Science.gov

Sample records for nadir angle results

  1. Extension of the GPS satellite antenna patterns to nadir angles beyond 14°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggi, A.; Dilssner, F.; Schmid, R.; Dach, R.; Springer, T.; Bock, H.; Steigenberger, P.; Andres, Y.; Enderle, W.

    2012-04-01

    The absolute phase center model igs08.atx adopted by the International GNSS Service (IGS) in 2011 is based on robot calibrations for more than 200 terrestrial GNSS receiver antennas and consistent correction values for the GNSS transmitter antennas estimated from tracking data of the global IGS ground network. As the calibration of the satellite antennas is solely based on terrestrial measurements, the estimation of their phase patterns is limited to a nadir angle of 14°. This is not sufficient for the analysis of spaceborne GPS data collected by low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites that record - depending on the missions' orbital altitude - observations at nadir angles of up to 17°. We use GPS tracking data from the LEO missions Jason-1/2, MetOp-A, GRACE, and GOCE to extend the IGS satellite antenna patterns to nadir angles beyond 14° using different processing strategies and GNSS software packages (BERNESE, NAPEOS). In order to achieve estimates that are consistent with the PCVs currently used within the IGS, GPS satellite orbits and clocks are fixed to reprocessed solutions obtained by adopting the IGS conventional values from igs08.atx. Due to significant near-field multipath effects arising in the LEO spacecraft environment, it is necessary to solve for GPS (nadir-dependent only) and LEO (azimuth- and elevation-dependent) antenna patterns simultaneously. We compare and combine the results obtained with both software packages and derive the PCV extension proposed for igs08.atx.

  2. Extending the GPS satellite antenna patterns of the IGS to nadir angles beyond 14° using LEO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dach, R.; Jaeggi, A.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.; Montenbruck, O.; Schmid, R.

    2010-12-01

    The absolute phase center model adopted by the International GNSS Service (IGS) in 2006 is based on robot calibrations for a number of terrestrial GNSS receiver antennas and consistent correction values for the GNSS transmitter antennas estimated from data of the global IGS tracking network. As the calibration of the satellite antennas is solely based on terrestrial measurements, the estimation of their phase patterns is limited to a nadir angle of 14°. This is not sufficient for the analysis of spaceborne GPS data collected by low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites that record observations at nadir angles of up to 17°. Moreover, phase center variation (PCV) estimates for nadir angles close to 14° derived from terrestrial measurements might be affected by uncertainties in the troposphere modeling. This drawback could also be overcome by the use of LEO data. We use GPS tracking data from several LEO missions to extend the IGS satellite antenna patterns to nadir angles beyond 14°. In order to achieve estimates that are consistent with the PCVs currently used within the IGS, GPS and LEO orbits are fixed to solutions obtained by adopting the IGS conventional values. Due to significant near-field multipath effects in the LEO spacecraft environment, it is necessary to solve for GPS (nadir-dependent only) and LEO (azimuth- and elevation-dependent) antenna patterns simultaneously. We analyze the separability of these parameters and discuss appropriate constraints. We assess the contribution of different LEO missions to a combined solution and analyze the impact of LEO orbit modeling errors.

  3. Automated scene generated background context for near-nadir look angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jonathan D.; Stanfill, S. Robert

    2016-05-01

    Multi-INT fusion of GEOINT and IMINT can enable performance optimization of target detection and target tracking problem domains1, amongst others. Contextual information, which defines the relationship of foreground to background scene content, is a source of GEOINT for which various online repositories exist today including but not limited to the following: Open Street Maps (OSM)2 and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)3. However, as the nature of the world's landscape is dynamic and ever-changing, such contextual information can easily become stagnant and irrelevant if not maintained. In this paper we discuss our approach to providing the latest relevant context by performing automated scene generated background context segmentation and classification for near-nadir look angles for the purpose of defining roadways or parking lots, buildings, and natural areas. This information can be used in a variety of ways including augmenting context data from repositories, performing mission pre-planning, and for real-time missions such that GEOINT and IMINT fusion can occur and enable significant performance advantages in target detection and tracking applications in all areas of the world.

  4. Sensitivity of MODIS 2.1-(micrometers) Channel for Off-Nadir View Angles for Use in Remote Sensing of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.; Arnold, T.

    2000-01-01

    In this sensitivity study, we examined the ratio technique, the official method for remote sensing of aerosols over land from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) DATA, for view angles from nadir to 65 deg. off-nadir using Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data collected during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment conducted in 1995. For the data analyzed and for the view angles tested, results seem to suggest that the reflectance (rho)0.47 and (rho)0.67 are predictable from (rho)2.1 using: (rho)0.47 = (rho)2.1/6, which is a slight modification and (rho)0.67 = (rho)2.1/2. These results hold for target viewed from backscattered direction, but not for the forward direction.

  5. Sensitivity of MODIS 2.1 micron Channel for Off-Nadir View Angles for Use in Remote Sensing of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol over land, from MODIS will be based on dark targets using mid-IR channels 2.1 and 3.9 micron. This approach was developed by Kaufman et al (1997), who suggested that dark surface reflectance in the red (0.66 micron -- rho(sub 0.66)) channel is half of that at 2.2 micron (rho(sub 2.2)), and the reflectance in the blue (0.49 micron - rho(sub 0.49)) channel is a quarter of that at 2.2 micron. Using this relationship, the surface reflectance in the visible channels can be predicted within Delta.rho(sub 0.49) approximately Delat.rho(sub 0.66) approximately 0.006 from rho(sub 2.2) for rho(sub 2.2) <= 0.10. This was half the error obtained using the 3.75 micron and corresponds to an error in aerosol optical thickness of Delat.tau approximately 0.06. These results, though applicable to several biomes (e.g. forests, and brighter lower canopies), have only been tested at one view angle - the nadir (theta = 0 deg). Considering the importance of the results in remote sensing of aerosols over land surfaces from space, we are validating the relationships for off-nadir view angles using Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data. The CAR data are available for channels between 0.3 and 2.3 micron and for different surface types and conditions: forest, tundra, ocean, sea-ice, swamp, grassland and over areas covered with smoke. In this study we analyzed data collected during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation - Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment to validate Kaufman et al.'s (1997) results for non-nadir view angles. We will show the correlation between rho(sub 0.472), rho(sub 0.675), and rho(sub 2.2) for view angles between nadir (0 deg) and 55 deg off-nadir, and for different viewing directions in the backscatter and forward scatter directions.

  6. Nadir Measurements of Carbon Monoxide Distributions by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer Instrument Onboard the Aura Spacecraft: Overview of Analysis Approach and Examples of Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Luo, Ming; Logan, Jennifer A.; Beer, Reinhard; Worden, Helen; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rider, David; Osterman, Greg; Gunson, Michael; Eldering, Annmarie; Goldman, Aaron; Shephard, Mark; Clough, Shepard A.; Rodgers, Clive; Lampel, Michael; Chiou, Linda

    2006-01-01

    We provide an overview of the nadir measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) obtained thus far by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The instrument is a high resolution array Fourier transform spectrometer designed to measure infrared spectral radiances from low Earth orbit. It is one of four instruments successfully launched onboard the Aura platform into a sun synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km on July 15, 2004 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Nadir spectra are recorded at 0.06/cm spectral resolution with a nadir footprint of 5 x 8 km. We describe the TES retrieval approach for the analysis of the nadir measurements, report averaging kernels for typical tropical and polar ocean locations, characterize random and systematic errors for those locations, and describe instrument performance changes in the CO spectral region as a function of time. Sample maps of retrieved CO for the middle and upper troposphere from global surveys during December 2005 and April 2006 highlight the potential of the results for measurement and tracking of global pollution and determining air quality from space.

  7. Nadir measurements of carbon monoxide distributions by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer instrument onboard the Aura Spacecraft: Overview of analysis approach and examples of initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Luo, Ming; Logan, Jennifer A.; Beer, Reinhard; Worden, Helen; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rider, David; Osterman, Greg; Gunson, Michael; Eldering, Annmarie; Goldman, Aaron; Shephard, Mark; Clough, Shepard A.; Rodgers, Clive; Lampel, Michael; Chiou, Linda

    2006-11-01

    We provide an overview of the nadir measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) obtained thus far by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The instrument is a high resolution array Fourier transform spectrometer designed to measure infrared spectral radiances from low Earth orbit. It is one of four instruments successfully launched onboard the Aura platform into a sun synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km on July 15, 2004 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Nadir spectra are recorded at 0.06-cm-1 spectral resolution with a nadir footprint of 5 × 8 km. We describe the TES retrieval approach for the analysis of the nadir measurements, report averaging kernels for typical tropical and polar ocean locations, characterize random and systematic errors for those locations, and describe instrument performance changes in the CO spectral region as a function of time. Sample maps of retrieved CO for the middle and upper troposphere from global surveys during December 2005 and April 2006 highlight the potential of the results for measurement and tracking of global pollution and determining air quality from space.

  8. Reflectance anisotropy for nadir observations of coniferous forest canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Syren, P. . Lab. of Remote Sensing)

    1994-07-01

    Nadir-viewed reflectances from forest canopies in four spectral bands, centered at 485 nm, 654 nm, 841 nm, and 1,676 nm were measured at different sun angles. Reflectances were measured made from a helicopter ca. 10 km NE of Stockholm, Sweden, over mature and young stands of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). The results show a significant increase in nadir reflectance with decreasing solar zenith angle. On the average, reflectance factors increased by 1--2% for each degree of decreasing solar zenith angle. Band ratios showed that there is a disproportional reflectance response in several of the spectral bands at varying zenith angles, differently expressed according to stand type and age. Within the solar zenith angle interval 30--70[degree], canopy reflectance was expressed as linear functions for each spectral band. These functions were used to calculate factors for reflectance standardization. Nomograms, containing reflectance correction factors for mature spruce stands, are presented. These can be directly applied in time-series analysis of multitemporal spectral data.

  9. Recent Results on the CKM Angle Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-10-18

    The method to measure the CKM angle {alpha} and the modes sensitive to it are discussed. It is shown that the B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays provide the most stringent constraint on {alpha}, which is found to be {alpha} = 96{sup o} {+-} 10{sup o}(stat) {+-} 4{sup o}(syst){+-} 13{sup o}(penguin).

  10. Review of weak mixing angle results at SLC and LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, the authors review recent precise measurements of the weak mixing angle by the SLD experiment at SLC and by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL experiments at LEP. If they assume that the Minimal Standard Model provides a complete description of the quark and lepton couplings to the Z boson, they find sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23143 {+-} 0.00028. If this assumption is relaxed to apply to lepton couplings only, they find sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23106 {+-} 0.00035. They compare these results with other precision electroweak tests.

  11. Results of wide-angle underwater acoustic-telemetry tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, D.E.

    1982-03-01

    Acoustic telemetry provides wireless communication between subsurface ocean instrumentation systems and surface receiving equipment. Sandia National Laboratories' high data rate acoustic telemetry system has previously been demonstrated in water depths to 1600 feet and vertical cone angles to 70/sup 0/. Design changes and tests of the system are discussed showing that it can operate within vertical cone angles of 145/sup 0/.

  12. Inferring hemispherical reflectance of the earth's surface for global energy budgets from remotely sensed nadir or directional radiance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Sellers, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between directional reflectances spanning the entire reflecting hemisphere and hemispherical reflectance (albedo) and the effect of solar zenith angle and cover type on these relationships were investigated, using the results obtained from NOAA's 7/8 AVHRR ground-level reflectance measurements. Bands 1 (0.58-0.6B microns) and 2 (0.73-1. 1 microns) were used for reflectance measurements of 11 natural vegetation surfaces ranging from bare soils to dense vegetation canopies. The results show that errors in inferring hemispherical reflectance from nadir reflectance can be between 11 and 45 percent for all cover types and solar angles, depending on the viewing angles. A technique is described in which a choice of two specific view angles reduces this error to less than 6 percent for both bands and for all sun angles and cover types.

  13. Clinical results of Trabectome surgery for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Takanori; Nishigaki, Shiro; Sato, Tomoki; Wakiyama, Harumi; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes when using Trabectome surgery and to evaluate factors associated with its effects in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and exfoliation glaucoma (EXG). Methods This was a prospective, non-randomized, observational, comparative cohort study in which Trabectome surgery was used alone in patients with POAG or EXG. Trabectome surgery was considered to have failed when at least one of the following three criteria was fulfilled: intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥21 mmHg and a <20% reduction below the baseline IOP on two consecutive follow-up visits 3 months or more after surgery; need for additional glaucoma surgery; and an increase in number of medications compared with baseline. Results The subjects were 32 males (34 eyes) and 46 females (48 eyes). POAG was observed in 43 eyes and EXG in 39 eyes. IOP after Trabectome surgery decreased significantly from 22.3±6.8 mmHg at baseline to 14.0±3.9 mmHg (23.0% reduction) at month 24 in all cases (P<0.0000). The success rate at 2 years was 51.2% for all cases (POAG, 50.9%; EXG, 49.2%). There was no significant difference in success rate between POAG and EXG (P=0.91). Preoperative IOP (P=0.033) and number of medications (P=0.041) were significant factors for surgical success/failure in multivariate logistic regression. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion Trabectome surgery achieved favorable IOP control and was equally effective in patients with POAG and those with EXG. Its effects were influenced by preoperative IOP and number of preoperative medications. PMID:26487799

  14. Nadir vector modeling for the spacecraft and its engineering implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-xing; Shen, Gong-xun; Lin, Wang-peng; Xu, Jian-feng

    2011-08-01

    Attitude control and determination along with the fix and navigation of the spacecraft is the fundamental functional elements in the space scientific research tasks. Nadir vector is usually applied in the attitude determination of spacecraft relative to the Earth, and it is also commonly used as a reference vector in autonomous navigation especially in the satellites' preliminary coarse orbit determination. In the paper, we begin with the shape of the Earth as seen from the space, which is defined by the Earth horizon as seen from the position of the observer. The geometric model of the nadir vector pointing from the spacecraft to the Earth center is established basing on three-dimension earth spheroid model; the effect of Earth flattening on the attitude determination and positioning is discussed, the flattening and irregularity of the Earth ultraviolet layer model are the major error sources resulting in poor accuracy of attitude determination and fix. An error modification method is presented to compensate for the Earth flattening error. Several crucial techniques in determining earth center and nadir vector basing on CCD sensor are stressed in the paper. Noise elimination and image processing means are introduced to restraint the influences of harmful signals in the image acquisitions; edge detection is one of the most important aspects in the process of determining the Earth center, Randomed Hough Transformation method and least square method are effective way to check the edge of earth horizon profile.

  15. Using Microwave and Infrared Radiances from Off-Nadir Pixels: Application of Radiative Transfer to Slanted Line-of-Sight and Comparisons with NASA EOS Aqua Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    The passive infrared and microwave nadir sounders such as (A)TOVS observe the atmosphere from a polar orbit by directing their scan pointed at the ground up to about 49 degrees from nadir. Except for the pixels located right on the satellite ground track, the radiance measurements collected by these instruments characterize hence atmospheric emission paths which are slanted with respect to the zenithal direction at the ground. At the outer swath edges, the deviations from nadir reach about 60 degrees in terms of Satellite Zenith Angle (SZA). The radiative transfer codes used in operational Numerical Weather Prediction applications make the appropriate corrections to account for the extra path induced by the non-zero SZA. However, no corrections are made to account for the fact that the atmospheric profiles along the slanted line-of-sight (LOS) are different from the vertical because of horizontal gradients in the atmosphere. Using NASA EOS Aqua satellite's orbits, zenith and azimuth angles, as well as three-dimensional fields of temperature, water vapor, and ozone produced by the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, we extracted slanted atmospheric profiles for actual soundings performed by the AIRS and AMSU-A instruments onboard EOS Aqua. We will present the results of our study comparing the calculated brightness temperatures along slanted LOS and vertical LOS with AIRS and AMSU-A observations.

  16. Flight Test Results of an Angle of Attack and Angle of Sideslip Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Marie-Michele; Martos, Borja; Foster, John V.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a joint partnership between the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) and the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), research on advanced air data calibration methods has been in progress. This research was initiated to expand a novel pitot-static calibration method that was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) facility. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. Subscale flight tests demonstrated small 2-s error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. Recent UTSI full scale flight tests have shown airspeed calibrations with the same accuracy or better as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted GPS 'four-leg' method in a smaller test area and in less time. The current research was motivated by the desire to extend this method for inflight calibration of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) flow vanes. An instrumented Piper Saratoga research aircraft from the UTSI was used to collect the flight test data and evaluate flight test maneuvers. Results showed that the output-error approach produces good results for flow vane calibration. In addition, maneuvers for pitot-static and flow vane calibration can be integrated to enable simultaneous and efficient testing of each system.

  17. NADIR: A Flexible Archiving System Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; De Marco, M.; Smareglia, R.; Molinaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) is under development at the Italian center for Astronomical Archives (IA2) to increase the performances of the current archival software tools at the data center. Traditional softwares usually offer simple and robust solutions to perform data archive and distribution but are awkward to adapt and reuse in projects that have different purposes. Data evolution in terms of data model, format, publication policy, version, and meta-data content are the main threats to re-usage. NADIR, using stable and mature framework features, answers those very challenging issues. Its main characteristics are a configuration database, a multi threading and multi language environment (C++, Java, Python), special features to guarantee high scalability, modularity, robustness, error tracking, and tools to monitor with confidence the status of each project at each archiving site. In this contribution, the development of the core components is presented, commenting also on some performance and innovative features (multi-cast and publisher-subscriber paradigms). NADIR is planned to be developed as simply as possible with default configurations for every project, first of all for LBT and other IA2 projects.

  18. Impact of Footprint Diameter and Off-Nadir Pointing on the Precision of Canopy Height Estimates from Spaceborne Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Yong; Lefskky, Michael; Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, Jon

    2011-01-01

    A spaceborne lidar mission could serve multiple scientific purposes including remote sensing of ecosystem structure, carbon storage, terrestrial topography and ice sheet monitoring. The measurement requirements of these different goals will require compromises in sensor design. Footprint diameters that would be larger than optimal for vegetation studies have been proposed. Some spaceborne lidar mission designs include the possibility that a lidar sensor would share a platform with another sensor, which might require off-nadir pointing at angles of up to 16 . To resolve multiple mission goals and sensor requirements, detailed knowledge of the sensitivity of sensor performance to these aspects of mission design is required. This research used a radiative transfer model to investigate the sensitivity of forest height estimates to footprint diameter, off-nadir pointing and their interaction over a range of forest canopy properties. An individual-based forest model was used to simulate stands of mixed conifer forest in the Tahoe National Forest (Northern California, USA) and stands of deciduous forests in the Bartlett Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Waveforms were simulated for stands generated by a forest succession model using footprint diameters of 20 m to 70 m. Off-nadir angles of 0 to 16 were considered for a 25 m diameter footprint diameter. Footprint diameters in the range of 25 m to 30 m were optimal for estimates of maximum forest height (R(sup 2) of 0.95 and RMSE of 3 m). As expected, the contribution of vegetation height to the vertical extent of the waveform decreased with larger footprints, while the contribution of terrain slope increased. Precision of estimates decreased with an increasing off-nadir pointing angle, but off-nadir pointing had less impact on height estimates in deciduous forests than in coniferous forests. When pointing off-nadir, the decrease in precision was dependent on local incidence angle (the angle between the off-nadir

  19. Polypeptide motions are dominated by peptide group oscillations resulting from dihedral angle correlations between nearest neighbors.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Jha, Abhishek K; Sosnick, Tobin R; Freed, Karl F

    2007-01-23

    To identify basic local backbone motions in unfolded chains, simulations are performed for a variety of peptide systems using three popular force fields and for implicit and explicit solvent models. A dominant "crankshaft-like" motion is found that involves only a localized oscillation of the plane of the peptide group. This motion results in a strong anticorrelated motion of the phi angle of the ith residue (phi(i)) and the psi angle of the residue i - 1 (psi(i-1)) on the 0.1 ps time scale. Only a slight correlation is found between the motions of the two backbone dihedral angles of the same residue. Aside from the special cases of glycine and proline, no correlations are found between backbone dihedral angles that are separated by more than one torsion angle. These short time, correlated motions are found both in equilibrium fluctuations and during the transit process between Ramachandran basins, e.g., from the beta to the alpha region. A residue's complete transit from one Ramachandran basin to another, however, occurs in a manner independent of its neighbors' conformational transitions. These properties appear to be intrinsic because they are robust across different force fields, solvent models, nonbonded interaction routines, and most amino acids. PMID:17223689

  20. An improved tropospheric ozone database retrieved from SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Rozanov, Alexei; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rahpoe, Nabiz; Bötel, Stefan; Burrows, John

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most important green-house gases and the main component of photochemical smog. It is either transported from the stratosphere or photochemically produced during pollution events in the troposphere that threaten the respiratory system. To investigate sources, transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, limb nadir matching (LNM) technique applied with SCIAMACHY instrument is used to retrieve tropospheric ozone. With the fact that 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only about 10% can be observed in the troposphere, the usage of satellite data requires highly qualified nadir and limb data. In this study we show an improvement of SCIAMACHY limb data as well as its influence on tropospheric ozone results. The limb nadir matching technique is also refined to increase the quality of the tropospheric ozone. The results are validated with ozone sonde measurements.

  1. Determination of Optimum Viewing Angles for the Angular Normalization of Land Surface Temperature over Vegetated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huazhong; Yan, Guangjian; Liu, Rongyuan; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Nerry, Françoise; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Multi-angular observation of land surface thermal radiation is considered to be a promising method of performing the angular normalization of land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from remote sensing data. This paper focuses on an investigation of the minimum requirements of viewing angles to perform such normalizations on LST. The normally kernel-driven bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is first extended to the thermal infrared (TIR) domain as TIR-BRDF model, and its uncertainty is shown to be less than 0.3 K when used to fit the hemispheric directional thermal radiation. A local optimum three-angle combination is found and verified using the TIR-BRDF model based on two patterns: the single-point pattern and the linear-array pattern. The TIR-BRDF is applied to an airborne multi-angular dataset to retrieve LST at nadir (Te-nadir) from different viewing directions, and the results show that this model can obtain reliable Te-nadir from 3 to 4 directional observations with large angle intervals, thus corresponding to large temperature angular variations. The Te-nadir is generally larger than temperature of the slant direction, with a difference of approximately 0.5~2.0 K for vegetated pixels and up to several Kelvins for non-vegetated pixels. The findings of this paper will facilitate the future development of multi-angular thermal infrared sensors. PMID:25825975

  2. Determination of optimum viewing angles for the angular normalization of land surface temperature over vegetated surface.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huazhong; Yan, Guangjian; Liu, Rongyuan; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Nerry, Françoise; Liu, Qiang

    2015-03-27

    Multi-angular observation of land surface thermal radiation is considered to be a promising method of performing the angular normalization of land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from remote sensing data. This paper focuses on an investigation of the minimum requirements of viewing angles to perform such normalizations on LST. The normally kernel-driven bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is first extended to the thermal infrared (TIR) domain as TIR-BRDF model, and its uncertainty is shown to be less than 0.3 K when used to fit the hemispheric directional thermal radiation. A local optimum three-angle combination is found and verified using the TIR-BRDF model based on two patterns: the single-point pattern and the linear-array pattern. The TIR-BRDF is applied to an airborne multi-angular dataset to retrieve LST at nadir (Te-nadir) from different viewing directions, and the results show that this model can obtain reliable Te-nadir from 3 to 4 directional observations with large angle intervals, thus corresponding to large temperature angular variations. The Te-nadir is generally larger than temperature of the slant direction, with a difference of approximately 0.5~2.0 K for vegetated pixels and up to several Kelvins for non-vegetated pixels. The findings of this paper will facilitate the future development of multi-angular thermal infrared sensors.

  3. Results from Core-collapse Simulations with Multi-dimensional, Multi-angle Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Burrows, Adam; Ott, Christian D.; Livne, Eli

    2011-02-01

    We present new results from the only two-dimensional multi-group, multi-angle calculations of core-collapse supernova evolution. The first set of results from these calculations was published in 2008 by Ott et al. We have followed a nonrotating and a rapidly rotating 20 M sun model for ~400 ms after bounce. We show that the radiation fields vary much less with angle than the matter quantities in the region of net neutrino heating. This happens because most neutrinos are emitted from inner radiative regions and because the specific intensity is an integral over sources from many angles at depth. The latter effect can only be captured by multi-angle transport. We then compute the phase relationship between dipolar oscillations in the shock radius and in matter and radiation quantities throughout the post-shock region. We demonstrate a connection between variations in neutrino flux and the hydrodynamical shock oscillations, and use a variant of the Rayleigh test to estimate the detectability of these neutrino fluctuations in IceCube and Super-Kamiokande. Neglecting flavor oscillations, fluctuations in our nonrotating model would be detectable to ~10 kpc in IceCube, and a detailed power spectrum could be measured out to ~5 kpc. These distances are considerably lower in our rapidly rotating model or with significant flavor oscillations. Finally, we measure the impact of rapid rotation on detectable neutrino signals. Our rapidly rotating model has strong, species-dependent asymmetries in both its peak neutrino flux and its light curves. The peak flux and decline rate show pole-equator ratios of up to ~3 and ~2, respectively.

  4. Results of the self-expandable BA9 stent for treatment of large angle coronary bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Lucisano, L; Calcagno, S; Pennacchi, M; Stio, R E; Mancone, M; Sardella, G

    2014-02-01

    Since the advent of coronary angioplasty the treatment of bifurcation lesions has always proved a complex issue resulting in lower angiographic success rates, increased risk of restenosis, higher rates of dissection, myocardial infarction, and acute vessel closure. The advent of coronary stenting reduced the risks, but in-stent restenosis was noted to be frequent at the ostium of the side branch; for this reasons two-stent techniques were developed to try to combat this phenomenon. Novel dedicated stents have recently been developed to provide easier access to the SB and to scaffold more effectively its ostium, matching the stent configuration more closely to the anatomy of the bifurcation. Most of bifurcation lesions that require treatment and which have a wide angle involving the left main coronary artery (LMCA). The impact of the angle and the asymmetry of bifurcation on flow dynamic are very important and may influence clinical outcome. More recently, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to treat wide angle disease has increased in frequency, and is associated with improvements in interventional techniques and adjunctive drug therapy. Several studies have shown that stenting in LMCA, especially using drug-eluting stents (DES), is a safe and effective treatment strategy both at mid- and long-term follow-up. The AXXESS System is a self-expanding, conically-shaped stent from nitinol (nickel-titanium alloy) with strut thickness, specifically designed to conform to the anatomy at the level of the bifurcation carina. A special version of the AXXESS System has been designed for left main bifurcation lesions, allowing for larger diameters (up to 4.75 mm) and distinct bifurcation angles (flare-end diameters of 8, 10 and 12 mm). The AXXENT trial is the first study to evaluate the vascular response of the self-expanding biolimus-eluting AXXESS stent for the treatment of LMCA bifurcation lesions. It was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the AXXESS

  5. Aerosol measurements in the IR: from limb to nadir?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, A.; Irion, F. W.; Mills, F. P.; Steele, H. M.; Gunson, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration have been derived from the ATMOS solar occultation dataset. The EOS instrument TES has motivated studies of the feasibility of quantifying aerosols in nadir and limb emission measurements.

  6. The TOMS V9 Algorithm for OMPS Nadir Mapper Total Ozone: An Enhanced Design That Ensures Data Continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, D. P.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Labow, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    The TOMS V9 total ozone algorithm will be applied to the OMPS Nadir Mapper instrument to supersede the exisiting V8.6 data product in operational processing and re-processing for public release. Becuase the quality of the V8.6 data is already quite high, enchancements in V9 are mainly with information provided by the retrieval and simplifcations to the algorithm. The design of the V9 algorithm has been influenced by improvements both in our knowledge of atmospheric effects, such as those of clouds made possible by studies with OMI, and also limitations in the V8 algorithms applied to both OMI and OMPS. But the namesake instruments of the TOMS algorithm are substantially more limited in their spectral and noise characterisitics, and a requirement of our algorithm is to also apply the algorithm to these discrete band spectrometers which date back to 1978. To achieve continuity for all these instruments, the TOMS V9 algorithm continues to use radiances in discrete bands, but now uses Rodgers optimal estimation to retrieve a coarse profile and provide uncertainties for each retrieval. The algorithm remains capable of achieving high accuracy results with a small number of discrete wavelengths, and in extreme cases, such as unusual profile shapes and high solar zenith angles, the quality of the retrievals is improved. Despite the intended design to use limited wavlenegths, the algorithm can also utilitze additional wavelengths from hyperspectral sensors like OMPS to augment the retreival's error detection and information content; for example SO2 detection and correction of Ring effect on atmospheric radiances. We discuss these and other aspects of the V9 algorithm as it will be applied to OMPS, and will mention potential improvements which aim to take advantage of a synergy with OMPS Limb Profiler and Nadir Mapper to further improve the quality of total ozone from the OMPS instrument.

  7. PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING: RESONANCE VERSUS NONRESONANCE, A BASIC TEST OF THE QUASILINEAR DIFFUSIVE RESULT

    SciTech Connect

    Ragot, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the very broad range of the scales available for the development of turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas, the energy at the resonant scales of wave-particle interaction often constitutes only a tiny fraction of the total magnetic turbulent energy. Despite the high efficiency of resonant wave-particle interaction, one may therefore question whether resonant interaction really is the determining interaction process between particles and turbulent fields. By evaluating and comparing resonant and nonresonant effects in the frame of a quasilinear calculation, the dominance of resonance is here put to the test. By doing so, a basic test of the classical resonant quasilinear diffusive result for the pitch-angle scattering of charged energetic particles is also performed.

  8. Nadir Observations of Lightning and TLEs by JEM-GLIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Inan, Umran; Linscott, Ivan; Hobara, Yasuhide

    2013-04-01

    JEM-GLIMS is a space mission to observe lightning and lightning-associated Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) from the Exposed Facility (EF) of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) at the International Space Station (ISS). The main purpose of this mission is to carry out the nadir observations of these phenomena and to identify temporal and spatial evolutions of lightning and TLEs and to clarify the occurrence conditions of TLEs and global occurrence locations and rates of TLEs. JEM-GLIMS consists of two optical instruments, two radio receivers, and one onboard computer. The optical instruments are two CMOS cameras (LSI-1, LSI-2) and six-channel spectrophotometers (PH1 - PH6). The FOV of LSI is 28.3 deg. x 28.3 deg., and LSI-1 (LSI-2) equips a 766-832 nm wide band filter (a 762+/-7 nm narrow band filter). Each PH channel equips the optical band-pass filter, and these photometers measure the N2 1P, N2 2P, N2 LBH, and N2+ 1N emissions of lightning and TLEs. The radio receivers consist of one VLF receiver (VLFR) and two sets of VHF receivers (VITF). In order to detect TLE-associated whistler waves, VLFR employs a nadir-directing monopole antenna and an electronics unit recording waveform data with a sampling frequency of 100 kHz with 14-bit resolution. VITF consists of two patch-type antennas separated by 1.5 m and an electronics unit, and VITF mainly observes VHF pulses in the frequency range of 70-100 MHz excited by lightning discharges with a sampling frequency of 200 MHz with 8-bit resolution. JEM-GIMS was successfully launched and transported to the ISS by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) No.3 cargo transporter at the end of July 2012, and was installed at JEM-EF on August 9. For the period from September 15 to November 12 we have carried out the initial checkout operation and confirmed that the functions of all the instruments are normal and that the performance of all the science instruments is identical with that before launch. Finally, we have started the

  9. Results of trench perpendicular wide angle seismic transects across the Manila subduction zone offshore southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, D. H.; McIntosh, K. D.; Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-channel seismic reflection and wide-angle seismic data collected in 2009 aboard the R/V Marcus Langseth as part of the TAIGER program delineate the crustal structure of the Manila subduction zone in the northern South China Sea. As part of that project, we recorded marine seismic data using a deployment of ocean-bottom-seismometers (OBS) from the U.S. instrument pool and National Taiwan Ocean University. The region between northern Luzon and southern Taiwan evolves from oceanic subduction to incipient arc-continent collision. This presentation focuses on results of 2 offshore transects across the Manila subduction zone offshore southern Taiwan. Our goal here is to document the transition from pure oceanic subuction in the south to incipient arc-continent collision in the north, an understanding of which is integral for future geodynamic modeling of the advanced arc-continent collision in the north. The northern transect, line T2 is located at 21.4° N and used 30 OBSs. Line T1 was located at 20.5° N and used 27 OBSs across the Manila subduction zone. Data quality is extremely variable due to the local geology and quality of seafloor coupling at each instrument. Preliminary travel-time tomography of transect T2 shows a 10-15 km thick Eurasian crust with crustal velocities of 5-7.5 km/sec entering the Manila trench suggesting thinned continental crust, serpentinized upper mantle, or both in this region. The model shows the accretionary prism to be cored by high velocity material (6-7 km/sec) that may be the result of accretion of crustal material from the subducting Eurasian slab. We also observe asymmetric crustal thickening beneath the Gagua Ridge that is potentially a result of failed subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate westward along the Gagua Ridge. The wide-angle data is complimented by MCS reflection data to constrain sediment thickness, top of the crystalline basement, and moho. Preliminary work is in progress with transect T1 which will be

  10. Postlaunch Performance of the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seftor, C. J.; Jaross, G.; Kowitt, M.; Haken, M.; Li, J.; Flynn, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    The prelaunch specifications for nadir sensors of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) were designed to ensure that measurements from them could be used to retrieve total column ozone and nadir ozone profile information both for operational use and for use in long-term ozone data records. In this paper, we will show results from our extensive analysis of the performance of the nadir mapper (NM) and nadir profiler (NP) sensors during the first year and a half of OMPS nadir operations. In most cases, we determined that both sensors meet or exceed their prelaunch specifications. Normalized radiance (radiance divided by irradiance) measurements have been determined to be well within their 2% specification for both sensors. In the case of stray light, the NM sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the shortest wavelengths, while the NP sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the longest wavelengths. Artifacts that negatively impacted the sensor calibration due to diffuser features were reduced to less than 1% through changes made in the solar calibration sequence. Preliminary analysis of the disagreement between measurements made by the NM and NP sensors in the region where their wavelengths overlap indicates that it is due to shifts in the shared dichroic filter after launch and that it can be corrected. In general, our analysis indicates that both the NM and NP sensors are performing well, that they are stable, and that any deviations from nominal performance can be well characterized and corrected.

  11. Postlaunch performance of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) nadir sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seftor, C. J.; Jaross, G.; Kowitt, M.; Haken, M.; Li, J.; Flynn, L. E.

    2014-04-01

    The prelaunch specifications for nadir sensors of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) were designed to ensure that measurements from them could be used to retrieve total column ozone and nadir ozone profile information both for operational use and for use in long-term ozone data records. In this paper, we will show results from our extensive analysis of the performance of the nadir mapper (NM) and nadir profiler (NP) sensors during the first year and a half of OMPS nadir operations. In most cases, we determined that both sensors meet or exceed their prelaunch specifications. Normalized radiance (radiance divided by irradiance) measurements have been determined to be well within their 2% specification for both sensors. In the case of stray light, the NM sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the shortest wavelengths, while the NP sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the longest wavelengths. Artifacts that negatively impacted the sensor calibration due to diffuser features were reduced to less than 1% through changes made in the solar calibration sequence. Preliminary analysis of the disagreement between measurements made by the NM and NP sensors in the region where their wavelengths overlap indicates that it is due to shifts in the shared dichroic filter after launch and that it can be corrected. In general, our analysis indicates that both the NM and NP sensors are performing well, that they are stable, and that any deviations from nominal performance can be well characterized and corrected.

  12. Interpreting vegetation reflectance measurements as a function of solar zenith angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Ranson, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Spectral hemispherical-conical reflectances of a nadir looking sensor were taken throughout the day for a lodgepole pine and two grass canopies. Mathematical simulations of both spectral hemispherical-conical and bi-hemispherical reflectances were performed for two theoretical canopies of contrasting geometric structure. These results and comparisons with literature studies showed a great amount of variability of vegetation canopy reflectances as a function of solar zenith angle. Explanations for this variability are discussed and recommendations for further measurements are proposed.

  13. NADIR (Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter): A prototype network intrusion detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.A.; DuBois, D.H.; Stallings, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) is an expert system which is intended to provide real-time security auditing for intrusion and misuse detection at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network (ICN). It is based on three basic assumptions: that statistical analysis of computer system and user activities may be used to characterize normal system and user behavior, and that given the resulting statistical profiles, behavior which deviates beyond certain bounds can be detected, that expert system techniques can be applied to security auditing and intrusion detection, and that successful intrusion detection may take place while monitoring a limited set of network activities such as user authentication and access control, file movement and storage, and job scheduling. NADIR has been developed to employ these basic concepts while monitoring the audited activities of more than 8000 ICN users.

  14. Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite Nadir instruments in-flight performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chunhui; Flynn, Larry; Wu, Xiangqian; Buss, Rich

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the in-flight performance of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping & Profiling Suite (OMPS) nadir instruments and evaluates sensors' on-orbit calibrations after sensors' two-year operation. All uncertainty values quoted in this paper are 1-σ values unless stated otherwise. With the data collected from in-flight nominal calibration, our results have demonstrated that sensor performance complies with the system specifications in most cases. The largest term in the wavelength-dependent albedo calibration uncertainty for Nadir Mapper is the cross-track position difference effect of 2.5%. Final adjustments of stray light and wavelength variation are still being made to optimize OMPS sensor data records before reaching the validation mature level.

  15. On the use of off-nadir pointing for increased temporal resolution of Earth observing satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    The change in radiance expected at a satellite in a LANDSAT type orbit by pointing the sensor across track was examined with simulated data. The simulation incorporated the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of a spherical geometry grass canopy and scattering under clear, light haze and heavy haze atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that if the sensor pointed up to + or - 37 deg off nadir (up to three tracks east and west) through a clear atmosphere, between 50% and 75% of the orbital path between 60 deg N and 60 deg S would have two or more off-nadir views within + or - 5% of nadir. Although increased atmospheric scattering causes large variations in across track radiance, it appears possible, using various combinations of views depending on atmospheric conditions, that at least two views could be obtained with radiances within + or - 5% of each other over atmospheric visibilities from 23 km to 4 km.

  16. Tropospheric ozone retrieval by using SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Ladstätter-Weissenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John

    2014-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced during pollution events and transported from the stratosphere towards the troposphere. It is the third most important green house gases and the main component of summer smog. Global covered satellite measurements are well suitable to investigate sources, sinks, and transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, and to study a characteristic behaviour of the tropospheric ozone in regions. However, the usage of satellite data is associated to a large uncertainty as 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only the remaining part of 10% can be observed in the troposphere. The limb-nadir matching (LNM) technique is one of the methods suitable to retrieve tropospheric ozone distributions from space borne observations of the scattered solar light in the UV-visible spectral range. In this study we apply the LNM approach to alternating limb and nadir measurements performed by the SCIAMACHY instrument. A precise tropopause height is used to subtract the stratospheric ozone from the total ozone amount for each matching point. The focus of this work is to reduce the uncertainty of the resulting tropospheric ozone distributions by analysing possible error sources, refining both limb and nadir retrievals and the matching technique.

  17. Clinical assessment of oral mucositis and candidiasis compare to chemotherapic nadir in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Patussi, Cleverson; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir; Munhoz, Eduardo Ciliao; Zanicotti, Roberta Targa Stramandinoli; Schussel, Juliana Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a chief complication in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It is considered a toxic inflammatory reaction that interferes with the patient's recuperation and quality of life. Oral candidiasis is a common fungal infection observed in dental practice, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral mucositis and oral candidiasis in patients who underwent HSCT and their correlation with the chemotherapeutic nadir (lowest possible outcome). We evaluated patients with different diagnoses who underwent HSCT at the Hospital Erasto Gaertner. No chemotherapeutic nadir curves could be associated with mucositis, and patients had different presentations of mucositis. No patient developed oral candidiasis during hospitalization. Together with cell counts, we collected demographic data including age, oral hygiene, habits harmful to health, and the use of oral prostheses. It was observed that patients who smoked cigarettes before hospitalization showed less mucositis, resulting in no feeding problems or other comorbid conditions due to the effect of mucositis. However, the nadir of the chemotherapy curve, in isolation, is not a predictive tool for the appearance (or no appearance) of oral mucositis.

  18. Intercomparison of Near Infrared SCIAMACHY and Thermal Infrared Nadir Vertical Column Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno-Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Gunter; Hess, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Nadir infrared (IR) sounding can be used to derive information on trace gases relevant for climate and air quality. For vertical column density retrievals using SCIAMACHY near IR nadir observations, the BIRRA (Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) code has recently been implemented in the operational level 1 - 2 processor. For analysis of thermal IR nadir observations of AIRS, GOSAT, IASI, or TES, a closely related code CERVISA (Column EstimatoR Vertical Infrared Sounding of the Atmosphere) has been developed. Both codes share a large portion of modules, e.g., for line-by-line absorption and the nonlinear least squares solver. The essential difference is the part of the forward model devoted to radiative transfer through the atmosphere, i.e., Beer's law for the near IR versus Schwarzschild's equation for the thermal IR. For the ongoing validation of the BIRRA carbon monoxide CO and methane CH4 products inter-comparisons with thermal IR sounding data are performed. CERVISA retrieval results are compared both to the operational products of the IR sounder considered and to SCIAMACHY products retrieved with BIRRA.

  19. New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR): Status and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.

    2015-09-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) has been developed at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National Institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives), as an evolution of the previous archiving and distribution system, used on several telescopes (LBT, TNG, Asiago, etc.) to improve performance, efficiency and reliability. At the present, NADIR system is running on LBT telescope and Vespa (Italian telescopes network for outreach) Ramella et al. (2014), and will be used on TNG, Asiago and IRA (Istituto Radio Astronomia) archives of Medicina, Noto and SRT radio telescopes Zanichelli et al. (2014) as the data models for radio data will be ready. This paper will discuss the progress status, the architectural choices and the solutions adopted, during the development and the commissioning phase of the project. A special attention will be given to the LBT case, due to some critical aspect of data flow and policies and standards compliance, adopted by the LBT organization.

  20. Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz brightness temperatures of several tactical-scene clutter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikner, David A.; Pizzillo, Thomas J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors present 94-GHz radiometric brightness temperatures of various clutter materials at nadir. The clutter materials measured include field vegetation, asphalt pavement, and an asphalt shingle roof and data is presented for each clutter type. We also report measurements that quantify the effect of water on the brightness temperature of metal. These measurements were made by adding calibrated quantities of water to a metal plate while recording the plate's millimeter-wave brightness temperature. Off-nadir data out to 45 deg is also presented for the field vegetation and asphalt pavement. Using a simple rough scattering model for the materials, we made estimates of the emissivity of the field vegetation and asphalt. The emissivity of the roof was determined by measuring its brightness temperature as it was heated.

  1. Retrieval of tropospheric column densities of NO2 from combined SCIAMACHY nadir/limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, S.; Kühl, S.; Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Wagner, T.

    2009-11-01

    The SCIAMACHY instrument onboard the ESA satellite ENVISAT allows the retrieval of column densities of various trace gases, among them NO2. As only instrument of its kind, SCIAMACHY measures in an alternating limb/nadir mode. The limb measurements allow a direct determination of stratospheric column densities, which are needed to extract tropospheric from the total column density measurements performed in (quasi simultaneous) nadir geometry. Here we discuss the potential and limitations of SCIAMACHY limb measurements for estimating stratospheric column densities of NO2 in comparison to a simple reference sector method, and the consequences for the resulting tropospheric column densities. A direct, absolute limb correction scheme improves spatial patterns of tropospheric NO2 column densities at high latitudes compared to the simple reference sector method. However, it results in artificial zonal stripes at low latitudes. Thus, also a relative limb correction scheme was defined, which turned out to successfully reduce stratospheric artefacts in the resulting tropospheric data product without introducing new ones. This relative limb correction scheme is rather simple, robust, and, in essence, based on measurements alone. The effect of the different stratospheric estimation schemes on tropospheric column densities is discussed with respect to zonal and temporal dependencies. In addition, error quantities are defined from the nadir/limb measurements which indicate remaining systematic errors as function of latitude and day. Our new suggested stratospheric estimation scheme, the relative limb correction, improves monthly mean tropospheric slant column densities significantly, e.g. from -1×1015 molec/cm2 (using a simple reference sector method) to ≈0 in the Atlantic ocean, and from +1×1015 molec/cm2 to ≈0 over Siberia, at 50° N in January.

  2. [Study of hyperspectral polarized reflectance of vegetation canopy at nadir viewing direction].

    PubMed

    Lŭ, Yun-Feng

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, corn canopy is the objective. Firstly the polarization of corn canopy was analyzed based on polarization reflection mechanism; then, the polarization of canopy was measured in different growth period at nadir before heading. The result proved the theoretical derivation that the light reflected from corn canopy is polarized, and found that in the total reflection the polarization light accounts for up to 10%. This shows that polarization measurement provides auxiliary information for remote sensing, but also illustrates that the use of the polarization information retrieval of atmospheric parameters should be considered when the surface polarization affects on it.

  3. Retrieval of tropospheric column densities of NO2 from combined SCIAMACHY nadir/limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, S.; Kühl, S.; Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Wagner, T.

    2010-02-01

    The SCIAMACHY instrument onboard the ESA satellite ENVISAT allows measurements of various atmospheric trace gases, such as NO2. A unique feature of SCIAMACHY is that measurements are made alternately in limb and nadir mode. The limb measurements provide an opportunity for directly determining stratospheric column densities (CDs), which are needed to extract tropospheric CDs from the total CD measurements performed in (quasi simultaneous) nadir geometry. Here we discuss the potential and limitations of SCIAMACHY limb measurements for estimating stratospheric CDs of NO2 in comparison to a simple reference sector method, and the consequences for the resulting tropospheric CDs. A direct, absolute limb correction scheme is presented that improves spatial patterns of tropospheric NO2 column densities at high latitudes, but results in artificial zonal stripes at low latitudes. Subsequently, a relative limb correction scheme is introduced that successfully reduces stratospheric artefacts in the tropospheric data product without introducing new ones. This relative limb correction scheme is rather simple, robust, and, in essence, based on measurements alone. The effects of the different stratospheric estimation schemes on tropospheric CDs are discussed with respect to zonal and temporal dependencies. In addition, we define error quantities from the nadir/limb measurements that indicate remaining systematic errors as a function of latitude and day. Our new suggested stratospheric estimation scheme, the relative limb correction, improves mean tropospheric slant CDs significantly, e.g. from -1×1015 molec/cm2 (using a reference sector method) to ≍0 in the Atlantic ocean, and from +1×1015 molec/cm2 to ≍0 over Siberia, at 50° N in January 2003-2008.

  4. Association of Hematological Nadirs and Survival in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Hematopoietic Syndrome of Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gluzman-Poltorak, Zoya; Vainstein, Vladimir; Basile, Lena A

    2015-08-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-12 (rHuIL-12) mitigates the hematopoietic subsyndrome of acute radiation syndrome (HSARS) after total body irradiation (TBI) in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of HSARS. The mechanism for this effect appears to involve multiple effects of rHuIL-12 on hematopoiesis. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine hematological nadirs and survival across our three NHP completed studies. Animals were irradiated (700 cGy) and treated with a single subcutaneous injection of vehicle (n = 64) or rHuIL-12 (50-500 ng/kg; n = 108) 24-25 h after irradiation, or with daily subcutaneous injections of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; 10 μg/kg/day) for 18 days starting 24-25 h after exposure (n = 26). Blood samples were obtained at various time points up to day 60 after TBI. Lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the overall sample and in each treatment group (P < 0.001 for each comparison, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Lymphocyte nadir was the strongest and most consistent predictor of death by Spearman's rank correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of death and threshold hematologic nadir values (where nadir values less than or equal the threshold are predictive of death) showed that a threshold of 0.08 × 10(9)/L for lymphocytes had the largest positive predictive value of death (97.2% and 92.5% for the control and rHuIL-12 groups, respectively) and high sensitivity (76.1% and 62.7%, respectively), consistent with human radiation victims data. The current findings suggest that enhanced early bone marrow regeneration resulting in increases in nadir values for all major blood cell types may be the main mechanism of action by which rHuIL-12 mitigates the lethality of HSARS.

  5. NADIR: Monitoring, Error Handling, and Logging with Tango

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.

    2014-05-01

    The ingest and transport of a large amount of astronomical data, in geographically distributed archives, imply some challenging issues, like remote control and configuration, monitoring and logging anomalous conditions, fault tolerance and error handling. Based on this considerations and on our experience in data management, we started development of a New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR), using Tango (Team 2013; S. Gara 2012), a well known distributed control system (DCSs) within scientific environments, taking advantage of its key features, like reliability, scalability, logging and alarm system, consolidated pattern and template, to solve this complexity. In this paper we discuss about design choices and technical aspects around this project.

