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Wang, Xuan; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-13

    The subject invention pertains to the discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural. This allows for a new approach to improve furfural tolerance in bacterial and/or yeast cells used to produce desired products. Thus, novel biocatalysts (bacterial, fungal or yeast cells) exhibiting increased tolerance to furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are provided as are methods of making and using such biocatalysts for the production of a desired product.

  14. Glutamate 190 is a general acid catalyst in the 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Karsten, W E; Chooback, L; Cook, P F

    1998-11-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change E190 of sheep liver 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase to A, D, H, K, Q, and R to probe its possible role as a general acid catalyst. Each of the mutant proteins was characterized with respect to the pH dependence of kinetic parameters. Mutations that eliminate a titrable group at position 190, result in pH-rate profiles with no observable pK on the basic side of the V/K6PG profile. Mutations that change the pK of the group at position 190 result in the expected pK perturbations in the V/K6PG profile. Kinetic parameters obtained at the pH optimum in the pH-rate profiles are consistent with a rate-limiting tautomerization of the 1,2-enediol of ribulose 5-phosphate consistent with the proposed role of E190. Data are also consistent with some participation of E190 in an isomerization required to form the active Michaelis complex.

  15. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.

  16. Gene expression patterns in the hippocampus during the development and aging of Glud1 (Glutamate Dehydrogenase 1) transgenic and wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraneuronal levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in brain rise during aging. This is thought to lead to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal injury or death. To study the effects of glutamate hyperactivity in brain, we created transgenic (Tg) mice in which the gene for glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1) is over-expressed in neurons and in which such overexpression leads to excess synaptic release of glutamate. In this study, we analyzed whole genome expression in the hippocampus, a region important for learning and memory, of 10 day to 20 month old Glud1 and wild type (wt) mice. Results During development, maturation and aging, both Tg and wt exhibited decreases in the expression of genes related to neurogenesis, neuronal migration, growth, and process elongation, and increases in genes related to neuro-inflammation, voltage-gated channel activity, and regulation of synaptic transmission. Categories of genes that were differentially expressed in Tg vs. wt during development were: synaptic function, cytoskeleton, protein ubiquitination, and mitochondria; and, those differentially expressed during aging were: synaptic function, vesicle transport, calcium signaling, protein kinase activity, cytoskeleton, neuron projection, mitochondria, and protein ubiquitination. Overall, the effects of Glud1 overexpression on the hippocampus transcriptome were greater in the mature and aged than the young. Conclusions Glutamate hyperactivity caused gene expression changes in the hippocampus at all ages. Some of these changes may result in premature brain aging. The identification of these genomic expression differences is important in understanding the effects of glutamate dysregulation on neuronal function during aging or in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24593767

  17. A membrane-bound form of glutamate dehydrogenase possesses an ATP-dependent high-affinity microtubule-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rajas, F; Rousset, B

    1993-01-01

    We previously identified a 50 kDa membrane protein which bound to in vitro assembled microtubules [Mithieux and Rousset (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 4664-4668]. This protein exhibited the expected properties for mediating the ATP-dependent association of vesicles with microtubules [Mithieux, Audebet and Rousset (1988) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 969, 121-130]. The 50 kDa membrane protein (MP50), initially extracted in very low amount from isolated pig thyroid lysosomes/endosomes, has now been purified from membrane preparations of crude vesicle fractions from pig liver and brain. MP50 was isolated from detergent-solubilized membrane protein by affinity chromatography on immobilized ATP; 3-5 mg of MP50 was obtained from 100 g of liver tissue. Phase partitioning in Triton X-114 indicated that MP50 is a peripheral membrane protein. Radioiodinated liver MP50 bound to microtubules assembled in vitro. The binding was inhibited by ATP (Ki = 0.76 mM) and displaced by unlabelled liver or brain MP50. Equilibrium binding studies yielded KD values of 1.8 x 10(-7) M. By N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, MP50 was identified as glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), by comparison of V8 protease peptide maps of MP50 with purified liver GDH. Liver MP50 exhibited a low GDH activity; 4-5 units/mg compared with 18 and 34 units/mg for purified bovine and rat liver GDH respectively. Bovine and rat liver GDH yielded six spots from pI 5.7 to 7.2 when analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; in contrast, MP50 gave one main spot (corresponding to spot 2 of liver GDH) with a pI of approx. 6.5. Soluble liver GDH from commercial sources exhibited a very low or no microtubule-binding activity. In conclusion, we have found a membrane-bound form of GDH capable of specific and nucleotide-sensitive interaction with microtubules. Our data suggest that GDH isoproteins, the number of which has been undervalued up to now, could have cellular functions other than that of an enzyme. Images Figure 1 Figure 3

  18. Alpha helical structures in the leader sequence of human GLUD2 glutamate dehydrogenase responsible for mitochondrial import.

    PubMed

    Kotzamani, Dimitra; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase (hGDH) exists in two highly homologous isoforms with a distinct regulatory and tissue expression profile: a housekeeping hGDH1 isoprotein encoded by the GLUD1 gene and an hGDH2 isoenzyme encoded by the GLUD2 gene. There is evidence that both isoenzymes are synthesized as pro-enzymes containing a 53 amino acid long N-terminal leader peptide that is cleaved upon translocation into the mitochondria. However, this GDH signal peptide is substantially larger than that of most nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins, the leader sequence of which typically contains 17-35 amino acids and they often form a single amphipathic α-helix. To decode the structural elements that are essential for the mitochondrial targeting of human GDHs, we performed secondary structure analyses of their leader sequence. These analyses predicted, with 82% accuracy, that both leader peptides are positively charged and that they form two to three α-helices, separated by intermediate loops. The first α-helix of hGDH2 is strongly amphipathic, displaying both a positively charged surface and a hydrophobic plane. We then constructed GLUD2-EGFP deletion mutants and used them to transfect three mammalian cell lines (HEK293, COS 7 and SHSY-5Y). Confocal laser scanning microscopy, following co-transfection with pDsRed2-Mito mitochondrial targeting vector, revealed that deletion of the entire leader sequence prevented the enzyme from entering the mitochondria, resulting in its retention in the cytoplasm. Deletion of the first strongly amphipathic α-helix only was also sufficient to prevent the mitochondrial localization of the truncated protein. Moreover, truncated leader sequences, retaining the second and/or the third putative α-helix, failed to restore the mitochondrial import of hGDH2. As such, the first N-terminal alpha helical structure is crucial for the mitochondrial import of hGDH2 and these findings may have implications in understanding the evolutionary

  19. Amino acid changes within antenna helix are responsible for different regulatory preferences of human glutamate dehydrogenase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Min; Kim, Eun-A; Yang, Seung-Ju; Choi, Soo Young; Cho, Sung-Woo; Huh, Jae-Wan

    2007-07-01

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase (hGDH) exists in hGDH1 (housekeeping isozyme) and in hGDH2 (nerve-specific isozyme), which differ markedly in their allosteric regulation. Because they differ in only 16 of their 505 amino acids, the regulatory preferences must arise from amino acid residues that are not common between hGDH1 and hGDH2. To our knowledge none of the mutagenesis studies on the hGDH isozymes to date have identified the amino acid residues fully responsible for the different regulatory preferences between hGDH1 and hGDH2. In this study we constructed hGDH1(hGDH2(390-448))hGDH1 (amino acid segment 390-448 of hGDH1 replaced by the corresponding hGDH2 segment) and hGDH2(hGDH1(390-448))hGDH2 (amino acid segment 390-448 of hGDH2 replaced by the corresponding hGDH1 segment) by swapping the corresponding amino acid segments in hGDH1 and hGDH2. The chimeric enzymes by reciprocal swapping resulted in double mutations in amino acid sequences at 415 and 443 residues that are not common between hGDH1 and hGDH2 and are located in the C-terminal 48-residue "antenna" helix, which is thought to be part of the regulatory domain of mammalian GDHs. Functional analyses revealed that the doubly mutated chimeric enzymes almost completely acquired most of the different regulatory preferences between hGDH1 and hGDH2 for electrophoretic mobility, heat-stability, ADP activation, palmitoyl-CoA inhibition, and l-leucine activation, except for GTP inhibition. Our results indicate that substitutions of the residues in the antenna region may be important evolutionary changes that led to the adaptation of hGDH2 to the unique metabolic needs of the nerve tissue.

  20. Identification and characterization of kinetically competent carbinolamine and alpha-iminoglutarate complexes in the glutamate dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of L-glutamate using a multiwavelength transient state approach.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, S J; Saha, S K; Fisher, H F

    1998-10-13

    A highly constrained and heavily overdetermined multiwavelength transient state kinetic approach has been used to study the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate catalyzed by beef liver glutamate dehydrogenase. Spectra generated using the known enzyme-reduced coenzyme-substrate spectrum served as models for deconvolution of kinetic scan data. Deconvolution of the multiwavelength time course array shows formation of three distinguishable intermediates in the reaction sequence, an ultrablue-shifted complex, an ultrared-shifted complex, and a blue-shifted complex. The ultrablue-shifted entity is identified as the enzyme-NADPH-alpha-iminoglutarate complex (ERI) and the ultrared as the enzyme-NADPH-alpha-carbinolamine complex (ERC). The blue-shifted complex is characterized as the E-NADPH-ketoglutarate species (ERK). The location of these species along the reaction coordinate has been determined and their kinetic competency in the reaction sequence has been established by fitting the concentration time courses of the components for both the alpha-deuterio- and the alpha-protio-L-glutamate reactions to the now highly constrained differential equations derived from a kinetic scheme involving the sequential formation of alpha-iminoglutarate, alpha-carbinolamine, and alpha-ketoglutarate-reduced coenzyme complexes, following the formation of two prehydride transfer complexes. PMID:9772187

  1. Carbon source-dependent modulation of NADP-glutamate dehydrogenases in isophthalate-degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4, Pseudomonas strain PPD and Acinetobacter lwoffii strain ISP4.

    PubMed

    Vamsee-Krishna, C; Phale, Prashant S

    2008-11-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffii strain ISP4 metabolizes isophthalate rapidly compared with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PP4 and Pseudomonas strain PPD. Isophthalate has been reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Exogenous supplementation of isophthalate with glutamate or alpha-ketoglutarate at 1 mM concentration caused strains PP4 and PPD to grow faster than in the presence of isophthalate alone; however, no such effect was observed in strain ISP4. When grown on isophthalate, all strains showed activity of NADP-dependent GDH (NADP-GDH), while cells grown on glucose, 2x yeast extract-tryptone broth (2YT) or glutamate showed activities of both NAD-dependent GDH (NAD-GDH) and NADP-GDH. Activity staining, inhibition and thermal stability studies indicated the carbon source-dependent presence of two (GDH(I) and GDH(II)), three (GDH(A), GDH(B) and GDH(C)) and one (GDH(P)) forms of NADP-GDH in strains PP4, PPD and ISP4, respectively. The results demonstrate the carbon source-dependent modulation of different forms of NADP-GDH in these bacterial strains. This modulation may help the efficient utilization of isophthalate as a carbon source by overcoming the inhibitory effect on GDH.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a NADH-dependent aldo-keto reductase from a newly isolated Kluyveromyces lactis XP1461.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-09-01

    An aldo-keto reductase gene (klakr) from Kluyveromyces lactis XP1461 was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The aldo-keto reductase KlAKR was purified and found to be NADH-dependent with a molecular weight of approximately 36 kDa. It is active and stable at 30 °C and pH 7.0. The maximal reaction rate (vmax), apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) for NADH and t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a) and catalytic number (kcat) were calculated as 7.63 U mg(-1), 0.204 mM, 4.42 mM and 697.4 min(-1), respectively. Moreover, the KlAKR has broad substrate specificity to a range of aldehydes, ketones and keto-esters, producing chiral alcohol with e.e. or d.e. >99% for the majority of test substrates.

  3. Ammonia Production and Assimilation in Glutamate Synthase Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul F.; Layzell, David B.; Canvin, David T.

    1988-01-01

    Ammonia production and assimilation1 were examined in photorespiratory mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana L. lacking ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GluS) activity. Although photosynthesis was rapidly inhibited in these mutants in normal air, NH4+ continued to accumulate. The accumulation of NH4+ was also seen after an initial lag of 30 minutes in 2% O2, 350 microliters per liter of CO2 and after 90 minutes in 2% O2, 900 microliters per liter of CO2. The accumulation of NH4+ in normal air and low O2 was also associated with an increase in the total pool of amino acid-N and glutamine, and a decrease in the pools of glutamate, aspartate, alanine, and serine. Upon return to dark conditions, or to 21% O2, 1% CO2 in the light, the NH4+ which had accumulated in the leaves was reassimilated into amino acids. The addition of methionine sulfoximine (MSO) resulted in higher accumulations of NH4+ in glutamate synthase mutants and prevented the reassimilation of NH4+ upon return to the dark. The addition of MSO also resulted in the accumulation of NH4+ in glutamate synthase mutants in the light and in 21% O2, 1% CO2. These results indicate that glutamine synthetase is essential for the reassimilation of photorespiratory NH4+ and for primary N assimilation in the leaves and strongly suggest that glutamate dehydrogenase plays only a minimal role in the assimilation of ammonia. Levels of NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (NADH-GluS) appear to be sufficient to account for the assimilation of NH4+ by a GS/NADH-GluS cycle. PMID:16666091

  4. Plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities in water buffaloes with experimental subclinical fasciolosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Mao, W H; Ferre, I; Bayón, J E; Mao, X Z; González-Gallego, J

    1998-07-31

    The effect of chronic Fasciola hepatica infection on the activity of plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) was investigated in water buffaloes dosed daily with 60 F. hepatica metacercariae over 20 days. Experimental fluke infection caused no clinical signs but provoked an increase in plasma level of IgG directed against F. hepatica from 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant increase in plasma AST from 6 weeks post-infection. Maximal values were reached at 14 weeks and remained significantly elevated by 23 weeks. Plasma GLDH was significantly elevated from 6 to 21 weeks post-infection. Significant increases in plasma GGT occurred from 8 to 26 weeks post-infection, reaching maximal values at 15 weeks. This study shows that plasma enzyme activities may be useful in studies of fluke-induced liver damage in water buffaloes.

  5. Correlation of loss of activity of human aldehyde dehydrogenase with reaction of bromoacetophenone with glutamic acid-268 and cysteine-302 residues. Partial-sites reactivity of aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Abriola, D P; MacKerell, A D; Pietruszko, R

    1990-01-01

    Bromoacetophenone (2-bromo-1-phenylethanone) has been characterized as an affinity reagent for human aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) [MacKerell, MacWright & Pietruszko (1986) Biochemistry 25, 5182-5189], and has been shown to react specifically with the Glu-268 residue [Abriola, Fields, Stein, MacKerell & Pietruszko (1987) Biochemistry 26, 5679-5684] with an apparent inactivation stoichiometry of two molecules of bromoacetophenone per molecule of enzyme. The specificity of bromoacetophenone for reaction with Glu-268, however, is not absolute, owing to the extreme reactivity of this reagent. When bromo[14C]acetophenone was used to label the human cytoplasmic E1 isoenzyme radioactively and tryptic fragmentation was carried out, peptides besides that containing Glu-268 were found to have reacted with reagent. These peptides were purified by h.p.l.c. and analysed by sequencing and scintillation counting to quantify radioactive label in the material from each cycle of sequencing. Reaction of bromoacetophenone with the aldehyde dehydrogenase molecule during enzyme activity loss occurs with two residues, Glu-268 and Cys-302. The activity loss, however, appears to be proportional to incorporation of label at Glu-268. The large part of incorporation of label at Cys-302 occurs after the activity loss is essentially complete. With both Glu-268 and Cys-302, however, the incorporation of label stops after one molecule of bromoacetophenone has reacted with each residue. Reaction with other residues continues after activity loss is complete. PMID:1968743

  6. Radiochemical assay for a NADP+-specific gamma-glutamate semialdehyde dehydrogenase extracted from mitochondrial membrane of rat intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.J.; Gooding, R.C.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-02-01

    A radiochemical assay has been developed for a NADP+-specific gamma-glutamate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from rat intestinal epithelial cells. The spectrophotometric assay utilized to measure the enzyme in bacterial cell homogenates is not sensitive enough for homogenates from rat mitochondria, which require an assay that can measure as little as 0.5 nmol NADPH formed/min/ml extract. The assay described here is sensitive to 0.1 nmol product formed/min/ml of extract and employs the use of (/sup 3/H)pyrroline 5-carboxylate which is phosphorylated and oxidized by the enzyme to gamma-(/sup 3/H)glutamyl phosphate, a product that decomposes to (/sup 3/H)pyrrolidone 5-carboxylate. The latter product is separated from the substrate by ion-exchange chromatography. In order to correct for any product loss during separation by ion-exchange (/sup 14/C)pyrrolidone 5-carboxylate is added as an internal standard to the deproteinized assay mixture. Under the assay conditions described mammalian gamma-glutamate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity is linear with respect to time and protein concentration. Comparison between the kinetic parameters reported for the bacterial enzyme and those reported here for the mammalian enzyme indicate similarities in the pH optima as well as a requirement for phosphate. Kinetic studies on mammalian enzyme yield apparent Km values of 1.8 mM for pyrroline 5-carboxylate, 0.2 mM for NADP+, and 11.3 mM for phosphate.

  7. Plant NAD(H)-Glutamate Dehydrogenase Consists of Two Subunit Polypeptides and Their Participation in the Seven Isoenzymes Occurs in an Ordered Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Loulakakis, Konstantinos A.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    1991-01-01

    The structure and function of NAD(H)-glutamate dehydrogenase in plants was studied by using grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv Sultanina) callus grown under different nitrogen sources. The enzyme consists of two subunit-polypeptides, α and β, with similar antigenic properties but with different molecular mass and charge. The two polypeptides have molecular masses of 43.0 and 42.5 kilodaltons, respectively. The holoenzyme is hexameric and is resolved into seven isoenzymes by native gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional native/SDS-PAGE revealed that the 1 and 7 isoenzymes are homohexamers and the isoenzymes 2 through 6 are hybrids of the two polypeptides following an ordered ratio. The total quantity of α- and β-polypeptides and the isoenzymic pattern was altered by the exogenous nitrogen source. The sample derived from callus grown on nitrate or glutamic acid contained a slightly greater amount of β-polypeptide and of the more cathodal isoenzymes, whereas α-polypeptide and the more anodal isoenzymes predominated in callus grown in the presence of either ammonium or glutamine. The anabolic reaction was correlated with the α- and the catabolic reaction with the β-polypeptide; this could suggest that each isoenzyme exhibits anabolic and catabolic function of different magnitude. The isoenzymic patterns did not obey the expected binomial distribution proportions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:16668355

  8. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  9. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, Julius K.; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD+. Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg187 is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH•/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  10. Electron-transport pathway of the NADH-dependent haem oxygenase system of rat liver microsomal fraction induced by cobalt chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Hino, Y; Minakami, S

    1979-01-01

    The hepatic microsomal haem oxygenase activity of rats treated with CoCl2 was studied kinetically by measuring biliverdin, the immediate product of the reaction. Biliverdin was extracted with diethyl ether/ethanol mixture, and was determined by the difference between A690 and A800. The apparent Km value for NADPH (at 50 microM-haematin) was about 0.2 microM when an NADPH-generating system was used, whereas that for NADH was about 630 microM. Essentially the same Vmax. values were obtained for both the NADH- and NADPH-dependent haem oxygenase reactions. No synergism was observed with NADH and NADPH. The NADH-dependent reaction was competitively inhibited by NADP+, with a Ki of about 10 microM. The inhibitoin of the NADH-dependent reaction by the antibody against rat liver microsomal NADPH-cytochrome c reductase was essentially complete, with a pattern similar to that of the NADPH-dependent reaction. The immunochemical experiment and the comparison of the kinetic values with the reported data on isolated NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and NADPH--cytochrome c reductase indicated the involvement of the latter enzyme in NADH-dependent haem oxygenation by microsomal fraction in situ. PMID:36076

  11. Different rates of synthesis and degradation of two chloroplastic ammonium-inducible NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes during induction and deinduction in Chlorella sorokiniana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bascomb, N.F.; Prunkard, D.E.; Schmidt, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of accumulation (per milliliter of culture) of the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits, associated with chloroplast-localized ammonium inducible nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) isoenzymes, were measured during a 3 hour induction of synchronized daughter cells of Chlorella sorokiniana in 29 millimolar ammonium medium under photoautotrophic conditions. The ..beta..-subunit holoenzyme(s) accumulated in a linear manner for 3 hours without an apparent induction lag. A 40 minute induction lag preceded the accumulation of the ..cap alpha..-subunit holoenzyme(s). After 120 minutes, the ..cap alpha..-subunit ceased accumulating and thereafter remained at a constant level. From pulse-chase experiments, using /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ and immunochemical procedures, the rate of synthesis of the ..cap alpha..-subunit was shown to be greater than the ..beta..-subunit during the first 80 minutes of induction. The ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits had different rates of degradation during the induction period (t/sub 1/2/ = 50 versus 150 minutes, respectively) and during the deinduction period (t/sub 1/2/ = 5 versus 13.5 minutes) after removal of ammonium from the culture. During deinduction, total NADP-GDH activity decreased with a half-time of 9 minutes. Cycloheximide completely inhibited the synthesis and degradation of both subunits. A model for regulation of expression of the NADP-GDH gene was proposed.

  12. Evidence for messenger ribonucleic acid of an ammonium-inducible glutamate dehydrogenase and synthesis, covalent modification, and degradation of enzyme subunits in uninduced Chlorella sorokiniana cells.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, K J; Bascomb, N F; Lynch, J J; Molin, W T; Thurston, C F; Schmidt, R R

    1981-01-01

    The cells of Chlorella sorokiniana cultured in nitrate medium contain no detectable catalytic activity of an ammonium-inducible nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH). However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that the NADP-GDH messenger ribonucleic acid was present at high levels and was being translated in uninduced cells. First, binding studies with 125I-labeled anti-NADP-GDH immunoglobulin G and total polysomes isolated from uninduced and induced cells showed that NADP-GDH subunits were being synthesized on polysomes from both types of cells. Second, when polyadenylic acid-containing ribonucleic acid was extracted from polysomes from uninduced and induced cells and placed into a messenger ribonucleic acid-dependent in vitro translation system, NADP-GDH subunits were synthesized from the ribonucleic acid from both sources. Third, when ammonia was added to uninduced cells, NADP-GDH antigen accumulated without an apparent induction lag. Fourth, by use of a specific immunoprecipitation procedure coupled to pulse-chase studies with [35S]sulfate, it was shown that the NADP-GDH subunits are rapidly synthesized, covalently modified, and then degraded in uninduced cells. PMID:7217012

  13. The Isoenzyme 7 of Tobacco NAD(H)-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase Exhibits High Deaminating and Low Aminating Activities in Vivo1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Skopelitis, Damianos S.; Paranychianakis, Nikolaos V.; Kouvarakis, Antonios; Spyros, Apostolis; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2007-01-01

    Following the discovery of glutamine synthetase/glutamate (Glu) synthase, the physiological roles of Glu dehydrogenase (GDH) in nitrogen metabolism in plants remain obscure and is the subject of considerable controversy. Recently, transgenics were used to overexpress the gene encoding for the β-subunit polypeptide of GDH, resulting in the GDH-isoenzyme 1 deaminating in vivo Glu. In this work, we present transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing the plant gdh gene encoding for the α-subunit polypeptide of GDH. The levels of transcript correlated well with the levels of total GDH protein, the α-subunit polypeptide, and the abundance of GDH-anionic isoenzymes. Assays of transgenic plant extracts revealed high in vitro aminating and low deaminating activities. However, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the metabolic fate of 15NH4 or [15N]Glu revealed that GDH-isoenzyme 7 mostly deaminates Glu and also exhibits low ammonium assimilating activity. These and previous results firmly establish the direction of the reactions catalyzed by the anionic and cationic isoenzymes of GDH in vivo under normal growth conditions and reveal a paradox between the in vitro and in vivo enzyme activities. PMID:17932305

  14. ROLE OF GLUTAMATE DEHYDROGENASE AND GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE IN CHLORELLA VULGARIS DURING ASSIMILATION OF AMMONIUM WHEN JOINTLY IMMOBILIZED WITH THE MICROALGAE-GROWTH-PROMOTING BACTERIUM AZOSPIRILLUM BRASILENSE(1).

    PubMed

    De-Bashan, Luz E; Magallon, Paola; Antoun, Hani; Bashan, Yoav

    2008-10-01

    Enzymatic activities of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) participating in the nitrogen metabolism and related ammonium absorption were assayed after the microalga Chlorella vulgaris Beij. was jointly immobilized with the microalgae-growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. At initial concentrations of 3, 6, and 10 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , joint immobilization enhances growth of C. vulgaris but does not affect ammonium absorption capacity of the microalga. However, at 8 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , joint immobilization enhanced ammonium absorption by the microalga without affecting the growth of the microalgal population. Correlations between absorption of ammonium per cell and per culture showed direct (negative and positive) linear correlations between these parameters and microalga populations at 3, 6, and 10 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , but not at 8 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) , where the highest absorption of ammonium occurred. In all cultures, immobilized and jointly immobilized, having the four initial ammonium concentrations, enzymatic activities of Chlorella are affected by A. brasilense. Regardless of the initial concentration of ammonium, GS activity in C. vulgaris was always higher when jointly immobilized and determined on a per-cell basis. When jointly immobilized, only at an initial concentration of 8 mg · L(-1)  NH4 (+) was GDH activity per cell higher.

  15. Evaluation of a rapid membrane enzyme immunoassay for the simultaneous detection of glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejung; Kim, Wan Hee; Kim, Myungsook; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the new C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE (CD COMPLETE; TechLab, USA), which is a rapid membrane enzyme immunoassay that uses a combination of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen and toxin A and B detection. A total of 608 consecutive loose stool specimens collected from the patients with suspected Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) from August to December 2012 were subjected to the CD COMPLETE and VIDAS Clostridium difficile A & B (VIDAS CDAB; bioMérieux, France). Their performances were compared with a toxigenic culture as a reference. Stool specimens that were culture-negative and CD COMPLETE- or VIDAS CDAB-positive were analyzed by using an enrichment procedure. In comparison to the toxigenic cultures, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV), and negative predictive values (NPV) were 63.6%, 98.0%, 76.1%, and 96.4%, respectively, for the CD COMPLETE-toxin and 75.5%, 97.4%, 72.5%, and 97.8%, respectively, for the VIDAS CDAB. In comparison to the enriched C. difficile cultures, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the CD COMPLETE-GDH were 91.0%, 92.4%, 70.5%, and 98.1%, respectively. The CD COMPLETE is a reliable method for the diagnosis of CDI and provides greater sensitivity than toxin enzyme immunoassay alone. Furthermore, the CD COMPLETE-GDH has advantages over direct culture in detecting C. difficile.

  16. [Glutamine synthetase-like protein, glutamate dehydrogenase, and cytochrome c-oxidase in platelets of patients with the first episode psychosis in the course of treatment].

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Kaleda, V G; Barkhatova, A N; Turishcheva, M S; Omel'chenko, M A; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Starodubtseva, L I; Prokhorova, T A; Vorob'eva, E A

    2011-01-01

    The authors searched for correlations between amounts of platelet proteins and results of psychometric tests in patients with the first episode psychosis (schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis) in the course of their combined antipsychotic treatment with haloperidol and clozapine. Psychometric evaluations (PANSS, BPRS) and analyses of platelet enzymes - glutamine synthetase-like protein (GSLP), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and cytochrome c-oxidase (COX) - were carried out before, during, and after the treatment. These proteins were also analyzed in matched controls. All the parameters comprised a database, followed by statistical data processing using Statistica 6.0 (StatSoft) software, nonparametric statistics module. The patients before the treatment, when compared with controls, demonstrated significantly decreased COX activity (p=0,0000001) and increased GSLP amount (p=0,006) with a positive correlation between GSLP amount and PANSSneg (R=0,34, p<0,01). Those patients who displayed initially low COX activity (below median) demonstrated significant increase in COX activity after the treatment. Negative correlations were revealed between COX activity and PANSS, PANSSpsy scores during the treatment, i.e. the lower was COX activity, the more severe syndromes were observed. Negative correlations were found between the initial COX activity and PANSS, PANSSpsy, BPRS scores after the treatment, i.e., the higher was COX before the treatment, the less prominent syndromes were observed after the treatment. Significantly more "non-responders" by PANSSneg were found among the patients with low GSLP level (below median) than their calculated expected amount. The COX activity measured before the treatment was significantly lower in patients with schizophrenia than in patients with schizoaffective disorder (SAD) (p=0,038). In SAD patients, the initial COX activity was negatively correlated with PANSSpsy and BPRS scores after the treatment (R=-0,5, p=0,02), i.e. the lower

  17. Changes in nitrogen assimilation, metabolism, and growth in transgenic rice plants expressing a fungal NADP(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA).

    PubMed

    Abiko, Tomomi; Wakayama, Masataka; Kawakami, Akira; Obara, Mitsuhiro; Kisaka, Hiroaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Aoki, Naohiro; Ohsugi, Ryu

    2010-07-01

    In plants, glutamine synthetase (GS) is the enzyme that is mainly responsible for the assimilation of ammonium. Conversely, in microorganisms such as bacteria and Ascomycota, NADP(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and GS both have important roles in ammonium assimilation. Here, we report the changes in nitrogen assimilation, metabolism, growth, and grain yield of rice plants caused by an ectopic expression of NADP(H)-GDH (gdhA) from the fungus Aspergillus niger in the cytoplasm. An investigation of the kinetic properties of purified recombinant protein showed that the fungal gdhA had 5.4-10.2 times higher V(max) value and 15.9-43.1 times higher K(m) value for NH(4)(+), compared with corresponding values for rice cytosolic GS as reported in the literature. These results suggested that the introduction of fungal GDH into rice could modify its ammonium assimilation pathway. We therefore expressed gdhA in the cytoplasm of rice plants. NADP(H)-GDH activities in the gdhA-transgenic lines were markedly higher than those in a control line. Tracer experiments by feeding with (15)NH(4)(+) showed that the introduced gdhA, together with the endogenous GS, directly assimilated NH(4)(+) absorbed from the roots. Furthermore, in comparison with the control line, the transgenic lines showed an increase in dry weight and nitrogen content when sufficient nitrogen was present, but did not do so under low-nitrogen conditions. Under field condition, the transgenic line examined showed a significant increase in grain yield in comparison with the control line. These results suggest that the introduction of fungal gdhA into rice plants could lead to better growth and higher grain yield by enhancing the assimilation of ammonium.

  18. Diagnosing Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea using enzyme immunoassay: the clinical significance of toxin negativity in glutamate dehydrogenase-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuhashi, Kazuhito; Yagihara, Yuka; Misawa, Yoshiki; Sato, Tomoaki; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The enzyme immunoassay (EIA) has lower sensitivity for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B than the polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Furthermore, toxin positivity with EIA performed on C. difficile isolates from stool cultures may be observed even in patients with EIA glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)-positive and toxin-negative stool specimens. It is unclear whether such patients should be treated as having CDAD. Methods The present study retrospectively compared patient characteristics, treatment, and diarrhea duration among three groups of patients who underwent stool EIA testing for CDAD diagnosis: a toxin-positive stool group (positive stool group; n=39); a toxin-negative stool/toxin-positive isolate group (discrepant negative/positive group, n=14); and a dual toxin-negative stool and isolate group (dual negative group, n=15). All cases included were confirmed to be GDH positive on EIA test. Results Patients’ backgrounds and comorbidities were not significantly different among three groups. No difference was observed among the three groups with regard to antimicrobial drug use before diarrhea onset. Treatment was received by 82.1% of the positive stool group compared to 7.1% of the discrepant positive/negative group and 0% of the dual negative group, while mean diarrhea duration was 10.6 days compared to 7.9 days (P=0.6006) and 3.4 days (P=0.0312), respectively. Conclusion Even without treatment, patients with toxin-negative stool specimens had shorter diarrhea duration than those with toxin-positive stool specimens even with toxin-positive isolates. These findings may suggest a limited need for CDAD treatment for GDH-positive patients and toxin-negative stool specimens. PMID:27313472

  19. Glutamates 78 and 122 in the active site of saccharopine dehydrogenase contribute to reactant binding and modulate the basicity of the acid-base catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake, Devi K; Andi, Babak; Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2010-07-01

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent oxidative deamination of saccharopine to give l-lysine and alpha-ketoglutarate. There are a number of conserved hydrophilic, ionizable residues in the active site, all of which must be important to the overall reaction. In an attempt to determine the contribution to binding and rate enhancement of each of the residues in the active site, mutations at each residue are being made, and double mutants are being made to estimate the interrelationship between residues. Here, we report the effects of mutations of active site glutamate residues, Glu(78) and Glu(122), on reactant binding and catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate E78Q, E122Q, E78Q/E122Q, E78A, E122A, and E78A/E122A mutant enzymes. Mutation of these residues increases the positive charge of the active site and is expected to affect the pK(a) values of the catalytic groups. Each mutant enzyme was completely characterized with respect to its kinetic and chemical mechanism. The kinetic mechanism remains the same as that of wild type enzymes for all of the mutant enzymes, with the exception of E78A, which exhibits binding of alpha-ketoglutarate to E and E.NADH. Large changes in V/K(Lys), but not V, suggest that Glu(78) and Glu(122) contribute binding energy for lysine. Shifts of more than a pH unit to higher and lower pH of the pK(a) values observed in the V/K(Lys) pH-rate profile of the mutant enzymes suggests that the presence of Glu(78) and Glu(122) modulates the basicity of the catalytic groups.

  20. Glutamate dehydrogenase and Na+-K+ ATPase expression and growth response of Litopenaeus vannamei to different salinities and dietary protein levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erchao; Arena, Leticia; Lizama, Gabriel; Gaxiola, Gabriela; Cuzon, Gerard; Rosas, Carlos; Chen, Liqiao; van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Improvement in the osmoregulation capacity via nutritional supplies is vitally important in shrimp aquaculture. The effects of dietary protein levels on the osmoregulation capacity of the Pacific white shrimp ( L. vannamei) were investigated. This involved an examination of growth performance, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and Na+-K+ ATPase mRNA expression,, and GDH activity in muscles and gills. Three experimental diets were formulated, containing 25%, 40%, and 50% dietary protein, and fed to the shrimp at a salinity of 25. After 20 days, no significant difference was observed in weight gain, though GDH and Na+-K+ ATPase gene expression and GDH activity increased with higher dietary protein levels. Subsequently, shrimp fed diets with 25% and 50% dietary protein were transferred into tanks with salinities of 38 and 5, respectively, and sampled at weeks 1 and 2. Shrimp fed with 40% protein at 25 in salinity (optimal conditions) were used as a control. Regardless of the salinities, shrimp fed with 50% dietary protein had significantly higher growth performance than other diets; no significant differences were found in comparison with the control. Shrimp fed with 25% dietary protein and maintained at salinities of 38 and 5 had significantly lower weight gain values after 2 weeks. Ambient salinity change also stimulated the hepatosomatic index, which increased in the first week and then recovered to a relatively normal level, as in the control, after 2 weeks. These findings indicate that in white shrimp, the specific protein nutrient and energy demands related to ambient salinity change are associated with protein metabolism. Increased dietary protein level could improve the osmoregulation capacity of L. vannamei with more energy resources allocated to GDH activity and expression.

  1. Butachlor impact on protein, free amino acid and glutamine contents, and on activity levels of aminotransferases, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in the fresh water snail, Pila globosa (Swainson).

    PubMed

    Rajyalakshmi, T; Srinivas, T; Swamy, K V; Mohan, P M

    1996-08-01

    Biochemical changes followed in the freshwater snail Pila globosa (Swainson) during exposure to sublethal concentrations of the herbicide butachlor (26.6 ppm) in the ambient medium, at 3,6,12,24 and 48 h intervals, were marked by a significant decrease in total and soluble proteins, and an increase in free amino acids in foot and hepatopancreas up to 12 h before gradually recovering. Aminotransferase activities and glutamine content decreased during the early periods of exposure, while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. After an initial elevation, glutamate synthetase activity decreased at later intervals. Maximum effect of butachlor on the enzymes was seen after 12 h exposure. The extent of increase or decrease in different parameters examined varied between the two tissues studied. These changes are discussed in relation to the toxic stress of butachlor.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of a modified two-step algorithm using a combined glutamate dehydrogenase/toxin enzyme immunoassay and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Stevens, Jane; Portillo, Lena; Barza, Ruby; Schejbal, Debra; Wu, May May; Chancey, Christina; Singh, Kamaljit

    2014-02-01

    The analytical performance and cost-effectiveness of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, the C. Diff. Quik Chek Complete (CdQCC) (a combined glutamate dehydrogenase antigen/toxin enzyme immunoassay), two RT-PCR assays (Progastro Cd and BD GeneOhm) and a modified two-step algorithm using the CdQCC reflexed to RT-PCR for indeterminate results were compared. The sensitivity of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, CdQCC (GDH antigen), BD GeneOhm and Progastro Cd RT-PCR were 85.4%, 95.8%, 100% and 93.8%, respectively. The algorithm provided rapid results for 86% of specimens and the remaining indeterminate results were resolved by RT-PCR, offering the best balance of sensitivity and cost savings per test (algorithm ∼US$13.50/test versus upfront RT-PCR ∼US$26.00/test).

  3. Increased furfural tolerance due to overexpression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli strains engineered for the production of ethanol and lactate.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Miller, E N; Yomano, L P; Zhang, X; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2011-08-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low K(m) for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced ethanol or lactate efficiently as primary products from xylose were developed. These strains included chromosomal mutations in yqhD expression that permitted the fermentation of xylose broths containing up to 10 mM furfural. Expression of fucO from plasmids was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50% and to permit the fermentation of 15 mM furfural. Product yields with 15 mM furfural were equivalent to those of control strains without added furfural (85% to 90% of the theoretical maximum). These two defined genetic traits can be readily transferred to enteric biocatalysts designed to produce other products. A similar strategy that minimizes the depletion of NADPH pools by native detoxification enzymes may be generally useful for other inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic sugar streams and with other organisms.

  4. Increased furfural tolerance due to overexpression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli strains engineered for the production of ethanol and lactate.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Miller, E N; Yomano, L P; Zhang, X; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2011-08-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low K(m) for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced ethanol or lactate efficiently as primary products from xylose were developed. These strains included chromosomal mutations in yqhD expression that permitted the fermentation of xylose broths containing up to 10 mM furfural. Expression of fucO from plasmids was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50% and to permit the fermentation of 15 mM furfural. Product yields with 15 mM furfural were equivalent to those of control strains without added furfural (85% to 90% of the theoretical maximum). These two defined genetic traits can be readily transferred to enteric biocatalysts designed to produce other products. A similar strategy that minimizes the depletion of NADPH pools by native detoxification enzymes may be generally useful for other inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic sugar streams and with other organisms. PMID:21685167

  5. Application of NAD-dependent polyol dehydrogenases for enzymatic mannitol/sorbitol production with coenzyme regeneration.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, S; Arnaut, F; Soetaert, W; Vandamme, E J

    2003-01-01

    D-Mannitol and D-sorbitol were produced enzymatically from D-fructose using NAD-dependent polyol dehydrogenases. For the production of D-mannitol the Leuconostoc mesenteroides mannitol dehydrogenase could be used. Gluconobacter oxydans cell extract contained however both mannitol and sorbitol dehydrogenase. When this cell extract was used, the reduction of D-fructose resulted in a mixture of D-sorbitol and D-mannitol. To determine the optimal bioconversion conditions the polyol dehydrogenases were characterized towards pH- and temperature-optimum and -stability. As a compromise between enzyme activity and stability, the bioconversion reactions were performed at pH 6.5 and 25 degrees C. Since the polyol dehydrogenases are NADH-dependent, an efficient coenzyme regeneration was needed. Regeneration of NADH was accomplished by formate dehydrogenase-mediated oxidation of formate into CO2.

