Science.gov

Sample records for nadir angle results

  1. Change detection from very high resolution satellite time series with variable off-nadir angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Brumana, Raffaella; Cuca, Branka; Previtali, Mattia

    2015-06-01

    Very high resolution (VHR) satellite images have the potential for revealing changes occurred overtime with a superior level of detail. However, their use for metric purposes requires accurate geo-localization with ancillary DEMs and GCPs to achieve sub-pixel terrain correction, in order to obtain images useful for mapping applications. Change detection with a time series of VHS images is not a simple task because images acquired with different off-nadir angles have a lack of pixel-to-pixel image correspondence, even after accurate geo-correction. This paper presents a procedure for automatic change detection able to deal with variable off-nadir angles. The case study concerns the identification of damaged buildings from pre- and post-event images acquired on the historic center of L'Aquila (Italy), which was struck by an earthquake in April 2009. The developed procedure is a multi-step approach where (i) classes are assigned to both images via object-based classification, (ii) an initial alignment is provided with an automated tile-based rubber sheeting interpolation on the extracted layers, and (iii) change detection is carried out removing residual mis-registration issues resulting in elongated features close to building edges. The method is fully automated except for some thresholds that can be interactively set to improve the visualization of the damaged buildings. The experimental results proved that damages can be automatically found without additional information, such as digital surface models, SAR data, or thematic vector layers.

  2. Automated scene generated background context for near-nadir look angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jonathan D.; Stanfill, S. Robert

    2016-05-01

    Multi-INT fusion of GEOINT and IMINT can enable performance optimization of target detection and target tracking problem domains1, amongst others. Contextual information, which defines the relationship of foreground to background scene content, is a source of GEOINT for which various online repositories exist today including but not limited to the following: Open Street Maps (OSM)2 and the United States Geological Survey (USGS)3. However, as the nature of the world's landscape is dynamic and ever-changing, such contextual information can easily become stagnant and irrelevant if not maintained. In this paper we discuss our approach to providing the latest relevant context by performing automated scene generated background context segmentation and classification for near-nadir look angles for the purpose of defining roadways or parking lots, buildings, and natural areas. This information can be used in a variety of ways including augmenting context data from repositories, performing mission pre-planning, and for real-time missions such that GEOINT and IMINT fusion can occur and enable significant performance advantages in target detection and tracking applications in all areas of the world.

  3. Sensitivity of MODIS 2.1 micron Channel for Off-Nadir View Angles for Use in Remote Sensing of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol over land, from MODIS will be based on dark targets using mid-IR channels 2.1 and 3.9 micron. This approach was developed by Kaufman et al (1997), who suggested that dark surface reflectance in the red (0.66 micron -- rho(sub 0.66)) channel is half of that at 2.2 micron (rho(sub 2.2)), and the reflectance in the blue (0.49 micron - rho(sub 0.49)) channel is a quarter of that at 2.2 micron. Using this relationship, the surface reflectance in the visible channels can be predicted within Delta.rho(sub 0.49) approximately Delat.rho(sub 0.66) approximately 0.006 from rho(sub 2.2) for rho(sub 2.2) <= 0.10. This was half the error obtained using the 3.75 micron and corresponds to an error in aerosol optical thickness of Delat.tau approximately 0.06. These results, though applicable to several biomes (e.g. forests, and brighter lower canopies), have only been tested at one view angle - the nadir (theta = 0 deg). Considering the importance of the results in remote sensing of aerosols over land surfaces from space, we are validating the relationships for off-nadir view angles using Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data. The CAR data are available for channels between 0.3 and 2.3 micron and for different surface types and conditions: forest, tundra, ocean, sea-ice, swamp, grassland and over areas covered with smoke. In this study we analyzed data collected during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation - Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment to validate Kaufman et al.'s (1997) results for non-nadir view angles. We will show the correlation between rho(sub 0.472), rho(sub 0.675), and rho(sub 2.2) for view angles between nadir (0 deg) and 55 deg off-nadir, and for different viewing directions in the backscatter and forward scatter directions.