  6. First-Day Newborn Weight Loss Predicts In-Hospital Weight Nadir for Breastfeeding Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bokser, Seth; Newman, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Exclusive breastfeeding reduces infant infectious disease. Losing ≥10% birth weight may lead to formula use. The predictive value of first-day weight loss for subsequent weight loss has not been studied. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between weight loss at <24 hours and subsequent in-hospital weight loss ≥10%. Methods For 1,049 infants, we extracted gestational age, gender, delivery method, feeding type, and weights from medical records. Weight nadir was defined as the lowest weight recorded during birth hospitalization. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the effect of first-day weight loss on subsequent in-hospital weight loss. Results Mean in-hospital weight nadir was 6.0 ± 2.6%, and mean age at in-hospital weight nadir was 38.7 ± 18.5 hours. While in the hospital 6.4% of infants lost ≥10% of birth weight. Infants losing ≥4.5% birth weight at <24 hours had greater risk of eventual in-hospital weight loss ≥10% (adjusted odds ratio 3.57 [1.75, 7.28]). In this cohort, 798 (76.1%) infants did not have documented weight gain while in the hospital. Conclusions Early weight loss predicts higher risk of ≥10% in-hospital weight loss. Infants with high first-day weight loss could be targeted for further research into improved interventions to promote breastfeeding. PMID:20113202

  7. ICU Blood Pressure Variability May Predict Nadir of Respiratory Depression After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Anne S. M.; Costa, Paulo H. M.; de Lima, Carlos E. B.; Pádua, Luiz E. M.; Campos, Luciana A.; Baltatu, Ovidiu C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical stress induces alterations on sympathovagal balance that can be determined through assessment of blood pressure variability. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is associated with postoperative respiratory depression. In this study we aimed at investigating ICU blood pressure variability and other perioperative parameters that could predict the nadir of postoperative respiratory function impairment. Methods: This prospective observational study evaluated 44 coronary artery disease patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). At the ICU, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was monitored every 30 min for 3 days. MAP variability was evaluated through: standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), variation independent of mean (VIM), and average successive variability (ASV). Respiratory function was assessed through maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures and peak expiratory flow (PEF) determined 1 day before surgery and on the postoperative days 3rd to 7th. Intraoperative parameters (volume of cardioplegia, CPB duration, aortic cross-clamp time, number of grafts) were also monitored. Results: Since, we aimed at studying patients without confounding effects of postoperative complications on respiratory function, we had enrolled a cohort of low risk EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation) with < 2. Respiratory parameters MIP, MEP, and PEF were significantly depressed for 4–5 days postoperatively. Of all MAP variability parameters, the ASV had a significant good positive Spearman correlation (rho coefficients ranging from 0.45 to 0.65, p < 0.01) with the 3-day nadir of PEF after cardiac surgery. Also, CV and VIM of MAP were significantly associated with nadir days of MEP and PEF. None of the intraoperative parameters had any correlation with the postoperative respiratory depression. Conclusions: Variability parameters ASV, CV, and VIM of the MAP

  8. Failure-plane angle in Bentheim sandstone subjected to true triaxial stresses: experimental results and theoretical prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Rudnicki, John; Haimson, Bezalel

    2014-05-01

    We conducted true triaxial tests in the high-porosity (n = 24%), quartz-rich (95%), Bentheim sandstone. An important objective was to investigate the dependence of failure-plane angle θ (angle between the normal to the plane and σ1 direction) on the prevailing stress conditions. We employed two distinct loading paths, and seven σ3 magnitudes (between 0 and 150 MPa). In tests using the common loading path, σ2 and σ3 were fixed, while σ1 was raised monotonically to failure. In tests using the novel loading path (which facilitate comparison with theoretical predictions), σ3 was fixed, and the Lode angle, Θ (= tan-1 [(σ1 - 2σ2 + σ3) / 30.5(σ1 - σ3)]) was kept constant by raising σ1 and σ2 simultaneously at a set ratio b [= (σ2 -σ3)/(σ1 -σ3)] until failure occurred. Six stress ratios b (= 0, 1/6, 1/3, 1/2, 3/4, 1), i.e. six Θ (= tan-1 [(1-2b) / 30.5]) values from +π/6 (axisymmetric compression) to -π/6 (axisymmetric extension) were used. In axisymmetric common loading path tests, failure-plane angle θ generally declined as the applied σ3 = σ2 increased from about 80° at σ3 = σ2 = 0 MPa to 0° at σ3 = σ2 = 150 MPa (forming compaction bands). In tests where σ3 ≠ σ2, the resulting failure-plane strike was consistently parallel to σ2 direction. For low σ3, θ typically rose by up to 12° as σ2 rose from σ2 = σ3 to σ2 = σ1. However, the rise in θ with σ2 tended to diminish at higher σ3. A limiting case occurred at σ3 = 150 MPa, where failure plane remained at 0° , regardless of the rise in σ2. In the novel loading path tests, failure-plane angle θ declined monotonically for any given Lode angle Θ, from roughly 80° to 0° , as the mean stress at failure (σoct,f) rose from about 20 MPa to around 220 MPa; for a constant σoct,f, θ typically increased from 10° (at σoct,f = 20 MPa) to 30° (at σoct,f = 220 MPa) as Θ dropped from +π/6 (σ2 = σ3) to -π/6 (σ2 = σ1). We compared the measured θ with that predicted using

  9. A comparative analysis of UV nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragani, Rossana

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative assessment of ultraviolet nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone profile assimilation. The Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp-A) Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) nadir and the ENVISAT Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) limb profiles, generated by the ozone consortium of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA O3-CCI), were individually added to a reference set of ozone observations and assimilated in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data assimilation system (DAS). The two sets of resulting analyses were compared with that from a control experiment, only constrained by the reference dataset, and independent, unassimilated observations. Comparisons with independent observations show that both datasets improve the stratospheric ozone distribution. The changes inferred by the limb-based observations are more localized and, in places, more important than those implied by the nadir profiles, albeit they have a much lower number of observations. A small degradation (up to 0.25 mg kg-1 for GOME-2 and 0.5 mg kg-1 for MIPAS in the mass mixing ratio) is found in the tropics between 20 and 30 hPa. In the lowermost troposphere below its vertical coverage, the limb data are found to be able to modify the ozone distribution with changes as large as 60 %. Comparisons of the ozone analyses with sonde data show that at those levels the assimilation of GOME-2 leads to about 1 Dobson Unit (DU) smaller root mean square error (RMSE) than that of MIPAS. However, the assimilation of MIPAS can still improve the quality of the ozone analyses and - with a reduction in the RMSE of up to about 2 DU - outperform the control experiment thanks to its synergistic assimilation with total-column ozone data within the DAS. High vertical resolution ozone profile observations are essential to accurately monitor and forecast ozone concentrations in a DAS

  10. Computer communications through telecommunications satellite systems - The NADIR project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, J.-L.

    Current developments in satellite digital communication in Europe are surveyed, and the status of the French NADIR project begun in 1980 is reported. The geographic coverage, transmission rates, propagation delays, broadcasting and multidestination channels, and error rates characteristic of present satellite systems are discussed, and the specific performance parameters of the Telecom-1 system, comprising three geosynchronous satellites (one operational and two backup) with six 25-Mbit/sec, 12-14-GHz digital transponders and one 4-6 GHz analog port (for telephone and TV services) each, are examined. Telecom-1 will operate in a TDMA-AD mode with coverage of up to 320 earth stations in Central and Western Europe, transmission rates of 2.4-2000 kbit/sec, and error rates less than 10 to the -6th during 99 percent of the time. New applications foreseen include remote processing, distributed databases, computer teleconferencing, and electronic mail systems; new basic tools such as bulk-transfer and transaction-transfer protocols and database-management systems will be required. These tools are under development and testing (using the ANIS Telecom-1 simulator) by NADIR.

  11. Understanding angular effects in VHR imagery and their significance for urban land-cover model portability: A study of two multi-angle in-track image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, Giona; Longbotham, Nathan; Pacifici, Fabio; Kanevski, Mikhail; Tuia, Devis

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the angular effects causing spectral distortions in multi-angle remote sensing imagery. We study two WorldView-2 multispectral in-track sequences acquired over the cities of Atlanta, USA, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, consisting of 13 and 20 co-located images, respectively. The sequences possess off-nadir acquisition angles up to 47.5° and bear markedly different sun-satellite configurations with respect to each other. Both scenes comprise classic urban structures such as buildings of different size, road networks, and parks. First, we quantify the degree of distortion affecting the sequences by means of a non-linear measure of distance between probability distributions, the Maximum Mean Discrepancy. Second, we assess the ability of a classification model trained on an image acquired at a certain view angle to predict the land-cover of all the other images in the sequence. The portability across the sequence is investigated for supervised classifiers of different nature by analyzing the evolution of the classification accuracy with respect to the off-nadir look angle. For both datasets, the effectiveness of physically- and statistically-based normalization methods in obtaining angle-invariant data spaces is compared and synergies are discussed. The empirical results indicate that, after a suitable normalization (histogram matching, atmospheric compensation), the loss in classification accuracy when using a model trained on the near-nadir image to classify the most off-nadir acquisitions can be reduced to as little as 0.06 (Atlanta) or 0.03 (Rio de Janeiro) Kappa points when using a SVM classifier.

  12. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Lister, T.; Collier Cameron, A.; Street, R. A.; Pollacco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.

    2004-12-01

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extra-solar planets across the face of their parent star. We present some recent results from the WASP0 camera, including observations of the known transiting planet around HD 209458. The current status of the next generation camera (SuperWASP) located on La Palma is briefly outlined.

  13. Constraining the physical properties of Titan's empty lake basins using nadir and off-nadir Cassini RADAR backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Poggiali, V.; Mullen, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We use repeat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and complementary altimetry passes acquired by the Cassini spacecraft to study the scattering properties of Titan's empty lake basins. The best-fit coefficients from fitting SAR data to a quasi-specular plus diffuse backscatter model suggest that the bright basin floors have a higher dielectric constant, but similar facet-scale rms surface facet slopes, to surrounding terrain. Waveform analysis of altimetry returns reveals that nadir backscatter returns from basin floors are greater than nadir backscatter returns from basin surroundings and have narrower pulse widths. This suggests that floor deposits are structurally distinct from their surroundings, consistent with the interpretation that some of these basins may be filled with evaporitic and/or sedimentary deposits. Basin floor deposits also express a larger diffuse component to their backscatter, which is likely due to variations in subsurface structure or an increase in roughness at the wavelength scale (Hayes, A.G. et al. [2008]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 9). We generate a high-resolution altimetry radargram of the T30 altimetry pass over an empty lake basin, with which we place geometric constraints on the basin's slopes, rim heights, and depth. Finally, the importance of these backscatter observations and geometric measurements for basin formation mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  14. The impact of ozone field horizontal inhomogeneities on nadir-viewing orbital backscatter UV measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Martin D.; Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations for nadir-viewing satellites normally assume the atmosphere to be horizontally homogeneous. Yet it has been shown recently that horizontal gradients can lead to significant errors in satellite infrared and microwave soundings. We extend the methodology to backscatter ultra-violet observations of ozone, and present a first estimate of the effect s magnitude. The Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument, a pure nadir sounder, serves as our test bed. Our results indicate that in a vast majority of cases the abovementioned errors can be neglected. However, occurrence of higher errors, particularly at wavelengths longer than 300 nm, coincides with some of the most interesting atmospheric phenomena like tropopause folds and the South polar ozone hole. This leads to a seasonal variation of the magnitude of the effect. Due to the mostly zonal geometry of the ozone distribution, there is also the possibility that biases may be introduced, which is particularly critical if the data are to be assimilated or used to determine trends. The results presented are tested for robustness using different model atmospheres. The influence of horizontal inhomogeneities will be even more pronounced for cross-track sounders and limb viewers, and easier to detect once higher resolution atmospheric models are available. This will be investigated in future studies.

  15. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Street, R. A.; Pollaco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Collier Cameron, A.

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extrasolar planets across the face of their parent star. The WASP0 instrument is a wide-field (9-degree) 6.3 cm aperture F/2.8 Apogee 10 CCD camera (2Kx2K chip, 16-arcsec pixels). The camera is mounted piggy-back on a commercial 10-inch Meade telescope. We present some recent results from the WASP camera, including observations from La Palma of the known transiting planet around HD 209458 and preliminary analysis of other stars located in the same field. We also outline further problems which restrict the ability to achieve photon limited precision with a wide-field commercial CCD.

  16. Precipitation measurement using SIR-C: A feasibility study. Investigation at nadir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahamad, Atiq; Moore, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    The most significant limitation of the imaging SAR in rain measurements is the ground return coupled to the rain cell. Here we report a study of the possibility of using the X-SAR and the C-band channel of SIR-C for rain measurement. Earlier signal-to-clutter calculations rule out the use of X-SAR at steeper off-vertical angles of incidence (i.e., 20 less than theta less than 50). Only rain rates greater than 30 mm/hr at angles of incidence greater than 60 degrees showed good signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). This study involved calculations at vertical incidence. There is adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at vertical incidence, but the presence of high-range side-lobe levels leads to small SCR for measurement over oceans at both X and C bands. For larger rain thickness (greater than two km), the SCR gets better and smaller rain rates (greater than 10 mm/hr) can be measured. However, rain measurements over forests seem to be feasible at nadir even for smaller rain thickness (less than two km). We conclude that X band may be usable over the forest at vertical incidence to measure rain rates greater than five mm/hr even for shallow rain thickness and over ocean for large rain thickness.

  17. Optimal directional view angles for remote-sensing missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Holben, B. N.; Tucker, C. J.; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the directional, off-nadir viewing of terrestrial scenes using remote-sensing systems from aircraft and satellite platforms, taking into account advantages of such an approach over strictly nadir viewing systems. Directional reflectance data collected for bare soil and several different vegetation canopies in NOAA-7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 were analyzed. Optimum view angles were recommended for two strategies. The first strategy views the utility of off-nadir measurements as extending spatial and temporal coverage of the target area. The second strategy views the utility of off-nadir measurements as providing additional information about the physical characteristics of the target. Conclusions regarding the two strategies are discussed.

  18. NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS RSB Comparison Using Observations from Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Wu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership) satellite (http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/viirs.html) began to daily collect global data following its successful launch on October 28, 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key NPP sensor. Similar to the design of the OLS, SeaWiFS and MODIS instruments, VIIRS has on-board calibration components including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) for the reflective solar bands (RSB), a V-groove blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a space view (SV) port for background subtraction. Immediately after the VIIRS nadir door s opening on November 21, 2011, anomalously large degradation in the SD response was identified in the near-IR wavelength region, which was unexpected as decreases in the SD reflectance usually occur gradually in the blue (0.4 m) wavelength region based on past experience. In this study, we use a well-calibrated Aqua MODIS as reference to track and evaluate VIIRS RSB stability and performance. Reflectances observed by both sensors from simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNO) are used to determine VIIRS to MODIS reflectance ratios for their spectral matching bands. Results of this study provide an immediate post-launch assessment, independent validation of the anomalous degradation observed in SD measurements at near-IR wavelengths and initial analysis of calibration stability and consistency.

  19. Computerized data reduction techniques for nadir viewing remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gormsen, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Computer resources have been developed for the analysis and reduction of MAPS experimental data from the OSTA-1 payload. The MAPS Research Project is concerned with the measurement of the global distribution of mid-tropospheric carbon monoxide. The measurement technique for the MAPS instrument is based on non-dispersive gas filter radiometer operating in the nadir viewing mode. The MAPS experiment has two passive remote sensing instruments, the prototype instrument which is used to measure tropospheric air pollution from aircraft platforms and the third generation (OSTA) instrument which is used to measure carbon monoxide in the mid and upper troposphere from space platforms. Extensive effort was also expended in support of the MAPS/OSTA-3 shuttle flight. Specific capabilities and resources developed are discussed.

  20. Results of multiband (L, S, Ku band) propagation measurements and model for high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, M. A. N.; Butt, G.; Evans, Barry G.; Richharia, M.

    1993-01-01

    Signal propagation in the land mobile satellite (LMS) service is an important consideration due to its critical impact on the overall economic and commercial viability of the system. At frequencies allocated for LMS systems, shadowing of the line-of-sight (LOS) signal as well as multipath propagation phenomena can severely impair the link availability. In particular, as most of the studies have shown, the shadowing of LOS signal causes long and deep fades in a variety of mobile environments due to the inherent nature of the channel between the satellite and a mobile. Roadside obstacles, such as buildings, trees, utility poles etc., in the immediate vicinity of a mobile and the surrounding terrain are major sources of signal shadowing in LMS links. Therefore, a proper knowledge of link degradation is essential for cost-effective planning of a satellite based mobile communication system. The results of a propagation campaign undertaken to characterize the fading nature of LMS channel at high elevation angles is presented. It was envisaged that one of the most important physical variables contributing to the amount of LOS signal shadowing is the elevation angle of the satellite. At higher elevation angles to the satellite, less obstructions in the direct satellite-to-mobile path would therefore amount to statistically better link availability. Narrowband channel measurements were carried out at three RF frequencies corresponding to L (1.3 GHz), S (2.32/2.45 GHz), and Ku (10.4 GHz) bands. The campaign itself was divided into two phases to observe the effects of seasonal variation of foliage on the roadside trees. Phase measurements were carried out in September 1991 and in April 1992. Some important aspects from the statistical analysis of the propagation data are presented.

  1. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.2 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  2. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  3. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  4. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Monoxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  7. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Vertical Resolution Precision Order ...

  8. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  9. MODIS-N - Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer-Nadir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Richard R.; Thompson, Leslie L.

    1990-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer-Nadir (MODIS-N) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) is intended to provide daily global surveys for the atmosphere, the oceans, and the land. To achieve this capability, MODIS-N requires an at-least 2300-km swath width, and provides geometric-instantaneous-fields-of-view (GIFOVs) that are either 856 m, 428 m, or 214 m in size with reference to a 705 km satellite altitude. The 214 m GIFOV may or may not be used depending on total data rate impact assessments traded with science needs. To achieve the data for the multiplicity of science investigations MODIS-N provides nominally 36 spectral bands that are selected for specific locations and bandpasses in the spectral range from the visible to the long wave infrared. Another driver of this instrument combination is the need for long term spectral and radiometric calibration stability. Specific calibration capabilities are to be built into MODIS-N to achieve calibration knowledge over a 5 year operational life.

  10. Tropospheric Ozone Near-Nadir-Viewing IR Spectral Sensitivity and Ozone Measurements from NAST-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared ozone spectra from near nadir observations have provided atmospheric ozone information from the sensor to the Earth's surface. Simulations of the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (approximately 20 km altitude) with a spectral resolution of 0.25/cm were used for sensitivity analysis. The spectral sensitivity of ozone retrievals to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and water vapor is assessed in order to understand the relationship between the IR emissions and the atmospheric state. In addition, ozone spectral radiance sensitivity to its ozone layer densities and radiance weighting functions reveals the limit of the ozone profile retrieval accuracy from NAST-I measurements. Statistical retrievals of ozone with temperature and moisture retrievals from NAST-I spectra have been investigated and the preliminary results from NAST-I field campaigns are presented.

  11. Crustal velocity structure across the Main Ethiopian Rift: results from two-dimensional wide-angle seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, G. D.; Thybo, H.; Maguire, P. K. H.

    2005-09-01

    We present the results of velocity modelling of a recently acquired wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction profile across the Main Ethiopian Rift. The models show a continental type of crust with significant asymmetry between the two sides of the rift. A 2- to 5-km-thick layer of sedimentary and volcanic sequences is modelled across the entire region. This is underlain by a 40- to 45-km-thick crust with a c. 15-km-thick high-velocity lowest crustal layer beneath the western plateau. This layer is absent from the eastern side, where the crust is 35 km thick beneath the sediments. We interpret this layer as underplated material associated with the Oligocene flood basalts of the region with possible subsequent addition by recent magmatic events. Slight crustal thinning is observed beneath the rift, where Pn velocities indicate the presence of hot mantle rocks containing partial melt. Beneath the rift axis, the velocities of the upper crustal layers are 5-10 per cent higher than outside the rift, which we interpret as resulting from mafic intrusions that can be associated with magmatic centres observed in the rift valley. Variations in seismic reflectivity suggest the presence of layering in the lower crust beneath the rift, possibly indicating the presence of sills, as well as some layering in the proposed underplated body.

  12. Identifying the occurrence of lightning and transient luminous events by nadir spectrophotometric observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Toru; Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Makoto; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Inan, Umran S.; Linscott, Ivan; Hobara, Yasuhide; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.; Chen, Alfred B.; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Kusunoki, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new technique to identify the occurrence of lightning and transient luminous events (TLEs) using multicolor photometric data obtained by space borne nadir measurements. We estimate the spectral characteristics of lightning and TLEs by converting the optical data obtained by the ISUAL limb experiment to the GLIMS nadir geometry. We find that the estimated spectral shapes of TLE-accompanied lightning are clearly different from those of pure lightning. The obtained results show that (1) the intensity of FUV signals and (2) the ratio of 337/red (609-753 nm) spectral irradiance are useful to identify the occurrence of TLEs. The occurrence probabilities of TLEs are 10%, 40%, 80%, in the case of lightning events having the 337/red spectral irradiance ratio of 0.95, 2.95, 14.79, respectively. By using the 60% criterion of the 337/red ratio and the existence of FUV emissions, we classify the 1039 GLIMS-observed lightning events into 828 pure lightning and 211 TLE-accompanied lightning. Since the GLIMS trigger level is adjusted to observe extremely-bright events, the occurrence probability of TLEs obtained here most probably reflects the characteristics of energetic lightning. The estimated global map is consistent with previously determined distributions: the highest activities of lightning and TLEs are found over the North/South American continents, African continent, and Asian maritime regions. While the absolute occurrence number of pure lightning and TLE-accompanied lightning are found to maximize in the equatorial region, the occurrence probability of TLEs possibly increase somewhat in the mid-latitude region. Since the occurrence probabilities of TLEs are higher over the ocean than over land, it is likely that the GLIMS-observed TLEs are due primarily to elves which tends to occur more frequently over the ocean.

  13. Backscattering enhancement for Marshall-Palmer distributed rains for a W-band nadir-pointing radar with a finite beam width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we expand the previous theory to be applied to a generic drop size distribution with spheroidal raindrops including spherical raindrops. Results will be used to discuss the multiple scattering effects on the backscatter measurements acquired by a W-band nadir-pointing radar.

  14. Is the Caribbean plate subducting underneath Hispaniola? Preliminary results from Caribe Norte wide-angle seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes Estrada, M.; ten Brink, U. S.; Carbo-Gorosabel, A.; Granja Bruña, J.; Flores, C. H.; Davila, J. M.; Pazos, A.; Quijano, J.

    2010-12-01

    A 200 km long, wide-angle seismic refraction transect was collected in the spring of 2009, across the widest part of the Muertos compressive margin (longitude 69°W). The transect was designed to test the hypothesized subduction of the Caribbean plate’s interior beneath the eastern Greater Antilles island arc. Shots were fired every 90 seconds from the R/V Hesperides’ 3850 cubic inches water-gun array, which, towed at 5 knots, resulted in a shot spacing of ~ 230 m. The seismic signal was recorded by 5 ocean-bottom seismometers deployed at distances varying from 25 to 50 km. Gravity, bathymetry and magnetic data were also acquired along that transect. Published and reprocessed reflection seismic lines nearby provided an initial model of the sediment column and on the pattern of upper crustal reflectors. Preliminary results of a 2-D forward ray-tracing model have enabled us to outline the broad-scale crustal structure across the Muertos margin. The Caribbean oceanic slab shows considerable variations in crustal thickness in the Venezuelan basin area (Caribbean plate’s interior). Farther north, the slab is imaged underneath the Muertos margin to about 60 km north of the deformation front and up to 19 km depth,. A change in crustal p wave velocity at about 60 km from the deformation front (or 70 km from the southern coast of the Dominican Republic) is interpreted to be the boundary between the arc crust and the accretionary prism. Caribbean oceanic crust does not appear to extend farther north. We interpret the results to indicate limited overthrusting of the Caribbean slab in the muertos Trough, rather than subduction.

  15. In-flight flow visualization results from the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.; Saltzman, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used on the X-29A aircraft at high angles of attack to study the vortical flow off the forebody and the surface flow on the wing and tail. The forebody vortex system was studied because asymmetries in the vortex system were suspected of inducing uncommanded yawing moments at zero sideslip. Smoke enabled visualization of the vortex system and correlation of its orientation with flight yawing moment data. Good agreement was found between vortex system asymmetries and the occurrence of yawing moments. Surface flow on the forward-swept wing of the X-29A was studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread outboard encompassing the full wing by 30 deg angle of attack. In general, the progression of the separated flow correlated well with subscale model lift data. Surface flow on the vertical tail was also studied using tufts and flow cones. As angle of attack increased, separated flow initiated at the root and spread upward. The area of separated flow on the vertical tail at angles of attack greater than 20 deg correlated well with the marked decrease in aircraft directional stability.

  16. The Caribbean-South American plate boundary at 65°W: Results from wide-angle seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Magnani, M. B.; Zelt, C. A.; Schmitz, M.; Levander, A.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of the analysis of new wide-angle seismic data across the Caribbean-South American plate boundary in eastern Venezuela at about 65°W. The ˜500 km long profile crosses the boundary in one of the few regions dominated by extensional structures, as most of the southeastern Caribbean margin is characterized by the presence of fold and thrust belts. A combination of first-arrival traveltime inversion and simultaneous inversion of PmP and Pn arrivals was used to develop a P wave velocity model of the crust and the uppermost mantle. At the main strike-slip fault system, we image the Cariaco Trough, a major pull-apart basin along the plate boundary. The crust under the Southern Caribbean Deformed Belt exhibits a thickness of ˜15 km, suggesting that the Caribbean Large Igneous Province extends to this part of the Caribbean plate. The velocity structures of basement highs and offshore sedimentary basins imaged by the profile are comparable to those of features found in other parts of the margin, suggesting similarities in their tectonic history. We do not image an abrupt change in Moho depth or velocity structure across the main strike-slip system, as has been observed elsewhere along the margin. It is possible that a terrane of Caribbean island arc origin was accreted to South America at this site and was subsequently bisected by the strike-slip fault system. The crust under the continental portion of the profile is thinner than observed elsewhere along the margin, possibly as a result of thinning during Jurassic rifting.

  17. The new small-angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-1 at MLZ-characterization and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, S.; Heinemann, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Karge, L.; Ostermann, A.; Defendi, I.; Schreyer, A.; Petry, W.; Gilles, R.

    2016-10-01

    A thorough characterization of the key features of the new small-angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-1 at MLZ, a joint project of Technische Universität München and Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, is presented. Measurements of the neutron beam profile, divergency and flux are given for various positions along the instrument including the sample position, and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations of SANS-1 using the program McStas. Secondly, the polarization option of SANS-1 is characterized for a broad wavelength band. A key feature of SANS-1 is the large accessible Q-range facilitated by the sideways movement of the detector. Particular attention is hence paid to the effects that arise due to large scattering angles on the detector where a standard cos3 solid angle correction is no longer applicable. Finally the performance of the instrument is characterized by a set of standard samples.

  18. TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ozone Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ozone Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data Guide ...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  20. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  1. TES/Aura L2 Methane (CH4) Lite Nadir (TL2CH4LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-31

    TES/Aura L2 Methane (CH4) Lite Nadir (TL2CH4LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Methane Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methane Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  2. Development of a Model to Correct Multi-View Angle above Water Measurements for the Analysis of the Bidirectional Reflectance of Coral and Other Reef Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, I.; Forster, B. C.; Laffan, S. W.

    2012-07-01

    Spectral reflectance characteristics of substrates in a coral reef environment are often measured in the field by viewing a substrate at nadir. However, viewing a substrate from multiple angles would likely result in different spectral characteristics for most coral reef substrates and provide valuable information on structural properties. To understand the relationship between the morphology of a substrate and its spectral response it is necessary to correct the observed above-water radiance for the effects of atmosphere and water attenuation, at a number of view and azimuth angles. In this way the actual surface reflectance can be determined. This research examines the air-water surface interaction for two hypothetical atmospheric conditions (clear Rayleigh scattering and totally cloudcovered) and the global irradiance reaching the benthic surface. It accounts for both water scattering and absorption, with simplifications for shallow water conditions, as well as the additive effect of background reflectance being reflected at the water-air surface at angles greater than the critical refraction angle (~48°). A model was developed to correct measured above-water radiance along the refracted view angle for its decrease due to path attenuation and the "n squared law of radiance" and the additive surface reflectance. This allows bidirectional benthic surface reflectance and nadir-normalised reflectance to be determined. These theoretical models were adapted to incorporate above-water measures relative to a standard, diffuse, white reference panel. The derived spectral signatures of a number of coral and non-coral benthic surfaces compared well with other published results, and the signatures and nadir normalised reflectance of the corals and other benthic surface classes indicate good class separation.

  3. Comparing nadir and limb observations of polar mesospheric clouds: The effect of the assumed particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry D.; Randall, Cora E.; Carstens, Justin N.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Rusch, David W.; Russell, James M.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2015-05-01

    Nadir viewing observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft are compared to Common Volume (CV), limb-viewing observations by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) also on AIM. CIPS makes multiple observations of PMC-scattered UV sunlight from a given location at a variety of geometries and uses the variation of the radiance with scattering angle to determine a cloud albedo, particle size distribution, and Ice Water Content (IWC). SOFIE uses IR solar occultation in 16 channels (0.3-5 μm) to obtain altitude profiles of ice properties including the particle size distribution and IWC in addition to temperature, water vapor abundance, and other environmental parameters. CIPS and SOFIE made CV observations from 2007 to 2009. In order to compare the CV observations from the two instruments, SOFIE observations are used to predict the mean PMC properties observed by CIPS. Initial agreement is poor with SOFIE predicting particle size distributions with systematically smaller mean radii and a factor of two more albedo and IWC than observed by CIPS. We show that significantly improved agreement is obtained if the PMC ice is assumed to contain 0.5% meteoric smoke by mass, in agreement with previous studies. We show that the comparison is further improved if an adjustment is made in the CIPS data processing regarding the removal of Rayleigh scattered sunlight below the clouds. This change has an effect on the CV PMC, but is negligible for most of the observed clouds outside the CV. Finally, we examine the role of the assumed shape of the ice particle size distribution. Both experiments nominally assume the shape is Gaussian with a width parameter roughly half of the mean radius. We analyze modeled ice particle distributions and show that, for the column integrated ice distribution, Log-normal and Exponential distributions better represent the range

  4. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  5. Towards 3D Matching of Point Clouds Derived from Oblique and Nadir Airborne Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    Because of the low-expense high-efficient image collection process and the rich 3D and texture information presented in the images, a combined use of 2D airborne nadir and oblique images to reconstruct 3D geometric scene has a promising market for future commercial usage like urban planning or first responders. The methodology introduced in this thesis provides a feasible way towards fully automated 3D city modeling from oblique and nadir airborne imagery. In this thesis, the difficulty of matching 2D images with large disparity is avoided by grouping the images first and applying the 3D registration afterward. The procedure starts with the extraction of point clouds using a modified version of the RIT 3D Extraction Workflow. Then the point clouds are refined by noise removal and surface smoothing processes. Since the point clouds extracted from different image groups use independent coordinate systems, there are translation, rotation and scale differences existing. To figure out these differences, 3D keypoints and their features are extracted. For each pair of point clouds, an initial alignment and a more accurate registration are applied in succession. The final transform matrix presents the parameters describing the translation, rotation and scale requirements. The methodology presented in the thesis has been shown to behave well for test data. The robustness of this method is discussed by adding artificial noise to the test data. For Pictometry oblique aerial imagery, the initial alignment provides a rough alignment result, which contains a larger offset compared to that of test data because of the low quality of the point clouds themselves, but it can be further refined through the final optimization. The accuracy of the final registration result is evaluated by comparing it to the result obtained from manual selection of matched points. Using the method introduced, point clouds extracted from different image groups could be combined with each other to build a

  6. Increase in the maximum lift of an airplane wing due to a sudden increase in its effective angle of attack resulting from a gust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Max

    1932-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests are described, in which the angle of attack of a wing model was suddenly increased (producing the effect of a vertical gust) and the resulting forces were measured. It was found that the maximum lift coefficient increases in proportion to the rate of increase in the angle of attack. This fact is important for the determination of the gust stresses of airplanes with low wing loading. The results of the calculation of the corrective factor are given for a high-performance glider and a light sport plane of conventional type.

  7. An Overview of Three-year JEM-GLIMS Nadir Observations of Lightning and TLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Ushio, T.; Morimoto, T.; Adachi, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Hobara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    JEM-GLIMS nadir observations of lightning and TLEs at the ISS started from November 2012 and successfully ended on August 2015. For three-year observation period, JEM-GLIMS succeeded in detecting over 8,000 lightning events and 670 TLEs. The detected optical emissions of sprites showed clear horizontal displacement with the range of 10-20 km from the peak location of the +CG emissions and from the +CG locations detected by NLDN and WWLLN. Using VITF electric field waveform data, source locations of VHF pulses excited by the parent CG discharges are estimated. It is found that the possible VHF source locations were mostly located within the area of the parent lightning emissions. These facts may imply that the center region of the neutralized charge by CG discharges in the thundercloud located near the return stroke point and that the some seed conditions were established in advance at the sprite location before the occurrence of sprites. The global occurrence distributions and rates of lightning discharges and TLEs are also estimated. The estimated mean global occurrence rate of lightning discharges is ~1.5 events/s, which is smaller number than that derived from MicroLab-1/OTD and TRMM/LIS measurements. This may be originated in the fact that JEM-GLISM detected only intense lightning optical events due to the high threshold level for the event triggering. To the contrary, the estimated mean global occurrence rate of TLEs is ~9.8 events/min, which is two times higher than the ISUAL result. It is likely that JEM-GLIMS could detect dimmer optical emissions of TLEs than ISUAL since the distance between the JEM-GLIMS instruments and TLEs is much closer. At the presentation, we will summarize the results derived from three-year JEM-GLIMS nadir observations. We will discuss possible occurrence conditions of sprites, properties of global occurrence rates of lightning and TLEs, and their LT dependences more in detail.

  8. Note on the Effect of Horizontal Gradients for Nadir-Viewing Microwave and Infrared Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Poli, P.

    2004-01-01

    Passive microwave and infrared nadir sounders such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), both flying on NASA s EOS Aqua satellite, provide information about vertical temperature and humidity structure that is used in data assimilation systems for numerical weather prediction and climate applications. These instruments scan cross track so that at the satellite swath edges, the satellite zenith angles can reach approx. 60 deg. The emission path through the atmosphere as observed by the satellite is therefore slanted with respect to the satellite footprint s zenith. Although radiative transfer codes currently in use at operational centers use the appropriate satellite zenith angle to compute brightness temperature, the input atmospheric fields are those from the vertical profile above the center of the satellite footprint. If horizontal gradients are present in the atmospheric fields, the use of a vertical atmospheric profile may produce an error. This note attempts to quantify the effects of horizontal gradients on AIRS and AMSU-A channels by computing brightness temperatures with accurate slanted atmospheric profiles. We use slanted temperature, water vapor, and ozone fields from data assimilation systems. We compare the calculated slanted and vertical brightness temperatures with AIRS and AMSU-A observations. We show that the effects of horizontal gradients on these sounders are generally small and below instrument noise. However, there are cases where the effects are greater than the instrument noise and may produce erroneous increments in an assimilation system. The majority of the affected channels have weighting functions that peak in the upper troposphere (water vapor sensitive channels) and above (temperature sensitive channels) and are unlikely t o significantly impact tropospheric numerical weather prediction. However, the errors could be significant for other applications such as stratospheric

  9. Retrieval of tropospheric ozone columns from SCIAMACHY limb-nadir matching observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebojie, F.; Savigny, C.; Ladstätter-Weissenmayer, A.; Bötel, S.; Weber, M.; Alexei, R.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite observations of tropospheric ozone are of critical importance in obtaining a global and more thorough knowledge of the phenomena affecting air quality. Tropospheric ozone has a significant adverse effect on the climate system. In the lower troposphere, during summer, it is a major constituent of photochemical smog and excess of it is toxic to the ecosystem, animal and man. It is equally known as a major oxidant and also involved in the production of other oxidants such as hydroxyl (OH) radicals. In the middle and upper troposphere, ozone acts as a greenhouse gas. The retrieval of tropospheric ozone from UV/VIS/NIR satellite spectrometer such as the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) instrument onboard the ESA satellite Envisat is difficult because only about 10 % of the Total Ozone Column (TOC) is in the troposphere. In this analysis we present the retrieval of tropospheric ozone columns from SCIAMACHY limb-nadir matching observations. This technique is a residual approach that involves the subtraction of the stratospheric ozone columns derived from the limb observations from the total ozone columns derived from the nadir observations. The stratospheric ozone columns were derived by integrating the stratospheric ozone profiles from the tropopause, which was obtained from the re-analyses data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in 1.5o x 1.5o x 91 levels based on both the thermal definition of tropopause using the WMO lapse-rate criterion as well as the potential vorticity definition of the tropopause. The total ozone columns were on the other hand retrieved using the Weighting Function DOAS algorithm (WFDOAS) at the spectral window of 326.6 - 334.5 nm. Equally of importance in our analysis is the tropospheric ozone columns derived from the ozonesondes by integrating the tropospheric ozone profiles from the bottom to the top of the troposphere, which was determined from the

  10. Preliminary results from a subsonic high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system: Design, calibration, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research flight vehicle. The system is a matrix of 25 pressure orifices in concentric circles on the nose of the vehicle. The orifices determine angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and pressure altitude. Pressure was transmitted from the orifices to an electronically scanned pressure module by lines of pneumatic tubing. The HI-FADS system was calibrated and demonstrated using dutch roll flight maneuvers covering large Mach, angle-of-attack, and sideslip ranges. Reference airdata for system calibration were generated by a minimum variance estimation technique blending measurements from two wingtip airdata booms with inertial velocities, aircraft angular rates and attitudes, precision radar tracking, and meteorological analyses. The pressure orifice calibration was based on identifying empirical adjustments to modified Newtonian flow on a hemisphere. Calibration results are presented. Flight test results used all 25 orifices or used a subset of 9 orifices. Under moderate maneuvering conditions, the HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz. Aerodynamic lags in the aircraft flow field caused some performance degradation during heavy maneuvering.

  11. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-06-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2:3 μm . Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  12. Near infrared nadir sounding of vertical column densities: methodology and application to SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno García, S.; Schreier, F.; Lichtenberg, G.; Slijkhuis, S.

    2011-06-01

    Nadir observations with the shortwave infrared channels of SCIAMACHY onboard the ENVISAT satellite can be used to derive information on atmospheric gases such as CO, CH4, N2O, CO2, and H2O. For the operational level 1b-2 processing of SCIAMACHY data a new retrieval code BIRRA (Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) has been developed: BIRRA performs a nonlinear least squares fit of the measured radiance, where molecular concentration vertical profiles are scaled to fit the observed data. Here we present the forward modeling (radiative transfer) and inversion (least squares optimization) fundamentals of the code along with the further processing steps required to generate higher level products such as global distributions and time series. Moreover, various aspects of level 1 (observed spectra) and auxiliary input data relevant for successful retrievals are discussed. BIRRA is currently used for operational analysis of carbon monoxide vertical column densities from SCIAMACHY channel 8 observations, and is being prepared for methane retrievals using channel 6 spectra. A set of representative CO retrievals and first CH4 results are presented to demonstrate BIRRA's capabilities.

  13. Near infrared nadir retrieval of vertical column densities: methodology and application to SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno García, S.; Schreier, F.; Lichtenberg, G.; Slijkhuis, S.

    2011-12-01

    Nadir observations with the shortwave infrared channels of SCIAMACHY on-board the ENVISAT satellite can be used to derive information on atmospheric gases such as CO, CH4, N2O, CO2, and H2O. For the operational level 1b-2 processing of SCIAMACHY data, a new retrieval code BIRRA (Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) has been developed. BIRRA performs a nonlinear or separable least squares fit (with bound constraints optional) of the measured radiance, where molecular concentration vertical profiles are scaled to fit the observed data. Here we present the forward modeling (radiative transfer) and inversion (least squares optimization) fundamentals of the code along with the further processing steps required to generate higher level products such as global distributions and time series. Moreover, various aspects of level 1 (observed spectra) and auxiliary input data relevant for successful retrievals are discussed. BIRRA is currently used for operational analysis of carbon monoxide vertical column densities from SCIAMACHY channel 8 observations, and is being prepared for methane retrievals using channel 6 spectra. A set of representative CO retrievals and first CH4 results are presented to demonstrate BIRRA's capabilities.

  14. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  15. Recent results in the study of heavy-ion elastic scattering at large angles. [180/sup 0/

    SciTech Connect

    Barrette, J.; Kahana, S.

    1983-01-01

    The observation, a few years ago, of unexpected large cross sections at backward angles in the elastic scattering of mass-asymmetric heavy ion systems gave us hope that we could learn something new and more precise on the properties of the average ion-ion potential. The subsequent observation of broad regular structures in the elastic and inelastic excitation functions near theta/sub cm/ = 180/sup 0/ were also very promising. Numerous models were proposed to explain some or all the observed features. These models can be divided mainly in two groups. Some try to modify directly the average optical potential whereas others associate the observed cross sections to a modification of specific partial waves outside the scope of the optical potential. This separation in two groups is not always clear since as demonstrated adding a Regge pole to a strongly absorbing potential is under some conditions perfectly equivalent to changing the shape of this potential. Similarly the resonances added to an S matrix can be understood as the manifestation of the potential resonances of a completely different optical potential. We describe recent calculations which have been carried on to try to understand the behavior of the data near the barrier.

  16. View angle dependence of MODIS liquid water path retrievals in warm oceanic clouds

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Ákos; Seethala, Chellappan; Deneke, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the view angle dependence of domain mean Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) liquid water path (LWP) and that of corresponding cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and liquid cloud fraction as proxy for plane-parallel retrieval biases. Independent Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer–EOS LWP was used to corroborate that the observed variations with sun-view geometry were not severely affected by seasonal/latitudinal changes in cloud properties. Microwave retrievals showed generally small (<10%) cross-swath variations. The view angle (cross-swath) dependence of MODIS optical thickness was weaker in backscatter than forward scatter directions and transitioned from mild ∩ shape to stronger ∪ shape as heterogeneity, sun angle, or latitude increased. The 2.2 µm effective radius variations always had a ∪ shape, which became pronounced and asymmetric toward forward scatter in the most heterogeneous clouds and/or at the lowest sun. Cloud fraction had the strongest and always ∪-shaped view angle dependence. As a result, in-cloud MODIS cloud liquid water path (CLWP) showed surprisingly good view angle (cross-swath) consistency, usually comparable to that of microwave retrievals, due to cancelation between optical thickness and effective radius biases. Larger (20–40%) nadir-relative increases were observed in the most extreme heterogeneity and sun angle bins, that is, typically in the polar regions, which, however, constituted only 3–8% of retrievals. The good consistency of MODIS in-cloud CLWP was lost for gridbox mean LWP, which was dominated by the strong cloud fraction increase with view angle. More worryingly, MODIS LWP exhibited significant and systematic absolute increases with heterogeneity and sun angle that is not present in microwave LWP. Key Points Microwave LWP shows small overall and cross-swath variations MODIS in-cloud LWP also shows good view angle consistency in most cases MODIS retrievals show strong

  17. Using SOURCES to Examine the Nadir of Race Relations (1890-1920)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVallee, Carol; Waring, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The "nadir of race relations" is a term used by historians to describe the time period after Reconstruction, 1890-1920. During this time, African Americans were free; some argue, however, that it was a worse time than when these individuals were enslaved (Brundage 1990; Woodward 2002). There is a debate whether this time period…

  18. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Lite Nadir (TL2H2OLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Lite Nadir (TL2H2OLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... HDFView Read Software Level 2 Google Earth Visualizations Related Data:  Level 2 Lite Survey ...

  19. Integrating Chlorophyll fapar and Nadir Photochemical Reflectance Index from EO-1/Hyperion to Predict Cornfield Daily Gross Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qingyuan; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Kustas, William P.; Russ, Andrew L.; Prueger, John H.; Yao, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The concept of light use efficiency (Epsilon) and the concept of fraction of photosynthetically active ration (PAR) absorbed for vegetation photosynthesis (PSN), i.e., fAPAR (sub PSN), have been widely utilized to estimate vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP). It has been demonstrated that the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) is empirically related to e. An experimental US Department of Agriculture (USDA) cornfield in Maryland was selected as our study field. We explored the potential of integrating fAPAR(sub chl) (defined as the fraction of PAR absorbed by chlorophyll) and nadir PRI (PRI(sub nadir)) to predict cornfield daily GPP. We acquired nadir or near-nadir EO-1/Hyperion satellite images that covered the cornfield and took nadir in-situ field spectral measurements. Those data were used to derive the PRI(sub nadir) and fAPAR (sub chl). The fAPAR (sub chl) is retrieved with the advanced radiative transfer model PROSAIL2 and the Metropolis approach, a type of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation procedure. We define chlorophyll light use efficiency Epsilon (sub chl) as the ratio of vegetation GPP as measured by eddy covariance techniques to PAR absorbed by chlorophyll (Epsilon(sub chl) = GPP/APAR (sub chl). Daily Epsilon (sub chl) retrieved with the EO-1 Hyperion images was regressed with a linear equation of PRI (sub nadir) Epsilon (sub chl) = Alpha × PRI (sub nadir) + Beta). The satellite Epsilon(sub chl- PRI (sub nadir) linear relationship for the cornfield was implemented to develop an integrated daily GPP model [GPP = (Alpha × PRI(sub nadir) + Beta) × fAPAR (sub chl) × PAR], which was evaluated with fAPAR (sub chl) and PRI (sub nadir) retrieved from field measurements. Daily GPP estimated with this fAPAR (sub chl-) PRI (nadir) integration model was strongly correlated with the observed tower in-situ daily GPP (R(sup 2) = 0.93); with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.71 g C mol-(sup -1) PPFD and coefficient of variation (CV) of 16

  20. Influence of subaqueous shelf angle on coastal plain-shelf-slope deposits resulting from a rise or fall in base-level

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.J.; Ethridge, F.G.; Schumm, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Extensive research in the past decade concerning the effects of base-level fluctuations on coastal plain-shelf-slope systems along passive margins has failed to properly assess the influence of the subaqueous shelf angle on the development, character, and preservation of the resulting deposits. A series of experiments were performed in a 4 m by 7 m flume to examine the effect that differing shelf angles have on a simulated coastal plain-shelf-slope system undergoing a cycle of base-level rise and fall. Results of the experiments indicate that the angle of the shelf affects (1) the amount of sediment available for deposition, (2) the timing of the influx of drainage basin sediment into the lower portions of the fluvial system, and (3) the width to depth ratio and sinuosity of fluvial systems that develop on the shelf. Base-level fall over a steep shelf results in deep, narrow, straight fluvial channels on the shelf and fine-grained, thick shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems show high sedimentation rates, but a low ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are rapidly abandoned for a single incised valley. In contrast, gentle shelf angles result in shallow, wide, meandering fluvial channels on the shelf and coarser-grained, thinner shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems have a lower sedimentation rate, but a high ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are active for a longer period of time. During subsequent base-level rise, deposits have a low potential for preservation owing to their thin nature and the slower rate at which transgression occurs over the shelf.

  1. Limb-nadir matching using non-coincident NO2 observations: proof of concept and the OMI-minus-OSIRIS prototype product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Cristen; Normand, Elise N.; McLinden, Chris A.; Bourassa, Adam E.; Lloyd, Nicholas D.; Degenstein, Douglas A.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Belmonte Rivas, Maria; Folkert Boersma, K.; Eskes, Henk

    2016-08-01

    A variant of the limb-nadir matching technique for deriving tropospheric NO2 columns is presented in which the stratospheric component of the NO2 slant column density (SCD) measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is removed using non-coincident profiles from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS). In order to correct their mismatch in local time and the diurnal variation of stratospheric NO2, OSIRIS profiles, which were measured just after sunrise, were mapped to the local time of OMI observations using a photochemical box model. Following the profile time adjustment, OSIRIS NO2 stratospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) were calculated. For profiles that did not reach down to the tropopause, VCDs were adjusted using the photochemical model. Using air mass factors from the OMI Standard Product (SP), a new tropospheric NO2 VCD product - referred to as OMI-minus-OSIRIS (OmO) - was generated through limb-nadir matching. To accomplish this, the OMI total SCDs were scaled using correction factors derived from the next-generation SCDs that improve upon the spectral fitting used for the current operational products. One year, 2008, of OmO was generated for 60° S to 60° N and a cursory evaluation was performed. The OmO product was found to capture the main features of tropospheric NO2, including a background value of about 0.3 × 1015 molecules cm-2 over the tropical Pacific and values comparable to the OMI operational products over anthropogenic source areas. While additional study is required, these results suggest that a limb-nadir matching approach is feasible for the removal of stratospheric NO2 measured by a polar orbiter from a nadir-viewing instrument in a geostationary orbit such as Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) or Sentinel-4.