  6. Resolving the Role of Plant NAD-Glutamate Dehydrogenase: III. Overexpressing Individually or Simultaneously the Two Enzyme Subunits Under Salt Stress Induces Changes in the Leaf Metabolic Profile and Increases Plant Biomass Production.

    PubMed

    Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Clément, Gilles; Marchi, Laura; Restivo, Francesco M; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) of higher plants has a central position at the interface between carbon and nitrogen metabolism due to its ability to carry out the deamination of glutamate. In order to obtain a better understanding of the physiological function of NAD-GDH under salt stress conditions, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that overexpress two genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia individually (GDHA and GDHB) or simultaneously (GDHA/B) were grown in the presence of 50 mM NaCl. In the different GDH overexpressors, the NaCl treatment induced an additional increase in GDH enzyme activity, indicating that a post-transcriptional mechanism regulates the final enzyme activity under salt stress conditions. A greater shoot and root biomass production was observed in the three types of GDH overexpressors following growth in 50 mM NaCl, when compared with the untransformed plants subjected to the same salinity stress. Changes in metabolites representative of the plant carbon and nitrogen status were also observed. They were mainly characterized by an increased amount of starch present in the leaves of the GDH overexpressors as compared with the wild type when plants were grown in 50 mM NaCl. Metabolomic analysis revealed that overexpressing the two genes GDHA and GDHB, individually or simultaneously, induced a differential accumulation of several carbon- and nitrogen-containing molecules involved in a variety of metabolic, developmental and stress-responsive processes. An accumulation of digalactosylglycerol, erythronate and porphyrin was found in the GDHA, GDHB and GDHA/B overexpressors, suggesting that these molecules could contribute to the improved performance of the transgenic plants under salinity stress conditions.

  7. Resolving the Role of Plant NAD-Glutamate Dehydrogenase: III. Overexpressing Individually or Simultaneously the Two Enzyme Subunits Under Salt Stress Induces Changes in the Leaf Metabolic Profile and Increases Plant Biomass Production.

    PubMed

    Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Clément, Gilles; Marchi, Laura; Restivo, Francesco M; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) of higher plants has a central position at the interface between carbon and nitrogen metabolism due to its ability to carry out the deamination of glutamate. In order to obtain a better understanding of the physiological function of NAD-GDH under salt stress conditions, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants that overexpress two genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia individually (GDHA and GDHB) or simultaneously (GDHA/B) were grown in the presence of 50 mM NaCl. In the different GDH overexpressors, the NaCl treatment induced an additional increase in GDH enzyme activity, indicating that a post-transcriptional mechanism regulates the final enzyme activity under salt stress conditions. A greater shoot and root biomass production was observed in the three types of GDH overexpressors following growth in 50 mM NaCl, when compared with the untransformed plants subjected to the same salinity stress. Changes in metabolites representative of the plant carbon and nitrogen status were also observed. They were mainly characterized by an increased amount of starch present in the leaves of the GDH overexpressors as compared with the wild type when plants were grown in 50 mM NaCl. Metabolomic analysis revealed that overexpressing the two genes GDHA and GDHB, individually or simultaneously, induced a differential accumulation of several carbon- and nitrogen-containing molecules involved in a variety of metabolic, developmental and stress-responsive processes. An accumulation of digalactosylglycerol, erythronate and porphyrin was found in the GDHA, GDHB and GDHA/B overexpressors, suggesting that these molecules could contribute to the improved performance of the transgenic plants under salinity stress conditions. PMID:26251210

  8. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-12-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to {mu}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time ({approx}30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from {mu}M to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  9. Clostridium difficile testing algorithms using glutamate dehydrogenase antigen and C. difficile toxin enzyme immunoassays with C. difficile nucleic acid amplification testing increase diagnostic yield in a tertiary pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kaede V; McGowan, Karin L

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the rapid C. diff Quik Chek Complete's glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (GDH) and toxin A/B (CDT) tests in two algorithmic approaches for a tertiary pediatric population: algorithm 1 entailed initial testing with GDH/CDT followed by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and algorithm 2 entailed GDH/CDT followed by cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) for adjudication of discrepant GDH-positive/CDT-negative results. A true positive (TP) was defined as positivity by CCNA or positivity by LAMP plus another test (GDH, CDT, or the Premier C. difficile toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay [P-EIA]). A total of 141 specimens from 141 patients yielded 27 TPs and 19% prevalence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 56%, 100%, 100%, and 90% for P-EIA and 81%, 100%, 100%, and 96% for both algorithm 1 and algorithm 2. In summary, GDH-based algorithms detected C. difficile infections with superior sensitivity compared to P-EIA. The algorithms allowed immediate reporting of half of all TPs, but LAMP or CCNA was required to confirm the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile in GDH-positive/CDT-negative specimens.

  10. Evaluation of the C.Diff Quik Chek Complete Assay, a new glutamate dehydrogenase and A/B toxin combination lateral flow assay for use in rapid, simple diagnosis of clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Ruden, Lila O; Pohl, Julie C; Hatcher, Patricia A; Jayne, Linda M; Ivie, W Michael

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection continues to be a challenge for many clinical microbiology laboratories. A new lateral flow assay, the C.Diff Quik Chek Complete assay, which tests for the presence of both glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and C. difficile toxins A and B, was evaluated for its ability to diagnose C. difficile disease. The results of this assay were compared to those of both PCR and toxigenic culture. The results showed that this assay allows 88% of specimens to be accurately screened as either positive (both tests positive) or negative (both tests negative) for the presence of toxigenic C. difficile in less than 30 min and with minimal hands-on time. Use of a random-access PCR for the analysis of specimens with discrepant results (one test positive and the other negative) allows the easy, rapid, and highly sensitive (100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.6 to 100%) and specific (99.6%; 95% CI, 97.3 to 99.9%) diagnosis of C. difficile disease. The use of this algorithm would save institutional costs, curtail unnecessary isolation days, reduce the nosocomial transmission of disease, and increase the quality of care for patients.

  11. Purification and Partial Kinetic and Physical Characterization of Two Chloroplast-Localized NADP-Specific Glutamate Dehydrogenase Isoenzymes and Their Preferential Accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana Cells Cultured at Low or High Ammonium Levels 1

    PubMed Central

    Bascomb, Newell F.; Schmidt, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Two ammonium-inducible, chloroplast-localized NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes were purified to homogeneity from Chlorella sorokiniana. These isoenzymes were homopolymers of either α- or β-subunits with molecular weights of 55,500 or 53,000, respectively. The α-isoenzyme was preferentially induced at low ammonium concentrations (2 millimolar or lower), whereas only the β-isoenzyme accumulated after cells were fully induced (120 minutes) at high ammonium concentrations (29 millimolar). Purification of isoenzymes was achieved by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, gel-filtration, anion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography, and affinity chromatography. The α- and β-isoenzymes were separated by their differential binding to Type 4 nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-Sepharose. Both isoenzymes bound to an antibody affinity column to which purified antibody (prepared against β-isoenzyme) was covalently attached. Peptide mapping of the subunits showed them to have a high degree of sequence homology. Both subunits were synthesized in vitro from precursor protein(s) with a molecular weight of 58,500. Although the subunits have similar chemical, physical, and antigenic properties, their holoenzymes have strikingly different ammonium Km values. The ammonium Km of the β-isoenzyme remained constant at approximately 75 millimolar, whereas this Km of the α-isoenzyme ranged from 0.02 to 3.5 millimolar, depending upon nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:16665219

  12. Glutamate 636 of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1 participates in active center communication and behaves as an engineered acetolactate synthase with unusual stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia; Tittmann, Kai; Joseph, Ebenezer; Zhou, Leon; Vazquez-Coll, Michelle B; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Hübner, Gerhard; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2005-06-01

    The residue Glu636 is located near the thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) binding site of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 subunit (PDHc-E1), and to probe its function two variants, E636A and E636Q were created with specific activities of 2.5 and 26% compared with parental PDHc-E1. According to both fluorescence binding and kinetic assays, the E636A variant behaved according to half-of-the-sites mechanism with respect to ThDP. In contrast, with the E636Q variant a K(d,ThDP) = 4.34 microM and K(m,ThDP) = 11 microM were obtained with behavior more reminiscent of the parental enzyme. The CD spectra of both variants gave evidence for formation of the 1',4'-iminopyrimidine tautomer on binding of phosphonolactylthiamine diphosphate, a stable analog of the substrate-ThDP covalent complex. Rapid formation of optically active (R)-acetolactate by both variants, but not by the parental enzyme, was observed by CD and NMR spectroscopy. The acetolactate configuration produced by the Glu636 variants is opposite that produced by the enzyme acetolactate synthase and the Asp28-substituted variants of yeast pyruvate decarboxylase, suggesting that the active centers of the two sets of enzymes exhibit different facial selectivity (re or si) vis à vis pyruvate. The tryptic peptide map (mass spectral analysis) revealed that the Glu636 substitution changed the mobility of a loop comprising amino acid residues from the ThDP binding fold. Apparently, the residue Glu636 has important functions both in active center communication and in protecting the active center from undesirable "carboligase" side reactions.

  13. Gene Cloning and mRNA Expression of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in the Liver, Brain, and Intestine of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus (Zuiew), Exposed to Freshwater, Terrestrial Conditions, Environmental Ammonia, or Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tok, Chia Y.; Chew, Shit F.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2011-01-01

    The swamp eel, Monopterus albus, is an obligatory air-breathing teleost which can undergo long period of emersion, has high environmental and tissue ammonia tolerance, and can survive in brackish water. We obtained a cDNA sequence of glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), which consisted of a 133-bp 5′ UTR, a complete coding sequence region spanning 1629 bp and a 3′ UTR of approximately 717 bp, from the liver, intestine, and brain of M. albus. The translated Gdh amino acid sequence had 542 residues, and it formed a monophyletic clade with Bostrychus sinensis Gdh1a, Tetraodon nigroviridis Gdh1a, Chaenocephalus aceratus Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1 and Gdh1a2, and O. mykiss Gdh1a. One day of exposure to terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl, but not to water at salinity 20, resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity in the liver of M. albus. However, exposure to brackish water, but not to terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl, led to a significant increase in the mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity in the intestine. By contrast, all the three experimental conditions had no significant effects on the mRNA expression of gdh1a in the brain of M. albus, despite a significant decrease in the Gdh amination activity in the brain of fish exposed to 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl for 6 days. Our results indicate for the first time that the mRNA expression of gdh1a was differentially up-regulated in the liver and intestine of M. albus in response to ammonia toxicity and salinity stress, respectively. The increases in mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity would probably lead to an increase in glutamate production in support of increased glutamine synthesis for the purpose of ammonia detoxification or cell volume regulation under these two different environmental conditions. PMID:22319499

  14. Isocitrate dehydrogenases and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activities of baker's yeast grown in a variety of hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Machado, A; Nuñez de Castro, I; Mayor, F

    1975-02-28

    The activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD), isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP) and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase have been investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in a variety of aerobic and hypoxic conditions, the latter including oxygen deprivation, high glucose concentration, addition of inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis, respiratory inhibition by azide, and impaired respiration mutants. All hypoxic conditions led to a marked decrease of oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and significant decreases of the two isocitrate dehydrogenases. According to its kinetic properties, the NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase will not be operative in hypoxia "in vivo". From these and other related facts it is concluded that hypoxic conditions in yeast generally lead to a splitting of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and that glutamate synthesis in these conditions takes place through the coupling of the NADP-linked isocitrate and glutamate dehydrogenases.

  15. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing. PMID:26659011

  16. Re-engineering the discrimination between the oxidized coenzymes NAD+ and NADP+ in clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase and a thorough reappraisal of the coenzyme specificity of the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Capone, Marina; Scanlon, David; Griffin, Joanna; Engel, Paul C

    2011-07-01

    Clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase mutants, designed to accommodate the 2'-phosphate of disfavoured NADPH, showed the expected large specificity shifts with NAD(P)H. Puzzlingly, similar assays with oxidized cofactors initially revealed little improvement with NADP(+) , although rates with NAD(+) were markedly diminished. This article reveals that the enzyme's discrimination in favour of NAD(+) and against NADP(+) had been greatly underestimated and has indeed been abated by a factor of > 16,000 by the mutagenesis. Initially, stopped-flow studies of the wild-type enzyme showed a burst increase of A(340) with NADP(+) but not NAD(+), with amplitude depending on the concentration of the coenzyme, rather than enzyme. Amplitude also varied with the commercial source of the NADP(+). FPLC, HPLC and mass spectrometry identified NAD(+) contamination ranging from 0.04 to 0.37% in different commercial samples. It is now clear that apparent rates of NADP(+) utilization mainly reflected the reduction of contaminating NAD(+), creating an entirely false view of the initial coenzyme specificity and also of the effects of mutagenesis. Purification of the NADP(+) eliminated the burst. With freshly purified NADP(+), the NAD(+) : NADP(+) activity ratio under standard conditions, previously estimated as 300 : 1, is 11,000. The catalytic efficiency ratio is even higher at 80,000. Retested with pure cofactor, mutants showed marked specificity shifts in the expected direction, for example, 16 200 fold change in catalytic efficiency ratio for the mutant F238S/P262S, confirming that the key structural determinants of specificity have been successfully identified. Of wider significance, these results underline that, without purification, even the best commercial coenzyme preparations are inadequate for such studies.

  17. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing. PMID:26659011

  18. Substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site of a clostridial alcohol dehydrogenase lead to unexpected changes in substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Danielle J; Patrick, Wayne M; Gerth, Monica L

    2015-08-01

    Changing the cofactor specificity of an enzyme from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 2'-phosphate (NADPH) to the more abundant NADH is a common strategy for increasing overall enzyme efficiency in microbial metabolic engineering. The aim of this study was to switch the cofactor specificity of the primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Clostridium autoethanogenum, a bacterium with considerable promise for the bio-manufacturing of fuels and other petrochemicals, from strictly NADPH-dependent to NADH-dependent. We used insights from a homology model to build a site-saturation library focussed on residue S199, the position deemed most likely to disrupt binding of the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. Although the CaADH(S199X) library did not yield any NADH-dependent enzymes, it did reveal that substitutions at the cofactor phosphate-binding site can cause unanticipated changes in the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Using consensus-guided site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to create an enzyme that was stringently NADH-dependent, albeit with a concomitant reduction in activity. This study highlights the role that distal residues play in substrate specificity and the complexity of enzyme-cofactor interactions.

  19. N-Benzyl-4-((heteroaryl)methyl)benzamides: A New Class of Direct NADH-Dependent 2-trans Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (InhA) Inhibitors with Antitubercular Activity.

    PubMed

    Guardia, Ana; Gulten, Gulcin; Fernandez, Raquel; Gómez, Jesus; Wang, Feng; Convery, Maire; Blanco, Delia; Martínez, María; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Alonso, Marta; Ortega, Fátima; Rullás, Joaquín; Calvo, David; Mata, Lydia; Young, Robert; Sacchettini, James C; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Remuiñán, Modesto; Ballell Pages, Lluís; Castro-Pichel, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Isoniazid (INH) remains one of the cornerstones of antitubercular chemotherapy for drug-sensitive strains of M. tuberculosis bacteria. However, the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains containing mutations in the KatG enzyme, which is responsible for the activation of INH into its antitubercular form, have rendered this drug of little or no use in many cases of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Presented herein is a novel family of antitubercular direct NADH-dependent 2-trans enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (InhA) inhibitors based on an N-benzyl-4-((heteroaryl)methyl)benzamide template; unlike INH, these do not require prior activation by KatG. Given their direct InhA target engagement, these compounds should be able to circumvent KatG-related resistance in the clinic. The lead molecules were shown to be potent inhibitors of InhA and showed activity against M. tuberculosis bacteria. This new family of inhibitors was found to be chemically tractable, as exemplified by the facile synthesis of analogues and the establishment of structure-activity relationships. Furthermore, a co-crystal structure of the initial hit with the enzyme is disclosed, providing valuable information toward the design of new InhA inhibitors for the treatment of MDR/XDR tuberculosis. PMID:26934341

  20. Characterization of the mechanism of the NADH-dependent polysulfide reductase (Npsr) from Shewanella loihica PV-4: formation of a productive NADH-enzyme complex and its role in the general mechanism of NADH and FAD-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Hyun; Humbarger, Scott; Bahnvadia, Raj; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Crane, Edward J

    2014-09-01

    The NADH-dependent polysulfide reductase (Npsr) from Shewanella loihica PV-4 is a member of the single cysteine-containing subset of the family of disulfide reductases represented by glutathione reductase. We have determined the kinetics of the reductive half-reaction of the enzyme with NADH using stopped-flow spectroscopy and kinetic isotope effects, and these results indicate that the reductive and oxidative half-reactions are both partially rate-limiting for enzyme turnover. During reaction with NADH, the reduced nucleotide appears to bind rapidly in an unproductive conformation, followed by the formation of a productive E·NADH complex and subsequent electron transfer to FAD. F161 of Npsr fills the space in which the nicotinamide ring of NADH would be expected to bind. We have shown that while this residue is not absolutely required for catalysis, it does assist in the forward commitment to catalysis through its role in the reductive half reaction, where it appears to enhance hydride transfer in the productive E·NADH complex. While the fluorescence and absorbance spectra of the stable redox forms of the wild-type and F161A mutant enzymes are similar, intermediates formed during reduction and turnover have different characteristics and appear to indicate that the enzyme-NADH complex formed just prior to hydride transfer on the F161A enzyme has weaker FAD-NADH interactions than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with a "looser" enzyme-NADH complex. The 2.7Å crystal structure of the F161A mutant was determined, and shows that the nicotinamide ring of NADH would have the expected freedom of motion in the more open NADH binding cavity.

  1. On the regulative role of the glutamate receptor in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Selin, Alexey A; Lobysheva, Natalia V; Nesterov, Semen V; Skorobogatova, Yulia A; Byvshev, Ivan M; Pavlik, Lyubov L; Mikheeva, Irina B; Moshkov, Dmitry A; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the regulative role of the glutamate receptor found earlier in the brain mitochondria. In the present work a glutamate-dependent signaling system with similar features was detected in mitochondria of the heart. The glutamate-dependent signaling system in the heart mitochondria was shown to be suppressed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The GABA receptor presence in the heart mitochondria was shown by golding with the use of antibodies to α- and β-subunits of the receptor. The activity of glutamate receptor was assessed according to the rate of synthesis of hydrogen peroxide. The glutamate receptor in mitochondria could be activated only under conditions of hypoxic stress, which in model experiments was imitated by blocking Complex I by rotenone or fatty acids. The glutamate signal in mitochondria was shown to be calcium- and potential-dependent and the activation of the glutamate cascade was shown to be accompanied by production of hydrogen peroxide. It was discovered that H2O2 synthesis involves two complexes of the mitochondrial electron transfer system - succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and fatty acid dehydrogenase (ETF:QO). Thus, functions of the glutamate signaling system are associated with the system of respiration-glycolysis switching (the Pasteur-Crabtree) under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26812870

  2. Enzyme-based flow injection analysis system for glutamine and glutamate in mammalian cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C; Frauer, A; Schalkhammer, T; Pittner, F

    1999-03-01

    We present the setup of a flow injection analysis system designed for on-line monitoring of glutamate and glutamine. These amino acids represent a major energy source in mammalian cell culture. A cycling assay consisting of glutamate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase produces NADH proportional to the glutamate concentration in the sample. NADH is then measured spectrophotometrically. Glutamine is determined by conversion to glutamate which is fed into the cycling assay. The conversion of glutamine to glutamate is catalyzed by asparaginase. Asparaginase was used in place of glutaminase due to its relatively high reactivity with glutamine and a pH optimum similar to that of glutamate dehydrogenase. The enzymes were immobilized covalently to activated controlled pore glass beads and integrated into the flow injection analysis system. The application of the immobilized enzymes and the technical setup are presented in this paper.

  3. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Jeitner, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration—typically 10–12 mM—far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low—typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate

  4. Central Role of Glutamate Metabolism in the Maintenance of Nitrogen Homeostasis in Normal and Hyperammonemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Jeitner, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is present in the brain at an average concentration-typically 10-12 mM-far in excess of those of other amino acids. In glutamate-containing vesicles in the brain, the concentration of glutamate may even exceed 100 mM. Yet because glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter, the concentration of this amino acid in the cerebral extracellular fluid must be kept low-typically µM. The remarkable gradient of glutamate in the different cerebral compartments: vesicles > cytosol/mitochondria > extracellular fluid attests to the extraordinary effectiveness of glutamate transporters and the strict control of enzymes of glutamate catabolism and synthesis in well-defined cellular and subcellular compartments in the brain. A major route for glutamate and ammonia removal is via the glutamine synthetase (glutamate ammonia ligase) reaction. Glutamate is also removed by conversion to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) via the action of glutamate decarboxylase. On the other hand, cerebral glutamate levels are maintained by the action of glutaminase and by various α-ketoglutarate-linked aminotransferases (especially aspartate aminotransferase and the mitochondrial and cytosolic forms of the branched-chain aminotransferases). Although the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction is freely reversible, owing to rapid removal of ammonia as glutamine amide, the direction of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction in the brain in vivo is mainly toward glutamate catabolism rather than toward the net synthesis of glutamate, even under hyperammonemia conditions. During hyperammonemia, there is a large increase in cerebral glutamine content, but only small changes in the levels of glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. Thus, the channeling of glutamate toward glutamine during hyperammonemia results in the net synthesis of 5-carbon units. This increase in 5-carbon units is accomplished in part by the ammonia-induced stimulation of the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase

  5. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn M; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-08-16

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  6. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Parks, Jerry M; Smolin, Nikolai; Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Bhandiwad, Ashwini; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Raman, Babu; Shao, Xiongjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Smith, Jeremy C; Keller, Martin; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

  7. Purification of acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenases from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E and characterization of the secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) as a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase--acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Burdette, D; Zeikus, J G

    1994-01-01

    The purification and characterization of three enzymes involved in ethanol formation from acetyl-CoA in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum 39E) is described. The secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase (2 degrees Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 40 kDa subunits (SDS/PAGE) with a molecular mass of 160 kDa. The 2 degrees Adh had a lower catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of 1 degree alcohols, including ethanol, than for the oxidation of secondary (2 degrees) alcohols or the reduction of ketones or aldehydes. This enzyme possesses a significant acetyl-CoA reductive thioesterase activity as determined by NADPH oxidation, thiol formation and ethanol production. The primary-alcohol dehydrogenase (1 degree Adh) was determined to be a homotetramer of 41.5 kDa (SDS/PAGE) subunits with a molecular mass of 170 kDa. The 1 degree Adh used both NAD(H) and NADP(H) and displayed higher catalytic efficiencies for NADP(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation and NADH-dependent acetaldehyde (identical to ethanal) reduction than for NADPH-dependent acetaldehyde reduction or NAD(+)-dependent ethanol oxidation. The NAD(H)-linked acetaldehyde dehydrogenase was a homotetramer (360 kDa) of identical subunits (100 kDa) that readily catalysed thioester cleavage and condensation. The 1 degree Adh was expressed at 5-20% of the level of the 2 degrees Adh throughout the growth cycle on glucose. The results suggest that the 2 degrees Adh primarily functions in ethanol production from acetyl-CoA and acetaldehyde, whereas the 1 degree Adh functions in ethanol consumption for nicotinamide-cofactor recycling. Images Figure 1 PMID:8068002

  8. Purification and partial kinetic and physical characterization of two NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes and their protein precursors, and measurement of the patterns of accumulation and rates of degradation of their nonidentical subunits in synchronized cells of Chlorella cultured in different concentrations of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bascomb, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    Two ammonium-inducible, chloroplast-localized, NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenases were purified from Chlorella sorokiniana. They were homopolymers of either alpha or beta subunits with molecular weights of 55,500 and 53,000, respectively. These isoenzymes were separated by their differential binding to the substrate affinity column. Peptide mapping of purified alpha and beta subunits showed them to have a high degree of sequence homology. By use of SDS slab-gel electrophoresis and a Western blot/immunodetection procedure, patterns of accumulation of alpha and beta subunits (in their holoenzyme) were measured in cells cultured in media, containing different concentrations of ammonia. Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 35/S)sulfate were performed to measured the rates of degradation of the two isoenzymes. When the culture medium contained 2 mM ammonia or lower, cells accumulated only the alpha holoenzyme. Above 2 mM ammonia, cells contained both enzymes; however, their patterns of accumulation and rates of degradation were very different. The physiological role of alpha and beta holoenzymes appears to be ammonia assimilation at low and high external ammonia concentrations, respectively. From in vitro-translation studies with total cellular poly(A)/sup +/RNA, isolated from cells engaged in synthesis of alpha or beta holoenzymes or both, it was concluded that alpha and beta subunits have protein precursor(s) or identical molecular weight (M/sub r/ = 58,500). When the putative protein-precursor(s) were incubated in vitro, with cell-free extracts from Chlorella cells, they were processed to proteins the size of alpha and beta subunits.

  9. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  10. On the mechanism underlying tellurite reduction by Aeromonas caviae ST dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Arenas, F A; Leal, C A; Pinto, C A; Arenas-Salinas, M A; Morales, W A; Cornejo, F A; Díaz-Vásquez, W A; Vásquez, C C

    2014-07-01

    The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LpdA) from the tellurite-resistant bacterium Aeromonas caviae ST reduces tellurite to elemental tellurium. To characterize this NADH-dependent activity, the A. caviae lpdA gene was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and genes containing C45A, H322Y and E354K substitutions were individually transformed into Escherichia coli Δlpd. Cells expressing the modified genes exhibited decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase and TR activity regarding that observed with the wild type A. caviae lpdA gene. In addition, cells expressing the altered lpdA genes showed increased oxidative stress levels and tellurite sensitivity than those carrying the wild type counterpart. The involvement of Cys residues in LpdA's TR activity was analyzed using specific inhibitors that interact with catalytic cysteines and/or disulfide bridges such as aurothiomalate, zinc or nickel. TR activity of purified LpdA was drastically affected by these compounds. Since LpdA belongs to the flavoprotein family, the involvement of the FAD/NAD(P)(+)-binding domain in TR activity was determined. FAD removal from purified LpdA results in loss of TR activity, which was restored with exogenously added FAD. Substitutions in E354, involved in FAD/NADH binding, resulted in low TR activity because of flavin loss. Finally, changing H322 (involved in NAD(+)/NADH binding) by tyrosine also resulted in altered TR activity.

  11. On the mechanism underlying tellurite reduction by Aeromonas caviae ST dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Arenas, F A; Leal, C A; Pinto, C A; Arenas-Salinas, M A; Morales, W A; Cornejo, F A; Díaz-Vásquez, W A; Vásquez, C C

    2014-07-01

    The dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LpdA) from the tellurite-resistant bacterium Aeromonas caviae ST reduces tellurite to elemental tellurium. To characterize this NADH-dependent activity, the A. caviae lpdA gene was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and genes containing C45A, H322Y and E354K substitutions were individually transformed into Escherichia coli Δlpd. Cells expressing the modified genes exhibited decreased pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase and TR activity regarding that observed with the wild type A. caviae lpdA gene. In addition, cells expressing the altered lpdA genes showed increased oxidative stress levels and tellurite sensitivity than those carrying the wild type counterpart. The involvement of Cys residues in LpdA's TR activity was analyzed using specific inhibitors that interact with catalytic cysteines and/or disulfide bridges such as aurothiomalate, zinc or nickel. TR activity of purified LpdA was drastically affected by these compounds. Since LpdA belongs to the flavoprotein family, the involvement of the FAD/NAD(P)(+)-binding domain in TR activity was determined. FAD removal from purified LpdA results in loss of TR activity, which was restored with exogenously added FAD. Substitutions in E354, involved in FAD/NADH binding, resulted in low TR activity because of flavin loss. Finally, changing H322 (involved in NAD(+)/NADH binding) by tyrosine also resulted in altered TR activity. PMID:24680738

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  13. Protection of the glutamate pool concentration in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dalai

    2007-05-29

    The central nitrogen metabolic circuit in enteric bacteria consists of three enzymes: glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase (GOGAT), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). With the carbon skeleton provided by 2-oxoglutarate, ammonia/ammonium (NH(4)(+)) is assimilated into two central nitrogen intermediates, glutamate and glutamine. Although both serve as nitrogen donors for all biosynthetic needs, glutamate and glutamine play different roles. Internal glutamine serves as a sensor of external nitrogen availability, and its pool concentration decreases upon nitrogen limitation. A high glutamate pool concentration is required to maintain the internal K(+) pool. The configuration of high glutamate and low glutamine pools was disrupted in GOGAT(-) mutants under low NH(4)(+) conditions: the glutamate pool was low, the difference between glutamate and glutamine was diminished, and growth was defective. When a GOGAT(-) mutant was cultured in an NH(4)(+)-limited chemostat, two sequential spontaneous mutations occurred. Each resulted in a suppressor mutant that outgrew its predecessor in the chemostat. The first suppressor overexpressed GDH, and the second also had a partially impaired glutamine synthetase. The result was a triple mutant in which NH(4)(+) was assimilated by two enzymes instead of the normal three and yet glutamate and glutamine pools and growth were essentially normal. The results indicate preference for the usual ratio of glutamate and glutamine and the resilient and compensatory nature of the circuit on pool control. Analysis of other suppressor mutants selected on solid medium suggests that increased GDH expression is the key for rescue of the growth defect of GOGAT(-) mutants under low NH(4)(+) conditions.

  14. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Alteration of coenzyme specificity of malate dehydrogenase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Y D; Song, P; Cao, Z Y; Wang, P; Zhu, G P

    2014-07-29

    We describe here for the first time the alteration of coenzyme specificity of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) (ScMDH). In the present study, we replaced four amino acid residues in the Rossmann fold (βB-αC) region of NADH-dependent ScMDH by site-directed mutagenesis with those of NADPH-dependent MDH (Glu42Gly, Ile43Ser, Pro45Arg, and Ala46Ser). The coenzyme specificity of the mutant enzyme (ScMDH-T4) was examined. Coenzyme specificity of ScMDH-T4 was shifted 2231.3-fold toward NADPH using kcat/Km(coenzyme) as the measurement of coenzyme specificity. Accordingly, the effect of the replacements on coenzyme specificity is discussed. Our work provides further insight into the coenzyme specificity of ScMDH.

  16. Deletion of the structural gene for the NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 4 of Synechocystis 6803 alters respiratory properties.

    PubMed Central

    Dzelzkalns, V A; Obinger, C; Regelsberger, G; Niederhauser, H; Kamensek, M; Peschek, G A; Bogorad, L

    1994-01-01

    Chloroplasts and cyanobacteria contain genes encoding polypeptides homologous to some subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory NADH-ubiquinol oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase). Nothing is known of the role of the NADH dehydrogenase complex in photosynthesis, respiration, or other functions in chloroplasts, and little is known about the specific roles of the perhaps 42 subunits of this complex in the mitochondrion. Inactivation of a gene for subunit 4 (ndhD-2, ndh4) of this complex in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 has no effect on photosynthesis, judging from the rate of photoautotrophic growth of mutant cells, but the mutant's respiratory rate is about 6 times greater than that of wild-type cells. Respiratory electron transport activity in cyanobacteria is associated both with photosynthetic thylakoid membranes and with the outer cytoplasmic membrane of the cell. Cytoplasmic membranes of mutant cells have much greater NADH-dependent cytochrome reductase activity than preparations from wild-type cells; this activity remains at wild-type levels in isolated thylakoid membranes. It is suggested that the 56.6-kD product of ndhD-2 is not essential for the activity of a cytoplasmic membrane-bound NADH dehydrogenase but that it regulates the rate of electron flow through the complex, establishing a link between this ndh gene and respiration. The activity of the molecularly distinct thylakoid-bound NADH dehydrogenase is apparently unaffected by the loss of ndhD-2. PMID:7846157

  17. [Glutamate dehydrogenase activity in platelets of patients with endogenous psychosis].

    PubMed

    Prokhorova, T A; Boksha, I S; Savushkina, O K; Tereshkina, E B; Vorob'eva, E A; Pomytkin, A N; Kaleda, V G; Burbaeva, G Sh

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования — сравнение уровня ферментативной активности тромбоцитарной глутаматдегидрогеназы (ГДГ) у больных с эндогенными психозами и в контрольной группе здоровых и выявление возможной связи активности ГДГ с клинико-психопатологической оценкой состояния больных. Материал и методы. Группу больных составили 69 мужчин, госпитализированных с приступом эндогенного психоза (шизофрения у 48 больных, шизоаффективное расстройство у 21); 34 пациента были с первым психотическим приступом (ПП) и 35 — c повторными приступами заболевания (ППЗ). Больные обследовались с использованием шкалы PANSS до и после курса антипсихотической терапии. Контрольные образцы крови были взяты у 34 мужчин без психической патологии. Изо всех образцов крови были выделены тромбоциты, в белковых экстрактах которых была определена удельная активность ГДГ. Результаты и заключение. Активность ГДГ в группе больных в целом до лечения была достоверно ниже, чем в контрольной группе. Активность ГДГ достоверно различалась в контроле и до лечения в подгруппах больных с ПП и с ППЗ. У больных с ПП (но не ППЗ) до лечения активность ГДГ достоверно коррелировала с баллами по PANSS. У больных с ПП активность ГДГ до лечения достоверно была связана с баллами PANSS после лечения: чем выше активность ГДГ у больного, тем ниже оценка по PANSS после лечения. Сделан вывод, что определение исходных значений активности тромбоцитарной ГДГ может иметь практическую ценность для прогноза эффективности антипсихотической фармакотерапии у пациентов с ПП эндогенного психоза.

  18. Glutamate signalling in roots.

    PubMed

    Forde, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    As a signalling molecule, glutamate is best known for its role as a fast excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian nervous system, a role that requires the activity of a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). The unexpected discovery in 1998 that Arabidopsis thaliana L. possesses a family of iGluR-related (GLR) genes laid the foundations for an assessment of glutamate's potential role as a signalling molecule in plants that is still in progress. Recent advances in elucidating the function of Arabidopsis GLR receptors has revealed similarities with iGluRs in their channel properties, but marked differences in their ligand specificities. The ability of plant GLR receptors to act as amino-acid-gated Ca(2+) channels with a broad agonist profile, combined with their expression throughout the plant, makes them strong candidates for a multiplicity of amino acid signalling roles. Although root growth is inhibited in the presence of a number of amino acids, only glutamate elicits a specific sequence of changes in growth, root tip morphology, and root branching. The recent finding that the MEKK1 gene is a positive regulator of glutamate sensitivity at the root tip has provided genetic evidence for the existence in plants of a glutamate signalling pathway analogous to those found in animals. This short review will discuss the most recent advances in understanding glutamate signalling in roots, considering them in the context of previous work in plants and animals.

  19. II. Glutamine and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Tapiero, H; Mathé, G; Couvreur, P; Tew, K D

    2002-11-01

    Glutamine and glutamate with proline, histidine, arginine and ornithine, comprise 25% of the dietary amino acid intake and constitute the "glutamate family" of amino acids, which are disposed of through conversion to glutamate. Although glutamine has been classified as a nonessential amino acid, in major trauma, major surgery, sepsis, bone marrow transplantation, intense chemotherapy and radiotherapy, when its consumption exceeds its synthesis, it becomes a conditionally essential amino acid. In mammals the physiological levels of glutamine is 650 micromol/l and it is one of the most important substrate for ammoniagenesis in the gut and in the kidney due to its important role in the regulation of acid-base homeostasis. In cells, glutamine is a key link between carbon metabolism of carbohydrates and proteins and plays an important role in the growth of fibroblasts, lymphocytes and enterocytes. It improves nitrogen balance and preserves the concentration of glutamine in skeletal muscle. Deamidation of glutamine via glutaminase produces glutamate a precursor of gamma-amino butyric acid, a neurotransmission inhibitor. L-Glutamic acid is a ubiquitous amino acid present in many foods either in free form or in peptides and proteins. Animal protein may contain from 11 to 22% and plants protein as much as 40% glutamate by weight. The sodium salt of glutamic acid is added to several foods to enhance flavor. L-Glutamate is the most abundant free amino acid in brain and it is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the vertebrate central nervous system. Most free L-glutamic acid in brain is derived from local synthesis from L-glutamine and Kreb's cycle intermediates. It clearly plays an important role in neuronal differentiation, migration and survival in the developing brain via facilitated Ca++ transport. Glutamate also plays a critical role in synaptic maintenance and plasticity. It contributes to learning and memory through use-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy and

  20. Engineered ketol-acid reductoisomerase and alcohol dehydrogenase enable anaerobic 2-methylpropan-1-ol production at theoretical yield in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Sabine; Liu, Xiang; Meyerowitz, Joseph T; Snow, Christopher D; Chen, Mike M Y; Arnold, Frances H

    2011-05-01

    2-methylpropan-1-ol (isobutanol) is a leading candidate biofuel for the replacement or supplementation of current fossil fuels. Recent work has demonstrated glucose to isobutanol conversion through a modified amino acid pathway in a recombinant organism. Although anaerobic conditions are required for an economically competitive process, only aerobic isobutanol production has been feasible due to an imbalance in cofactor utilization. Two of the pathway enzymes, ketol-acid reductoisomerase and alcohol dehydrogenase, require nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH); glycolysis, however, produces only nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH). Here, we compare two solutions to this imbalance problem: (1) over-expression of pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase PntAB and (2) construction of an NADH-dependent pathway, using engineered enzymes. We demonstrate that an NADH-dependent pathway enables anaerobic isobutanol production at 100% theoretical yield and at higher titer and productivity than both the NADPH-dependent pathway and transhydrogenase over-expressing strain. Our results show how engineering cofactor dependence can overcome a critical obstacle to next-generation biofuel commercialization.

  1. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  2. Changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence and membrane current produced by glutamate uptake into salamander Müller cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, B; Magnus, C; Szatkowski, M; Gray, P T; Attwell, D

    1993-01-01

    1. Glutamate uptake into isolated, whole-cell patch-clamped glial cells was studied by monitoring the increase of cell fluorescence generated as glutamate and NAD(P) were converted into alpha-ketoglutarate and NAD(P)H by glutamate dehydrogenase. The current generated by the glutamate uptake carrier was recorded simultaneously. 2. L-Glutamate evoked an increase of cell fluorescence and an inward uptake current. L- and D-aspartate generated an uptake current but no fluorescence response, consistent with the amino acid specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase. 3. In the absence of external sodium the glutamate-evoked fluorescence response and uptake current were abolished, showing that there is no sodium-independent glutamate uptake across the cell membrane. 4. Varying the glutamate concentration altered both the fluorescence response and the uptake current. The fluorescence response saturated at a lower glutamate concentration than the uptake current, and depended in a Michaelis-Menten fashion on the uptake current. 5. The fluorescence response and the uptake current were reduced by membrane depolarization, and also by removal of intracellular potassium. 6. The dependence of the fluorescence response on uptake current when membrane potential was altered or intracellular potassium was removed was the same as that seen when the external glutamate concentration was altered. 7. These fluorescence studies show that glutamate uptake is inhibited by depolarization and by removal of intracellular potassium, consistent with the conclusion of earlier work in which uptake was monitored solely as a membrane current. The data are consistent with high-affinity electrogenic sodium- and potassium-dependent glutamate uptake with fixed stoichiometry being the only significant influx route for glutamate. Other possible interpretations of the data are also discussed. PMID:8105078

  3. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  4. Purification and characterization of benzyl alcohol- and benzaldehyde- dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Basu, Aditya; Phale, Prashant S

    2011-08-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 utilizes benzyl alcohol via catechol and methylnaphthalenes through detoxification pathway via hydroxymethylnaphthalenes and naphthaldehydes. Based on metabolic studies, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase (BADH) and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (BZDH) were hypothesized to be involved in the detoxification pathway. BADH and BZDH were purified to apparent homogeneity and were (1) homodimers with subunit molecular mass of 38 and 57 kDa, respectively, (2) NAD(+) dependent, (3) broad substrate specific accepting mono- and di-aromatic alcohols and aldehydes but not aliphatic compounds, and (4) BADH contained iron and magnesium, while BZDH contained magnesium. BADH in the forward reaction converted alcohol to aldehyde and required NAD(+), while in the reverse reaction it reduced aldehyde to alcohol in NADH-dependent manner. BZDH showed low K (m) value for benzaldehyde as compared to BADH reverse reaction. Chemical cross-linking studies revealed that BADH and BZDH do not form multi-enzyme complex. Thus, the conversion of aromatic alcohol to acid is due to low K (m) and high catalytic efficiency of BZDH. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BADH is a novel enzyme and diverged during the evolution to gain the ability to utilize mono- and di-aromatic compounds. The wide substrate specificity of these enzymes enables strain to detoxify methylnaphthalenes to naphthoic acids efficiently.