  2. Photometric Characteristics of Sprites and Elves Derived from JEM-GLIMS Nadir Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Adachi, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Mihara, M.; Ushio, T.; Morimoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of the JEM-GLIMS mission is to identify the horizontal structures of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) and spatiotemporal relationship between TLEs and their parent lightning discharges based on the nadir observations from the International Space Station (ISS). For this purpose JEM-GLIMS equips two sets of optical instruments (LSI: CMOS camera, and PH: spectrophotometers) and two sets of radio wave receivers (VLFR: VLF receiver, and VITF: VHF interferometer). As all these instruments are installed at the bottom plane of the bus module facing to the Earth, JEM-GLIMS can carry out the nadir observations continuously. JEM-GLIMS was launched by HTV3 and was successfully installed at the exposed facility of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on August 9, 2012. After the initial checkout operations, JEM-GLIMS finally started continuous observations on November 20, 2012. In the period from November 20, 2012 to June 30, 2013, totally 1597 transient optical events related to lightning flashes and/or TLE emissions were detected by the optical instruments. In 578 of these events, both LSI and PH detected clear transient optical signals well above the noise level. In order to derive sprite events from the detected transient optical events, we analyzed PH light-curve data first and estimated the peak irradiance related to the transient optical flashes. Then, we compared these intensities with the atmospheric transmittance. Finally, LSI image data are examined to clarify the morphological properties of the optical emission. We analyzed a transient optical event detected at 00:56:29.198 UT on December 15, 2012. The peak intensities of PH channels are estimated to be 1.4E-2 W/m2 (150-280 nm), 2.3E-4 W/m2 (316 nm), 5.9E-4 W/m2 (337 nm), 4.0E-4 W/m2 (392 nm), 4.2E-4 W/m2 (762 nm), and 6.3E-2 W/m2 (600-900 nm), respectively. It is found that all these intensities are significantly stronger than the lightning emission affected by the atmospheric transmittance. This fact

  3. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF PROXIMAL HUMERAL END FRACTURES WITH FIXED-ANGLE PLATE AND LOCKING SCREWS: TECHNIQUE AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marcio; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Brandão, Bruno Lobo; Motta Filho, Geraldo Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Describe the results of proximal humeral fractures surgically treated with the Philos locking plate system. Method: Between March 2003 and October 2004 we prospectively reviewed 24 of 26 patients with proximal humerus fractures treated with a Philos plate. The mean follow-up time was 12 months and the mean age of patients was 57 years. Six patients had four-part proximal humerus fractures, 11 patients had three-part proximal humerus fractures, and nine patients had two-part proximal humerus fractures. Clinical evaluation was performed using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: The mean UCLA score was 30 points (17-34). All fractures showed union. Three patients showed fracture union at varus position. The mean UCLA score for these patients was 27 points. Conclusion: Osteosynthesis with Philos plate provides a stable fixation method with good functional outcome. PMID:26998460

  4. Horizontal distributions of sprites derived from the JEM-GLIMS nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Mihara, M.; Adachi, T.; Ushio, T.; Morimoto, T.; Kikuchi, M.; Kikuchi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Ishida, R.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Hobara, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Global Lightning and Sprite Measurements on Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-GLIMS) started the nadir observations of lightning discharges and transient luminous events (TLEs) from the International Space Station (ISS) since November 2012. In the nadir observations, JEM-GLIMS optical instruments have to simultaneously detect incomparably intense lightning emissions and weak TLE emissions. To distinguish TLEs, especially sprite events, from lightning events, combined data analytical methods are adopted: (1) a subtraction of the wideband camera image from the narrowband camera image, (2) a calculation of the intensity ratio between different photometer channels, and (3) an estimation of the polarization and charge moment changes for the TLE-producing lightning discharges. We succeeded in identifying numbers of sprite events using the combined analytical methods, and here we report three sprite events detected by JEM-GLIMS as a case study. In the subtracted images, sprite emissions are located over the area of the sprite-producing lightning emissions. However, these sprites and sprite-producing lightning discharges did not occur at the nadir point of the ISS. For this reason, the geometry conversion of the sprite and sprite-producing lightning emissions as observed from the point just over the sprite-producing lightning discharges is performed. In the geometry-converted images, the locations of the sprite emissions are clearly displaced by 8-20 km from the peak positions of the sprite-producing lightning emissions. Thus, the first quantitative spatial distributions of sprites and sprite-producing lightning discharges from the JEM-GLIMS nadir observations are revealed.

  5. Multi-Angle Switched HIFU: A New Ultrasound Device for Controlled Non-Invasive Induction of Small Spherical Ablation Zones—Simulation and Ex-Vivo Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Petr; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Benson, Donny G.; Webber, Jessica S.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Shafirstein, Gal; Griffin, Robert J.

    2009-04-01

    Current HIFU devices produce elongated elliptical lesions (cigar shaped) in a single energy deposition. This prohibits the effective use of HIFU in small animal research as well as in clinical treatment where small volumes of tissue surrounded by critical structures need to be destroyed. We developed an ultrasound ablation device that non-invasively creates spheroidal lesions of an arbitrary diameter of up to 1 cm in a depth of up to 5 cm. The device consists of two focused ultrasound transducers aimed to the ablation target volume from two directions at a 90 degree angle. The operation of the transducers is switched back and forth so that only one transducer is energized at a time. A transient analysis of this ablation approach was performed using coupled simulations of acoustical pressure distributions, resulting temperature distributions, and thermal dose deposited to soft tissue. A prototype of the device was developed and tested in-vitro in a phantom and later in ex-vivo experiments in pig liver. The experimental results agreed with the numerical simulations and confirmed the ability of the multi-angle switched HIFU (MASH) device to create small spheroidal lesions in soft tissue within 2 minutes without significantly affecting the surrounding tissues.

  6. Recall of Nadir CD4 Cell Count and Most Recent HIV Viral Load Among HIV-Infected, Socially Marginalized Adults.

    PubMed

    Buisker, Timothy R; Dufour, Mi-Suk Kang; Myers, Janet J

    2015-11-01

    Lower nadir CD4 cell counts and higher HIV viral loads are associated with increased risks of adverse events in the progression of HIV disease. In cases where medical records are inaccessible or incomplete, little evidence is available regarding whether nadir CDR cell count or HIV viral load is reliably reported in any patient population. We compare survey data collected from 207 HIV-infected individuals detained in San Francisco jails to data collected from electronic medical records (EMR) kept by the jails and community health providers. The sensitivity of self-reported nadir CD4 cell count less than 200 was 82 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 68, 88], and the sensitivity of reporting an undetectable most recent HIV viral load was 93 % (95 % CI 84, 97). This suggests that in a highly socially marginalized population, nadir CD4 cell count and most recent HIV viral load are recalled accurately when compared to EMR.

  7. Systematic Structural Change in Selected Rare Earth Oxide Pyrochlores as Determined by Wide-Angle CBED and a Comparison with the Results of Atomistic Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabira, Yasunori; Withers, Ray L.; Minervini, Licia; Grimes, Robin W.

    2000-08-01

    An unknown oxygen atom fractional co-ordinate characteristic of the pyrochlore structure type has been determined for selected rare earth zirconate and titanate pyrochlores via a systematic row wide-angle CBED technique and shown to vary systematically with rare earth ion size. In the case of the titanate pyrochlore Gd2Ti2O7, the obtained results contrast with previously published X-ray results. Atomistic computer simulation is used to predict the value of the same parameter for a wide range of oxide pyrochlores. Comparison of calculated values with experimentally determined values shows that the general trends are correctly predicted although there appears to be systematic underestimation of both the observed values (by approximately 0.007) as well as their rate of change with rare earth ion size. Cation anti-site disorder is proposed as the origin of these discrepancies.

  8. Monitoring regional vegetation change using reflectance measurements from multiple solar zenith angles.

    PubMed

    Russell, M

    2001-09-01

    Many traditional models of vegetation canopy reflectance have commonly used one of two approaches. Either the canopy is assumed to consist of discrete objects of known reflectance and geometric-optics are then used to calculate shading effects, or, as in the turbid medium approach, the canopy is treated as a horizontally homogeneous layer of small elements of known optical properties and radiative transfer theory is used to calculate canopy reflectance. This paper examines the effect of solar zenith angle on the reflectance of red and near-infrared radiation from forests using a combination of these modelling approaches. Forests are first modelled as randomly spaced eucalypt crowns over a homogeneous understorey and the fractional coverage of four components: shaded and sunlit canopy and shaded and sunlit understorey are calculated. Reflectance from each fraction is then modelled for a range of solar zenith angles using the Verhoef SAIL model. The overall scene reflection as seen by a nadir viewing satellite sensor is compared for three forest types representing a gradient of crown density from open dry grassy woodlands to dense wetter closed forest with an understorey of mesophytic plants. Modelled trends in scene reflectance change are consistent with aircraft measurements carried out at three different solar zenith angles. Results indicate that an increase in both tree density and solar zenith angle leads to an increase in the dominance of shaded components. In the visible band, both the sparsely treed woodland and the medium density dry forest show similar trends to that predicted by a turbid medium model, however, the wet forest shows a less rapid decrease in reflectance with solar zenith angle. In the near-infrared band, as tree density increases from woodland to wet forest, overall scene reflectance shows increased departure from that modelled using the traditional assumption of smooth homogeneous canopies, changing from an increase with solar zenith angle

  9. Assessment of the stratospheric NO2 column using long-term ground-based UV-visible and satellite nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinardi, Gaia; Van Roozendael, Michel; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Hendrick, Francois; Granville, José; Tack, Frederik; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Pazmino, Andrea; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Wagner, Thomas; Gu, Myojeong; Friess, Udo; Navarro, Monica; Puentedura, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Zenith-sky UV-visible instruments have been used to monitor stratospheric NO2 columns from pole to pole for more than 2 decades, as part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Long-term monitoring and fit-for-purpose data quality are essential commitments of the network. Recently, recommendations were made for a better harmonization of the retrieval of NO2 stratospheric vertical columns (Van Roozendael and Hendrick 2012, http://ndacc-uvvis-wg.aeronomie.be/tools/NDACC_UVVIS-WG_NO2settings_v4.pdf). Those include, in addition to the use of harmonized SCD settings, a common approach to the air-mass factor (AMF) calculation, based on pre-calculated look-up tables of climatological AMFs resolved in latitude, time, wavelength, surface albedo, solar zenith angle and station altitude. The impact of the NDACC recommendations on the quality of the zenith-sky UV-visible stratospheric NO2 columns is first illustrated based on 10 SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales) instruments deployed from the Arctic to the Antarctic. The long-term time-series of SAOZ and other ground-based NDACC zenith-sky measurements are then used in synergy with data from an ensemble of satellite UV-vis nadir sensors (GOME-2, SCIAMACHY and OMI), for characterising the stratospheric NO2 columns on the global scale. Appropriate photochemical state matching is applied whenever necessary to combine/compare the different data sets. Results are interpreted in terms of ground-based network data homogeneity, and accuracy, consistency and long-term stability of space-borne stratospheric NO2 columns. The consistency with previously published studies including stratospheric NO2 column measurements from limb sensors such as MIPAS and SCIAMACHY is also discussed. These quality-assessed ground-based and satellite data sets offer new perspectives for the analysis of the variability and trends of stratospheric NO2 at the global scale.

  10. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  11. EP3/FP dual receptor agonist ONO-9054 administered morning or evening to patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: results of a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Michael S; Rowe-Rendleman, Cheryl; Ahmed, Ike; Ross, Douglas T; Fujii, Akifumi; Ouchi, Takafumi; Quach, Christine; Wood, Andrew; Ward, Caroline L

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The novel prostaglandin E (EP) 3 and prostaglandin F (FP) receptor agonist ONO-9054 is effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension and open-angle glaucoma when administered once daily. This study compares the effects of morning (AM) versus evening (PM) dosing of ONO-9054 on tolerability and IOP lowering. Methods This was a single-centre, randomised, double-masked, two-sequence, placebo-controlled crossover study in 12 subjects with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Two 14-day crossover regimens were separated by a 2-week washout: ONO-9054 (1 drop to each eye) in the morning (07:00) and vehicle in the evening (19:00) and vice versa. IOP was measured multiple times during select days. Ocular examinations also evaluated safety and tolerability. Results Mild ocular hyperaemia, reported by six subjects with PM dosing, was the most frequent adverse event. Mild to moderate dryness was also slightly more frequent after PM dosing. Maximum IOP reduction from baseline occurred on day 2 with decreases from baseline of −7.4 mm Hg (−30.8%) for AM dosing and −9.1 mm Hg, (−38.0%) for PM dosing; after 14 days, mean reduction in IOP was −6.8 mm Hg (−28.6%) for AM dosing and −7.5 mm Hg (−31.0%) for PM dosing. Conclusions PM dosing of ONO-0954 was associated with a slightly increased frequency of mild hyperaemia and mild to moderate dryness. Both dosing schedules provided sustained reduction in IOP. Trial registration number NCT01670266. PMID:26453641

  12. Characterisation of a stratospheric sulphate plume from the Nabro volcano using a combination of passive satellite measurements in nadir and limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Dörner, S.; Puķīte, J.; Hörmann, C.; Fromm, M. D.; Wagner, T.

    2014-03-01

    The eruption of the Nabro volcano (Eritrea), which started on 12 June 2011, caused the introduction of large quantities of SO2 into the lower stratosphere. The subsequently formed sulphate aerosols could be detected for several months following the eruption. It is generally assumed that the formation of sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere takes about a month, but in plumes from explosive eruptions significant amounts of aerosols have been seen to form within a few hours. We show that sulphate aerosols were present in the lower stratosphere within hours of the onset of the eruption of Nabro. Evidence comes from nadir UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) and SO2 measurements by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI, and limb aerosol measurements by SCIAMACHY. The sulphate plume displays negative UVAI in the western part of OMI's swath and positive UVAI in the eastern part - an effect that is due to the strong viewing angle dependence of UVAI and can only be caused by a high-altitude (>11 km), non-absorbing (single-scattering albedo >0.97) aerosol plume. For the retrieval of the aerosol profile from limb measurements, the horizontal dimensions and the position of the aerosol plume need to be taken into account, otherwise both extinction and layer height may be underestimated appreciably. By combining nadir SO2 column density and UVAI with limb aerosol profiles, a stratospheric plume from Nabro could be tracked from 13 to 17 June, before the plumes from later, lower-altitude explosions started interfering with the signal. Our findings are in agreement with ground-based lidar and sun-photometer data from an MPLNET/AERONET station in Israel and with data from the satellite-borne CALIOP lidar.

  13. Characterisation of a stratospheric sulfate plume from the Nabro volcano using a combination of passive satellite measurements in nadir and limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Dörner, S.; Puķīıte, J.; Hörmann, C.; Fromm, M. D.; Wagner, T.

    2014-08-01

    The eruption of the Nabro volcano (Eritrea), which started on 12 June 2011, caused the introduction of large quantities of SO2 into the lower stratosphere. The subsequently formed sulfate aerosols could be detected for several months following the eruption. It is generally assumed that the formation of sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere is a relatively slow process, but in plumes from explosive eruptions significant amounts of aerosols have been seen to form within a few hours. We show that sulfate aerosols were present in the lower stratosphere within hours of the onset of the eruption of Nabro. Evidence comes from nadir UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) and SO2 measurements by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI, and limb aerosol measurements by SCIAMACHY. The sulfate plume displays negative UVAI in the western part of OMI's swath and positive UVAI in the eastern part - an effect that is due to the strong viewing angle dependence of UVAI and can only be caused by a high-altitude (>11 km), non-absorbing (single-scattering albedo >0.97) aerosol plume. For the retrieval of the aerosol profile from limb measurements, the horizontal dimensions and the position of the aerosol plume need to be taken into account, otherwise both extinction and layer height may be underestimated appreciably. By combining nadir SO2 column density and UVAI with limb aerosol profiles, a stratospheric plume from Nabro could be tracked from 13 to 17 June, before the plumes from later, lower-altitude explosions started interfering with the signal. Our findings are in agreement with ground-based lidar and sun-photometer data from an MPLNET/AERONET station in Israel and with data from the satellite-borne CALIOP lidar.

  14. Preliminary Results on the Mechanics of the Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault (Dayman Dome), Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Boulton, C. J.; Mizera, M.; Webber, S. M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Wallace, L. M.; Biemiller, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid slip on the Mai'iu low-angle normal fault (LANF) has exhumed a smooth, corrugated fault surface contiguous for >24 km up-dip, rising from near sea level to ~2900 m. The fault emerges from the ground dipping ~21° N and flattens over the crest of the dome to dip south. Geomorphic analysis reveals a progressive back-tilting of the surface during exhumation accompanied by cross-cutting antithetic-sense high-angle faults—features that we attribute to "rolling-hinge" deformation of a once more steeply-dipping fault. Near the scarp base, the footwall exposes mafic mylonites that deformed at ~400-450°C. The younger Mai'iu fault cross-cuts this ductile mylonite zone, with most brittle slip being localized into a ~20 cm-thick, gouge-filled core. Near the range front, active faults bite across both the hangingwall and footwall of the Mai'iu fault and record overprinting across a dying, shallow (<~1 km deep) part of the fault by more optimally oriented, steeper faults. Such depth-dependent locking up of the fault suggests it weakens primarily by friction reduction rather than cohesion loss. Outcrop-scale fractures in the exhumed footwall reflect formation in an Andersonian stress regime. Previous campaign GPS data suggest the fault slips at up to ~1 cm/yr. To improve resolution and test for aseismic creep, we installed 12 GPS sites across the fault trace in 2015. Quantitative XRD indicates the gouges were derived primarily from mafic footwall, containing up to 65% corrensite and saponite. Hydrothermal friction experiments on two gouges from a relict LANF strand were done at varying normal stresses (30-120 MPa), temperatures (50-200oC), and sliding velocities (0.3-100 μm/s). Results reveal very weak frictional strength (μ=0.13-0.15 and 0.20-0.28) and velocity-strengthening behavior conducive to fault creep. At the highest temperatures (T≥150oC) and lowest sliding velocities (<3 μm/s), a transition to velocity-weakening behavior indicates the potential for

  15. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherap*

    PubMed Central

    Franca, Carlos Antônio da Silva; Vieira, Sérgio Lannes; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Bernabe, Antonio Jose Serrano; Penna, Antonio Belmiro Rodrigues Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn) after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%), and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%). Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%), and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%). Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%), and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2%) (p < 0.02). The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02), respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence. PMID:25741055

  16. Measurement of rainfall path attenuation near nadir: A comparison of radar and radiometer methods at 13.8 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durden, S. L.; Haddad, Z. S.; Im, E.; Kitiyakara, A.; Li, F. K.; Tanner, A. B.; Wilson, W. J.

    1995-07-01

    Rain profile retrieval from spaceborne radar is difficult because of the presence of attenuation at the higher frequencies planned for these systems. One way to reduce the ambiguity in the retrieved rainfall profile is to use the path-integrated attenuation as a constraint. Two techniques for measuring the path-integrated attenuation have been proposed: the radar surface reference technique and microwave radiometry. We compare these two techniques using data acquired by the Airborne Rain Mapping Radar (ARMAR) 13.8-GHz airborne radar and radiometer during the Tropical Ocean-Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) in the western Pacific Ocean in early 1993. The two techniques have a mean difference close to zero for both nadir and 10° incidence. The RMS difference is 1.4 dB and is reduced to 1 dB or less if points where the radiometer was likely saturated are excluded. Part of the RMS difference can be attributed to variability in the ocean surface cross section due to wind effects and possibly rain effects. The results presented here are relevant for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, which will include a 13.8-GHz precipitation radar.

  17. P-wave velocity structure of the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan: Results from the ACTS wide-angle seismic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Berthet, T.; Lallemand, S.; Schnurle, P.; Lee, C.-S.; Liu, C.-S.; McIntosh, K.; Theunissen, T.

    2012-11-01

    An active seismic experiment has been conducted across the southern Ryukyu margin east of Taiwan over the whole trench-arc-backarc system in May 2009. Twenty-four ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed from the Ryukyu trench to the southern Okinawa trough over the Ryukyu arc and forearc. Wide angle seismic data were recorded by the OBS array while coincident reflection seismic data were acquired using a 6 km long streamer and a 6600 cubic inch seismic airgun array. Results from tomographic inversion of 21091 travel time picks along this line allowed us to image crustal structures of the Ryukyu margin down to a depth of 25 km. The transect has been designed to provide a better seismic velocity structure of the subduction zone in a highly deformed area that has produced an M8 earthquake in 1920. The line crosses a seismic cluster of earthquakes which source mechanisms are still poorly understood. The subducting oceanic crust of the Huatung Basin is about 5-6 km thick. The underlying mantle exhibits low seismic velocities around 7.8 km/s suggesting some hydrothermal alterations or alteration of the upper mantle through faults generated by the flexure of the subducting plate as it enters the subduction. Low velocities, up to 4.5 km/s, associated with the accretionary wedge are well imaged from the trench back to the Nanao forearc. A major result concerns the abrupt termination of the buttress at the rear of the accretionary wedge. Despite the low resolution of the tomographic inversion near the subduction interface, several lines of evidence supporting the presence of a low velocity zone beneath the toe of the forearc buttress could be established. The Moho beneath the Ryukyu non-volcanic arc is located at a depth around 25 km depth.

  18. Sun-view angle effects on reflectance factors of corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sun and view angles on reflectance factors of corn (Zea mays L.) canopies ranging from the six leaf stage to harvest maturity were studied on the Purdue University Agronomy Farm by a multiband radiometer. The two methods of acquiring spectral data, the truck system and the tower systrem, are described. The analysis of the spectral data is presented in three parts: solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at nadir; solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at a fixed sun angle; and both sun and view angles effect on reflectance factors. The analysis revealed that for nadir-viewed reflectance factors there is a strong solar angle dependence in all spectral bands for canopies with low leaf area index. Reflectance factors observed from the sun angle at different view azimuth angles showed that the position of the sensor relative to the sun is important in determining angular reflectance characteristics. For both sun and view angles, reflectance factors are maximized when the sensor view direction is towards the sun.

  19. The inference of atmospheric ozone using satellite nadir measurements in the 1042/cm band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    A description and detailed analysis of a technique for inferring atmospheric ozone information from satellite nadir measurements in the 1042 cm band are presented. A method is formulated for computing the emission from the lower boundary under the satellite which circumvents the difficult analytical problems caused by the presence of atmospheric clouds and the watervapor continuum absorption. The inversion equations are expanded in terms of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a least-squares-solution matrix, and an analysis is performed to determine the information content of the radiance measurements. Under favorable conditions there are only two pieces of independent information available from the measurements: (1) the total ozone and (2) the altitude of the primary maximum in the ozone profile.

  20. Seismic Refraction & Wide-angle Reflection Experiment on the Northern Margin of North China Craton -Data Acquisition and Preliminary Processing Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gao, R.; Keller, G. R.; Hou, H.; Li, Q.; Cox, C. M.; Chang, J. C.; Zhang, J.; Guan, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The evolution history of Central Asian Orogen Belt (CAOB) is still the main tectonic problems in northeastern Asia. The Siberia Craton (NC), North China Craton (NCC) and several blocks collided, and the resulting tectonic collage formed as the Paleo-Asian Ocean disappeared. Concerning the northern margin of North China Craton, many different geological questions remain unanswered, such as: the intracontinental orogenic process in the Yanshan orogen and the nature and location of the suture between the southern NC and the northern NCC. In Dec 2009, a 400 km long seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profile was completed jointly by Institute of Geology, CAGS and University of Oklahoma. The survey line extended from the west end of the Yanshan orogen, across a granitoid belt to the Solonker suture zone. The recording of seismic waves from 8 explosions (500~1500 kg each) was conducted in four deployments of 300 Reftek125 (Texan) seismic recorders, with an average spacing of 1 km. For the calculations, we used the Rayinvr, Vmed and Zplot programs for ray tracing, model modification and phase picking. The initial result show that: 1)the depth of low velocity sediment cover ranges from 0.6 to 2.7 km (velocity: 2.8~5.6 km/s); 2)the depth of basement is 5.6~10 km (the depth of basement under the granitoid belt deepens to 10 km and velocity increases to 6.2 km/s); 3)the upper crust extends to a depth of 15.5~21 km and has the P-wave velocities between 5.6 and 6.4 km/s; 4)the thickness of the lower crust ranges from 22~28 km(velocity: 6.4~6.9 km/s); and 5)the depth of Moho varies from 39.5 km under the granitoid belt to 49 km under the Yanshan orogen. Based on these results, we can preliminarily deduce that: 1) the concave depression of the Moho observed represents the root of the Yanshan orogen, and it may prove that the orogen is dominated by thick-skinned tectonics; 2) the shape of velocity variations under the granitoid belt is suggestive of a magma conduit. It

  1. Retrieval and monitoring of atmospheric trace gas concentrations in nadir and limb geometry using the space-borne SCIAMACHY instrument.

    PubMed

    Sierk, B; Richter, A; Rozanov, A; Von Savigny, Ch; Schmoltner, A M; Buchwitz, M; Bovensmann, H; Burrows, J P

    2006-09-01

    The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) onboard the European Envisat spacecraft performs continuous spectral observations of reflected, scattered and transmitted sunlight in various observation geometries. A unique feature of SCIAMACHY is the capability of probing the atmosphere in three different observation geometries:The nadir, limb, and occultation measurement modes. In nadir mode, column densities of trace gases are retrieved with a spatial resolution of typically 30 x 60 km using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Platt and Perner, 1983). Alternating with the nadir measurement, vertical profiles of absorber concentration in the stratosphere are derived in limb and occultation. In this paper we present an overview over some applications of SCIAMACHY data in space-based monitoring of atmospheric pollution. The DOAS algorithms for the retrieval of total column amounts from nadir spectra are briefly described and case studies of pollution events are presented. We also illustrate the technique used to derive stratospheric concentration profiles from limb observations and show comparisons with other remote sensing systems. Special emphasis will be given to techniques, which take advantage of SCIAMACHY's different viewing geometries. In particular, we will discuss the potential and limits of strategies to infer tropospheric abundances of O3 and NO2. PMID:16715354

  2. Retrieval and monitoring of atmospheric trace gas concentrations in nadir and limb geometry using the space-borne SCIAMACHY instrument.

    PubMed

    Sierk, B; Richter, A; Rozanov, A; Von Savigny, Ch; Schmoltner, A M; Buchwitz, M; Bovensmann, H; Burrows, J P

    2006-09-01

    The Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) onboard the European Envisat spacecraft performs continuous spectral observations of reflected, scattered and transmitted sunlight in various observation geometries. A unique feature of SCIAMACHY is the capability of probing the atmosphere in three different observation geometries:The nadir, limb, and occultation measurement modes. In nadir mode, column densities of trace gases are retrieved with a spatial resolution of typically 30 x 60 km using the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique (Platt and Perner, 1983). Alternating with the nadir measurement, vertical profiles of absorber concentration in the stratosphere are derived in limb and occultation. In this paper we present an overview over some applications of SCIAMACHY data in space-based monitoring of atmospheric pollution. The DOAS algorithms for the retrieval of total column amounts from nadir spectra are briefly described and case studies of pollution events are presented. We also illustrate the technique used to derive stratospheric concentration profiles from limb observations and show comparisons with other remote sensing systems. Special emphasis will be given to techniques, which take advantage of SCIAMACHY's different viewing geometries. In particular, we will discuss the potential and limits of strategies to infer tropospheric abundances of O3 and NO2.

  3. Results from 1984 airborne Doppler lidar wind measurement program. Flight 6: Analysis of line-of-sight elevation angle errors and apparent Doppler velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    During the summer of 1984 the Marshall Space Flight Center's Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) made a series of wind measurements in the California Central Valley. This study quantifies the lidar beam angle errors and velocity errors through analysis of ground return signals. Line-of-sight elevation (LOSE) angle errors are under 1 deg. Apparent Doppler ground velocities, as large as 2m/s, are considerably less than in a previous flight experiment in 1981. No evidence was found of a Schuler resonance phenomenon common to inertial navigation systems (INS), however the aperiodic nature of the apparent velocities implies an error in the INS-derived ground speeds. Certain features and subtleties in the ground returns are explained in terms of atmospheric structure and characteristics of the ADLS hardware and software. Finally, least squares and low-pass filtering techniques are suggested for eliminating errors during post-processing.

  4. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) study of "two-line" ferrihydrite structure: Effect of arsenate sorption and counterion variation and comparison with EXAFS results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Rea, B.A.; Davis, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements have been made on a suite of "two-line" ferrihydrite (FHY2) samples containing varying amounts of coprecipitated arsenate. Samples prepared at pH 8 with counter ions chloride, nitrate, and a mixture of both also were examined. The raw WAXS scattering functions show that "two-line" ferrihydrite actually has a large number of non-Bragg (i.e., diffuse scattering) maxima up to our observation limit of 16 A??-1. The type of counter ion used during synthesis produces no significant change in this function. In unarsenated samples, Radial Distribution Functions (RDFs) produced from the scattering functions show a well-defined Fe-O peak at 2.02 A?? in excellent agreement with the mean distance of 2.01 A?? from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. The area under the Fe-O peak is consistent with only octahedral oxygen coordination about iron, and an iron coordination about oxygen of 2.2, in agreement with the EXAFS results, the sample composition, and XANES measurements. The second peak observed in the RDFs is clearly divided into two populations of correlations, at 3.07 and 3.52 A??, respectively. These distances are close to the EXAFS-derived Fe-Fe subshell distances of 3.02-3.05 and 3.43-3.46 A??, respectively, though this is misleading as the RDF peaks also include contributions from O-Fe and O-O correlations. Simulated RDFs of the FeOOH polymorphs indicate how the observed RDF structure relates to the EXAFS pair-correlation function, and allow comparisons with an ordered ferrihydrite structure. The effect of increasing arsenate content is dramatic, as the RDF peaks are progressively smeared out, indicating a wider range of interatomic distances even at moderate surface coverages, and a loss of longer range correlations. At an As/Fe ratio of 0.68, the surface saturation level of arsenate, the RDF shows little order beyond what would be expected from small pieces of dioctahedral Fe oxyhydroxyl chains or

  5. Characteristics of Deep Tropical and Subtropical Convection from Nadir-Viewing High-Altitude Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Li, Lihua; Guimond, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents observations of deep convection characteristics in the tropics and subtropics that have been classified into four categories: tropical cyclone, oceanic, land, and sea breeze. Vertical velocities in the convection were derived from Doppler radar measurements collected during several NASA field experiments from the nadir-viewing high-altitude ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP). Emphasis is placed on the vertical structure of the convection from the surface to cloud top (sometimes reaching 18-km altitude). This unique look at convection is not possible from other approaches such as ground-based or lower-altitude airborne scanning radars. The vertical motions from the radar measurements are derived using new relationships between radar reflectivity and hydrometeor fall speed. Various convective properties, such as the peak updraft and downdraft velocities and their corresponding altitude, heights of reflectivity levels, and widths of reflectivity cores, are estimated. The most significant findings are the following: 1) strong updrafts that mostly exceed 15 m/s, with a few exceeding 30 m/s, are found in all the deep convection cases, whether over land or ocean; 2) peak updrafts were almost always above the 10-km level and, in the case of tropical cyclones, were closer to the 12-km level; and 3) land-based and sea-breeze convection had higher reflectivities and wider convective cores than oceanic and tropical cyclone convection. In addition, the high-resolution EDOP data were used to examine the connection between reflectivity and vertical velocity, for which only weak linear relationships were found. The results are discussed in terms of dynamical and microphysical implications for numerical models and future remote sensors.

  6. AIRS and Full-Resolution CrIS: Comparison Using Tropical Simultaneous Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Manning, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    AIRS on EOS-Aqua and CrIS on Suomi NPP are two hyperspectral infrared sounders with similar capabilities and orbits, so there is a great opportunity to compare their absolute calibration while they are both in orbit. This insures that long-term climate record can be created by concatenating the two instrument records. There are significant differences in instrument architecture which may lead to subtle differences and complicate any attempt to combine the records. We use Tropical Simultaneous Nadir Observations (TSNOs), cases where both instruments are looking nearly at the same place at the same time, to explore the differences. Differences are explored as a function of wavelength, day vs. night, land vs. ocean, and different levels of cloudiness. Differences unique to the design of each instrument are seen. With the currently available AIRS L1c and CrIS CCAST calibrated data radiometric differences as large a 0.3K are seen. These differences need to be corrected or at least flagged to prevent them from becoming artifacts in a long-term climate record.

  7. A New Radiometric Calibration Paradigm for the OMPS Nadir Total Column and Profile Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Donald; Georgiew, Georgi

    2011-01-01

    A fused silica Mie Scattering Diffuser (MSD) has been developed at Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp. that has measured characteristics which could be used to increase the accuracy of the spectral albedo calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir ozone total column and profile instrument by almost an order of magnitude. Measurements have been made of the optical characteristics on both natural and synthetic forms of fused silica MSDs. Preliminary measurements suggest that MSDs are useable in the solar reflective wavelength region from 250 nm to 3.7 m. To date synthetic and natural MSDs have been irradiated for 60 hours of UV radiation from a solar simulator, and synthetic MSDs have been irradiated with increasing doses of Co-60 gamma rays at 30, 500 krads up to 1.5 Mrads, and 30 krads of 200 MeV protons. The principal effects have been small loses in transmittance at wavelengths < 350 nm. The high energy particle irradiation measurements were provided by Neal Nickles and Dean Spieth.

  8. Modelling Steep Surfaces by Various Configurations of Nadir and Oblique Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, V.; Franzini, M.

    2016-06-01

    Among the parts of the territory requiring periodical and careful monitoring, many have steep surfaces: quarries, river basins, land-slides, dangerous mountainsides. Aerial photogrammetry based on lightweight unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is rapidly becoming the tool of election to survey limited areas of land with a high level of detail. Aerial photogrammetry is traditionally based on vertical images and only recently the use of significantly inclined imagery has been considered. Oblique photogrammetry presents peculiar aspects and offers improved capabilities for steep surface reconstruction. Full comprehension of oblique photogrammetry still requires research efforts and the evaluation of diverse case studies. In the present paper, the focus is on the photogrammetric UAS-based survey of a part of a large sandpit. Various flight configurations are considered: ordinary linear strips, radial strips (as the scarp considered has a semi-circular shape) and curved ones; moreover, nadir looking and oblique image blocks were acquired. Around 300 control points were measured with a topographic total station. The various datasets considered are evaluated in terms of density of the extracted point cloud and in terms of the distance between the reconstructed surface and a number of check points.

  9. Towards a NNORSY Ozone Profile ECV from European Nadir UV/VIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Martin; Kaifel, Anton; Huckle, Roger

    2010-12-01

    The Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) has been adapted and applied to several different satellite instruments, including the backscatter UV/VIS instruments ERS2-GOME, SCIAMACHY and METOP-GOME-2. The retrieved long term ozone field hence spans the years 1995 till now. To provide target data for training the neural networks, the lower parts of the atmosphere are sampled by ozone sondes from the WOUDC and SHADOZ data archives. Higher altitudes are covered by a variety of limb-sounding instruments, including the SAGE and POAM series, HALOE, ACE-FTS and AURA-MLS. In this paper, we show ozone profile time series over the entire time range to demonstrate the "out-of-the-box" consistency and homogeneity of our data across the three different nadir sounders, i.e. without any kind of tuning applied. These features of Essential Climate Variable (ECV) datasets [1] also lie at the heart of the recently announced ESA Climate Change Initiative, to which we hope to contribute in the near future.

  10. Direct estimate of methane radiative forcing by use of nadir spectral radiances.

    PubMed

    Chazette, P; Clerbaux, C; Mégie, G

    1998-05-20

    Direct determination of the radiative forcing of trace gases will be made possible by use of the next generation of nadir-looking spaceborne instruments that provide measurements of atmospheric radiances in the infrared spectral range with improved spectral and spatial resolution. An inversion statistical method has thus been developed and applied to the direct determination of the radiative forcing of methane, based on such instruments as the Fourier-transform Interferometric Monitor for Greenhouse Gases launched onboard the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite in 1996 and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer planned for the European polar platform Meteorological Operational Satellite in 2000. The method is based on simple statistical laws that directly relate the measured radiances to the radiative forcing by use of an a priori selection of appropriate spectral intervals and global modeling of methane spatial variations. This procedure avoids the use of an indirect determination based on an inversion process that requires precise knowledge of the methane vertical profiles throughout the troposphere. The overall accuracy and precision of this new algorithm are studied, and interfering gases and instrumental characteristics are taken into account. It is shown that radiative forcing can be determined at high horizontal spatial resolution with a precision better than 7% in cloud-free conditions and with well-known surface properties.

  11. The feasibility of retrieving vertical temperature profiles from satellite nadir UV observations: A sensitivity analysis and an inversion experiment with neural network algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Del Frate, F.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric temperature profiles are inferred from passive satellite instruments, using thermal infrared or microwave observations. Here we investigate on the feasibility of the retrieval of height resolved temperature information in the ultraviolet spectral region. The temperature dependence of the absorption cross sections of ozone in the Huggins band, in particular in the interval 320-325 nm, is exploited. We carried out a sensitivity analysis and demonstrated that a non-negligible information on the temperature profile can be extracted from this small band. Starting from these results, we developed a neural network inversion algorithm, trained and tested with simulated nadir EnviSat-SCIAMACHY ultraviolet observations. The algorithm is able to retrieve the temperature profile with root mean square errors and biases comparable to existing retrieval schemes that use thermal infrared or microwave observations. This demonstrates, for the first time, the feasibility of temperature profiles retrieval from space-borne instruments operating in the ultraviolet.

  12. Utility of BRDF Models for Estimating Optimal View Angles in Classification of Remotely Sensed Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, P. F.; Donohoe, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    Statistical classification of remotely sensed images attempts to discriminate between surface cover types on the basis of the spectral response recorded by a sensor. It is well known that surfaces reflect incident radiation as a function of wavelength producing a spectral signature specific to the material under investigation. Multispectral and hyperspectral sensors sample the spectral response over tens and even hundreds of wavelength bands to capture the variation of spectral response with wavelength. Classification algorithms then exploit these differences in spectral response to distinguish between materials of interest. Sensors of this type, however, collect detailed spectral information from one direction (usually nadir); consequently, do not consider the directional nature of reflectance potentially detectable at different sensor view angles. Improvements in sensor technology have resulted in remote sensing platforms capable of detecting reflected energy across wavelengths (spectral signatures) and from multiple view angles (angular signatures) in the fore and aft directions. Sensors of this type include: the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), the multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR), and the airborne solid-state array spectroradiometer (ASAS). A goal of this paper, then, is to explore the utility of Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models in the selection of optimal view angles for the classification of remotely sensed images by employing a strategy of searching for the maximum difference between surface BRDFs. After a brief discussion of directional reflect ante in Section 2, attention is directed to the Beard-Maxwell BRDF model and its use in predicting the bidirectional reflectance of a surface. The selection of optimal viewing angles is addressed in Section 3, followed by conclusions and future work in Section 4.

  13. Evaluation of the Sensor Data Record from the Nadir Instruments of the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Liu, Quanhua; Zeng, Jian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng; Caponi, Maria; Flynn, Larry; Jaross, Glen; Sen, Bhaswar; Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Johnsen, William; Janz, Scott; Pan, Chunhui; Niu, Jianguo; Beck, Trevor; Beach, Eric; Yu, Wei; Raja, M. K. Rama Varma; Stuhmer, Derek; Cumpton, Daniel; Owen, Cristina; Li, Wen-Hao

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the first 15 months of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) acquired by the nadir sensors and processed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Interface Data Processing Segment. The evaluation consists of an inter-comparison with a similar satellite instrument, an analysis using a radiative transfer model, and an assessment of product stability. This is in addition to the evaluation of sensor calibration and the Environment Data Record product that are also reported in this Special Issue. All these are parts of synergetic effort to provide comprehensive assessment at every level of the products to ensure its quality. It is found that the OMPS nadir SDR quality is satisfactory for the current Provisional maturity. Methods used in the evaluation are being further refined, developed, and expanded, in collaboration with international community through the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System, to support the upcoming long-term monitoring.

  14. Evaluation of the Sensor Data Record from the nadir instruments of the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Liu, Quanhua; Zeng, Jian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng; Caponi, Maria; Flynn, Larry; Jaross, Glen; Sen, Bhaswar; Buss, Richard H.; Johnsen, William; Janz, Scott; Pan, Chunhui; Niu, Jianguo; Beck, Trevor; Beach, Eric; Yu, Wei; Rama Varma Raja, M. K.; Stuhmer, Derek; Cumpton, Daniel; Owen, Cristina; Li, Wen-Hao

    2014-05-01

    This paper evaluates the first 15 months of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) acquired by the nadir sensors and processed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Interface Data Processing Segment. The evaluation consists of an inter-comparison with a similar satellite instrument, an analysis using a radiative transfer model, and an assessment of product stability. This is in addition to the evaluation of sensor calibration and the Environment Data Record product that are also reported in this Special Issue. All these are parts of synergetic effort to provide comprehensive assessment at every level of the products to ensure its quality. It is found that the OMPS nadir SDR quality is satisfactory for the current Provisional maturity. Methods used in the evaluation are being further refined, developed, and expanded, in collaboration with international community through the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System, to support the upcoming long-term monitoring.

  15. On Orbit Measurement of Response vs. Scan Angle for the Infrared Bands on TRMM/VIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, William L.; Lyu, Cheng-Hsuan; Barnes, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The Visible and Infrared Scanner on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/VIRS) is a whiskbroom imaging radiometer with two reflected solar bands and three emissive infrared bands. All five detectors are on a single cooled focal plane. This configuration necessitated the use of a paddlewheel scan mirror to avoid the effects of focal plane rotation that arise when using a scan mirror that is inclined to its axis of rotation. System radiometric requirements led to the need for protected silver as the mirror surface. Unfortunately, the SiO(x) coatings currently used to protect silver from oxidation introduce a change in reflectance with angle of incidence (AOI). This AOI dependence results in a modulation of system level response with scan angle. Measurement of system response vs. scan angle (RVS) was not difficult for the VIRS reflected solar bands, but attaining the required accuracy for the IR bands in the laboratory was not possible without a large vacuum chamber and a considerable amount of custom designed testing apparatus. Therefore, the decision was made to conduct the measurement on-orbit. On three separate occasions, the TRMM spacecraft was rotated about its pitch axis and, after the nadir view passed over the Earth's limb, the VIRS performed several thousand scans while viewing deep space. The resulting data has been analyzed and the RVS curves generated for the three IR bands are being used in the VIRS radiometric calibration algorithm. This, to our knowledge, the first time this measurement has been made on-orbit. Similar measurements are planned for the EOS-AM and EOS-PM MODIS sensors and are being considered for several systems under development. The VIRS on-orbit results will be compared to VIRS and MODIS system level laboratory measurements, MODIS scan mirror witness sample measurements and modeled data.

  16. Atmospheric correction for ocean spectra retrievals from high-altitude multi-angle, multi-spectral photo-polarimetric remote sensing observations: Results for coastal ocean waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; McCubbin, I.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS.To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed to increase the aerosol information content for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry. However few systematic studies have been performed to quantify the improvement such measurements bring to atmospheric correction. To study the polarimetric atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we conducted field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude (65,000 ft) and ship-based observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and multi-spectral multi-angle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss examples of retrieved atmosphere and ocean state vectors, and of corresponding ocean color spectra obtained by subtracting the computed atmospheric scattering contribution from the high-altitude radiance measurements. The ocean color spectra thus obtained are compared with those measured from the ship.

  17. Crustal Structure Across Coast Shear Zoone in SE Alaska and Western British Columbia: Extension of ACCRETE Wide-Angle Results to 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Morozov, I.; Smithson, S.

    2004-12-01

    The accreted terranes and the continental arc in southeastern Alaska and western British Columbia represent one of the best areas to study crustal structures and processes for the growth of continental crust. In particular, the structure and formation of the Coast Shear Zone (CSZ) and the Coast Mountains Batholith (CMB) is critical for understanding these processes. In 1994, the multidisciplinary ACCRETE project was carried out in this area targeting the structural contrasts across the CSZ. Seismic profiles consist of closely spaced marine air gun shot lines into 3C recording stations on land yielding densely spaced receiver gathers. Present research extends the previous ACCRETE interpretation of the crustal structure across the CSZ into 3D using two additional wide-angle lines. Line 1255, which is perpendicular to the CSZ, extends for ~80 km to the west of the CSZ, and line 1256 extends for ~200 km on the west of the CSZ, approximately parallel to the CSZ. With the basically 2-D data from line 1255 and 3-D data from line 1256 with 4 consecutive stations, a 1-D velocity model is determined to the west of the CSZ. Thereafter, several groups of 1-D models are derived to constrain the variations of the upper crustal structure across and along the strike of CSZ. A 2-D model is then obtained from Moho reflections to constrain the variations of Moho depth across the CSZ. To the west of the CSZ, the crust is modeled as consisting of 4 layers with velocities increasing from ~6.0 km/s in the upper crust to 6.8 km/s near the Moho depth of ~27 km. A shallow Tertiary graben is identified by ~300 ms advances in both the first arrivals and the reflections at the west end of shot line 1255 and the south end of shot line 1256. The observed variations of the Moho depth are in agreement with those obtained previously along the main ACCRETE transect (~27 km to the west and ~32 km to the east of the CSZ), and show that the Moho ramp is characteristic of the CSZ. The upper mantle

  18. Long-term nadir observations of the O2 dayglow by SPICAM IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guslyakova, S.; Fedorova, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Korablev, O.; Montmessin, F.; Trokhimovskiy, A.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The O2(a1Δg) dayglow at the 1.27 μm band on Mars is produced by the solar UV photolysis of ozone and quenched in collisions with CO2. The SPICAM IR instrument onboard the Mars Express orbiter observes the O2(a1Δg) emission in the Martian atmosphere starting from 2004. We present a continuous set of O2(a1Δg) dayglow intensities from nadir measurements for six Martian years from the end of MY26 to MY32. Maximum values of the O2(a1Δg) dayglow reaching 31 MR were observed in early northern and southern springs in both hemispheres. Near the equator a spring maximum of 5-8 MR was observed for all years. The emission intensity is minimum in the Southern hemisphere in summer with values of 1-2 MR. Comparison of the data with GCM simulations and simultaneous ozone measurements by SPICAM UV allows to derive the quenching rate (k) of the excited O2 molecules by CO2, k=0.73×10-20 cm3 molecules-1 s-1. The interannual variation of the O2 emission has been studied after applying correction for the local time. The O2(a1Δg) seasonal pattern is rather stable with average year-to-year relative variation of about 21%, in accord with interannual variations detected from the ground (Krasnopolsky, 2013). The most variable region corresponds to northern and southern spring at middle latitudes, coinciding with sublimation of the polar caps in both hemispheres. Southern latitudes also show a high year-to-year variability in summer (Ls=270-330°) relating to the dust activity in this region. A comparison with simultaneous SPICAM water vapor observations shows that the O2(a1Δg) dayglow depends on the water vapor variations, and clearly confirms their anti-correlation, excepting the case of low and middle latitudes in the aphelion period.

  19. Nadir Testosterone Within First Year of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy (ADT) Predicts for Time to Castration-Resistant Progression: A Secondary Analysis of the PR-7 Trial of Intermittent Versus Continuous ADT

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Laurence; O'Callaghan, Chris; Ding, Keyue; Toren, Paul; Dearnaley, David; Higano, Celestia S.; Horwitz, Eric; Malone, Shawn; Goldenberg, Larry; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Crook, Juanita M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Three small retrospective studies have suggested that patients undergoing continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) have superior survival and time to progression if lower castrate levels of testosterone (< 0.7 nmol/L) are achieved. Evidence from prospective large studies has been lacking. Patients and Methods The PR-7 study randomly assigned patients experiencing biochemical failure after radiation therapy or surgery plus radiation therapy to CAD or intermittent androgen deprivation. The relationship between testosterone levels in the first year and cause-specific survival (CSS) and time to androgen-independent progression in men in the CAD arm was evaluated using Cox regression. Results There was a significant difference in CSS (P = .015) and time to hormone resistance (P = .02) among those who had first-year minimum nadir testosterone ≤ 0.7, > 0.7 to ≤ 1.7, and ≥ 1.7 nmol/L. Patients with first-year nadir testosterone consistently > 0.7 nmol/L had significantly higher risks of dying as a result of disease (0.7 to 1.7 nmol/L: hazard ratio [HR], 2.08; 95% CI, 1.28 to 3.38; > 1.7 nmol/L: HR, 2.93; 95% CI, 0.70 to 12.30) and developing hormone resistance (0.7 to 1.7 nmol/L: HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20 to 2.18; ≥ 1.7 nmol/L: HR, 1.90; 95% CI, 0.77 to 4.70). Maximum testosterone ≥ 1.7 nmol/L predicted for a higher risk of dying as a result of disease (P = .02). Conclusion Low nadir serum testosterone (ie, < 0.7 mmol/L) within the first year of androgen-deprivation therapy correlates with improved CSS and duration of response to androgen deprivation in men being treated for biochemical failure undergoing CAD. PMID:25732157

  20. Off-nadir antenna bias correction using Amazon rain forest sigma deg data. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrer, I. J.; Bracalente, E. M.; Dome, G. J.; Sweet, J.; Berthold, G.; Moore, R. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The radar response from the Amazon rain forest was studied to determine the suitability of this region for use as a standard target to calibrate a scatterometer like that proposed for the National Ocean Satellite System (NOSS). Backscattering observations made by the SEASAT-1 scatterometer system show the Amazon rain forest to be a homogeneous, azimuthally-isotropic, radar target which is insensitive to polarization. The variation with angle of incidence may be adequately modeled as sigma deg (dB) = alpha theta + beta with typical values for the incidence-angle coefficient from 0.07 dB deg to 0.15 dB/deg. A small diurnal effect occurs, with measurements at sunrise being 0.5 dB to 1 dB higher than the rest of the day. Maximum likelihood estimation algorithms are presented which permit determination of relative bias and true pointing angle for each beam. Specific implementation of these algorithms for the proposed NOSS scatterometer system is also discussed.

  1. The topographic effect on spectral response from nadir-pointing sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Justice, C. O.

    1980-01-01

    It is difficult to interpret multispectral Landsat earth resources data in areas of rugged and mountainous terrain because of the topographic effect on the sensor response. The objectives of this study were to examine and quantify the topographic effect on the sensor response from a uniform sand surface, to assess a simple theoretical incidence model for modeling the radiance from the surface, and to simulate Landsat sensor response due to the topographic effect. A field experiment was designed to collect data from a large range of slope angles and aspects at a range of solar elevations, using a hand-held radiometer. Analysis of these data showed that the magnitude of the topographic effect varied as a function of the solar elevation, the azimuthal orientation of the slope, and the slope inclination. The field measured variations in spectral response were found to have generally strong correlations with the theoretical model, and it was shown that the applicability of the Lambertian assumption varied within and between data sets. It is concluded that if slope angle, aspect, and solar zenith angle and azimuth are known, a technique incorporating a model to reduce the topographic effect prior to multispectral classification may be developed.

  2. Off-nadir antenna bias correction using Amazon rain sigma(0) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrer, I. J.; Dome, G. J.; Sweet, J.; Berthold, G.; Moore, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The radar response from the Amazon rain forest was studied to determine the suitability of this region for use as a standard target to calibrate a scatterometer like that proposed for the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS). Backscattering observations made by the SEASAT Scatterometer System (SASS) showed the Amazon rain forest to be a homogeneous, azimuthally-isotropic, radar target which was insensitive to polarization. The variation with angle of incidence was adequately modeled as scattering coefficient (dB) = a theta b with typical values for the incidence-angle coefficient from 0.07 to 0.15 dB/deg. A small diurnal effect occurs, with measurements at sunrise being 0.5 dB to 1 dB higher than the rest of the day. Maximum-likelihood estimation algorithms presented here permit determination of relative bias and true pointing angle for each beam. Specific implementation of these algorithms for the proposed NOSS scatterometer system is also discussed.

  3. MISR Multi-angle Views of Sunday Morning Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Hot, dry Santa Ana winds began blowing through the Los Angeles and San Diego areas on Sunday October 21, 2007. Wind speeds ranging from 30 to 50 mph were measured in the area, with extremely low relative humidities. These winds, coupled with exceptionally dry conditions due to lack of rainfall resulted in a number of fires in the Los Angeles and San Diego areas, causing the evacuation of more than 250,000 people.

    These two images show the Southern California coast from Los Angeles to San Diego from two of the nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the NASA EOS Terra satellite. These images were obtained around 11:35 a.m. PDT on Sunday morning, October 21, 2007 and show a number of plumes extending out over the Pacific ocean. In addition, locations identified as potential hot spots from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the same satellite are outlined in red.

    The left image is from MISR's nadir looking camera and the plumes appear very faint. The image on the right is from MISR's 60o forward looking camera, which accentuates the amount of light scattered by aerosols in the atmosphere, including smoke and dust. Both these images are false color and contain information from MISR's red, green, blue and near-infrared wavelengths, which makes vegetated land appear greener than it would naturally. Notice in the right hand image that the color of the plumes associated with the MODIS hot spots is bluish, while plumes not associated with hot spots appear more yellow. This is because the latter plumes are composed of dust kicked up by the strong Santa Ana winds. In some locations along Interstate 5 on this date, visibility was severely reduced due to blowing dust. MISR's multiangle and multispectral capability give it the ability to distinguish smoke from dust in this situation.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days

  4. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  5. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  6. The measurement of boundary layers on a compressor blade in cascade at high positive incidence angle. 1: Experimental techniques and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, S.; Zierke, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the mean velocity and turbulence intensity were made using a one-component laser Doppler velocimeter in the boundary layer and near wake about a double circular arc, compressor blade in cascade. The measurements were made at a chord Reynolds number of 500,000. Boundary layer measurements on the pressure surface indicate a transition region over the last 40% of the chord. A small separation bubble near the leading edge of the suction surface results in an immediate transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The non-equilibrium turbulent boundary layer separates near the trailing edge of the suction surface. Similarity of the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer ceases to exist in the separated region. Also, similarity does not hold in the near-wake region, a region which includes negative mean velocities because of the separation near the trailing edge on the suction surface.

  7. Round-robin evaluation of nadir ozone profile retrievals: methodology and application to MetOp-A GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Granville, J.; Miles, G.; Siddans, R.; van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Delcloo, A.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Kivi, R.; Stübi, R.; Zehner, C.

    2014-11-01

    A methodology for the round-robin evaluation and geophysical validation of ozone profile data retrieved from nadir UV backscatter satellite measurements is detailed and discussed, consisting of dataset content studies, information content studies, co-location studies, and comparisons with reference measurements. Within ESA's Climate Change Initiative on ozone (Ozone_cci project), the proposed round-robin procedure is applied to two nadir ozone profile datasets retrieved at KNMI and RAL, using their respective OPERA v1.26 and RAL v2.1 optimal estimation algorithms, from MetOp-A GOME-2 measurements taken in 2008. The ground-based comparisons use ozonesonde and lidar profiles as reference data, acquired by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde programme (SHADOZ), and other stations of WMO's Global Atmosphere Watch. This direct illustration highlights practical issues that inevitably emerge from discrepancies in e.g. profile representation and vertical smoothing, for which different recipes are investigated and discussed. Several approaches for information content quantification, vertical resolution estimation, and reference profile resampling are compared and applied as well. The paper concludes with compliance estimates of the two GOME-2 ozone profile datasets with user requirements from GCOS and from climate modellers.

  8. Round-robin evaluation of nadir ozone profile retrievals: methodology and application to MetOp-A GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Granville, J.; Miles, G.; Siddans, R.; van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Delcloo, A.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Kivi, R.; Stubi, R.; Zehner, C.

    2015-05-01

    A methodology for the round-robin evaluation and the geophysical validation of ozone profile data retrieved from nadir UV backscatter satellite measurements is detailed and discussed, consisting of data set content studies, information content studies, co-location studies, and comparisons with reference measurements. Within the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative on ozone (Ozone_cci project), the proposed round-robin procedure is applied to two nadir ozone profile data sets retrieved at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL, United Kingdom), using their respective OPERA v1.26 and RAL v2.1 optimal estimation algorithms, from MetOp-A GOME-2 (i.e. the second generation Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment on the first Meteorological Operational Satellite) measurements taken in 2008. The ground-based comparisons use ozonesonde and lidar profiles as reference data, acquired by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde programme (SHADOZ), and other stations of the World Meteorological Organisation's Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO GAW). This direct illustration highlights practical issues that inevitably emerge from discrepancies in e.g. profile representation and vertical smoothing, for which different recipes are investigated and discussed. Several approaches for information content quantification, vertical resolution estimation, and reference profile resampling are compared and applied as well. The paper concludes with compliance estimates of the two GOME-2 ozone profile data sets with user requirements from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and from climate modellers.

  9. Effects of skylight polarization, cloudiness, and view angle on the detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three passive radiometric techniques, which use the contrast of sunlight reflected and backscattered from oil and water in specific wavelength regions, have potential application for remote sensing of oil spills. These techniques consist of measuring (1) total radiance, (2) the polarization components (normal and parallel) of radiance, and (3) the difference between the normal and parallel components. In this paper, the best view directions for these techniques are evaluated, conclusions are drawn as to the most promising technique, and explanations are developed to describe why previous total-radiance measurements yielded highest contrast between oil and water under overcast skies. The technique based on measurement of only the normal polorization component appears to be the most promising. The differential technique should be further investigated because of its potential to reduce the component of backscattered light from below the surface of the water. Measurements should be made about 45 deg nadir view angle in the direction opposite the sun. Overcast sky conditions provide a higher intensity of skylight relative to clear sky conditions and a lower intensity of backscatter within the water relative to surface reflectance. These factors result in higher contrast between oil and water under overcast skies.

  10. The Feasibility of Tropospheric and Total Ozone Determination Using a Fabry-perot Interferometer as a Satellite-based Nadir-viewing Atmospheric Sensor. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen Maurice

    1993-01-01

    Monitoring of the global distribution of tropospheric ozone (O3) is desirable for enhanced scientific understanding as well as to potentially lessen the ill-health impacts associated with exposure to elevated concentrations in the lower atmosphere. Such a capability can be achieved using a satellite-based device making high spectral resolution measurements with high signal-to-noise ratios; this would enable observation in the pressure-broadened wings of strong O3 lines while minimizing the impact of undesirable signal contributions associated with, for example, the terrestrial surface, interfering species, and clouds. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) provides high spectral resolution and high throughput capabilities that are essential for this measurement task. Through proper selection of channel spectral regions, the FPI optimized for tropospheric O3 measurements can simultaneously observe a stratospheric component and thus the total O3 column abundance. Decreasing stratospheric O3 concentrations may lead to an increase in biologically harmful solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface, which is detrimental to health. In this research, a conceptual instrument design to achieve the desired measurement has been formulated. This involves a double-etalon fixed-gap series configuration FPI along with an ultra-narrow bandpass filter to achieve single-order operation with an overall spectral resolution of approximately .068 cm(exp -1). A spectral region of about 1 cm(exp -1) wide centered at 1054.73 cm(exp -1) within the strong 9.6 micron ozone infrared band is sampled with 24 spectral channels. Other design characteristics include operation from a nadir-viewing satellite configuration utilizing a 9 inch (diameter) telescope and achieving horizontal spatial resolution with a 50 km nadir footprint. A retrieval technique has been implemented and is demonstrated for a tropical atmosphere possessing enhanced tropospheric ozone amounts. An error analysis

  11. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  12. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  13. Multi-Angle View of the Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A multi-angle view of the Canary Islands in a dust storm, 29 February 2000. At left is a true-color image taken by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. This image was captured by the MISR camera looking at a 70.5-degree angle to the surface, ahead of the spacecraft. The middle image was taken by the MISR downward-looking (nadir) camera, and the right image is from the aftward 70.5-degree camera. The images are reproduced using the same radiometric scale, so variations in brightness, color, and contrast represent true variations in surface and atmospheric reflectance with angle. Windblown dust from the Sahara Desert is apparent in all three images, and is much brighter in the oblique views. This illustrates how MISR's oblique imaging capability makes the instrument a sensitive detector of dust and other particles in the atmosphere. Data for all channels are presented in a Space Oblique Mercator map projection to facilitate their co-registration. The images are about 400 km (250 miles)wide, with a spatial resolution of about 1.1 kilometers (1,200 yards). North is toward the top. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  14. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  15. The First Eighteen Months of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2): Mission Status, Error Characterization, and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    OCO-2 began taking science data in September 2014 and continues to operate well, returning nearly 1 million observations per day. Approximately 10% of these are sufficiently free of cloud and aerosol contamination to allow for an accurate determination of the column mean carbon dioxide dry air mole fraction, XCO2. The measurements have relatively low noise, of order 0.5-1.0 ppm for most nadir soundings over land and sun-glint geometry soundings over water surfaces. A number of changes have been made to the observing strategy to maintain performance and enhance the science quality of the data: change in glint yaw angle in October 2014, change in nadir glint cycling in July 2015, change to nadir yaw and glint orbit optimization in late 2015, in addition to periodic instrument cyclings. In this presentation, we will summarize the data quality enabled via comparison to a number of validation metrics, discuss the current health and long-term prospects for the instrument, and give an overview of some early science results from the first 18 months of observations. While XCO2 and other products are still being validated to identify and correct biases, OCO-2's XCO2 observations are starting to reveal the most robust features of the atmospheric carbon cycle. At regional scales, fluxes from the eastern U.S. and China are most clear in the fall, when the north-south XCO2 gradient is small. Enhanced XCO2 coincident with biomass burning in the some parts of the tropics, in particular central Africa, is also obvious in the fall. The annual growth rate of CO2 was anomalously high in 2015 according to OCO-2, consistent with NOAA surface measurements and in accord with the warmer annual average surface temperature that year. This was also apparent in the decreased northern hemisphere summer uptake, likely due to anomalously warm boreal temperatures in the northern hemisphere summer of 2015.

  16. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  17. Multi-Angle Views of the Appalachian Mountains, 6 March 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The true-color image at left is a downward-looking (nadir) view of the eastern United States, stretching from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The three images to the right are also in true-color, taken by the forward 45.6-degree, 60.0-degree, and 70.5-degree cameras, respectively, of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. As the slant angle increases, the line-of-sight through the atmosphere grows longer, and a pall of haze over the Appalachians becomes progressively more apparent. You can see a similar effect by scanning from near-nadir to the horizon when standing on a mountain top or looking out an airplane window. MISR uses this multi-angle technique to monitor particulate pollution and to distinguish different types of haze. These observations reveal how airborne particles are interacting with sunlight, a measure of their impact on Earth's climate system. The images are about 400 km (250 miles) wide, and the spatial resolution is 1.1 kilometers (1,200 yards). North is toward the top. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  18. Individualized optimal release angles in discus throwing.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Steve; Liu, Hui; Hubbard, Mont; Yu, Bing

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine individualized optimal release angles for elite discus throwers. Three-dimensional coordinate data were obtained for at least 10 competitive trials for each subject. Regression relationships between release speed and release angle, and between aerodynamic distance and release angle were determined for each subject. These relationships were linear with subject-specific characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between release speed and release angle may be due to subjects' technical and physical characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between aerodynamic distance and release angle may be due to interactions between the release angle, the angle of attack, and the aerodynamic distance. Optimal release angles were estimated for each subject using the regression relationships and equations of projectile motion. The estimated optimal release angle was different for different subjects, and ranged from 35 degrees to 44 degrees . The results of this study demonstrate that the optimal release angle for discus throwing is thrower-specific. The release angles used by elite discus throwers in competition are not necessarily optimal for all discus throwers, or even themselves. The results of this study provide significant information for understanding the biomechanics of discus throwing techniques.

  19. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  20. The Retroacetabular Angle Determines the Safe Angle for Screw Placement in Posterior Acetabular Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Ayman M. A.; Oxland, Thomas R.; O'Brien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A method for the determination of safe angles for screws placed in the posterior acetabular wall based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) is described. It defines a retroacetabular angle and determines its variation in the population. Methods. The retroacetabular angle is the angle between the retroacetabular surface and the tangent to the posterior acetabular articular surface. Screws placed through the marginal posterior wall at an angle equal to the retroacetabular angle are extraarticular. Medial screws can be placed at larger angles whose difference from the retroacetabular angle is defined as the allowance angles. CT scans of all patients with acetabular fractures treated in our institute between September 2002 to July 2007 were used to measure the retroacetabular angle and tangent. Results. Two hundred thirty one patients were included. The average (range) age was 42 (15–74) years. The average (range) retroacetabular angle was 39 (30–47) degrees. The average (range) retroacetabular tangent was 36 (30–45) mm. Conclusions. Placing the screws at an average (range) angle of 39 (33–47) degrees of anterior inclination with the retroacetabular surface makes them extraarticular. Angles for medial screws are larger. Safe angles can be calculated preoperatively with a computer program. PMID:24959359

  1. Metrology of angles in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    2004-10-01

    In astronomy, measurements of angles play a major role. After defining the units in use in astronomy, three methods of measuring angles are presented, with an application to the transit instrument. The interferometric techniques for measuring large angles are described in optical and radio wavelengths. Due to the atmospheric and mechanical limitation on ground, space astrometry has multiple advantages. The satellite Hipparcos is described and the data reduction procedures and results obtained are sketched. In the future, two new astrometric space missions are approved: GAIA, based on Hipparcos principles and SIM, a space interferometer. They are described and the expected accuracies are presented. To cite this article: J. Kovalevsky, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  2. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  3. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  4. What’s your angle? Using sun angle and look angle to improve carbon flux estimates from optical remote sensing. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Most optical remote sensing remains focused on single-pass nadir views near solar noon, yet optical signals related to carbon uptake (physiological retrievals) are strongly influenced by sun and look angle. Additionally, a long history of remote sensing research into these angular effects (e.g. BRDF studies) indicate a strong angular dependence of vegetation reflectance signatures that clearly affect our ability to model carbon exchange using vegetation indices derived from remote sensing. The structural and physiological aspects of these angular effects have not always been treated in an integrated way within the remote sensing or carbon modeling communities. This presentation will review recent findings suggesting that consideration of combined physiological and structural aspects of angular effects can improve physiological retrievals of optical signals related to biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange. Using several vegetation indices (NDVI, PRI and WBI) as examples, this presentation will offer suggestions for how carbon flux models can benefit from further consideration of sun and look angle effects in optical remote sensing. Key challenges for further research and suggestions for operational solutions will also be presented.

  5. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  6. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  7. Sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of UTLS secondary sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring upper-tropospheric-lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS sulfate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulfuric acid/water droplets, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulfate and bisulfate ions and the undissociated sulfuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulfuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interfering parameters like the ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile uncertainties

  8. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  9. Tropical tropospheric ozone columns from nadir retrievals of GOME-1/ERS-2, SCIAMACHY/Envisat, and GOME-2/MetOp-A (1996-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventidou, Elpida; Eichmann, Kai-Uwe; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P.

    2016-07-01

    Tropical tropospheric ozone columns are retrieved with the convective cloud differential (CCD) technique using total ozone columns and cloud parameters from different European satellite instruments. Monthly-mean tropospheric column amounts [DU] are calculated by subtracting the above-cloud ozone column from the total column. A CCD algorithm (CCD_IUP) has been developed as part of the verification algorithm developed for TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) on Sentinel 5-precursor (S5p) mission, which was applied to GOME/ERS-2 (1995-2003), SCIAMACHY/Envisat (2002-2012), and GOME-2/MetOp-A (2007-2012) measurements. Thus a unique long-term record of monthly-mean tropical tropospheric ozone columns (20° S-20° N) from 1996 to 2012 is now available. An uncertainty estimation has been performed, resulting in a tropospheric ozone column uncertainty less than 2 DU ( < 10 %) for all instruments. The dataset has not been yet harmonised into one consistent; however, comparison between the three separate datasets (GOME/SCIAMACHY/GOME-2) shows that GOME-2 overestimates the tropical tropospheric ozone columns by about 8 DU, while SCIAMACHY and GOME are in good agreement. Validation with Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) data shows that tropospheric ozone columns from the CCD_IUP technique and collocated integrated ozonesonde profiles from the surface up to 200 hPa are in good agreement with respect to range, interannual variations, and variances. Biases within ±5 DU and root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of less than 10 DU are found for all instruments. CCD comparisons using SCIAMACHY data with tropospheric ozone columns derived from limb/nadir matching have shown that the bias and RMS deviation are within the range of the CCD_IUP comparison with the ozonesondes. The 17-year dataset can be helpful for evaluating chemistry models and performing climate change studies.

  10. A comparison of superresolution reconstruction methods for multi-angle CHRIS/Proba images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jonathan Cheung-Wai; Ma, Jianglin; Canters, Frank

    2008-10-01

    Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Project for On-board Autonomy, or CHRIS/Proba, represents a new generation of satellite images that provide different acquisitions of the same scene at five different angles. Given the hyperspectral-oriented waveband configuration of the CHRIS images, the scope of its application would be much wider if the present 17m nadir resolution could be refined. This paper presents the results of three superresolution methods applied to multiangular CHRIS/Proba data. The CHRIS images were preprocessed and then calibrated into reflectance using the method described in [1][2]. Automatic registration using an intensity variation approach described in [3] was implemented for motion estimation. Three methods, namely non-uniform interpolation and de-convolution [4], iterative back-projection [5], and total variation [6] are examined. Quantitative measures including peak signal to noise ratio [7], structural similarity [8], and edge stability [9], are used for the evaluation of the image quality. To further examine the benefit of multi-frame superresolution methods, a single-frame superresolution method of bicubic resampling was also applied. Our results show that a high resolution image derived from superresolution methods enhance spatial resolution and provides substantially more image details. The spectral profiles of selected land covers before and after the application of superresolution show negligible differences, hinting the use of superresolution algorithm would not degrade the capability of the data set for classification. Among the three methods, total variation gives the best performance in all quantitative measures. Visual inspections find good results with total variation and iterative back-projection approaches. The use of superresolution algorithms, however, is complex as there are many parameters. In this paper, most of the parameter settings were tuned manually or decided empirically.

  11. Signature extension for sun angle, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (Principal Investigator); Berry, J. K.; Heimes, F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Within a restricted zenith sun angle range of 35 - 50 degrees, it was empirically observed that canopy reflectance is mainly Lambertian. Reflectance changes with crop stage were simple shifts in scale in the sun angle range. It was noted that sun angle variations depend on canopy characteristics. Effects of the vegetative canopy were most pronounced at the larger solar zenith angles (20 %). The linear sun angle correction coefficients demonstrate a dependency on both crop stage (15-20 %) and crop type (10-20 %). The use of canopy reflectance modeling allowed for the generation of a simulated data set over an extremely broad envelope of sun angles.

  12. Dynamic-angle spinning without sidebands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, S. L.; Baltisberger, J. H.; Pines, A.

    1993-07-01

    By means of rotor-synchronized π-pulses, it is possible to eliminate the spinning sidebands (while retaining their full intensity in the isotropic centerband) that usually arise in dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR. The theory of this approach, dynamic-angle hopping (DAH-180), is described and illustrated with experimental results on quadrupolar nuclei. A magic-angle hopping (MAH-180) version of magic-angle spinning is also possible and can be used in a two-dimensional NMR experiment to produce sideband-free isotropic—anisotropic correlation spectra for spin- 1/2 nuclei.

  13. SEDIMENTATION IN THE ANGLE CENTRIFUGE.

    PubMed

    Pickels, E G

    1943-01-20

    1. Using hemocyanin from Limulus polyphemus as a test material, the process of sedimentation in the angle centrifuge, operating both in vacuum and in the open air, has been investigated. 2. Sedimentation in a given field of force was found less efficient when centrifugation was conducted in the open air, because of thermal convection. 3. Correlations have been made with results obtained in the analytical ultracentrifuge, and a theory of sedimentation in inclined tubes has been presented to explain the experimental results. 4. It has been shown that under proper conditions the angle centrifuge may be used for approximate determinations of particle size. 5. Recommendations, based mostly on experimental evidence, have been made for improving sedimentation and interpreting results. 6. To counteract convective disturbances of either thermal or inertial origin, a satisfactory method has been developed which consists of furnishing the fluid under study with a synthetic density gradient, formed with sucrose or some other non-sedimentable material.

  14. Neural network cloud screening algorithm Part II: global synthetic cases using high resolution spectra in O2 and CO2 near infrared absorption bands in nadir and sun glint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Thomas E.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2010-03-01

    In Part I a set of two layer feed-forward neural networks, trained via back propagation of sensitivities, was applied to a synthetic set of radiances in micro-windows of the near-infrared to make predictions of cloud water (cw), cloud ice (ci), effective scattering heights of cloud water and ice, (pcw and pci, respectively) and the column water vapor (w). A threshold test, using 2 g/m-2 for cloud water and 10 g/m-2 for cloud ice, was applied to the retrieved values to distinguish clear from cloudy scenes. In that work the discussion was limited to the nadir viewing geometry, and was applied only to land surfaces, excluding desert and snow and ice fields. Part II describes the extension to a set of high resolution radiances, as might be measured by a grating spectrometer from space, in both nadir and sun glint viewing geometries. Furthermore, results are given for all land surface types as well as scenes over ocean. Prior to neural network training, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied to the high resolution spectra, which consist of three bands centered at 0.76μm (O2 A-band), 1.61μm (weak CO2 band) and 2.06μm (strong CO2 band), each with 1016 channels. Analysis shows that the five leading EOFs together capture 99.9% of the variance in each band, reducing the data size by more than two orders of magnitude. Application of the trained neural networks to an independent data set, generated using CloudSat and Calipso cloud and aerosol profiles, as well as carbon dioxide profiles from a chemical transport model, were used to quantify the skill in the retrieval. The results vary significantly with surface type, viewing mode and cloud properties. Accuracies range from 7% to 100% (typically close to 75%), with confidence levels almost always greater than 90%.

  15. Effect of flying altitude, scanning angle and scanning mode on the accuracy of ALS based forest inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, Juha; Maltamo, Matti; Packalen, Petteri

    2016-10-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely used technology in the mapping of environment and forests. Data acquisition costs and the accuracy of the forest inventory are closely dependent on some extrinsic parameters of the ALS survey. These parameters have been assessed in numerous studies about a decade ago, but since then ALS devices have developed and it is possible that previous findings do not hold true with newer technology. That is why, the effect of flying altitudes (2000, 2500 or 3000 m), scanning angles (±15° and ±20° off nadir) and scanning modes (single- and multiple pulses in air) with the area-based approach using a Leica ALS70HA-laser scanner was studied here. The study was conducted in a managed pine-dominated forest area in Finland, where eight separate discrete-return ALS data were acquired. The comparison of datasets was based on the bootstrap approach with 5-fold cross validation. Results indicated that the narrower scanning angle (±15° i.e. 30°) led to slightly more accurate estimates of plot volume (RMSE%: 21-24 vs. 22.5-25) and mean height (RMSE%: 8.5-11 vs. 9-12). We also tested the use case where the models are constructed using one data and then applied to other data gathered with different parameters. The most accurate models were identified using the bootstrap approach and applied to different datasets with and without refitting. The bias increased without refitting the models (bias%: volume 0 ± 10, mean height 0 ± 3), but in most cases the results did not differ much in terms of RMSE%. This confirms previous observations that models should only be used for datasets collected under similar data acquisition conditions. We also calculated the proportions of echoes as a function of height for different echo categories. This indicated that the accuracy of the inventory is affected more by the height distribution than the proportions of echo categories.

  16. Dose to specific subregions of pelvic bone marrow defined with FDG-PET as a predictor of hematologic nadirs during concomitant chemoradiation in anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Arcadipane, Francesca; Ragona, Riccardo; Lesca, Adriana; Gallio, Elena; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Cassoni, Paola; Arena, Vincenzo; Bustreo, Sara; Faletti, Riccardo; Rondi, Nadia; Morino, Mario; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that irradiated volume of specific subregions of pelvic active bone marrow as detected by (18)FDG-PET may be a predictor of decreased blood cells nadirs in anal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation, we analyzed 44 patients submitted to IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Several bony structures were defined: pelvic and lumbar-sacral (LSBM), lower pelvis (LPBM) and iliac (IBM) bone marrow. Active BM was characterized employing (18)FDG-PET and characterized in all subregions as the volume having standard uptake values (SUVs) higher than SUVmean. All other regions were defined as inactive BM. On dose-volume histograms, dosimetric parameters were taken. Endpoints included white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin (Hb) and platelet (Plt) nadirs. Generalized linear modeling was used to find correlations between dosimetric variables and blood cells nadirs. WBC nadir was significantly correlated with LSBM mean dose (β = -1.852; 95 % CI -3.205/-0.500; p = 0.009), V10 (β = -2.153; 95 % CI -4.263/-0.721; p = 0.002), V20 (β = -2.081; 95 % CI -4.880/-0.112; p = 0.003), V30 (β = -1.971; 95 % CI -4.748/-0.090; p = 0.023) and IBM V10 (β = -0.073; 95 % CI -0.106/-0.023; p = 0.016). ANC nadir found to be significantly associated with LSBM V10 (β = -1.878; 95 % CI -4.799/-0.643; p = 0.025), V20 (β = -1.765; 95 % CI -4.050/-0.613; p = 0.030) and IBM V10 (β = -0.039; 95 % CI -0.066/-0.010; p = 0.027). Borderline significance was found for correlation between Plt nadir and LSBM V30 (β = -0.056; 95 % CI -2.748/-0.187; p = 0.060), V40 (β = -0.059; 95 % CI -3.112/-0.150; p = 0.060) and IBM V30 (β = -0.028; 95 % CI -0.074/-0.023; p = 0.056). No inactive BM subsites were found to be correlated with any blood cell nadir. (18)FDG-PET is able to define active bone marrow within pelvic osseous structures. LSBM is the strongest predictor of decreased blood cells

  17. Rain Fallspeeds and Rates Derived from Airborne Nadir-Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, L.; Geerts, Bart

    1999-01-01

    The use of vertical-incidence Doppler velocity in addition to radar reflectivity may yield information on drop size distribution and therefore result in better rainrate estimates. Doppler velocity can provide useful information on the raindrop size distribution. Doppler velocities from a zenith-pointing radar represent the sum of the mean reflectivity-weighted hydrometeor fallspeed and the vertical air motion. Dual-parameter rain estimation methods using the Doppler velocity, require that the latter can be removed, or is negligible. Atlas et al. (1972) derived relations between Doppler velocity, reflectivity, and rain rate assuming an exponential size distribution for rain. Ulbrich (1994) expanded on this work by deriving the relation between the Doppler velocity and the reflectivity assuming a Gamma size distribution. This distribution provides a more realistic representation of the small rain drops. To get accurate information on raindrop size distributions with the above method, the air motions must be removed from the observed Doppler velocities

  18. Measurement of Peak Esophageal Luminal Cross Sectional Area Utilizing Nadir Intraluminal Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) is currently used to monitor gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal bolus clearance. We describe a novel methodology to measure maximal luminal CSA during bolus transport from MII measurements. METHODS Studies were conducted in-vitro (test tubes) and in-vivo (healthy subjects). Concurrent MII, HRM, and intraluminal ultrasound (US) were recorded 7 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallows with two concentrations of saline, 0.1N and 0.5N, of bolus volumes 5cc, 10cc and 15cc were performed. The CSA was estimated by solving two algebraic Ohm’s law equations, resulting from the two saline solutions. The CSA calculated from impedance method was compared with the CSA measured from the intraluminal US images. KEY RESULTS The CSA measured in duplicate from B-mode US images showed a mean difference between the two manual delineations to be near zero, and the repeatability coefficient was within 7.7% of the mean of the two CSA measurements. The calculated CSA from the impedance measurements strongly correlated with the US measured CSA (R2 ≅ 0.98). A detailed statistical analysis of the impedance and US measured CSA data indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between the two methods ranged from −9.1 to 13mm2. The root mean square error (RMS) of the two measurements was 4.8% of the mean US-measured CSA. CONCLUSIONS We describe a novel methodology to measure peak esophageal luminal CSA during peristalsis. Further studies are needed to determine if it is possible to measure patterns of luminal distension during peristalsis across the entire length of the esophagus. PMID:25930157

  19. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  20. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  1. Interferometric measurement of angles.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Harris, O

    1970-07-01

    A new interferometric device for measuring small angles or rotations with high accuracy is described. This instrument works by counting fringes formed by the rotation of a flat-parallel plate of glass illuminated with a collimated beam from a gas laser. Some possible applications are given.

  2. Later endogenous circadian temperature nadir relative to an earlier wake time in older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Klerman, E. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the circadian timing system to the age-related advance of sleep-wake timing was investigated in two experiments. In a constant routine protocol, we found that the average wake time and endogenous circadian phase of 44 older subjects were earlier than that of 101 young men. However, the earlier circadian phase of the older subjects actually occurred later relative to their habitual wake time than it did in young men. These results indicate that an age-related advance of circadian phase cannot fully account for the high prevalence of early morning awakening in healthy older people. In a second study, 13 older subjects and 10 young men were scheduled to a 28-h day, such that they were scheduled to sleep at many circadian phases. Self-reported awakening from scheduled sleep episodes and cognitive throughput during the second half of the wake episode varied markedly as a function of circadian phase in both groups. The rising phase of both rhythms was advanced in the older subjects, suggesting an age-related change in the circadian regulation of sleep-wake propensity. We hypothesize that under entrained conditions, these age-related changes in the relationship between circadian phase and wake time are likely associated with self-selected light exposure at an earlier circadian phase. This earlier exposure to light could account for the earlier clock hour to which the endogenous circadian pacemaker is entrained in older people and thereby further increase their propensity to awaken at an even earlier time.

  3. Detecting blind building façades from highly overlapping wide angle aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burochin, Jean-Pascal; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Mallet, Clément; Brosset, Thomas; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the identification of blind building façades, i.e. façades which have no openings, in wide angle aerial images with a decimeter pixel size, acquired by nadir looking cameras. This blindness characterization is in general crucial for real estate estimation and has, at least in France, a particular importance on the evaluation of legal permission of constructing on a parcel due to local urban planning schemes. We assume that we have at our disposal an aerial survey with a relatively high stereo overlap along-track and across-track and a 3D city model of LoD 1, that can have been generated with the input images. The 3D model is textured with the aerial imagery by taking into account the 3D occlusions and by selecting for each façade the best available resolution texture seeing the whole façade. We then parse all 3D façades textures by looking for evidence of openings (windows or doors). This evidence is characterized by a comprehensive set of basic radiometric and geometrical features. The blindness prognostic is then elaborated through an (SVM) supervised classification. Despite the relatively low resolution of the images, we reach a classification accuracy of around 85% on decimeter resolution imagery with 60 × 40 % stereo overlap. On the one hand, we show that the results are very sensitive to the texturing resampling process and to vegetation presence on façade textures. On the other hand, the most relevant features for our classification framework are related to texture uniformity and horizontal aspect and to the maximal contrast of the opening detections. We conclude that standard aerial imagery used to build 3D city models can also be exploited to some extent and at no additional cost for facade blindness characterisation.

  4. On the effect of emergence angle on emissivity spectra: application to small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; Ferrari, Sabrina; D'Amore, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Dependence of laboratory-measured emissivity spectra from the emergence angle is a subject that still needs a lot of investigations to be fully understood. Most of the previous work is based on reflectance measurements in the VIS-NIR spectral region and on emissivity measurements of flat, solid surfaces (mainly metals), which are not directly applicable to the analysis of remote sensing data. Small bodies in particular (c.f. asteroids Itokawa and 1999JU3, the respective targets of JAXA Hayabusa and Hayabusa 2 missions) have a very irregular surface; hence, the spectra from those rough surfaces are difficult to compare with laboratory spectra, where the observing geometry is always close to "nadir." At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), we have set up a series of spectral measurements to investigate this problem in the 1- to 16-µm spectral region. We measured the emissivity for two asteroid analogue materials (meteorite Millbillillie and a synthetic enstatite) in vacuum and under purged air, at surface temperature of 100 °C, for emergence angles of 0°, 5°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°. Emissivity of a serpentinite slab, already used as calibration target for the MARA instrument on Hayabusa 2 MASCOT lander and for the thermal infrared imager spectrometer on Hayabusa 2 orbiter, was measured under the same conditions. Additionally, a second basalt slab was measured. Both slabs were not measured at 5° inclination. Complementary reflectance measurements of the four samples were taken. For all the samples measured, we found that for calibrated emissivity, significant variations from values obtained at nadir (0° emergence angle) appear only for emergence angles ≥40°. Reflectance measurements confirmed this finding, showing the same trend of variations.

  5. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  6. Angle Sense: A Valuable Connector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Rheta N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposes angle sense as a fundamental connector between mathematical concepts for middle grade students. Introduces the use of pattern blocks and a goniometer, a tool to measure angles, to help students develop angle sense. Discusses connections between angle measurement and the concepts of rational numbers, circles, area, number theory,…

  7. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  8. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  9. Experimental study of crossing angle collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Rice, D.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Tigner, M.

    1993-05-01

    The non-linear coupling due to the beam-beam interaction with crossing angle has been studied. The major effect of a small ({approximately}12mrad) crossing angle is to excite 5Q{sub x}{plus_minus}Q{sub s}=integer coupling resonance family on large amplitude particles, which results in bad lifetime. On the CESR, a small crossing angle ({approximately}2.4mr) was created at the IP and a reasonable beam-beam tune-shift was achieved. The decay rate of the beam is measured as a function of horizontal tune with and without crossing angle. The theoretical analysis, simulation and experimental measurements have a good agreement. The resonance strength as a function of crossing angle is also measured.

  10. Meridional Distribution of CH3C2H and C4H2 in Saturn's Stratosphere from CIRS/Cassini Limb and Nadir Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Fouchet, Thierry; Bezard, Bruno; Moses, Julianne I.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Limb and nadir spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) are analyzed in order to derive, for the first time, the meridional variations of diacetylene (C4H2) and methylacetylene (CH3C2H) mixing ratios in Saturn's stratosphere, from 5 hPa up to 0.05 hPa and 80 deg S to 45 deg N. We find that the C4H2 and CH3C2H meridional distributions mimic that of acetylene (C2H2), exhibiting small-scale variations that are not present in photochemical model predictions. The most striking feature of the meridional distribution of both molecules is an asymmetry between mid-southern and mid-northern latitudes. The mid-southern latitudes are found depleted in hydrocarbons relative to their northern counterparts. In contrast, photochemical models predict similar abundances at north and south mid-latitudes. We favor a dynamical explanation for this asymmetry, with upwelling in the south and downwelling in the north, the latter coinciding with the region undergoing ring shadowing. The depletion in hydrocarbons at mid-southern latitudes could also result from chemical reactions with oxygen-bearing molecules. Poleward of 60 deg S, at 0.1 and 0.05 hPa, we find that the CH3C2H and C4H2 abundances increase dramatically. This behavior is in sharp contradiction with photochemical model predictions, which exhibit a strong decrease towards the south pole. Several processes could explain our observations, such as subsidence, a large vertical eddy diffusion coefficient at high altitudes, auroral chemistry that enhances CH3C2H and C4H2 production, or shielding from photolysis by aerosols or molecules produced from auroral chemistry. However, problems remain with all these hypotheses, including the lack of similar behavior at lower altitudes. Our derived mean mixing ratios at 0.5 hPa of (2.4 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -10) for C4H2 and of (1.1 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -9) for CH3C2H are compatible with the analysis of global-average ISO observations performed by Moses et al. Finally, we provide

  11. Prostate-specific antigen nadir after high-dose-rate brachytherapy predicts long-term survival outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Komori, Shouko; Sekiguchi, Akane; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kurosaka, Shinji; Fujita, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masashi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen nadir (nPSA) after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in clinically non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods Data from 216 patients with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer who underwent HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at diagnosis was 24 ng/ml (range: 3-338 ng/ml). The clinical stage was T1c-2a in 55 cases (26%), T2b-2c in 48 (22%), T3a in 75 (35%), and T3b-4 in 38 (17%). The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After 5 fractions, external beam radiation therapy with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent neoadjuvant ADT for at least 6 months, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months. The median follow-up was 7 years from the start of radiotherapy. Results The 7-year PSA relapse-free rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 94%, compared with 23% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 28.57; 95% CI: 12.04-66.66; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the nPSA value after radiotherapy was a significant independent predictor of biochemical failure, whereas pretreatment predictive values for worse biochemical control including higher level of initial PSA, Gleason score ≥ 8, positive biopsy core rate ≥ 67%, and T3b-T4, failed to reach independent predictor status. The 7-year cancer-specific survival rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 99%, compared with 82% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 32.25; 95% CI: 3.401-333.3; p = 0.002). Conclusions A post-radiotherapy nPSA value of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was associated with better long-term biochemical tumor control even if patients had pretreatment predictive values for worse

  12. Utilizing the US Lab Nadir Research Window for Remote Sensing Operations with The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Richard; Barley, Bryan; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) is an ISPR-based rack facility designed to take advantage of the high optical quality US Lab Nadir research window. The WORF is based on the ISS Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack mechanical structure and electronic systems. The WORF has a unique payload volume located at the center of the rack that provides access to the window. The interior dimensions of the payload volume are 34-in. (86.36 cm) wide by 33-in. (83.82 cm) high by 23-in. (58.42 cm) deep. This facility supports the deployment of payloads such as 9 in. aerial photography cameras and 12 in. diameter optical equipment. The WORF coupled with the optical quality of the United States Lab window support the deployment of various payload disciplines. The WORF provides payloads with power, data command and control, air cooling, water cooling, and video processing. The WORF's payload mounting surfaces and interfaces include the interior payload mounting shelf and the interior and exterior aircraft-like seat tracks. The payload mounting shelf is limited to a maximum mass of 136 kg (299 pounds). The WORF can accommodate large payloads such as the commonly used Leica-Heerbrug RC-30 aerial photography camera (whose dimensions are 53.3 cm (21-in.) wide by 50.8 cm (20-in.) deep by 76.2 cm (30-in.) long). The performance characteristics of the WORF allow it to support an array of payload disciplines. The WORF provides a maximum of 3 Kw at 28 Vdc and has a maximum data rate of 10 Mbps. The WORF's unique payload volume is designed to be light-tight, down to 2.8 x 10(exp -11) Watts/cm2/steradian, and have low-reflective surfaces. This specially designed WORF interior supports payload investigations that observe low-light-level phenomenon such as aurora. Although the WORF rack does not employ any active rack isolation (i.e., vibration dampening) technology, the rack provides a very stable environment for payload operations (on the order

  13. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  14. Skylab S-193 radar altimeter experiment analyses and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    The design of optimum filtering procedures for geoid recovery is discussed. Statistical error bounds are obtained for pointing angle estimates using average waveform data. A correlation of tracking loop bandwidth with magnitude of pointing error is established. The impact of ocean currents and precipitation on the received power are shown to be measurable effects. For large sea state conditions, measurements of sigma 0 deg indicate a distinct saturation level of about 8 dB. Near-nadir less than 15 deg values of sigma 0 deg are also presented and compared with theoretical models. Examination of Great Salt Lake Desert scattering data leads to rejection of a previously hypothesized specularly reflecting surface. Pulse-to-pulse correlation results are in agreement with quasi-monochromatic optics theoretical predictions and indicate a means for estimating direction of pointing error. Pulse compression techniques for and results of estimating significant waveheight from waveform data are presented and are also shown to be in good agreement with surface truth data. A number of results pertaining to system performance are presented.

  15. Perceptions of tilt angles of an agricultural tractor.

    PubMed

    Görücü, Serap; Cavallo, Eugenio; Murphy, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    A tractor stability simulator has been developed to help study tractor operators' perceptions of angles when the simulator is tilted to the side. The simulator is a trailer-mounted tractor cab equipped with hydraulic lift that can tilt the tractor cabin up to 30 degrees. This paper summarizes data from 82 participants who sat in the simulator while it was tilted. Demographic variables, estimates of tilt angles, and measured tilt angles were collected. The effects of age, gender, tractor driving experience, and frequency of operation on the estimated and measured tilt angles were analyzed. The results showed that about 50% of the participants reported estimations of side tilt angles within ±5 degrees of the actual angles, and nearly the same percentage overestimated the actual side tilt angles. Only a small percentage underestimated the angles. Older, more experienced, and male participants set higher limits on the actual angle at which they felt uncomfortable and would not drive. PMID:24417527

  16. Angle amplifier based on multiplexed volume holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Yifei; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2008-03-01

    Angle amplifier of laser beam scanner is a widely used device in optical systems. Volume holographic optical elements can be applied in the angle amplifier. Compared with the traditional angle amplifier, it has the advantages of high angle resolution, high diffraction efficiency, small size, and high angle magnification and flexible design. Bragg anglewavelength- compensating recording method is introduced. Because of the Bragg compensatory relation between angle and wavelength, this device could be recorded at another wavelength. The design of the angle amplifier recording at the wavelength of 514.2nm for the working wavelength of 632.8nm is described. An optical setup for recording the angle amplifier device is designed and discussed. Experimental results in the photorefractive crystal Fe:LiNbO 3 demonstrate the feasibility of the angle amplifier scheme.

  17. Study on self-calibration angle encoder using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Zi; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    The angle measurement technology is very important in precision manufacture, optical industry, aerospace, aviation and navigation, etc. Further, the angle encoder, which uses concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' and transforms the angle into number of electronic pulse, is the most common instrument for angle measurement. To improve the accuracy of the angle encoder, a novel self-calibration method was proposed that enables the angle encoder to calibrate itself without angle reference. An angle deviation curve among 0° to 360° was simulated with equal weights Fourier components for the study of the self-calibration method. In addition, a self-calibration algorithm was used in the process of this deviation curve. The simulation result shows the relationship between the arrangement of multi-reading heads and the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. Besides, an actual self-calibration angle encoder was calibrated by polygon angle standard in national institute of metrology, China. The experiment result indicates the actual self-calibration effect on the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. In the end, the comparison, which is between the simulation self-calibration result and the experiment self-calibration result, reflects good consistency and proves the reliability of the self-calibration angle encoder.

  18. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  19. Longitudinal Changes of Angle Configuration in Primary Angle-Closure Suspects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; Chang, Dolly S.; Zhu, Haogang; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Aung, Tin; Huang, Shengsong; Chen, Qianyun; Munoz, Beatriz; Grossi, Carlota M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine longitudinal changes in angle configuration in the eyes of primary angle-closure suspects (PACS) treated by laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) and in untreated fellow eyes. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Participants Primary angle-closure suspects aged 50 to 70 years were enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Methods Each participant was treated by LPI in 1 randomly selected eye, with the fellow eye serving as a control. Angle width was assessed in a masked fashion using gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) before and at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 18 months after LPI. Main Outcome Measures Angle width in degrees was calculated from Shaffer grades assessed under static gonioscopy. Angle configuration was also evaluated using angle opening distance (AOD250, AOD500, AOD750), trabecular-iris space area (TISA500, TISA750), and angle recess area (ARA) measured in AS-OCT images. Results No significant difference was found in baseline measures of angle configuration between treated and untreated eyes. At 2 weeks after LPI, the drainage angle on gonioscopy widened from a mean of 13.5° at baseline to a mean of 25.7° in treated eyes, which was also confirmed by significant increases in all AS-OCT angle width measures (P<0.001 for all variables). Between 2 weeks and 18 months after LPI, a significant decrease in angle width was observed over time in treated eyes (P<0.001 for all variables), although the change over the first 5.5 months was not statistically significant for angle width measured under gonioscopy (P = 0.18), AOD250 (P = 0.167) and ARA (P = 0.83). In untreated eyes, angle width consistently decreased across all follow-up visits after LPI, with a more rapid longitudinal decrease compared with treated eyes (P values for all variables ≤0.003). The annual rate of change in angle width was equivalent to 1.2°/year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8–1.6) in treated eyes and 1.6°/year (95% CI, 1

  20. No differences in metabolic outcomes between nadir GH 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL during OGTT in surgically cured acromegalic patients (observational study).

    PubMed

    Ku, Cheol Ryong; Choe, Eun Yeong; Hong, Jae Won; Kim, Eui Hyun; Park, Se Hee; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Eun Jig

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic impairment is the common cause for mortality in acromegalic patients. In this study, long-term improvements of metabolic parameters were evaluated according to 2 different remission criteria.This was an observational cohort study before and up to 1 year after transsphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA). Participants were 187 patients with acromegaly. At 6 months after TSA, remitted patients with age- and sex-matched normalized IGF-1 were divided into 2 groups: remission 1 (R1), nadir growth hormone (GH) below 0.4 ng/mL; and remission 2 (R2), nadir GH between 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Metabolic parameters during serial OGTTs were evaluated for 12 months. Remission was achieved in 157 (R1-136; R2-21) patients. Immediate postoperative metabolic parameters including body weight, body mass index, glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid in OGTT were all significantly improved in R1 and R2. HOMA-%β and HOMA-IR scores also improved in both R1 and R2. These improvements persisted for duration (12 months) of this study. However, no difference was present in metabolic parameters between R1 and R2. Although the patients with preoperative adrenal insufficiency presented significantly increased HOMA scores before TSA, there was no difference between classifications of deficient pituitary axes and changes of metabolic parameters after TSA. Remitted patients exhibited rapid restoration of metabolic parameters immediate postoperative period. Long-term improvements in metabolic parameters were not different between the 2 different nadir GH cut-offs, 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL. PMID:27310957

  1. No differences in metabolic outcomes between nadir GH 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL during OGTT in surgically cured acromegalic patients (observational study)

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cheol Ryong; Choe, Eun Yeong; Hong, Jae Won; Kim, Eui Hyun; Park, Se Hee; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Eun Jig

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic impairment is the common cause for mortality in acromegalic patients. In this study, long-term improvements of metabolic parameters were evaluated according to 2 different remission criteria. This was an observational cohort study before and up to 1 year after transsphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA). Participants were 187 patients with acromegaly. At 6 months after TSA, remitted patients with age- and sex-matched normalized IGF-1 were divided into 2 groups: remission 1 (R1), nadir growth hormone (GH) below 0.4 ng/mL; and remission 2 (R2), nadir GH between 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Metabolic parameters during serial OGTTs were evaluated for 12 months. Remission was achieved in 157 (R1–136; R2–21) patients. Immediate postoperative metabolic parameters including body weight, body mass index, glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid in OGTT were all significantly improved in R1 and R2. HOMA-%β and HOMA-IR scores also improved in both R1 and R2. These improvements persisted for duration (12 months) of this study. However, no difference was present in metabolic parameters between R1 and R2. Although the patients with preoperative adrenal insufficiency presented significantly increased HOMA scores before TSA, there was no difference between classifications of deficient pituitary axes and changes of metabolic parameters after TSA. Remitted patients exhibited rapid restoration of metabolic parameters immediate postoperative period. Long-term improvements in metabolic parameters were not different between the 2 different nadir GH cut-offs, 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL. PMID:27310957

  2. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  3. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  4. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  5. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  6. Characteristics of lightning, sprites, and human-induced emissions observed by nadir-viewing cameras on board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    The Lightning and Sprites Observation (LSO) experiment was designed to test a new concept of nadir-viewing sprite measurement on board the International Space Station using spectral differentiation methods for lightning and sprite identification. It was composed of two calibrated cameras: one equipped with a narrowband filter at 763 nm to maximize the contrast between sprites and lightning, and the other to monitor lightning. The LSO was operated at night during 15 days from 2001 to 2004 during which 197 lightning flashes, several sprites, hundreds of gas flares, and tens of cities were analyzed. The main strength of this experiment was its high spatial resolution of about 400 m. The structural details of some lightning are thus observed highlighting complex systems. Some features such as the nonlinear increase of the lightning-illuminated cloud top area with the peak radiance and the radial decrease of the lightning flash radiance were quantified. The median area is 129 km2 with median minor and major axes of 12 and 16 km. Two methods of sprite identification are presented and applied to the most intense sprite events observed by LSO. The sprite diameter is 5 km and it is shifted of about 22 km from the center of the parent lightning. A ratio of 1.7% is deduced for lightning flashes between the radiances measured by both cameras. These observations should be useful for the preparation or the analysis of future space missions dedicated to nadir-viewing observations of sprites.

  7. Global environmental monitoring with the EOS multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. J.; Bruegge, C. J.; Martonchik, J. V.; Bothwell, G. W.; Hovland, L. E.; Jones, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The MISR provides a unique opportunity for studying the ecology and climate of the earth through the acquisition of systematic, global multiangle imagery in reflected sunlight. MISR uses nine cameras: a nadir camera and two banks of four cameras each pointed forward and aftward along the spacecraft ground track to image the earth at +/-30.7, +/-45.6, +/-60.0, and +/-72.5 deg. Radiometrically calibrated images at each angle will be obtained in four spectral bands centered at 440, 550, 670, and 860 nm. MISR will take image data in two different spatial resolution modes: local mode, in which selected targets are observed with 240-m spatial sampling, and global mode, where the entire sunlit eEarth is observed continuously with 1.92-km sampling. The instrument is capable of acquiring global coverage every nine days.