  5. Production of D-Glutamate from L-Glutamate with Glutamate Racemase and L-Glutamate Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, T; Watanabe, M; Makiura, H; Kusakabe, H; Yamade, K; Soda, K

    1999-01-01

    We studied production of D-glutamate from L-glutamate using a bioreactor consisting of two columns of sequentially connected immobilized glutamate racemase (EC 5.1.1.3, from Bacillus subtilis IFO 3336) and L-glutamate oxidase (EC 1.4.3.11, from Streptomyces sp. X119-6): L-glutamate was racemized by the glutamate racemase column, and then L-glutamate was oxidized by the L-glutamate oxidase column. Consequently only D-glutamate remained, and was easily separated from the α-ketoglutarate formed by anion-exchange chromatography. Both enzymes were highly stabilized by immobilization. The pH and temperature optima of immobilized glutamate racemase (pH 8, 40°C) were similar to those of immobilized L-glutamate oxidase (pH 7, 50°C). Accordingly, we connected the two columns tandemly to do both enzyme reactions under the same conditions. Actually 4.5 μmol of D-glutamate was produced and isolated from 10 μmol of L-glutamate, about 90% of the theoretical yield. PMID:27373918

  6. Relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase extended family.

    PubMed

    Perozich, J; Nicholas, H; Wang, B C; Lindahl, R; Hempel, J

    1999-01-01

    One hundred-forty-five full-length aldehyde dehydrogenase-related sequences were aligned to determine relationships within the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) extended family. The alignment reveals only four invariant residues: two glycines, a phenylalanine involved in NAD binding, and a glutamic acid that coordinates the nicotinamide ribose in certain E-NAD binary complex crystal structures, but which may also serve as a general base for the catalytic reaction. The cysteine that provides the catalytic thiol and its closest neighbor in space, an asparagine residue, are conserved in all ALDHs with demonstrated dehydrogenase activity. Sixteen residues are conserved in at least 95% of the sequences; 12 of these cluster into seven sequence motifs conserved in almost all ALDHs. These motifs cluster around the active site of the enzyme. Phylogenetic analysis of these ALDHs indicates at least 13 ALDH families, most of which have previously been identified but not grouped separately by alignment. ALDHs cluster into two main trunks of the phylogenetic tree. The largest, the "Class 3" trunk, contains mostly substrate-specific ALDH families, as well as the class 3 ALDH family itself. The other trunk, the "Class 1/2" trunk, contains mostly variable substrate ALDH families, including the class 1 and 2 ALDH families. Divergence of the substrate-specific ALDHs occurred earlier than the division between ALDHs with broad substrate specificities. A site on the World Wide Web has also been devoted to this alignment project.

  7. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  8. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  9. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  10. Structure-Guided Engineering of Lactococcus lactis Alcohol Dehydrogenase LlAdhA for Improved Conversion of Isobutyraldehyde to Isobutanol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiang; Bastian, Sabine; Snow, Christopher D.; Brustad, Eric M.; Saleski, Tatyana E.; Xu, Jian-He; Meinhold, Peter; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the NADH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase LlAdhA from Lactococcus lactis and its laboratory-evolved variant LlAdhARE1 at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. LlAdhARE1, which contains three amino acid mutations (Y50F, I212T, and L264V), was engineered to increase the microbial production of isobutanol (2-methylpropan-1-ol) from isobutyraldehyde (2-methylpropanal). Structural comparison of LlAdhA and LlAdhARE1 indicates that the enhanced activity on isobutyraldehyde stems from increases in the protein’s active site size, hydrophobicity, and substrate access. Further structure-guided mutagenesis generated a quadruple mutant (Y50F/N110S/I212T/L264V), whose KM for isobutyraldehyde is ~17-fold lower and catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) is ~160-fold higher than wild-type LlAdhA. Combining detailed structural information and directed evolution, we have achieved significant improvements in non-native alcohol dehydrogenase activity that will facilitate the production of next-generation fuels such as isobutanol from renewable resources. PMID:22974724

  11. Engineering a d-lactate dehydrogenase that can super-efficiently utilize NADPH and NADH as cofactors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hengkai; Liu, Pi; Sun, Hongbing; Cai, Zhen; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Jianping; Li, Yin

    2016-04-25

    Engineering the cofactor specificity of a natural enzyme often results in a significant decrease in its activity on original cofactor. Here we report that a NADH-dependent dehydrogenase (d-LDH) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii 11842 can be rationally engineered to efficiently use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Point mutations on three amino acids (D176S, I177R, F178T) predicted by computational analysis resulted in a modified enzyme designated as d-LDH*. The Kcat/Km of the purified d-LDH* on NADPH increased approximately 184-fold while the Kcat/Km on NADH also significantly increased, showing for the first time that a rationally engineered d-LDH could exhibit comparable activity on both NADPH and NADH. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the enhanced affinity with NADH or NADPH and the significant increased Kcat of d-LDH* resulted in the significant increase of d-LDH* activity on both NADPH and NADH. This study thus demonstrated that the cofactor specificity of dehydrogenase can be broadened by using targeted engineering approach, and the engineered enzyme can efficiently function in NADH-rich, or NADPH-rich, or NADH and NADPH-rich environment.

  12. Engineering a d-lactate dehydrogenase that can super-efficiently utilize NADPH and NADH as cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hengkai; Liu, Pi; Sun, Hongbing; Cai, Zhen; Zhou, Jie; Lin, Jianping; Li, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Engineering the cofactor specificity of a natural enzyme often results in a significant decrease in its activity on original cofactor. Here we report that a NADH-dependent dehydrogenase (d-LDH) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii 11842 can be rationally engineered to efficiently use both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Point mutations on three amino acids (D176S, I177R, F178T) predicted by computational analysis resulted in a modified enzyme designated as d-LDH*. The Kcat/Km of the purified d-LDH* on NADPH increased approximately 184-fold while the Kcat/Km on NADH also significantly increased, showing for the first time that a rationally engineered d-LDH could exhibit comparable activity on both NADPH and NADH. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the enhanced affinity with NADH or NADPH and the significant increased Kcat of d-LDH* resulted in the significant increase of d-LDH* activity on both NADPH and NADH. This study thus demonstrated that the cofactor specificity of dehydrogenase can be broadened by using targeted engineering approach, and the engineered enzyme can efficiently function in NADH-rich, or NADPH-rich, or NADH and NADPH-rich environment. PMID:27109778

  13. Furfural reduction mechanism of a zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Kang, ChulHee; Hayes, Robert; Sanchez, Emiliano J.; Webb, Brian N.; Li, Qunrui; Hooper, Travis; Nissen, Mark S.; Xun, Luying

    2012-01-01

    Summary FurX is a tetrameric Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) from Cupriavidus necator JMP134. The enzyme rapidly reduces furfural with NADH as the reducing power. For the first time among characterized ADHs, the high-resolution structures of all reaction steps were obtained in a time-resolved manner, thereby illustrating the complete catalytic events of NADH-dependent reduction of furfural and the dynamic Zn2+ coordination among Glu66, water, substrate and product. In the fully closed conformation of the NADH complex, the catalytic turnover proved faster than observed for the partially closed conformation due to an effective proton transfer network. The domain motion triggered by NAD(H) association/dissociation appeared to facilitate dynamic interchanges in Zn2+ coordination with substrate and product molecules, ultimately increasing the enzymatic turnover rate. NAD+ dissociation appeared to be a slow process, involving multiple steps in concert with a domain opening and reconfiguration of Glu66. This agrees with the report that the cofactor is not dissociated from FurX during ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural, in which ethanol reduces NAD+ to NADH that is subsequently used for furfural reduction. PMID:22081946

  14. Alcohol dehydrogenases from Scheffersomyces stipitis involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Menggen; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xianxian

    2013-09-01

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are generated from biomass pretreatment. Scheffersomyces stipitis is able to reduce furfural and HMF to less toxic furanmethanol and furan-2,5-dimethanol; however, the enzymes involved in the reductive reaction still remain unknown. In this study, transcription responses of two known and five putative alcohol dehydrogenase genes from S. stipitis were analyzed under furfural and HMF stress conditions. All the seven alcohol dehydrogenase genes were also cloned and overexpressed for their activity analyses. Our results indicate that transcriptions of SsADH4 and SsADH6 were highly induced under furfural and HMF stress conditions, and the proteins encoded by them exhibited NADH- and/or NADPH-dependent activities for furfural and HMF reduction, respectively. For furfural reduction, NADH-dependent activity was also observed in SsAdh1p and NAD(P)H-dependent activities were also observed in SsAdh5p and SsAdh7p. For HMF reduction, NADPH-dependent activities were also observed in SsAdh5p and SsAdh7p. SsAdh4p displayed the highest NADPH-dependent specific activity and catalytic efficiency for reduction of both furfural and HMF among the seven alcohol dehydrogenases. Enzyme activities of all SsADH proteins were more stable under acidic condition. For most SsADH proteins, the optimum temperature for enzyme activities was 30 °C and more than 50 % enzyme activities remained at 60 °C. Reduction activities of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, benzaldehyde, and phenylacetaldehyde were also observed in some SsADH proteins. Our results indicate that multiple alcohol dehydrogenases in S. stipitis are involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion. PMID:23912116

  15. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  16. Making biochemistry count: life among the amino acid dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2011-04-01

    The guiding principle of the IAS Medal Lecture and of the research it covered was that searching mathematical analysis, depending on good measurements, must underpin sound biochemical conclusions. This was illustrated through various experiences with the amino acid dehydrogenases. Topics covered in the present article include: (i) the place of kinetic measurement in assessing the metabolic role of GDH (glutamate dehydrogenase); (ii) the discovery of complex regulatory behaviour in mammalian GDH, involving negative co-operativity in coenzyme binding; (iii) an X-ray structure solution for a bacterial GDH providing insight into catalysis; (iv) almost total positive co-operativity in glutamate binding to clostridial GDH; (v) unexpected outcomes with mutations at the catalytic aspartate site in GDH; (vi) reactive cysteine as a counting tool in the construction of hybrid oligomers to probe the basis of allosteric interaction; (vii) tryptophan-to-phenylalanine mutations in analysis of allosteric conformational change; (viii) site-directed mutagenesis to alter substrate specificity in GDH and PheDH (phenylalanine dehydrogenase); and (ix) varying strengths of binding of the 'wrong' enantiomer in engineered mutant enzymes and implications for resolution of racemates.

  17. Deletion of genes involved in glutamate metabolism to improve poly-gamma-glutamic acid production in B. amyloliquefaciens LL3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; He, Yulian; Gao, Weixia; Feng, Jun; Cao, Mingfeng; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2015-02-01

    Here, we attempted to elevate poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) production by modifying genes involved in glutamate metabolism in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3. Products of rocR, rocG and gudB facilitate the conversion from glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in Bacillus subtillis. The gene odhA is responsible for the synthesis of a component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A. In-frame deletions of these four genes were performed. In shake flask experiments the gudB/rocG double mutant presented enhanced production of γ-PGA, a 38 % increase compared with wild type. When fermented in a 5-L fermenter with pH control, the γ-PGA yield of the rocR mutant was increased to 5.83 g/L from 4.55 g/L for shake flask experiments. The gudB/rocG double mutant produced 5.68 g/L γ-PGA compared with that of 4.03 g/L for the wild type, a 40 % increase. Those results indicated the possibility of improving γ-PGA production by modifying glutamate metabolism, and identified potential genetic targets to improve γ-PGA production.

  18. Glutamate and glutathione interplay in a motor neuronal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis reveals altered energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Calcagno, Eleonora; Tartari, Silvia; Rizzardini, Milena; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Cantoni, Lavinia

    2011-08-01

    Impairment of mitochondrial function might contribute to oxidative stress associated with neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Glutamate levels in tissues of ALS patients are sometimes altered. In neurons, mitochondrial metabolism of exogenous glutamine is mainly responsible for the net synthesis of glutamate, which is a neurotransmitter, but it is also necessary for the synthesis of glutathione, the main endogenous antioxidant. We investigated glutathione synthesis and glutamine/glutamate metabolism in a motor neuronal model of familial ALS. In standard culture conditions (with glutamine) or restricting glutamine or cystine, the level of glutathione was always lower in the cell line expressing the mutant (G93A) human Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (G93ASOD1) than in the line expressing wild-type SOD1. With glutamine the difference in glutathione was associated with a lower glutamate and impairment of the glutamine/glutamate metabolism as evidenced by lower glutaminase and cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity. d-β-hydroxybutyrate, as an alternative to glutamine as energy substrate in addition to glucose, reversed the decreases of cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity and glutamate and glutathione. However, in the G93ASOD1 cell line, in all culture conditions the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase l protein, which down-regulates pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, was induced, together with an increase in lactate release in the medium. These findings suggest that the glutathione decrease associated with mutant SOD1 expression is due to mitochondrial dysfunction caused by the reduction of the flow of glucose-derived pyruvate through the TCA cycle; it implies altered glutamate metabolism and depends on the different mitochondrial energy substrates. PMID:21530659

  19. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  20. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  1. Altered acetylation and succinylation profiles in Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to conditions inducing glutamate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Kubo, Shosei; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru; Kosono, Saori

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is utilized during industrial fermentation to produce amino acids such as L-glutamate. During L-glutamate fermentation, C. glutamicum changes the flux of central carbon metabolism to favor L-glutamate production, but the molecular mechanisms that explain these flux changes remain largely unknown. Here, we found that the profiles of two major lysine acyl modifications were significantly altered upon glutamate overproduction in C. glutamicum; acetylation decreased, whereas succinylation increased. A label-free semi-quantitative proteomic analysis identified 604 acetylated proteins with 1328 unique acetylation sites and 288 succinylated proteins with 651 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation and succinylation targeted enzymes in central carbon metabolic pathways that are directly related to glutamate production, including the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC), a key enzyme regulating glutamate overproduction. Structural mapping revealed that several critical lysine residues in the ODHC components were susceptible to acetylation and succinylation. Furthermore, induction of glutamate production was associated with changes in the extent of acetylation and succinylation of lysine, suggesting that these modifications may affect the activity of enzymes involved in glutamate production. Deletion of phosphotransacetylase decreased the extent of protein acetylation in nonproducing condition, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is active in C. glutamicum. However, no effect was observed on the profiles of acetylation and succinylation in glutamate-producing condition upon disruption of acetyl phosphate metabolism or deacetylase homologs. It was considered likely that the reduced acetylation in glutamate-producing condition may reflect metabolic states where the flux through acid-producing pathways is very low, and substrates for acetylation do not accumulate in the cell. Succinylation would occur more

  2. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  3. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  4. Biochemical characterization of ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural by alcohol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Li, Qunrui; Metthew Lam, L K; Xun, Luying

    2011-11-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is usually converted to hydrolysates, which consist of sugars and sugar derivatives, such as furfural. Before yeast ferments sugars to ethanol, it reduces toxic furfural to non-inhibitory furfuryl alcohol in a prolonged lag phase. Bioreduction of furfural may shorten the lag phase. Cupriavidus necator JMP134 rapidly reduces furfural with a Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (FurX) at the expense of ethanol (Li et al. 2011). The mechanism of the ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural by FurX and three homologous alcohol dehydrogenases was investigated. The reduction consisted of two individual reactions: ethanol-dependent reduction of NAD(+) to NADH and then NADH-dependent reduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol. The kinetic parameters of the coupled reaction and the individual reactions were determined for the four enzymes. The data indicated that limited NADH was released in the coupled reaction. The enzymes had high affinities for NADH (e.g., K ( d ) of 0.043 μM for the FurX-NADH complex) and relatively low affinities for NAD(+) (e.g., K ( d ) of 87 μM for FurX-NAD(+)). The kinetic data suggest that the four enzymes are efficient "furfural reductases" with either ethanol or NADH as the reducing power. The standard free energy change (ΔG°') for ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural was determined to be -1.1 kJ mol(-1). The physiological benefit for ethanol-dependent reduction of furfural is likely to replace toxic and recalcitrant furfural with less toxic and more biodegradable acetaldehyde.

  5. Methylmalonate impairs mitochondrial respiration supported by NADH-linked substrates: involvement of mitochondrial glutamate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Melo, Daniela R; Mirandola, Sandra R; Assunção, Nilson A; Castilho, Roger F

    2012-06-01

    The neurodegeneration that occurs in methylmalonic acidemia is proposed to be associated with impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism resulting from methylmalonate (MMA) accumulation. The present study evaluated the effects of MMA on oxygen consumption by isolated rat brain mitochondria in the presence of NADH-linked substrates (α-ketoglutarate, citrate, isocitrate, glutamate, malate, and pyruvate). Respiration supported either by glutamate or glutamate plus malate was significantly inhibited by MMA (1-10 mM), whereas no inhibition was observed when a cocktail of NADH-linked substrates was used. Measurements of glutamate transport revealed that the inhibitory effect of MMA on respiration maintained by this substrate is not due to inhibition of its mitochondrial uptake. In light of this result, the effect of MMA on the activity of relevant enzymes involved in mitochondrial glutamate metabolism was investigated. MMA had minor inhibitory effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase, whereas α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase was significantly inhibited by this metabolite (K(i) = 3.65 mM). Moreover, measurements of α-ketoglutarate transport and mitochondrial MMA accumulation indicated that MMA/α-ketoglutarate exchange depletes mitochondria from this substrate, which may further contribute to the inhibition of glutamate-sustained respiration. To study the effect of chronic in vivo MMA treatment on mitochondrial function, young rats were intraperitoneally injected with MMA. No significant difference was observed in respiration between isolated brain mitochondria from control and MMA-treated rats, indicating that in vivo MMA treatment did not lead to permanent mitochondrial respiratory defects. Taken together, these findings indicate that the inhibitory effect of MMA on mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be ascribed to concurrent inhibition of specific enzymes and lower availability of respiratory substrates. PMID:22488725

  6. Mitochondrial transporters involved in oleic acid utilization and glutamate metabolism in yeast.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Pamela J; Adamson, Amy L; Ghrist, Angela C; Rowe, Lindsay; Scott, Lori R; Sherman, Matthew P; Stites, Nicole C; Sun, Yue; Tawiah-Boateng, Mary Anne; Tibbetts, Anne S; Wadington, Megan C; West, Aaron C

    2005-10-01

    Utilization of fatty acids such as oleic acid as sole carbon source by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires coordinated function of peroxisomes, where the fatty acids are degraded, and the mitochondria, where oxidation is completed. We identified two mitochondrial oxodicarboxylate transporters, Odc1p and Odc2p, as important in efficient utilization of oleic acid in yeast [Tibbetts et al., Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 406 (2002) 96-104]. Yet, the growth phenotype of odc1delta odc2delta strains indicated that additional transporter(s) were also involved. Here, we identify two putative transporter genes, YMC1 and YMC2, as able to suppress the odc1delta odc2delta growth phenotype. The mRNA levels for both are elevated in the presence of glycerol or oleic acid, as compared to glucose. Ymc1p and Ymc2p are localized to the mitochondria in oleic acid-grown cells. Deletion of all four transporters (quad mutant) prevents growth on oleic acid as sole carbon source, while growth on acetate is retained. It is known that the glutamate-sensitive retrograde signaling pathway is important for upregulation of peroxisomal function in response to oleic acid and the oxodicarboxylate alpha-ketoglutarate is transported out of the mitochondria for synthesis of glutamate. So, citric acid cycle function and glutamate synthesis were examined in transporter mutants. The quad mutant has significantly decreased citrate synthase activity and whole cell alpha-ketoglutarate levels, while isocitrate dehydrogenase activity is unaffected and glutamate dehydrogenase activity is increased 10-fold. Strains carrying only two or three transporter deletions exhibit intermediate affects. 13C NMR metabolic enrichment experiments confirm a defect in glutamate biosynthesis in the quad mutant and, in double and triple mutants, suggest increased cycling of the glutamate backbone in the mitochondria before export. Taken together these studies indicate that these four transporters have overlapping activity, and

  7. Asymmetric reduction of ketones and β-keto esters by (S)-1-phenylethanol dehydrogenase from denitrifying bacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum.

    PubMed

    Dudzik, A; Snoch, W; Borowiecki, P; Opalinska-Piskorz, J; Witko, M; Heider, J; Szaleniec, M

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed enantioselective reductions of ketones and keto esters have become popular for the production of homochiral building blocks which are valuable synthons for the preparation of biologically active compounds at industrial scale. Among many kinds of biocatalysts, dehydrogenases/reductases from various microorganisms have been used to prepare optically pure enantiomers from carbonyl compounds. (S)-1-phenylethanol dehydrogenase (PEDH) was found in the denitrifying bacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum (strain EbN1) and belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. It catalyzes the stereospecific oxidation of (S)-1-phenylethanol to acetophenone during anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization, but also the reverse reaction, i.e., NADH-dependent enantioselective reduction of acetophenone to (S)-1-phenylethanol. In this work, we present the application of PEDH for asymmetric reduction of 42 prochiral ketones and 11 β-keto esters to enantiopure secondary alcohols. The high enantioselectivity of the reaction is explained by docking experiments and analysis of the interaction and binding energies of the theoretical enzyme-substrate complexes leading to the respective (S)- or (R)-alcohols. The conversions were carried out in a batch reactor using Escherichia coli cells with heterologously produced PEDH as whole-cell catalysts and isopropanol as reaction solvent and cosubstrate for NADH recovery. Ketones were converted to the respective secondary alcohols with excellent enantiomeric excesses and high productivities. Moreover, the progress of product formation was studied for nine para-substituted acetophenone derivatives and described by neural network models, which allow to predict reactor behavior and provides insight on enzyme reactivity. Finally, equilibrium constants for conversion of these substrates were derived from the progress curves of the reactions. The obtained values matched very well with theoretical predictions.

  8. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  9. Computational Studies of Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Setiadi, Jeffry; Heinzelmann, Germano; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain whose binding to receptors on neurons excites them while excess glutamate are removed from synapses via transporter proteins. Determination of the crystal structures of bacterial aspartate transporters has paved the way for computational investigation of their function and dynamics at the molecular level. Here, we review molecular dynamics and free energy calculation methods used in these computational studies and discuss the recent applications to glutamate transporters. The focus of the review is on the insights gained on the transport mechanism through computational methods, which otherwise is not directly accessible by experimental probes. Recent efforts to model the mammalian glutamate and other amino acid transporters, whose crystal structures have not been solved yet, are included in the review. PMID:26569328

  10. The pathways of glutamate and glutamine oxidation by tumor cell mitochondria. Role of mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    Little evidence has been available on the oxidative pathways of glutamine and glutamate, the major respiratory substrates of cancer cells. Glutamate formed from glutamine by phosphate-dependent glutaminase undergoes quantitative transamination by aerobic tumor mitochondria to yield aspartate. However, when malate is also added there is a pronounced decrease in aspartate production and a large formation of citrate and alanine, in both state 3 and 4 conditions. In contrast, addition of malate to normal rat heart, liver, or kidney mitochondria oxidizing glutamate causes a marked increase in aspartate production. Further analysis showed that extramitochondrial malate is oxidized almost quantitatively to pyruvate + CO2 by NAD(P)+-linked malic enzyme, present in the mitochondria of all tumors tested, but absent in heart, liver, and kidney mitochondria. On the other hand intramitochondrial malate generated from glutamate is oxidized quantitatively to oxalacetate by mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase of tumors. Acetyl-CoA derived from extramitochondrial malate via pyruvate and oxalacetate derived from glutamate via intramitochondrial malate are quantitatively converted into citrate, which is extruded. No evidence was found that malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria converts glutamate-derived malate into pyruvate as postulated in other reports. Possible mechanisms for the integration of mitochondrial malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase activities in tumors are discussed.

  11. Cyanobacterial NADPH dehydrogenase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Teruo; Mi, Hualing

    2007-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess functionally distinct multiple NADPH dehydrogenase (NDH-1) complexes that are essential to CO2 uptake, photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration. The unique nature of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes is the presence of subunits involved in CO2 uptake. Other than CO2 uptake, chloroplastic NDH-1 complex has similar role as cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes in photosystem-1 cyclic electron transport and respiration (chlororespiration). In this mini-review we focus on the structure and function of cyanobacterial NDH-1 complexes and their phylogeny. The function of chloroplastic NDH-1 complex and characteristics of plants defective in NDH-1 are also described forcomparison.

  12. Bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Weckert, Edgar; Frahm, August Wilhelm

    2006-05-15

    For the second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, the cyanide addition as the key stereodifferentiating step produces mixtures of diastereomeric alpha-amino nitrile esters the composition of which is independent of the reaction temperature and the type of the solvent, respectively. The subsequent hydrolysis is exclusively achieved with concentrated H(2)SO(4) yielding diastereomeric mixtures of three secondary alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters and two diastereomeric cis-fused angular alpha-carbamoyl gamma-lactams as bicyclic glutamic acid derivatives, gained from in situ stereomer differentiating cyclisation of the secondary cis-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters. Separation was achieved by CC. The pure secondary trans-alpha-amino alpha-carbamoyl-gamma-esters cyclise on heating and treatment with concentrated H(2)SO(4), respectively, to diastereomeric cis-fused angular secondary alpha-amino imides. Their hydrogenolysis led to the enantiomeric cis-fused angular primary alpha-amino imides. The configuration of all compounds was completely established by NMR methods, CD-spectra, and by X-ray analyses of the (alphaR,1R,5R)-1-carbamoyl-2-(1-phenylethyl)-2-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octan-3-one and of the trans-alphaS,1S,2R-2-ethoxycarbonylmethyl-1-(1-phenylethylamino)cyclopentanecarboxamide. PMID:16596563

  13. Vitamin E-Induced Changes in Glutamate and GABA Metabolizing Enzymes of Chick Embryo Cerebrum

    PubMed Central

    Dessai, Shanti N.; Pinto, Annaliza

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin E exists in eight different forms, four tocopherols and four tocotrienols. It forms an important component of our antioxidant system. The structure of Vitamin E makes it unique and indispensable in protecting cell membranes. α-tocopherol, one of the forms of Vitamin E, is also known to regulate signal transduction pathways by mechanisms that are independent of its antioxidant properties. Vitamin E compounds reduce the production of inflammatory compounds such as prostaglandins. Swollen, dystrophic axons are considered as the hallmark of Vitamin E deficiency in the brains of rats, monkeys, and humans. The present work aimed to study the Vitamin E- (α-tochopherol acetate-) induced alterations of enzymes involved in metabolism of Glutamate and GABA during developmental neurogenesis of cerebrum. Therefore, cytosolic and crude mitochondrial enzyme activities of glutamine synthetase, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, GABA transaminase, succinic Semialdehyde dehydrogenase, glutamic dehydrogenase, and α-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were analysed. Vitamin E induced significant changes in these enzymes thus altering the normal levels of glutamate and GABA during developmental neurogenesis. Such changes are surely to disturb the expression and/or intensity of neurotransmitter signaling during critical periods of brain development. PMID:23984094

  14. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... control the activity of the complex: pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase turns on (activates) the complex, while pyruvate dehydrogenase ... binding protein (the PDHX gene), and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (the PDP1 gene) have been identified in people ...

  15. Physiological Regulation of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase and the Role of 2-Oxoglutarate in Prochlorococcus sp. Strain PCC 9511

    PubMed Central

    Diez, Jesús; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Rangel-Zúñiga, Oriol Alberto; García-Fernández, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate, to produce 2-oxoglutarate. The incompleteness of the tricarboxylic acids cycle in marine cyanobacteria confers a special importance to isocitrate dehydrogenase in the C/N balance, since 2-oxoglutarate can only be metabolized through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase pathway. The physiological regulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase was studied in cultures of Prochlorococcus sp. strain PCC 9511, by measuring enzyme activity and concentration using the NADPH production assay and Western blotting, respectively. The enzyme activity showed little changes under nitrogen or phosphorus starvation, or upon addition of the inhibitors DCMU, DBMIB and MSX. Azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamate synthase, induced clear increases in the isocitrate dehydrogenase activity and icd gene expression after 24 h, and also in the 2-oxoglutarate concentration. Iron starvation had the most significant effect, inducing a complete loss of isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, possibly mediated by a process of oxidative inactivation, while its concentration was unaffected. Our results suggest that isocitrate dehydrogenase responds to changes in the intracellular concentration of 2-oxoglutarate and to the redox status of the cells in Prochlorococcus. PMID:25061751

  16. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  17. Cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus proline dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    White, Tommi A.; Tanner, John J.

    2005-08-01

    Cloning, purification and crystallization of T. thermophilus proline dehydrogenase is reported. The detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside was used to reduce polydispersity, which enabled crystallization. Nature recycles l-proline by converting it to l-glutamate. This four-electron oxidation process is catalyzed by the two enzymes: proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. This note reports the cloning, purification and crystallization of Thermus thermophilus PRODH, which is the prototype of a newly discovered superfamily of bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. The results presented here include production of a monodisperse protein solution through use of the detergent n-octyl β-d-glucopyranoside and the growth of native crystals that diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. The space group is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 82.2, b = 89.6, c = 94.3 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain two protein molecules and 46% solvent. Molecular-replacement trials using a fragment of the PRODH domain of the multifunctional Escherichia coli PutA protein as the search model (24% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of T. thermophilus PRODH will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  18. Cloning and expression of a putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Entamoeba histolytica and its application to immunological examination.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Hara, Y; Kimoto, T; Okuno, Y; Minekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, T

    1996-01-01

    To clone and express the genes encoding major antigens of Entamoeba histolytica, we constructed a lambda gt11 cDNA library for E. histolytica HM1:IMSS and screened it with pooled sera from patients with amoebiasis. A 1,223-bp cDNA was cloned (clone 1223), and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence predicted to be encoded by the open reading frame of clone 1223 consisted of 396 residues and showed 32.5 and 32.3% homology to the NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenases I and II (bdhA and bdhB) of Clostridium acetobutylicum, respectively. In addition, 29 of the 34 consensus positions of bdhA and bdhB were also well conserved in clone 1223. The recombinant protein expressed from clone 1223 had an estimated molecular mass of 43.5 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The antigenicity and specificity of the recombinant protein were evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using sera obtained from two clinical groups of patients with amoebiasis and a group of healthy controls. The recombinant protein had potent and specific antigenicity. In all, 53 serum samples (88.3%) from 60 patients with amoebiasis were positive for immunoglobulin G antibody against the recombinant protein, with a mean optical density value of 0.42. In contrast, 53 of 54 healthy control serum samples were negative, with only 1 positive serum sample showing the lower optical density value. These results suggested that clone 1223 is promising in terms of providing a useful antigen for the accurate serodiagnosis of amoebiasis and that the gene encodes a putative alcohol dehydrogenase of E. histolytica. PMID:8705667

  19. Tissue Distribution of Glutamate Synthase and Glutamine Synthetase in Rice Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Toshihiko; Tanasawa, Keisuke; Kamachi, Kazunari; Mae, Tadahiko; Ojima, Kunihiko

    1992-01-01

    To further explore the function of NADH-dependent glutamate synthase (GOGAT), the tissue distribution of NADH-GOGAT protein and activity was investigated in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves. The distributions of ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent GOGAT, plastidic glutamine synthetase, and cytosolic glutamine synthetase proteins were also determined in the same tissues. High levels of NADH-GOGAT protein (33.1 μg protein/g fresh weight) and activity were detected in the 10th leaf blade before emergence. The unexpanded, nongreen portion of the 9th leaf blade contained more than 50% of the NADH-GOGAT protein and activity per gram fresh weight when compared with the 10th leaf. The expanding, green portion of the 9th leaf blade outside of the sheath contained a slightly lower abundance of NADH-GOGAT protein than the nongreen portion of the 9th blade on a fresh weight basis. The fully expanded leaf blades at positions lower than the 9th leaf had decreased NADH-GOGAT levels as a function of increasing age, and the oldest, 5th blade contained only 4% of the NADH-GOGAT protein compared with the youngest 10th leaf blade. Fd-GOGAT protein, on the other hand, was the major form of GOGAT in the green tissues, and the highest amount of Fd-GOGAT protein (111 μg protein/g fresh weight) was detected in the 7th leaf blade. In the nongreen 10th leaf blade, the content of Fd-GOGAT protein was approximately 7% of that found in the 7th leaf blade. In addition, the content of NADH-GOGAT protein in the 10th leaf blade was about 4 times higher than that of Fd-GOGAT protein. The content of plastidic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was also the highest in the 7th leaf blade (429 μg/g fresh weight) and lowest in nongreen blades and sheaths. On the other hand, the relative abundance of the cytosolic glutamine synthetase polypeptide was the highest in the oldest leaf blade, decreasing to 10 to 20% of that value in young, nongreen leaves. These results suggest that NADH-GOGAT is important for the

  20. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  1. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  2. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally recognized...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  4. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  5. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  8. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  13. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  2. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  4. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of...

  5. Brain neuroprotection by scavenging blood glutamate.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Gurevich, Boris; Tkachov, Sergei; Maoz, Ilana; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I

    2007-01-01

    Excess glutamate in brain fluids characterizes acute brain insults such as traumatic brain injury and stroke. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As blood glutamate scavenging has been demonstrated to increase the efflux of excess glutamate from brain into blood, we tested the prediction that oxaloacetate-mediated blood glutamate scavenging causes neuroprotection in a pathological situation such as closed head injury (CHI), in which there is a well established deleterious increase of glutamate in brain fluids. We observed highly significant improvements of the neurological status of rats submitted to CHI following an intravenous treatment with 1 mmol oxaloacetate/100 g rat weight which decreases blood glutamate levels by 40%. No detectable therapeutic effect was obtained when rats were treated IV with 1 mmol oxaloacetate together with 1 mmol glutamate/100 g rat. The treatment with 0.005 mmol/100 g rat oxaloacetate was no more effective than saline but when it was combined with the intravenous administration of 0.14 nmol/100 g of recombinant glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, recovery was almost complete. Oxaloacetate provided neuroprotection when administered before CHI or at 60 min post CHI but not at 120 min post CHI. Since neurological recovery from CHI was highly correlated with the decrease of blood glutamate levels (r=0.89, P=0.001), we conclude that blood glutamate scavenging affords brain neuroprotection Blood glutamate scavenging may open now new therapeutic options.

  6. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  7. Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, H. J.; Hanson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase from Methylobacterium organophilum, a facultative methane-oxidizing bacterium, has been purified to homogeneity as indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis. It has several properties in common with the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The active enzyme is a dimeric protein, both subunits having molecular weights of about 62,000. The enzyme exhibits broad substrate specificity for primary alcohols and catalyzes the two-step oxidation of methanol to formate. The apparent Michaelis constants of the enzyme are 2.9 × 10−5 M for methanol and 8.2 × 10−5 M for formaldehyde. Activity of the purified enzyme is dependent on phenazine methosulfate. Certain characteristics of this enzyme distinguish it from the other alcohol dehydrogenases of other methylotrophic bacteria. Ammonia is not required for, but stimulates the activity of newly purified enzyme. An absolute dependence on ammonia develops after storage of the purified enzyme. Activity is not inhibited by phosphate. The fluorescence spectrum of the enzyme indicates that it and the cofactor associated with it may be chemically different from the alcohol dehydrogenases from other methylotrophic bacteria. The alcohol dehydrogenases of Hyphomicrobium WC-65, Pseudomonas methanica, Methylosinus trichosporium, and several facultative methylotrophs are serologically related to the enzyme purified in this study. The enzymes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and of organisms of the Methylococcus group did not cross-react with the antiserum prepared against the alcohol dehydrogenase of M. organophilum. Images PMID:80974

  8. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  9. Physiological Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Exotoxin A Synthesis: Glutamate, Iron Limitation, and Aconitase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Greg; Mikoryak, Carole Ann; Reitzer, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate enhances the yield of exotoxin A (ETA), which is induced by iron limitation, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We tested the possibility that glutamate affects growth during iron restriction. We confirmed that iron limitation caused early entry into stationary phase but had no effect on the exponential growth rate. We showed that glutamate, as well as citrate and isocitrate, partially overcame this growth limitation. Glutamate had no effect on toxA (ETA-encoding) transcription, which implies that glutamate primarily increases the number of toxin-producing cells. In contrast, citrate and isocitrate diminished toxA transcription. Since glutamate, citrate, and isocitrate stimulated growth, we suspected a block in the citric acid cycle. Iron limitation reduced the activity of the iron-containing aconitase 12-fold but had no effect on isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, which was assayed as a control. There is a reciprocal relationship between aconitase activity and ETA synthesis, and this correlation does not appear to be coincidental because aconitase-specific effectors affect ETA synthesis. We tested whether a metabolic block is sufficient to induce ETA synthesis, but an aconitase-specific inhibitor diminished ETA production, which argues against this possibility. Finally, we present preliminary evidence that iron limitation may reversibly and posttranslationally inactivate aconitase in vivo. In summary, the environmental factors that stimulate ETA synthesis are related: glutamate bypasses an iron limitation-dependent metabolic block that causes entry into stationary phase. We speculate that one or more of the aconitases in P. aeruginosa may contribute to the control of virulence factor synthesis. PMID:9973331

  10. Metabolic fate of unsaturated glucuronic/iduronic acids from glycosaminoglycans: molecular identification and structure determination of streptococcal isomerase and dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Takase, Ryuichi; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    Glycosaminoglycans in mammalian extracellular matrices are degraded to their constituents, unsaturated uronic (glucuronic/iduronic) acids and amino sugars, through successive reactions of bacterial polysaccharide lyase and unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase. Genes coding for glycosaminoglycan-acting lyase, unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase, and the phosphotransferase system are assembled into a cluster in the genome of pathogenic bacteria, such as streptococci and clostridia. Here, we studied the streptococcal metabolic pathway of unsaturated uronic acids and the structure/function relationship of its relevant isomerase and dehydrogenase. Two proteins (gbs1892 and gbs1891) of Streptococcus agalactiae strain NEM316 were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. 4-Deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate (Dhu) nonenzymatically generated from unsaturated uronic acids was converted to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate via 3-deoxy-d-glycero-2,5-hexodiulosonate through successive reactions of gbs1892 isomerase (DhuI) and gbs1891 NADH-dependent reductase/dehydrogenase (DhuD). DhuI and DhuD enzymatically corresponded to 4-deoxy-l-threo-5-hexosulose-uronate ketol-isomerase (KduI) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate dehydrogenase (KduD), respectively, involved in pectin metabolism, although no or low sequence identity was observed between DhuI and KduI or between DhuD and KduD, respectively. Genes for DhuI and DhuD were found to be included in the streptococcal genetic cluster, whereas KduI and KduD are encoded in clostridia. Tertiary and quaternary structures of DhuI and DhuD were determined by x-ray crystallography. Distinct from KduI β-barrels, DhuI adopts an α/β/α-barrel structure as a basic scaffold similar to that of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase. The structure of DhuD is unable to accommodate the substrate/cofactor, suggesting that conformational changes are essential to trigger enzyme catalysis. This is the first report on the bacterial metabolism of

  11. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    PubMed

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  12. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  13. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  14. Michael hydratase alcohol dehydrogenase or just alcohol dehydrogenase?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Michael hydratase – alcohol dehydrogenase (MhyADH) from Alicycliphilus denitrificans was previously identified as a bi-functional enzyme performing a hydration of α,β-unsaturated ketones and subsequent oxidation of the formed alcohols. The investigations of the bi-functionality were based on a spectrophotometric assay and an activity staining in a native gel of the dehydrogenase. New insights in the recently discovered organocatalytic Michael addition of water led to the conclusion that the previously performed experiments to identify MhyADH as a bi-functional enzyme and their results need to be reconsidered and the reliability of the methodology used needs to be critically evaluated. PMID:24949265

  15. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  16. Glutamate racemization and catabolism in Fusobacterium varium.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Resmer, Kelly L; White, Robert L

    2011-07-01

    The pathways of glutamate catabolism in the anaerobic bacterium Fusobacterium varium, grown on complex, undefined medium and chemically defined, minimal medium, were investigated using specifically labelled (13)C-glutamate. The metabolic end-products acetate and butyrate were isolated from culture fluids and derivatized for analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. On complex medium, labels from L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and L-[4-(13)C]glutamate were incorporated into C1 of acetate and equally into C1/C3 of butyrate, while label derived from L-[5-(13)C]glutamate was not incorporated. The isotopic incorporation results and the detection of glutamate mutase and 3-methylaspartate ammonia lyase in cell extracts are most consistent with the methylaspartate pathway, the best known route of glutamate catabolism in Clostridium species. When F. varium was grown on defined medium, label from L-[4-(13)C]glutamate was incorporated mainly into C4 of butyrate, demonstrating a major role for the hydroxyglutarate pathway. Upon addition of coenzyme B(12) or cobalt ion to the defined medium in replicate experiments, isotope was located equally at C1/C3 of butyrate in accord with the methylaspartate pathway. Racemization of D-glutamate and subsequent degradation of L-glutamate via the methylaspartate pathway are supported by incorporation of label into C2 of acetate and equally into C2/C4 of butyrate from D-[3-(13)C]glutamate and the detection of a cofactor-independent glutamate racemase in cell extracts. Together the results demonstrate a major role for the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate catabolism in F. varium and substantial participation of the hydroxyglutarate pathway when coenzyme B(12) is not available.