  8. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  9. Comparison between angle interferometer and angle encoder during calibration of autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Xue, Zi; Wang, He Yan

    2015-02-01

    An angle interferometer was set up using concept `ratio of two lengths' and an angle encoder was set up using concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' at the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM). For the analysis of the systematic errors of each device, two autocollimator calibration systems were separately set up based on the angle interferometer and the angle encoder with a similar measuring uncertainty (around 0.1″). An autocollimator was calibrated using two systems in the same measurement range (+/-1000″) and the same measurement step (10″). The systematic errors of each system were found through comparison between their original calibration results. The compensation curves were calculated using the analysis results, and two systems' original calibration results were compensated according to two systems' compensation curves. The maximum difference between the compensated calibration results of two systems was 0.05″ which is lower than measuring uncertainty of each system.

  10. [Angle-closure chronic glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of chronic angle closure glaucoma is considerably greater than the incidence of the acute type. This type of glaucoma may mimic primary open angle glaucoma with visual field deterioration, optic nerve alteration and intraocular pressure elevation with a quiet painless eye. Its diagnosis is based on indentation gonioscopy showing peripheral anterior synechiae. The mechanisms of angle closure are the pupillary block, the plateau iris configuration and the creeping form. The treatment of chronic angle closure glaucoma is based on laser peripheral iridotomy. PMID:14646832

  11. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  12. [Chronic closed-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2004-06-01

    Five times more frequent than the acute form, chronic closed-angle glaucoma often goes unrecognized for a long time, resulting in considerable visual field deficiencies, even in loss of the eye. It is sometimes confused with chronic glaucoma and treated as such, which is inadequate to halt the progression of the disease. Only gonioscopy can diagnose it. If doubt persists, UBM (ultrasound biomicroscopy) can detect goniosynechiae, a malposition of the ciliary body or of the lens, or the existence of iridociliary cysts. Nine times out of ten, pupillary block initiates the process and an iridotomy should always be done to remediate it, even if this procedure alone does not always suffice to solve the problem. PMID:15319750

  13. Angle Kappa and its importance in refractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Hoggan, Ryan N.; Muthappan, Valliammai

    2013-01-01

    Angle kappa is the difference between the pupillary and visual axis. This measurement is of paramount consideration in refractive surgery, as proper centration is required for optimal results. Angle kappa may contribute to MFIOL decentration and its resultant photic phenomena. Adjusting placement of MFIOLs for angle kappa is not supported by the literature but is likely to help reduce glare and haloes. Centering LASIK in angle kappa patients over the corneal light reflex is safe, efficacious, and recommended. Centering in-between the corneal reflex and the entrance pupil is also safe and efficacious. The literature regarding PRK in patients with an angle kappa is sparse but centering on the corneal reflex is assumed to be similar to centering LASIK on the corneal reflex. Thus, centration of MFIOLs, LASIK, and PRK should be focused on the corneal reflex for patients with a large angle kappa. More research is needed to guide surgeons’ approach to angle kappa. PMID:24379548

  14. Solar cell angle of incidence corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on solar array angle of incidence corrections was found to be sparse and contained no tabular data for support. This lack along with recent data on 27 GaAs/Ge 4 cm by 4 cm cells initiated the analysis presented in this paper. The literature cites seven possible contributors to angle of incidence effects: cosine, optical front surface, edge, shadowing, UV degradation, particulate soiling, and background color. Only the first three are covered in this paper due to lack of sufficient data. The cosine correction is commonly used but is not sufficient when the incident angle is large. Fresnel reflection calculations require knowledge of the index of refraction of the coverglass front surface. The absolute index of refraction for the coverglass front surface was not known nor was it measured due to lack of funds. However, a value for the index of refraction was obtained by examining how the prediction errors varied with different assumed indices and selecting the best fit to the set of measured values. Corrections using front surface Fresnel reflection along with the cosine correction give very good predictive results when compared to measured data, except there is a definite trend away from predicted values at the larger incident angles. This trend could be related to edge effects and is illustrated by a use of a box plot of the errors and by plotting the deviation of the mean against incidence angle. The trend is for larger deviations at larger incidence angles and there may be a fourth order effect involved in the trend. A chi-squared test was used to determine if the measurement errors were normally distributed. At 10 degrees the chi-squared test failed, probably due to the very small numbers involved or a bias from the measurement procedure. All other angles showed a good fit to the normal distribution with increasing goodness-of-fit as the angles increased which reinforces the very small numbers hypothesis. The contributed data only went to 65 degrees

  15. Measuring Angles in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeley, Nansee; Offerman, Theresa Reardon

    1997-01-01

    Features articles about physical therapy and its history as related to geometry through measurement of body angles. Includes open-ended worksheets for mathematics activities that introduce students to angle measurement, data analysis, and mathematical tools. Activities include: (1) Making Your Own Goniometer; (2) Range of Motion; (3) Active versus…

  16. Combined effects of the in-plane orientation angle and the loading angle on the dynamic enhancement of honeycombs under mixed shear-compression loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tounsi, R.; Markiewicz, E.; Haugou, G.; Chaari, F.; Zouari, B.

    2016-05-01

    The combined effect of the loading angle (ψ) and the in-plane orientation angle (β) on the dynamic enhancement of aluminium alloy honeycombs is investigated. Experimental results are analysed on the crushing surfaces (initial peak and average crushing forces). A significant effect of the loading angle is reported. The dynamic enhancement rate depends on the loading angle until a critical loading angle (ψcritical). Beyond, a negative dynamic enhancement rate is observed. Concerning the in-plane orientation angle β effect, it depends on the loading angle ψ under quasi-static conditions. Under dynamic conditions, a significant effect is reported independently of the loading angle ψ. Therefore, the dynamic enhancement rate depends on the combined effects of ψ and β angles. A global analysis of the buckling mechanisms allowed us to explain the combined effect of ψ and β angles on the initial peak force. The collapse mechanisms analysis explain the negative dynamic enhancement rate for large loading angles.

  17. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  18. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

    1989-09-12

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.

  19. Execution phase (C/D) spectral band characteristics of the EOS moderate resolution imaging spectrometer-Nadir (Modis-N) facility instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, Vincent V.; Toll, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (Modis) observing facility on the Earth Observing System (EOS) is composed of two instruments: Modis-Nadir (N) and Modis-Tilt (T). Modis-N has 36 spectral bands between 0.4 and 14.2 microns, with spatial resolution between 250 and 1000 meters. Modis-T has 32 bands with 10-15 nm bandwidths between 0.4 and 0.9 microns. Modis-T scans fore and aft +/- 50 degrees. Both instruments scan cross-track so as to provide daily (Modis-N) or once every two days (Modis-T) coverage at 705-km altitude. Both instruments are entering into the execution phases of their development in 1990. The bands of the Modis-N hve been chosen so as to provide key observations of land, ocean, and atmosphere parameters that will provide key data sets assisting in gaining an improved understanding of global processes.

  20. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  1. Incident Angle Dependence of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeorge, Vincent; Valle, Brent; Singer, Kenneth

    2010-10-01

    We have been recently studying the use of interference effects to enhance optical absorption in polymer photovoltaic cells. These interference effects are expected to be angle dependent. We measure here the angle dependent absorption and compare with numerical simulations. The cells used were P3HT/PCBM active layer, organic photovoltaic cells. The angular dependence of the cells' reflection was measured using an Ocean Optics light source and spectrophotometer and a precision rotary stage apparatus. The experimental results were compared to a Matlab simulation of the characteristic matrix problem. Analysis showed that the reflection/absorption peaks predicted by the simulation largely coincided in wavelength to those observed in experiment. Moreover, no additional cavity resonance can be attributed to incidence angle.

  2. Bicycle helmet ventilation and comfort angle dependence.

    PubMed

    Brühwiler, Paul A; Ducas, Charline; Huber, Roman; Bishop, Phillip A

    2004-09-01

    Five modern bicycle helmets were studied to elucidate some of the variations in ventilation performance, using both a heated manikin headform and human subjects (n = 7). Wind speed and head angle were varied to test their influence on the measured steady-state heat exchange (cooling power) in the skull section of the headform. The cooling power transmitted by the helmets varied from about 60% to over 90% of that of the nude headform, illustrating the range of present manufacturer designs. Angling the head forward by 30 degrees was found to provide better cooling power to the skull (up to 25%) for three of the helmets and almost equal cooling power in the remaining two cases. Comparisons of skull ventilation at these angles with human subjects strongly supported the headform results.

  3. Patellar Tendon–Trochlear Groove Angle Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina B.; Gobbi, Riccardo G.; Kihara Filho, Eduardo N.; Demange, Marco K.; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tibial tubercle–trochlear groove (TT-TG) is used as the gold standard for patellofemoral malalignment. Purpose: To assess 3 patellar tendon–trochlear groove (PT-TG) angle measurement techniques and the PT-TG distance measurement (tendinous cartilaginous TT-TG) as predictors of patellar instability. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Three PT-TG angle measurements and the PT-TG distance were measured in 82 participants with patellar instability and 100 controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurement landmarks were the line tangent to the posterior femoral condyles, the deepest point of the trochlea, the transepicondylar line, and the patellar tendon center. All measurements were recorded once by 1 examiner, and the measurements were recorded twice by 2 examiners in a random group of 100 knees. Mean values and standard deviations (SDs) were obtained. Normality cutoff values were defined as 2 and 3 SDs above the mean in the control group. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio (LR+) were calculated. Inter- and intrarater reliability were assessed based on the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The measurements from the patellar instability and control groups, respectively, for angle 1 (16.4° and 8.4°), angle 2 (31° and 15.6°), angle 3 (30.8° and 15.7°), PT-TG distance (14.5 and 8.4 mm), and patellar tilt (21.1° and 7.5°) were significantly different (P < .05). The angle measurements showed greater sensitivity, specificity, and LR+ than the PT-TG distance. Inter- and intrarater ICC values were >0.95 for all measurements. Conclusion: The PT-TG angle and the PT-TG distance are reliable and are different between the patellar instability and control groups. PT-TG angles are more closely associated with patellar instability than PT-TG distance. Clinical Relevance: PT-TG angle measurements show high reliability and association with patellar instability and can

  4. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  5. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  6. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an optical calibration apparatus provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted.

  7. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  8. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three- dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  9. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FbG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three-dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  10. Determination of detector rotation angle in the experiment based on the total internal reflection using an equilateral right angle prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendro, Viridi, S.; Pratama, Y.

    2015-04-01

    We present a relation between incident angle and rotation angle detector in the Total Internal Reflection (TIR) experiments when using a right angle prism. In the TIR method, the light coming toward the prism will experience reflection and out of the prism at a certain angle direction. Results of analysis of the geometry and Snell's law shows that the angular position of the detector is not only determined by the angle of incidence of light alone but also by the size of the prism and the detector position from the rotation axis of goniometer. The experimental results show relation between the angle of detector and angle of goniometer. When the prism rotated 45 °, position of goniometer detector is 2×45 °. However, when the prism rotated at an angle instead of 45 °, detector position µ is not always equal to twice the rotation angle goniometer ψ, so that this relationship needs to be corrected. This correction is also determined by the value of the refractive index of the prism is used. By knowing the relationship between detector position and the incident angle of light, this formulation can be used to control the position of the sample and the detector in the experiments based on ATR.

  11. Bilateral acute angle-closure glaucoma after dexfenfluramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Denis, P; Charpentier, D; Berros, P; Touameur, S

    1995-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with narrow angles who had an attack of bilateral acute angle-closure glaucoma precipitated by dexfenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug developed for appetite suppression. Although the exact mechanism remains uncertain, the pupillary block observed in our case may be the result of the serotoninergic or indirect parasympatholytic properties of the drug on the iris sphincter muscle. Serotonergic psychoactive drugs should be prescribed cautiously in patients with known narrow angles and should be monitored by an ophthalmologist.

  12. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods. PMID:26470038

  13. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods.

  14. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  15. Chronic open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Feisal A.; Damji, Karim F.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide, including in Canada. It presents a challenge in diagnosis, as disease often progresses without symptoms; an estimated 50% of cases are undetected. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE searches, reference lists of articles, and expert knowledge from one of the authors (K.F.D.), a glaucoma specialist, were used. MAIN MESSAGE A casefinding approach using early referral to optometrists and ophthalmologists for early detection of COAG is helpful for patients with risk factors such as age above 50, a positive family history, black race, and myopia. Moderate evidence for referral also exists for the following risk factors: hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and sleep apnea. Treatment with intraocular pressure–lowering medication can arrest or slow the course of the disease, permitting patients to retain good visual function. Family physicians should be aware that some intraocular pressure–lowering medications, particularly topical beta-blockers, can pose iatrogenic harm to patients and result in or exacerbate such conditions as asthma, cardiovascular disturbances, depression, and sexual dysfunction. CONCLUSION Appropriate referral patterns and an understanding of common as well as serious side effects of glaucoma medications are important in optimizing management of patients at risk of developing, or who have, COAG. PMID:16190176

  16. Statistical analysis of Contact Angle Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardan, Nachiketa; Panchagnula, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a new statistical approach to determining Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) by studying the nature of the triple line. A statistical distribution of local contact angles on a random three-dimensional drop is used as the basis for this approach. Drops with randomly shaped triple lines but of fixed volumes were deposited on a substrate and their triple line shapes were extracted by imaging. Using a solution developed by Prabhala et al. (Langmuir, 2010), the complete three dimensional shape of the sessile drop was generated. A distribution of the local contact angles for several such drops but of the same liquid-substrate pairs is generated. This distribution is a result of several microscopic advancing and receding processes along the triple line. This distribution is used to yield an approximation of the CAH associated with the substrate. This is then compared with measurements of CAH by means of a liquid infusion-withdrawal experiment. Static measurements are shown to be sufficient to measure quasistatic contact angle hysteresis of a substrate. The approach also points towards the relationship between microscopic triple line contortions and CAH.

  17. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single

  18. The Semiotic and Conceptual Genesis of Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguay, Denis; Venant, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we try to understand how students at the end of primary school conceive of angle: Is an angle a magnitude for them or a geometric figure, and how do they manage to coordinate the two aspects in their understanding of the concepts of angle and of angle measurement? With the aim of better grasping the way "angle" is…

  19. Non-contact measurement of rotation angle with solo camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Xiaochuan; Sun, Anbin; Ye, Xin; Ma, Liqun

    2015-02-01

    For the purpose to measure a rotation angle around the axis of an object, a non-contact rotation angle measurement method based on solo camera was promoted. The intrinsic parameters of camera were calibrated using chessboard on principle of plane calibration theory. The translation matrix and rotation matrix between the object coordinate and the camera coordinate were calculated according to the relationship between the corners' position on object and their coordinates on image. Then the rotation angle between the measured object and the camera could be resolved from the rotation matrix. A precise angle dividing table (PADT) was chosen as the reference to verify the angle measurement error of this method. Test results indicated that the rotation angle measurement error of this method did not exceed +/- 0.01 degree.

  20. An Experimental Study on the Iso-Content-Based Angle Similarity Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    2002-01-01

    Retrieval performance of the iso-content-based angle similarity measure within the angle, distance, conjunction, disjunction, and ellipse retrieval models is compared with retrieval performance of the distance similarity measure and the angle similarity measure. Results show the iso-content-based angle similarity measure achieves satisfactory…

  1. Methane Cross-Validation Between Spaceborne Solar Occultation Observations from ACE-FTS, Spaceborne Nadir Sounding from Gosat, and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Measurements, at a High Arctic Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S. A.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing observations of methane profiles in the Canadian High Arctic. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas on Earth, and second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to anthropogenic global warming. Accurate and precise observations of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. The Arctic is a particular region of concern, as melting permafrost and disappearing sea ice might lead to accelerated release of methane into the atmosphere. Global observations require spaceborne instruments, in particular in the Arctic, where surface measurements are sparse and expensive to perform. Satellite-based remote sensing is an underconstrained problem, and specific validation under Arctic circumstances is required. Here, we show a cross-validation between two spaceborne instruments and ground-based measurements, all Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS). We consider the Canadian SCISAT ACE-FTS, a solar occultation spectrometer operating since 2004, and the Japanese GOSAT TANSO-FTS, a nadir-pointing FTS operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W) since 2006. Measurements are collocated considering temporal, spatial, and geophysical criteria and regridded to a common vertical grid. We perform smoothing on the higher-resolution instrument results to account for different vertical resolutions. Then, profiles of differences for each pair of instruments are examined. Any bias between instruments, or any accuracy that is worse than expected, needs to be understood prior to using the data. The results of the study will serve as a guideline on how to use the vertically resolved methane products from ACE and

  2. Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Angle θ13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuze, Masahiro

    Neutrinos exhibit an interesting phenomenon called "neutrino oscillation", in which a neutrino changes its flavor after traveling some flight length. Many experiments measured the mixing angles and mass differences, but the angle θ13 had been unmeasured due to its smallness compared to others. During 2011 and 2012, series of new-generation neutrino experiments reported positive results in θ13 search, and its value has been determined to be just below the previous upper limit. The non-zero result of θ13 is a very good news for future of neutrino physics, since it opens a possibility of measuring the CP violation phase in the lepton sector. An introduction to neutrino oscillation and latest experimental results are presented. A detail is put on Double Chooz reactor experiment, in which the author is involved.

  3. Angle parameter changes of phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy for acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Wei; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Lu, Bin; Wang, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the difference in angle parameters and clinical outcome following phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy in patients with acute primary angle closure (APAC) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). METHODS Patients (n=23, 31 eyes) were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or combined phacotrabeculectomy (n=24, 31 eyes). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), the main complications following surgery, and indentation gonioscopy and angle parameters measured using UBM were documented preoperatively and postoperatively. RESULTS The improvement in BCVA in the phacoemulsification group was significantly greater than in the combined group (P<0.05). IOP in the phacoemulsification group was slightly higher than in the combined group following 1wk of follow-up (P<0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups at the latter follow-up (P>0.05). Phacoemulsification alone resulted in a slight increase in the trabecular ciliary processes distance compared with the combined surgery (P<0.05), whereas the other angle parameters showed no significant difference between the groups. Complications in combined group were greater than phacoemulsification only group. CONCLUSION Both surgeries effectively opened the drainage angle and deepened the anterior chamber, and IOP was well controlled postoperatively. However, phacoemulsification showed better efficacy in improving visual function and showed reduced complications following surgery. PMID:26309873

  4. Pitch-angle scattering in magnetostatic turbulence. II. Analytical considerations and pitch-angle isotropization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: The process of pitch-angle isotropization is important for many applications ranging from diffusive shock acceleration to large-scale cosmic-ray transport. Here, the basic analytical description is revisited on the basis of recent simulation results. Methods: Both an analytical and a numerical investigation were undertaken of the Fokker-Planck equation for pitch-angle scattering. Additional test-particle simulations obtained with the help of a Monte-Carlo code were used to verify the conclusions. Results: It is shown that the usual definition of the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient via the mean-square displacement is flawed. The reason can be traced back to the assumption of homogeneity in time which does not hold for pitch-angle scattering. Conclusions: Calculating the mean free path via the Fokker-Planck coefficient has often proven to give an accurate description. For numerical purposes, accordingly, it is the definition that has to be exchanged in favor of the pitch-angle correlation function.

  5. Can a surgeon drill accurately at a specified angle?

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Valentina; Cook, Jodie; Arthurs, Gareth I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether a surgeon can drill accurately a specified angle and whether surgeon experience, task repetition, drill bit size and perceived difficulty influence drilling angle accuracy. Methods The sample population consisted of final-year students (n=25), non-specialist veterinarians (n=22) and board-certified orthopaedic surgeons (n=8). Each participant drilled a hole twice in a horizontal oak plank at 30°, 45°, 60°, 80°, 85° and 90° angles with either a 2.5  or a 3.5 mm drill bit. Participants then rated the perceived difficulty to drill each angle. The true angle of each hole was measured using a digital goniometer. Results Greater drilling accuracy was achieved at angles closer to 90°. An error of ≤±4° was achieved by 84.5 per cent of participants drilling a 90° angle compared with approximately 20 per cent of participants drilling a 30–45° angle. There was no effect of surgeon experience, task repetition or drill bit size on the mean error for intended versus achieved angle. Increased perception of difficulty was associated with the more acute angles and decreased accuracy, but not experience level. Clinical significance This study shows that surgeon ability to drill accurately (within ±4° error) is limited, particularly at angles ≤60°. In situations where drill angle is critical, use of computer-assisted navigation or custom-made drill guides may be preferable. PMID:27547423

  6. Angle Closure Scoring System (ACSS)-A Scoring System for Stratification of Angle Closure Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Aparna; Padhy, Debananda; Sarangi, Sarada; Das, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the angle closure scoring system (ACSS) for stratifying primary angle course disease. Methods This observational cross sectional institutional study included patients with primary open angle glaucoma suspects (n = 21) and primary angle closure disease (primary angle closure, PAC, n = 63 and primary angle course glaucoma, PACG, n = 58 (defined by International society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology, ISGEO). Two independent examiners blinded to clinical details, graded good quality pre-laser goniophotographs of the patients incorporating quadrants of peripheral anterior synechieae (PAS), non-visibility of posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM) and blotchy pigments (ranging from 1–4 quadrants), iris configuration, angle recess (sum of above depicting ACSSg) and lens thickness/axial length ratio (LT/AL), cup disc ratio and baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) to give total score (ACSSt). Result There were significant differences in ACSSg scores within the same ISGEO stage of PAC and PACG between eyes that required nil or >1medicines after laser iridotomy, p<0.001. The ACSSg was associated with need for >1 medicines in both PAC and PACG eyes, p<0.001. An ACSSg score>12 and 14 in PAC (odds ratio = 2.7(95% CI-1.7–5.9) and PACG (Odds ratio = 1.6(95%CI-1.19–2.2) predicted need for single medicines while ACSSg scores >14 and 19 predicted need for ≥2 medicines in PAC and PACG eyes, respectively. The LT/Al ratio, IOP score or cup disc score did not influence the need for medical treatment independently. Conclusion The ACSS can be a useful clinical adjunct to the ISGEO system to predict need for medicines and prognosticate each stage more accurately. PMID:27788183

  7. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  8. Large angle measurement by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Dan; Blanaru, Constantin; Damian, Victor S.; Logofatu, Petre-Catalin; Tumbar, R.; Dobroiu, Adrian

    1995-03-01

    An interferometric set-up able to measure angles as large as +180 degree(s) is presented. The principle of the method is to measure a linear displacement (translation) produced by a crank-gear mechanism which converts the angular movement of a rotating table. The optical scheme and consideration on the accuracy of the method are presented.

  9. Discovering the Inscribed Angle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to play tennis is difficult. It takes practice, but it also helps to have a coach--someone who gives tips and pointers but allows the freedom to play the game on one's own. Learning to act like a mathematician is a similar process. Students report that the process of proving the inscribed angle theorem is challenging and, at times,…

  10. The Effect of Incidence Angle on Stereo DTM Quality: Simulations in Support of Europa Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T. M.; Jorda, L.

    2015-12-01

    Many quality factors for digital topographic models (DTMs) from stereo imaging can be predicted geometrically. For example, pixel scale is related to instantaneous field of view and range, and vertical precision is a known function of the pixel scale and convergence angle if the image quality is high so that automated image matching reaches its optimal precision (~0.2 pixel). The influence of incidence angle is harder to predict. Reduced quality is expected both at low incidence (where topographic shading disappears) and high incidence (where signal/noise ratio is low and shadows occur). This problem is of general interest, but critical for NASA's Europa mission. The REASON instrument will obtain a radar sounding profile on each Europa flyby. Stereo images collected simultaneously by the EIS camera will be used to make DTMs needed to distinguish off-nadir surface echos (clutter) from subsurface features. The question is, how much of this DTM strip will be useful, given that incidence angle will vary substantially? We are using simulations to answer this question. We mosaicked 220 m/pixel Galileo images of the Castalia Macula region of Europa and made a DTM by photoclinometry, using a low-incidence image to correct for albedo variations. With the simulation software OASIS we generated synthetic stereopairs that are realistic in terms of image resolution, noise, photometry (including albedo variations based on the low incidence image), and cast shadows. We then use the commercial stereo software SOCET SET (® BAE Systems), which we have used for a wide variety of planetary mapping projects, to produce DTMs. These are compared to the input DTM as "truth" to quantify the dependence of DTM resolution and vertical precision on illumination, and to document the ways that DTMs degrade at high and low incidence angles. This methodology is immediately applicable to other planetary targets, and in particular can be used to address how much difference in illumination can be

  11. Recent Flight Results of the TRMM Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Bilanow, Stephen; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls the roll and pitch attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. TRMM's nominal orbit altitude was 350 km, until raised to 402 km to prolong mission life. During the boost, the ESA experienced a decreasing signal to noise ratio, until sun interference at 393 km altitude made the ESA data unreliable for attitude determination. At that point, the backup attitude determination algorithm, an extended Kalman filter, was enabled. After the boost finished, TRMM reacquired its nadir-pointing attitude, and continued its mission. This paper will briefly discuss the boost and the decision to turn on the backup attitude determination algorithm. A description of the extended Kalman filter algorithm will be given. In addition, flight results from analyzing attitude data and the results of software changes made onboard TRMM will be discussed. Some lessons learned are presented.

  12. Tilt angle control of nanocolumns grown by glancing angle sputtering at variable argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Cebollada, A.; Alvarez, R.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Palmero, A.

    2010-10-25

    We show that the tilt angle of nanostructures obtained by glancing angle sputtering is finely tuned by selecting the adequate argon pressure. At low pressures, a ballistic deposition regime dominates, yielding high directional atoms that form tilted nanocolumns. High pressures lead to a diffusive regime which gives rise to vertical columnar growth. Monte Carlo simulations reproduce the experimental results indicating that the loss of directionality of the sputtered particles in the gas phase, together with the self-shadowing mechanism at the surface, are the main processes responsible for the development of the columns.

  13. Estimation of stratospheric NO2 from nadir-viewing satellites: The MPI-C TROPOMI verification algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The retrieval of tropospheric column densities of NO2 requires the subtraction of the stratospheric fraction from the total columns derived by DOAS. Here we present a modified reference sector method, which estimates the stratosphere over "clean" regions, as well as over clouded scenarios in which the tropospheric column is shielded. The selection of "clean" pixels is realized gradually by assingning weighting factors to the individual ground pixels, instead of applying binary flags. Global stratospheric fields are then compiled by "weighted convolution". In a second iteration, unphysical negative tropospheric residues are suppressed by adjusting the weights respectively. This algorithm is foreseen as "verification algorithm" for the upcoming TROPOMI on S5p. We show the resulting stratospheric estimates and tropospheric residues for a test data set based on OMI observations. The dependencies on the a-priori settings (definition of weighting factors and convolution kernels) are discussed, and the results are compared to other products, in particular to DOMINO v.2 (based on assimilation, similar to the TROPOMI prototype algorithm) and the NASA standard product (based on a similar reference-region-type approach).

  14. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  15. Automated small tilt-angle measurement using Lau interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Shashi; Singh, Sumitra; Rana, Santosh

    2005-10-01

    A technique for a tilt-angle measurement of reflecting objects based on the Lau interferometry coupled with the moire readout has been proposed. A white-light incoherent source illuminates a set of two gratings, resulting in the generation of the Fresnel image due to the Lau effect. The Fresnel image is projected onto a reflecting object. The image reflected from the object is superimposed onto an identical grating, which results in the formation of a moire fringe pattern. The inclination angle of moire fringes is a function of tilt angle of the object. Theory and experimental arrangement of the proposed technique is presented and results of the investigation are reported.

  16. Off-Angle Iris Correction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph T; Karakaya, Mahmut; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2016-01-01

    In many real world iris recognition systems obtaining consistent frontal images is problematic do to inexperienced or uncooperative users, untrained operators, or distracting environments. As a result many collected images are unusable by modern iris matchers. In this chapter we present four methods for correcting off-angle iris images to appear frontal which makes them compatible with existing iris matchers. The methods include an affine correction, a retraced model of the human eye, measured displacements, and a genetic algorithm optimized correction. The affine correction represents a simple way to create an iris image that appears frontal but it does not account for refractive distortions of the cornea. The other method account for refraction. The retraced model simulates the optical properties of the cornea. The other two methods are data driven. The first uses optical flow to measure the displacements of the iris texture when compared to frontal images of the same subject. The second uses a genetic algorithm to learn a mapping that optimizes the Hamming Distance scores between off-angle and frontal images. In this paper we hypothesize that the biological model presented in our earlier work does not adequately account for all variations in eye anatomy and therefore the two data-driven approaches should yield better performance. Results are presented using the commercial VeriEye matcher that show that the genetic algorithm method clearly improves over prior work and makes iris recognition possible up to 50 degrees off-angle.

  17. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  18. Role of Optical Coherence Tomography in Assessing Anterior Chamber Angles

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakal, Reema Thomas; Jha, Kirti Nath; Rajalakshmi, A.R.; Nagarajan, Swathi; Ezhumalai, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gonioscopy is the gold standard in assessing anterior chamber angles. However, interobserver variations are common and there is a need for reliable objective method of assessment. Aim To compare the anterior chamber angle by gonioscopy and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) in individuals with shallow anterior chamber. Materials and Methods This comparative observational study was conducted in a rural tertiary multi-speciality teaching hospital. A total of 101 eyes of 54 patients with shallow anterior chamber on slit lamp evaluation were included. Anterior chamber angle was graded by gonioscopy using the shaffer grading system. Angles were also assessed by SD-OCT with Trabecular Iris Angle (TIA) and Angle Opening Distance (AOD). Chi-square test, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value to find correlation between OCT parameters and gonioscopy grading. Results Females represented 72.7%. The mean age was 53.93 ±8.24 years and mean anterior chamber depth was 2.47 ± 0.152 mm. Shaffer grade ≤ 2 were identified in 95(94%) superior, 42(41.5%) inferior, 65(64.3%) nasal and 57(56.4%) temporal quadrants. Cut-off values of TIA ≤ 22° and AOD ≤ 290 μm were taken as narrow angles on SD-OCT. TIA of ≤ 22° were found in 88(92.6%) nasal and 87(87%) temporal angles. AOD of ≤ 290 μm was found in 73(76.8%) nasal and 83(83%) temporal quadrants. Sensitivity in detecting narrow angles was 90.7% and 82.2% for TIA and AOD, while specificity was 11.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Conclusion Individuals were found to have narrow angles more with SD-OCT. Sensitivity was high and specificity was low in detecting narrow angles compared to gonioscopy, making it an unreliable tool for screening. PMID:27190851

  19. Return of hunger following a relatively high carbohydrate breakfast is associated with earlier recorded glucose peak and nadir.

    PubMed

    Chandler-Laney, Paula C; Morrison, Shannon A; Goree, Laura Lee T; Ellis, Amy C; Casazza, Krista; Desmond, Renee; Gower, Barbara A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that a breakfast meal with high carbohydrate/low fat results in an earlier increase in postprandial glucose and insulin, a greater decrease below baseline in postprandial glucose, and an earlier return of appetite, compared with a low carbohydrate/high fat meal. Overweight but otherwise healthy adults (n = 64) were maintained on one of two eucaloric diets: high carbohydrate/low fat (HC/LF; 55:27:18% kcals from carbohydrate:fat:protein) versus low carbohydrate/high fat (LC/HF; 43:39:18% kcals from carbohydrate:fat:protein). After 4 weeks of acclimation to the diets, participants underwent a meal test during which circulating glucose and insulin and self-reported hunger and fullness, were measured before and after consumption of breakfast from their assigned diets. The LC/HF meal resulted in a later time at the highest and lowest recorded glucose, higher glucose concentrations at 3 and 4 hours post meal, and lower insulin incremental area under the curve. Participants consuming the LC/HF meal reported lower appetite 3 and 4 hours following the meal, a response that was associated with the timing of the highest and lowest recorded glucose. Modest increases in meal carbohydrate content at the expense of fat content may facilitate weight gain over the long-term by contributing to an earlier rise and fall of postprandial glucose concentrations and an earlier return of appetite.

  20. The Pluto System At Small Phase Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Buie, Marc W.; Binzel, Richard; Ennico, Kimberly; Grundy, William M.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of the Pluto system acquired during the New Horizons encounter epoch (HST Program 13667, M. Buie, PI) span the phase angle range from 0.06 to 1.7 degrees, enabling the measurement and characterization of the opposition effect for Pluto and its satellites at 0.58 microns using HST WFC3/UVIS with the F350LP filter, which has a broadband response and a pivot wavelength of 0.58 microns. At these small phase angles, differences in the opposition effect width and amplitude appear. The small satellites Nix and Hydra both exhibit a very narrow opposition surge, while the considerably larger moon Charon has a broader opposition surge. Microtextural surface properties derived from the shape and magnitude of the opposition surge of each surface contain a record of the collisional history of the system. We combine these small phase angle observations with those made at larger phase angles by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), which also has a broadband response with a pivot wavelength of 0.61 microns, to produce the most complete disk-integrated solar phase curves that we will have for decades to come. Modeling these disk-integrated phase curves generates sets of photometric parameters that will inform spectral modeling of the satellite surfaces as well as terrains on Pluto from spatially resolved New Horizons Ralph Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) data from 1.2 to 2.5 microns. Rotationally resolved phase curves of Pluto reveal opposition effects that only appear at phase angles less than 0.1 degree and have widths and amplitudes that are highly dependent on longitude and therefore on Pluto's diverse terrains. The high albedo region informally known as Sputnik Planum dominates the disk-integrated reflectance of Pluto on the New Horizons encounter hemisphere. These results lay the groundwork for observations at true opposition in 2018, when the Pluto system will be observable at phase angles so small that

  1. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  2. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Mekking, J.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.; Monteiro, D.

    2013-09-01

    The Gaia mission1 will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft2, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the `Basic Angle', at an operational temperature of 100 K. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability at cryogenic conditions, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system3 for this mission, measuring the relative motion of Gaia's telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to detect Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction on Gaia and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material this paper addresses the specific challenges towards the cryogenic application of the Gaia BAM including design, integration and verification/qualification by testing.

  3. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  4. The effect of knee joint angle on torque control.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Voudrie, Stefani J; Ebersole, Kyle T

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the author's investigation was to examine the effect of knee joint angle on torque control of the quadriceps muscle group. In all, 12 healthy adults produced maximal voluntary contractions and submaximal torque (15, 30, and 45% MVC [maximal voluntary contraction]) at leg flexion angles of 15 degrees , 30 degrees , 60 degrees , and 90 degrees below the horizontal plane. As expected, MVC values changed with respect to joint angle with maximum torque output being greatest at 60 degrees and least at 15 degrees . During the submaximal tasks, participants appropriately scaled their torque output to the required targets. Absolute variability (i.e., standard deviation) of torque output was greatest at 60 degrees and 90 degrees knee flexion. However, relative variability as indexed by coefficient of variation (CV) decreased as joint angle increased, with the greatest CV occurring at 15 degrees . These results are congruent with the hypothesis that joint angle influences the control of torque.

  5. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xiong; Liu, Qi-Fan; Hong, Ru-Jia; Pan, Ping-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP) of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF). Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars. PMID:27271629

  6. Multiple incidence angle SIR-B experiment over Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, Jobea; Casey, Daren; Wall, Stephen; Brandani, Aldo; Domik, Gitta; Leberl, Franz

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), the second synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to fly aboard a shuttle, was launched on October 5, 1984. One of the primary goals of the SIR-B experiment was to use multiple incidence angle radar images to distinguish different terrain types through the use of their characteristic backscatter curves. This goal was accomplished in several locations including the Chubut Province of southern Argentina. Four descending image acquisitions were collected providing a multiple incidence angle image set. The data were first used to assess stereo-radargrammetric techniques. A digital elevation model was produced using the optimum pair of multiple incidence angle images. This model was then used to determine the local incidence angle of each picture element to generate curves of relative brightness vs. incidence angle. Secondary image products were also generated using the multi-angle data. The results of this work indicate that: (1) various forest species and various structures of a single species may be discriminated using multiple incidence angle radar imagery, and (2) it is essential to consider the variation in backscatter due to a variable incidence angle when analyzing and comparing data collected at varying frequencies and polarizations.

  7. Complete 360° circumferential SSOCT gonioscopy of the iridocorneal angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, Ryan P.; Kuo, Anthony N.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2014-02-01

    The ocular iridocorneal angle is generally an optically inaccessible area when viewed directly through the cornea due to the high angle of incidence required and the large index of refraction difference between air and cornea (nair = 1.000 and ncornea = 1.376) resulting in total internal reflection. Gonioscopy allows for viewing of the angle by removing the aircornea interface through the use of a special contact lens on the eye. Gonioscopy is used clinically to visualize the angle directly but only en face. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to image the angle and deeper structures via an external approach. Typically, this imaging technique is performed by utilizing a conventional anterior segment OCT scanning system. However, instead of imaging the apex of the cornea, either the scanner or the subject is tilted such that the corneoscleral limbus is orthogonal to the optical axis of the scanner requiring multiple volumes to obtain complete circumferential coverage of the ocular angle. We developed a novel gonioscopic OCT (GOCT) system that images the entire ocular angle within a single volume via an "internal" approach through the use of a custom radially symmetric gonioscopic contact lens. We present, to our knowledge, the first complete 360° circumferential volumes of the iridocorneal angle from a direct, internal approach.

  8. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xiong; Liu, Qi-Fan; Hong, Ru-Jia; Pan, Ping-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP) of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF). Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars. PMID:27271629

  9. Initial flight results of the TRMM Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. After a potential single point failure in the ESA was identified, the contingency attitude determination method chosen to backup the ESA-based system was a sixth-order extended Kalman filter that uses magnetometer and digital sun sensor measurements. A brief description of the TRMM Kalman filter will be given, including some implementation issues and algorithm heritage. Operational aspects of the Kalman filter and some failure detection and correction will be described. The Kalman filter was tested in a sun pointing attitude and in a nadir pointing attitude during the in-orbit checkout period, and results from those tests will be presented. This paper will describe some lessons learned from the experience of the TRMM team.

  10. Initial Flight Results of the TRMM Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. After a potential single point failure in the ESA was identified, the contingency attitude determination method chosen to backup the ESA-based system was a sixth-order extended Kalman filter that uses magnetometer and digital sun sensor measurements. A brief description of the TRMM Kalman filter will be given, including some implementation issues and algorithm heritage. Operational aspects of the Kalman filter and some failure detection and correction will be described. The Kalman filter was tested in a sun pointing attitude and in a nadir pointing attitude during the in-orbit checkout period, and results from those tests will be presented. This paper will describe some lessons learned from the experience of the TRMM team.

  11. Evaluation of arctic multibeam sonar data quality using nadir crossover error analysis and compilation of a full-resolution data product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Ashton F.; Mayer, Larry A.; Calder, Brian A.; Armstrong, Andrew A.

    2014-05-01

    We document a new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry compilation for the Canada Basin and Chukchi Borderland in the Arctic Ocean - United States Arctic Multibeam Compilation (USAMBC Version 1.0). The compilation preserves the highest native resolution of the bathymetric data, allowing for more detailed interpretation of seafloor morphology than has been previously possible. The compilation was created from multibeam bathymetry data available through openly accessible government and academic repositories. Much of the new data was collected during dedicated mapping cruises in support of the United States effort to map extended continental shelf regions beyond the 200 nm Exclusive Economic Zone. Data quality was evaluated using nadir-beam crossover-error statistics, making it possible to assess the precision of multibeam depth soundings collected from a wide range of vessels and sonar systems. Data were compiled into a single high-resolution grid through a vertical stacking method, preserving the highest quality data source in any specific grid cell. The crossover-error analysis and method of data compilation can be applied to other multi-source multibeam data sets, and is particularly useful for government agencies targeting extended continental shelf regions but with limited hydrographic capabilities. Both the gridded compilation and an easily distributed geospatial PDF map are freely available through the University of New Hampshire's Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (ccom.unh.edu/theme/law-sea). The geospatial pdf is a full resolution, small file-size product that supports interpretation of Arctic seafloor morphology without the need for specialized gridding/visualization software.

  12. LINTRAN v2.0: A linearised vector radiative transfer model for efficient simulation of satellite-born nadir-viewing reflection measurements of cloudy atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepers, D.; aan de Brugh, J. M. J.; Hahne, Ph.; Butz, A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Landgraf, J.

    2014-12-01

    Radiance measurements of solar radiation that is backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere or surface contain information about the atmospheric composition and the state of the Earth's surface. Retrieving such information from satellite-based observations in nadir geometry employs a radiative transfer forward model. The forward model simulates the observed quantity, aiming to reproduce the observation. LINTRAN v2.0 is a linearised vector radiative transfer forward model, employing forward-adjoint theory, that is capable of modelling cloud contaminated satellite observations and their derivatives with respect to the state of the atmosphere and the Earth's surface in a numerically efficient manner. A significant gain in efficiency with respect to its predecessor (LINTRAN v1.0) is achieved through a mathematical framework that combines an approximate iterative solving method using the forward-adjoint perturbation theory with separation of the first N orders of scattering from the diffuse intensity vector field. Contributions to the observable up to order of scattering N are recursively solved in an analytical manner. Contributions from higher orders of scattering are subsequently solved in a numerical manner, assuming that the intensity field varies linearly with the vertical coordinate within an optically homogeneous model layer. This method is implemented in LINTRAN v2.0, choosing N=2, within the general framework of forward-adjoint perturbation theory. This new approach allows us to decrease the number of model layers and the degree of angular quadrature within the numerical solver by a factor of 10 and 1.4 respectively, compared to the previous model version, assuming a homogeneous atmosphere loaded with scattering Mie particles (size parameter χ≈35). In this homogeneous atmosphere, the reduced discretisation sampling in turn reduces the numerical effort associated with the numerical matrix solver by a factor of 42 relative to the previous model version, without

  13. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  14. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  15. Euler angles as torsional flat spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Mandujano, Hector A.

    In this work we use general tensor calculus to compare the geodesic equation of motion and Newton's first law for force-free classical systems that are described by an arbitrary number of generalized coordinates in spaces with and without torsion. We choose as objects of study the flat torsional Euler angle metric spaces for rigid rotators. We tested the equivalence of the two motion equations using computational software that allowed algebraic manipulation. The main result is that the equivalence only holds for torsion-free spaces, and for isotropic force-free rotators. We present analytical calculations for the isotropic case and computational results for the general case.

  16. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USMT,2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  17. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  18. Measurement of critical contact angle in a microgravity space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the NASA USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's ``double proboscis'' containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  19. Measurement of critical contact angle in a microgravity space experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1999-06-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the NASA USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's double proboscis containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  20. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Meijer, E.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Monteiro, D.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.

    2012-09-01

    The Gaia mission will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the ‘Basic Angle’. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system for this mission. The BAM measures the relative motion of Gaia’s telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to measure Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction to the Gaia mission, the Payload Module (PLM) and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material, this presentation will address an overview of the challenges towards the key requirements, design, integration and testing (including space-level qualification) of the Gaia BAM.

  1. Optimum Projection Angle for Attaining Maximum Distance in a Soccer Punt Kick

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Patel, Dipesh S.

    2011-01-01

    To produce the greatest horizontal distance in a punt kick the ball must be projected at an appropriate angle. Here, we investigated the optimum projection angle that maximises the distance attained in a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper. Two male players performed many maximum-effort kicks using projection angles of between 10° and 90°. The kicks were recorded by a video camera at 100 Hz and a 2 D biomechanical analysis was conducted to obtain measures of the projection velocity, projection angle, projection height, ball spin rate, and foot velocity at impact. The player’s optimum projection angle was calculated by substituting mathematical equations for the relationships between the projection variables into the equations for the aerodynamic flight of a soccer ball. The calculated optimum projection angles were in agreement with the player’s preferred projection angles (40° and 44°). In projectile sports even a small dependence of projection velocity on projection angle is sufficient to produce a substantial shift in the optimum projection angle away from 45°. In the punt kicks studied here, the optimum projection angle was close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball remained almost constant across all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing projection angle and so the optimum projection angle is well below 45°. Key points The optimum projection angle that maximizes the distance of a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper is about 45°. The optimum projection angle is close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball is almost the same at all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the optimum projection angle is well below 45° because the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing

  2. The ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic nd {yields} p(nn) to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange-process yields at the proton emitting angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. over 0.55-2.0 GeV neutron beam energy region. Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, V. I. Morozov, A. A.; Shindin, R. A.; Antonenko, V. G.; Borzakov, S. B.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Chernykh, E. V.; Chumakov, V. F.; Dolgii, S. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Golovanov, L. B.; Guriev, D. K.; Janata, A.; Kirillov, A. D.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Krasnov, V. A.; Kuzmin, N. A.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.

    2009-06-15

    New experimental results on ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic charge-exchange yield at the outgoing proton angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. for the nd {yields} p(nn) reaction to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange yield, are presented. The measurements were carried out at the Nuclotron of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energies of the JINR (Dubna) at the neutron-beam kinetic energies of 0.55, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.0 GeV. The intense neutron beam with small momentum spread was produced by breakup of deuterons which were accelerated and extracted to the experimental hall. In both reactions mentioned above the outgoing protons with the momenta p{sub p} approximately equal to the neutron-beam momentum p{sub n,beam} were detected in the directions close to the direction of incident neutrons, i.e., in the vicinity of the scattering angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. Measured in the same data-taking runs, the angular distributions of the charge-exchange-reaction products were corrected for the well-known instrumental effects and averaged in the vicinity of the incident-neutron-beam direction. These corrected angular distributions for every of nd {yields} p(nn) and np {yields} pn charge-exchange processes were proportional to the differential cross sections of the corresponding reactions. The data were accumulated by Delta-Sigma setup magnetic spectrometer with two sets of multiwire proportional chambers located upstream and downstream of the momentum analyzing magnet. Inelastic processes were considerably reduced by the additional detectors surrounding the hydrogen and deuterium targets. The time-of-flight system was applied to identify the detected particles. The accumulated data treatment and analysis, as well as possible sources of the systematic errors are discussed.

  3. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  4. Fractures of angle of mandible – A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sourav; Fry, Ramesh R.; Joshi, Ajit; Sharma, Geeta; Singh, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Aims This retrospective study was done to evaluate the efficacy of single miniplate osteosynthesis at superior border of angle of mandible. Material and methods In this study 50 patients were treated by single miniplate osteosynthesis according to Champy's principle. Bite force generated was used as a parameter for judging the efficacy of internal fixation. In this article we present our experience over the years in the management of the fractures of angle of mandible based on this model. Results Most patients were of 21–30 yrs of age with unilateral angle fracture of mandible except one patient who had isolated bilateral angle fracture. The patients were treated successfully according to Champy's principle of osteosynthesis. There was a progressive improvement in the bite force generated after osteosynthesis. Conclusions The angle of the mandible is an anatomically weak and an area susceptible to fracture. The presence of an impacted or partially erupted third molar tooth further weakens it. Angle of mandible is the most common site for fracture however, bilateral angle fracture is very rare and uncommon. Osteosynthesis according to Champy's model led to an early functional improvement as demonstrated by the bite force generated. PMID:25737858

  5. Moment-angle relations in the initial time of contraction.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, E N; Herzog, W; Boudolos, K D

    2010-09-01

    Standard moment-angle relations are typically obtained for values at maximum of contraction. Muscle properties for contraction times, similar to the short times of powerful athletic activities, may be more important than muscle properties that are obtained at maximum (TMAX) of contraction. The research question was whether moment-angle relations obtained during the initial time course of contraction are linearly scaled reflections of moment-angle relations obtained at maximum of contraction. The isometric moment of the knee extensor and the electromyographic activity (EMG) of the knee extensor and flexor muscles were measured at 9 knee angles in 22 elite female track and field jumpers. Absolute moments (Nm), relative moments (%TMAX) and EMG integrals were determined at 30 ms, 50 ms, 150 ms and 200 ms from the onset of contraction and at maximum. For moment-angle relations obtained during the initial time course of contraction, there was a shift of the optimum knee angle to a more extended knee. During the initial time course of the contraction, %TMAX moment was greater near full knee extension. The EMG activity was the same across knee angles. The results may have important practical implications for muscular force evaluation for activities where maximum force production is coupled to a short activation time.

  6. Dayside temperatures in the Venus upper atmosphere from Venus Express/VIRTIS nadir measurements at 4.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Gilli, G.; Piccialli, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed nadir observations of atmospheric infrared emissions carried out by VIRTIS, a high-resolution spectrometer on board the European spacecraft Venus Express. We focused on the ro-vibrational band of CO2 at 4.3 μm on the dayside, whose fluorescence originates in the Venus upper mesosphere and above. This is the first time that a systematic sounding of these non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) emissions has been carried out in Venus using this geometry. As many as 143,218 spectra have been analysed on the dayside during the period 14/05/2006 to 14/09/2009. We designed an inversion method to obtain the atmospheric temperature from these non-thermal observations, including a NLTE line-by-line forward model and a pre-computed set of spectra for a set of thermal structures and illumination conditions. Our measurements sound a broad region of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere of Venus ranging from 10-2-10-5 mb (which in the Venus International Reference Atmosphere, VIRA, is approximately 100-150 km during the daytime) and show a maximum around 195 ± 10 K in the subsolar region, decreasing with latitude and local time towards the terminator. This is in qualitative agreement with predictions by a Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) after a proper averaging of altitudes for meaningful comparisons, although our temperatures are colder than the model by about 25 K throughout. We estimate a thermal gradient of about 35 K between the subsolar and antisolar points when comparing our data with nightside temperatures measured at similar altitudes by SPICAV, another instrument on Venus Express (VEx). Our data show a stable temperature structure through five years of measurements, but we also found episodes of strong heating/cooling to occur in the subsolar region of less than two days. The table with numerical data and averaged temperatures displayed in Fig. 7A provided as a CSV data file is only available at the CDS via

  7. A new procedure for measuring contact angle

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1994-05-01

    Described here are some recent work regarding the mathematic design of apparatus that exploits microgravity conditions for accurate experimental determination of contact angle. The underlying motivation for the procedures rests on a discontinuous dependence of the capillary free surface interface S on the contact angle {gamma}, in a cylindrical capillary tube whose section (base) {Omega} contains a protruding corner with opening angle 2{alpha}.

  8. 30 CFR 57.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fleet angles. 57.19037 Section 57.19037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Sheaves § 57.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not...

  9. 30 CFR 56.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fleet angles. 56.19037 Section 56.19037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Sheaves § 56.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not...

  10. SU-E-I-56: Scan Angle Reduction for a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scanning angle required by the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for intrafraction verification. Methods: LIVE acquires limited angle MV projections from the exit fluence of the arc treatment beam or during gantry rotation between static beams. Orthogonal limited-angle kV projections are also acquired simultaneously to provide additional information. LIVE considers the on-board 4D-CBCT images as a deformation of the prior 4D-CT images, and solves the deformation field based on deformation models and data fidelity constraint. LIVE reaches a checkpoint after a limited-angle scan, and reconstructs 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification at the checkpoint. In adaptive reconstruction strategy, a larger scanning angle of 30° is used for the first checkpoint, and smaller scanning angles of 15° are used for subsequent checkpoints. The onboard images reconstructed at the previous adjacent checkpoint are used as the prior images for reconstruction at the current checkpoint. As the algorithm only needs to reconstruct the small deformation occurred between adjacent checkpoints, projections from a smaller scan angle provide enough information for the reconstruction. XCAT was used to simulate tumor motion baseline drift of 2mm along sup-inf direction at every subsequent checkpoint, which are 15° apart. Adaptive reconstruction strategy was used to reconstruct the images at each checkpoint using orthogonal 15° kV and MV projections. Results: Results showed that LIVE reconstructed the tumor volumes accurately using orthogonal 15° kV-MV projections. Volume percentage differences (VPDs) were within 5% and center of mass shifts (COMS) were within 1mm for reconstruction at all checkpoints. Conclusion: It's feasible to use an adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scan angle needed by LIVE to allow faster and more frequent intrafraction verification to minimize the

  11. A system concept for wide swath constant incident angle coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claassen, J. P.; Eckerman, J.

    1978-01-01

    Multiple beam approach readily overcomes radar ambiguity constraints associated with orbital systems and therefore permits imagery over swaths much wider than 100 kilometers. Furthermore, the antenna technique permits imagery at nearly constant incident angles. When frequency scanning is employed, the center angle may be programmed. The redundant use of the antenna aperture during reception results in lower transmitted power and in shorter antenna lengths in comparison to conventional designs. Compatibility of the approach with passive imagery is also considered.

  12. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer.

  13. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb’s angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=−0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  14. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  15. Multilateration with the wide-angle airborne laser ranging system: positioning precision and atmospheric effects.

    PubMed

    Bock, O

    1999-05-20

    Numerical simulations based on previously validated models for the wide-angle airborne laser ranging system are used here for assessing the precision in coordinate estimates of ground-based cube-corner retroreflectors (CCR's). It is shown that the precision can be optimized to first order as a function of instrument performance, number of laser shots (LS's), and network size. Laser beam divergence, aircraft altitude, and CCR density are only second-order parameters, provided that the number of echoes per LS is greater than 20. Thus precision in the vertical is approximately 1 mm, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 50 at nadir, a 10-km altitude, a 20 degrees beam divergence, and approximately 5 x 10(3) measurements. Scintillation and fair-weather cumulus clouds usually have negligible influence on the estimates. Laser biases and path delay are compensated for by adjustment of aircraft offsets. The predominant atmospheric effect is with mesoscale nonuniform horizontal temperature gradients, which might lead to biases near 0.5 mm.

  16. Extracting Accurate and Precise Topography from Lroc Narrow Angle Camera Stereo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, M. R.; Manheim, M. R.; Speyerer, E. J.; Robinson, M. S.; LROC Team

    2016-06-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) includes two identical Narrow Angle Cameras (NAC) that acquire meter scale imaging. Stereo observations are acquired by imaging from two or more orbits, including at least one off-nadir slew. Digital terrain models (DTMs) generated from the stereo observations are controlled to Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) elevation profiles. With current processing methods, digital terrain models (DTM) have absolute accuracies commensurate than the uncertainties of the LOLA profiles (~10 m horizontally and ~1 m vertically) and relative horizontal and vertical precisions better than the pixel scale of the DTMs (2 to 5 m). The NAC stereo pairs and derived DTMs represent an invaluable tool for science and exploration purposes. We computed slope statistics from 81 highland and 31 mare DTMs across a range of baselines. Overlapping DTMs of single stereo sets were also combined to form larger area DTM mosaics, enabling detailed characterization of large geomorphic features and providing a key resource for future exploration planning. Currently, two percent of the lunar surface is imaged in NAC stereo and continued acquisition of stereo observations will serve to strengthen our knowledge of the Moon and geologic processes that occur on all the terrestrial planets.

  17. The Effect of Incidence Angle on Stereo DTM Quality: Simulations in Support of Europa Clipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T. M.; Jorda, L.

    2014-12-01

    Many quality factors for digital topographic models (DTMs) from stereo imaging can be predicted geometrically. For example, pixel scale is related to instantaneous field of view and to range. DTM resolution can be no better than a few times this pixel scale. Even vertical precision is a known function of the pixel scale and convergence angle, providedthe image quality is high enough that automated image matching reaches its optimal precision (~0.2 pixel). The influence of incidence angle is harder to predict. Reduced quality is expected both at low incidence (where topographic shading disappears) and high incidence (where signal/noise ratio is low and shadows occur). This problem is of general interest, but especially critical for the Europa Clipper mission profile. Clipper would obtain a radar sounding profile on each Europa flyby. Stereo images collected simultaneously would be used to produce a DTM needed to distinguish off-nadir surface echos (clutter) from subsurface features. The question is, how much of this DTM strip will be useful, given that incidence angle will vary substantially? We are using simulations to answer this question. We produced a 210 m/post DTM of the Castalia Macula region of Europa from 6 Galileo images by photoclinometry. A low-incidence image was used to correct for albedo variations before photoclinometry. We are using the image simulation software OASIS to generate synthetic stereopairs of the region at a full range of incidence angles. These images will be realistic in terms of image resolution, noise, photometry including albedo variations (based on the low incidence image), and cast shadows. The pairs will then be analyzed with the commercial stereomapping software SOCET SET (® BAE Systems), which we have used for a wide variety of planetary mapping projects. Comparing the stereo-derived DTMs to the input ("truth") DTM will allow us to quantify the dependence of true DTM resolution and vertical precision on illumination, and to

  18. Adaptive control of a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control algorithm for realizing a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope so that rotation angle can be directly measured without integration of angular rate, thus eliminating the accumulation of numerical integration errors. The proposed control algorithm uses a trajectory following approach and the reference trajectory is generated by an ideal angle measuring gyroscope driven by the estimate of angular rate and the auxiliary sinusoidal input so that the persistent excitation condition is satisfied. The developed control algorithm can compensate for all types of fabrication imperfections such as coupled damping and stiffness, and mismatched stiffness and un-equal damping term in an on-line fashion. The simulation results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control algorithm that is capable of directly measuring rotation angle without the integration of angular rate.

  19. Role of Pitch Angle Anisotropy in Ring Current Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Y.; Sazykin, S.; Fok, M. H.; Buzulukova, N.; Wolf, R.

    2009-12-01

    We quantitatively investigate the degree to which the basic characteristics of the injection of a storm-time ring current depend on the pitch-angle distribution. The investigation centers on a comparison of two simulations of the August 12, 2000 storm: one based on the Rice Convection Model (RCM), which assumes an isotropic pitch angle distribution, and the other on the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM), which calculates the pitch angle distribution in detail. Results from the two runs are compared with regard to the main-phase increase in the energy in ring current particles, the strength and distribution of the region-2 currents, and the strength and pattern of the prompt-penetration electric field. We also compare the recovery phase characteristics predicted by the CRCM, which carefully calculates the changes in pitch-angle distribution as charge exchange proceeds, and the RCM, which uses a much simpler way of estimating charge-exchange loss.

  20. Wing-alone aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, R. L., Jr.; Lamb, M.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine wing-alone supersonic aerodynamic characteristics at high angles of attack. The family of wings tested varied in aspect ratio from 0.5 to 4.0 and taper ratio from 0.0 to 1.0. The wings were tested at angles of attack ranging from 0 to 60 deg and Mach numbers from 1.6 to 4.6. The aerodynamic characteristics were obtained by integrating local pressures measured over the wing surface. Comparison of these data with the limited available data from the literature indicate the present data are free of sting interference effects through the test range of angle of attack. Presented and discussed are results showing the effects of model geometry, Mach number and angle of attack on aerodynamic characteristics consisting of normal force, pitching moment, bending moment, longitudinal center-of-pressure locations, and lateral center-of-pressure locations.

  1. Report on APMP key comparison: calibration of angle standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, C.-S.; Kruger, O. A.; Cox, P.; Xue, Z.; Liou, P.; Wong, S. Y.; Chaudhary, K. P.; Alfiyati, N.; Watanabe, T.; Eom, T.; Halim, R. M.; Tan, S. L.; Tonmueanwai, A.; Dibo, M.

    2016-01-01

    A regional key comparison, APMP.L-K3 (calibration of angle standards) was held in 2005. Thirteen National Metrology Institutes (NMISA, NMIA, KRISS, NMIJ/ AIST, NMC/ A*STAR, NIMT, SCL, CMS/ ITRI, NPLI, RCM- LIPI, NIM, and NSCL) have participated in this comparison and the measurements were carried out during the period from April 2005 to December 2007. This report describes the measurement results of a 12-sided optical polygon with nominal angles of 30°, and four angle blocks with nominal angles of 5 arc seconds, 5 minutes, 30 minutes and 5 degrees, respectively. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. ILC Extraction Line for 14 mrad Crossing Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; Seryi, A.; Parker, B.; /Brookhaven

    2005-12-08

    The earlier studies of the ILC extraction line for 20 mrad and 2 mrad crossing angle options [1]-[5] showed that the 20 mrad design has an advantage of a simpler beamline and lower extraction beam loss because of the independent incoming and extraction optics. However, the large 20 mrad crossing angle requires the use of a crab cavity correction, increases synchrotron radiation emittance growth in the solenoid, and increases photon backscattering from the forward calorimeter of the detector. To reduce these effects, an attempt has been made to minimize the crossing angle while keeping the extraction and incoming lines separate. A new quadrupole scheme near the interaction point has been proposed which allows a reduction of the crossing angle to 14 mrad [6]. The optics design and results of tracking and background simulations for the 14 mrad extraction line are presented.

  3. Folded cavity angled-grating broad-area lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunsong; Zhu, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The angled-grating broad-area laser is a promising candidate for high power, high brightness diode laser source. The key point in the design is the angled gratings which can simultaneously support the unique snake-like zigzag lasing mode and eliminate the direct Fabry-Perot (FP) feedback. Unlike a conventional laser waveguide mode, the phase front of the zigzag mode periodically changes along the propagation direction. By use of the mirror symmetry of the zigzag mode, we propose and demonstrate the folded cavity angled-grating broad-area lasers. One benefit of this design is to reduce the required wafer space compared to a regular angled-grating broad-area laser, especially in a long cavity laser for high power operation. Experimental results show that the folded cavity laser exhibits good beam quality in far field with a slightly larger threshold and smaller slope efficiency due to the additional interface loss.

  4. Axial Tilt Angles of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert F.

    1996-12-01

    Separate Mount Wilson plage and sunspot group data sets are analyzed in this review to illustrate several interesting aspects of active region axial tilt angles. (1) The distribution of tilt angles differs between plages and sunspot groups in the sense that plages have slightly higher tilt angles, on average, than do spot groups. (2) The distributions of average plage total magnetic flux, or sunspot group area, with tilt angle show a consistent effect: those groups with tilt angles nearest the average values are larger (or have a greater total flux) on average than those farther from the average values. Moreover, the average tilt angles on which these size or flux distributions are centered differ for the two types of objects, and represent closely the actual different average tilt angles for these two features. (3) The polarity separation distances of plages and sunspot groups show a clear relationship to average tilt angles. In the case of each feature, smaller polarity separations are correlated with smaller tilt angles. (4) The dynamics of regions also show a clear relationship with region tilt angles. The spot groups with tilt angles nearest the average value (or perhaps 0-deg tilt angle) have on average a faster rotation rate than those groups with extreme tilt angles. All of these tilt-angle characteristics may be assumed to be related to the physical forces that affect the magnetic flux loop that forms the region. These aspects are discussed in this brief review within the context of our current view of the formation of active region magnetic flux at the solar surface.

  5. Assessment of scan-angle dependent radiometric bias of Suomi-NPP VIIRS day/night band from night light point source observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yan; Cao, Changyong; Shao, Xi

    2015-09-01

    The low gain stage of VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB) on Suomi-NPP is calibrated using onboard solar diffuser. The calibration is then transferred to the high gain stage of DNB based on the gain ratio determined from data collected along solar terminator region. The calibration transfer causes increase of uncertainties and affects the accuracy of the low light radiances observed by DNB at night. Since there are 32 aggregation zones from nadir to the edge of the scan and each zone has its own calibration, the calibration versus scan angle of DNB needs to be independently assessed. This study presents preliminary analysis of the scan-angle dependence of the light intensity from bridge lights, oil platforms, power plants, and flares observed by VIIRS DNB since 2014. Effects of atmospheric path length associated with scan angle are analyzed. In addition, other effects such as light changes at the time of observation are also discussed. The methodology developed will be especially useful for JPSS J1 VIIRS due to the nonlinearity effects at high scan angles, and the modification of geolocation software code for different aggregation modes. It is known that J1 VIIRS DNB has large nonlinearity across aggregation zones, and requires new aggregation modes, as well as more comprehensive validation.

  6. Wave-angle control of delta evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2011-07-01

    Wave-influenced deltas, with large-scale arcuate shapes and demarcated beach ridge complexes, often display an asymmetrical form about their river channel. Here, we use a numerical model to demonstrate that the angles from which waves approach a delta can have a first-order influence upon its plan-view morphologic evolution and sedimentary architecture. The directional spread of incoming waves plays a dominant role over fluvial sediment discharge in controlling the width of an active delta lobe, which in turn affects the characteristic rates of delta progradation. Oblique wave approach (and a consequent net alongshore sediment transport) can lead to the development of morphologic asymmetry about the river in a delta's plan-view form. This plan-form asymmetry can include the development of discrete breaks in shoreline orientation and the appearance of self-organized features arising from shoreline instability along the downdrift delta flank, such as spits and migrating shoreline sand waves—features observed on natural deltas. Somewhat surprisingly, waves approaching preferentially from one direction tend to increase sediment deposition updrift of the river. This ‘morphodynamic groin effect’ occurs when the delta's plan-form aspect ratio is sufficiently large such that the orientation of the shoreline on the downdrift flank is rotated past the angle of maximum alongshore sediment transport, resulting in preferential redirection of fluvial sediment updrift of the river mouth.

  7. Angled Layers in Super Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers used a special imaging technique with the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to get as detailed a look as possible at a target region near eastern foot of 'Burns Cliff.' The intervening terrain was too difficult for driving the rover closer. The target is the boundary between two sections of layered rock. The layers in lower section (left) run at a marked angle to the layers in next higher section (right).

    This view is the product of a technique called super resolution. It was generated from data acquired on sol 288 of Opportunity's mission (Nov. 14, 2004) from a position along the southeast wall of 'Endurance Crater.' Resolution slightly higher than normal for the panoramic camera was synthesized for this view by combining 17 separate images of this scene, each one 'dithered' or pointed slightly differently from the previous one. Computer manipulation of the individual images was then used to generate a new synthetic view of the scene in a process known mathematically as iterative deconvolution, but referred to informally as super resolution. Similar methods have been used to enhance the resolution of images from the Mars Pathfinder mission and the Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. Angiomas of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Viale, G L; Pau, A; Viale, E S; Turtas, S

    1981-01-01

    Angiomas situated within the pontocerebellar cistern lie superficially on the ventrolateral aspect of the brain stem. Occasionally, minor extensions penetrate into the adjacent nervous structures. Five patients bearing such lesions were operated upon, using a microsurgical technique. Radical excision was performed in all cases. Within 2 to 12 months the patients had returned to their previous occupations, being fully able to work or attend school. There is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of surgical treatment of angiomas of the ventrolateral aspect of the brain stem and the cerebellopontine angle. The illness usually presents with hemorrhages of varying severity, ranging from mild to devastating. Impairment of consciousness, contralateral hemiparesis and ipsilateral cranial nerve palsies are the most frequent neurological signs after bleeding. The outcome following excision is primarily related to the preoperative condition. No additional deficits or only minor further impairment can be expected from surgical interference. Exploration is advisable whenever the malformation appears to lie on the surface rather than within the brain stem.

  9. The influence of incident angle on physical properties of a novel back contact prepared by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yue; Feng, Yue; Shen, Jiesheng; Liang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Jian; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, oblique vacuum thermal evaporation and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique are used to produce a novel back contact electrode (BCE) of CuInS2 solar cell. These novel back contact electrodes (BCEs) are based on a layered structure of Mo/Ag/Mo (MAM). The influence of vapor source incidence angle θ on optical-electrical properties of novel BCE is investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Surface Profiler, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-vis-IR Spectrometer, and Four-point Probe Method. According to the analysis of AFM images of BCEs, the variation tendencies of surface roughness and uniformity are closely related to the incidence angle θ. The surface roughness increases with the increase of incidence angle θ, but the uniformity becomes poor at same time. This phenomenon can be attributed to the variation of interlayer Ag films (the density and inclined angle of Ag nanorods). The results of four-point probe test show that the novel BCE deposited by vapor source incidence angle θ equal to 45° owns the lowest resistance value of 3.71 × 10-8 Ω m, which is probably due to a loose and multi-point contact interface between Ag layer and top layer (Mo2). The reflectance of novel BCEs deposited by incident angle less than 45° is higher than that of normal bi-layer Mo (Mo12) BCE. As a result, the efficiency of corresponding solar cell may be upgraded.

  10. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  11. Influence of Different Diffuser Angle on Sedan's Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xingjun; Zhang, Rui; Ye, Jian; Yan, Xu; Zhao, Zhiming

    The aerodynamic characteristics have a great influence on the fuel economics and the steering stability of a high speed vehicle. The underbody rear diffuser is one of important aerodynamic add-on devices. The parameters of the diffuser, including the diffuser angle, the number and the shape of separators, the shape of the end plate and etc, will affect the underbody flow and the wake. Here, just the influence of the diffuser angle was investigated without separator and the end plate. The method of Computational Fluid Dynamics was adopted to study the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified sedan with a different diffuser angle respectively. The diffuser angle was set to 0°, 3°, 6°, 9.8° and 12° respectively. The diffuser angle of the original model is 9.8°. The conclusions were drawn that when the diffuser angle increases, the underbody flow and especially the wake change greatly and the pressure change correspondingly; as a result, the total aerodynamic drag coefficients of car first decrease and then increases, while the total aerodynamic lift coefficients decrease.

  12. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  13. Limbus Impact on Off-angle Iris Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Barstow, Del R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph W; Bolme, David S; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of iris recognition depends on the quality of data capture and is negatively affected by several factors such as angle, occlusion, and dilation. Off-angle iris recognition is a new research focus in biometrics that tries to address several issues including corneal refraction, complex 3D iris texture, and blur. In this paper, we present an additional significant challenge that degrades the performance of the off-angle iris recognition systems, called the limbus effect . The limbus is the region at the border of the cornea where the cornea joins the sclera. The limbus is a semitransparent tissue that occludes a side portion of the iris plane. The amount of occluded iris texture on the side nearest the camera increases as the image acquisition angle increases. Without considering the role of the limbus effect, it is difficult to design an accurate off-angle iris recognition system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that investigates the limbus effect in detail from a biometrics perspective. Based on results from real images and simulated experiments with real iris texture, the limbus effect increases the hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 depending upon the limbus height.

  14. Uncertainties in Small-Angle Measurement Systems Used to Calibrate Angle Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jack A; Amer, Mohamed; Faust, Bryon; Zimmerman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a number of effects that can give rise to errors in small-angle measurement systems when they are used to calibrate artifacts such as optical polygons. Of these sources of uncertainty, the most difficult to quantify are errors associated with the measurement of imperfect, non-flat faces of the artifact, causing the instrument to misinterpret the average orientation of the surface. In an attempt to shed some light on these errors, we have compared autocollimator measurements to angle measurements made with a Fizeau phase-shifting interferometer. These two instruments have very different operating principles and implement different definitions of the orientation of a surface, but (surprisingly) we have not yet seen any clear differences between results obtained with the autocollimator and with the interferometer. The interferometer is in some respects an attractive alternative to an autocollimator for small-angle measurement; it implements an unambiguous and robust definition of surface orientation in terms of the tilt of a best-fit plane, and it is easier to quantify likely errors of the interferometer measurements than to evaluate autocollimator uncertainty.

  15. Uncertainties in Small-Angle Measurement Systems Used to Calibrate Angle Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack A.; Amer, Mohamed; Faust, Bryon; Zimmerman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a number of effects that can give rise to errors in small-angle measurement systems when they are used to calibrate artifacts such as optical polygons. Of these sources of uncertainty, the most difficult to quantify are errors associated with the measurement of imperfect, non-flat faces of the artifact, causing the instrument to misinterpret the average orientation of the surface. In an attempt to shed some light on these errors, we have compared autocollimator measurements to angle measurements made with a Fizeau phase-shifting interferometer. These two instruments have very different operating principles and implement different definitions of the orientation of a surface, but (surprisingly) we have not yet seen any clear differences between results obtained with the autocollimator and with the interferometer. The interferometer is in some respects an attractive alternative to an autocollimator for small-angle measurement; it implements an unambiguous and robust definition of surface orientation in terms of the tilt of a best-fit plane, and it is easier to quantify likely errors of the interferometer measurements than to evaluate autocollimator uncertainty. PMID:27366616

  16. Dual-view angle backlight module design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Tsuen; Pan, Jui-Wen

    2015-10-01

    We propose a bilayer light guide plate (BLGP) with specially designed microstructures and two light source modules to achieve an adjustable viewing angle backlight for ecofriendly displays. The dual viewing angle backlight module has a thin, simple structure and a high optical efficiency. Comparison with the conventional edge-lit backlight module shows an improvement in the on-axis luminance of the narrow viewing angle mode of 4.3 times and a decrease in the half-luminance angle of 7° in the horizontal direction. When using the wide viewing angle mode, there is an improvement in the on-axis luminance of 1.8 times and an improvement in the half-luminance angle of 54° in the horizontal direction. The uniformity of illuminance can reach 80% in each mode. The backlight optical sheet number is reduced from 5 to 1. PMID:26479670

  17. Ultrasonic anemometer angle of attack errors under turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, T.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements of eddy fluxes are premised on the assumption that wind speeds are measured accurately by an ultrasonic anemometer. Recently, ultrasonic anemometers have been shown to suffer errors depending on the angle of attack, which is the angle between the wind vector and the horizontal. The correction of these errors resulted in general increases in eddy fluxes. However, since the check of the angle of attack dependent error was carried out in the wind tunnel experiment, which would be under the condition of nearly laminar flow, the applicability of this correction to the field data under turbulent conditions has been questioned. In this study, angle of attack dependencies of wind speeds measured by Gill Windmaster ultrasonic anemometers were assessed by field experiment over meadow, considered to be turbulent conditions. By using five identical anemometers, two pairs of systems were prepared: two anemometers for references and one between them for tilt. The dependencies of (co)sine responses of anemometers on angles of attack of 0 to -90 degrees in 10-degree steps and 45 degrees were checked, and clarified that the angle of attack dependent errors occur also under turbulent conditions, with results similar to the wind tunnel experiments. Sine responses of vertical wind speeds depended not only on vertical angle of attack but also on horizontal wind direction, which had not been considered in previous studies. For more robust correction, alternative calibration functions were obtained empirically so as to reasonably explain our field experimental results. Applying this new correction, eddy fluxes increased substantially even over meadow, which is somewhat aerodynamically smooth compared with forests or agricultural fields.

  18. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type.

  19. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  20. Straight ladder inclined angle in a field environment: the relationship among actual angle, method of set-up and knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Chi; Brunette, Christopher; Fallentin, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ladder inclined angle is a critical factor that could lead to a slip at the base of portable straight ladders, a major cause of falls from heights. Despite several methods established to help workers achieve the recommended 75.5° angle for ladder set-up, it remains unclear if these methods are used in practice. This study explored ladder set-up behaviours in a field environment. Professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for ladder set-up at their worksites. The results showed that the actual angles of 265 ladder set-ups by 67 participants averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°. Although all the participants had training on recommended ladder set-up methods, only 3 out of 67 participants applied these methods in their daily work and even they failed to achieve the desired 75.5° angle. Therefore, ladder set-up remains problematic in real-world situations. Practitioner Summary: Professional installers of a cable company were observed for portable straight ladder set-up at their worksites. The ladder inclined angle averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°, while the recommended angle is 75.5°. Only a few participants used the methods that they learned during training in their daily work. PMID:26672809

  1. Straight ladder inclined angle in a field environment: the relationship among actual angle, method of set-up and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Chi; Brunette, Christopher; Fallentin, Nils

    2016-08-01

    Ladder inclined angle is a critical factor that could lead to a slip at the base of portable straight ladders, a major cause of falls from heights. Despite several methods established to help workers achieve the recommended 75.5° angle for ladder set-up, it remains unclear if these methods are used in practice. This study explored ladder set-up behaviours in a field environment. Professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for ladder set-up at their worksites. The results showed that the actual angles of 265 ladder set-ups by 67 participants averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°. Although all the participants had training on recommended ladder set-up methods, only 3 out of 67 participants applied these methods in their daily work and even they failed to achieve the desired 75.5° angle. Therefore, ladder set-up remains problematic in real-world situations. Practitioner Summary: Professional installers of a cable company were observed for portable straight ladder set-up at their worksites. The ladder inclined angle averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°, while the recommended angle is 75.5°. Only a few participants used the methods that they learned during training in their daily work.

  2. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  3. Step angles to reduce the north-finding error caused by rate random walk with fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Xie, Jun; Yang, Chuanchuan; He, Changhong; Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Ziyu

    2015-10-20

    We study the relationship between the step angles and the accuracy of north finding with fiber optic gyroscopes. A north-finding method with optimized step angles is proposed to reduce the errors caused by rate random walk (RRW). Based on this method, the errors caused by both angle random walk and RRW are reduced by increasing the number of positions. For when the number of positions is even, we proposed a north-finding method with symmetric step angles that can reduce the error caused by RRW and is not affected by the azimuth angles. Experimental results show that, compared with the traditional north-finding method, the proposed methods with the optimized step angles and the symmetric step angles can reduce the north-finding errors by 67.5% and 62.5%, respectively. The method with symmetric step angles is not affected by the azimuth angles and can offer consistent high accuracy for any azimuth angles.

  4. High Resolution Quantitative Angle-Scanning Widefield Surface Plasmon Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Han-Min; Pechprasarn, Suejit; Zhang, Jing; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Michael G.

    2016-02-01

    We describe the construction of a prismless widefield surface plasmon microscope; this has been applied to imaging of the interactions of protein and antibodies in aqueous media. The illumination angle of spatially incoherent diffuse laser illumination was controlled with an amplitude spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate back focal plane to allow dynamic control of the illumination angle. Quantitative surface plasmon microscopy images with high spatial resolution were acquired by post-processing a series of images obtained as a function of illumination angle. Experimental results are presented showing spatially and temporally resolved binding of a protein to a ligand. We also show theoretical results calculated by vector diffraction theory that accurately predict the response of the microscope on a spatially varying sample thus allowing proper quantification and interpretation of the experimental results.

  5. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-12-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  6. An optical angle of attack sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, T. Kevin; Owen, F. Kevin

    A major source of transonic and supersonic wind-tunnel test data uncertainty is due to angle of attack (alpha) measurement errors caused by unknown sting and balance deflections under load. A novel laser-based instrument has been developed to enable continuous time-dependent alpha measurements to be made without signal dropout. Detectors capable of 0.01-deg resolution over an 18-deg range and 0.03-deg resolution over a 44-deg range with time-dependent outputs of 60 Hz have been developed. This capability is sufficient to provide accurate real-time alpha information for correlation with model balance measurements during transport and fighter model testing. Proof-of-concept experiments, along with the results of recent measurements conducted at the NASA Ames 9 x 7-ft supersonic wind tunnel, are presented. Experiments were also conducted to determine the reliable range, sensitivity, and long-term stability of the instrument.

  7. Experimental determination of the quark mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, G.L. )

    1991-07-30

    This paper reviews the current status of the determination of the quark mixing angles {vert bar}V{sub qq{prime}}{vert bar}, where q = u,c; q{prime} = d,s,b. The authors consider essentially exclusive decay processes, taking into account the main sources of uncertainties, the available calculations of flavor symmetry breaking for hadronic matrix elements and the possibilities of improvement offered by new experimental results. In some cases the authors provide full expressions for {vert bar}V{sub qq{prime}}{vert bar} in terms of measurable decay properties, which can be useful for new experimental data. Finally, the authors discuss briefly the effects on the unitarity tests of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix when the authors consider recent corrections to the determination of {vert bar}V {sub ud}{vert bar}.

  8. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  9. Repulsion-based model for contact angle saturation in electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new model for contact angle saturation phenomenon in electrowetting on dielectric systems. This new model attributes contact angle saturation to repulsion between trapped charges on the cap and base surfaces of the droplet in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line, which prevents these surfaces from converging during contact angle reduction. This repulsion-based saturation is similar to repulsion between charges accumulated on the surfaces of conducting droplets which causes the well known Coulombic fission and Taylor cone formation phenomena. In our model, both the droplet and dielectric coating were treated as lossy dielectric media (i.e., having finite electrical conductivities and permittivities) contrary to the more common assumption of a perfectly conducting droplet and perfectly insulating dielectric. We used theoretical analysis and numerical simulations to find actual charge distribution on droplet surface, calculate repulsion energy, and minimize energy of the total system as a function of droplet contact angle. Resulting saturation curves were in good agreement with previously reported experimental results. We used this proposed model to predict effect of changing liquid properties, such as electrical conductivity, and system parameters, such as thickness of the dielectric layer, on the saturation angle, which also matched experimental results. PMID:25759748

  10. Analyzing angle crashes at unsignalized intersections using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Haleem, Kirolos

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed machine learning technique, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), is introduced in this study to predict vehicles' angle crashes. MARS has a promising prediction power, and does not suffer from interpretation complexity. Negative Binomial (NB) and MARS models were fitted and compared using extensive data collected on unsignalized intersections in Florida. Two models were estimated for angle crash frequency at 3- and 4-legged unsignalized intersections. Treating crash frequency as a continuous response variable for fitting a MARS model was also examined by considering the natural logarithm of the crash frequency. Finally, combining MARS with another machine learning technique (random forest) was explored and discussed. The fitted NB angle crash models showed several significant factors that contribute to angle crash occurrence at unsignalized intersections such as, traffic volume on the major road, the upstream distance to the nearest signalized intersection, the distance between successive unsignalized intersections, median type on the major approach, percentage of trucks on the major approach, size of the intersection and the geographic location within the state. Based on the mean square prediction error (MSPE) assessment criterion, MARS outperformed the corresponding NB models. Also, using MARS for predicting continuous response variables yielded more favorable results than predicting discrete response variables. The generated MARS models showed the most promising results after screening the covariates using random forest. Based on the results of this study, MARS is recommended as an efficient technique for predicting crashes at unsignalized intersections (angle crashes in this study).

  11. Angle dependent Fiber Bragg grating inscription in microstructured polymer optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Bundalo, Ivan-Lazar; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2015-02-01

    We report on an incidence angle influence on inscription of the Fiber Bragg Gratings in Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microstructured polymer optical fibers. We have shown experimentally that there is a strong preference of certain angles, labeled ГK, over the other ones. Angles close to ГK showed fast start of inscription, rapid inscription and stronger gratings. We have also shown that gratings can be obtained at almost any angle but their quality will be lower if they are not around ГK angle. Our experimental results verify earlier numerical and experimental predictions of Marshall et al. PMID:25836222

  12. The Ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic nd {yields} p(nn) to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange-process yields at the proton emitting angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. over 0.55-2.0 GeV neutron-beam energy region. Comparison of the results with the model-dependent calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, V. I. Morozov, A. A.; Shindin, R. A.; Chernykh, E. V.; Nomofilov, A. A.; Strunov, L. N.

    2009-06-15

    Our new experimental results (see, e.g., Preprint JINR no. E1-2008-61 (Dubna, 2008)) on ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic charge-exchange yield at the proton emitting angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. for the nd {yields} p(nn) reaction to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange yield were presented. The measurements were carried out at the Nuclotron of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energies of the JINR (Dubna) at the neutron-beam kinetic energies of 0.55, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.0 GeV. In this paper the comparison of the experimental R{sub dp} data with the obtained R{sub dp} calculations within the impulse approximation by using the invariant-amplitude sets from the GW/VPI phase-shift analysis is made. The R{sub dp} values calculated using the set of invariant amplitude data for the elastic np {yields} pn charge exchange at {theta}{sub p,CM} = 0 deg., agree with the experimental data. This confirmed the nd {yields} p(nn) process yield at {theta}{sub p,CM} = 0 deg. is caused by the contribution of the spin-dependent part of the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange reaction. Thus, it has been shown that the obtained experimental R{sub dp} results can be used for the Delta-Sigma experimental program to reduce the total ambiguity in the extraction of the amplitude real parts.

  13. Results of the Second SeaWiFS Data Analysis Round Robin, March 2000 (DARR-00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; D'Alimonte, Davide; Maritorena, Stephane; McLean, Scott; Sildam, Juri; McClain, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate determination of upper ocean apparent optical properties (AOPs) is essential for the vicarious calibration of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument and the validation of the derived data products. To evaluate the importance of data analysis methods upon derived AOP values, the Second Data Analysis Round Robin (DARR-00) activity was planned during the latter half of 1999 and executed during March 2000. The focus of the study was the intercomparison of several standard AOP parameters: (1) the upwelled radiance immediately below the sea surface, L(sub u)(0(-),lambda); (2) the downward irradiance immediately below the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(-),lambda); (3) the diffuse attenuation coefficients from the upwelling radiance and the downward irradiance profiles, L(sub L)(lambda) and K(sub d)(lambda), respectively; (4) the incident solar irradiance immediately above the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(+),lambda); (5) the remote sensing reflectance, R(sub rs)(lambda); (6) the normalized water-leaving radiance, [L(sub W)(lambda)](sub N); (7) the upward irradiance immediately below the sea surface, E(sub u)(0(-)), which is used with the upwelled radiance to derive the nadir Q-factor immediately below the sea surface, Q(sub n)(0(-),lambda); and (8) ancillary parameters like the solar zenith angle, theta, and the total chlorophyll concentration, C(sub Ta), derived from the optical data through statistical algorithms. In the results reported here, different methodologies from three research groups were applied to an identical set of 40 multispectral casts in order to evaluate the degree to which differences in data analysis methods influence AOP estimation, and whether any general improvements can be made. The overall results of DARR-00 are presented in Chapter 1 and the individual methods used by the three groups and their data processors are presented in Chapters 2-4.

  14. Defining “occludable” angles in population surveys: drainage angle width, peripheral anterior synechiae, and glaucomatous optic neuropathy in east Asian people

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P J; Aung, T; Nolan, W P; Machin, D; Baasanhu, J; Khaw, P T; Alsbirk, P-H; Lee, P S; Seah, S K L; Johnson, G J

    2004-01-01

    Background/aim: A current consensus in epidemiological studies of primary angle closure (PAC) is to diagnose the condition only if the posterior (usually pigmented) trabecular meshwork is seen for less than 90° of the angle circumference, termed an “occludable angle.” The authors sought to assess the validity of this epidemiological classification by exploring the relation between drainage angle width, peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS) and glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON). Methods: 918 Mongolians and 995 Chinese Singaporeans, both groups aged 40 years and older were examined in two population based surveys. Gonioscopic angle width was graded in five categories (0 = closed to 4 = wide open) according the scheme described by Shaffer. Cases with secondary PAS were excluded. Results: The rate of PAS was between 0.3% and 1.7% in people with wide angles (grades 3 and 4). In those with grade 2 angles, PAS were seen in between 8% of eyes. In eyes with grade 1 angles, the rate rose to 17% in Chinese Singaporeans, and 31% in Mongolians. The odds of PAS were higher in people with narrower angles. However, there was a greater absolute number of people with PAS whose drainage angles were classified as “not occludable” than those classified “occludable.” Conclusions: The traditional view that primary angle closure becomes a significant possibility in drainage angles of ⩽ grade 2 (approximately 20°) is valid in east Asians. The definition of an “occludable” angle examined here excludes many people with PAS. This probably serves to underemphasise the role of PAC in population surveys of glaucoma prevalence in Asian people. PMID:15031161

  15. A Climbing Class' Reinvention of Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    A previous study shows how a twelve-year-old girl discovers angles in her narrative from a climbing trip. Based on this research, the girl's class takes part in one day of climbing and half a day of follow-up work at school. The students mathematise their climbing with respect to angles and they express themselves in texts and drawings. Their…

  16. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  17. The SU(2) action-angle variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellinas, Demosthenes

    1993-01-01

    Operator angle-action variables are studied in the frame of the SU(2) algebra, and their eigenstates and coherent states are discussed. The quantum mechanical addition of action-angle variables is shown to lead to a noncommutative Hopf algebra. The group contraction is used to make the connection with the harmonic oscillator.

  18. Constant-variable flip angles for hyperpolarized media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Chen, Xian; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-02-01

    The longitudinal magnetization of hyperpolarized media, such as hyperpolarized 129Xe, 3He, etc., is nonrenewable. When the MRI data acquisition begins at the k-domain center, a constant flip angle (CFA) results in an image of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) but sacrifices the accuracy of spatial information. On the other hand, a variable flip angle (VFA) strategy results in high accuracy but suffers from a low SNR. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to optimize both the SNR and accuracy, called constant-variable flip angles (CVFA). The proposed scheme suggests that hyperpolarized magnetic resonance signals are firstly acquired through a train of n∗ CFA excitation pulses, followed by a train of N-n∗ VFA excitation pulses. We simulate and optimize the flip angle used in the CFA section, the number of CFA excitation pulses, the number of VFA excitation pulses, and the initial and final variable flip angles adopted in the VFA section. Phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate the good performance of the CVFA designs and their ability to maintain both high SNR and spatial resolution.

  19. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation.

  20. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation. PMID:25571415

  1. Let's Do It! Using Geostrips and "Angle-Fixers" to Develop Ideas About Shapes and Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, James V.; Silverman, Helene

    1975-01-01

    Homemade geostrips, "angle-fixers" (cardboard circular sectors) and brass fasteners can be used by students to explore properties of angles, triangles and other polygons. Several games and other activities are suggested. (SD)

  2. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-08-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to a Kelvin angle of 19.5° for ship waves, has been challenged recently with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship's velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semiangle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements.

  3. Reliability of the ATD Angle in Dermatoglyphic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brunson, Emily K; Hohnan, Darryl J; Giovas, Christina M

    2015-09-01

    The "ATD" angle is a dermatoglyphic trait formed by drawing lines between the triradii below the first and last digits and the most proximal triradius on the hypothenar region of the palm. This trait has been widely used in dermatoglyphic studies, but several researchers have questioned its utility, specifically whether or not it can be measured reliably. The purpose of this research was to examine the measurement reliability of this trait. Finger and palm prints were taken using the carbon paper and tape method from the right and left hands of 100 individuals. Each "ATD" angle was read twice, at different times, by Reader A, using a goniometer and a magnifying glass, and three times by a Reader B, using Adobe Photoshop. Inter-class correlation coefficients were estimated for the intra- and inter-reader measurements of the "ATD" angles. Reader A was able to quantify ATD angles on 149 out of 200 prints (74.5%), and Reader B on 179 out of 200 prints (89.5%). Both readers agreed on whether an angle existed on a print 89.8% of the time for the right hand and 78.0% for the left. Intra-reader correlations were 0.97 or greater for both readers. Inter-reader correlations for "ATD" angles measured by both readers ranged from 0.92 to 0.96. These results suggest that the "ATD" angle can be measured reliably, and further imply that measurement using a software program may provide an advantage over other methods.

  4. Wind-tunnel calibration and requirements for in-flight use of fixed hemispherical head angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted with three different fixed pressure-measuring hemispherical head sensor configurations which were strut-mounted on a nose boom. The tests were performed at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 3.6. The boom-angle-of-attack range was -6 to 15 deg, and the angle-of-sideslip range was -6 to 6 deg. The test Reynolds numbers were from 3.28 million to 65.6 million per meter. The results were used to obtain angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip calibration curves for the configurations. Signal outputs from the hemispherical head sensor had to be specially processed to obtain accurate real-time angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip measurements for pilot displays or aircraft systems. Use of the fixed sensors in flight showed them to be rugged and reliable and suitable for use in a high temperature environment.

  5. Small roll angle measurement based on auto-collimation and moiré fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xu-guang; Cai, Sheng; Qiao, Yan-feng; Dai, Ming

    2009-11-01

    A novel method for small roll angle measurement based on auto-collimation and moiré fringe is presented. A right-angle prism is used as an indicator of small roll angle around the optical axis, and a CCD is used to collect moiré fringes that are generated by scale grating image which is reflected by prism and index grating. Any small roll angle of the prism will change the include angle of the grating pair and meanwhile induce a change in the moiré fringe period. The relationship between roll angle and period of moiré fringes is established. The period data is obtained by image processing. The experimental result certifies that the principle of small angle measurement method based on auto-collimation and moiré fringe is correct and feasible. The measuring error is smaller than 0.2" within 7' range compared with 0.2" autocollimator.

  6. Physiological response of wild rainbow trout to angling: Impact of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meka, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate physiological response of wild rainbow trout to catch-and-release angling in the Alagnak River, southwest Alaska. Information was recorded on individual rainbow trout (n = 415) captured by angling including landing time and the time required to remove hooks (angling duration), the time to anesthetize fish in clove oil and withdraw blood, fish length and weight, and water temperature at capture locations. Plasma cortisol, glucose, ions (sodium, potassium, chloride), and lactate were analyzed to determine the effects of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature. Levels of plasma ions did not change significantly during the observed physiological response and levels of plasma glucose were sometimes influenced by length (2000, 2001), body condition (2001), or temperature (2001). Levels of plasma cortisol and lactate in extended capture fish (angling duration greater than 2 min) were significantly higher than levels in rapid capture fish (angling duration less than 2 min). Rapid capture fish were significantly smaller than extended capture fish, reflecting that fish size influenced landing and handling times. Fish size was related to cortisol and lactate in 2002, which corresponded to the year when larger fish were captured and there were longer landing times. Body condition (i.e., weight/length regression residuals index), was significantly related to lactate in 2000 and 2001. Water temperatures were higher in 2001 (mean temperature ± S.E., 13 ± 2oC) than in 2002 (10 ± 2oC), and fish captured in 2001 had significantly higher cortisol and lactate concentrations than fish captured in 2002. The pattern of increase in plasma cortisol and lactate was due to the amount of time fish were angled, and the upper limit of the response was due to water temperature. The results of this study indicate the importance of minimizing the duration of angling in order to reduce the sublethal physiological disturbances in wild

  7. Associations between Narrow Angle and Adult Anthropometry: The Liwan Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; He, Mingguang; Friedman, David S.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Lee, Pak Sang; Nolan, Winifred P.; Yin, Qiuxia; Foster, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the associations between narrow angle and adult anthropometry. Methods Chinese adults aged 50 years and older were recruited from a population-based survey in the Liwan District of Guangzhou, China. Narrow angle was defined as the posterior trabecular meshwork not visible under static gonioscopy in at least three quadrants (i.e. a circumference of at least 270°). Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between narrow angle and anthropomorphic measures (height, weight and body mass index, BMI). Results Among the 912 participants, lower weight, shorter height, and lower BMI were significantly associated with narrower angle width (tests for trend: mean angle width in degrees vs weight p<0.001; vs height p<0.001; vs BMI p = 0.012). In univariate analyses, shorter height, lower weight and lower BMI were all significantly associated with greater odds of narrow angle. The crude association between height and narrow angle was largely attributable to a stronger association with age and sex. Lower BMI and weight remained significantly associated with narrow angle after adjustment for height, age, sex, axial ocular biometric measures and education. In analyses stratified by sex, the association between BMI and narrow angle was only observed in women. Conclusion Lower BMI and weight were associated with significantly greater odds of narrow angle after adjusting for age, education, axial ocular biometric measures and height. The odds of narrow angle increased 7% per 1 unit decrease in BMI. This association was most evident in women. PMID:24707840

  8. Simple technique for the fabrication of a penta prism with high accuracy right angle deviation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Pavan Kumar, Y

    2007-09-10

    What we believe to be a new technique for the fabrication of a penta prism (PP) with high accuracy right angle deviation of the incident beam is presented. We derive simple formulas relating to the error in right angle deviation with the errors in 45 degrees (beta) and 90 degrees (delta) angles of a PP, and we determine error in right angle deviation from the angle ((error in right angle deviation)r) between the plane wavefronts reflected from the right angled surfaces (external Fresnel reflection on the entrance surface and internal Fresnel reflection on the exit surface) of a PP and the angular error (delta) between the same surfaces. The error in right angle deviation is determined from the measurement of (error in right angle deviation)r using an autocollimator and a Fizeau interferometer, and error in right angle deviation is corrected to a high order of accuracy during the final stage of polishing one of the slanted surfaces of the PP. A new technique to determine the magnitude and direction of the small values of (error in right angle deviation)r is proposed and verified. The result for a PP is presented.

  9. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  10. Evaluation of angle dependence in spectral emissivity of ceramic tiles measured by FT-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, C.; Ogasawara, N.; Yamada, H.; Yamada, S.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-05-01

    Ceramic tiles are widely used for building walls. False detections are caused in inspections by infrared thermography because of the infrared reflection and angle dependence of emissivity. As the first problem, ceramic tile walls are influenced from backgrounds reflection. As the second problem, in inspection for tall buildings, the camera angles are changed against the height. Thus, to reveal the relation between the emissivity and angles is needed. However, there is very little data about it. It is impossible to decrease the false detection on ceramic tile walls without resolving these problems; background reflection and angle dependence of emissivity. In this study, the angle problem was investigated. The purpose is to establish a revision method in the angle dependence of the emissivity for infrared thermography. To reveal the relation between the emissivity and angles, the spectral emissivity of a ceramic tile at various angles was measured by FT-IR and infrared thermographic instrument. These two experimental results were compared with the emissivity-angle curves from the theoretical formula. In short wavelength range, the two experimental results showed similar behavior, but they did not agree with the theoretical curve. This will be the subject of further study. In long wavelength range, the both experimental results almost obeyed the theoretical curve. This means that it is possible to revise the angle dependence of spectral emissivity, for long wavelength range.

  11. Non-uniform projection angle processing in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, Yanic; Tayag, Tristan J.

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for the collection of computed tomography data. Non-uniform increments in projection angle may be used to reduce data acquisition time with minimal reduction in the accuracy of the reconstructed profile. The key is to exploit those projection angles which correspond to regions where the object contains few high spatial frequency components. This technique is applicable to optical phase computed tomography, as well as X-ray computed tomography. We present simulation results on intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

  12. Boundary layer thermal stresses in angle-ply composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1979-01-01

    Boundary-layer thermal stress singularities and distributions of angle-ply composite laminates under uniform thermal loading are investigated through a system of sixth-order governing partial differential equations developed with the aid of the anisotropic elasticity field equations and Lekhnitskii's complex stress functions. Results are presented for cases of various angle-ply graphite/epoxy laminates, and it is shown that the boundary-layer thickness depends on the degree of anisotropy of each individual lamina, thermomechanical properties of each ply, and the relative thickness of adjacent layers.

  13. Solar angles revisited using a general vector approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, Robert E.

    2010-06-15

    Rather than follow the standard technique using direction cosines or major axes vectors to define the angles of the sun, we develop the necessary formulae from a 3-tuple vector based analysis. The direction of the sun with respect to a Cartesian coordinate system is defined as a unit vector, as is the orthogonal to a surface intended to accept solar radiation. The vector formulation is powerful and universal. More importantly, the diagrams used to describe the relative motion of the sun with respect to the Earth are quite simple, leading to less confusion when translating the geometry to algebra. An interesting result on the change in solar angle with time follows. (author)

  14. Thermally Tunable Hydrogels Displaying Angle-Independent Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yumiko; Seki, Takahiro; Takeoka, Yukikazu

    2015-12-14

    We report the preparation of thermally tunable hydrogels displaying angle-independent structural colors. The porous structures were formed with short-range order using colloidal amorphous array templates and a small amount of carbon black (CB). The resultant porous hydrogels prepared using colloidal amorphous arrays without CB appeared white, whereas the hydrogels with CB revealed bright structural colors. The brightly colored hydrogels rapidly changed hues in a reversible manner, and the hues varied widely depending on the water temperature. Moreover, the structural colors were angle-independent under diffusive lighting because of the isotropic nanostructure generated from the colloidal amorphous arrays. PMID:26503915

  15. Digital holographic metrology based on multi-angle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Jiang, Chao; Jia, Shuhai

    2016-09-15

    We propose a multi-angle interferometry method for digital holographic metrology. In an application of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, the hologram corresponding to a different illumination angle is recorded as the illumination angle with a single wavelength tilted at regular intervals by an electronically controlled rotating stage. A Fourier-transform-based axial depth scanning algorithm formed by the reconstructed phase is used to obtain the height point by point over the whole field of view. Hence, the 3D reconstruction can be obtained effectively; even the object has large depth discontinuities resulting from the difficulty of the phase unwrapping. Due to a monochrome source only being used, the method is available for objects with wavelength-dependent reflectivity and those that are free of chromatic aberration caused by the different wavelengths. PMID:27628382

  16. Control of the bias tilt angles in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonskii, S. V.; Nakayama, K.; Okazaki, S.; Ozaki, M.; Yoshino, K.; Palto, S. P.; Baranovich, M. Yu.; Michailov, A. S.