  17. Evidence for Hysteretic Substrate Channeling in the Proline Dehydrogenase and Δ1-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate Dehydrogenase Coupled Reaction of Proline Utilization A (PutA)*

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Michael A.; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Krishnan, Navasona; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2014-01-01

    PutA (proline utilization A) is a large bifunctional flavoenzyme with proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) domains that catalyze the oxidation of l-proline to l-glutamate in two successive reactions. In the PRODH active site, proline undergoes a two-electron oxidation to Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxlylate, and the FAD cofactor is reduced. In the P5CDH active site, l-glutamate-γ-semialdehyde (the hydrolyzed form of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate) undergoes a two-electron oxidation in which a hydride is transferred to NAD+-producing NADH and glutamate. Here we report the first kinetic model for the overall PRODH-P5CDH reaction of a PutA enzyme. Global analysis of steady-state and transient kinetic data for the PRODH, P5CDH, and coupled PRODH-P5CDH reactions was used to test various models describing the conversion of proline to glutamate by Escherichia coli PutA. The coupled PRODH-P5CDH activity of PutA is best described by a mechanism in which the intermediate is not released into the bulk medium, i.e., substrate channeling. Unexpectedly, single-turnover kinetic experiments of the coupled PRODH-P5CDH reaction revealed that the rate of NADH formation is 20-fold slower than the steady-state turnover number for the overall reaction, implying that catalytic cycling speeds up throughput. We show that the limiting rate constant observed for NADH formation in the first turnover increases by almost 40-fold after multiple turnovers, achieving half of the steady-state value after 15 turnovers. These results suggest that EcPutA achieves an activated channeling state during the approach to steady state and is thus a new example of a hysteretic enzyme. Potential underlying causes of activation of channeling are discussed. PMID:24352662

  18. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  19. 2-Butanol and Butanone Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through Combination of a B12 Dependent Dehydratase and a Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using a TEV-Based Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Ghiaci, Payam; Norbeck, Joakim; Larsson, Christer

    2014-01-01

    2-Butanol and its chemical precursor butanone (methyl ethyl ketone – MEK) are chemicals with potential uses as biofuels and biocommodity chemicals. In order to produce 2-butanol, we have demonstrated the utility of using a TEV-protease based expression system to achieve equimolar expression of the individual subunits of the two protein complexes involved in the B12-dependent dehydratase step (from the pdu-operon of Lactobacillus reuterii), which catalyze the conversion of meso-2,3-butanediol to butanone. We have furthermore identified a NADH dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Sadh from Gordonia sp.) able to catalyze the subsequent conversion of butanone to 2-butanol. A final concentration of 4±0.2 mg/L 2-butanol and 2±0.1 mg/L of butanone was found. A key factor for the production of 2-butanol was the availability of NADH, which was achieved by growing cells lacking the GPD1 and GPD2 isogenes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25054226

  20. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... dehydrogenase-B pieces (subunits) of the lactate dehydrogenase enzyme. This enzyme is found throughout the body and is important ... cells. There are five different forms of this enzyme, each made up of four protein subunits. Various ...

  1. The glutamate homeostasis hypothesis of addiction.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Peter W

    2009-08-01

    Addiction is associated with neuroplasticity in the corticostriatal brain circuitry that is important for guiding adaptive behaviour. The hierarchy of corticostriatal information processing that normally permits the prefrontal cortex to regulate reinforcement-seeking behaviours is impaired by chronic drug use. A failure of the prefrontal cortex to control drug-seeking behaviours can be linked to an enduring imbalance between synaptic and non-synaptic glutamate, termed glutamate homeostasis. The imbalance in glutamate homeostasis engenders changes in neuroplasticity that impair communication between the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens. Some of these pathological changes are amenable to new glutamate- and neuroplasticity-based pharmacotherapies for treating addiction. PMID:19571793

  2. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-01

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  3. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  4. Scavenging of blood glutamate for enhancing brain-to-blood glutamate efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Qi, Qi; Wang, Le; Luo, Lan; Yang, Shaoqi; Zhang, Yumei; Miao, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Hongyan; Huang, Weidong; Wang, Zhenhai; Shen, Ying; Wang, Yin

    2014-01-01

    The presence of excess glutamate in the brain interstitial fluid characterizes several acute pathological conditions of the brain, including traumatic brain injury and stroke. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to eliminate excess glutamate in the brain by decreasing blood glutamate levels and, accordingly, accelerating the brain-to-blood glutamate efflux. It is feasible to accomplish this process by activating blood resident enzymes in the presence of the respective glutamate cosubstrates. In the present study, several glutamate cosubstrates and cofactors were studied in an attempt to identify the optimal conditions to reduce blood glutamate levels. The administration of a mixture of 1 mM pyruvate and oxaloacetate (Pyr/Oxa) for 1 h decreased blood glutamate levels by ≤50%. The addition of lipoamide to this mixture resulted in a further reduction in blood glutamate levels of >80%. In addition, in vivo experiments showed that lipoamide together with Pyr/Oxa is able to decrease blood glutamate levels to a greater extent than Pyr/Oxa alone, and accordingly, this enhances the glutamate efflux from the brain to the blood. These results may outline a novel neuroprotective strategy with increased effectiveness for the removal of excess brain glutamate in various neurodegenerative conditions.

  5. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  6. Characterization of testis-specific isoenzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S

    2006-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), the first component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, has two isoenzymes, somatic cell-specific PDH1 and testis-specific PDH2 with 87% sequence identity in the alpha subunit of alpha(2) beta(2) PDH. The presence of functional testis-specific PDH2 is important for sperm cells generating nearly all their energy from carbohydrates via pyruvate oxidation. Kinetic and regulatory properties of recombinant human PDH2 and PDH1 were compared in this study. Site-specific phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the three phosphorylation sites by four PDH kinases (PDK1-4) and two PDH phosphatases (PDP1-2) were investigated by substituting serines with alanine or glutamate in PDHs. PDH2 was found to be very similar to PDH1 as follows: (i) in specific activities and kinetic parameters as determined by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex assay; (ii) in thermostability at 37 degrees C; (iii) in the mechanism of inactivation by phosphorylation of three sites; and (iv) in the phosphorylation of sites 1 and 2 by PDK3. In contrast, the differences for PDH2 were indicated as follows: (i) by a 2.4-fold increase in binding affinity for the PDH-binding domain of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase as measured by surface plasmon resonance; (ii) by possible involvement of Ser-264 (site 1) of PDH2 in catalysis as evident by its kinetic behavior; and (iii) by the lower activities of PDK1, PDK2, and PDK4 as well as PDP1 and PDP2 toward PDH2. These differences between PDH2 and PDH1 are less than expected from substitution of 47 amino acids in each PDH2 alpha subunit. The multiple substitutions may have compensated for any drastic alterations in PDH2 structure thereby preserving its kinetic and regulatory characteristics largely similar to that of PDH1. PMID:16436377

  7. Convergent evolution of Trichomonas vaginalis lactate dehydrogenase from malate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Fiser, András; ter Kuile, Benno; Šali, Andrej; Müller, Miklós

    1999-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is present in the amitochondriate parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis and some but not all other trichomonad species. The derived amino acid sequence of T. vaginalis LDH (TvLDH) was found to be more closely related to the cytosolic malate dehydrogenase (MDH) of the same species than to any other LDH. A key difference between the two T. vaginalis sequences was that Arg91 of MDH, known to be important in coordinating the C-4 carboxyl of oxalacetate/malate, was replaced by Leu91 in LDH. The change Leu91Arg by site-directed mutagenesis converted TvLDH into an MDH. The reverse single amino acid change Arg91Leu in TvMDH, however, gave a product with no measurable LDH activity. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that TvLDH arose from an MDH relatively recently. PMID:10339579

  8. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is a zinc enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, J; Chesters, J; Mills, C; Sadler, P J; Jörnvall, H

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is given that tetrameric sorbitol dehydrogenase from sheep liver contains one zinc atom per subunit, most probably located at the active site, and no other specifically bound zinc or iron atom. In alcohol dehydrogenases that are structurally related to sorbitol dehydrogenase, more than one zinc atom per subunit can complicate investigations of zinc atom function. Therefore, sorbitol dehydrogenase will be particularly valuable for defining the precise roles of zinc in alcohol and polyol dehydrogenases, and for establishing correlations of structure and function with other important zinc-containing proteins. PMID:6370679

  9. Effect of insulin on muscle glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T. T.; Brennan, M. F.; Müller, W. A.; Moore, F. D.; Cahill, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    For decades, investigators concerned with protein metabolism in man have performed detailed amino acid analyses of human plasma obtained under a wide range of experimental situations. A large body of information has been used to calculated rates of protein synthesis and proteolysis. During the course of an investigation of the effect of intrabrachial artery infusion of insulin (70 μU/min per kg body weight) on glutamate uptake by human forearm muscle, it was discovered that plasma arterio-deep venous glutamate difference analysis failed to document any increase in the uptake of this amino acid, suggesting that insulin had little influence on glutamate uptake by muscle. However, whole blood glutamate analyses, performed on the same blood samples, revealed that (a) the resting muscle uptake of glutamate is smaller than previously reported and (b) insulin is capable of markedly increasing glutamate uptake by muscle from whole blood. Since the hematocrit was obtained on all samples, detailed analyses of the various compartments in which glutamate could be found were performed. It was determined that circulating blood cells have a dynamic role in glutamate transport. These data underscore the need for both whole blood and plasma amino acid analysis in investigations concerned with protein synthesis and/or amino acid flux, for analysis of plasma samples alone could be misleading as illustrated in the present study. Images PMID:5080414

  10. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    PubMed

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. PMID:27422519

  11. Glutamate Transporter-Mediated Glutamate Secretion in the Mammalian Pineal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mean-Hwan; Uehara, Shunsuke; Muroyama, Akiko; Hille, Bertil; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Koh, Duk-Su

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are expressed throughout the central nervous system where their major role is to clear released glutamate from presynaptic terminals. Here we report a novel function of the transporter in rat pinealocytes. This electrogenic transporter conducted inward current in response to L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate and depolarized the membrane in patch clamp experiments. Ca2+ imaging demonstrated that the transporter-mediated depolarization induced a significant Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The Ca2+ rise finally evoked glutamate exocytosis as detected by carbon-fiber amperometry and by high-performance liquid chromatography. In pineal slices with densely packed pinealocytes, glutamate released from the cells effectively activated glutamate transporters in neighboring cells. The Ca2+ signal generated by KCl depolarization or acetylcholine propagated through several cell layers by virtue of the regenerative ‘glutamate-induced glutamate release’. Therefore we suggest that glutamate transporters mediate synchronized elevation of L-glutamate and thereby efficiently down-regulate melatonin secretion via previously identified inhibitory metabotropic glutamate receptors in the pineal gland. PMID:18945893

  12. Glutamate-based antidepressants: preclinical psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Wierońska, Joanna M; Skolnick, Phil

    2013-06-15

    Over the past 20 years, converging lines of evidence have both linked glutamatergic dysfunction to the pathophysiology of depression and demonstrated that the glutamatergic synapse presents multiple targets for developing novel antidepressants. The robust antidepressant effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists ketamine and traxoprodil provide target validation for this family of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This article reviews the preclinical evidence that it may be possible to develop glutamate-based antidepressants by not only modulating ionotropic (N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, including mGlu2/3, mGLu5 and mGlu7 receptors, but also by altering synaptic concentrations of glutamate via specialized transporters such as glial glutamate transporter 1 (excitatory amino-acid transporter 2).

  13. Further studies on the bioaffinity chromatography of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases using the locking-on effect.

    PubMed

    O'Carra, P; Griffin, T; O'Flaherty, M; Kelly, N; Mulcahy, P

    1996-10-17

    Previous studies have capitalized on ordered kinetic mechanisms in the design of biospecific affinity chromatographic methods for highly efficient purifications and mechanistic studies of enzymes. The most direct tactic has been the use of immobilised analogues of the following, usually enzyme-specific substrates, e.g., lactate/pyruvate in the case of lactate dehydrogenase for which NAD+ is the leading substrate. Such immobilised specific substrates are, however, often difficult or impossible to synthesise. The locking-on strategy reverses the tactic by using the more accessible immobilised leading substrate, immobilised NAD+, as adsorbent with soluble analogues of the enzyme-specific ligands (e.g., lactate in the case of lactate dehydrogenase) providing a substantial reinforcement of biospecific adsorption sufficient to effect adsorptive selection of an enzyme from a group of enzymes such as the NAD(+)-specific enzymes. The value of this approach is demonstrated using model studies with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH, EC 1.1.1.37). Purification of bovine liver GDH in high yield from crude extracts is described using the tactic. PMID:8917627

  14. Acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides act as antagonists against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death via Bcl-2/Bax signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Cui; Gao, Lixia; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Wei; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Chunxia

    2015-03-12

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs), depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4) D-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs) and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs) were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death.

  15. Acetylated Chitosan Oligosaccharides Act as Antagonists against Glutamate-Induced PC12 Cell Death via Bcl-2/Bax Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Cui; Gao, Lixia; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Wei; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Chunxia

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs), depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4) d-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs) and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs) were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death. PMID:25775423

  16. Evaluation of the VIDAS glutamate dehydrogenase assay for the detection of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Shin, Bo-Moon; Lee, Eun Joo; Moon, Jung Wha; Lee, Seon Yeong

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the performance of the VIDAS GDH assay for the detection of Clostridium difficile. In total, 350 fecal specimens collected from patients clinically suspected of having CDI were analyzed by C. difficile culture and enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay (VIDAS GDH); the results were compared with those of toxigenic C. difficile culture (TC), PCR (Xpert C. difficile assay), and toxin AB EIA (VIDAS CDAB). The numbers of culture-positive and culture-negative samples were 108 and 242, respectively. The concordance between the GDH assay and C. difficile culture was 90.3%. With PCR, 12 more samples were found to be positive in GDH-positive/C. difficile culture-negative specimens. Thus, the concordance between GDH assay and C. difficile culture/PCR was 93.7%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the VIDAS GDH assay were 97.2%, 87.2%, 77.2%, and 98.6%, respectively, based on the C. difficile culture, and 97.5%, 91.7%, 86.0%, and 98.6%, respectively, based on C. difficile culture/PCR. Positivity rates of the GDH assay were partially associated with those of semi-quantitative C. difficile cultures, which were maximized in grade 3 (>100 colony-forming unit [CFU]) compared with grade 1 (<10 CFU). We evaluated the two-step or three-step algorithm using GDH assay as a first step. No toxin EIA-positive case was found among GDH-negative samples, and 60.8% (48/79) were TC- and/or PCR-positive among the GDH-positive/toxin EIA-negative samples. Thus, approximately 25% of the 350 samples required a confirmatory test (TC or PCR) in the GDH-toxin EIA algorithm, whereas only 2.3% of the total samples in GDH-PCR algorithm was discrepant and required another confirmatory test like TC.

  17. 13N as a tracer for studying glutamate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2010-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes studies my associates and I carried out that are relevant to the topic of the present volume [i.e. glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)] using radioactive 13N (t½ 9.96 min) as a biological tracer. These studies revealed the previously unrecognized rapidity with which nitrogen is exchanged among certain metabolites in vivo. For example, our work demonstrated that a) the t½ for conversion of portal vein ammonia to urea in the rat liver is ~10–11 sec, despite the need for five enzyme-catalyzed steps and two mitochondrial transport steps, b) the residence time for ammonia in the blood of anesthetized rats is ≤7–8 sec, c) the t½ for incorporation of blood-borne ammonia into glutamine in the normal rat brain is <3 sec, and d) equilibration between glutamate and aspartate nitrogen in rat liver is extremely rapid (seconds), a reflection of the fact that the components of the hepatic aspartate aminotransferase reaction are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Our work emphasizes the importance of the GDH reaction in rat liver as a conduit for dissimilating or assimilating ammonia as needed. In contrast, our work shows that the GDH reaction in rat brain appears to operate mostly in the direction of ammonia production (dissimilation). The importance of the GDH reaction as an endogenous source of ammonia in the brain and the relation of GDH to the brain glutamine cycle is discussed. Finally, our work integrates with the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study brain ammonia uptake and brain glutamine, respectively, in normal individuals and in patients with liver disease or other diseases associated with hyperammonemia. PMID:21108979

  18. Replication of the Shrimp Virus WSSV Depends on Glutamate-Driven Anaplerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Jan; Huang, Shiao-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Shun; Wang, Han-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Infection with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) induces a metabolic shift in shrimp that resembles the "Warburg effect" in mammalian cells. This effect is triggered via activation of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, and it is usually accompanied by the activation of other metabolic pathways that provide energy and direct the flow of carbon and nitrogen. Here we show that unlike the glutamine metabolism (glutaminolysis) seen in most cancer cells to double deaminate glutamine to produce glutamate and the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), at the WSSV genome replication stage (12 hpi), although glutaminase (GLS) expression was upregulated, only glutamate was taken up by the hemocytes of WSSV-infected shrimp. At the same time, we observed an increase in the activity of the two enzymes that convert glutamate to α-KG, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT). α-ketoglutarate concentration was also increased. A series of inhibition experiments suggested that the up-regulation of GDH is regulated by mTORC2, and that the PI3K-mTORC1 pathway is not involved. Suppression of GDH and ASAT by dsRNA silencing showed that both of these enzymes are important for WSSV replication. In GDH-silenced shrimp, direct replenishment of α-KG rescued both ATP production and WSSV replication. From these results, we propose a model of glutamate-driven anaplerosis that fuels the TCA cycle via α-KG and ultimately supports WSSV replication. PMID:26751681

  19. Replication of the Shrimp Virus WSSV Depends on Glutamate-Driven Anaplerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Jan; Huang, Shiao-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Shun; Wang, Han-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Infection with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) induces a metabolic shift in shrimp that resembles the “Warburg effect” in mammalian cells. This effect is triggered via activation of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, and it is usually accompanied by the activation of other metabolic pathways that provide energy and direct the flow of carbon and nitrogen. Here we show that unlike the glutamine metabolism (glutaminolysis) seen in most cancer cells to double deaminate glutamine to produce glutamate and the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), at the WSSV genome replication stage (12 hpi), although glutaminase (GLS) expression was upregulated, only glutamate was taken up by the hemocytes of WSSV-infected shrimp. At the same time, we observed an increase in the activity of the two enzymes that convert glutamate to α-KG, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT). α-ketoglutarate concentration was also increased. A series of inhibition experiments suggested that the up-regulation of GDH is regulated by mTORC2, and that the PI3K-mTORC1 pathway is not involved. Suppression of GDH and ASAT by dsRNA silencing showed that both of these enzymes are important for WSSV replication. In GDH-silenced shrimp, direct replenishment of α-KG rescued both ATP production and WSSV replication. From these results, we propose a model of glutamate-driven anaplerosis that fuels the TCA cycle via α-KG and ultimately supports WSSV replication. PMID:26751681

  20. Biotransformation of CL-20 by a dehydrogenase enzyme from Clostridium sp. EDB2.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Hawari, Jalal

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study, a marine isolate Clostridium sp. EDB2 degraded 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) under anaerobic conditions (Bhushan B, Halasz A, Thiboutot S, Ampleman G, Hawari J (2004c) Chemotaxis-mediated biodegradation of cyclic nitramine explosives RDX, HMX, and CL-20 by Clostridium sp. EDB2. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 316:816-821); however, the enzyme responsible for CL-20 degradation was not known. In the present study, we isolated and purified an enzyme, from strain EDB2, responsible for CL-20 degradation. The enzyme was membrane-associated and NADH-dependent and had a molecular weight of 56 kDa (with SDS-PAGE). N-terminal amino acid sequence of enzyme revealed that it belonged to dehydrogenase class of enzymes. The purified enzyme degraded CL-20 at a rate of 18.5 nmol/h mg protein under anaerobic conditions. Carbon and nitrogen mass balance of the products were 100 and 64%, respectively. In LC-MS-MS studies, we detected three different initial metabolites from CL-20, i.e., mono-nitroso derivative, denitrohydrogenated product, and double-denitrated isomers with molecular weight of 422, 393, and 346 Da, corresponding to presumed empirical formulas of C(6)H(6)N(12)O(11), C(6)H(7)N(11)O(10), and C(6)H(6)N(10)O(8), respectively. Identity of all the three metabolites were confirmed by using ring-labeled [(15)N]CL-20 and the nitro-group-labeled [(15)NO(2)]CL-20. Taken together, the above data suggested that the enzyme degraded CL-20 via three different routes: Route A, via two single electron transfers necessary to release two nitro-groups from CL-20 to produce two double-denitrated isomers; Route B, via a hydride transfer necessary to produce a denitrohydrogenated product; and Route C, via transfer of two redox equivalents to CL-20 necessary to produce a mono-nitroso derivative of CL-20. This is the first biochemical study which showed that CL-20 degradation can be initiated via more than one pathway.

  1. Biotransformation of CL-20 by a dehydrogenase enzyme from Clostridium sp. EDB2.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Hawari, Jalal

    2005-12-01

    In a previous study, a marine isolate Clostridium sp. EDB2 degraded 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) under anaerobic conditions (Bhushan B, Halasz A, Thiboutot S, Ampleman G, Hawari J (2004c) Chemotaxis-mediated biodegradation of cyclic nitramine explosives RDX, HMX, and CL-20 by Clostridium sp. EDB2. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 316:816-821); however, the enzyme responsible for CL-20 degradation was not known. In the present study, we isolated and purified an enzyme, from strain EDB2, responsible for CL-20 degradation. The enzyme was membrane-associated and NADH-dependent and had a molecular weight of 56 kDa (with SDS-PAGE). N-terminal amino acid sequence of enzyme revealed that it belonged to dehydrogenase class of enzymes. The purified enzyme degraded CL-20 at a rate of 18.5 nmol/h mg protein under anaerobic conditions. Carbon and nitrogen mass balance of the products were 100 and 64%, respectively. In LC-MS-MS studies, we detected three different initial metabolites from CL-20, i.e., mono-nitroso derivative, denitrohydrogenated product, and double-denitrated isomers with molecular weight of 422, 393, and 346 Da, corresponding to presumed empirical formulas of C(6)H(6)N(12)O(11), C(6)H(7)N(11)O(10), and C(6)H(6)N(10)O(8), respectively. Identity of all the three metabolites were confirmed by using ring-labeled [(15)N]CL-20 and the nitro-group-labeled [(15)NO(2)]CL-20. Taken together, the above data suggested that the enzyme degraded CL-20 via three different routes: Route A, via two single electron transfers necessary to release two nitro-groups from CL-20 to produce two double-denitrated isomers; Route B, via a hydride transfer necessary to produce a denitrohydrogenated product; and Route C, via transfer of two redox equivalents to CL-20 necessary to produce a mono-nitroso derivative of CL-20. This is the first biochemical study which showed that CL-20 degradation can be initiated via more than one pathway. PMID:15841370

  2. Emerging aspects of dietary glutamate metabolism in the developing gut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as a flavour additive in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is exten...

  3. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. PMID:27017513

  4. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sulkowski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Salińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs), the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST). Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release) by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  5. Higher Ammonium Transamination Capacity Can Alleviate Glutamate Inhibition on Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Root Growth under High Ammonium Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Jingwen; Liu, Yang; Tian, Zhongwei; Muhammad, Abid; Zhang, Yixuan; Jiang, Dong; Cao, Weixing; Dai, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the studies about NH4+ stress mechanism simply address the effects of free NH4+, failing to recognize the changed nitrogen assimilation products. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of glutamate on root growth under high ammonium (NH4+) conditions in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Hydroponic experiments were conducted using two wheat cultivars, AK58 (NH4+-sensitive) and Xumai25 (NH4+-tolerant) with either 5 mM NH4+ nitrogen (AN) as stress treatment or 5 mM nitrate (NO3-) nitrogen as control. To evaluate the effects of NH4+-assimilation products on plant growth, 1 μM L-methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS)) and 1 mM glutamates (a primary N assimilation product) were added to the solutions, respectively. The AN significantly reduced plant biomass, total root length, surface area and root volume in both cultivars, but less effect was observed in Xumai25. The inhibition effects were alleviated by the application of MSO but strengthened by the application of glutamate. The AN increased the activities of GS, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in both cultivars, resulting in higher glutamate contents. However, its contents were decreased by the application of MSO. Compared to AK58, Xumai25 showed lower glutamate contents due to its higher activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT). With the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) contents decreasing in roots, the ratio of shoot to root in IAA was increased, and further increased by the application of glutamate, and reduced by the application of MSO, but the ratio was lower in Xumai25. Meanwhile, the total soluble sugar contents and its root to shoot ratio also showed similar trends. These results indicate that the NH4+-tolerant cultivar has a greater transamination ability to prevent glutamate over-accumulation to maintain higher IAA transport ability, and consequently promoted soluble sugar transport to roots, further

  6. Higher Ammonium Transamination Capacity Can Alleviate Glutamate Inhibition on Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Root Growth under High Ammonium Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Tian, Zhongwei; Muhammad, Abid; Zhang, Yixuan; Jiang, Dong; Cao, Weixing; Dai, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the studies about NH4+ stress mechanism simply address the effects of free NH4+, failing to recognize the changed nitrogen assimilation products. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of glutamate on root growth under high ammonium (NH4+) conditions in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Hydroponic experiments were conducted using two wheat cultivars, AK58 (NH4+-sensitive) and Xumai25 (NH4+-tolerant) with either 5 mM NH4+ nitrogen (AN) as stress treatment or 5 mM nitrate (NO3-) nitrogen as control. To evaluate the effects of NH4+-assimilation products on plant growth, 1 μM L-methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS)) and 1 mM glutamates (a primary N assimilation product) were added to the solutions, respectively. The AN significantly reduced plant biomass, total root length, surface area and root volume in both cultivars, but less effect was observed in Xumai25. The inhibition effects were alleviated by the application of MSO but strengthened by the application of glutamate. The AN increased the activities of GS, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in both cultivars, resulting in higher glutamate contents. However, its contents were decreased by the application of MSO. Compared to AK58, Xumai25 showed lower glutamate contents due to its higher activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT). With the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) contents decreasing in roots, the ratio of shoot to root in IAA was increased, and further increased by the application of glutamate, and reduced by the application of MSO, but the ratio was lower in Xumai25. Meanwhile, the total soluble sugar contents and its root to shoot ratio also showed similar trends. These results indicate that the NH4+-tolerant cultivar has a greater transamination ability to prevent glutamate over-accumulation to maintain higher IAA transport ability, and consequently promoted soluble sugar transport to roots, further

  7. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    FEATHERSTONE, DAVID E.; SHIPPY, SCOTT A.

    2008-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μM of glutamate is high enough to cause constitutive desensitization of most glutamate receptors. Therefore, most glutamate receptors in vivo may be constitutively desensitized, and ambient extracellular glutamate and receptor desensitization may be potent but generally unrecognized regulators of synaptic transmission. Unfortunately, the mechanisms regulating ambient extracellular glutamate and glutamate receptor desensitization remain poorly understood and understudied. PMID:17947494

  8. Construction of a potentiometric glutamate biosensor for determination of glutamate in some real samples.

    PubMed

    Y Lmaz, Demet; Karaku, Emine

    2011-12-01

    The potentiometric glutamate biosensor based on ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode was constructed by chemically immobilizing glutamate oxidase. Ammonium ions produced after an enzymatic reaction were determined potentiometrically. We determined the optimum working conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, lifetime, response time, linear working range, kinetic constants (K(m) and V(max)) of glutamate oxidase enzyme used for biosensor construction values, and other response characteristics. Additionally, glutamate assay in some real samples such as chicken bullion, healthy human serum, and commercial multipower amino acid mixture were also successfully carried out. The results showed good agreement with previously reported values.

  9. Brain glutamate decarboxylase and pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Choi, S Y; Khemlani, L S; Churchich, J E

    1992-01-01

    Porcine brain glutamate decarboxylase was examined for the presence of covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). HPLC analysis of pure glutamate decarboxylase subjected to the hexanol extraction procedure gave negative results when monitored at 320 nm, the maximum of absorbance of 4-hydroxy-5-hexoxy-PQQ. Resolved glutamate decarboxylase exhibits a structureless absorption band at wavelengths longer than 300 nm which cannot be attributed to PQQ. The holoenzyme is not a pyridoxal-quinoprotein; its catalytic mechanism involves the participation of only one cofactor, i.e. pyridoxal-5-P. Free PQQ is a strong inhibitor of the decarboxylase (Ki = 13 microM) and the reaction with the protein results in spectral changes resembling those of polylysine treated with PQQ. If the concentration of free PQQ in some regions of the brain reaches the micromolar level, then PQQ might play a role in the regulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity.

  10. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  11. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  12. [Glutamate transporter dysfunction and major mental illnesses].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohichi

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and plays an important role in most aspects of normal brain function. In spite of its importance as a neurotransmitter, excess glutamate is toxic to neurons. Clearance of extracellular glutamate is critical for maintenance of low extracellular glutamate concentration, and occurs in large part through the activity of GLT1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1), which are primarily expressed by astrocytes. Rare variants and down-regulation of GLT1 and GLAST, in psychiatric disorders have been reported. In this review, we demonstrate that various kinds of GLT1 and/or GLAST knockout mice replicate many aspects of the behavioral abnormalities seen in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, obsessive -compulsive disorders, autism, epilepsy and addiction. PMID:26793898

  13. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylation in Chlorella12

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T. R.; Stiller, Mary

    1970-01-01

    The decarboxylation of endogenous free glutamic acid by Chlorella pyrenoidosa, Marburg strain, was induced by a variety of metabolic poisons, by anaerobic conditions, and by freezing and thawing the cells. The rate of decarboxylation was proportional to the concentration of inhibitor present. Possible mechanisms which relate the effects of the various conditions on glutamate decarboxylation and oxygen consumption by Chlorella are discussed. Images PMID:5429350

  14. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44

  15. Δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate/Glutamate Biogenesis Is Required for Fungal Virulence and Sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ziting; Zou, Chengwu; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Jinzi; Lu, Lidan; Li, Yang; Chen, Baoshan

    2013-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (Prodh) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5Cdh) are two key enzymes in the cellular biogenesis of glutamate. Recombinant Prodh and P5Cdh proteins of the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica were investigated and showed activity in in vitro assays. Additionally, the C. parasitica Prodh and P5Cdh genes were able to complement the Saccharomyces cerevisiae put1 and put2 null mutants, respectively, to allow these proline auxotrophic yeast mutants to grow on media with proline as the sole source of nitrogen. Deletion of the Prodh gene in C. parasitica resulted in hypovirulence and a lower level of sporulation, whereas deletion of P5Cdh resulted in hypovirulence though no effect on sporulation; both Δprodh and Δp5cdh mutants were unable to grow on minimal medium with proline as the sole nitrogen source. In a wild-type strain, the intracellular level of proline and the activity of Prodh and P5Cdh increased after supplementation of exogenous proline, though the intracellular Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) content remained unchanged. Prodh and P5Cdh were both transcriptionally down-regulated in cells infected with hypovirus. The disruption of other genes with products involved in the conversion of arginine to ornithine, ornithine and glutamate to P5C, and P5C to proline in the cytosol did not appear to affect virulence; however, asexual sporulation was reduced in the Δpro1 and Δpro2 mutants. Taken together, our results showed that Prodh, P5Cdh and related mitochondrial functions are essential for virulence and that proline/glutamate pathway components may represent down-stream targets of hypovirus regulation in C. parasitica. PMID:24039956

  16. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  17. Medroxyprogesterone acetate exacerbates glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon; Morales, Alison; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2006-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone functions as a neuroprotective agent whereas medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; Provera) does not. Moreover, MPA antagonized the neuroprotective and neurotrophic outcomes induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). Towards developing effective hormone therapies for protection against neurodegeneration, we sought to determine whether formulation, chemical features or prevention versus treatment mode of exposure affected the outcome of MPA treatment in survival of primary hippocampal neurons. Results of these analyses indicated that both crystalline MPA and a pharmaceutical formulation (Depo-Provera) lacked neuroprotective efficacy, indicating that the effects were not dependent upon MPA formulation. Likewise, MPA in the prevention and treatment paradigms were equally ineffective at promoting neuronal survival, indicating that timing of MPA administration was not a factor. Further, the detrimental effects of MPA were not due to the presence of the acetate group, as medroxyprogesterone was as ineffective as MPA in promoting neuronal survival. Moreover, MPA pretreatment exacerbated neuron death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity as indicated by a 40% increase in neuron death determined by direct live/dead cell count and a commensurate increase in the number of positive cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling. Collectively these results predict that the progestin formulation of hormone therapy will affect the vulnerability of the central nervous system to degenerative insults.

  18. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ji; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Xiaolei; Wu, Mingchun; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Xiaonan; Huo, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular Cu/Zn SOD (SOD1) and SOD2 activities; western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were performed to investigate SOD2 protein expression; MTT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), release and cell morphology were used to evaluate cell injury degree, and apoptotic rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression were taken to assess apoptosis; mitochondrial superoxide production, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated by reagent kits. Results. Amifostine increased SOD2 activity and expression, decreased cell injury and apoptosis, reduced mitochondrial superoxide production and intracellular ROS generation, and restored intracellular GSH and CAT levels in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. SOD2-siRNA, however, significantly reversed the amifostine-induced cytoprotective and antioxidative actions. Conclusion. SOD2 mediates amifostine-induced protection in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. PMID:26770652

  19. Synaptic vesicle-bound pyruvate kinase can support vesicular glutamate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Atsuhiko; Noda, Yasuko; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    2008-01-01

    Glucose metabolism is essential for normal brain function and plays a vital role in synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that ATP synthesized locally by glycolysis, particularly via glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase/3-phosphoglycerate kinase, is critical for synaptic transmission. We present evidence that ATP generated by synaptic vesicle-associated pyruvate kinase is harnessed to transport glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Isolated synaptic vesicles incorporated [3H]glutamate in the presence of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP. Pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors stimulated and reduced PEP/ADP-dependent glutamate uptake, respectively. Membrane potential was also formed in the presence of pyruvate kinase activators. “ATP-trapping” experiments using hexokinase and glucose suggest that ATP produced by vesicle-associated pyruvate kinase is more readily used than exogenously added ATP. Other neurotransmitters such as GABA, dopamine, and serotonin were also taken up into crude synaptic vesicles in a PEP/ADP-dependent manner. The possibility that ATP locally generated by glycolysis supports vesicular accumulation of neurotransmitters is discussed. PMID:18751889

  20. Yeast nitrogen catabolite repression is sustained by signals distinct from glutamine and glutamate reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Fayyad-Kazan, Mohammad; Feller, A; Bodo, E; Boeckstaens, M; Marini, A M; Dubois, E; Georis, I

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) is a wide transcriptional regulation program enabling baker's yeast to downregulate genes involved in the utilization of poor nitrogen sources when preferred ones are available. Nowadays, glutamine and glutamate, the major nitrogen donors for biosyntheses, are assumed to be key metabolic signals regulating NCR. NCR is controlled by the conserved TORC1 complex, which integrates nitrogen signals among others to regulate cell growth. However, accumulating evidence indicate that the TORC1-mediated control of NCR is only partial, arguing for the existence of supplementary regulatory processes to be discovered. In this work, we developed a genetic screen to search for new players involved in NCR signaling. Our data reveal that the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Gdh1 negatively regulates NCR-sensitive gene transcription. By determining the total, cytoplasmic and vacuolar pools of amino acids, we show that there is no positive correlation between glutamine/glutamate reservoirs and the extent of NCR. While our data indicate that glutamine could serve as initial trigger of NCR, they show that it is not a sufficient signal to sustain repression and point to the existence of yet unknown signals. Providing additional evidence uncoupling TORC1 activity and NCR, our work revisits the dogmas underlying NCR regulation. PMID:26419331

  1. STRUCTURE AND KINETICS OF MONOFUNCTIONAL PROLINE DEHYDROGENASE FROM THERMUS THERMOPHILUS

    PubMed Central

    White, Tommi A.; Krishnan, Navasona; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) catalyze the two-step oxidation of proline to glutamate. They are distinct monofunctional enzymes in all eukaryotes and some bacteria, but are fused into bifunctional enzymes known as Proline utilization A (PutA) in other bacteria. Here we report the first structure and biochemical data for a monofunctional PRODH. The 2.0 Å resolution structure of Thermus thermophilus PRODH reveals a distorted (βα)8 barrel catalytic core domain and a hydrophobic α-helical domain located above the carboxyl terminal ends of the strands of the barrel. Although the catalytic core is similar to that of the PutA PRODH domain, the FAD conformation of T. thermophilus PRODH is remarkably different and likely reflects unique requirements for membrane association and communication with P5CDH. Also, the FAD of T. thermophilus PRODH is highly solvent exposed compared to PutA due to a 4-Å shift of helix 8. Structure-based sequence analysis of the PutA/PRODH family led us to identify 9 conserved motifs involved in cofactor and substrate recognition. Biochemical studies show that the midpoint potential of the FAD is −75 mV and the kinetic parameters for proline are Km=27 mM and kcat=13 s−1. 3,4-dehydro-L-proline was found to be an efficient substrate and L-tetrahydro-2-furoic acid is a competitive inhibitor (KI=1.0 mM). Finally, we demonstrate that T. thermophilus PRODH reacts with O2 producing superoxide. This is significant because superoxide production underlies the role of human PRODH in p53-mediated apoptosis, implying commonalities between eukaryotic and bacterial monofunctional PRODHs. PMID:17344208

  2. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  3. [The PQQ-dehydrogenases. A novel example of bacterial quinoproteins].