    1999-03-01

    The pretilt angle controlled by electric field was studied by the modulation ellipsometry technique. The easy direction of compensated nematic liquid crystals was controlled by surface flexoelectric torque created by the linear coupling of the director deformation and electric field. The weak anchoring energy necessary for the occurrence of flexoelectric distortion was produced by unidirectional rubbing of the clean indium-tin-oxide covered glasses with a cotton cloth. The pretilt angle was measured as a function of electric field. Long relaxation times of the optical response (hundreds of seconds) were observed. The rubbed thin polyvinyl alcohol and polyimide aligning layers were seen to promote strong anchoring energy (>0.5 erg/cm2) preventing any deviation of pretilt angle and, consequently, to suppress the optical response. The probable applications of the obtained results are discussed.

  17. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ginel C; Soto, Daniel R; Peattie, Anne M; Full, Robert J; Kenny, T W

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts.

  18. Orientation angle and the adhesion of single gecko setae

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ginel C.; Soto, Daniel R.; Peattie, Anne M.; Full, Robert J.; Kenny, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of orientation angle on the adhesion of single gecko setae using dual-axis microelectromechanical systems force sensors to simultaneously detect normal and shear force components. Adhesion was highly sensitive to the pitch angle between the substrate and the seta's stalk. Maximum lateral adhesive force was observed with the stalk parallel to the substrate, and adhesion decreased smoothly with increasing pitch. The roll orientation angle only needed to be roughly correct with the spatular tuft of the seta oriented grossly towards the substrate for high adhesion. Also, detailed measurements were made to control for the effect of normal preload forces. Higher normal preload forces caused modest enhancement of the observed lateral adhesive force, provided that adequate contact was made between the seta and the substrate. These results should be useful in the design and manufacture of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with anisotropic properties, an area of substantial recent research efforts. PMID:21288955

  19. Optimum design of 2D micro-angle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinggang; Zhao, Heng; Lou, Xiaona; Jiang, Ningchuan; Hu, Xiaotang

    2008-12-01

    To improve dynamic measurement performance and resolution, an optimum design on two-dimensional (2D) micro-angle sensor based on optical internal-reflection method via critical-angle refractive index measurement is presented in the paper. The noise signals were filtered effectively by modulating laser-driven and demodulating in signal proceeding. The system's accuracy and response speed are improved further by using 16-bit high-precision AD converter and MSP430 CPU which present with a high-speed performance during signals processes such as fitting angle-voltage curve through specific arithmetic, full range and zero point calibration, filter, scaling transformation etc. The experiment results indicated that, dynamic signal measurement range can be up to +/-600arcsec, the measurement resolution can be better than 0.1arcsec, and the repeatability could be better than +/-0.5arcsec.

  20. Equiangular-spiral bent lightpipes with arbitrary bent angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shu-Chun; Cheng, Yi-Kai; Chern, Jyh-Long

    2009-05-01

    A recent study proposed the concept of a leakage-free bent lightpipe with an equiangular-spiral shape [S.-C. Chu, J.-L. Chern, Opt. Lett. 30 (2005) 3006]. This paper extends the design of a leakage-free equiangular-spiral bent lightpipe with arbitrary-bend-angle and addresses in detail the mathematical formalism required to build such an equiangular-spiral bent lightpipe. Furthermore, a comparison of the proposed equiangular-spiral bent lightpipe and a conventional circular bent lightpipe is provided. Numerical verifications are discussed, and experimental explorations with different bent shapes and angles are carried out for comparison. Results show that equiangular-spiral bent lightpipes with different bent angles exhibit a theoretical 100% transmission with more than 76% efficiency when practically propagating, which is much better than conventional circular bent lightpipes. The output irradiance distributions of bent lightpipes with different bent shapes are also investigated.

  1. Guidance law against maneuvering targets with intercept angle constraint.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shaofeng; Wang, Weihong; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Sen; Chen, Zengqiang

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the guidance law against maneuvering targets with the intercept angle constraint. The limitation of the traditional guidance law, which simply treats the unknown target acceleration as zero, has been analyzed. To reduce this limitation, a linear extended state observer is constructed to estimate the acceleration of the maneuvering target to enhance the tracking performance of the desired intercept angle. Furthermore, a nonsingular terminal sliding mode control scheme is adopted to design the sliding surface, which is able to avoid the singularity in the terminal phase of guidance. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed guidance law outperforms the traditional guidance law in the sense that more accurate intercept angle can be achieved.

  2. Aerodynamics of slender finned bodies at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnone, A. M.; Zakkay, V.; Tory, E.; Stallings, R.

    1977-01-01

    In certain missions finned missiles perform slewing maneuvers. Here, large angles of attack are attained. Experimental data needed to understand the aerodynamics of such vehicles are presented. The purpose of this investigation was to study the interaction of the body flow field with that produced by the fins and the resulting effects on the aerodynamic forces and moments. The experiments were conducted at a nominal Mach number of 2.7 and angles of attack from 0 to 50 deg, with two different models. The tests were performed in a range of Reynolds number from 1.5 x 10 to the 6th to 4 x 10 to the 7th per foot (to cover both the laminar and fully turbulent regimes.) Several fin roll angles were investigated. Static pressures on both body and fin surfaces are reported.

  3. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  4. Branes at angles from worldvolume actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspur, Reza

    2016-05-01

    We investigate possible stable configurations of two arbitrary branes at general angles using the dynamics of DBI + WZ action. The analysis naturally reveals two types of solutions which we identify as the "marginal" and "non-marginal" configurations. We characterize possible configurations of a pair of identical or non-identical branes in either of these two classes by specifying their proper intersection rules and allowed intersection angles. We also perform a partial analysis of configurations with multiple angles of a system of asymptotically flat curved branes.

  5. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; McDougal, A.R.

    1980-12-23

    A first embodiment incorporating an actuator including a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine is described. The restraint link is releasably supported against axial displacement by releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft and a second embodiment incorporating a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crankshafts for a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  6. Wide-angle vision for road views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Fehrs, K.-K.; Hartmann, G.; Klette, R.

    2013-03-01

    The field-of-view of a wide-angle image is greater than (say) 90 degrees, and so contains more information than available in a standard image. A wide field-of-view is more advantageous than standard input for understanding the geometry of 3D scenes, and for estimating the poses of panoramic sensors within such scenes. Thus, wide-angle imaging sensors and methodologies are commonly used in various road-safety, street surveillance, street virtual touring, or street 3D modelling applications. The paper reviews related wide-angle vision technologies by focusing on mathematical issues rather than on hardware.

  7. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An actuator includes a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a Stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine. The restraint link is releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft. A second embodiment incorporates a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crank fpr a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  8. Small angle neutron scattering from nanometer grain sized materials

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Siegel, R.W.

    1991-11-01

    Small angie neutron scattering has been utilized, along with a number of complementary characterization methods suitable to the nanometer size scale, to investigate the structures of cluster-assembled nanophase materials. Results of these investigations are described and problems and opportunities in using small angle scattering for elucidating nanostructures are discussed.

  9. Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, L. E.; Kuyk, T.

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study of an earlier report on the Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) was conducted to analyze the various applications of the device and its reliability. Results indicate high client satisfaction with WAML among test subjects (26 blind male veterans with night blindness, age 32 to 68). (Author/PB)

  10. Measurements of CKM Angle Beta from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, Keith A.; /Colorado U.

    2007-05-23

    We present recent results of hadronic B meson decays related to the CKM angle beta. The data used were collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  11. Association between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in eyes with narrow or open-angle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song-Feng; Wu, Ge-Wei; Chen, Chang-Xi; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in subjects with eyes with narrow or open-angle. METHODS The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging optical coherence tomography and anterior chamber parameters were measured with ultrasound biomicroscopy in one eye of 23 subjects with open-angle eyes and 38 subjects with narrow-angle eyes. The mean age was 59.52±7.04y for narrow-angle subjects and 60.76±7.23y for open-angle subjects (P=0.514). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and narrow-angle parameters. RESULTS There were no differences in subfoveal choroidal thickness between open- and narrow-angle subjects (P=0.231). Anterior chamber parameters, including central anterior chamber depth, trabecular iris angle, iris thickness 500 µm from the scleral spur (IT500), and ciliary body thickness at 1 mm and 2 mm from the scleral spur (CBT1, CBT2) showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Subfoveal choroidal thickness showed negative correlation (β=-0.496, P=0.016) only with anterior chamber depth in the open-angle group and with age (β=-0.442, P=0.003) and IT500 (β=-0.399, P=0.008) in the narrow-angle group. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness was not correlated with trabecular iris angle, anterior chamber depth, ciliary body thickness, or central corneal thickness in the narrow-angle group. CONCLUSION Choroidal thickness does not differ in the two groups and has not correlated with anterior chamber parameters in narrow-angle subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and primary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:27588269

  12. [Effects of multi-angle hyperspectral polarized reflection by forest soil].

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Zhao, Yun-Sheng; Zhao, Nai-Zhuo; Li, Qian; Lü, Yun-Feng

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the authors measured samples of typical forest soils in different states with multi-angle hyperspectral polarized reflections. The authors analyzed multi-angle hyperspectral polarized reflections of soil data with various viewing zenith angles, incidence angles, relative azimuth angles, polarized states, soil water content and soil granule. The authors found that those factors affected the reflectance values of forest soils but not the spectral feature. The conclusions included that the larger the incidence angles and viewing zenith angles are, the bigger the polarized reflectance values of the surface of the forest soil. When the forest soil was dry, the surface had phenomenon of diffuse reflection and the polarized light reflection did not take place. When the soil moisture content reached a certain level, the polarized reflection appeared. The more the moisture content of the forest soil was, the smaller the polarized reflectance of the surface. The bigger the soil granule was and the rougher the soil surface was, the smaller the surface polarized reflectance. The results and conclusions suggested that the spectral characteristics of the ground target need to be considered adequately in order to design the best mode for sensor systems by remote sensing technology. The authors suggest that the incidence angle and viewing zenith angle be selected on the basis of factual instance. The authors suggest using larger viewing zenith angles and that the incidence angle should be equal to the viewing zenith angle. In the meantime, the effects of sheltering by ground targets need to be considered and the proper state of polarization should be chosen while keeping relative zenith angle at 180 degrees. This study not only helps find a new way for detection of soil characters, but also provides a theoretical basis for further research on multi-angle hyperspectral polarized reflection for detecting characteristic spectrum and best states in measuring

  13. Rubber Hand Illusion Affects Joint Angle Perception

    PubMed Central

    Butz, Martin V.; Kutter, Esther F.; Lorenz, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    The Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) is a well-established experimental paradigm. It has been shown that the RHI can affect hand location estimates, arm and hand motion towards goals, the subjective visual appearance of the own hand, and the feeling of body ownership. Several studies also indicate that the peri-hand space is partially remapped around the rubber hand. Nonetheless, the question remains if and to what extent the RHI can affect the perception of other body parts. In this study we ask if the RHI can alter the perception of the elbow joint. Participants had to adjust an angular representation on a screen according to their proprioceptive perception of their own elbow joint angle. The results show that the RHI does indeed alter the elbow joint estimation, increasing the agreement with the position and orientation of the artificial hand. Thus, the results show that the brain does not only adjust the perception of the hand in body-relative space, but it also modifies the perception of other body parts. In conclusion, we propose that the brain continuously strives to maintain a consistent internal body image and that this image can be influenced by the available sensory information sources, which are mediated and mapped onto each other by means of a postural, kinematic body model. PMID:24671172

  14. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Raeder, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric/ magnetotail/ ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast foward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30o in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along th Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail on both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in a larger geomagnetic activity there. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to larger geomagnetic responses in the ionosphere nightside. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and even Mach number, can be differently geoeffective, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  15. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.

    2014-10-01

    We use Open Geospace General Circulation Model global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30° in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger geomagnetic activity. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  16. Moderate positive spin Hall angle in uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Simranjeet; Anguera, Marta; Barco, Enrique del E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu; Springell, Ross; Miller, Casey W. E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu

    2015-12-07

    We report measurements of spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/uranium bilayers designed to study the efficiency of spin-charge interconversion in a super-heavy element. We employ broad-band ferromagnetic resonance on extended films to inject a spin current from the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} (permalloy) into the uranium layer, which is then converted into an electric field by the inverse spin Hall effect. Surprisingly, our results suggest a spin mixing conductance of order 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} and a positive spin Hall angle of 0.004, which are both merely comparable with those of several transition metals. These results thus support the idea that the electronic configuration may be at least as important as the atomic number in governing spin pumping across interfaces and subsequent spin Hall effects. In fact, given that both the magnitude and the sign are unexpected based on trends in d-electron systems, materials with unfilled f-electron orbitals may hold additional exploration avenues for spin physics.

  17. Preliminary Results from the First Year of Operations of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; O'Dell, C.; Fisher, B.; Wunch, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Osterman, G. B.; Mandrake, L.; Payne, V.; Natraj, V.; Frankenberg, C.; Taylor, T.; Worden, J. R.; Bloom, A. A.; Nelson, R. R.; Schwandner, F. M.; Fu, D.; Braverman, A. J.; Chatterjee, A.; Baker, I. T.; Avis, C.; Livermore, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    On September 6, 2014, OCO-2 began routinely returning almost 106 soundings over the sunlit hemisphere each day. Over 10% of these soundings are sufficiently cloud free to yield full-column estimates of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2. Nadir soundings over land yield XCO2 estimates with single-sounding random errors of 0.5 - 1 ppm at solar zenith angles (SZA) < 60° while ocean glint soundings yield precisions near 0.5 ppm at SZA < 70°. Nadir soundings over the ocean and glint soundings over high-latitude land are less precise. Initially, OCO-2 recorded only nadir soundings or glint soundings on alternate, 16-day ground-track repeat cycles. This provided adequate coverage of the globe each month, but produced 16-day gaps in ocean coverage while observing nadir, and similar gaps over high-latitude land while observing glint. In July 2015, this strategy was modified to alternate between glint and nadir soundings on consecutive orbits to yield more continuous coverage each day. While XCO2 and other products are being validated to identify and correct biases, global XCO2 maps are starting to reveal the most robust features of the atmospheric carbon cycle. XCO2 enhancements co-located with intense fossil fuel emissions in eastern U.S. and eastern China are most obvious in the fall, when the north-south XCO2 gradient is small. Enhanced XCO2 coincident with biomass burning in the Amazon, central Africa, and Indonesian is also obvious in the fall. In mid spring, when the north-south XCO2 gradient was largest, these sources were less apparent in global maps. From late May to mid-July, OCO-2 maps show a 2-3% reduction in XCO2 across the northern hemisphere, as the land biosphere rapidly absorbs CO2. As the carbon cycle community continues to analyze these OCO-2 data, quantitative estimates of regional-scale emission sources and natural sinks are expected to emerge. This presentation will summarize the OCO-2 mission status, early products, and near

  18. High angle conveyors climb to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    Descriptions are presented of various types of high angle conveyors, including pocket belt, fin belt, sandwich belt, snake sandwich conveyor, mechanically pressed sandwich conveyor, and pneumatically pressed sandwich conveyors. 10 references.

  19. High angle conveyors climb to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A major objective in the design of a storage facility is to have the least handling over the shortest distances and to optimize land usage by attaining the highest tons-per-acre value. The advantages of high angle conveyors become apparent when the height of lift is compared with the surface area. High angle conveyors achieve high capacities in the least amount of space. Continental Conveyor and Equipment Co., has conducted several studies that evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of using high angle conveyors in conveyor systems. A few of the high angle conveying concepts reviewed are the bucket ladder or pocket belt, belts with partitions or fin belt, and the sandwich type belt conveyors.

  20. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  1. Nucleation of small-angle boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |; Wilsdorf, D.K.

    1996-12-01

    The internal stresses induced by the strain gradients in an array of lattice cells delineated by low-angle dislocation boundaries are partially relieved by the creation of new low-angle boundaries. This is shown to be a first-order transition, the new boundaries having finite misorientations. The calculated misorientations both of the new boundaries and of the existing boundaries which provoke the transition agree well with observations.

  2. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea; Purdie, Thomas G. Jaffray, David A.; Levinshtein, Alex; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Pekar, Vladimir

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  3. Farley-Buneman Waves at Large Aspect Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, P.; St-Maurice, J. P.; Noel, J. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The FB instability mechanism provides an excellent explanation for the presence of large amplitude plasma waves in the cm to few m wavelength range in the high latitude E region whenever the ambient electric field exceeds 20 mV/m. Observations suggest that the instabilities are moving at their threshold speed when they reach their largest amplitudes. This can be explained in terms of a combination of decreasing electric field and increasing aspect angle inside individual structures. However, another feature of observations is that linear theory predicts instability for aspect angles smaller than 1.5 degree, up to maybe 2 degrees even though there is plenty of evidence to show that large amplitude structures exist at aspect angles well beyond 2 degrees during FB events. We show that this observational feature is caused by the weak altitude dependence of the eigenfrequency, which forces the aspect angle to grow monotonically with time. This means that after the structures have reached their maximum amplitude, they continue to exist, but with the caveat that their aspect angle increases while their amplitude decreases. This allows damped modes at large aspect angles to be observed. However, as the aspect angle increases, the phase velocity will also change, although that change is actually a strong function of the wavelength. This means that we must assess the real and imaginary part of the eigenfrequency to query the Doppler shift of the structures and see how they compare with observations at different radar frequencies. To this goal, we have studied both the fluid isothermal dispersion relation, as well as the full kinetic dispersion. Our results for sub-meter wavelengths show that the phase velocity remains very constant at only slightly less than the ion-acoustic speed as the aspect angle increases. At larger wavelengths, the transition to zero phase velocity proceeds according to V_d/(1+ψ), a result in agreement with simple fluid predictions based on small

  4. View angle dependence of cloud optical thicknesses retrieved by MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether cloud inhomogeneity influences the view angle dependence of MODIS cloud optical thickness (tau) retrieval results. The degree of cloud inhomogeneity is characterized through the local gradient in 11 microns brightness temperature. The analysis of liquid phase clouds in a one year long global dataset of Collection 4 MODIS data reveals that while optical thickness retrievals give remarkably consistent results for all view directions if clouds are homogeneous, they give much higher tau-values for oblique views than for overhead views if clouds are inhomogeneous and the sun is fairly oblique. For solar zenith angles larger than 55deg, the mean optical thickness retrieved for the most inhomogeneous third of cloudy pixels is more than 30% higher for oblique views than for overhead views. After considering a variety of possible scenarios, the paper concludes that the most likely reason for the increase lies in three-dimensional radiative interactions that are not considered in current, one-dimensional retrieval algorithms. Namely, the radiative effect of cloud sides viewed at oblique angles seems to contribute most to the enhanced tau-values. The results presented here will help understand cloud retrieval uncertainties related to cloud inhomogeneity. They complement the uncertainty estimates that will start accompanying MODIS cloud products in Collection 5 and may eventually help correct for the observed view angle dependent biases.

  5. THE VIEWING ANGLES OF BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VERSUS UNABSORBED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.

    2012-06-10

    It was recently shown that there is a significant difference in the radio spectral index distributions of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and unabsorbed quasars, with an overabundance of BAL quasars with steeper radio spectra. This result suggests that source orientation does play into the presence or absence of BAL features. In this paper, we provide more quantitative analysis of this result based on Monte Carlo simulations. While the relationship between viewing angle and spectral index does indeed contain a lot of scatter, the spectral index distributions are different enough to overcome that intrinsic variation. Utilizing two different models of the relationship between spectral index and viewing angle, the simulations indicate that the difference in spectral index distributions can be explained by allowing BAL quasar viewing angles to extend about 10 Degree-Sign farther from the radio jet axis than non-BAL sources, though both can be seen at small angles. These results show that orientation cannot be the only factor determining whether BAL features are present, but it does play a role.

  6. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  7. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle <θ2> of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio <θ4>/<θ2>2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio <θ4>/<θ2>2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  8. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  9. Modelling PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The accurate and traceable form measurement of optical surfaces has been greatly advanced by a new generation of surface profilometers which are based on the reflection of light at the surface and the measurement of the reflection angle. For this application, high-resolution electronic autocollimators provide accurate and traceable angle metrology. In recent years, great progress has been made at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in autocollimator calibration. For an advanced autocollimator characterisation, a novel calibration device has been built up at PTB: the Spatial Angle Autocollimator Calibrator (SAAC). The system makes use of an innovative Cartesian arrangement of three autocollimators (two reference autocollimators and the autocollimator to be calibrated), which allows a precise measurement of the angular orientation of a reflector cube. Each reference autocollimator is sensitive primarily to changes in one of the two relevant tilt angles, whereas the autocollimator to be calibrated is sensitive to both. The distance between the reflector cube and the autocollimator to be calibrated can be varied flexibly. In this contribution, we present the SAAC and aspects of the mathematical modelling of the system for deriving analytical expressions for the autocollimators' angle responses. These efforts will allow advancing the form measurement substantially with autocollimator-based profilometers and approaching fundamental measurement limits. Additionally, they will help manufacturers of autocollimators to improve their instruments and will provide improved angle measurement methods for precision engineering.

  10. Winding angles of long lattice walks.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 10(7). We show that the mean square winding angle 〈θ(2)〉 of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio 〈θ(4)〉/〈θ(2)〉(2) converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio 〈θ(4)〉/〈θ(2)〉(2) exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 10(4). We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2(i) steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i(0.5), which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)(1.5). PMID:27394124

  11. Management of Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jimmy; Choy, Bonnie N K; Shum, Jennifer W H

    2016-01-01

    Primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) is a progressive optic nerve degeneration and is defined as a glaucomatous optic neuropathy with associated characteristic enlargement of optic disc cupping and visual field loss that is secondary to ocular hypertension caused by closure of the drainage angle. Angle closure is caused by appositional approximation or adhesion between the iris and the trabecular meshwork. The main treatment strategy for PACG lies in the reduction of intraocular pressure, reopening of the closed angle, and possible prevention of further angle closure. There is no universally agreed best surgical treatment for PACG. Trabeculectomy, goniosynechialysis (GSL), glaucoma implant, and cyclodestructive procedures are effective surgical options. Each of them plays an important role in the management of PACG with its own pros and cons. Accumulating evidence is available to show the effectiveness of visually significant and visually nonsignificant cataract extraction in the treatment of PACG. Trabeculectomy and GSL are often combined with cataract extraction, which may offer additional pressure control benefits to patients with PACG. This review article will discuss laser peripheral iridotomy, argon laser peripheral iridoplasty, and surgeries such as GSL, phacoemulsification, and phaco plus glaucoma surgeries that lower intraocular pressure and also alter the anterior segment and/or drainage angle anatomy. Currently, glaucoma implants and cyclodestruction are mainly reserved for PACG patients who have failed previous filtering operations. Their role as initial surgical treatment for PACG will not be discussed. PMID:26886121

  12. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets.

  13. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  14. Three-dimensional finger joint angles by hand posture and object properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Sun; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify three-dimensional finger joint angles for various hand postures and object properties. Finger joint angles were measured using a VICON system for 10 participants while they pinched objects with two, three, four and five fingers and grasped them with five fingers. The objects were cylinders and square pillars with diameters of 2, 4, 6 and 8 cm and weights of 400, 800, 1400 and 1800 g. Hand posture and object size more significantly affected the joint flexion angles than did object shape and weight. Object shape affected only the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint angle of the index finger and the flexion angle of the MCP joint of the little finger. Larger flexion angles resulted when the hand posture was grasping with five fingers. The joint angle increased linearly as the object size decreased. This report provides fundamental information about the specific joint angles of the thumb and fingers. Practitioner Summary: Three-dimensional finger joint angles are of special interest in ergonomics because of their importance in handheld devices and musculoskeletal hand disorders. In this study, the finger joint angles corresponding to various hand postures and objects with different properties were determined.

  15. LDEF yaw and pitch angle estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Quantification of the LDEF yaw and pitch misorientations is crucial to the knowledge of atomic oxygen exposure of samples placed on LDEF. Video camera documentation of the LDEF spacecraft prior to grapple attachment, atomic oxygen shadows on experiment trays and longerons, and a pinhole atomic oxygen camera placed on LDEF provided sources of documentation of the yaw and pitch misorientation. Based on uncertainty-weighted averaging of data, the LDEF yaw offset was found to be 8.1 plus or minus 0.6 degrees, allowing higher atomic oxygen exposure of row 12 than initially anticipated. The LDEF pitch angle offset was found to be 0.8 plus or minus 0.4 degrees, such that the space end was tipped forward toward the direction of travel. The resulting consequences of the yaw and pitch misorientation of LDEF on the atomic oxygen fluence is a factor of 2.16 increase for samples located on row 12, and a factor of 1.18 increase for samples located on the space end compared to that which would be expected for perfect orientation.

  16. Evaluation of Absorbable Mesh Fixation Devices at Various Deployment Angles

    PubMed Central

    Zihni, Ahmed M.; Cavallo, Jaime A.; Thompson, Dominic M.; Chowdhury, Nabeel H.; Frisella, Margaret M.; Matthews, Brent D.; Deeken, Corey R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hernia repair failure may occur due to suboptimal mesh fixation by mechanical constructs before mesh integration. Construct design and acute penetration angle may alter mesh-tissue fixation strength. We compared acute fixation strengths of absorbable fixation devices at various deployment angles, directions of loading, and construct orientations. METHODS Porcine abdominal walls were sectioned. Constructs were deployed at 30, 45, 60, and 90 degree angles to fix mesh to the tissue specimens. Lap-shear testing was performed in upward, downward, and lateral directions in relation to the abdominal wall cranial-caudal axis to evaluate fixation. Absorbatack™ (AT), SorbaFix™ (SF), and SecureStrap™ in vertical (SSV) and horizontal (SSH) orientations in relation to the abdominal wall cranial-caudal axis were tested. Ten tests were performed for each combination of device, angle, and loading direction. Failure types and strength data were recorded. ANOVA with Tukey-Kramer adjustments for multiple comparisons and chi-square tests were performed as appropriate (p<0.05 considered significant). RESULTS At 30 degrees, SSH and SSV had greater fixation strengths (12.95 N, 12.98 N, respectively) than SF (5.70 N; p=0.0057, p=0.0053, respectively). At 45 degrees, mean fixation strength of SSH was significantly greater than SF (18.14 N, 11.40 N; p=0.0002). No differences in strength were identified at 60 or 90 degrees. No differences in strength were noted between SSV and SSH with different directions of loading. No differences were noted between SS and AT at any angle. Immediate failure was associated with SF (p<0.0001) and the 30 degree tacking angle (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS Mesh-tissue fixation was stronger at acute deployment angles with SS compared to SF constructs. The 30 degree angle and the SF device were associated with increased immediate failures. Varying construct and loading direction did not generate statistically significant differences in the fixation

  17. Integrated Study of APS YSZ Coatings with Different Spray Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yikai; Tan, Yang; Tessarini, Silvia; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Spray parameters play an important role on the microstructure and properties of plasma-sprayed coatings. Parameters such as spray distance, plasma gas flow and current, raster speed, and spray angle all can be varied. In this paper, an integrated study to investigate the effects and influences of spray angle on properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings was carried out with spray angles of 60°, 75°, and 90° (to the substrate surface). In situ coating property sensor based on beam curvature measurements was used to measure the evolving stress and elastic moduli of the resultant coatings and combined with other characterization tools for thermo-physical property and microstructure analysis, such as laser flash and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the coating with 60° spray angle had the lowest thermal conductivity and more compliant structure. This study seeks to understand the mechanism for this effect and will provide important insight into parametric sensitivities on complex spray parts.

  18. Radiative transfer in shrub savanna sites in Niger: Preliminary results from HAPEX-Sahel. Part 3: Optical dynamics and vegetation index sensitivity to biomass and plant cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanLeeuwen, W. J. D.; Huete, A. R.; Duncan, J.; Franklin, J.

    1994-01-01

    A shrub savannah landscape in Niger was optically characterized utilizing blue, green, red and near-infrared wavelengths. Selected vegetation indices were evaluated for their performance and sensitivity to describe the complex Sahelian soil/vegetation canopies. Bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF) of plants and soils were measured at several view angles, and used as input to various vegetation indices. Both soil and vegetation targets had strong anisotropic reflectance properties, rendering all vegetation index (6) responses to be a direct function of sun and view geometry. Soil background influences were shown to alter the response of most vegetation indices. N-space greenness had the smallest dynamic range in VI response, but the n-space brightness index provided additional useful information. The global environmental monitoring index (GEMI) showed a large 6 dynamic range for bare soils, which was undesirable for a vegetation index. The view angle response of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), atmosphere resistant vegetation index (ARVI) and soil atmosphere resistant vegetation index (SARVI) were asymmetric about nadir for multiple view angles, and were, except for the SARVI, altered seriously by soil moisture and/or soil brightness effects. The soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) was least affected by surface soil moisture and was symmetric about nadir for grass vegetation covers. Overall the SAVI, SARVI and the n-space vegetation index performed best under all adverse conditions and were recommended to monitor vegetation growth in the sparsely vegetated Sahelian zone.

  19. A model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR imaging sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Russo, Leonard E.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2005-10-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. 3D Flash LADAR is the latest evolution of laser radar systems and provides unique capability in its ability to provide high-resolution LADAR imagery upon a single laser pulse; rather than constructing an image from multiple pulses as with conventional scanning LADAR systems. However, accurate methods to model and simulate performance from these 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation developed and reported here is expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment, this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) atmospheric transmission; 4) atmospheric backscatter; 5) atmospheric turbulence; 6) obscurants, and; 7) obscurant path length. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel in the array. Here, noise sources are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel. Model outputs are in the form of 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array. Other outputs include power distribution from a target, signal-to-noise vs. range, probability of

  20. A model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash ladar imaging sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Russo, Leonard E.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-11-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. 3D Flash LADAR is the latest evolution of laser radar systems and provides unique capability in its ability to provide high-resolution LADAR imagery upon a single laser pulse; rather than constructing an image from multiple pulses as with conventional scanning LADAR systems. However, accurate methods to model and simulate performance from these 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation developed and reported here is expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment, this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) atmospheric transmission; 4) atmospheric backscatter; 5) atmospheric turbulence; 6) obscurants, and; 7) obscurant path length. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel in the array. Here, noise sources are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel. Model outputs are in the form of 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array. Other outputs include power distribution from a target, signal-to-noise vs. range, probability of

  1. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  2. Asymmetric dihedral angle offsets for large-size lunar laser ranging retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsubo, Toshimichi; Kunimori, Hiroo; Noda, Hirotomo; Hanada, Hideo; Araki, Hiroshi; Katayama, Masato

    2011-08-01

    The distribution of two-dimensional velocity aberration is off-centered by 5 to 6 microradians in lunar laser ranging, due to the stable measurement geometry in the motion of the Earth and the Moon. The optical responses of hollow-type retroreflectors are investigated through numerical simulations, especially focusing on large-size, single-reflector targets that can ultimately minimize the systematic error in future lunar laser ranging. An asymmetric dihedral angle offset, i.e. setting unequal angles between the three back faces, is found to be effective for retroreflectors that are larger than 100 mm in diameter. Our numerical simulation results reveal that the optimized return energy increases approximately 3.5 times more than symmetric dihedral angle cases, and the optimized dihedral angle offsets are 0.65-0.8 arcseconds for one angle, and zeroes for the other two angles.

  3. The effect of vapor incidence angle upon thin film columnar growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazor, A.; Bukiet, B.G.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    We present a generalized theory for the growth of columnar microstructure in vapor deposited thin films under the joint influence of a constant uniform deposition flux coming down with arbitrarily chosen incidence angle, and surface diffusion. The dependences of the Zone I to Zone II transition temperature, and the characteristic length scales associated with the unstable modes on the deposition angle are predicted. The surface morphology is obtained as a function of vapor incidence angle. For a specific deposition angle, there is a one-parameter family of steady-state surface profiles which corresponds to a range of possible columnar orientation angles, among which only one angle is associated with the tangent rule. These results agree with experimental observations. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Development of portable and real-time self-calibration angle encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Xue, Zi; Lin, Hu; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    At National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM), a portable and real-time self-calibration angle encoder was developed to meet the requirement of angular measurement with high accuracy, high speed, and high adaptability in limited size. In the development, the special arrangement of reading heads, the structure of bearing was designed base on the novel selfcalibration method, and the corresponding signal acquisition and processing system was set up with capability of high speed and multi-channel synchronous data acquisition and processing. The max rotary speed of this angle encoder gets 18 r/min (110°/s) in real-time mode. This angle encoder was compared with NIM's primary angle standard. The calibration result shows that this angle encoder has angle measuring accuracy better than +/-4″.

  5. Comparison of the forward head angle and the lumbar flexion and rotation angles of computer workers using routine and individually fixed computer workstations.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the forward head angle and the lumbar flexion and rotation angles of computer workers using routine and fixed computer workstations. [Subjects] Ten male workers voluntarily consented to participate in the study. [Methods] A 3-D motion analysis system was used to measure the angles of the forward head and lumbar flexion. All subjects performed computer work for 30 minutes using both types of workstation. [Results] When working at the fixed workstation, the forward head angle was less than that observed when the routine workstation was used. At the fixed workstation, the lumbar flexion and rotation angles were less than that at the routine workstation. [Conclusion] The computer workstation individually fixed for standard posture may have prevented poor sitting posture.

  6. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  7. Noise of the SR-3 propeller model at 2 deg and 4 deg angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The noise effect of operating supersonic tip speed propellers at angle of attack with respect to the incoming flow was determined. Increases in the maximum blade passage noise were observed for the propeller operating at angle of attack. The noise increase was not symmetrical with one wall of the wind tunnel having significantly more noise increase than the other wall. This was apparently the result of the rotational direction of the propeller. The lack of symmetry of the noise at angle of attack to the use of oppositely rotating propellers on opposite sides of an airplane fuselage as a way of minimizing the noise due to operation at angle of attack.

  8. Effectiveness of variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals in lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wearable sensor system developed by our group, which measured lower limb angles using Kalman-filtering-based method, was suggested to be useful in evaluation of gait function for rehabilitation support. However, it was expected to reduce variations of measurement errors. In this paper, a variable-Kalman-gain method based on angle error that was calculated from acceleration signals was proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The proposed method was tested comparing to fixed-gain Kalman filter and a variable-Kalman-gain method that was based on acceleration magnitude used in previous studies. First, in angle measurement in treadmill walking, the proposed method measured lower limb angles with the highest measurement accuracy and improved significantly foot inclination angle measurement, while it improved slightly shank and thigh inclination angles. The variable-gain method based on acceleration magnitude was not effective for our Kalman filter system. Then, in angle measurement of a rigid body model, it was shown that the proposed method had measurement accuracy similar to or higher than results seen in other studies that used markers of camera-based motion measurement system fixing on a rigid plate together with a sensor or on the sensor directly. The proposed method was found to be effective in angle measurement with inertial sensors.

  9. Effectiveness of Variable-Gain Kalman Filter Based on Angle Error Calculated from Acceleration Signals in Lower Limb Angle Measurement with Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wearable sensor system developed by our group, which measured lower limb angles using Kalman-filtering-based method, was suggested to be useful in evaluation of gait function for rehabilitation support. However, it was expected to reduce variations of measurement errors. In this paper, a variable-Kalman-gain method based on angle error that was calculated from acceleration signals was proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The proposed method was tested comparing to fixed-gain Kalman filter and a variable-Kalman-gain method that was based on acceleration magnitude used in previous studies. First, in angle measurement in treadmill walking, the proposed method measured lower limb angles with the highest measurement accuracy and improved significantly foot inclination angle measurement, while it improved slightly shank and thigh inclination angles. The variable-gain method based on acceleration magnitude was not effective for our Kalman filter system. Then, in angle measurement of a rigid body model, it was shown that the proposed method had measurement accuracy similar to or higher than results seen in other studies that used markers of camera-based motion measurement system fixing on a rigid plate together with a sensor or on the sensor directly. The proposed method was found to be effective in angle measurement with inertial sensors. PMID:24282442

  10. Diffraction by polyhedral angle: Field in vicinity of singular ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, Vladimir A.

    2002-11-01

    If the plane acoustic wave hits a polyhedral angle, the scattered field consists of an incident wave, of its reflections from the angle's facets, of primary edge waves excited at angle's edges, and of a spherical wave excited at the angle's vertex. It is supposed for simplicity that the geometry of the problem is such that there is no secondary and subsequent edge waves. There are two types of light-shadow boundaries: first for incident and reflected waves and second for edge waves. As is well known, the field in penumbras is expressed via a Fresnel integral. The incident wave's ray passing through the vertex and its reflections from facets are singular rays belonging to the light-shadow boundaries of both types. It will be shown that the field in the vicinity of a singular ray is expressed via a Fresnel intergal and via a generalized Fresnel integral G(p,q) which was introduced in [P. S. Clemmov and T. B. A. Senior, Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc. 9, 570-572 (1953); see also V. A. Borovikov, Uniform Stationary Phase Method, IEE Electromagnetic Series 40, London, 1994]. This result is valid for an elastic incident wave as well.

  11. Method on camouflaged target recognition using the angle of ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuansun, Xiao-bo; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Yan-hua; Li, Zhao-zhao

    2015-10-01

    Using polarimetric information of the camouflaged target surface to identify camouflage has been a hot research area in camouflage detecting. The main method is to use the difference in the degree of polarization(DOP) between background and target to add the contrast ratio of them. The measurement of the DOP has some requirements on the intensity of reflected radiation. In case of low reflected radiation intensity, the difference in the DOP for different materials is not so distinguishable. In addition, the linear degree of polarization is largely under the effects of detection angle and surface roughness, so it is hard to differentiate the degree of polarization when the targets with similar surface roughness are detected at the same detection angle. By analyzing the elements affecting the reflected electromagnetic radiation amplitudes and phase on the camouflaged target surface, this article makes a research on the polarization character of reflected radiation A method on camouflaged target recognition directly or indirectly by taking the angle of ellipsometry (AOE) imaging under the linear polarized light. The function model of the angle of incidence, complex refractive index and AOE was modeled, then the model was simulated by MATLAB and the results showed it can describe the distribution properties of AOE. A new thought for the approach of identifying camouflaged target recognition by detecting polarimetric information was proposed, and it has a deep theoretical and practical significance in camouflaged target recognition.

  12. Improving gated cardiac scanning using limited-angle reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, K.C.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1983-02-01

    Selected phases of the cardiac cycle can be imaged by the method of gated cardiac scanning using whole body scanners. However, since there is no synchronization between the random heart beats and the CT machine, the output will have gaps in the angular coverage of each scan. The missing projections in these gaps result in artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper, the technique of limited-angle reconstruction is employed to fill in the missing projections to remove the artifacts. The object is transformed back and forth between the object space and the projection space, being corrected in each step by the constraints of the finite spatial extent and of the upper and lower bounds of the object in the object space, and the known projections in the projection space. It is found that by using the proposed algorithm the rms errors of the limited-angle images are reduced to a level comparable to those of the complete-angle images. The same iteration algorithm can also be used to reduce the fan beam scanning angle from 360 degree to 180 degree without sacrificing much image quality.

  13. Characterization of treated porcelain surfaces via dynamic contact angle analysis.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, R D; Shen, C

    1995-01-01

    Successful porcelain repair requires conditioning of porcelain surfaces. Conditioning is intended to facilitate wetting by repair materials and improve interfacial bonding. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of selected surface treatments upon the wettability of a representative feldspathic porcelain. Dynamic contact angle analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the effects of such treatments. Standardized porcelain specimens were subjected to the following five treatment regimens: (1) control (no treatment); (2) airborne particle abrasion using 50 microns aluminum oxide; (3) etching with ammonium bifluoride gel; (4) etching with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel; and (5) etching with hydrofluoric acid gel. Following treatment, specimens were cleansed and dried. Advancing contact angles were quantified using dynamic contact angle analysis. Mean values and 95% confidence intervals were (in degrees): control, 63.8 +/- 2.7; ammonium bifluoride, 39.4 +/- 2.0; airborne particle abrading, 29.1 +/- 2.9; acidulated phosphate fluoride, 24.9 +/- 1.7; and hydrofluoric acid, 16.5 +/- 1.2. Significant differences were found between all treatment groups (P = .05). Subsequent scanning electron microscopy examination of treated surfaces indicated lesser contact angles were associated with surfaces displaying deeper and wider grooves. Apparently, the resultant increase in surface area produces increased wettability. It is inferred that an increase in surface area may correspond to enhanced resin-porcelain bonding.

  14. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  15. Effects of temperature and conditioning on contact lens wetting angles.

    PubMed

    Knick, P D; Huff, J W

    1991-07-01

    Because wettability is not always examined under standard conditions, we investigated the temperature dependence of saline wettability on unconditioned and conditioned polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), and three silicone acrylate lens materials. Sessile drop contact angles were measured in a humidity chamber at 23 degrees C and 34 degrees C using laser-assisted contact angle goniometry. In separate experiments, saline-stored and preconditioned lenses were examined either with or without rinsing. Sessile drop contact angles at 34 degrees C were within 2 degrees to 5 degrees of the room temperature values for both conditioned and unconditioned lenses, demonstrating a negligible temperature dependence. At both temperatures, the conditioned PMMA, CAB, silafocon A, and pasifocon C lenses wet slightly better, by 1 degree to 12 degrees, than unconditioned lenses. However, this increase was only significant with PMMA and silafocon A (P less than 0.05) and reversed when the preconditioned lenses were rinsed repeatedly in saline and reexamined. The results suggest that for these materials: 1) in vitro saline contact angles do not approach those seen on the eye, and this discrepancy can not be explained by temperature or conditioning; and 2) conditioning does not increase material wettability but merely forms a temporary hydrophilic interface that is more wettable than the lens material. PMID:1654228

  16. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  17. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  18. Tilt angle of bipolar sunspot groups and solar dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Dmitry; Illarionov, Egor; Pipin, Valery; Tlatov, Andrey

    We obtain the latitude-time distribution of the averaged tilt angle of solar bipoles. For large bipoles, which are mainly bipolar sunspot groups, the spatially averaged tilt angle is positive in the Northern solar hemisphere and negative in the Southern, with modest variations during course of the solar cycle. We consider the averaged tilt angle to be a tracer for a crucial element of the solar dynamo, i.e. the regeneration rate of poloidal large-scale magnetic field from toroidal. The value of the tilt obtained crudely corresponds to a regeneration factor corresponding to about 10% of r.m.s. velocity of solar convection. These results develop findings of Kosovichev and Stenflo (2012) concerning Joy's law, and agree with the usual expectations of solar dynamo theory. Quite surprisingly, we find a pronounced deviation from these properties for smaller bipoles, which are mainly solar ephemeral regions. They possess tilt angles of approximately the same absolute value, but of opposite sign compared to that of the large bipoles. Of course, the tilt data for small bipoles are less well determined than those for large bipoles; however they remain robust under various modifications of the data processing.

  19. Broadband "Infinite-Speed" Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yan-Yan; Levin, E.M; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2009-06-02

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR of high-Z spin- 1/2 nuclei such as {sup 125}Te, {sup 207}Pb, {sup 119}Sn, {sup 113}Cd, and {sup 195}Pt is often hampered by large (>1000 ppm) chemical-shift anisotropies, which result in strong spinning sidebands that can obscure the centerbands of interest. In various tellurides with applications as thermoelectrics and as phase-change materials for data storage, even 22-kHz magic-angle spinning cannot resolve the center- and sidebands broadened by chemical-shift dispersion, which precludes peak identification or quantification. For sideband suppression over the necessary wide spectral range (up to 200 kHz), radio frequency pulse sequences with few, short pulses are required. We have identified Gan's two-dimensional magic-angle-turning (MAT) experiment with five 90{sup o} pulses as a promising broadband technique for obtaining spectra without sidebands. We have adapted it to broad spectra and fast magic-angle spinning by accounting for long pulses (comparable to the dwell time in t{sub 1}) and short rotation periods. Spectral distortions are small and residual sidebands negligible even for spectra with signals covering a range of 1.5 {gamma}B{sub 1}, due to a favorable disposition of the narrow ranges containing the signals of interest in the spectral plane. The method is demonstrated on various technologically interesting tellurides with spectra spanning up to 170 kHz, at 22 kHz MAS.

  20. Acquisition and analysis of angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Levine, Ross M.; Chen, Xin; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2014-02-18

    Angle-beam ultrasonic testing is a common practical technique used for nondestructive evaluation to detect, locate, and characterize a variety of material defects and damage. Greater understanding of the both the incident wavefield produced by an angle-beam transducer and the subsequent scattering from a variety of defects and geometrical features is anticipated to increase the reliability of data interpretation. The focus of this paper is on acquiring and analyzing propagating waves from angle-beam transducers in simple, defect-free plates as a first step in the development of methods for flaw characterization. Unlike guided waves, which excite the plate throughout its thickness, angle-beam bulk waves bounce back and forth between the plate surfaces, resulting in the well-known multiple “skips” or “V-paths.” The experimental setup consists of a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. Although laser vibrometry is now routinely used to record guided waves for which the frequency content is below 1 MHz, it is more challenging to acquire higher frequency bulk waves in the 1–10 MHz range. Signals are recorded on the surface of an aluminum plate that were generated from a 5 MHz, 65° refracted angle, shear wave transducer-wedge combination. Data are analyzed directly in the x-t domain, via a slant stack Radon transform in the τ-p (offset time-slowness) domain, and via a 2-D Fourier transform in the ω-k domain, thereby enabling identification of specific arrivals and modes. Results compare well to those expected from a simple ray tracing analysis except for the unexpected presence of a strong Rayleigh wave.

  1. In situ estimation of sediment sound speed and critical angle

    PubMed

    Maguer; Bovio; Fox; Schmidt

    2000-09-01

    Understanding the basic physics of sound penetration into ocean sediments is essential for the design of sonar systems that can detect, localize, classify, and identify buried objects. In this regard the sound speed of the sediment is a crucial parameter as the ratio of sound speed at the water-sediment interface determines the critical angle. Sediment sound speed is typically measured from core samples using high frequency (100's of kHz) pulsed travel time measurements. Earlier experimental work on subcritical penetration into sandy sediments has suggested that the effective sound speed in the 2-20 kHz range is significantly lower than the core measurement results. Simulations using Biot theory for propagation in porous media confirmed that sandy sediments may be highly dispersive in the range 1-100 kHz for the type of sand in which the experiments were performed. Here it is shown that a direct and robust estimate of the critical angle, and therefore the sediment sound speed, at the lower frequencies can be achieved by analyzing the grazing angle dependence of the phase delays observed on a buried array. A parametric source with secondary frequencies in the 2-16 kHz range was directed toward a sandy bottom similar to the one investigated in the earlier study. An array of 14 hydrophones was used to measure penetrated field. The critical angle was estimated by analyzing the variations of signal arrival times versus frequency, burial depth, and grazing angle. Matching the results with classical transmission theory yielded a sound speed estimate in the sand of 1626 m/s in the frequency range 2-5 kHz, again significantly lower the 1720 m/s estimated from the cores at 200 kHz. However, as described here, this dispersion is consistent with the predictions of the Biot theory for this type of sand.

  2. Harnessing Genetic Variation in Leaf Angle to Increase Productivity of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Truong, Sandra K; McCormick, Ryan F; Rooney, William L; Mullet, John E

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency with which a plant intercepts solar radiation is determined primarily by its architecture. Understanding the genetic regulation of plant architecture and how changes in architecture affect performance can be used to improve plant productivity. Leaf inclination angle, the angle at which a leaf emerges with respect to the stem, is a feature of plant architecture that influences how a plant canopy intercepts solar radiation. Here we identify extensive genetic variation for leaf inclination angle in the crop plant Sorghum bicolor, a C4 grass species used for the production of grain, forage, and bioenergy. Multiple genetic loci that regulate leaf inclination angle were identified in recombinant inbred line populations of grain and bioenergy sorghum. Alleles of sorghum dwarf-3, a gene encoding a P-glycoprotein involved in polar auxin transport, are shown to change leaf inclination angle by up to 34° (0.59 rad). The impact of heritable variation in leaf inclination angle on light interception in sorghum canopies was assessed using functional-structural plant models and field experiments. Smaller leaf inclination angles caused solar radiation to penetrate deeper into the canopy, and the resulting redistribution of light is predicted to increase the biomass yield potential of bioenergy sorghum by at least 3%. These results show that sorghum leaf angle is a heritable trait regulated by multiple loci and that genetic variation in leaf angle can be used to modify plant architecture to improve sorghum crop performance.

  3. A highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm for drops on inclined surface based on ellipse-fitting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z N; Wang, S Y

    2015-02-01

    To improve the accuracy in the calculation of dynamic contact angle for drops on the inclined surface, a significant number of numerical drop profiles on the inclined surface with different inclination angles, drop volumes, and contact angles are generated based on the finite difference method, a least-squares ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to calculate the dynamic contact angle. The influences of the above three factors are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the dynamic contact angle errors, including the errors of the left and right contact angles, evaluated by the ellipse-fitting algorithm tend to increase with inclination angle/drop volume/contact angle. If the drop volume and the solid substrate are fixed, the errors of the left and right contact angles increase with inclination angle. After performing a tremendous amount of computation, the critical dimensionless drop volumes corresponding to the critical contact angle error are obtained. Based on the values of the critical volumes, a highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm is proposed and fully validated. Within nearly the whole hydrophobicity range, it can decrease the dynamic contact angle error in the inclined plane method to less than a certain value even for different types of liquids.