    PubMed

    Flores-Encarnación, Marcos; Sánchez-Cuevas, Mariano; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Felipe

    2004-01-01

    The word "quinoprotein" describes four groups of different enzymes which have cofactors containing o-quinones. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is not covalently attached. PQQ is the cofactor of several quinoprotein bacterial dehydrogenases including glucose dehydrogenase (G-DH), alcohol dehydrogenase (A-DH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (AL-DH). These dehydrogenases are located in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria. This report summarises the structural properties of quinoprotein dehydrogenases, such as the biological functions and biotechnological aspects more important.

  4. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1445 - Lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dehydrogenase isoenzymes test system is a device intended to measure the activity of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (a group of enzymes with similar biological activity) in serum. Measurements of...

  9. Formate dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas oxalaticus.

    PubMed

    Müller, U; Willnow, P; Ruschig, U; Höpner, T

    1978-02-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.2) from Pseudomonas oxalaticus has been isolated and characterized. The enzyme (molecular weight 315000) is a complex flavoprotein containing 2 FMN, 18--25 non-heme iron atoms and 15--20 acid-labile sulphides. In the last step of the purification, a sucrose gradient centrifugation, a second catalytically active species has been found apparently originating from a dissociation of the enzyme into two equal subunits. The enzyme is specific toward its natural substrate formate. It transfers electrons to NAD+, oxygen, ferricyanide, and a lot of nonphysiological acceptors (dyes). In addition electrons are transferred from NADH to these acceptors. The (reversible) removal of FMN requires a reduction step. Reincorporation has been followed by the reappearance of the reactivity against formate and by fluorescence titration. The deflavo enzyme also binds FAD and riboflavin. The resulting enzyme species show characteristic catalytic abilities. Activity against formate is peculiar to the FMN species. PMID:631130

  10. Opine dehydrogenases in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Harcet, Matija; Perina, Drago; Pleše, Bruna

    2013-10-01

    It is well known today that opine production anaerobic pathways are analogs to the classical glycolytic pathway (lactate production pathway). These pathways, catalyzed by a group of enzymes called opine dehydrogenases (OpDHs), ensure continuous flux of glycolysis and a constant supply of ATP by maintaining the NADH/NAD(+) ratio during exercise and hypoxia, thus regulating the cytosolic redox balance in glycolysis under anoxia. OpDHs are distributed in a wide range of marine invertebrate phyla, including sponges (Porifera). Phylogenetic analyses supported with enzymatic assays strongly indicate that sponge OpDHs constitute an enzyme class unrelated to other OpDHs. Therefore, OpDHs in marine invertebrates are divided into two groups, a mollusk/annelid type and a sponge type, which belongs to the OCD/mu-crystallin family.

  11. Data of multiple regressions analysis between selected biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in Saudi autistic patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates data of multiple regression analysis between nine biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and impaired detoxification as two mechanisms recently recorded as autism phenotypes. The presented data was obtained by measuring a panel of markers in 20 autistic patients aged 3–15 years and 20 age and gender matching healthy controls. Levels of GSH, glutathione status (GSH/GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and peroxidoxins (Prxs I and III), glutamate, glutamine, glutamate/glutamine ratio glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in plasma and mercury (Hg) in red blood cells were determined in both groups. In Multiple regression analysis, R2 values which describe the proportion or percentage of variance in the dependent variable attributed to the variance in the independent variables together were calculated. Moreover, β coefficients values which show the direction either positive or negative and the contribution of the independent variable relative to the other independent variables in explaining the variation of the dependent variable were determined. A panel of inter-related markers was recorded. This paper contains data related to and supporting research articles currently published entitled “Mechanism of nitrogen metabolism-related parameters and enzyme activities in the pathophysiology of autism” [1], “Novel metabolic biomarkers related to sulfur-dependent detoxification pathways in autistic patients of Saudi Arabia [2], and “A key role for an impaired detoxification mechanism in the etiology and severity of autism spectrum disorders” [3]. PMID:26933667

  12. Data of multiple regressions analysis between selected biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in Saudi autistic patients.

    PubMed

    El-Ansary, Afaf

    2016-06-01

    This work demonstrates data of multiple regression analysis between nine biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and impaired detoxification as two mechanisms recently recorded as autism phenotypes. The presented data was obtained by measuring a panel of markers in 20 autistic patients aged 3-15 years and 20 age and gender matching healthy controls. Levels of GSH, glutathione status (GSH/GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and peroxidoxins (Prxs I and III), glutamate, glutamine, glutamate/glutamine ratio glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in plasma and mercury (Hg) in red blood cells were determined in both groups. In Multiple regression analysis, R (2) values which describe the proportion or percentage of variance in the dependent variable attributed to the variance in the independent variables together were calculated. Moreover, β coefficients values which show the direction either positive or negative and the contribution of the independent variable relative to the other independent variables in explaining the variation of the dependent variable were determined. A panel of inter-related markers was recorded. This paper contains data related to and supporting research articles currently published entitled "Mechanism of nitrogen metabolism-related parameters and enzyme activities in the pathophysiology of autism" [1], "Novel metabolic biomarkers related to sulfur-dependent detoxification pathways in autistic patients of Saudi Arabia [2], and "A key role for an impaired detoxification mechanism in the etiology and severity of autism spectrum disorders" [3]. PMID:26933667

  13. Metabolic fate of L-(N-13) glutamate in normal isolated myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, R.E.; Krivokapich, J.; Barrio, J.R.; Douglas, A.; Wittmer, S.; Shine, K.; Phelps, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    In the present work nitrogen flux of an amino acid in myocardium is followed via arterial bolus injection of non-carrier added L-(N-13)glutamate (N-13 GLU) into the isolated rabbit septa. Incorporation of nitrogen-13 into (N-13)aspartate (N-13 ASP)(16%) and (N-13)alanine (N-13 ALA)(14%) predominates over (N-13)glutamine (N-13 GLN) (3.2%) as determined by reversed phase HPLC in normal septa 6 min after bolus injection. No N-13 ammonia or N-13 urea is detected. Introduction of the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate (AOA, 2 nM) into perfusate completely blocked transaminase reaction and increased N-13 GLN (7.3%) and free N-13 ammonia (4.0%), probably resulting from glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. Inclusion of 2mM pyruvate in the perfusate resulted in 3 fold increase in N-13 ALA (44%), slight increase in N-13 GLN (5.0%) and significant decrease in N-13 ASP. Addition of 2mM AOA in the presence of pyruvate blocked production of N-13 ASP and N-13 ALA, and increased N-13 GLN slightly (6.0%). All studies had similar residual fractions (50%) except AOA treated septa (23%) indicating decreased metabolic trapping of the N-13 label. In conclusion, nitrogen-13 distribution in tissue is primarily governed by glutamate interaction with transaminases. Although the Michaelis constants of glutamate for GOT (Km = 4 nM, pig heart), GPT (Km = 8.1 mM, beef heart) and glutamine synthetase (Km = 2.5 mM, ovine brain) are similar, the transaminases play a predominant role because of their great abundance in myocardial tissue.

  14. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Chadi G.; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M.; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Mason, Graeme F.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in MDD we used in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with MDD relative to non-depressed subjects. Method 1H MRS and 13C MRS data were collected on 23 medication-free MDD and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]-glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (VTCAN) for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling, from voxels placed in the occipital cortex. Results Our main finding was that mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was reduced by 26% in MDD subjects (t = 2.57, p = 0.01). Paradoxically we found no difference in the rate of glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). We also found a significant correlation between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle considering the total sample. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities. PMID:25073688

  15. Flavor Preferences Conditioned by Dietary Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Our understanding of the molecular basis of umami taste and its appetitive qualities has been greatly aided by studies in laboratory rodents. This review describes methods for testing responses to the prototypical umami substance monosodium glutamate (MSG) in rodents. Two techniques, forced exposure to MSG and 2-bottle choice tests with ascending concentrations, were used to evaluate the responses to the taste of umami itself, and 2 other methods used oral or postoral MSG to modify the responses to other flavors. Intake and preference for MSG are enhanced in mice by experience with MSG and with other nutrients with positive postoral effects. In addition, flavor preferences are enhanced in mice and rats by gastric or intestinal MSG infusions via an associative learning process. Even mice with an impaired or absent ability to taste MSG can learn to prefer a flavor added to an MSG solution, supporting the notion that glutamate acts postorally. The more complex flavor of dashi seasoning, which includes umami substances (inosinate, glutamate), is attractive to rodents, but dashi does not condition flavor preferences. Details of the postoral glutamate detection process and the nature of the signal involved in learned preferences are still uncertain but probably involve gastric or intestinal sensors or both and vagal transmission. Some findings suggest that postoral glutamate effects may enhance food preferences in humans, but this requires further study. PMID:27422522

  16. Molecular characterization of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Robertson, A G; Fewson, C A

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of xylB and xylC from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, the genes encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II, were determined. The complete nucleotide sequence indicates that these two genes form part of an operon and this was supported by heterologous expression and physiological studies. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II is a 51654 Da protein with 484 amino acids per subunit and it is typical of other prokaryotic and eukaryotic aldehyde dehydrogenases. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase has a subunit Mr of 38923 consisting of 370 amino acids, it stereospecifically transfers the proR hydride of NADH, and it is a member of the family of zinc-dependent long-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. The enzyme appears to be more similar to animal and higher-plant alcohol dehydrogenases than it is to most other microbial alcohol dehydrogenases. Residue His-51 of zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases is thought to be necessary as a general base for catalysis in this category of alcohol dehydrogenases. However, this residue was found to be replaced in benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase from A. calcoaceticus by an isoleucine, and the introduction of a histidine residue in this position did not alter the kinetic coefficients, pH optimum or substrate specificity of the enzyme. Other workers have shown that His-51 is also absent from the TOL-plasmid-encoded benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase of Pseudomonas putida and so these two closely related enzymes presumably have a catalytic mechanism that differs from that of the archetypal zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:9494109

  17. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  18. GLT-1: The elusive presynaptic glutamate transporter.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Theresa S; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Historically, glutamate uptake in the CNS was mainly attributed to glial cells for three reasons: 1) none of the glutamate transporters were found to be located in presynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses; 2) the putative glial transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST are expressed at high levels in astrocytes; 3) studies of the constitutive GLT-1 knockout as well as pharmacological studies demonstrated that >90% of glutamate uptake into forebrain synaptosomes is mediated by the operation of GLT-1. Here we summarize the history leading up to the recognition of GLT-1a as a presynaptic glutamate transporter. A major issue now is understanding the physiological and pathophysiological significance of the expression of GLT-1 in presynaptic terminals. To elucidate the cell-type specific functions of GLT-1, a conditional knockout was generated with which to inactivate the GLT-1 gene in different cell types using Cre/lox technology. Astrocytic knockout led to an 80% reduction of GLT-1 expression, resulting in intractable seizures and early mortality as seen also in the constitutive knockout. Neuronal knockout was associated with no obvious phenotype. Surprisingly, synaptosomal uptake capacity (Vmax) was found to be significantly reduced, by 40%, in the neuronal knockout, indicating that the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake is disproportionate to its protein expression (5-10%). Conversely, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to synaptosomal uptake was much lower than expected. In contrast, the loss of uptake into liposomes prepared from brain protein from astrocyte and neuronal knockouts was proportionate with the loss of GLT-1 protein, suggesting that a large portion of GLT-1 in astrocytic membranes in synaptosomal preparations is not functional, possibly because of a failure to reseal. These results suggest the need to reinterpret many previous studies using synaptosomal uptake to investigate glutamate transport itself as well as changes in glutamate

  19. Mood disorders: regulation by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nowak, Gabriel; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2008-03-01

    Medicinal therapies for mood disorders neither fully serve the efficacy needs of patients nor are they free of side-effect issues. Although monoamine-based therapies are the primary current treatment approaches, both preclinical and clinical findings have implicated the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders. The present commentary focuses on the metabotropic glutamate receptors and their relationship to mood disorders. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors regulate glutamate transmission by altering the release of neurotransmitter and/or modulating the post-synaptic responses to glutamate. Convergent biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, and clinical data will be reviewed that establish glutamatergic neurotransmission via mGlu receptors as a biologically relevant process in the regulation of mood and that these receptors may serve as novel targets for the discovery of small molecule modulators with unique antidepressant properties. Specifically, compounds that antagonize mGlu2, mGlu3, and/or mGlu5 receptors (e.g. LY341495, MGS0039, MPEP, MTEP) exhibit biochemical effects indicative of antidepressant effects as well as in vivo activity in animal models predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Both preclinical and clinical data have previously been presented to define NMDA and AMPA receptors as important targets for the modulation of major depression. In the present review, we present a model suggesting how the interplay of glutamate at the mGlu and at the ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors might account for the antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic- and monoaminergic-based drugs affecting mood in patients. The current data lead to the hypothesis that mGlu-based compounds and conventional antidepressants impact a network of interactive effects that converge upon a down regulation of NMDA receptor function and an enhancement in AMPA receptor signaling. PMID:18164691

  20. Structure-based Conversion of the Coenzyme Requirement of a Short-chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Involved in Bacterial Alginate Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Ryuichi; Mikami, Bunzo; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    The alginate-assimilating bacterium, Sphingomonas sp. strain A1, degrades the polysaccharides to monosaccharides through four alginate lyase reactions. The resultant monosaccharide, which is nonenzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronate (DEH), is further metabolized to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate by NADPH-dependent reductase A1-R in the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family. A1-R-deficient cells produced another DEH reductase, designated A1-R′, with a preference for NADH. Here, we show the identification of a novel NADH-dependent DEH reductase A1-R′ in strain A1, structural determination of A1-R′ by x-ray crystallography, and structure-based conversion of a coenzyme requirement in SDR enzymes, A1-R and A1-R′. A1-R′ was purified from strain A1 cells and enzymatically characterized. Except for the coenzyme requirement, there was no significant difference in enzyme characteristics between A1-R and A1-R′. Crystal structures of A1-R′ and A1-R′·NAD+ complex were determined at 1.8 and 2.7 Å resolutions, respectively. Because of a 64% sequence identity, overall structures of A1-R′ and A1-R were similar, although a difference in the coenzyme-binding site (particularly the nucleoside ribose 2′ region) was observed. Distinct from A1-R, A1-R′ included a negatively charged, shallower binding site. These differences were caused by amino acid residues on the two loops around the site. The A1-R′ mutant with the two A1-R-typed loops maintained potent enzyme activity with specificity for NADPH rather than NADH, demonstrating that the two loops determine the coenzyme requirement, and loop exchange is a promising method for conversion of coenzyme requirement in the SDR family. PMID:25288804

  1. Luminal l-glutamate enhances duodenal mucosal defense mechanisms via multiple glutamate receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chikako; Mizumori, Misa; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Presence of taste receptor families in the gastrointestinal mucosa suggests a physiological basis for local and early detection of a meal. We hypothesized that luminal l-glutamate, which is the primary nutrient conferring fundamental umami or proteinaceous taste, influences mucosal defense mechanisms in rat duodenum. We perfused the duodenal mucosa of anesthetized rats with l-glutamate (0.1–10 mM). Intracellular pH (pHi) of the epithelial cells, blood flow, and mucus gel thickness (MGT) were simultaneously and continuously measured in vivo. Some rats were pretreated with indomethacin or capsaicin. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion (DBS) was measured with flow-through pH and CO2 electrodes. We tested the effects of agonists or antagonists for metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 or 4 or calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) on defense factors. Luminal l-glutamate dose dependently increased pHi and MGT but had no effect on blood flow in the duodenum. l-glutamate (10 mM)-induced cellular alkalinization and mucus secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with indomethacin or capsaicin. l-glutamate effects on pHi and MGT were mimicked by mGluR4 agonists and inhibited by an mGluR4 antagonist. CaSR agonists acidified cells with increased MGT and DBS, unlike l-glutamate. Perfusion of l-glutamate with inosinate (inosine 5′-monophosphate, 0.1 mM) enhanced DBS only in combination, suggesting synergistic activation of the l-glutamate receptor, typical of taste receptor type 1. l-leucine or l-aspartate had similar effects on DBS without any effect on pHi and MGT. Preperfusion of l-glutamate prevented acid-induced cellular injury, suggesting that l-glutamate protects the mucosa by enhancing mucosal defenses. Luminal l-glutamate may activate multiple receptors and afferent nerves and locally enhance mucosal defenses to prevent subsequent injury attributable to acid exposure in the duodenum. PMID:19643955

  2. Extracorporeal methods of blood glutamate scavenging: a novel therapeutic modality.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Agzam; Boyko, Matthew; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Brotfain, Evgeny; Bilotta, Federico; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Pathologically elevated glutamate concentrations in the brain's extracellular fluid are associated with several acute and chronic brain insults. Studies have demonstrated that by decreasing the concentration of glutamate in the blood, thereby increasing the concentration gradient between the brain and the blood, the rate of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux can be increased. Blood glutamate scavengers, pyruvate and oxaloacetate have shown great promise in providing neuroprotection in many animal models of acute brain insults. However, glutamate scavengers' potential systemic toxicity, side effects and pharmacokinetic properties may limit their use in clinical practice. In contrast, extracorporeal methods of blood glutamate reduction, in which glutamate is filtered from the blood and eliminated, may be an advantageous adjunct in treating acute brain insults. Here, we review the current evidence for the glutamate-lowering effects of hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and hemofiltration. The evidence reviewed here highlights the need for clinical trials.

  3. Conditions for (13)C NMR detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate in tissue extracts from isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Malloy, Craig R; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-07-15

    (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant gliomas, (13)C labeling is obscured in oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2 HG) by glutamate and glutamine, prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2 HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically cooled (13)C probe, but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, significantly improved detection of 2 HG. These methods enable the monitoring of (13)C-(13)C spin-spin couplings in 2 HG expressing IDH-mutant gliomas.

  4. Shikimate dehydrogenase from Pinu sylvestris L. needles

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V.I.; Shein, I.V.

    1986-07-10

    Shikimate dehydrogenase was isolated by extraction from pine needles and partially purified by fractionation with ammonium sulfate. In conifers, in contrast to other plants, all three isoenzymes of shikimate dehydrogenase exhibit activity not only with NADP/sup +/, but also with NAD/sup +/. The values of K/sub m/ for shikimate, when NADP/sup +/ and NAD/sup +/ are used as cofactors, are 0.22 and 1.13 mM, respectively. The enzyme is maximally active at pH 10 with both cofactors. It is suggested that NAD-dependent shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the initial reaction of the alternative pathway of the conversion of shikimic acid to hydroxybenzoic acid. The peculiarities of the organization and regulation of the initial reactions of the shikimate pathway in conifers and in plants with shikimate dehydrogenase absolutely specific for NADP are discussed.

  5. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation....

  6. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  7. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  8. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride....

  9. Localization of L-glutamate and glutamate-like receptors at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Di Cosmo, A; Nardi, G; Di Cristo, C; De Santis, A; Messenger, J B

    1999-08-28

    HPLC analysis of the amino acid contents of the second- and third-order giant fibres at the giant synapse in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo vulgaris shows that there are significantly higher amounts of L-glutamate and L-aspartate in the second-order (presynaptic) fibre than in the third-order (postsynaptic) fibre. Immunocytochemical staining of sections of the ganglion with an antibody raised against L-glutamate produces specific positive staining in the synaptic region of the second-order fibre. In contrast, staining with antibodies raised against glutamate-receptors (mammalian GluR1 with GluR2/3) produces positive staining in the third-order fibre at the postsynaptic region. These data provide further evidence for the hypothesis that L-glutamate is an excitatory transmitter at the giant synapse.

  10. Circuit mapping by ultraviolet uncaging of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Gordon M G

    2012-09-01

    In laser photostimulation, small clusters of neurons in brain slices are induced to fire action potentials by focal glutamate uncaging, and synaptic connectivity between photoexcited presynaptic neurons and individual postsynaptic neurons is assessed by intracellular recording of synaptic events. With a scanner, this process can be repeated sequentially across a patterned array of stimulus locations, generating maps of neurons' local sources of synaptic inputs. Laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) based on patterned glutamate uncaging offers an efficient, quantitative, optical-electrophysiological way to map synaptic circuits in brain slices. The efficacy of glutamate-based photostimulation for circuit mapping (in contrast to electrical stimulation) derives from the ability to stimulate neurons with high precision and speed, and without stimulating axons of passage. This protocol describes the components, assembly, and operation of a laser scanning microscope for ultraviolet (UV) uncaging, along with experimental methods for circuit mapping in brain slices. It presents a general approach and a set of guidelines for quantitative circuit mapping using "standard" LSPS methods based on single-photon glutamate uncaging using a UV laser, a pair of scanning mirror galvanometers, a patch-clamp setup, and open-source data acquisition software. PMID:22949715

  11. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  12. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  13. Immobilization of Ni-Pd/core-shell nanoparticles through thermal polymerization of acrylamide on glassy carbon electrode for highly stable and sensitive glutamate detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huicheng; Ma, Zhenzhen; Wu, Zhaoyang

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of a persistently stable and sensitive biosensor is highly important for practical applications. To improve the stability and sensitivity of glutamate sensors, an electrode modified with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)/Ni-Pd/core-shell nanoparticles was developed using the thermal polymerization of acrylamide (AM) to immobilize the synthesized Ni-Pd/core-shell nanoparticles onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Electrochemical data showed that the prepared biosensor had remarkably enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward glutamate. Moreover, superior reproducibility and excellent stability were observed (relative average deviation was 2.96% after continuous use of the same sensor for 60 times, and current responses remained at 94.85% of the initial value after 60 d). The sensor also demonstrated highly sensitive amperometric detection of glutamate with a low limit of detection (0.052 μM, S/N = 3), high sensitivity (4.768 μA μM(-1) cm(-2)), and a wide, useful linear range (0.1-500 μM). No interference from potential interfering species such as l-cysteine, ascorbic acid, and l-aspartate were noted. The determination of glutamate levels in actual samples achieved good recovery percentages.

  14. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  15. Structural Features of the Glutamate Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Konings, Wil N.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1999-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus prevent neurotoxicity. The proteins belong to a large and widespread family of secondary transporters, including bacterial glutamate, serine, and C4-dicarboxylate transporters; mammalian neutral-amino-acid transporters; and an increasing number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic proteins that have not yet been functionally characterized. Sixty members of the glutamate transporter family were found in the databases on the basis of sequence homology. The amino acid sequences of the carriers have diverged enormously. Homology between the members of the family is most apparent in a stretch of approximately 150 residues in the C-terminal part of the proteins. This region contains four reasonably well-conserved sequence motifs, all of which have been suggested to be part of the translocation pore or substrate binding site. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal stretch revealed the presence of five subfamilies with characterized members: (i) the eukaryotic glutamate transporters, (ii) the bacterial glutamate transporters, (iii) the eukaryotic neutral-amino-acid transporters, (iv) the bacterial C4-dicarboxylate transporters, and (v) the bacterial serine transporters. A number of other subfamilies that do not contain characterized members have been defined. In contrast to their amino acid sequences, the hydropathy profiles of the members of the family are extremely well conserved. Analysis of the hydropathy profiles has suggested that the glutamate transporters have a global structure that is unique among secondary transporters. Experimentally, the unique structure of the transporters was recently confirmed by membrane topology studies. Although there is still controversy about part of the topology, the most likely model predicts the presence of eight membrane-spanning α-helices and a loop-pore structure which is unique among secondary

  16. Glutamate Receptor Agonists and Glutamate Transporter Antagonists Regulate Differentiation of Osteoblast Lineage Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjie; Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Hofstetter, Willy

    2016-08-01

    Development and function of osteoblast lineage cells are regulated by a complex microenvironment consisting of the bone extracellular matrix, cells, systemic hormones and cytokines, autocrine and paracrine factors, and mechanical load. Apart from receptors that transduce extracellular signals into the cell, molecular transporters play a crucial role in the cellular response to the microenvironment. Transporter molecules are responsible for cellular uptake of nutritional components, elimination of metabolites, ion transport, and cell-cell communication. In this report, the expression of molecular transporters in osteoblast lineage cells was investigated to assess their roles in cell development and activity. Low-density arrays, covering membrane and vesicular transport molecules, were used to assess gene expression in osteoblasts representing early and late differentiation states. Receptors and transporters for the amino acid glutamate were found to be differentially expressed during osteoblast development. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and the mechanisms of its release, signal transduction, and cellular reabsorption in the synaptic cleft are well understood. Less clear, however, is the control of equivalent processes in peripheral tissues. In primary osteoblasts, inhibition of glutamate transporters with nonselective inhibitors leads to an increase in the concentration of extracellular glutamate. This change was accompanied by a decrease in osteoblast proliferation, stimulation of alkaline phosphatase, and the expression of transcripts encoding osteocalcin. Enzymatic removal of extracellular glutamate abolished these pro-differentiation effects, as did the inhibition of PKC- and Erk1/2-signaling pathways. These findings demonstrate that glutamate signaling promotes differentiation and activation of osteoblast lineage cells. Consequently, the glutamate system may represent a putative therapeutic target to induce an anabolic response

  17. Mathematical model for evaluating the Krebs cycle flux with non-constant glutamate-pool size by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Evidence for the existence of two types of Krebs cycles in cells.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Beganton, F; Nguyen, T T; Bouet, F; Herve, M

    1996-12-01

    A practical method using matrix operations is proposed for studying the isotopic transformation of glutamate, or any other metabolite isotopomers, in the Krebs cycle. Two mathematical models were constructed for evaluating the Krebs cycle flux where the enrichment of [2-13C]acetyl-CoA is not 100% and the total glutamate concentration remains constant or varies during incubation. A comparative study of [1-13C]glucose metabolism was subsequently carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells from two different strains (ATCC-9763 and NCYC-239) by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and biochemical techniques. The results show that there are two types of Krebs cycles in cells. The first is represented by the ATCC cells which contain a small amount of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and hence the flux in the Krebs cycle is negligible. With [1-13C]glucose as a carbon source, the 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate exhibit the C2 and C4 resonances that are almost equivalent and much greater than that of the C3. Labeled metabolites derived from [1-13C]glucose enter the Krebs cycle at two points: oxaloacetate and citrate. The second cell type is represented by NCYC-239. The C2 and C3 areas are equivalent and smaller than the C4 resonance. The results suggest that labeled metabolites enter the Krebs cycle only at the citrate level via acetyl-CoA, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase is present but pyruvate carboxylase is virtually absent or inactivated. When both are incubated with glucose, the total concentration of glutamate was found to decrease with the incubation time. The fraction of glutamate in isotopic exchange with the Krebs cycle in NCYC-239 cells is about 2.6% and the reduction in glutamate concentration is about 0.5%/min. Using our model, with a variable glutamate pool size, good agreement between the theoretical and experimental data is obtained.

  18. 3-Aminoglutarate is a "silent" false transmitter for glutamate neurons.

    PubMed

    Foster, Alan C; Chen, June; Runyan, Stephen; Dinh, Tim; Venadas, Steven; Ehring, George R; Li, Yong-Xin; Staubli, Ursula

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the storage and release of the excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate by synaptic vesicles has lagged behind receptor characterizations due to a lack of pharmacological agents. We report that the glutamate analog, 3-aminoglutarate (3-AG) is a "silent" false transmitter for glutamate neurons that may be a useful tool to study storage and release mechanisms. Like L-glutamate itself, 3-AG is a high-affinity substrate for both the plasma membrane (EAATs) and vesicular (vGLUT) glutamate transporters. As such, EAATs facilitate 3-AG entry into neuronal cytoplasm allowing 3-AG to compete with L-glutamate for transport into vesicles thus reducing glutamate content. In a synaptosomal preparation, 3-AG inhibited calcium-dependent endogenous L-glutamate release. Unlike L-glutamate, 3-AG had low affinity for both ionotropic (NMDA and AMPA) and G-protein coupled (mGlu1-8) receptors. Consequently, 3-AG behaves as a "silent" false transmitter that may be used in physiological experiments to probe synaptic vesicle storage and release mechanisms for L-glutamate. The companion paper by Wu et al. (2015) describes initial experiments that explore the effects of 3-AG on glutamate synaptic transmission under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  19. Understanding safety of glutamate in food and brain.

    PubMed

    Mallick, H N

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate is ubiquitous in nature and is present in all living organisms. It is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system. Glutamate is being used as food additive for enhancing flavour for over last 1200 years imparting a unique taste known as "umami" in Japanese. It is being marketed for about last 100 years. The taste of umami is now recognized as the fifth basic taste. Many of the foods used in cooking for enhancing flavour contain high amount of glutamate. Breast milk has the highest concentration of glutamate amongst all amino acids. Glutamate in high doses as gavage or parenteral injection have been reported to produce neurodegeneration in infant rodents. The neurodegeneration was not produced when gluamate was given with food. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives, based on enumerable scientific evidence, has declared that, "glutamate as an additive in food" is not an health hazard to human being. Glutamate is used as signaling molecule not only in neuronal but also in non-neuronal tissues. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the synaptic cleft has been associated with excitotoxicty and glutamate is implicated in number of neurological disorders. Excessive accumulation could be attributed to increase release, failure of transport system for uptake mechanism, neuronal injury due to hypoxia-ischemia, trauma and associated metabolic failures. The role blood brain barrier, vesicular glutamate and sodium dependent excitatory amino acid transporters in glutamate homeostasis are emphasized in the review.

  20. Structural determinants in bacterial 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate dehydrogenase KduD for dual-coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ryuichi; Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) is distributed in many organisms, from bacteria to humans, and has significant roles in metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and other biomolecules. An important intermediate in acidic polysaccharide metabolism is 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG). Recently, two short and long loops in Sphingomonas KDG-producing SDR enzymes (NADPH-dependent A1-R and NADH-dependent A1-R') involved in alginate metabolism were shown to be crucial for NADPH or NADH coenzyme specificity. Two SDR family enzymes-KduD from Pectobacterium carotovorum (PcaKduD) and DhuD from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpyDhuD)-prefer NADH as coenzyme, although only PcaKduD can utilize both NADPH and NADH. Both enzymes reduce 2,5-diketo-3-deoxy-d-gluconate to produce KDG. Tertiary and quaternary structures of SpyDhuD and PcaKduD and its complex with NADH were determined at high resolution (approximately 1.6 Å) by X-ray crystallography. Both PcaKduD and SpyDhuD consist of a three-layered structure, α/β/α, with a coenzyme-binding site in the Rossmann fold; similar to enzymes A1-R and A1-R', both arrange the two short and long loops close to the coenzyme-binding site. The primary structures of the two loops in PcaKduD and SpyDhuD were similar to those in A1-R' but not A1-R. Charge neutrality and moderate space at the binding site of the nucleoside ribose 2' coenzyme region were determined to be structurally crucial for dual-coenzyme specificity in PcaKduD by structural comparison of the NADH- and NADPH-specific SDR enzymes. The corresponding site in SpyDhuD was negatively charged and spatially shallow. This is the first reported study on structural determinants in SDR family KduD related to dual-coenzyme specificity. Proteins 2016; 84:934-947. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028675

  1. Structural determinants in bacterial 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate dehydrogenase KduD for dual-coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ryuichi; Maruyama, Yukie; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) is distributed in many organisms, from bacteria to humans, and has significant roles in metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and other biomolecules. An important intermediate in acidic polysaccharide metabolism is 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG). Recently, two short and long loops in Sphingomonas KDG-producing SDR enzymes (NADPH-dependent A1-R and NADH-dependent A1-R') involved in alginate metabolism were shown to be crucial for NADPH or NADH coenzyme specificity. Two SDR family enzymes-KduD from Pectobacterium carotovorum (PcaKduD) and DhuD from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpyDhuD)-prefer NADH as coenzyme, although only PcaKduD can utilize both NADPH and NADH. Both enzymes reduce 2,5-diketo-3-deoxy-d-gluconate to produce KDG. Tertiary and quaternary structures of SpyDhuD and PcaKduD and its complex with NADH were determined at high resolution (approximately 1.6 Å) by X-ray crystallography. Both PcaKduD and SpyDhuD consist of a three-layered structure, α/β/α, with a coenzyme-binding site in the Rossmann fold; similar to enzymes A1-R and A1-R', both arrange the two short and long loops close to the coenzyme-binding site. The primary structures of the two loops in PcaKduD and SpyDhuD were similar to those in A1-R' but not A1-R. Charge neutrality and moderate space at the binding site of the nucleoside ribose 2' coenzyme region were determined to be structurally crucial for dual-coenzyme specificity in PcaKduD by structural comparison of the NADH- and NADPH-specific SDR enzymes. The corresponding site in SpyDhuD was negatively charged and spatially shallow. This is the first reported study on structural determinants in SDR family KduD related to dual-coenzyme specificity. Proteins 2016; 84:934-947. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  3. A novel reagentless glutamate microband biosensor for real-time cell toxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G; Pemberton, R M; Fielden, P R; Hart, J P

    2016-08-24

    A reagentless glutamate biosensor was applied to the determination of glutamate released from liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) in response to toxic challenge from various concentrations of paracetamol. A screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) containing the electrocatalyst Meldola's Blue (MB-SPCE) served as the electron mediator for the oxidation of NADH. A mixture of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and the biopolymer chitosan (CHIT) were drop-coated onto the surface of the transducer (MB-SPCE) in a simple one step fabrication process. The reagentless biosensor was used with amperometry in stirred solution at an applied potential of +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). All experiments were carried out at the following conditions: pH 7, temperature 37 °C, atmosphere 5% CO2. The linear range of the device was found to be 25-125 μM in phosphate buffer (75 mM, containing 0.05 M NaCl) and 25-150 μM in cell culture medium. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to be 1.2 μM and 4.2 μM based on three times signal to noise, using PBS and culture medium respectively. The sensitivity was calculated to be 106 nA μM(-1) cm(-2) and 210 nA μM(-1) cm(-2) in PBS and cell medium respectively. The response time was ∼60 s in an agitated solution. HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of paracetamol (1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM) in order to investigate the drug-induced release of glutamate into the culture medium in real time. Two toxicity studies were investigated using different methods of exposure and analysis. The first method consisted of a single measurement of the glutamate concentration, using the method of standard addition, after 24 h incubation. The concentrations of glutamate were found to be 52 μM, 93 μM and 177 μM, released on exposure to 1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM paracetamol respectively. The second method involved the continuous monitoring of glutamate released from Hep

  4. Alteration of substrate specificity of alanine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Puja; Aldeborgh, Hannah; Carlucci, Lauren; Walsh, Lauren; Wasserman, Jordan; Zhou, Edward; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Mundorff, Emily C.

    2015-01-01

    The l-alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) has a natural history that suggests it would not be a promising candidate for expansion of substrate specificity by protein engineering: it is the only amino acid dehydrogenase in its fold family, it has no sequence or structural similarity to any known amino acid dehydrogenase, and it has a strong preference for l-alanine over all other substrates. By contrast, engineering of the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily members has produced catalysts with expanded substrate specificity; yet, this enzyme family already contains members that accept a broad range of substrates. To test whether the natural history of an enzyme is a predictor of its innate evolvability, directed evolution was carried out on AlaDH. A single mutation identified through molecular modeling, F94S, introduced into the AlaDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtAlaDH) completely alters its substrate specificity pattern, enabling activity toward a range of larger amino acids. Saturation mutagenesis libraries in this mutant background additionally identified a double mutant (F94S/Y117L) showing improved activity toward hydrophobic amino acids. The catalytic efficiencies achieved in AlaDH are comparable with those that resulted from similar efforts in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily and demonstrate the evolvability of MtAlaDH specificity toward other amino acid substrates. PMID:25538307

  5. Benzene toxicity: emphasis on cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Bolcsak, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Blood dyscrasias such as leukopenia and anemia have been clearly identified as consequences of chronic benzene exposure. The metabolites, phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone produced inhibition of /sup 59/Fe uptake in mice which followed the same time course as that produced by benzene. The inhibitor of benzene oxidation, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, mitigated the inhibitory effects of benzene and phenol only. These data support the contention that benzene toxicity is mediated by a metabolite and suggest that the toxicity of phenol is a consequence of its metabolism to hydroquinone and that the route of metabolism to catechol may also contribute to the production of toxic metabolite(s). The properties of mouse liver cytosolic dihydrodiol dehydrogenases were examined. These enzymes catalyze the NADP/sup +/-dependent oxidation of trans-1,2-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzene (BDD) to catechol, a possible toxic metabolite of benzene produced via this metabolic route. Four distinct dihydrodiol dehydrogenases (DD1, DD2, DD3, and DD4) were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. DD1 appeared to be identical to the major ketone reductase and 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the liver. DD2 exhibited aldehyde reductase activity. DD3 and DD4 oxidized 17..beta..-hydroxysteroids, but no carbonyl reductase activity was detected. These relationships between BDD dehydrogenases and carbonyl reductase and/or 17..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities were supported by several lines of evidence.

  6. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  7. Evolutionary analyses of the small subunit of glutamate synthase: gene order conservation, gene fusions, and prokaryote-to-eukaryote lateral gene transfers.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jan O; Roger, Andrew J

    2002-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer has been identified as an important mode of genome evolution within prokaryotes. Except for the special case of gene transfer from organelle genomes to the eukaryotic nucleus, only a few cases of lateral gene transfer involving eukaryotes have been described. Here we present phylogenetic and gene order analyses on the small subunit of glutamate synthase (encoded by gltD) and its homologues, including the large subunit of sulfide dehydrogenase (encoded by sudA). The scattered distribution of the sudA and sudB gene pair and the phylogenetic analysis strongly suggest that lateral gene transfer was involved in the propagation of the genes in the three domains of life. One of these transfers most likely occurred between a prokaryote and an ancestor of diplomonad protists. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicate that the gene for the small subunit of glutamate synthase was transferred from a low-GC gram-positive bacterium to a common ancestor of animals, fungi, and plants. Interestingly, in both examples, the eukaryotes encode a single gene that corresponds to a conserved operon structure in prokaryotes. Our analyses, together with several recent publications, show that lateral gene transfers from prokaryotes to unicellular eukaryotes occur with appreciable frequency. In the case of the genes for sulfide dehydrogenase, the transfer affected only a limited group of eukaryotes--the diplomonads--while the transfer of the glutamate synthase gene probably happened earlier in evolution and affected a wider range of eukaryotes.

  8. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 mediates a GABA synthesis pathway in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B

    2015-10-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here, we show that GABA co-release in dopamine neurons does not use the conventional GABA-synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol (EtOH) at concentrations seen in blood alcohol after binge drinking, and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction.

  10. Concentration-Dependent Processivity of Multiple Glutamate Ligations Catalyzed by Folylpoly-γ-glutamate Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Tomsho, John W.; Moran, Richard G.; Coward, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Folylpoly-γ-glutamate synthetase (FPGS, EC 6.3.2.17) is an ATP-dependent ligase that catalyzes formation of poly-γ-glutamate derivatives of reduced folates and anti-folates such as methotrexate and 5,10-dideaza-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (DDAH4PteGlu1). While the chemical mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by FPGS is known, it is unknown whether single or multiple glutamate residues are added following each folate binding event. A very sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method has been used to analyze the multiple ligation reactions onto radiolabeled DDAH4PteGlu1 catalyzed by FPGS in order to distinguish between distributive or processive mechanisms of catalysis. Reaction time courses, substrate trapping, and pulse-chase experiments were used to measure folate release during multiple glutamate additions. Together, the results of these experiments indicate that hFPGS can catalyze the processive addition of approximately four glutamate residues onto DDAH4PteGlu1. The degree of processivity was determined to be dependent on the concentration of the folate substrate, thus suggesting a mechanism for the regulation of folate polyglutamate synthesis in cells. PMID:18672898

  11. Ketamine and other potential glutamate antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arpan; McKie, Shane; Deakin, J F William

    2015-01-30

    The need for rapid acting antidepressants is widely recognised. There has been much interest in glutamate mechanisms in major depressive disorder (MDD) as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. A single intravenous infusion of ketamine, a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist anaesthetic agent, can alleviate depressive symptoms in patients within hours of administration. The mechanism of action appears to be in part through glutamate release onto non-NMDA receptors including α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptors. However these are also reported effects on 5-HT, dopamine and intracellular effects on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The effects of SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) antidepressants may also involve alterations in NMDA function. The article reviews the effect of current antidepressants on NMDA and examines the efficacy and mechanism of ketamine. Response to ketamine is also discussed and comparison with other glutamate drugs including lamotrigine, amantadine, riluzole, memantine, traxoprodil, GLYX-13, MK-0657, RO4917523, AZD2066 and Coluracetam. Future studies need to link the rapid antidepressant effects seen with ketamine to inflammatory theories in MDD.

  12. New perspectives in glutamate and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Riaza Bermudo-Soriano, Carlos; Perez-Rodriguez, M Mercedes; Vaquero-Lorenzo, Concepcion; Baca-Garcia, Enrique

    2012-02-01

    Anxiety and stress-related disorders, namely posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (ODC), social and specific phobias, and panic disorder, are a major public health issue. A growing body of evidence suggests that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be involved in the biological mechanisms underlying stress response and anxiety-related disorders. The glutamatergic system mediates the acquisition and extinction of fear-conditioning. Thus, new drugs targeting glutamatergic neurotransmission may be promising candidates for new pharmacological treatments. In particular, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) antagonists (AP5, AP7, CGP37849, CGP39551, LY235959, NPC17742, and MK-801), NMDAR partial agonists (DCS, ACPC), α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs) antagonists (topiramate), and several allosteric modulators targeting metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5, have shown anxiolytic-like effects in several animal and human studies. Several studies have suggested that polyamines (agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) may be involved in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying stress-response and anxiety-related disorders. This could mainly be attributed to their ability to modulate ionotropic glutamate receptors, especially NR2B subunits. The aim of this review is to establish that glutamate neurotransmission and polyaminergic system play a fundamental role in the onset of anxiety-related disorders. This may open the way for new drugs that may help to treat these conditions.

  13. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-01-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  14. Affinity chromatography of bacterial lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kelly, N; Delaney, M; O'Carra, P

    1978-06-01

    The affinity system used was the immobilized oxamate derivative previously used to purify mammalian lactate dehydrogenases. The bacterial dehydrogenases specific for the L-stereoisomer of lactate behaved in the same way as the mammalian enzymes, binding strongly in the presence of NADH. The D-lactate-specific enzymes, however, did not show any biospecific affinity for this gel. The L-specific enzymes could be purified to homogeneity in one affinity-chromatographic step. The D-specific enzymes could be efficiently separated from the L-specific ones and could then be further purified on an immobilized NAD derivative. The mechanism of activation of the lactate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus faecalis by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was investigated by using the immobilized oxamate gel. PMID:666726

  15. Molybdopterin cofactor from Methanobacterium formicicum formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    May, H D; Schauer, N L; Ferry, J G

    1986-01-01

    The molybdopterin cofactor from the formate dehydrogenase of Methanobacterium formicicum was studied. The cofactor was released by guanidine denaturation of homogeneous enzyme, which also released greater than 80% of the molybdenum present in the enzyme. The anoxically isolated cofactor was nonfluorescent, but after exposure to air it fluoresced with spectra similar to those of described molybdopterin cofactors. Aerobic release from acid-denatured formate dehydrogenase in the presence of I2 and potassium iodide produced a mixture of fluorescent products. Alkaline permanganate oxidation of the mixture yielded pterin-6-carboxylic acid as the only detectable fluorescent product. The results showed that the cofactor from formate dehydrogenase contained a pterin nucleus with a 6-alkyl side chain of unknown structure. Covalently bound phosphate was also present. The isolated cofactor was unable to complement the cofactor-deficient nitrate reductase of the Neurospora crassa nit-1 mutant. PMID:3700335

  16. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  17. Enzymes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle in the anterior cingulate cortex in postmortem brain of subjects with autism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that dysfunction in the glutamatergic system may underlie the pathophysiology of autism. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in autism as well as in glutamatergic neurotransmission. We hypothesized that alterations in the glutamate-glutamine cycle in the ACC might play a role in the pathophysiology of autism. Methods We performed Western blot analyses for the protein expression levels of enzymes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, including glutamine synthetase, kidney-type glutaminase, liver-type glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenases 1 and 2, in the ACC of postmortem brain of individuals with autism (n = 7) and control subjects (n = 13). Results We found that the protein levels of kidney-type glutaminase, but not those of the other enzymes measured, in the ACC were significantly lower in subjects with autism than in controls. Conclusion The results suggest that reduced expression of kidney-type glutaminase may account for putative alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the ACC in autism. PMID:23531457

  18. Structural Determinants of Oligomerization of !1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Dehydrogenase: Identification of a Hexamerization Hot Spot

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Singh, Ranjan K.; Tanner, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily member !1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate, which is the final step of proline catabolism. Defects in P5CDH activity lead to the metabolic disorder type II hyperprolinemia, P5CDH is essential for virulence of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, and bacterial P5CDHs have been targeted for vaccine development. Although the enzyme oligomeric state is known to be important for ALDH function, the oligomerization of P5CDH has remained relatively unstudied. Here we determine the oligomeric states and quaternary structures of four bacterial P5CDHs using a combination of small-angle X-ray scattering, X-ray crystallography, and dynamic light scattering. The P5CDHs from Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans form trimer-of-dimers hexamers in solution, which is the first observation of a hexameric ALDH in solution. In contrast, two Bacillus P5CDHs form dimers in solution but do not assemble into a higher order oligomer. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify a hexamerization hot spot that is centered on an arginine residue in the NAD+-binding domain. Mutation of this critical Arg residue to Ala in either of the hexameric enzymes prevents hexamer formation in solution. Paradoxically, the dimeric Arg-to-Ala T. thermophilus mutant enzyme packs as a hexamer in the crystal state, which illustrates the challenges associated with predicting the biological assembly in solution from crystal structures. The observation of different oligomeric states among P5CDHs suggests potential differences in cooperativity and protein-protein interactions. PMID:23747974

  19. Glutamate involvement in calcium–dependent migration of astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Astrocytoma are known to have altered glutamate machinery that results in the release of large amounts of glutamate into the extracellular space but the precise role of glutamate in favoring cancer processes has not yet been fully established. Several studies suggested that glutamate might provoke active killing of neurons thereby producing space for cancer cells to proliferate and migrate. Previously, we observed that calcium promotes disassembly of integrin-containing focal adhesions in astrocytoma, thus providing a link between calcium signaling and cell migration. The aim of this study was to determine how calcium signaling and glutamate transmission cooperate to promote enhanced astrocytoma migration. Methods The wound-healing model was used to assay migration of human U87MG astrocytoma cells and allowed to monitor calcium signaling during the migration process. The effect of glutamate on calcium signaling was evaluated together with the amount of glutamate released by astrocytoma during cell migration. Results We observed that glutamate stimulates motility in serum-starved cells, whereas in the presence of serum, inhibitors of glutamate receptors reduce migration. Migration speed was also reduced in presence of an intracellular calcium chelator. During migration, cells displayed spontaneous Ca2+ transients. L-THA, an inhibitor of glutamate re-uptake increased the frequency of Ca2+ oscillations in oscillating cells and induced Ca2+ oscillations in quiescent cells. The frequency of migration-associated Ca2+ oscillations was reduced by prior incubation with glutamate receptor antagonists or with an anti-β1 integrin antibody. Application of glutamate induced increases in internal free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Finally we found that compounds known to increase [Ca2+]i in astrocytomas such as thapsigagin, ionomycin or the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist t-ACPD, are able to induce glutamate release. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that

  20. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  1. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  2. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the activity of the lactic dehydrogenase enzyme in serum. Increased levels of lactic dehydrogenase...

  3. Transcriptional regulation through glutamate receptors: Involvement of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguirre, Adán; Ortega, Arturo

    2003-12-01

    Glutamate receptors play a key role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in several neuropathologies. Short-term and long-term changes in synaptic efficacy are triggered by glutamate. Although an enhanced glutamate-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation has been described in several systems, its role in membrane-to-nuclei signaling is unclear. Taking advantage of the fact that the gene encoding the chick kainate-binding protein undergoes a glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation via an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site, we evaluated the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this process. We describe here the participation of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases in the signaling cascade triggered by glutamate. Our results suggest that in Bergmann glia cells, glutamate receptors transactivate receptor tyrosine kinases, favoring the idea of a complex network of signals activated by this excitatory neurotransmitter that results in regulation of gene expression.

  4. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  5. A "stripping" ligand tactic for use with the kinetic locking-on strategy: its use in the resolution and bioaffinity chromatographic purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, M; O'Carra, P; McMahon, M; Mulcahy, P

    1999-08-01

    The kinetic locking-on strategy utilizes soluble analogues of the target enzymes' specific substrate to promote selective adsorption of individual NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases on their complementary immobilized cofactor derivative. Application of this strategy to the purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases from crude extracts has proven that it can yield bioaffinity systems capable of producing one-chromatographic-step purifications with yields approaching 100%. However, in some cases the purified enzyme preparation was found to be contaminated with other proteins weakly bound to the immobilized cofactor derivative through binary complex formation and/or nonspecific interactions, which continuously "dribbled" off the matrix during the chromatographic procedure. The fact that this problem can be overcome by including a short pulse of 5'-AMP (stripping ligand) in the irrigant a couple of column volumes prior to the discontinuation of the specific substrate analogue (locking-on ligand) is clear from the results presented in this report. The general effectiveness of this auxiliary tactic has been assessed using model studies and through incorporation into an actual purification from a crude cellular extract. The results confirm the usefulness of the stripping-ligand tactic for the resolution and purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases when using the locking-on strategy. These studies have been carried out using bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC 1.1.1.1), porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH, EC 1.1.1.37), and bovine heart L-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH, EC 1.1.1.27).

  6. A "stripping" ligand tactic for use with the kinetic locking-on strategy: its use in the resolution and bioaffinity chromatographic purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, M; O'Carra, P; McMahon, M; Mulcahy, P

    1999-08-01

    The kinetic locking-on strategy utilizes soluble analogues of the target enzymes' specific substrate to promote selective adsorption of individual NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases on their complementary immobilized cofactor derivative. Application of this strategy to the purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases from crude extracts has proven that it can yield bioaffinity systems capable of producing one-chromatographic-step purifications with yields approaching 100%. However, in some cases the purified enzyme preparation was found to be contaminated with other proteins weakly bound to the immobilized cofactor derivative through binary complex formation and/or nonspecific interactions, which continuously "dribbled" off the matrix during the chromatographic procedure. The fact that this problem can be overcome by including a short pulse of 5'-AMP (stripping ligand) in the irrigant a couple of column volumes prior to the discontinuation of the specific substrate analogue (locking-on ligand) is clear from the results presented in this report. The general effectiveness of this auxiliary tactic has been assessed using model studies and through incorporation into an actual purification from a crude cellular extract. The results confirm the usefulness of the stripping-ligand tactic for the resolution and purification of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases when using the locking-on strategy. These studies have been carried out using bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH, EC 1.1.1.1), porcine heart mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH, EC 1.1.1.37), and bovine heart L-lactate dehydrogenase (l-LDH, EC 1.1.1.27). PMID:10425164

  7. Astroglial glutamate transporters coordinate excitatory signaling and brain energetics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael B; Jackson, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian brain, a family of sodium-dependent transporters maintains low extracellular glutamate and shapes excitatory signaling. The bulk of this activity is mediated by the astroglial glutamate transporters GLT-1 and GLAST (also called EAAT2 and EAAT1). In this review, we will discuss evidence that these transporters co-localize with, form physical (co-immunoprecipitable) interactions with, and functionally couple to various 'energy-generating' systems, including the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, glycogen metabolizing enzymes, glycolytic enzymes, and mitochondria/mitochondrial proteins. This functional coupling is bi-directional with many of these systems both being regulated by glutamate transport and providing the 'fuel' to support glutamate uptake. Given the importance of glutamate uptake to maintaining synaptic signaling and preventing excitotoxicity, it should not be surprising that some of these systems appear to 'redundantly' support the energetic costs of glutamate uptake. Although the glutamate-glutamine cycle contributes to recycling of neurotransmitter pools of glutamate, this is an over-simplification. The ramifications of co-compartmentalization of glutamate transporters with mitochondria for glutamate metabolism are discussed. Energy consumption in the brain accounts for ∼20% of the basal metabolic rate and relies almost exclusively on glucose for the production of ATP. However, the brain does not possess substantial reserves of glucose or other fuels. To ensure adequate energetic supply, increases in neuronal activity are matched by increases in cerebral blood flow via a process known as 'neurovascular coupling'. While the mechanisms for this coupling are not completely resolved, it is generally agreed that astrocytes, with processes that extend to synapses and endfeet that surround blood vessels, mediate at least some of the signal that causes vasodilation. Several studies have shown that either genetic deletion or

  8. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle. PMID:27184881

  9. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  10. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  11. Mono-sulfonated tetrazolium salt based NAD(P)H detection reagents suitable for dehydrogenase and real-time cell viability assays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Min; Wang, Feng; Cao, Danhui; Ruan, Jennifer Jin; Su, Weike; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    2016-09-15

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and is important for several biological processes. For GDH inhibitor screening, we developed a novel mono-sulfonated tetrazolium salt (EZMTT), which can be synthesized using H2O2 oxidation and purified easily on silica gel in large quantities. The EZMTT detection method showed linear dose responses to NAD(P)H, dehydrogenase concentration and cell numbers. In E. coli GDH assay, the EZMTT method showed excellent assay reproducibility with a Z factor of 0.9 and caused no false positives in the presence of antioxidants (such as BME). Using the EZMTT-formazan-NAD(P)H system, we showed that EGCG is a potent E. coli GDH inhibitor (IC50 45 nM) and identified that Ebselen, a multifunctional thioredoxin reductase inhibitor, inactivated E. coli GDH (IC50 213 nM). In cell-based assays at 0.5 mM tetrazolium concentration, EZMTT showed essentially no toxicity after a 3-day incubation, whereas 40% of inhibition was observed for WST-8. In conclusion, EZMTT is a novel tetrazolium salt which provides improved features that are suitable for dehydrogenases and real-time cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS). PMID:27387057

  12. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  13. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, Bengt; Graham, Terry; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2006-06-01

    During prolonged exercise, carbohydrate oxidation may result from decreased pyruvate production and increased fatty acid supply and ultimately lead to reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Pyruvate also interacts with the amino acids alanine, glutamine, and glutamate, whereby the decline in pyruvate production could affect tricarboxycylic acid cycle flux as well as gluconeogenesis. To enhance our understanding of these interactions, we studied the time course of changes in substrate utilization in six men who cycled at 44+/-1% peak oxygen consumption (mean+/-SE) until exhaustion (exhaustion at 3 h 23 min+/-11 min). Femoral arterial and venous blood, blood flow measurements, and muscle samples were obtained hourly during exercise and recovery (3 h). Carbohydrate oxidation peaked at 30 min of exercise and subsequently decreased for the remainder of the exercise bout (P<0.05). PDH activity peaked at 2 h of exercise, whereas pyruvate production peaked at 1 h of exercise and was reduced (approximately 30%) thereafter, suggesting that pyruvate availability primarily accounted for reduced carbohydrate oxidation. Increased free fatty acid uptake (P<0.05) was also associated with decreasing PDH activity (P<0.05) and increased PDH kinase 4 mRNA (P<0.05) during exercise and recovery. At 1 h of exercise, pyruvate production was greatest and was closely linked to glutamate, which was the predominant amino acid taken up during exercise and recovery. Alanine and glutamine were also associated with pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised approximately 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism in early exercise. PMID:16424076

  14. Effects of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gan, Li-Qin; Li, Shu-Ke; Zheng, Jie-Cong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Various alcoholic beverages containing different concentrations of ethanol are widely consumed, and excessive alcohol consumption may result in serious health problems. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is often accompanied by non-alcoholic beverages, such as herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages to relieve drunk symptoms. The aim of this study was to supply new information on the effects of these beverages on alcohol metabolism for nutritionists and the general public, in order to reduce problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The effects of 57 kinds of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity were evaluated. Generally, the effects of these beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity are very different. The results suggested that some beverages should not be drank after excessive alcohol consumption, and several beverages may be potential dietary supplements for the prevention and treatment of problems related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  15. Multiple retinoid dehydrogenases in testes cytosol from alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice.

    PubMed

    Posch, K C; Napoli, J L

    1992-05-28

    Retinoic acid syntheses from retinol by cytosol from testes of alcohol dehydrogenase negative or positive deermice were similar in specific activity and in their insensitivity to 1 M ethanol or 100 mM 4-methylpyrazole. Anion-exchange followed by size-exclusion chromatography revealed multiple and similarly migrating peaks in each cytosol that had both retinol and retinal dehydrogenase activities. Thus, the effects of ethanol on testes cannot be caused by direct inhibition of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis because retinoid dehydrogenases distinct from mouse class A2 alcohol dehydrogenases, which corresponds to human class I, occurred in testes and they were not inhibited by ethanol. These data also demonstrate the occurrence of multiple cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis activities and indicate that the two reactions of cytosolic retinoic acid synthesis, retinol and retinal dehydrogenation, may be catalyzed by enzymes that occur as complexes. PMID:1599517

  16. The physiological role of liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H A; Perkins, J R

    1970-07-01

    1. Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase was used to determine ethanol in the portal and hepatic veins and in the contents of the alimentary canal of rats given a diet free from ethanol. Measurable amounts of a substance behaving like ethanol were found. Its rate of interaction with yeast alcohol dehydrogenase and its volatility indicate that the substance measured was in fact ethanol. 2. The mean alcohol concentration in the portal blood of normal rats was 0.045mm. In the hepatic vein, inferior vena cava and aorta it was about 15 times lower. 3. The contents of all sections of the alimentary canal contained measurable amounts of ethanol. The highest values (average 3.7mm) were found in the stomach. 4. Infusion of pyrazole (an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) raised the alcohol concentration in the portal vein 10-fold and almost removed the difference between portal and hepatic venous blood. 5. Addition of antibiotics to the food diminished the ethanol concentration of the portal blood to less than one-quarter and that of the stomach contents to less than one-fortieth. 6. The concentration of alcohol in the alimentary canal and in the portal blood of germ-free rats was much decreased, to less than one-tenth in the alimentary canal and to one-third in the portal blood, but detectable quantities remained. These are likely to arise from acetaldehyde formed by the normal pathways of degradation of threonine, deoxyribose phosphate and beta-alanine. 7. The results indicate that significant amounts of alcohol are normally formed in the gastro-intestinal tract. The alcohol is absorbed into the circulation and almost quantitatively removed by the liver. Thus the function, or a major function, of liver alcohol dehydrogenase is the detoxication of ethanol normally present. 8. The alcohol concentration in the stomach of alloxan-diabetic rats was increased about 8-fold. 9. The activity of liver alcohol dehydrogenase is generally lower in carnivores than in herbivores and omnivores

  17. Development of L-lactate dehydrogenase biosensor based on porous silicon resonant microcavities as fluorescence enhancers.

    PubMed

    Jenie, S N Aisyiyah; Prieto-Simon, Beatriz; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-12-15

    The up-regulation of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), an intracellular enzyme present in most of all body tissues, is indicative of several pathological conditions and cellular death. Herein, we demonstrate LDH detection using porous silicon (pSi) microcavities as a luminescence-enhancing optical biosensing platform. Non-fluorescent resazurin was covalently attached onto the pSi surface via thermal hydrocarbonisation, thermal hydrosylilation and acylation. Each surface modification step was confirmed by means of FTIR and the optical shifts of the resonance wavelength of the microcavity. Thermal hydrocarbonisation also afforded excellent surface stability, ensuring that the resazurin was not reduced on the pSi surface. Using a pSi microcavity biosensor, the fluorescence signal upon detection of LDH was amplified by 10 and 5-fold compared to that of a single layer and a detuned microcavity, respectively, giving a limit of detection of 0.08 U/ml. The biosensor showed a linear response between 0.16 and 6.5 U/ml, covering the concentration range of LDH in normal as well as damaged tissues. The biosensor was selective for LDH and did not produce a signal upon incubation with another NAD-dependant enzyme L-glutamic dehydrogenase. The use of the pSi microcavity as a sensing platform reduced reagent usage by 30% and analysis time threefold compared to the standard LDH assay in solution.

  18. Conserved catalytic residues of the ALDH1L1 aldehyde dehydrogenase domain control binding and discharging of the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Krupenko, Sergey A

    2011-07-01

    The C-terminal domain (C(t)-FDH) of 10-formyltetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (FDH, ALDH1L1) is an NADP(+)-dependent oxidoreductase and a structural and functional homolog of aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we report the crystal structures of several C(t)-FDH mutants in which two essential catalytic residues adjacent to the nicotinamide ring of bound NADP(+), Cys-707 and Glu-673, were replaced separately or simultaneously. The replacement of the glutamate with an alanine causes irreversible binding of the coenzyme without any noticeable conformational changes in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Additional replacement of cysteine 707 with an alanine (E673A/C707A double mutant) did not affect this irreversible binding indicating that the lack of the glutamate is solely responsible for the enhanced interaction between the enzyme and the coenzyme. The substitution of the cysteine with an alanine did not affect binding of NADP(+) but resulted in the enzyme lacking the ability to differentiate between the oxidized and reduced coenzyme: unlike the wild-type C(t)-FDH/NADPH complex, in the C707A mutant the position of NADPH is identical to the position of NADP(+) with the nicotinamide ring well ordered within the catalytic center. Thus, whereas the glutamate restricts the affinity for the coenzyme, the cysteine is the sensor of the coenzyme redox state. These conclusions were confirmed by coenzyme binding experiments. Our study further suggests that the binding of the coenzyme is additionally controlled by a long-range communication between the catalytic center and the coenzyme-binding domain and points toward an α-helix involved in the adenine moiety binding as a participant of this communication.

  19. Extracellular glutamate alters mature osteoclast and osteoblast functions.

    PubMed

    Seidlitz, Eric P; Sharma, Mohit K; Singh, Gurmit

    2010-09-01

    Glutamatergic intercellular communication is involved in many aspects of metabolic homeostasis in normal bone. In bone metastasis, the balance between bone formation and degradation is disrupted. Although the responsible mechanisms are not clear, we have previously identified that cancer cell lines used in bone tumour models secrete glutamate, suggesting that tumour-derived glutamate may disrupt sensitive signalling systems in bone. This study examines the role of glutamate in mature osteoclastic bone resorption, osteoblast differentiation, and bone nodule formation. Glutamate was found to have no effect on the survival or activity of mature osteoclasts, although glutamate transporter inhibition and receptor blockade increased the number of bone resorption pits. Furthermore, transporter inhibition increased the area of resorbed bone while significantly decreasing the number of osteoclasts. Alkaline phosphatase activity and extracellular matrix mineralization were used as measurements of osteoblast differentiation. Glutamate significantly increased osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, but transport inhibitors had no effect. These studies support earlier findings suggesting that glutamate may be more important for osteoclastogenesis than for osteoclast proliferation or functions. Since glutamate is capable of changing the differentiation and activities of both osteoclast and osteoblast cell types in bone, it is reasonable to postulate that tumour-derived glutamate may impact bone homeostasis in bone metastasis.

  20. Glutamate and neurotrophic factors in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate's role as a neurotransmitter at synapses has been known for 40 years, but glutamate has since been shown to regulate neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and neuron survival in the developing and adult mammalian nervous system. Cell-surface glutamate receptors are coupled to Ca(2+) influx and release from endoplasmic reticulum stores, which causes rapid (kinase- and protease-mediated) and delayed (transcription-dependent) responses that change the structure and function of neurons. Neurotrophic factors and glutamate interact to regulate developmental and adult neuroplasticity. For example, glutamate stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn, modifies neuronal glutamate sensitivity, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and plasticity. Neurotrophic factors may modify glutamate signaling directly, by changing the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and Ca(2+)-regulating proteins, and also indirectly by inducing the production of antioxidant enzymes, energy-regulating proteins, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors, under conditions of oxidative and metabolic stress, may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in diseases ranging from stroke and Alzheimer's disease to psychiatric disorders. By enhancing neurotrophic factor signaling, environmental factors such as exercise and dietary energy restriction, and chemicals such as antidepressants may optimize glutamatergic signaling and protect against neurological disorders.

  1. The Relevance of Group II Glutamate Receptors Expression to Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Jonathan D; Mostofsky, David I

    2016-01-01

    The interface of receptor-mediated regulation of cellular signaling and neurological outputs remains an active field of investigation. The metabotropic G protein-coupled glutamate receptors, and in particular, the group II cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP)-lowering metabotropic glutamate receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors), have gained interest as therapeutic targets in different forms of neurological disorders. This review explores mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors expression, pharmacological activation, and signaling links to anxiety, as assessed in animal models and in clinical trials. PMID:27650988

  2. 21 CFR 866.5560 - Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5560 Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test system. (a) Identification. A lactic dehydrogenase... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lactic dehydrogenase immunological test...

  3. Properties of formate dehydrogenase in Methanobacterium formicicum.

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, N L; Ferry, J G

    1982-01-01

    Soluble formate dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium formicicum was purified 71-fold with a yield of 35%. Purification was performed anaerobically in the presence of 10 mM sodium azide which stabilized the enzyme. The purified enzyme reduced, with formate, 50 mumol of methyl viologen per min per mg of protein and 8.2 mumol of coenzyme F420 per min per mg of protein. The apparent Km for 7,8-didemethyl-8-hydroxy-5-deazariboflavin, a hydrolytic derivative of coenzyme F420, was 10-fold greater (63 microM) than for coenzyme F420 (6 microM). The purified enzyme also reduced flavin mononucleotide (Km = 13 microM) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (Km = 25 microM) with formate, but did not reduce NAD+ or NADP+. The reduction of NADP+ with formate required formate dehydrogenase, coenzyme F420, and coenzyme F420:NADP+ oxidoreductase. The formate dehydrogenase had an optimal pH of 7.9 when assayed with the physiological electron acceptor coenzyme F420. The optimal reaction rate occurred at 55 degrees C. The molecular weight was 288,000 as determined by gel filtration. The purified formate dehydrogenase was strongly inhibited by cyanide (Ki = 6 microM), azide (Ki = 39 microM), alpha,alpha-dipyridyl, and 1,10-phenanthroline. Denaturation of the purified formate dehydrogenase with sodium dodecyl sulfate under aerobic conditions revealed a fluorescent compound. Maximal excitation occurred at 385 nm, with minor peaks at 277 and 302 nm. Maximal fluorescence emission occurred at 455 nm. Images PMID:7061389

  4. Characterization of xylitol dehydrogenase from Debaryomyces hansenii

    SciTech Connect

    Girio, F.M.; Amaral-Collaco, M.T.; Pelica, F.

    1996-01-01

    The xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) from xylose-grown cells of Debaryomyces hansenii was partially purified in two chromatographic steps, and characterization studies were carried out in order to investigate the role of the xylitol dehydrogenase-catalyzed step in the regulation of D-xylose metabolism. The enzyme was most active at pH 9.0-9.5, and exhibited a broad polyol specificity. The Michaelis constants for xylitol and NAD{sup +} were 16.5 and 0.55 mM, respectively. Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} did not affect the enzyme activity. Conversely, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+} strongly inhibited the enzyme activity. It was concluded that NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase from D. hansenii has similarities with other xylose-fermenting yeasts in respect to optimal pH, substrate specificity, and K{sub m} value for xylitol, and therefore should be named L-iditol:NAD{sup +}-5-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.14). The reason D. hansenii is a good xylitol producer is not because of its value of K for xylitol, which is low enough to assure its fast oxidation by NAD{sup +}-xylitol dehydrogenase. However, a higher K{sub m} value of xylitol dehydrogenase for NAD{sup +} compared to the K{sub m} values of other xylose-fermenting yeasts may be responsible for the higher xylitol yields. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  6. Emotional Learning and Glutamate: Translational Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Charles F.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a common focus of clinical concern and certain forms of anxiety may be conceptualized as disorders of emotional learning. Behavior therapies effective in the treatment of anxiety are modeled on extinction training as a means of reducing pathological anxiety. The present understanding of human anxiety has been informed by preclinical research using rodent models to study the acquisition and extinction of fear. Glutamate appears to have a central role in both of these processes. The authors review this literature and discuss novel applications of D-cycloserine, a partial N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, for the treatment of anxiety. PMID:16400246

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells protect CNS neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity by inhibiting glutamate receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Voulgari-Kokota, A; Fairless, R; Karamita, M; Kyrargyri, V; Tseveleki, V; Evangelidou, M; Delorme, B; Charbord, P; Diem, R; Probert, L

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) promote functional recovery in experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) pathology and are currently being tested in clinical trials for stroke, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Their beneficial effects are attributed to the activation of endogenous CNS protection and repair processes as well as immune regulation but their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here we investigated the neuroprotective effects of mouse MSC in rodent MSC-neuron co-cultures and mice using models of glutamate excitotoxicity. A 24h pre-culture of mouse primary cortical neurons with MSC protected them against glutamate (NMDA) receptor-induced death and conditioned medium from MSC (MSC CM) was sufficient for this effect. Protection by MSC CM was associated with reduced mRNA levels of genes encoding NMDA receptor subunits, and increased levels for genes associated with non-neuronal and stem cell types, as shown by RT-PCR and cDNA microarray analyses. Changes in gene expression were not associated with alterations in cell lineage representation within the cultures. Further, MSC CM-mediated neuroprotection in rat retinal ganglion cells was associated with reduced glutamate-induced calcium influx. The adoptive transfer of EGFP(+)MSC in a mouse kainic acid epilepsy model also provided neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity in vivo, as shown by reduced neuron damage and glial cell activation in the hippocampus. These results show that MSC mediate direct neuroprotection by reducing neuronal sensitivity to glutamate receptor ligands and altering gene expression, and suggest a link between the therapeutic effects of MSC and the activation of cell plasticity in the damaged CNS. PMID:22561409

  8. Rat odontoblasts may use glutamate to signal dentin injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yi Sul; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Won, Jong Hwa; Vang, Hue; Oh, Seog Bae; Ro, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-10-29

    Accumulating evidence indicates that odontoblasts act as sensor cells, capable of triggering action potentials in adjacent pulpal nociceptive axons, suggesting a paracrine signaling via a currently unknown mediator. Since glutamate can mediate signaling by non-neuronal cells, and peripheral axons may express glutamate receptors (GluR), we hypothesized that the expression of high levels of glutamate, and of sensory receptors in odontoblasts, combined with an expression of GluR in adjacent pulpal axons, is the morphological basis for odontoblastic sensory signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the expression of glutamate, the thermo- and mechanosensitive ion channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TWIK-1-related K+channel (TREK-1), and the glutamate receptor mGluR5, in a normal rat dental pulp, and following dentin injury. We also examined the glutamate release from odontoblast in cell culture. Odontoblasts were enriched with glutamate, at the level as high as in adjacent pulpal axons, and showed immunoreactivity for TRPV1, TRPA1, and TREK-1. Pulpal sensory axons adjacent to odontoblasts expressed mGluR5. Both the levels of glutamate in odontoblasts, and the expression of mGluR5 in nearby axons, were upregulated following dentin injury. The extracellular glutamate concentration was increased significantly after treating of odontoblast cell line with calcium permeable ionophore, suggesting glutamate release from odontoblasts. These findings lend morphological support to the hypothesis that odontoblasts contain glutamate as a potential neuroactive substance that may activate adjacent pulpal axons, and thus contribute to dental pain and hypersensitivity.

  9. Rat odontoblasts may use glutamate to signal dentin injury.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yi Sul; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Won, Jong Hwa; Vang, Hue; Oh, Seog Bae; Ro, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-10-29

    Accumulating evidence indicates that odontoblasts act as sensor cells, capable of triggering action potentials in adjacent pulpal nociceptive axons, suggesting a paracrine signaling via a currently unknown mediator. Since glutamate can mediate signaling by non-neuronal cells, and peripheral axons may express glutamate receptors (GluR), we hypothesized that the expression of high levels of glutamate, and of sensory receptors in odontoblasts, combined with an expression of GluR in adjacent pulpal axons, is the morphological basis for odontoblastic sensory signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the expression of glutamate, the thermo- and mechanosensitive ion channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TWIK-1-related K+channel (TREK-1), and the glutamate receptor mGluR5, in a normal rat dental pulp, and following dentin injury. We also examined the glutamate release from odontoblast in cell culture. Odontoblasts were enriched with glutamate, at the level as high as in adjacent pulpal axons, and showed immunoreactivity for TRPV1, TRPA1, and TREK-1. Pulpal sensory axons adjacent to odontoblasts expressed mGluR5. Both the levels of glutamate in odontoblasts, and the expression of mGluR5 in nearby axons, were upregulated following dentin injury. The extracellular glutamate concentration was increased significantly after treating of odontoblast cell line with calcium permeable ionophore, suggesting glutamate release from odontoblasts. These findings lend morphological support to the hypothesis that odontoblasts contain glutamate as a potential neuroactive substance that may activate adjacent pulpal axons, and thus contribute to dental pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:27555550

  10. Postsynaptic activation at the squid giant synapse by photolytic release of L-glutamate from a 'caged' L-glutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Corrie, J E; DeSantis, A; Katayama, Y; Khodakhah, K; Messenger, J B; Ogden, D C; Trentham, D R

    1993-01-01

    1. Pharmacological evidence suggests L-glutamate is a strong candidate as a transmitter at the giant synapse of the squid. Postsynaptic activation at the giant synapse cannot be effected by conventional application of putative neurotransmitters by iontophoresis or perfusion, apparently because the complex structure of the synapse prevents a sufficiently rapid change in concentration at the postsynaptic membrane. Flash photolytic release of L-glutamate from a pharmacologically inert 'caged' L-glutamate pre-equilibrated in the stellate ganglion of Alloteuthis or Loligo was used to determine whether L-glutamate can produce postsynaptic activation when released rapidly in the synaptic clefts. 2. The preparation, reaction mechanism and properties of the caged L-glutamate, N-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethoxycarbonyl-L-glutamate, are described. The product quantum yield on photolysis was 0.65 (+/- 0.05). On flash photolysis glutamate release followed a single exponential time-course in the pH range 5.5-7.8. The rate constant was proportional to [H+] and was 93 s-1 at pH 5.5 and 16 degrees C in artificial sea water (ionic strength, I = 0.68 M). 3. At pH 7.8 flash photolysis of caged glutamate pre-equilibrated in the synapse caused only a slow depolarization. A second photolytic release of L-glutamate or transsynaptic activation produced no further depolarization, suggesting desensitization and inactivation of postsynaptic mechanisms by the initial pulse of L-glutamate. 4. Synaptic transmission in the giant synapse was normal at pH 5.5. Flash photolysis at pH 5.5 caused rapid production of L-glutamate within the synaptic cleft and a fast postsynaptic depolarization which generated postsynaptic action potentials.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7901400

  11. Mammalian folylpoly-. gamma. -glutamate synthetase. 3. Specificity for folate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.; Cichowicz, D.J.; Shane, B.

    1987-01-27

    A variety of folate analogues were synthesized to explore the specificity of the folate binding site of hog liver folypolyglutamate synthetase and the requirements for catalysis. Modifications of the internal and terminal glutamate moieties of folate cause large drops in on rates and/or affinity for the protein. The only exceptions are glutamine, homocysteate, and ornithine analogues, indicating a less stringent specificity around the delta-carbon of glutamate. It is proposed that initial folate binding to the enzyme involves low-affinity interactions at a pterin and a glutamate site and that the first glutamate bound is the internal residue adjacent to the benzoyl group. Processive movement of the polyglutamate chain through the glutamate site and a possible conformational change in the protein when the terminal residue is bound would result in tight binding and would position the ..gamma..-carboxyl of the terminal glutamate in the correct position for catalysis. The 4-amino substitution of folate increases the on rate for monoglutamate derivatives but severely impairs catalysis with diglutamate derivatives. Pteroylornithine derivatives are the first potent and specific inhibitors of folylpolyglutamate synthetase to be identified and may act as analogues of reaction intermediates. Other folate derivatives with tetrahedral chemistry replacing the peptide bond, such as pteroyl-..gamma..-glutamyl-(psi,CH/sub 2/-NH)-glutamate, retain affinity for the protein but are considerably less effective inhibitors than the ornithine derivatives. Enzyme activity was assayed using (/sup 14/C)glutamate.

  12. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Register of September 20, 2013 (78 FR 57881). The conference was held in Washington, DC, on October 23... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in...

  13. Neuronal vs glial glutamate uptake: Resolving the conundrum.

    PubMed

    Danbolt, N C; Furness, D N; Zhou, Y

    2016-09-01

    Neither normal brain function nor the pathological processes involved in neurological diseases can be adequately understood without knowledge of the release, uptake and metabolism of glutamate. The reason for this is that glutamate (a) is the most abundant amino acid in the brain, (b) is at the cross-roads between several metabolic pathways, and (c) serves as the major excitatory neurotransmitter. In fact most brain cells express glutamate receptors and are thereby influenced by extracellular glutamate. In agreement, brain cells have powerful uptake systems that constantly remove glutamate from the extracellular fluid and thereby limit receptor activation. It has been clear since the 1970s that both astrocytes and neurons express glutamate transporters. However the relative contribution of neuronal and glial transporters to the total glutamate uptake activity, however, as well as their functional importance, has been hotly debated ever since. The present short review provides (a) an overview of what we know about neuronal glutamate uptake as well as an historical description of how we got there, and (b) a hypothesis reconciling apparently contradicting observations thereby possibly resolving the paradox. PMID:27235987

  14. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  15. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  16. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's...

  17. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  18. Modulation of intestinal L-glutamate transport by luminal leptin.

    PubMed

    Fanjul, Carmen; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Lostao, María Pilar; Ducroc, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Leptin is secreted into the digestive tract and contributes to the absorption of dietary molecules by regulating transporters activity. Here, we studied the effect of luminal leptin on the intestinal transport of L-glutamate, an important component of human diet. We examined the effect of leptin on L-glutamate uptake in rat intestine in vitro measuring glutamate-induced short-circuit current (Isc) in Ussing chambers and L-[(3)H (U)]-glutamate uptake in jejunal everted rings. Glutamate-induced Isc was only observed in Na(+)-free conditions. This Isc was concentration (1-60 mmol L(-1)) and pH dependent. Luminal leptin increased glutamate Isc (∼100 %). Dose-response curve showed a biphasic pattern, with maximal stimulations observed at 10(-13) and 10(-10) mmol L(-1), that were sensitive to leptin receptor antagonist. In everted rings, two glutamate transport mechanisms were distinguished: a Na(+)-dependent, H(+)-independent, that was inhibited by leptin (∼20 %), and a Na(+)-independent but H(+)-dependent, that was enhanced by leptin (∼20 %), in line with data obtained in Ussing chambers. Altogether, these data reveal original non-monotonic effect of luminal leptin in the intestine and demonstrate a new role for this hormone in the modulation of L-glutamate transport, showing that luminal active gut peptides can influence absorption of amino acids.

  19. Glial glutamate transporters: new actors in brain signaling.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-10-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate brain, is critically involved in most of the physiological functions of the central nervous system. It has traditionally been assumed that glutamate triggers a wide array of signaling cascades through the activation of specific membrane receptors. The extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent neurotoxic insults. Electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glial glutamate transporters remove the bulk of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. An exquisitely ordered coupling between glutamatergic neurons and surrounding glia cells is fundamental for excitatory transmission. The glutamate/glutamine and astrocyte/neuron lactate shuttles provide the biochemical framework of this compulsory association. In this context, recent advances show that glial glutamate transporters act as signal transducers that regulate the expression of proteins involved in their compartmentalization with neurons in the so-called tripartite synapse.