  4. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  5. Flocking and invariance of velocity angles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Le; Huang, Lihong; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-04-01

    Motsch and Tadmor considered an extended Cucker-Smale model to investigate the flocking behavior of self-organized systems of interacting species. In this extended model, a cone of the vision was introduced so that outside the cone the influence of one agent on the other is lost and hence the corresponding influence function takes the value zero. This creates a problem to apply the Motsch-Tadmor and Cucker-Smale method to prove the flocking property of the system. Here, we examine the variation of the velocity angles between two arbitrary agents, and obtain a monotonicity property for the maximum cone of velocity angles. This monotonicity permits us to utilize existing arguments to show the flocking property of the system under consideration, when the initial velocity angles satisfy some minor technical constraints. PMID:27105986

  6. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  7. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  8. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  9. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 2: Openings and Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Ever wondered how to use technology to teach angles? This article follows on from an earlier article published last year, providing a range of ideas for integrating technology and concrete materials with the teaching of angle concepts. The authors also provide a comprehensive list of free online games and learning objects that can be used to teach…

  10. Understanding Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Study Using Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are quickly becoming tools found in the educational environment. The researchers in this study use a form of mobile learning to support students in learning about angle concepts. Design-based research is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated local instruction theory about students' develop of angle and…

  11. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Yang Wenjun; Wu Xiaodong

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft Axxent{sup TM} electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 270 Degree-Sign . The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D{sub 90} to 85-100 Gy{sub 10}, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5-25 and 10-30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D{sub 90} contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D{sub 90} and the delivery time within acceptable

  12. Hyperpronation in Dancers Incidence and Relation to Calcaneal Angle.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Rélana M E; Air, Mary E; Rietveld, A B M

    2012-09-01

    Hyperpronation is a common finding when examining the dancer-patient and is thought to be implicated in several dance-related injuries. Little is known about the incidence of hyperpronation-related symptoms in dancers. Additionally, there is no current easy method for estimating the degree of hyperpronation. This study was designed to investigate the incidence of symptoms related to foot hyperpronation in dancer-patients and to evaluate the potential correlation between the patient's calcaneal angle and severity of hyperpronation. A retrospective study of 2,427 dancers' charts over the past 6 years was undertaken to identify dancers who presented with musculoskeletal complaints or problems related to hyperpronation. Physical exam data and diagnoses were collected. Among 24 new dancer-patients presenting to clinic with hyperpronation-related symptoms, the calcaneal angle was measured and correlated with a clinical grading scale based on the Hübscher maneuver. Per chart review, the incidence of symptomatic hyperpronation resulting in prescription for orthotics was 30% (739 dancers out of 2,427). The most common related diagnosis was retropatellar chondropathy (10%). Clinical severity of hyperpronation was linearly related to the calcaneal angle (95% CI [1.25, 4.14], p = 0.0006; Pearson's r(2) = 0.97). The calcaneal angles among mild, moderate, and severe hyperpronators differed significantly (H = 13.45, p = 0.0012). It was concluded that measuring the calcaneal angle may be a useful adjunct to the Hübscher maneuver for grading the clinical severity of a dancer's hyperpronation. Healthcare providers working with dancers should be aware of the presence of hyperpronation, its relation to compensatory turnout techniques, and association with injuries in the foot, ankle, knee, hip, and low back. A standard, time-efficient method of measuring and grading hyperpronation is still needed.

  13. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries. PMID:19825746

  14. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  15. The effect of Q angle on ankle sprain occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Nikolaos; Papaharalampous, Xenofon; Tsiganos, Georgios; Papadakou, Eugenia; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-02-01

    The intersegmental joint forces and the structures that must resist them (articular surfaces, ligaments, and musculature) are related through anatomical alignment of the joints and skeletal system. Ankle joint structure can affect or be affected by bony malformations of the surrounding areas, including the knee and hip. The aim of the current study is to examine the possible relationship between the quadriceps (Q) angle and other factors (anthropometric characteristics, medical history, and age) on the occurrence of ankle sprains, because its value, when assessed correctly, provides useful information for the anatomical alignment of the lower extremity. The study sample consisted of 45 high-level athletes, evenly distributed among 3 sports (basketball, soccer, and volleyball). Q angle measurements were made on radiographs. The study lasted for 2 years. A logistic regression was used to determine the importance of each factor on the probability in question. A significance level of P = .1 was used. The factors contributing more to an ankle sprain were a previous injury of the same type ( P < .01) followed by body mass index (BMI; P < .10) and age (P < .10). On the contrary, Q angle was proven to be statistically nonsignificant (P > .10). The results were valid even when the BMI variable was substituted by body inertia propensity, a derived variable. The Q angle remained statistically nonsignificant ( P > .10). The Q angle magnitude does not seem to be a decisive factor that could increase the probability of spraining an ankle. The most important factors that could affect the probability of sustaining an ankle sprain are the athlete's age, anthropometric characteristics, and prior injuries.

  16. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p < .000). The obliquity values and intermetatarsal angles changed in direct relationship to the radiographic projection angle. This illustrates the importance of using standardized radiographic projection angles. We conclude that the 1-dimensional standard anteroposterior radiograph with assessment of the distal medial cuneiform angle cannot adequately demonstrate the pathologic features of hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity.

  17. Exact quantum cross sections for a three dimensional angle dependent model for three body reactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, M.; Kouri, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Exact quantum mechanical reactive cross sections are reported for a three dimensional angle dependent model surface. The surface simulates an atom-heteronuclear diatom system A + BC leading to AB + C where atom B is much heavier than A or C. The molecules BC and AB are taken to be rotating vibrators which can dissociate. Results for two angle dependent potentials are given.

  18. Cell surface energy, contact angles and phase partition. II. Bacterial cells in biphasic aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, D F; Akit, J

    1980-11-01

    Partition coefficients in biphasic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and Dextran are compared to cell surface energies obtained from contact angles of each liquid phase on cell layers. Linear relationships are observed between these two independent measurements for a variety of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the importance of interfacial phenomena and contact angles in the phase-partition process. PMID:6159003

  19. Algorithm for automatic angles measurement and screening for Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH).

    PubMed

    Al-Bashir, Areen K; Al-Abed, Mohammad; Abu Sharkh, Fayez M; Kordeya, Mohamed N; Rousan, Fadi M

    2015-08-01

    Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) is a medical term represent the hip joint instability that appear mainly in infants. The examination for this condition can be done by ultrasound for children under 6 months old and by X-ray for children over 6 months old. Physician's assessment is based on certain angles derived from those images, namely the Acetabular Angle, and the Center Edge Angle. In this paper, we are presenting a novel, fully automatic algorithm for measuring the diagnostic angles of DDH from the X-ray images. Our algorithm consists of Automatic segmentation and extraction of anatomical landmarks from X-ray images. Both of Acetabular angle and Center edge angle are automatically calculated. The analysis included X-ray images for 16 children recruited for the purposed of this study. The automatically acquired angles accuracy for Acetabular Angle was around 85%, and an absolute deviation of 3.4°±3.3° compared to the physician's manually calculated angle. The results of this method are very promising for the future development of an automatic method for screening X-ray images DDH that complement and aid the physicians' manual methods. PMID:26737754

  20. Correlation between anatomical parameters of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhaoxun; Chen, Jun; Qu, Lianjun; Cui, Yan; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Hongxin; Yang, Xiaoming; Guan, Qingli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To obtain anatomical data on intertubercular sulcus of humerus, evaluate the correlation between intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, to guide the positioning of torsion angle of prosthesis during total shoulder arthroplasty and provide references for shoulder prosthesis design. Methods: Using a Siemens Ultrahigh speed 64- rows multi-slices spiral CT scanner and 20 dried adult humeral specimens (intact specimen, no fractures or pathological damage), of these, left lateral in 10 cases, right lateral in 10 cases, male or female all inclusive, specimens are all provided by Anatomy Department of Weifang Medical College, scan ranged from the highest point of humeral head to the distal ends of trochlea. And scanned data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There is a linear correlation between the distance from intertubercular sulcus to central axis line of humeral head, position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the beginning slice of intertubercular sulcus. There is a linear correlation between position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the slice of surgical neck. Conclusion: There is a linear correlation between position of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, in total shoulder arthroplasty, using intertubercular sulcus as anatomical landmark will help to accurately position torsion angle of individualized prosthesis. Position angle of intertubercular sulcus is an objective, flexible positioning indicator. PMID:26131058

  1. Sensitivity of high-spectral resolution and broadband thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of secondary sulfate aerosols in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The observation of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols (SSA) and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations (with better spatial resolution than limb observations) is a fundamental tool to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Thermal infrared (TIR) observations are sensitive to the chemical composition of the aerosols due to the strong spectral variations of the imaginary part of the refractive index in this band and, correspondingly, of the absorption, as a function of the composition Then, these observations are, in principle, well adapted to detect and characterize UTLS SSA. Unfortunately, the exploitation of nadir TIR observations for sulfate aerosol layer monitoring is today very limited. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS SSA layers. The sulfate aerosol particles are assumed as binary systems of sulfuric acid/water solution droplets, with varying sulphuric acid mixing ratios. The extinction properties of the SSA, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. High-spectral resolution pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on

  2. Sensitivity of high-spectral resolution and broadband thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of secondary sulfate aerosols in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The observation of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols (SSA) and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations (with better spatial resolution than limb observations) is a fundamental tool to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Thermal infrared (TIR) observations are sensitive to the chemical composition of the aerosols due to the strong spectral variations of the imaginary part of the refractive index in this band and, correspondingly, of the absorption, as a function of the composition Then, these observations are, in principle, well adapted to detect and characterize UTLS SSA. Unfortunately, the exploitation of nadir TIR observations for sulfate aerosol layer monitoring is today very limited. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS SSA layers. The sulfate aerosol particles are assumed as binary systems of sulfuric acid/water solution droplets, with varying sulphuric acid mixing ratios. The extinction properties of the SSA, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. High-spectral resolution pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on

  3. Simultaneous Multi-angle Measurements of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    We report the results from a recent series of experiments employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at HAARP, the Super DARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. For the first time, plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region displayed marked but contemporaneous differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Line (OPL) spectra, rarely observed in past experiments, occurred with sufficient regularity for experimentation. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  4. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U.

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  5. Nanostructure surface design for broadband and angle-independent antireflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2013-01-01

    Three different antireflecting structures (ARS), namely, single-diameter nanorods, dual-diameter nanorods, and biomimetic nanotips (resembling moth-eye's submicrostructures) were compared to each other analytically for their reflectivities, using finite difference time domain calculations. Simulation results establish the biomimetic nanotips as better ARS than the others, in the visible and near-infrared wavelength zone and over a wider angle of incidence. The reflectance values in the nanotips are significantly lower compared to both types of nanorods and also the planar silicon below the Brewster angle (˜75 deg). The low antireflection translated to enhanced optical absorption in these subwavelength structures. A general antireflection design rule emerged from the simulation results.

  6. Anterior chamber angle in the exfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, P K; Spaeth, G L; Poryzees, E M

    1985-01-01

    The gonioscopic findings of 76 patients with the exfoliation syndrome were reviewed. A high frequency of narrowness of the anterior chamber (AC) angle was found (32%). 18% had angles considered occludable, and 14% had obvious angle-closure glaucoma as shown by the presence of peripheral anterior synechias (PAS). Increased pigmentation of the posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM) was noted in all cases. When this pigmentation was markedly asymmetrical, unilateral exfoliation with glaucoma was common in the more pigmented eye. In addition heavy angle pigmentation in the absence of exfoliation was noted in the fellow eye of patients with characteristic exfoliated material in the other eye. Increased pigmentation of the PTM may be the earliest detectable sign of the exfoliation syndrome (ES). The clinical significance of our estimating PTM pigmentation at the 12 o'clock position is discussed. In view of the accelerated optic nerve damage associated with the development of glaucoma secondary to ES, routine estimation of the pigmentation of the PTM at 12 o'clock is recommended in the hope of early detection of cases of otherwise inapparent ES. Images PMID:3966996

  7. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  8. Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L.; Hartley, Matthew; Pour Imani, Hamed; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  9. A Method for Measuring a Plane Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, George D.; Roberts, G. Gilbert

    1978-01-01

    Derivation of formulas and example problems for determining the size of a plane angle are given to help in drafting work. The authors state that a small hand calculator will provide greater accuracy in solving these problems than a protractor. (MF)

  10. Crank angle detecting system for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, H.; Nishiyama, M.; Nakamura, K.; Ishigami, K.

    1987-04-14

    A crank angle detecting system is described for a multicylinder engine having at least three cylinders classified as groups, which comprises: (a) a disc connected for rotation with a crankshaft and formed with a first slit group having a large number of slits for detecting crankshaft angular positions and a second slit group having a small number of slits for detecting each predetermined piston stroke of each of at least three cylinders, the slits of the second group having at least three widths which are different from each other; (b) sensing means responsive to the slits on the disc for continuously detecting crankshaft angular positions by sensing the first group of slits and producing crank angle signals corresponding to the slits of the first group and for detecting each predetermined piston stroke of each engine cylinder by sensing the second group of slits and producing piston stroke signals representing the piston strokes, each piston stroke signal having a duration which corresponds to one of the different widths; and (c) means for identifying the piston stroke signals based on the duration thereof by counting crank angle signals occurring during the duration of each piston stroke signal and classifying the piston stroke signals based on the counted crank angle signals.

  11. Ischemia detection from morphological QRS angle changes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an ischemia detector is presented based on the analysis of QRS-derived angles. The detector has been developed by modeling ischemic effects on the QRS angles as a gradual change with a certain transition time and assuming a Laplacian additive modeling error contaminating the angle series. Both standard and non-standard leads were used for analysis. Non-standard leads were obtained by applying the PCA technique over specific lead subsets to represent different potential locations of the ischemic zone. The performance of the proposed detector was tested over a population of 79 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in one of the major coronary arteries (LAD (n  =  25), RCA (n  =  16) and LCX (n  =  38)). The best detection performance, obtained for standard ECG leads, was achieved in the LAD group with values of sensitivity and specificity of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], followed by the RCA group with [Formula: see text], Sp  =  94.4 and the LCX group with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], notably outperforming detection based on the ST series in all cases, with the same detector structure. The timing of the detected ischemic events ranged from 30 s up to 150 s (mean  =  66.8 s) following the start of occlusion. We conclude that changes in the QRS angles can be used to detect acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:27243441

  12. Sensor Tracks the Sun From Any Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M., M.; Bunker, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Sensor system locates Sun from any angle and generates error signals to point object toward Sun and follow its motion. Sun-sensor system includes three photodetectors, each with separate field of view defined by set of apertures. As equipment rotates about axis, detectors put out time-varying signals processed by external electronics to determine rotation rate and direction to Sun.

  13. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    -spaced coplanar beams. The genetic and the cross-entropy algorithms showed faster convergence in the very beginning of the optimization but the simulated annealing algorithm eventually arrived at almost the same objective function values. These three strategies typically yield clinically equivalent treatment plans. The iterative algorithm showed the worst convergence properties. The choice of the termination criterion had a stronger influence on the performance of the simulated annealing algorithm than on the performance of the genetic and the cross-entropy algorithms. We advocate to terminate the optimization process after the evaluation of 1000 beam combinations without objective function decrease. For our simulations, this resulted in an average deviation of the objective function from the reference value after 10 000 evaluated beam ensembles of 0.5% for all metaheuristics. On average, there was only a minor improvement when increasing the angular resolution in the space of candidate beam angles from 20° to 5°. However, we observed significant improvements when considering non-coplanar candidate beams for challenging head and neck cases.

  14. Optically derived elevation angle dependence of fading for satellite PCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akturan, R.; Vogel, Wolf J.

    1995-01-01

    Images of urban Japan taken vertically through a 180 deg fisheye lens were analyzed to derive, as a function of elevation the fraction of sky that is clear, shadowed by trees, or blocked by buildings. At 32 deg elevation, results match those derived from satellite measurements fit to a 3-state fade model. Using the same model, for the first time the elevation angle dependence of mobile satellite fading is predicted.

  15. Low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is conducted of the results of investigations into the flowfields and aerodynamic forces associated with low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack. Attention is given to criteria for the cataloging of these flowfields, the phenomenon of vortex breakdown, with varying wing incidence and Mach number, and the effects of aspect ratio and compressibility. The planforms treated are of rectangular, clipped-delta, and strake-wing combination geometries. Extensive graphic representations of performance trends with varying parameters are furnished.

  16. Wire grid polarizers fabricated by low angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, M. P. C.; Little, M.; Egan, E.; Hochbaum, A.; Johns, C.; Stephansen, S.

    2013-03-01

    Oblique angle metal deposition has been combined with high aspect ratio imprinted structures to create wire grid polarizers (WGP's) for use as polarization recyclers in liquid crystal displays. The optical results for the oblique deposition WGP show contrast comparable to a conventionally etched WGP. In addition, the WGP showed improved spectral and spatial uniformity as compared to a multilayer reflective polarizer. The next steps to the fabrication of meter sized WGP are proposed.

  17. The small angle neutron spectrometer at the HANARO reactor, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, B.-S.; Han, Y.-S.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J.-S.; Hong, K.-P.; Park, K.-N.; Kim, H.-J.

    A new small angle neutron spectrometer (SANS) has been installed on the CN beam tube at the 30 MW HANARO Research Reactor in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The SANS is to be used for the study of microstructural inhomogeneities in materials in the 1 nm to 100 nm size range. In this paper, the design characteristics of the spectrometer are presented in detail, and several SANS results for standard samples are presented which illustrate its performance.

  18. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  19. Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, M. Jake

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving vane-type flow-angle probes. Forces in the FLAP can be measured by various techniques, including those that involve conventional strain gauges (based on electrical resistance) and those that involve more advanced strain gauges (based on optical fibers). A correlation is used to convert force-measurement data to the local flow angle. The use of fiber optics will enable the construction of a miniature FLAP, leading to the possibility of flow measurement in very small or confined regions. This may also enable the tufting of a surface with miniature FLAPs, capable of quantitative flow-angle measurements, similar to attaching yarn tufts for qualitative measurements. The prototype FLAP was a small, aerodynamically shaped, low-aspect-ratio fin about 2 in. (approximately equal to 5 cm) long, 1 in. (approximately equal to 2.5 cm) wide, and 0.125 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) thick (see Figure 1). The prototype FLAP included simple electrical-resistance strain gauges for measuring forces. Four strain gauges were mounted on the FLAP; two on the upper surface and two on the lower surface. The gauges were connected to form a full Wheatstone bridge, configured as a bending bridge. In preparation for a flight test, the prototype FLAP was mounted on the airdata boom of a flight-test fixture (FTF) on the NASA Dryden F-15B flight research airplane.

  20. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  1. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Thomas Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Palczynski, Karol Dzubiella, Joachim

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  2. Surgical treatment of the nasolabial angle in balanced rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Honrado, Carlo P; Pearlman, Steven J

    2003-01-01

    Nasal analysis and surgical planning are crucial for a successful, aesthetically pleasing rhinoplasty. One of the key parameters for evaluation is the nasolabial angle. The nasal spine, caudal septum, and medial crura of the lower lateral cartilages provide the framework for this area. Alteration of these structures, as well as nasal tip rotation and projection, may affect the resultant nasolabial angle, length of the upper lip, and overall harmony of the nose. Fullness at the nasolabial junction caused by a pushing philtrum may also result in an unbalanced appearance. The literature is replete with methods for categorizing the nasal tip and with recommendations for surgical treatment. Treatment of the caudal septum and nasal spine is often an afterthought that is left up to the aesthetic judgment of the surgeon. To make this a more systematic decision, in 1990 we devised a classification for analysis and treatment of this area. This study included the length of the nose, the nasolabial angle, and the presence of a pushing philtrum, with suggested treatment to allow proper tip placement and to provide aesthetic balance to the nose. The only modification was in the order of presentation of nasal types. Since that publication, the senior author has consistently followed these guidelines and has found them to be a reliable tool in creating a harmonious result in rhinoplasty. PMID:12873873

  3. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  4. A bioelectrical impedance phase angle measuring system for assessment of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanghao; Huo, Xiaolin; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Cheng; Duan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance phase angle has been recommended as a tool to assess nutrition state, but there are no measuring devices have been specially designed for hospital residents. In this study, a system was established for the measurement of bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The electrical composition, calculation method and measuring method of this system are presented in this paper. Experiments showed excellent performance of this system in measuring impedance made of resistors and capacitors. The designed system was also used to measure the bioelectrical impedance phase angle of both healthy subjects and patients with malnutrition, and the results demonstrated that the phase angle of patients with malnutrition is lower than that of healthy subjects (P < 0.01 for male and P < 0.05 for female). These results suggest that phase angle has the potential to be a useful tool for the quantitative assessment of nutritional status.

  5. Raman spectroscopy measurement of bilayer graphene's twist angle to boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Bin; Wang, Peng; Pan, Cheng; Miao, Tengfei; Wu, Yong; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2015-07-20

    When graphene is placed on hexagonal boron nitride with a twist angle, new properties develop due to the resulting moiré superlattice. Here, we report a method using Raman spectroscopy to make rapid, non-destructive measurements of the twist angle between bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. The lattice orientation is determined by using flakes with both bilayer and monolayer regions, and using the known Raman signature for the monolayer to measure the twist angle of the entire flake. The widths of the second order Raman peaks are found to vary linearly in the superlattice period and are used to determine the twist angle. The results are confirmed by using transport measurements to infer the superlattice period by the charge density required to reach the secondary resistance peaks. Small twist angles are also found to produce a significant modification of the first order Raman G band peak.

  6. Bilateral acute angle closure glaucoma following a snake bite: Are we missing it?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. Praveen; Kumar, S. Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report a case series of acute angle closure following snake bite, their clinical features, treatment, and the outcomes. Materials and Methods: Ocular examination was done in all the snake bite victims admitted over 1-year period. The systemic status, presenting intraocular pressure (IOP), treatment instituted, and outcomes were recorded for all cases of acute angle closure. Results: Six patients developed angle closure following snake bite. Average IOP was in the range of 32–56 mmHg. Treatment was initiated as for cases of acute angle closure. Two patients succumbed and the other four recovered, had normal IOP at follow-up. Conclusion: Acute angle closure glaucoma is a rare complication of snake bite. Timely detection and management will result in good visual prognosis. Treating physicians should be aware of this rare sight-threatening complication so that a preliminary ophthalmic examination can be sought and the visual morbidity be prevented. PMID:26955216

  7. Decoding low dihedral angles in gabbroic layered intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holness, M. B.; Humphreys, M.; Veksler, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    Texturally equilibrated rocks are granular with a unimodal grain size, smoothly curved grain boundaries, and angles at three-grain junctions of 110-140°. Gabbros are not texturally equilibrated: primocrysts commonly have planar faces whereas later-formed phases fill in the interstitial spaces. Augite-plagioclase-plagioclase dihedral angles (Θcpp) rarely attain the equilibrium value in gabbros and the population of disequilibrium angles preserves otherwise inaccessible information about rock history. The Θcpp population varies significantly between different basaltic bodies. In a rapidly cooled dolerite Θcpp has a low median (60-70°) and a high standard deviation (20-25°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar. In more slowly cooled gabbros in layered intrusions, the angle populations have a higher median (80-110°) with a low standard deviation (10-15°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar far from the triple junction, but curve within 10 microns of the junction. This curvature is commonly asymmetric. The angle population in solidified gabbros infiltrated by low-temperature melts is similar to that in dolerites, although the low angles are associated with cuspate interstitial grains. The dihedral angle is a function of both the original solidification process and subsequent high-temperature (melt-absent) grain boundary migration. Infilling of a melt pocket by overgrowth of the bounding solid phases necessitates supersaturation, and this is easier to attain for planar faces, resulting in inhibition of augite growth into pores bounded by planar plagioclase grains and an asymmetry of the initial augite-plag-plag junction. If the solidified gabbro is kept sufficiently hot these initial junction geometries can change during textural equilibration. In the Skaergaard, Rum and Bushveld intrusions, the median Θcpp varies with liquidus assemblage, increasing step-wise on the addition of a new liquidus phase. Locally

  8. Vortex asymmetry on conical forebodies at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taligoski, Jordan L.

    Vortex asymmetry on axisymmetric forebodies at high angles of attack results in side forces and yawing moments even in symmetrical flight. This can adversely affect the yaw control characteristics of a flight vehicle and limit maneuverability. The mechanisms responsible for vortex asymmetry and the nature of instabilities causing ow asymmetry are still not well understood. Few studies suggest the role of random micro-imperfections in the nose apex region as a cause of vortex asymmetry; however there is a lack of understanding about mechanisms by which these random imperfections result in a side force variation with the roll orientation. The present study involving experiments over a wide range of test conditions and high-fidelity simulations is an attempt to provide an insight to this complex phenomenon. Experiments were carried out on a 12° semi-apex angle cone at high angles of attack at low speeds. Measurements include forces and moments using a six-component strain gauge balance and Particle Image Velocimetry to obtain quantitative flow field characteristics. A high fidelity LES Navier-Stokes solver was utilized to investigate and understand vortex asymmetry phenomenon on the same configuration at a Reynolds number of 100,000 and free stream Mach number of 0.3. Flow field characteristics are assessed with the introduction of multiple random imperfections near the tip of the conical body. Results show that slender cones at high angles of attack display bistable variation of the side force and yawing moments with roll orientation. Vortex asymmetry is initiated very close to the cone tip due to the presence of micro-imperfections on the cone surface, and develop into asymmetric vortex sheet downstream along the conical body. The strength of the fully developed vortex moving away from the surface is nearly double of the vortex residing close to the surface, leading to large magnitude side forces and yawing moments.

  9. Effect of the collimator angle on dosimetric verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Ha Ryung; Kim, Won Taek; Kim, Dong Won; Ki, Yongkan; Lee, Juhye; Bae, Jinsuk; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Nam, Ji Ho

    2015-07-01

    The collimator is usually rotated when planning volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to the leakage of radiation between the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. We studied the effect of the collimator angle on the results of dosimetric verification of VMAT plans for head and neck patients. We studied VMAT plans for 10 head and neck patients. We made two sets of VMAT plans for each patient. Each set was composed of 10 plans with collimator angles of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 degrees. Plans in the first set were optimized individually, and plans in the second set shared the 30-degree collimator-angle optimization. The two sets of plans were verified by using the 2-dimensional ion chamber array MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The comparisons between the calculation and the measurements were made by using a γ-index analysis. The γ-index (2%/2 mm) and (3%/3 mm) passing rates had negative correlations with the collimator angle. The maximum difference between γ-index (3%/3 mm) passing rates of different collimator angles for each patient ranged from 1.46% to 5.60% with an average of 3.67%. There were significant differences (maximum 5.6%) in the passing rates for different collimator angles. The results suggested that the accuracy of the delivered dose depended on the collimator angle. These findings are informative when choosing a collimator angle for VMAT plans.

  10. Simultaneous Multi-angle Observations of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James P.; Watkins, Brenton J.

    2015-10-01

    We report results from a recent series of experiments employing the HF transmitter of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. The Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at the HAARP facility is used as the primary diagnostic. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments are used to avoid generation of artificial field-aligned irregularities and isolate ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. The HF pump frequency is close to the 3rd gyro-harmonic frequency and the HF pointing angle and MUIR look angle are between the HF Spitze angle and Magnetic Zenith angle. Plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region display differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam in the boresight direction and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Lines, cascade, collapse, coexistence, spectra are observed in agreement with existing theory and simulation results of Strong Langmuir Turbulence in ionospheric interaction experiments. It is found that SLT at HAARP is most readily observed at a HF pointing angle of 11° and UHF observation angle of 15°, which is consistent with the magnetic zenith effect as documented in previous works and optimal orientation of the refracted HF electric field vector.

  11. Impact of overweight and obesity on the musculoskeletal system using lumbosacral angles

    PubMed Central

    Onyemaechi, Ndubuisi OC; Anyanwu, Godson E; Obikili, Emmanuel N; Onwuasoigwe, Okechukwu; Nwankwo, Okechukwu E

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have been identified as independent risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders. However, the association between obesity and low back pain remains controversial. Little is known about the effects of overweight and obesity on the angles of the lumbosacral spine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) and waist–hip ratio (WHR) on lumbosacral angles. Methods The effects of BMI and WHR on the lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), lumbosacral angle (LSA), sacral inclination angle (°°), and lumbosacral disc angle (LSDA) of 174 overweight and obese subjects (test group) and 126 underweight and normal-weight subjects (control group) were analyzed. Results The test group had a significantly higher mean LSA, LLA, sacral inclination angle (SIA), and LSDA (P=0.001). A significant correlation was noted between BMI and LSA (P=0.001), LLA (P=0.001), SIA (P=0.001), and LSDA (P=0.03). There was also a positive relationship between WHR and LSA (P=0.012), LLA (P=0.009), SIA (P=0.02), and LSDA (P=0.01). Conclusion There was an increase in lumbosacral angles in individuals with raised BMI and WHR. This may result in biomechanical changes in the lumbosacral spine, which increase the incidence of low back pain. PMID:27022251

  12. Joint angles and angular velocities and relevance of eigenvectors during prehension in the monkey

    PubMed Central

    Prosise, Jodi F.; Hendrix, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Hand shaping during prehension involves intricate coordination of a complex system of bones, joints, and muscles. It is widely hypothesized that the motor system uses strategies to reduce the degrees of independent control. Both biomechanical constraints that result in coupling of the fingers and joints and neural synergies act to simplify the control problem. Synergies in hand shaping are typically defined using principal component-like analyses to define orthogonal patterns of movement. Although much less examined, joint angle velocities are also important parameters governing prehension. The primary goal of this study was to evaluate joint angles and joint angle velocities during prehension in monkeys. Fourteen joint angles and angular velocities were measured as monkeys reached to and grasped a set of objects designed to systematically vary hand shapes. Hand shaping patterns in joint angles and velocities were examined using singular value decomposition (SVD). Highly correlated patterns of movements were observed in both joint angles and joint angle velocities, but there was little correlation between the two, suggesting that velocities are controlled separately. Joint angles and velocities can be defined by a small number of eigenvectors by SVD. The unresolved question of the functional relevance of higher-order eigenvectors was also evaluated. Results support that higher-order components are not easily distinguished from noise and are likely not of physiological significance. PMID:25326080

  13. Development of the Angle Concept by Abstraction from Situated Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchelmore, Michael C.; White, Paul

    This paper explores a framework for research on the development of the angle concept based on theories of abstraction. The framework suggests that children initially acquire a body of disconnected angle knowledge situated in everyday experiences, group the situations to form angle contexts, and then form an abstract angle concept. The framework is…

  14. Discharge coefficients of holes angled to the flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, N.; Henshall, S. E.; Manning, A.

    1992-06-01

    In the cooling passages of gas turbine blades, branches are often angled to the direction of the internal flow. This is particularly the case with film cooling holes. Accurate knowledge of the discharge coefficient of such holes at the design stage is vital so that the holes are correctly sized thus avoiding wastage of coolant and the formation of hot spots on the blade. This paper describes an experimental investigation to determine the discharge coefficient of 30 deg inclined holes with various degrees of inlet radiusing and with the axis of the hole at various orientation angles to the direction of the flow. Results are given for nominal main flow Mach numbers of 0, 0.15 and 0.3. The effects of radiusing, orientation and cross flow Mach number are quantified in the paper, the general trends are described, and the criteria for optimum performance are identified.

  15. Interference-induced angle-independent acoustical transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Lehua; Yu, Gaokun Wang, Ning; Wang, Xinlong; Wang, Guibo

    2014-12-21

    It is revealed that the Fano-like interference leads to the extraordinary acoustic transmission through a slab metamaterial of thickness much smaller than the wavelength, with each unit cell consisting of a Helmholtz resonator and a narrow subwavelength slit. More importantly, both the theoretical analysis and experimental measurement show that the angle-independent acoustical transparency can be realized by grafting a Helmholtz resonator and a quarter-wave resonator to the wall of a narrow subwavelength slit in each unit cell of a slit array. The observed phenomenon results from the interferences between the waves propagating in the slit, those re-radiated by the Helmholtz resonator, and those re-radiated by the quarter-wave resonator. The proposed design may find its applications in designing angle-independent acoustical filters and controlling the phase of the transmitted waves.

  16. Crack depth profiling using guided wave angle dependent reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno Pahlavan, Lotfollah Blacquiere, Gerrit

    2015-03-31

    Tomographic corrosion monitoring techniques have been developed, using two rings of sensors around the circumference of a pipe. This technique is capable of providing a detailed wall thickness map, however this might not be the only type of structural damage. Therefore this concept is expanded to detect and size cracks and small corrosion defects like root corrosion. The expanded concept uses two arrays of guided-wave transducers, collecting both reflection and transmission data. The data is processed such that the angle-dependent reflectivity is obtained without using a baseline signal of a defect-free situation. The angle-dependent reflectivity is the input of an inversion scheme that calculates a crack depth profile. From this profile, the depth and length of the crack can be determined. Preliminary experiments show encouraging results. The depth sizing accuracy is in the order of 0.5 mm.

  17. A wide-angle camera module for disposable endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Dongha; Yeon, Jesun; Yi, Jason; Park, Jongwon; Park, Soo Nam; Lee, Nanhee

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle miniaturized camera module for disposable endoscope is demonstrated in this paper. A lens module with 150° angle of view (AOV) is designed and manufactured. All plastic injection-molded lenses and a commercial CMOS image sensor are employed to reduce the manufacturing cost. The image sensor and LED illumination unit are assembled with a lens module. The camera module does not include a camera processor to further reduce its size and cost. The size of the camera module is 5.5 × 5.5 × 22.3 mm3. The diagonal field of view (FOV) of the camera module is measured to be 110°. A prototype of a disposable endoscope is implemented to perform a pre-clinical animal testing. The esophagus of an adult beagle dog is observed. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a cost-effective and high-performance camera module for disposable endoscopy.

  18. Association Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Samarai, V.; Sharifi, N.; Nateghi, Sh.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the prevalence of Pylori infection in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) and control group with cataract. Methods: This is a prospective case-control study. The participants were organized in two groups. First group (case) consisted of 35 patients with POAG and second group consisted of 35 age matched participants with cataract whose optic disk could be evaluated. Serum levels of anti H. pylori IgG antibody were evaluated with the method of ELISA. Results: The seroprevalence of Pylori infection was 89.1 % (33 of 37) in patients with POAG and 59.5 % (25 of 42) in the control group. The difference was significant (P=0.008). The odds ratio for association between Pylori and POAG was 5.69 and the range of 95% confidence interval was from 1.58 to 20.50. Conclusion: This study suggests that Helicobacter Pylori infection might be associated with primary open angle glaucoma. PMID:25363173

  19. Detection Angle Calibration of Pressure-Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Uses of the pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) techniques in areas other than external aerodynamics continue to expand. The NASA Glenn Research Center has become a leader in the application of the global technique to non-conventional aeropropulsion applications including turbomachinery testing. The use of the global PSP technique in turbomachinery applications often requires detection of the luminescent paint in confined areas. With the limited viewing usually available, highly oblique illumination and detection angles are common in the confined areas in these applications. This paper will describe the results of pressure, viewing and excitation angle dependence calibrations using three popular PSP formulations to get a better understanding of the errors associated with these non-traditional views.

  20. Shallow-angle water entry of ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Gomez, Jason T.; Beal, David N.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2008-11-01

    The water-entry of ballistic projectiles is investigated using high-speed digital imaging. Projectiles enter the water at shallow angles to the free surface, 5^o-15^o, without ricochet at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 2.0. Projectile dynamics, critical entry angle, and cavity growth are discussed. Geometric modifications to a projectile allow it to travel large distances underwater assuming a sufficiently large air-cavity is formed after impact, which dramatically decreases drag on the projectile. Results show that successful water-entry occurs for projectiles with modified tip geometries at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2; these projectile modifications include tip geometry and material properties. A theoretical cavity model compares well with the experimental data and will be discussed for a range of experimental conditions.

  1. XFEL OSCILLATOR SIMULATION INCLUDING ANGLE-DEPENDENT CRYSTAL REFLECTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Lindberg, Ryan; Kim, K-J; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2010-08-23

    The oscillator package within the GINGER FEL simulation code has now been extended to include angle-dependent reflectivity properties of Bragg crystals. Previously, the package was modified to include frequencydependent reflectivity in order to model x-ray FEL oscillators from start-up from shot noise through to saturation. We present a summary of the algorithms used for modeling the crystal reflectivity and radiation propagation outside the undulator, discussing various numerical issues relevant to the domain of high Fresnel number and efficient Hankel transforms. We give some sample XFEL-O simulation results obtained with the angle-dependent reflectivity model, with particular attention directed to the longitudinal and transverse coherence of the radiation output.

  2. Wide-angle scannable reflector design using conformal transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Hum, Sean V

    2013-01-28

    A flat reflector capable of scanning over wide angles is designed using a transformation optics approach. This reflector is derived from its virtual parabolic counterpart using a conformal coordinate transformation that determines the permittivity profile of the flat reflector. By changing the permittivity profile, the flat reflector is then capable of scanning up to 47° away from broadside while maintaining good beam characteristics across a wide frequency range. Moreover, its directivity is comparable to that of the virtual parabolic reflector, even at high scan angles. We use the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation as a versatile tool to produce perfect conformal mapping of coordinates between the virtual and flat reflectors, thereby avoiding the need to monitor the anisotropy of the material that results when employing quasi-conformal methods. PMID:23389194

  3. Pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles with adiabatic focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.; Shalchi, A.; Dosch, A. E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com

    2014-10-20

    Understanding turbulent transport of charged particles in magnetized plasmas often requires a model for the description of random variations in the particle's pitch angle. The Fokker-Planck coefficient of pitch-angle scattering, which is used to describe scattering parallel to the mean magnetic field, is therefore of central importance. Whereas quasi-linear theory assumes a homogeneous mean magnetic field, such a condition is often not fulfilled, especially for high-energy particles. Here, a new derivation of the quasi-linear approach is given that is based on the unperturbed orbit found for an adiabatically focused mean magnetic field. The results show that, depending on the ratio of the focusing length and the particle's Larmor radius, the Fokker-Planck coefficient is significantly modified but agrees with the classical expression in the limit of a homogeneous mean magnetic field.

  4. Seismic Slip on an Oblique Detachment Fault at Low Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.; Steely, A. N.; Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes are one of the few accepted indicators of seismic slip along ancient faults. Low-angle normal faults have produced few large earthquakes in historic times and low-angle normal faults (detachment faults) are typically severely misoriented relative to a vertical maximum compressive stress. As a result many geoscientists question whether low-angle normal faults produce earthquakes at low angles. Relationships in southern California show that a major low-angle normal-oblique fault slipped at low angles and produced large earthquakes. The exhumed Late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault preserves spectacular fault- related pseudotachylytes along its fault plane and injected into its hanging wall and footwall. Composite pseudotachylyte zones are up to 1.25 m thick and persists over lateral distances of at least 10's of meters. Pseudotachylyte is common in most thin sections of damaged fault rocks with more than 20% (by volume) of cataclasite. We recognized the presence of original melt using numerous criteria: abundant spherulites in thin sections, injection structures at both the thin-section and outcrop scale, black aphanitic textures, quenched vein margins, variations in microcrystallite textures and/or size with respect to the vein margin, and glassy textures in hand sample. Multiple earthquakes are inferred to produce the layered "stratigraphy" in some exposures of pseudotachylytes. We infer that the West Salton detachment fault formed and slipped at low angles because it nearly perfectly reactivates a Cretaceous ductile thrust system at the half km scale and dips between 10 and 45 degrees. The about 30 degree NNE dip of the detachment fault on the north side of Yaqui Ridge is likely steeper than its dip during detachment slip because there is local steepening on the flanks of the Yaqui Ridge antiform in a contractional stepover of a crosscutting Quaternary San Felipe dextral fault zone. These relationships indicate a low dip on the detachment

  5. View Angle Effects on MODIS Snow Mapping in Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Qinchuan; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Liu, Jicheng; Tan, Bin; Melloh, Rae A.; Davis, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Binary snow maps and fractional snow cover data are provided routinely from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). This paper investigates how the wide observation angles of MODIS influence the current snow mapping algorithm in forested areas. Theoretical modeling results indicate that large view zenith angles (VZA) can lead to underestimation of fractional snow cover (FSC) by reducing the amount of the ground surface that is viewable through forest canopies, and by increasing uncertainties during the gridding of MODIS data. At the end of the MODIS scan line, the total modeled error can be as much as 50% for FSC. Empirical analysis of MODIS/Terra snow products in four forest sites shows high fluctuation in FSC estimates on consecutive days. In addition, the normalized difference snow index (NDSI) values, which are the primary input to the MODIS snow mapping algorithms, decrease as VZA increases at the site level. At the pixel level, NDSI values have higher variances, and are correlated with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in snow covered forests. These findings are consistent with our modeled results, and imply that consideration of view angle effects could improve MODIS snow monitoring in forested areas.

  6. Simple approximate formula for the reflection function of a homogeneous, semi-infinite turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2002-05-01

    A simple, approximate analytical formula is proposed for the reflection function of a semi-infinite, homogeneous particulate layer. It is assumed that the zenith angle of the viewing direction is equal to zero (thus corresponding to the case of nadir observations), whereas the light incidence direction is arbitrary. The formula yields accurate results for incidence-zenith angles less than approximately 85 degrees and can be useful in analyzing satellite nadir observations of optically thick clouds.

  7. High-speed angle-resolved imaging of a single gold nanorod with microsecond temporal resolution and one-degree angle precision.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Sawako; Iino, Ryota; Niitani, Yamato; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Tomishige, Michio; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-17

    We developed two types of high-speed angle-resolved imaging methods for single gold nanorods (SAuNRs) using objective-type vertical illumination dark-field microscopy and a high-speed CMOS camera to achieve microsecond temporal and one-degree angle resolution. These methods are based on: (i) an intensity analysis of focused images of SAuNR split into two orthogonally polarized components and (ii) the analysis of defocused SAuNR images. We determined the angle precision (statistical error) and accuracy (systematic error) of the resultant SAuNR (80 nm × 40 nm) images projected onto a substrate surface (azimuthal angle) in both methods. Although both methods showed a similar precision of ∼1° for the azimuthal angle at a 10 μs temporal resolution, the defocused image analysis showed a superior angle accuracy of ∼5°. In addition, the polar angle was also determined from the defocused SAuNR images with a precision of ∼1°, by fitting with simulated images. By taking advantage of the defocused image method's full revolution measurement range in the azimuthal angle, the rotation of the rotary molecular motor, F1-ATPase, was measured with 3.3 μs temporal resolution. The time constants of the pauses waiting for the elementary steps of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the torque generated in the mechanical steps have been successfully estimated. The high-speed angle-resolved SAuNR imaging methods will be applicable to the monitoring of the fast conformational changes of many biological molecular machines.

  8. Fan Stagger Angle for Dirt Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rose, Becky E. (Inventor); Brilliant, Lisa I. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be rotated about an axis by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades has a span between a root at the hub and a tip, and a chord between a leading edge and a trailing edge. The chord forms a stagger angle alpha with the axis, and the stagger angle alpha is less than 15 deg. at a position along the propulsor blade that is within an inboard 20% of the span.

  9. A high sensitive roll angle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Yanfen; Hou, Wenmei; Hu, Kai; Ju, Aisong

    2013-01-01

    A roll angle interferometer with high sensitivity is designed in this paper. Two sets of centrosymmetric beams are used to travel through the measurement and reference arms of the roll angle interferometer which contains two specific optical devices: wedge prism assembly and wedge mirror assembly. The optical path change in both arms caused by roll is converted into phase shift which can be measured by interferometer. Because of the adoption of the centrosymmetric measurement structure, the straightness errors, yaw error and pitch error can be avoided and the dead path is minimized, so that the stability and the accuracy of the measurement can be greatly enhanced. The resolution for the roll measurement is about 0.006″ with the measurement range of ±1°.

  10. Gaia: focus, straylight and basic angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, A.; Biermann, M.; Bombrun, A.; Boyadjian, J.; Chassat, F.; Corberand, P.; Davidson, M.; Doyle, D.; Escolar, D.; Gielesen, W. L. M.; Guilpain, T.; Hernandez, J.; Kirschner, V.; Klioner, S. A.; Koeck, C.; Laine, B.; Lindegren, L.; Serpell, E.; Tatry, P.; Thoral, P.

    2016-07-01

    The Gaia all-sky astrometric survey is challenged by several issues affecting the spacecraft stability. Amongst them, we find the focus evolution, straylight and basic angle variations Contrary to pre-launch expectations, the image quality is continuously evolving, during commissioning and the nominal mission. Payload decontaminations and wavefront sensor assisted refocuses have been carried out to recover optimum performance. An ESA-Airbus DS working group analysed the straylight and basic angle issues and worked on a detailed root cause analysis. In parallel, the Gaia scientists have also analysed the data, most notably comparing the BAM signal to global astrometric solutions, with remarkable agreement. In this contribution, a status review of these issues will be provided, with emphasis on the mitigation schemes and the lessons learned for future space missions where extreme stability is a key requirement.

  11. Newest results from SPICAV on-board Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcq, Emmanuel; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Rossi, Loïc; Montmessin, Franck; Fedorova, Anna; Korablev, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Venus Express is now entering its eighth year of operation in Venusian orbit. Among the still working instruments, all three channels of the SPICAV [Bertaux et al., 2007] spectrometer are still fully working and routinely provide new insights on the Venusian atmosphere. We propose to review and highlight the results and the work in progress, among which (non-exhaustive list): a new mapping of the nightside airglow of nitric oxide (NO) using the nadir mode of SPICAV-UV ; the first detection of the dayglow due to CO and CO2+ using limb observations of SPICAV-UV [Chaufray et al., 2012] ; the secular evolution of SO2 column density above Venus' cloud top using SPICAV-UV in nadir mode [Marcq et al., 2013] ; polarimetric and phase function studies of the upper clouds of Venus using SPICAV-IR. Bibilography: Bertaux et al., SPICAV on Venus Express: Three spectrometers to study the global structure and composition of the Venus atmosphere, PSS (2007) Chaufray et al., First observation of the Venus UV dayglow at limb from SPICAV/VEX, Geophys. Res. Let. (2012) Marcq et al., Variations of sulphur dioxide at the cloud top of Venus's dynamic atmosphere, Nature Geoscience (2013)

  12. Definition, transformation-formulae and measurements of tipvane angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruining, A.

    1987-10-01

    The theoretical background of different angle systems used to define tipvane attitude in 3-D space is outlined. Different Euler equations are used for the various, wind tunnel, towing tank, and full scale tipvane models. The influence of rotor blade flapping angle on tipvane angles is described. The tipvane attitude measuring method is outlined in relationship to the Euler angle system. Side effects on the angle of attack of the tipvane due to rotation, translation, and curving of the tipvane are described.

  13. Shuttle Program. Euler angles, quaternions, and transformation matrices working relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A brief mathematical development of the relationship between the Euler angles and the transformation matrix, the quaternion and the transformation matrix, and the Euler angles and the quaternion is presented. The analysis and equations presented apply directly to current space shuttle problems. The twelve three-axis Euler transformation matrices are given as functions of the Euler angles, the equations for the quaternion as a funtion of the Euler angles, and the Euler angles as a function of the transformation matrix elements.

  14. Wireless Orbiter Hang-Angle Inclinometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Perotti, Jose; Green, Eric; Byon, Jonathan; Burns, Bradley; Mata, Carlos; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman

    2011-01-01

    A document describes a system to reliably gather the hang-angle inclination of the orbiter. The system comprises a wireless handheld master station (which contains the main station software) and a wireless remote station (which contains the inclinometer sensors, the RF transceivers, and the remote station software). The remote station is designed to provide redundancy to the system. It includes two RF transceivers, two power-management boards, and four inclinometer sensors.

  15. Experimental Status of the CKM Angle β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, James F.

    2009-12-01

    We summarize measurements of the CKM angle β at the B-factories emphasizing a comparison of β measured in the B0→cc¯K(*)0 decay channels and βeff measured in b→qq¯s decay channels, such as B0→ωKS0, B0→η'K0, B0→π0KS0, and B0→S0KS0KS0.

  16. Low angle resistivity anomaly in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E. |; Vinokur, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The pinning effect of vortex lines by the layered structure (intrinsic pinning) on resistivity of high-T{sub c}, superconductors in the mixed state is investigated by means of perturbation theory. A sharp drop in the resistivity at small angles for which vortex lines are almost aligned with the ab-planes is shown to occur even in a high-temperature region where the pinning potential is reduced by thermal fluctuations.

  17. Measurement of the angle alpha at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.; /Orsay, LAL

    2009-06-25

    The authors present recent measurements of the CKM angle {alpha} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They present constraints on {alpha} from B {yields} {pi}{pi}, B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B {yields} {rho}{pi} decays.

  18. Tool Indicates Contact Angles In Bearing Raceways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akian, Richard A.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Tool devised for use in measuring contact angles between balls and races in previously operated ball bearings. Used on both inner and outer raceways of bearings having cross-sectional widths between approximately 0.5 and 2.0 in. Consists of integral protractor mounted in vertical plane on bracket equipped with leveling screws and circular level indicator. Protractor includes rotatable indicator needle and set of disks of various sizes to fit various raceway curvatures.

  19. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A. PMID:27612817

  20. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.