  20. Cortical neurons exposed to glutamate rapidly leak preloaded chromium 51

    SciTech Connect

    Maulucci-Gedde, M.; Choi, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    The acute toxic effects of excess glutamate exposure on cortical neurons in culture was followed using a novel adaptation of the /sup 51/Cr efflux assay. Although the acute, sodium-dependent phase of glutamate neurotoxicity may contribute to several acute disease settings, including sustained seizures and stroke, functional aspects of the phenomenon have not been previously studied. We report here that the earliest morphologic sign of glutamate neurotoxicity, neuronal swelling, is accompanied by a large efflux of complexed /sup 51/Cr from preloaded neurons in the first hour after exposure, and that this efflux is detectable as early as 15 min after the onset of glutamate exposure. We suggest that this pathological burst of /sup 51/Cr may result from glutamate-induced leakiness of neuronal cell membranes.

  1. Influence of glutamic acid enantiomers on C-mineralization.

    PubMed

    Formánek, Pavel; Vranová, Valerie; Lojková, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Seasonal dynamics in the mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils from selected ecosystems was determined and subjected to a range of treatments: ambient x elevated CO2 level and meadow x dense x thinned forest environment. Mineralization of glutamic acid was determined by incubation of the soil with 2 mg L- or D-glutamic acid g(-1) of dry soil to induce the maximum respiration rate. Mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils fluctuates over the course of a vegetation season, following a similar trend across a range of ecosystems. Mineralization is affected by environmental changes and management practices, including elevated CO2 level and thinning intensity. L-glutamic acid metabolism is more dependent on soil type as compared to metabolism of its D-enantiomer. The results support the hypothesis that the slower rate of D- compared to L- amino acid mineralization is due to different roles in anabolism and catabolism of the soil microbial community.

  2. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility.

  3. Peafowl lactate dehydrogenase: problem of isoenzyme identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, R G; Wilson, A C

    1966-09-16

    Peafowl, like other vertebrates, contain multiple forms of lactate dehydrogenase. The electrophoretic properties of the peafowl isoenzymes are unusual in that the isoenzyme from heart tissue can be either more or less anodic than that of muscle, depending on the pH. This finding focuses attention on the problem of isoenzyme identification. It is suggested that isoenzymes be identified on the basis of properties that are chemically and biologically more significant than electrophoretic mobility. PMID:5917779

  4. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  5. Prenatal presentation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Niranjana; Tully, Hannah M; Chapman, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a female infant referred for prenatal MR evaluation of ventriculomegaly, which had been attributed by the referring obstetrician to aqueductal stenosis. Fetal MR confirmed ventriculomegaly but also demonstrated cerebral volume loss and white matter abnormalities. After birth, the infant developed persistent lactic acidosis. A diagnosis of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency was made on the basis of metabolic and molecular genetic studies. Ventriculomegaly is a common referral reason for fetal MR, yet there are few published reports of the radiographic findings that accompany inborn errors of metabolism, one potentially under-recognized cause of enlarged ventricles. This case contributes to this small body of literature on the imaging features of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency by describing pre- and postnatal MR findings and key clinical details. Our report emphasizes the necessity of considering pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency and other metabolic disorders as potential etiologies for fetal ventriculomegaly since prompt diagnosis may allow for early initiation of treatment and improve outcome. PMID:27026023

  6. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Smithgall, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by microsomal monoxygenases proceeds through trans-dihydrodiol metabolites to diol-epoxide ultimate carcinogens. This thesis directly investigated the role of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, a cytosolic NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase, in the detoxification of polycyclic aromatic trans-dihydrodiols. A wide variety of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols were synthesized and shown to be substrates for the homogeneous rat liver dehydrogenase, including several potent proximate carcinogens derived from 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, 5-methylchrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Since microsomal activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is highly stereospecific, the stereochemical course of enzymatic trans-dihydrodiol oxidation was monitored using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. The major product formed from the dehydrogenase-catalyzed oxidation of the trans-1,2-dihydrodiol of naphthalene was characterized using UV, IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy, and appears to be 4-hydroxy-1,2-naphthoquinone. Mass spectral analysis suggests that an analogous hydroxylated o-quinone is formed as the major product of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol oxidation. Enzymatic oxidation of trans-dihydrodiols was shown to be potently inhibited by all of the major classes of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Enhancement of trans-dihydrodiol proximate carcinogen oxidation may protect against possible adverse effects of the aspirin-like drugs, and help maintain the balance between activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  7. Serum Glutamic-Oxaloacetic Transaminase (GOT) and Glutamic-Pyruvic Transaminase (GPT) Levels in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Fang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Lan-Ping; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The elevated serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) rate among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is unknown and have not been sufficiently studies. The present paper aims to provide the profile of GOT and GPT, and their associated relationship with other biochemical levels of children or…

  8. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Verwer, R W H; van Wamelen, D J; Qi, X-R; Gao, S-F; Lucassen, P J; Swaab, D F

    2016-11-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the neuronal/glial glutamate transporters was determined by qPCR in postmortem prefrontal cortex. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) were selected from young MDD patients who had committed suicide (MDD-S; n = 17), from MDD patients who died of non-suicide related causes (MDD-NS; n = 7) and from matched control subjects (n = 12). We also compared elderly depressed patients who had not committed suicide (n = 14) with matched control subjects (n = 22). We found that neuronal located components (EAAT3, EAAT4, ASCT1, SNAT1, SNAT2) of the glutamate-glutamine cycle were increased in the ACC while the astroglia located components (EAAT1, EAAT2, GLUL) were decreased in the DLPFC of MDD-S patients. In contrast, most of the components in the cycle were increased in the DLPFC of MDD-NS patients. In conclusion, the glutamate-glutamine cycle - and thus glutamine transmission - is differentially affected in depressed suicide patients and depressed non-suicide patients in an area specific way.

  9. Xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas putida Fu1: two molybdenum-containing dehydrogenases of novel structural composition.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, K; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    The constitutive xanthine dehydrogenase and the inducible 2-furoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase could be labeled with [185W]tungstate. This labeling was used as a reporter to purify both labile proteins. The radioactivity cochromatographed predominantly with the residual enzymatic activity of both enzymes during the first purification steps. Both radioactive proteins were separated and purified to homogeneity. Antibodies raised against the larger protein also exhibited cross-reactivity toward the second smaller protein and removed xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity up to 80 and 60% from the supernatant of cell extracts, respectively. With use of cell extract, Western immunoblots showed only two bands which correlated exactly with the activity stains for both enzymes after native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molybdate was absolutely required for incorporation of 185W, formation of cross-reacting material, and enzymatic activity. The latter parameters showed a perfect correlation. This evidence proves that the radioactive proteins were actually xanthine dehydrogenase and 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The apparent molecular weight of the native xanthine dehydrogenase was about 300,000, and that of 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase was 150,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of both enzymes revealed two protein bands corresponding to molecular weights of 55,000 and 25,000. The xanthine dehydrogenase contained at least 1.6 mol of molybdenum, 0.9 ml of cytochrome b, 5.8 mol of iron, and 2.4 mol of labile sulfur per mol of enzyme. The composition of the 2-furoyl-CoA dehydrogenase seemed to be similar, although the stoichiometry was not determined. The oxidation of furfuryl alcohol to furfural and further to 2-furoic acid by Pseudomonas putida Fu1 was catalyzed by two different dehydrogenases. Images PMID:2170335

  10. Elevated venous glutamate levels in (pre)catabolic conditions result at least partly from a decreased glutamate transport activity.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Stütz, O; Kinscherf, R; Schykowski, M; Kellerer, M; Holm, E; Dröge, W

    1996-06-01

    Abnormally high postabsorptive venous plasma glutamate levels have been reported for several diseases that are associated with a loss of body cell mass including cancer, human/simian immunodeficiency virus infection, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Studies on exchange rates in well-nourished cancer patients now show that high venous plasma glutamate levels may serve as a bona fide indicator for a decreased uptake of glutamate by the peripheral muscle tissue in the postabsorptive period and may be indicative for a precachectic state. High glutamate levels are also moderately correlated with a decreased uptake of glucose and ketone bodies. Relatively high venous glutamate levels have also been found in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and to some extent also in the cubital vein of normal elderly subjects, i.e., in conditions commonly associated with a decreased glucose tolerance and progressive loss of body cell mass.

  11. Translating Glutamate: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Javitt, Daniel C.; Schoepp, Darryle; Kalivas, Peter W.; Volkow, Nora D.; Zarate, Carlos; Merchant, Kalpana; Bear, Mark F.; Umbricht, Daniel; Hajos, Mihaly; Potter, William Z.; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The neurotransmitter glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in mammalian brain and is responsible for most corticocortical and corticofugal neurotransmission. Disturbances in glutamatergic function have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders—including schizophrenia, drug abuse and addiction, autism, and depression—that were until recently poorly understood. Nevertheless, improvements in basic information regarding these disorders have yet to translate into Food and Drug Administration–approved treatments. Barriers to translation include the need not only for improved compounds but also for improved biomarkers sensitive to both structural and functional target engagement and for improved translational models. Overcoming these barriers will require unique collaborative arrangements between pharma, government, and academia. Here, we review a recent Institute of Medicine–sponsored meeting, highlighting advances in glutamatergic theories of neuropsychiatric illness as well as remaining barriers to treatment development. PMID:21957170

  12. Poly(γ-glutamic acid), coagulation? Anticoagulation?

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Peng, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Chi, Bo; Xu, Hong; Mao, Chun; Feng, Shuaihui

    2016-11-01

    Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) powder was usually used as hemostatic agent because of its excellent physical properties of water-absorption and water-locking. However, if γ-PGA absorbs enough water, how about its blood compatibility? Here, the other side of the coin was investigated. The anticoagulant properties of γ-PGA were characterized by in vitro coagulation tests, hemolytic assay, platelet adhesion, and platelet activation. Moreover, cytotoxicity experiments of γ-PGA were also carried out by MTT assay. Results indicated that the sufficient water-absorbed γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property and non-cytotoxicity. It means γ-PGA has good anticoagulant property, non-cytotoxicity. If γ-PGA has absorbed enough water, it can be used as an anticoagulation biomaterial. With double effects (coagulation and anticoagulation), the γ-PGA with desirable bioproperties can be readily tailored to cater to various biomedical applications. PMID:27545694

  13. The cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc− drives breast tumor cell glutamate release and cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Slosky, Lauren M.; BassiriRad, Neemah M.; Symons, Ashley M.; Thompson, Michelle; Doyle, Timothy; Forte, Brittany L.; Staatz, William D.; Bui, Lynn; Neumann, William L.; Mantyh, Patrick W.; Salvemini, Daniela; Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bone is one of the leading sites of metastasis for frequently diagnosed malignancies, including those arising in the breast, prostate and lung. Although these cancers develop unnoticed and are painless in their primary sites, bone metastases result in debilitating pain. Deeper investigation of this pain may reveal etiology and lead to early cancer detection. Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is inadequately managed with current standard-of-care analgesics and dramatically diminishes patient quality of life. While CIBP etiology is multifaceted, elevated levels of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, in the bone-tumor microenvironment may drive maladaptive nociceptive signaling. Here, we establish a relationship between the reactive nitrogen species peroxynitrite, tumor-derived glutamate, and CIBP. In vitro and in a syngeneic in vivo model of breast CIBP, murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells significantly elevated glutamate via the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc−. The well-known system xc− inhibitor sulfasalazine significantly reduced levels of glutamate and attenuated CIBP-associated flinching and guarding behaviors. Peroxynitrite, a highly reactive species produced in tumors, significantly increased system xc− functional expression and tumor cell glutamate release. Scavenging peroxynitrite with the iron and mangano-based porphyrins, FeTMPyP and SRI10, significantly diminished tumor cell system xc− functional expression, reduced femur glutamate levels and mitigated CIBP. In sum, we demonstrate how breast cancer bone metastases upregulate a cystine/glutamate co-transporter to elevate extracellular glutamate. Pharmacological manipulation of peroxynitrite or system xc− attenuates CIBP, supporting a role for tumor-derived glutamate in CIBP and validating the targeting of system xc− as a novel therapeutic strategy for the management of metastatic bone pain. PMID:27482630

  14. Hippocampal glutamate receptors in fear memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Martín; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Bonini, Juliana S; Rossatto, Janine I; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, N

    2004-01-01

    It is thought that activity-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy driven by biochemical pathways responsive to the action of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate are critical components of the mechanisms responsible for memory formation. In particular, the early activation of the NMDA (rNMDA) and AMPA (rAMPA) subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors has been demonstrated to be a necessary event for the acquisition of several types of memory. In the rat, consolidation of the long-term memory for a one-trial, step-down inhibitory avoidance task is blocked by antagonists of the rNMDA and rAMPA infused into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus early after training and is associated with a rapid and reversible increase in the total number of [3H]AMPA binding sites. The learning-induced increase in [[3H]AMPA is accompanied by translocation of the GluR1 subunit of the rAMPA to the post-synaptic terminal together with its phosphorylation at Ser831. In addition, learning of the mentioned fear-motivated task induces the activation and rNMDA-dependent translocation of CaMKII to the post-synaptic density. Inhibition of this protein kinase as well as blockade of the rNMDA abolishes both the learning-induced translocation of GluR1 and its phosphorylation. Our data suggest that learning of an avoidance task enhances hippocampal rAMPA signaling through rNMDA and CaMKII-dependent mechanisms.

  15. On the biosynthesis of free and covalently bound PQQ. Glutamic acid decarboxylase from Escherichia coli is a pyridoxo-quinoprotein.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, R A; Groen, B W; Duine, J A

    1989-03-27

    Analysis of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GDC) (EC 4.1.1.15) from Escherichia coli ATCC 11246 revealed the presence of six pyridoxal phosphates (PLPs) as well as six covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinones (PQQs) per hexameric enzyme molecule. This is the second example of a pyridoxo-quinoprotein, suggesting that other atypical pyridoxoproteins (PLP-containing enzymes) have similar cofactor composition. Since the organism did not produce free PQQ and its quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase was present in the apo form, free PQQ is not used in the assemblage of GDC. Most probably, biosynthesis of covalently bound cofactor occurs in situ via a route which is different from that of free PQQ. Thus, organisms previously believed to be unable to synthesize (free) PQQ could in fact be able to produce quinoproteins with covalently bound cofactor. Implications for the role of PQQ in eukaryotic cells are discussed.

  16. Acamprosate {monocalcium bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate)} reduces ethanol-drinking behavior in rats and glutamate-induced toxicity in ethanol-exposed primary rat cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Oka, Michiko; Hirouchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masaru; Sugahara, Seishi; Oyama, Tatsuya

    2013-10-15

    Acamprosate, the calcium salt of bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate), contributes to the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients, but its mechanism of action in the central nervous system is unclear. Here, we report the effect of acamprosate on ethanol-drinking behavior in standard laboratory Wistar rats, including voluntary ethanol consumption and the ethanol-deprivation effect. After forced ethanol consumption arranged by the provision of only one drinking bottle containing 10% ethanol, the rats were given a choice between two drinking bottles, one containing water and the other containing 10% ethanol. In rats selected for high ethanol preference, repeated oral administration of acamprosate diminished voluntary ethanol drinking. After three months of continuous access to two bottles, rats were deprived of ethanol for three days and then presented with two bottles again. After ethanol deprivation, ethanol preference was increased, and the increase was largely abolished by acamprosate. After exposure of primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex to ethanol for four days, neurotoxicity, as measured by the extracellular leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was induced by incubation with glutamate for 1h followed by incubation in the absence of ethanol for 24h. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine, the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine and the voltage-gated calcium-channel blocker nifedipine all inhibited glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons. Acamprosate inhibited the glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons more strongly than that from intact neurons. In conclusion, acamprosate showed effective reduction of drinking behavior in rats and protected ethanol-exposed neurons by multiple blocking of glutamate signaling.

  17. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST: role of PKC.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-term, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules present at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate of the transporter molecules accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the long-term modulation apparently involves transcriptional regulation. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors activation mediate a substantial reduction in the transcriptional activity of the chglast promoter through the Ca2+/diacylglicerol-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling cascade. Overexpression of constitutive active PKC isoforms of mimic the glutamate effect. Accordingly, increased levels of c-Jun or c-Fos, but not Jun-B, Jun-D or Fos-B, lower the chglast promoter activity. Serial deletions and electrophorectic mobility shift assays were used to define a specific region within the 5' proximal region of the chglast promoter, associated with transcriptional repression. A putative glutamate response element could be defined in the proximal promoter stretch more likely between nts -40 and -78. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under glutamate-dependent transcriptional control through PKC, and support the notion of a pivotal role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of its own removal from the synaptic cleft, thereby modulating, mainly in the long term, glutamatergic transmission.

  18. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest. PMID:24269238

  19. Evidence for Glutamate as a Neuroglial Transmitter within Sensory Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Gong, Kerui; Adedoyin, Mary; Ng, Johnson; Bhargava, Aditi; Ohara, Peter T.; Jasmin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study examines key elements of glutamatergic transmission within sensory ganglia of the rat. We show that the soma of primary sensory neurons release glutamate when depolarized. Using acute dissociated mixed neuronal/glia cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia and a colorimetric assay, we show that when glutamate uptake by satellite glial cells (SGCs) is inhibited, KCl stimulation leads to simultaneous increase of glutamate in the culture medium. With calcium imaging we see that the soma of primary sensory neurons and SGCs respond to AMPA, NMDA, kainate and mGluR agonists, and selective antagonists block this response. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique, inward currents were recorded from small diameter (<30 µm) DRG neurons from intact DRGs (ex-vivo whole ganglion preparation) in response to local application of the above glutamate receptor agonists. Following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either the inferior orbital nerve or the sciatic nerve, glutamate expression increases in the trigeminal ganglia and DRG respectively. This increase occurs in neurons of all diameters and is present in the somata of neurons with injured axons as well as in somata of neighboring uninjured neurons. These data provides additional evidence that glutamate can be released within the sensory ganglion, and that the somata of primary sensory neurons as well as SGCs express functional glutamate receptors at their surface. These findings, together with our previous gene knockdown data, suggest that glutamatergic transmission within the ganglion could impact nociceptive threshold. PMID:23844184

  20. A comparison of potato and vertebrate lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Poerio, E; Davies, D D

    1980-01-01

    A 2000-fold purification of L(+)-lactate dehydrogenase from potatoes is reported. Five isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase can be detected in crude extracts of potato, and three of these are present in the purified preparation. The enzyme (mol.wt. 150 000), which is composed of four subunits (mol.wt. 37 500), is active with the same oxo acids and hydroxy acids that have been reported as substrates with the same oxo acids and hydroxy acids that have been reported as substrates for vertebrate lactate dehydrogenases. These similarities between potato and vertebrate lactate dehydrogenases contrast sharply with some other reports on potato lactate dehydrogenase. These discrepancies are discussed in relation to the proposition that vertebrate and potato lactate dehydrogenases share a common evolutionary origin. PMID:7236200

  1. Metabolic studies of temperature control strategy on poly(γ-glutamic acid) production in a thermophilic strain Bacillus subtilis GXA-28.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Chen, Guiguang; Wang, Qinglong; Zheng, Shuangfeng; Shu, Lin; Liang, Zhiqun

    2014-03-01

    A thermophilic strain Bacillus subtilis GXA-28 with capability of γ-PGA production was characterized, and its product was identified. The effect of temperatures on cell growth, γ-PGA yield and molecular weight were investigated. Results showed that γ-PGA yield reached 19.92g/L at 45°C with a high productivity of 0.91g/L/h, and the molecular weight reached 3.03×10(6)Da. Then, the flux distribution and the key enzyme activities at 2-oxoglutarate branch under specified temperature were determined to illustrate the possible metabolic mechanism contributing to the improved γ-PGA production. Results indicated that the fluxes from iso-citrate to 2-oxoglutarate and from 2-oxoglutarate to glutamate were increased with high activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase, which led to enhance γ-PGA production. This work firstly employed temperature control strategy to improve γ-PGA production, and provided novel information on the metabolic mechanism of γ-PGA biosynthesis in Bacillus species.

  2. Partial Similarities Between Yeast and Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Jörnvall, Hans

    1973-01-01

    The primary structure of about half of the protein chain of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase has been determined and compared with the amino-acid sequences of other dehydrogenases. The enzyme is found to be distantly related to horse-liver alcohol dehydrogenase, although these two proteins have different quaternary structures and subunit sizes. Some regions show no significant similarities, but long segments within the N-terminal parts of the molecules are homologous, suggesting a common and important function for these segments. Ancestral connections between some different dehydrogenases can be concluded and the degree of evolutionary changes may be estimated. PMID:4599620

  3. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1500 - Malic dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... plasma. Malic dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of muscle and liver diseases, myocardial infarctions, cancer, and blood disorders such as myelogenous (produced in the...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1420 - Isocitric dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and plasma. Isocitric dehydrogenase measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, or acute inflammation of the biliary tract; pulmonary...

  8. Improved poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gu, Yanyan; Quan, Yufen; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shufang; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    A Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain with enhanced γ-PGA production was constructed by metabolically engineering its γ-PGA synthesis-related metabolic networks: by-products synthesis, γ-PGA degradation, glutamate precursor synthesis, γ-PGA synthesis and autoinducer synthesis. The genes involved in by-products synthesis were firstly deleted from the starting NK-1 strain. The obtained NK-E7 strain with deletions of the epsA-O (responsible for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis), sac (responsible for levan synthesis), lps (responsible for lipopolysaccharide synthesis) and pta (encoding phosphotransacetylase) genes, showed increased γ-PGA purity and slight increase of γ-PGA titer from 3.8 to 4.15 g/L. The γ-PGA degrading genes pgdS (encoding poly-gamma-glutamate depolymerase) and cwlO (encoding cell wall hydrolase) were further deleted. The obtained NK-E10 strain showed further increased γ-PGA production from 4.15 to 9.18 g/L. The autoinducer AI-2 synthetase gene luxS was deleted in NK-E10 strain and the resulting NK-E11 strain showed comparable γ-PGA titer to NK-E10 (from 9.18 to 9.54 g/L). In addition, we overexpressed the pgsBCA genes (encoding γ-PGA synthetase) in NK-E11 strain; however, the overexpression of these genes led to a decrease in γ-PGA production. Finally, the rocG gene (encoding glutamate dehydrogenase) and the glnA gene (glutamine synthetase) were repressed by the expression of synthetic small regulatory RNAs in NK-E11 strain. The rocG-repressed NK-anti-rocG strain exhibited the highest γ-PGA titer (11.04 g/L), which was 2.91-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain. Fed-batch cultivation of the NK-anti-rocG strain resulted in a final γ-PGA titer of 20.3g/L, which was 5.34-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain in shaking flasks. This work is the first report of a systematically metabolic engineering approach that significantly enhanced γ-PGA production in a B. amyloliquefaciens strain. The engineering strategies explored here are

  9. Improved poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Gu, Yanyan; Quan, Yufen; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shufang; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    A Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain with enhanced γ-PGA production was constructed by metabolically engineering its γ-PGA synthesis-related metabolic networks: by-products synthesis, γ-PGA degradation, glutamate precursor synthesis, γ-PGA synthesis and autoinducer synthesis. The genes involved in by-products synthesis were firstly deleted from the starting NK-1 strain. The obtained NK-E7 strain with deletions of the epsA-O (responsible for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis), sac (responsible for levan synthesis), lps (responsible for lipopolysaccharide synthesis) and pta (encoding phosphotransacetylase) genes, showed increased γ-PGA purity and slight increase of γ-PGA titer from 3.8 to 4.15 g/L. The γ-PGA degrading genes pgdS (encoding poly-gamma-glutamate depolymerase) and cwlO (encoding cell wall hydrolase) were further deleted. The obtained NK-E10 strain showed further increased γ-PGA production from 4.15 to 9.18 g/L. The autoinducer AI-2 synthetase gene luxS was deleted in NK-E10 strain and the resulting NK-E11 strain showed comparable γ-PGA titer to NK-E10 (from 9.18 to 9.54 g/L). In addition, we overexpressed the pgsBCA genes (encoding γ-PGA synthetase) in NK-E11 strain; however, the overexpression of these genes led to a decrease in γ-PGA production. Finally, the rocG gene (encoding glutamate dehydrogenase) and the glnA gene (glutamine synthetase) were repressed by the expression of synthetic small regulatory RNAs in NK-E11 strain. The rocG-repressed NK-anti-rocG strain exhibited the highest γ-PGA titer (11.04 g/L), which was 2.91-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain. Fed-batch cultivation of the NK-anti-rocG strain resulted in a final γ-PGA titer of 20.3g/L, which was 5.34-fold higher than that of the NK-1 strain in shaking flasks. This work is the first report of a systematically metabolic engineering approach that significantly enhanced γ-PGA production in a B. amyloliquefaciens strain. The engineering strategies explored here are

  10. Relationship between increase in astrocytic GLT-1 glutamate transport and late-LTP

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na+-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) and late long-term potentiation (L-LTP). Four issues were addressed in this research: Which glutamate transporter is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP? In what cell type in the hippocampus does the increase in glutamate uptake occur? Does a single type of cell contain all the mechanisms to respond to an induction stimulus with a change in glutamate uptake? What role does the increase in glutamate uptake play during L-LTP? We have confirmed that GLT-1 is responsible for the increase in glutamate uptake during L-LTP. Also, we found that astrocytes were responsible for much, if not all, of the increase in glutamate uptake in hippocampal slices during L-LTP. Additionally, we found that cultured astrocytes alone were able to respond to an induction stimulus with an increase in glutamate uptake. Inhibition of basal glutamate uptake did not affect the induction of L-LTP, but inhibition of the increase in glutamate uptake did inhibit both the expression of L-LTP and induction of additional LTP. It seems likely that heightened glutamate transport plays an ongoing role in the ability of hippocampal circuitry to code and store information. PMID:23166293

  11. Efficient synthesis of novel glutamate homologues and investigation of their affinity and selectivity profile at ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrea; Tamborini, Lucia; Mastronardi, Federica; Ettari, Roberta; Romano, Diego; Nielsen, Birgitte; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola

    2014-04-15

    A convenient synthesis of four new enantiomerically pure acidic amino acids is reported and their affinity at ionotropic glutamate receptors was determined. The new compounds are higher homologues of glutamic acid in which the molecular complexity has been increased by introducing an aromatic/heteroaromatic ring, that is a phenyl or a thiophene ring, that could give additional electronic interactions with the receptors. The results of the present investigation indicate that the insertion of an aromatic/heteroaromatic ring into the amino acid skeleton of glutamate higher homologues is well tolerated and this modification could be exploited to generate a new class of NMDA antagonists. PMID:24630559

  12. Glutamate neurons within the midbrain dopamine regions.

    PubMed

    Morales, M; Root, D H

    2014-12-12

    Midbrain dopamine systems play important roles in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. The participation of midbrain dopamine systems in diverse clinical contexts suggests these systems are highly complex. Midbrain dopamine regions contain at least three neuronal phenotypes: dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic. Here, we review the locations, subtypes, and functions of glutamatergic neurons within midbrain dopamine regions. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGluT2) mRNA-expressing neurons are observed within each midbrain dopamine system. Within rat retrorubral field (RRF), large populations of VGluT2 neurons are observed throughout its anteroposterior extent. Within rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), VGluT2 neurons are observed centrally and caudally, and are most dense within the laterodorsal subdivision. RRF and SNC rat VGluT2 neurons lack tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), making them an entirely distinct population of neurons from dopaminergic neurons. The rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) contains the most heterogeneous populations of VGluT2 neurons. VGluT2 neurons are found in each VTA subnucleus but are most dense within the anterior midline subnuclei. Some subpopulations of rat VGluT2 neurons co-express TH or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), but most of the VGluT2 neurons lack TH or GAD. Different subsets of rat VGluT2-TH neurons exist based on the presence or absence of vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter, or D2 dopamine receptor. Thus, the capacity by which VGluT2-TH neurons may release dopamine will differ based on their capacity to accumulate vesicular dopamine, uptake extracellular dopamine, or be autoregulated by dopamine. Rat VTA VGluT2 neurons exhibit intrinsic VTA projections and extrinsic projections to the accumbens and to the prefrontal cortex. Mouse VTA VGluT2 neurons project to accumbens shell, prefrontal cortex, ventral pallidum, amygdala, and lateral habenula. Given their molecular

  13. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  14. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Hiroko; Niwa, Fumihiro; Sherwood, Mark W.; Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Arizono, Misa; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Sugiura, Kotomi; Lévi, Sabine; Triller, Antoine; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Summary GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I) balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses. PMID:26711343

  15. A further experimental study of the antisilicotic effect of glutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Morosova, K I; Katsnelson, B A; Rotenberg YuS; Belobragina, G V

    1984-01-01

    Two groups of rats were exposed to quartz dust for six months and in addition one group was given drinking water containing 1.5% sodium glutamate while the second received only water. In the rats receiving glutamate we observed (a) evidence for a considerably reduced cytotoxic effect of the quartz on cells obtained by bronchopulmonary lavage, (b) a reduction in dust retention in the lungs, especially in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, (c) a considerable reduction in the weight gain in the lungs and in their hydroxyproline and lipid contents, and (d) the inhibition of the formation of silicotic nodules. Polarographic studies of the oxygen consumption of peritoneal macrophages from rats receiving glutamate showed that glutamate prevents the adverse effects of quartz on mitochondrial oxidative processes. PMID:6093851

  16. Transport Mechanism of a Bacterial Homologue of Glutamate Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, N.; Ginter, C; Boudker, O

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are integral membrane proteins that catalyse a thermodynamically uphill uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft into the cytoplasm of glia and neuronal cells by harnessing the energy of pre-existing electrochemical gradients of ions. Crucial to the reaction is the conformational transition of the transporters between outward and inward facing states, in which the substrate binding sites are accessible from the extracellular space and the cytoplasm, respectively. Here we describe the crystal structure of a double cysteine mutant of a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii, GltPh, which is trapped in the inward facing state by cysteine crosslinking. Together with the previously determined crystal structures of Glt{sub Ph} in the outward facing state, the structure of the crosslinked mutant allows us to propose a molecular mechanism by which Glt{sub Ph} and, by analogy, mammalian glutamate transporters mediate sodium-coupled substrate uptake.

  17. Metabolic Control of Vesicular Glutamate Transport and Release

    PubMed Central

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A.; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H.; Nicoll, Roger A.; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl−. Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl− acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl− at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses, and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. PMID:20920794

  18. Vesicular release of glutamate from unmyelinated axons in white matter

    PubMed Central

    Ziskin, Jennifer L; Nishiyama, Akiko; Rubio, Maria; Fukaya, Masahiro; Bergles, Dwight E

    2007-01-01

    Directed fusion of transmitter-laden vesicles enables rapid intercellular signaling in the central nervous system and occurs at synapses within gray matter. Here we show that action potentials also induce the release of glutamate from axons in the corpus callosum, a white matter region responsible for interhemispheric communication. Callosal axons release glutamate by vesicular fusion, which induces quantal AMPA receptor–mediated currents in NG2+ glial progenitors at anatomically distinct axo–glial synaptic junctions. Glutamate release from axons was facilitated by repetitive stimulation and could be inhibited through activation of metabotropic autoreceptors. Although NG2+ cells form associations with nodes of Ranvier in white matter, measurements of conduction velocity indicated that unmyelinated fibers are responsible for glutamatergic signaling with NG2+ glia. This activity-dependent secretion of glutamate was prevalent in the developing and mature mouse corpus callosum, indicating that axons within white matter both conduct action potentials and engage in rapid neuron-glia communication. PMID:17293857

  19. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  20. Transport mechanism of a glutamate transporter homologue GltPh

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Postis, Vincent L.G.; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Goldman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate transporters are responsible for uptake of the neurotransmitter glutamate in mammalian central nervous systems. Their archaeal homologue GltPh, an aspartate transporter isolated from Pyrococcus horikoshii, has been the focus of extensive studies through crystallography, MD simulations and single-molecule FRET (smFRET). Here, we summarize the recent research progress on GltPh, in the hope of gaining some insights into the transport mechanism of this aspartate transporter. PMID:27284058

  1. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.; Reed, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg/sup 2 +/, and (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH ..cap alpha.. subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Ca/sup 2 +/. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Yun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2012-10-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity is crucial to maintains blood glucose and ATP levels, which largely depends on the phosphorylation status by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Although it has been reported that PDC is phosphorylated and inactivated by PDK2 and PDK4 in metabolically active tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and kidney during starvation and diabetes, the precise mechanisms by which expression of PDK2 and PDK4 are transcriptionally regulated still remains unclear. Insulin represses the expression of PDK2 and PDK4 via phosphorylation of FOXO through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Several nuclear hormone receptors activated due to fasting or increased fat supply, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, estrogen-related receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors, also participate in the up-regulation of PDK2 and PDK4; however, the endogenous ligands that bind those nuclear receptors have not been identified. It has been recently suggested that growth hormone, adiponectin, epinephrine, and rosiglitazone also control the expression of PDK4 in tissue-specific manners. In this review, we discuss several factors involved in the expressional regulation of PDK2 and PDK4, and introduce current studies aimed at providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. PMID:23130316

  3. Purification and Characterization of NADP+-Linked Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Scots Pine1

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Jesús; Gallardo, Fernando; Suárez, Maria F.; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    1998-01-01

    NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-IDH; EC 1.1.1.42) is involved in the supply of 2-oxoglutarate for ammonia assimilation and glutamate synthesis in higher plants through the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) cycle. Only one NADP+-IDH form of cytosolic localization was detected in green cotyledons of pine (Pinus spp.) seedlings. The pine enzyme was purified and exhibited molecular and kinetic properties similar to those described for NADP+-IDH from angiosperm, with a higher catalytic efficiency (105 m−1 s−1) than the deduced efficiencies for GS and GOGAT in higher plants. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against pine NADP+-IDH and used to assess protein expression in the seedlings. Steady-state levels of NADP+-IDH were coordinated with GS during seed germination and were associated with GS/GOGAT enzymes during chloroplast biogenesis, suggesting that NADP+-IDH is involved in the provision of carbon skeletons for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing molecules. However, a noncoordinated pattern of NADP+-IDH and GS/GOGAT was observed in advanced stages of cotyledon development and in the hypocotyl. A detailed analysis in hypocotyl sections revealed that NADP+-IDH abundance was inversely correlated with the presence of GS, GOGAT, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but was associated with the differentiation of the organ. These results cannot be explained by the accepted role of the enzyme in nitrogen assimilation and strongly suggest that NADP+-IDH may have other, as-yet-unknown, biological functions. PMID:9765548

  4. Functional architecture of olfactory ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abuin, Liliane; Bargeton, Benoîte; Ulbrich, Maximilian H.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Kellenberger, Stephan; Benton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate chemical communication between neurons at synapses. A variant iGluR subfamily, the Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), was recently proposed to detect environmental volatile chemicals in olfactory cilia. Here we elucidate how these peripheral chemosensors have evolved mechanistically from their iGluR ancestors. Using a Drosophila model, we demonstrate that IRs act in combinations of up to three subunits, comprising individual odor-specific receptors and one or two broadly expressed co-receptors. Heteromeric IR complex formation is necessary and sufficient for trafficking to cilia and mediating odor-evoked electrophysiological responses in vivo and in vitro. IRs display heterogeneous ion conduction specificities related to their variable pore sequences, and divergent ligand-binding domains function in odor recognition and cilia localization. Our results provide insights into the conserved and distinct architecture of these olfactory and synaptic ion channels and offer perspectives into use of IRs as genetically encoded chemical sensors. PMID:21220098

  5. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  6. Reduced hippocampal glutamate in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rupsingh, R; Borrie, M; Smith, M; Wells, J L; Bartha, R

    2011-05-01

    Altered neurometabolic profiles have been detected in Alzheimer disease (AD) using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), but no definitive biomarker of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD has been established. This study used MRS to compare hippocampal metabolite levels between normal elderly controls (NEC) and subjects with MCI and AD. Short echo-time (TE=46 ms) (1)H spectra were acquired at 4T from the right hippocampus of 23 subjects with AD, 12 subjects with MCI and 15 NEC. Absolute metabolite levels and metabolite ratios were compared between groups using a multivariate analysis of covariance (covariates: age, sex) followed by post hoc Tukey's test (p<0.05 significant). Subjects with AD had decreased glutamate (Glu) as well as decreased Glu/creatine (Cr), Glu/myo-inositol (mI), Glu/N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and NAA/Cr ratios compared to NEC. Subjects with AD also had decreased Glu/mI ratio compared to MCI. There were no differences between subjects with MCI and NEC. Therefore, in addition to NAA/Cr, decreased hippocampal Glu may be an indicator of AD.

  7. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  8. Podocytes: a new player for glutamate signaling.

    PubMed

    Armelloni, S; Li, M; Messa, P; Rastaldi, M P

    2012-12-01

    In the renal glomerulus, podocytes envelop the external side of the capillary basement membrane with their intertwining ramifications, and ensure elimination of metabolic waste within the urine, while proteins and important blood components are retained into the circulation. To preserve the integrity of the glomerular filter, which is constantly exposed to a high variety of stimuli, podocytes need to communicate by rapid and precise signaling, likely similar to that used by neuronal cells. In the last years, we and others have shown that podocytes are indeed molecularly equipped for communicating in a synaptic-like way, where glutamate and its receptors seem to have a pivotal role, because altering glutamatergic communication leads to podocyte damage and increased filter permeability. Major components of glutamatergic signaling are organized at foot process junctions by adhesion molecules, chiefly by nephrin, and are connected to the actin cytoskeleton, that governs the health of podocytes. Further advances in understanding podocyte physiological behavior and signaling properties have the potential to improve the knowledge of podocyte diseases, first among them idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis that still needs more precise molecular-based diagnosis and targeted treatment. PMID:23018105

  9. Nitrogen isotope effects on glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-05-03

    The nitrogen isotope effect on the decarboxylation of glutamic acid by glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli has been measured by comparison of the isotopic composition of the amino nitrogen of the product ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid isolated after 10-20% reaction with that of the starting glutamic acid. At pH 4.7, 37 /sup 0/C, the isotope effect is k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9855 +/- 0.0006 when compared to unprotonated glutamic acid. Interpretation of this result requires knowledge of the equilibrium nitrogen isotope effect for Schiff base formation. This equilibrium isotope effect is K/sup 14//K/sup 15/ - 0.9824 for the formation of the unprotonated Schiff base between unprotonated valine and salicylaldehyde. Analysis of the nitrogen isotope effect on decarboxylation of glutamic acid and of the previously measured carbon isotope effect on this same reaction shows that decarboxylation and Schiff base formation are jointly rate limiting. The enzyme-bound Schiff base between glutamate and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate partitions approximately 2:1 between decarboxylation and return to the starting state. The nitrogen isotope effect also reveals that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated in this intermediate.

  10. Effect of dexamethasone on fetal hepatic glutamine-glutamate exchange.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, M; Teng, C; Wilkening, R B; Fennessey, P; Battaglia, F C; Meschia, G

    2000-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of dexamethasone (Dex) in the fetal lamb causes a two- to threefold increase in plasma glutamine and other glucogenic amino acids and a decrease of plasma glutamate to approximately one-third of normal. To explore the underlying mechanisms, hepatic amino acid uptake and conversion of L-[1-(13)C]glutamine to L-[1-(13)C]glutamate and (13)CO(2) were measured in six sheep fetuses before and in the last 2 h of a 26-h Dex infusion. Dex decreased hepatic glutamine and alanine uptakes (P < 0.01) and hepatic glutamate output (P < 0.001). Hepatic outputs of the glutamate (R(Glu,Gln)) and CO(2) formed from plasma glutamine decreased to 21 (P < 0.001) and 53% (P = 0.009) of control, respectively. R(Glu,Gln), expressed as a fraction of both outputs, decreased (P < 0.001) from 0.36 +/- 0.02 to 0.18 +/- 0.04. Hepatic glucose output remained virtually zero throughout the experiment. We conclude that Dex decreases fetal hepatic glutamate output by increasing the routing of glutamate carbon into the citric acid cycle and by decreasing the hepatic uptake of glucogenic amino acids. PMID:10780940

  11. Glutamate biosensors based on diamond and graphene platforms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingping; Wisetsuwannaphum, Sirikarn; Foord, John S

    2014-01-01

    l-Glutamate is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes and implicated in several neurological disorders, for which monitoring of dynamic levels of extracellular glutamate in the living brain tissues may contribute to medical understanding and treatments. Electrochemical sensing of glutamate has been developed recently mainly using platinum, carbon fibre and carbon nanotube electrodes. In the present work, we explore the fabrication and properties of electrochemical glutamate sensors fabricated on doped chemical vapour deposition diamond electrodes and graphene nanoplatelet structures. The sensors incorporate platinum nanoparticles to catalyse the electrooxidation of hydrogen peroxide, glutamate oxidase to oxidise glutamate, and a layer of poly-phenylenediamine to impart selectivity. The performance of the devices was compared to a similar sensor fabricated on glassy carbon. Both the diamond and the graphene sensor showed very competitive performance compared to the majority of existing electrochemical sensors. The graphene based sensor showed the best performance of the three investigated in terms of sensitivity, linear dynamic range and long term stability, whereas it was found that the diamond device showed the best limit of detection.

  12. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  13. Glutamate biosensors based on diamond and graphene platforms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingping; Wisetsuwannaphum, Sirikarn; Foord, John S

    2014-01-01

    l-Glutamate is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the mammalian central nervous system, playing a vital role in many physiological processes and implicated in several neurological disorders, for which monitoring of dynamic levels of extracellular glutamate in the living brain tissues may contribute to medical understanding and treatments. Electrochemical sensing of glutamate has been developed recently mainly using platinum, carbon fibre and carbon nanotube electrodes. In the present work, we explore the fabrication and properties of electrochemical glutamate sensors fabricated on doped chemical vapour deposition diamond electrodes and graphene nanoplatelet structures. The sensors incorporate platinum nanoparticles to catalyse the electrooxidation of hydrogen peroxide, glutamate oxidase to oxidise glutamate, and a layer of poly-phenylenediamine to impart selectivity. The performance of the devices was compared to a similar sensor fabricated on glassy carbon. Both the diamond and the graphene sensor showed very competitive performance compared to the majority of existing electrochemical sensors. The graphene based sensor showed the best performance of the three investigated in terms of sensitivity, linear dynamic range and long term stability, whereas it was found that the diamond device showed the best limit of detection. PMID:25427169

  14. Structural Studies of Yeast Δ1-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate Dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1): Active Site Flexibility and Oligomeric State

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The proline catabolic enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (ALDH4A1) catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of γ-glutamate semialdehyde to l-glutamate. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ALDH4A1 is encoded by the PUT2 gene and known as Put2p. Here we report the steady-state kinetic parameters of the purified recombinant enzyme, two crystal structures of Put2p, and the determination of the oligomeric state and quaternary structure from small-angle X-ray scattering and sedimentation velocity. Using Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate as the substrate, catalytic parameters kcat and Km were determined to be 1.5 s–1 and 104 μM, respectively, with a catalytic efficiency of 14000 M–1 s–1. Although Put2p exhibits the expected aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily fold, a large portion of the active site is disordered in the crystal structure. Electron density for the 23-residue aldehyde substrate-binding loop is absent, implying substantial conformational flexibility in solution. We furthermore report a new crystal form of human ALDH4A1 (42% identical to Put2p) that also shows disorder in this loop. The crystal structures provide evidence of multiple active site conformations in the substrate-free form of the enzyme, which is consistent with a conformational selection mechanism of substrate binding. We also show that Put2p forms a trimer-of-dimers hexamer in solution. This result is unexpected because human ALDH4A1 is dimeric, whereas some bacterial ALDH4A1s are hexameric. Thus, global sequence identity and domain of life are poor predictors of the oligomeric states of ALDH4A1. Mutation of a single Trp residue that forms knob-in-hole interactions across the dimer–dimer interface abrogates hexamer formation, suggesting that this residue is the center of a protein–protein association hot spot. PMID:24502590

  15. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25473931

  16. Comparative evaluation of glutamate-sensitive radiopharmaceuticals: Technetium-99m-glutamic acid and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-bis(glutamate) conjugate for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Dipti; Tiwari, Anjani K; Chuttani, Krishna; Kaul, Ankur; Singh, Harpal; Mishra, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has become a significant imaging modality with huge potential to visualize and provide information of anatomic dysfunctions that are predictive of future diseases. This imaging tool is complimented by radiopharmaceuticals/radiosubstrates that help in imaging specific physiological aspects of the human body. The present study was undertaken to explore the utility of technetium-99m (⁹⁹(m)Tc)-labeled glutamate conjugates for tumor scintigraphy. As part of our efforts to further utilize the application of chelating agents, glutamic acid was conjugated with a multidentate ligand, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The DTPA-glutamate conjugate [DTPA-bis(Glu)] was well characterized by IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The biological activity of glutamic acid was compared with its DTPA conjugate by radiocomplexation with ⁹⁹(m)Tc (labeling efficiency ≥98%). In vivo studies of both the radiolabeled complexes ⁹⁹(m)Tc-Glu and ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) were then carried out, followed by gamma scintigraphy in New Zealand albino rabbits. Improved serum stability of ⁹⁹(m)Tc-labeled DTPA conjugate indicated that ⁹⁹(m)Tc remained bound to the conjugate up to 24 hours. Blood clearance showed a relatively slow washout of the DTPA conjugate when compared with the labeled glutamate. Biodistribution characteristics of the conjugate in Balb/c mice revealed that DTPA conjugation of glutamic acid favors less accumulation in the liver and bone and rapid renal clearance. Tumor scintigraphy in mice showed increasing tumor accumulation, stable up to 4 hours. These preliminary studies show that ⁹⁹(m)Tc-DTPA-bis(Glu) can be a useful radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic applications in single-photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  17. Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1) trigger the gating of GluD2 delta glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Visou; Perroy, Julie; Tricoire, Ludovic; Piochon, Claire; Dadak, Selma; Chen, Xiaoru; Dusart, Isabelle; Fagni, Laurent; Lambolez, Bertrand; Levenes, Carole

    2014-01-01

    The orphan GluD2 receptor belongs to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family but does not bind glutamate. Ligand-gated GluD2 currents have never been evidenced, and whether GluD2 operates as an ion channel has been a long-standing question. Here, we show that GluD2 gating is triggered by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, both in a heterologous expression system and in Purkinje cells. Thus, GluD2 is not only an adhesion molecule at synapses but also works as a channel. This gating mechanism reveals new properties of glutamate receptors that emerge from their interaction and opens unexpected perspectives regarding synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:24357660

  18. Inhibition effect of poly(γ-glutamic acid) on lead-induced toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, T L; Kao, T H; Inbaraj, B Stephen; Su, Y T; Chen, B H

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficiency in treatment of lead-induced intoxication in mice with γ-PGA as chelating agent and compare with the drug (meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid). The results showed the incorporation of γ-PGA at 200 and 400 mg/kg could reduce the accumulation of lead in the liver, heart, and testis; however, the latter was more effective in decreasing the lead content in the kidney and spleen. Nevertheless, both doses failed to inhibit the lead accumulation in the lung and brain. Additionally, both doses of γ-PGA could reduce TBARs in the kidney and brain, as well as elevate δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydrase (δ-ALAD) activity in blood and decrease glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the serum. For hematological parameters, both white blood cells (WBCs) and hematocrite (HCT) were raised by 400 mg/kg of γ-PGA, while for both doses of γ-PGA, a slight decline in hemoglobin (HGB), mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) was observed, with the red blood cells (RBCs) being unaffected.

  19. Rapid reaction kinetics of proline dehydrogenase in the multifunctional proline utilization A protein.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Michael A; Becker, Donald F

    2012-01-10

    The multifunctional proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate in two reaction steps using separate proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains. Here, the kinetic mechanism of PRODH in PutA is studied by stopped-flow kinetics to determine microscopic rate constants for the proline:ubiquinone oxidoreductase mechanism. Stopped-flow data for proline reduction of the flavin cofactor (reductive half-reaction) and oxidation of reduced flavin by CoQ(1) (oxidative half-reaction) were best-fit by a double exponential from which maximum observable rate constants and apparent equilibrium dissociation constants were determined. Flavin semiquinone was not observed in the reductive or oxidative reactions. Microscopic rate constants for steps in the reductive and oxidative half-reactions were obtained by globally fitting the stopped-flow data to a simulated mechanism that includes a chemical step followed by an isomerization event. A microscopic rate constant of 27.5 s(-1) was determined for proline reduction of the flavin cofactor followed by an isomerization step of 2.2 s(-1). The isomerization step is proposed to report on a previously identified flavin-dependent conformational change [Zhang, W. et al. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 483-491] that is important for PutA functional switching but is not kinetically relevant to the in vitro mechanism. Using CoQ(1), a soluble analogue of ubiquinone, a rate constant of 5.4 s(-1) was obtained for the oxidation of flavin, thus indicating that this oxidative step is rate-limiting for k(cat) during catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic constants calculated from the microscopic rate constants agree with the experimental k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) parameters.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 suggests three distinct pathways of nitroglycerin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, M Verena; Beretta, Matteo; Griesberger, Martina; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd; Gorren, Antonius C F

    2011-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying reduction of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO) by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), we generated mutants of the enzyme lacking the cysteines adjacent to reactive Cys302 (C301S and C303S), the glutamate that participates as a general base in aldehyde oxidation (E268Q) or combinations of these residues. The mutants were characterized regarding acetaldehyde dehydrogenation, GTN-triggered enzyme inactivation, GTN denitration, NO formation, and soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Lack of the cysteines did not affect dehydrogenase activity but impeded GTN denitration, aggravated GTN-induced enzyme inactivation, and increased NO formation. A triple mutant lacking the cysteines and Glu268 catalyzed sustained formation of superstoichiometric amounts of NO and exhibited slower rates of inactivation. These results suggest three alternative pathways for the reaction of ALDH2 with GTN, all involving formation of a thionitrate/sulfenyl nitrite intermediate at Cys302 as the initial step. In the first pathway, which predominates in the wild-type enzyme and reflects clearance-based GTN denitration, the thionitrate apparently reacts with one of the adjacent cysteine residues to yield nitrite and a protein disulfide. The predominant reaction catalyzed by the single and double cysteine mutants requires Glu268 and results in irreversible enzyme inactivation. Finally, combined lack of the cysteines and Glu268 shifts the reaction toward formation of the free NO radical, presumably through homolytic cleavage of the sulfenyl nitrite intermediate. Although the latter reaction accounts for less than 10% of total turnover of GTN metabolism catalyzed by wild-type ALDH2, it is most likely essential for vascular GTN bioactivation.

  1. NADP-dehydrogenases from pepper fruits: effect of maturation.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Rosa M; Bonilla-Valverde, Daniel; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2009-02-01

    NADPH is an important molecule in the redox balance of the cell. Pepper fruits are the second worldwide consumable vegetables and exhibit different phenotypes after maturation. In this paper, two pepper cultivars were studied: Vergasa whose fruits shift from green to red after maturation, and Biela that shifts to yellow. Using fresh fruits from the same plants of the two cultivars at distinct maturation stages, the activity and gene expression of the main NADPH-generating dehydrogenases was studied. The activity analysis of the main NADP-dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH), NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) and NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), showed that, except for the G6PDH, all the activities were enhanced (54-100%) in the mature pepper fruits from both cultivars (red or yellow) with respect to green pepper fruits. The content of NADPH and NADP in the mature fruits of both cultivars showed a noteworthy increase with respect to green fruits. For the transcript analysis, a partial cDNA of each NADP-dehydrogenase was obtained, and the NADP-ME was the only NADP-dehydrogenase that showed a significant induction. The increase in the content of NADPH in mature fruits because of the enhanced activity of NADP-dehydrogenases suggests that these NADPH-generating enzymes could be involved in the maturation of pepper fruits.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1670 - Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sorbitol dehydrogenase test system. 862.1670 Section 862.1670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1670 Sorbitol dehydrogenase...

  3. Conformations of Diphosphopyridine Coenzymes upon Binding to Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yu; Eichner, Ronald D.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of oxidized as well as reduced coenzyme to some dehydrogenases has been studied under different concentration ratios and temperatures by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A significant difference in the spectral behavior between DPN+ and DPNH upon binding is interpreted in terms of fast and slow on-off rates relative to the nuclear magnetic resonance time scale in the binding of these two coenzymes. Significant downfield shifts of DPN+ were observed upon binding, comparable in magnitude to those expected upon opening (destacking) of the coenzymes in the case of chicken-muscle and lobster-tail lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) and yeast alchol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1.). A preliminary survey of several other dehydrogenases is consistent with these findings. In the case of 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde dehydrogenase, there is a possibility that the coenzyme exists in the folded form. PMID:4351183

  4. Among the twenty classical L-amino acids, only glutamate directly activates metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Frauli, Mélanie; Neuville, Pascal; Vol, Claire; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions, cellular amino acids can be profusely released from cells into the cerebral interstitial space. Because several class-C G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) display a broad natural ligand spectrum, being sensitive to more than one endogenous ligand, we wondered whether the related metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors could be modulated by various types of L-amino acids, allowing them to sense large increase in extracellular amino acid concentration. Here, the agonist, antagonist and allosteric effects of the twenty classical L-amino acids were evaluated on the eight mGlu receptor subtypes. We show that, in addition to glutamate (Glu), cysteine, aspartate and asparagine also lead to the activation of mGlu3, 4 and 5. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the effect of these three amino acids did not result from a direct activation of the receptors, but from an indirect action involving Glu-transporters/exchangers. These data first demonstrate that mGlu receptors, unlike other class-C GPCRs, display an extremely high selectivity towards one ligand. Moreover, our results also show that Glu transport systems allow mGlu receptors to sense large increase in the extracellular concentration of some amino acids. Such a system will certainly lead to a large increase in some mGlu receptor activity under pathological conditions, such as seizure, ischemia or other brain injuries. PMID:16310227

  5. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  6. Interactions between heparinoids and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Paulíková, H; Valusová, E; Antalík, M

    1997-07-01

    The interaction between polysulfated polysaecharides (low-molecular-weight heparin LMWH, dextran sulfate DS and pentosan sulfate PS) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) was investigated. The fluorescence and UV spectra of YADH after adding the tested polysaccharides have confirmed the interaction between the enzyme and these compounds. Kinetic studies have shown that LMWH, DS and PS are inhibitors of YADH (mixed type with respect to NAD). The most potent inhibitor is PS (ID50=37.5 ng/ml, Ki=0.6 muM). The inhibition effect depends on the ionic strength (the inhibition decreased by about 50% in the presence of 100 mM Na2SO4) and pH value (the inhibition decreased at pH>7). The results indicate that the inhibition effect of these polyanions is caused by their electrostatic interactions with the NAD-binding region of YADH.

  7. The Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The website http://www.aldh.org is a publicly available database for nomenclature and functional and molecular sequence information for members of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily for animals, plants, fungi and bacteria. The site has organised gene-specific records. It provides synopses of ALDH gene records, marries trivial terms to correct nomenclature and links global accession identifiers with source data. Server-side alignment software characterises the integrity of each sequence relative to the latest genomic assembly and provides identifier-specific detail reports, including a graphical presentation of the transcript's exon - intron structure, its size, coding sequence, genomic strand and locus. Also included are a summary of substrates, inhibitors and enzyme kinetics. The site provides reference lists and is designed to facilitate data mining by interested investigators. PMID:20038501

  8. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase and cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Sun, Lihan; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2010-01-01

    Numerous conditions promote oxidative stress, leading to the build-up of reactive aldehydes that cause cell damage and contribute to cardiac diseases. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are important enzymes that eliminate toxic aldehydes by catalysing their oxidation to non-reactive acids. The review will discuss evidence indicating a role for a specific ALDH enzyme, the mitochondrial ALDH2, in combating oxidative stress by reducing the cellular ‘aldehydic load’. Epidemiological studies in humans carrying an inactive ALDH2, genetic models in mice with altered ALDH2 levels, and small molecule activators of ALDH2 all highlight the role of ALDH2 in cardioprotection and suggest a promising new direction in cardiovascular research and the development of new treatments for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20558439

  9. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Monkenbusch, M; Stadler, A; Biehl, R; Ollivier, J; Zamponi, M; Richter, D

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D2O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains. PMID:26298156

  10. NADH electrochemical sensor coupled with dehydrogenase enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Hideko; Mascini, Marco )

    1992-06-01

    A graphite electrode assembled in a flow cell has shown to be a good detector for NADH. Current is linearly dependent on concentration in the range 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}3} M without any mediator at the potential applied of 300 mV vs Ag/AgCl. Lactate and alcohol dehydrogenases were immobilized near to the electrode surface or in a reactor to obtain an NADH-based biosensor for lactate or ethanol. With lactate the authors succeeded to obtain a response only if the reactor was used and for alcohol a current proportional to the concentration was obtained either if the enzyme was immobilized in a membrane and placed near the electrode surface or when the enzyme was immobilized in a reactor form. By FIA procedures fast responses and recoveries were obtained, but with a short linear range.

  11. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  12. Fast internal dynamics in alcohol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, M.; Stadler, A. Biehl, R.; Richter, D.; Ollivier, J.; Zamponi, M.

    2015-08-21

    Large-scale domain motions in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) have been observed previously by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE). We have extended the investigation on the dynamics of ADH in solution by using high-resolution neutron time-of-flight (TOF) and neutron backscattering (BS) spectroscopy in the incoherent scattering range. The observed hydrogen dynamics were interpreted in terms of three mobility classes, which allowed a simultaneous description of the measured TOF and BS spectra. In addition to the slow global protein diffusion and domain motions observed by NSE, a fast internal process could be identified. Around one third of the protons in ADH participate in the fast localized diffusive motion. The diffusion coefficient of the fast internal motions is around two third of the value of the surrounding D{sub 2}O solvent. It is tempting to associate the fast internal process with solvent exposed amino acid residues with dangling side chains.

  13. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Weretilnyk, E.A.; Weigel, P.

    1986-04-01

    Betaine is synthesized in spinach chloroplasts via the pathway Choline ..-->.. Betaine Aldehyde ..-->.. Betaine; the second step is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The subcellular distribution of BADH was determined in leaf protoplast lysates; BADH isozymes were separated by 6-9% native PAGE. The chloroplast stromal fraction contains a single BADH isozyme (number1) that accounts for > 80% of the total protoplast activity; the extrachloroplastic fraction has a minor isozyme (number2) which migrates more slowly than number1. Both isozymes appear specific for betaine aldehyde, are more active with NAD than NADP, and show a ca. 3-fold activity increase in salinized leaves. The phenotype of a natural variant of isozyme number1 suggests that the enzyme is a dimer.

  14. Structure-Function Relationships in Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Margaret J.; Buehner, Manfred; Chandrasekhar, K.; Ford, Geoffrey C.; Hackert, Marvin L.; Liljas, Anders; Rossmann, Michael G.; Smiley, Ira E.; Allison, William S.; Everse, Johannes; Kaplan, Nathan O.; Taylor, Susan S.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of coenzyme and substrate are considered in relation to the known primary and tertiary structure of lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). The adenine binds in a hydrophobic crevice, and the two coenzyme phosphates are oriented by interactions with the protein. The positively charged guanidinium group of arginine 101 then folds over the negatively charged phosphates, collapsing the loop region over the active center and positioning the unreactive B side of the nicotinamide in a hydrophobic protein environment. Collapse of the loop also introduces various charged groups into the vicinity of the substrate binding site. The substrate is situated between histidine 195 and the C4 position on the nicotinamide ring, and is partially oriented by interactions between its carboxyl group and arginine 171. The spatial arrangements of these groups may provide the specificity for the L-isomer of lactate. PMID:4146647

  15. Molybdenum and tungsten-dependent formate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Maia, Luisa B; Moura, José J G; Moura, Isabel

    2015-03-01

    The prokaryotic formate metabolism is considerably diversified. Prokaryotes use formate in the C1 metabolism, but also evolved to exploit the low reduction potential of formate to derive energy, by coupling its oxidation to the reduction of numerous electron acceptors. To fulfil these varied physiological roles, different types of formate dehydrogenase (FDH) enzymes have evolved to catalyse the reversible 2-electron oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide. This review will highlight our present knowledge about the diverse physiological roles of FDH in prokaryotes, their modular structural organisation and active site structures and the mechanistic strategies followed to accomplish the formate oxidation. In addition, the ability of FDH to catalyse the reverse reaction of carbon dioxide reduction, a potentially relevant reaction for carbon dioxide sequestration, will also be addressed.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  17. Current approaches to enhance glutamate transporter function and expression.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Andréia C K

    2015-09-01

    L-glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS and has a central role in a variety of brain functions. The termination of glutamate neurotransmission by excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) is essential to maintain glutamate concentration low in extracellular space and avoid excitotoxicity. EAAT2/GLT-1, being the most abundant subtype of glutamate transporter in the CNS, plays a key role in regulation of glutamate transmission. Dysfunction of EAAT2 has been correlated with various pathologies such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, among others. Therefore, activators of the function or enhancers of the expression of EAAT2/GLT-1 could serve as a potential therapy for these conditions. Translational activators of EAAT2/GLT-1, such as ceftriaxone and LDN/OSU-0212320, have been described to have significant protective effects in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and epilepsy. In addition, pharmacological activators of the activity of EAAT2/GLT-1 have been explored for decades and are currently emerging as promising tools for neuroprotection, having potential advantages over expression activators. This review describes the current status of the search for EAAT2/GLT-1 activators and addresses challenges and limitations that this approach might encounter. Termination of glutamate neurotransmission by glutamate transporter EAAT2 is essential to maintain homeostasis in the brain and to avoid excitotoxicity. Dysfunction of EAAT2 has been correlated with various neurological pathologies. Therefore, activators of the function or enhancers of the expression of EAAT2 (green arrows) could serve as a potential therapy for these conditions. This review describes the current status of the search for EAAT2 activators and addresses challenges and limitations of this approach. PMID:26096891

  18. Therapeutic effects of glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition.

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Glutamic Acid in Piglets Challenged with Deoxynivalenol

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (P<0.05) induced oxidative stress in piglets, while this stress was remarkably reduced with glutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition. PMID:24984001

  20. Short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase associates with a protein super-complex integrating multiple metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Srinivas B; Master, Stephen R; Sireci, Anthony N; Bierl, Charlene; Stanley, Paige E; Li, Changhong; Stanley, Charles A; Bennett, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Proteins involved in mitochondrial metabolic pathways engage in functionally relevant multi-enzyme complexes. We previously described an interaction between short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCHAD) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) explaining the clinical phenotype of hyperinsulinism in SCHAD-deficient patients and adding SCHAD to the list of mitochondrial proteins capable of forming functional, multi-pathway complexes. In this work, we provide evidence of SCHAD's involvement in additional interactions forming tissue-specific metabolic super complexes involving both membrane-associated and matrix-dwelling enzymes and spanning multiple metabolic pathways. As an example, in murine liver, we find SCHAD interaction with aspartate transaminase (AST) and GDH from amino acid metabolic pathways, carbamoyl phosphate synthase I (CPS-1) from ureagenesis, other fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis enzymes and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, an extra-mitochondrial enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. Most of the interactions appear to be independent of SCHAD's role in the penultimate step of fatty acid oxidation suggesting an organizational, structural or non-enzymatic role for the SCHAD protein.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of alcohol dehydrogenase from Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Sunagawa, M; Mori, A; Imai, C; Fukuda, M; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1989-06-01

    A genomic library of Acetobacter aceti DNA was constructed by using a broad-host-range cosmid vector. Complementation of a spontaneous alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient mutant resulted in the isolation of a plasmid designated pAA701. Subcloning and deletion analysis of pAA701 limited the region that complemented the deficiency in alcohol dehydrogenase activity of the mutant. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and showed that this region contained the full structural gene for the 72-kilodalton dehydrogenase subunit of the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme complex. The predicted amino acid sequence of the gene showed homology with sequences of methanol dehydrogenase structural genes of Paracoccus denitrificans and Methylobacterium organophilum.

  2. HIV-1, Methamphetamine and Astrocyte Glutamate Regulation: Combined Excitotoxic Implications for Neuro-AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Irma E; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory transmitter in the brain can lead to neurotoxicity when not properly regulated. Excitotoxicity is a direct result of abnormal regulation of glutamate concentrations in the synapse, and is a common neurotoxic mediator associated with neurodegenerative disorders. It is well accepted that methamphetamine (METH), a potent central nervous stimulant with high abuse potential, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are implicated in the progression of neurocognitive malfunction. Both have been shown to induce common neurodegenerative effects such as astrogliosis, compromised blood brain barrier integrity, and excitotoxicity in the brain. Reduced glutamate uptake from neuronal synapses likely leads to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular spaces. Astrocytes express the glutamate transporters responsible for majority of the glutamate uptake from the synapse, as well as for vesicular glutamate release. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity in the context of METH and HIV-1 are undefined. Topics reviewed include dysregulation of the glutamate transporters, specifically excitatory amino acid transporter-2, metabotropic glutamate receptor(s) expression and the release of glutamate by vesicular exocytosis. We also discuss glutamate concentration dysregulation through astrocytic expression of enzymes for glutamate synthesis and metabolism. Lastly, we discuss recent evidence of various astrocyte and neuron crosstalk mechanisms implicated in glutamate regulation. Astrocytes play an essential role in the neuropathologies associated with METH/HIV-1-induced excitotoxicity. We hope to shed light on common cellular and molecular pathways astrocytes share in glutamate regulation during drug abuse and HIV-1 infection. PMID:22591363

  3. HIV-1, methamphetamine and astrocyte glutamate regulation: combined excitotoxic implications for neuro-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Irma E; Ghorpade, Anuja

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate, the most abundant excitatory transmitter in the brain can lead to neurotoxicity when not properly regulated. Excitotoxicity is a direct result of abnormal regulation of glutamate concentrations in the synapse, and is a common neurotoxic mediator associated with neurodegenerative disorders. It is well accepted that methamphetamine (METH), a potent central nervous stimulant with high abuse potential, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 are implicated in the progression of neurocognitive malfunction. Both have been shown to induce common neurodegenerative effects such as astrogliosis, compromised blood brain barrier integrity, and excitotoxicity in the brain. Reduced glutamate uptake from neuronal synapses likely leads to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular spaces. Astrocytes express the glutamate transporters responsible for majority of the glutamate uptake from the synapse, as well as for vesicular glutamate release. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of astrocyte-mediated excitotoxicity in the context of METH and HIV-1 are undefined. Topics reviewed include dysregulation of the glutamate transporters, specifically excitatory amino acid transporter-2, metabotropic glutamate receptor(s) expression and the release of glutamate by vesicular exocytosis. We also discuss glutamate concentration dysregulation through astrocytic expression of enzymes for glutamate synthesis and metabolism. Lastly, we discuss recent evidence of various astrocyte and neuron crosstalk mechanisms implicated in glutamate regulation. Astrocytes play an essential role in the neuropathologies associated with METH/HIV-1-induced excitotoxicity. We hope to shed light on common cellular and molecular pathways astrocytes share in glutamate regulation during drug abuse and HIV-1 infection.

  4. The Agaricus bisporus pruA gene encodes a cytosolic delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase which is expressed in fruit bodies but not in gill tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, P J; Müller, Y; Sonnenberg, A S; van Griensven, L J; Visser, J

    1997-01-01

    A fortuitously cloned 3'-truncated cDNA encoding the Agaricus bisporus delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase was used to characterize the complete gene. The gene would encode a cytosolic polypeptide of 546 amino acids, and the basidiomycetous gene was evenly expressed in various parts of the mushroom except for the gills. No expression was detected in compost-grown mycelium. The steady-state mRNA level of the gene in the vegetative phase was determined on simple synthetic media and was two- to threefold higher with ammonium or proline as the sole nitrogen source compared to glutamate as the sole nitrogen source. Moreover, the steady-state mRNA level was not markedly influenced by addition of ammonium phosphate to proline- or glutamate-utilizing cultures. The results suggest that ammonium and the amino acids proline and glutamate are equally preferred nitrogen sources in this organism and are consistent with previous observations of H. M Kalisz, D.A. Wood, and D. Moore (Trans. Br. Mycol. Soc. 88:221-227, 1987) that A. bisporus continues to degrade protein and secrete ammonium even if ammonium and glucose are present in the culture medium. PMID:8979339

  5. Characterization of Novel Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenases Involved in Bacterial Steroid Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Amanda; Maddox, Jaymie; Stirling, Alexander J.; Visaggio, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenases (ACADs) FadE34 and CasC, encoded by the cholesterol and cholate gene clusters of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, were successfully purified. Both enzymes differ from previously characterized ACADs in that they contain two fused acyl-CoA dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Site-specific mutagenesis showed that only the C-terminal ACAD domain contains the catalytic glutamate base required for enzyme activity, while the N-terminal ACAD domain contains an arginine required for ionic interactions with the pyrophosphate of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. Therefore, the two ACAD domains must associate to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC were not active toward the 3-carbon side chain steroid metabolite 3-oxo-23,24-bisnorchol-4-en-22-oyl-CoA (4BNC-CoA) but were active toward steroid CoA esters containing 5-carbon side chains. CasC has similar specificity constants for cholyl-CoA, deoxycholyl-CoA, and 3β-hydroxy-5-cholen-24-oyl-CoA, while FadE34 has a preference for the last compound, which has a ring structure similar to that of cholesterol metabolites. Knockout of the casC gene in R. jostii RHA1 resulted in a reduced growth on cholate as a sole carbon source and accumulation of a 5-carbon side chain cholate metabolite. FadE34 and CasC represent unique members of ACADs with primary structures and substrate specificities that are distinct from those of previously characterized ACADs. IMPORTANCE We report here the identification and characterization of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs) involved in the metabolism of 5-carbon side chains of cholesterol and cholate. The two homologous enzymes FadE34 and CasC, from M. tuberculosis and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, respectively, contain two ACAD domains per polypeptide, and we show that these two domains interact to form a single active site. FadE34 and CasC are therefore representatives of a new class of

  6. Multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase causing excessive acetaldehyde production from ethanol by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Sylvia I; Jin, Ling; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Tao, Lin

    2013-07-01

    Ethanol consumption and poor oral hygiene are risk factors for oral and oesophageal cancers. Although oral streptococci have been found to produce excessive acetaldehyde from ethanol, little is known about the mechanism by which this carcinogen is produced. By screening 52 strains of diverse oral streptococcal species, we identified Streptococcus gordonii V2016 that produced the most acetaldehyde from ethanol. We then constructed gene deletion mutants in this strain and analysed them for alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenases by zymograms. The results showed that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol and ethanol, respectively. Two additional dehydrogenases, S-AdhA and TdhA, were identified with specificities to the secondary alcohol 2-propanol and threonine, respectively, but not to ethanol. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase even though its adhE gene encodes a putative bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase. Mutants with adhE deletion showed greater tolerance to ethanol in comparison with the wild-type and mutant with adhA or adhB deletion, indicating that AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Analysis of 19 additional strains of S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis showed expressions of up to three alcohol dehydrogenases, but none showed detectable acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, except one strain that showed a novel ALDH. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases but no functional acetaldehyde dehydrogenase may contribute to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by certain oral streptococci.

  7. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD+ as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  8. Electrogenic Steps Associated with Substrate Binding to the Neuronal Glutamate Transporter EAAC1.

    PubMed

    Tanui, Rose; Tao, Zhen; Silverstein, Nechama; Kanner, Baruch; Grewer, Christof

    2016-05-27

    Glutamate transporters actively take up glutamate into the cell, driven by the co-transport of sodium ions down their transmembrane concentration gradient. It was proposed that glutamate binds to its binding site and is subsequently transported across the membrane in the negatively charged form. With the glutamate binding site being located partially within the membrane domain, the possibility has to be considered that glutamate binding is dependent on the transmembrane potential and, thus, is electrogenic. Experiments presented in this report test this possibility. Rapid application of glutamate to the wild-type glutamate transporter subtype EAAC1 (excitatory amino acid carrier 1) through photo-release from caged glutamate generated a transient inward current, as expected for the electrogenic inward movement of co-transported Na(+) In contrast, glutamate application to a transporter with the mutation A334E induced transient outward current, consistent with movement of negatively charged glutamate into its binding site within the dielectric of the membrane. These results are in agreement with electrostatic calculations, predicting a valence for glutamate binding of -0.27. Control experiments further validate and rule out other possible explanations for the transient outward current. Electrogenic glutamate binding can be isolated in the mutant glutamate transporter because reactions, such as glutamate translocation and/or Na(+) binding to the glutamate-bound state, are inhibited by the A334E substitution. Electrogenic glutamate binding has to be considered together with other voltage-dependent partial reactions to cooperatively determine the voltage dependence of steady-state glutamate uptake and glutamate buffering at the synapse. PMID:27044739

  9. Neuroprotective effect of astaxanthin against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT22 cells: Involvement of the Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Wen, X; Huang, A; Hu, J; Zhong, Z; Liu, Y; Li, Z; Pan, X; Liu, Z

    2015-09-10

    Oxidative stress (OS) mediated the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Astaxanthin (ATX) has been reported to exert antioxidant activities as well as neuroprotective effects in vivo and in vitro. But it is still unknown whether the Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) signaling mediated the neuroprotective effect of ATX in HT22 cells. Flow cytometric analysis was used to evaluate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Caspase and PARP activity was measured. The expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Bcl-2, Bax, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), cytochrome-c (Cyto-c), p-Akt and p-GSK-3β were evaluated to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Our results showed that ATX significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cell viability loss and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, decreased the expression of caspase-3/8/9 activity and cleaved PARP, and suppressed the intracellular accumulation of ROS in HT22 cells after exposure to glutamate. ATX also increased the mitochondrial expression of AIF, Cyto-c as well as Bax while decreased Bcl-2. Moreover, ATX also induced the HO-1 expression in a dose and time-dependent manner, increased the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE) activity and nuclear Nrf2 expression. Furthermore, treatment with ATX restored the p-Akt and p-GSK-3β (Ser9) as well as HO-1 expression reduced by glutamate. This protective effect was partially blocked by the inhibitors lithium chloride treatment in HT22, indicating the involvement of Akt/GSK-3β inactivation during the neuroprotective effect of ATX. Our results provide the first evidence that ATX can protect glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT22 via attenuating caspase activation and mitochondrial dysfunction and modulating the Akt/GSK-3β signaling, indicating ATX may be useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:26197224

  10. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  11. 4-Hydroxyhexenal (HHE) impairs glutamate transport in astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Mark A; Bradley, Melissa A; Fister, Shuling X

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies show elevations of α,β-unsaturated aldehydic by-products of lipid peroxidation including 4-hydroxynonenal and acrolein in vulnerable brain regions of subjects throughout the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). More recently 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE), a diffusible α,β-unsaturated aldehyde resulting from peroxidation of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, was shown to be elevated in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus (HPG) of subjects with preclinical AD (PCAD) and in late stage AD (LAD). HHE treatment of primary rat cortical neuron cultures led to a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in survival and glucose uptake. To determine if HHE also impairs glutamate uptake, primary rat astrocyte cultures were exposed to HHE for 4 hours and glutamate transport measured. Results show subtoxic (2.5 μM) HHE concentrations significantly (p < 0.05) impair glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes. Immunoprecipitation of excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (EAAT-2), the primary glutamate transporter in brain, from normal control, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), PCAD, and LAD HPG followed by quantification of HHE immunolabeling showed a significant increase in HHE positive EAAT-2 in MCI and LAD HPG. Together these data suggest HHE can significantly impair glutamate uptake and may play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22766736

  12. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  13. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Samadi-Bahrami, Zahra; Pavlov, Vlady; Stys, Peter K; Moore, G R Wayne

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate is the key excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS). Its role in human grey matter transmission is well understood, but this is less clear in white matter (WM). Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR) are found on both neuronal cell bodies and glia as well as on myelinated axons in rodents, and rodent WM tissue is capable of glutamate release. Thus, rodent WM expresses many of the components of the traditional grey matter neuron-to-neuron synapse, but to date this has not been shown for human WM. We demonstrate the presence of iGluRs in human WM by immunofluorescence employing high-resolution spectral confocal imaging. We found that the obligatory N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit GluN1 and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA4 co-localized with myelin, oligodendroglial cell bodies and processes. Additionally, GluA4 colocalized with axons, often in distinct clusters. These findings may explain why human WM is vulnerable to excitotoxic events following acute insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury and in more chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Further exploration of human WM glutamate signalling could pave the way for developing future therapies modulating the glutamate-mediated damage in these and other CNS disorders. PMID:27443784

  14. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  15. Frontal glutamate and reward processing in adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gleich, Tobias; Lorenz, Robert C; Pöhland, Lydia; Raufelder, Diana; Deserno, Lorenz; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The fronto-limbic network interaction, driven by glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, represents a core mechanism of motivated behavior and personality traits. Reward seeking behavior undergoes tremendous changes in adolescence paralleled by neurobiological changes of this network including the prefrontal cortex, striatum and amygdala. Since fronto-limbic dysfunctions also underlie major psychiatric diseases beginning in adolescence, this investigation focuses on network characteristics separating adolescents from adults. To investigate differences in network interactions, the brain reward system activity (slot machine task) together with frontal glutamate concentration (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) was measured in 28 adolescents and 26 adults employing functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. An inverse coupling of glutamate concentrations in the ACC and activation of the ventral striatum was observed in adolescents. Further, amygdala response in adolescents was negatively correlated with the personality trait impulsivity. For adults, no significant associations of network components or correlations with impulsivity were found. The inverse association between frontal glutamate concentration and striatal activation in adolescents is in line with the triadic model of motivated behavior stressing the important role of frontal top-down inhibition on limbic structures. Our data identified glutamate as the mediating neurotransmitter of this inhibitory process and demonstrates the relevance of glutamate on the reward system and related behavioral traits like impulsivity. This fronto-limbic coupling may represent a vulnerability factor for psychiatric disorders starting in adolescence but not in adulthood.

  16. The role of glutamate on the action of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2011-08-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common, chronic, recurrent mental illness that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Currently available antidepressants are known to affect the monoaminergic (e.g., serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine) systems in the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that the glutamatergic neurotransmission via the excitatory amino acid glutamate also plays an important role in the neurobiology and treatment of this disease. Clinical studies have demonstrated that the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant patients with MDD, suggesting the role of glutamate in the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant MDD. Furthermore, a number of preclinical studies demonstrated that the agents which act at glutamate receptors such as NMDA receptors, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) might have antidepressant-like activities in animal models of depression. In this article, the author reviews the role of glutamate in the neuron-glia communication induced by potential antidepressants.

  17. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  18. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  19. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from higher plant mitochondria and proplastids.

    PubMed

    Reid, E E; Thompson, P; Lyttle, C R; Dennis, D T

    1977-05-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pea (Pisum sativum L.) mitochondria was purified 23-fold by high speed centrifugation and glycerol gradient fractionation. The complex had a s(20,w) of 47.5S but this is a minimal value since the complex is unstable. The complex is specific for NAD(+) and pyruvate; NADP(+) and other keto acids give no reaction. Mg(2+), thiamine pyrophosphate, and cysteine are also required for maximal activity. The pH optimum for the complex was between 6.5 and 7.5.Continuous sucrose density gradients were used to separate castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) endosperm proplastids from mitochondria. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was found to be coincident with the proplastid peak on all of the gradients. Some separation of proplastids and mitochondria could be achieved by differential centrifugation and the ratios of the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex to succinic dehydrogenase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase to succinic dehydrogenase were consistent with both the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and acetyl-CoA carboxylase being present in the proplastid. The proplastid fraction has to be treated with a detergent, Triton X-100, before maximal activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity is expressed,