  4. Nadir Measurements of Carbon Monoxide Distributions by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer Instrument Onboard the Aura Spacecraft: Overview of Analysis Approach and Examples of Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Luo, Ming; Logan, Jennifer A.; Beer, Reinhard; Worden, Helen; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rider, David; Osterman, Greg; Gunson, Michael; Eldering, Annmarie; Goldman, Aaron; Shephard, Mark; Clough, Shepard A.; Rodgers, Clive; Lampel, Michael; Chiou, Linda

    2006-01-01

    We provide an overview of the nadir measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) obtained thus far by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The instrument is a high resolution array Fourier transform spectrometer designed to measure infrared spectral radiances from low Earth orbit. It is one of four instruments successfully launched onboard the Aura platform into a sun synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km on July 15, 2004 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Nadir spectra are recorded at 0.06/cm spectral resolution with a nadir footprint of 5 x 8 km. We describe the TES retrieval approach for the analysis of the nadir measurements, report averaging kernels for typical tropical and polar ocean locations, characterize random and systematic errors for those locations, and describe instrument performance changes in the CO spectral region as a function of time. Sample maps of retrieved CO for the middle and upper troposphere from global surveys during December 2005 and April 2006 highlight the potential of the results for measurement and tracking of global pollution and determining air quality from space.

  5. Recent Results on the CKM Angle Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-10-18

    The method to measure the CKM angle {alpha} and the modes sensitive to it are discussed. It is shown that the B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays provide the most stringent constraint on {alpha}, which is found to be {alpha} = 96{sup o} {+-} 10{sup o}(stat) {+-} 4{sup o}(syst){+-} 13{sup o}(penguin).

  6. Interpreting Negative Results in an Angle Maximization Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David R.; Litwiller, Bonnie H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a situation in which differential calculus is used with inverse trigonometric tangent functions to maximize an angle measure. A negative distance measure ultimately results, requiring a reconsideration of assumptions inherent in the initial figure. (Author/MKR)

  7. Review of weak mixing angle results at SLC and LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, the authors review recent precise measurements of the weak mixing angle by the SLD experiment at SLC and by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL experiments at LEP. If they assume that the Minimal Standard Model provides a complete description of the quark and lepton couplings to the Z boson, they find sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23143 {+-} 0.00028. If this assumption is relaxed to apply to lepton couplings only, they find sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23106 {+-} 0.00035. They compare these results with other precision electroweak tests.

  8. Results from the G0 forward angle measurement

    SciTech Connect

    J. Liu

    2006-07-01

    The results from the G0 forward angle experiment are reported in this talk. The parity-violating asymmetry of elastic e-p scattering has been measured within the range of the four-momentum transfer (Q2) from 0.12 to 1.0 (GeV/c)2, which yields linear combinations of the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon, G{sub E}{sup s} + etaG{sub M}{sup s}, in the same Q2 range. The G0 results, combined with the measurements from other experiments, indicate that G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are both likely non-zero.

  9. Inferring hemispherical reflectance of the earth's surface for global energy budgets from remotely sensed nadir or directional radiance values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Sellers, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between directional reflectances spanning the entire reflecting hemisphere and hemispherical reflectance (albedo) and the effect of solar zenith angle and cover type on these relationships were investigated, using the results obtained from NOAA's 7/8 AVHRR ground-level reflectance measurements. Bands 1 (0.58-0.6B microns) and 2 (0.73-1. 1 microns) were used for reflectance measurements of 11 natural vegetation surfaces ranging from bare soils to dense vegetation canopies. The results show that errors in inferring hemispherical reflectance from nadir reflectance can be between 11 and 45 percent for all cover types and solar angles, depending on the viewing angles. A technique is described in which a choice of two specific view angles reduces this error to less than 6 percent for both bands and for all sun angles and cover types.

  10. Correction of Sampling Errors in Ocean Surface Cross-Sectional Estimates from Nadir-Looking Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, I. Jeff; Meneghini, R.; Miller, L. S.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    The return from the ocean surface has a number of uses for airborne meteorological radar. The normalized surface cross section has been used for radar system calibration, estimation of surface winds, and in algorithms for estimating the path-integrated attenuation in rain. However, meteorological radars are normally optimized for observation of distributed targets that fill the resolution volume, and so a point target such as the surface can be poorly sampled, particularly at near-nadir look angles. Sampling the nadir surface return at an insufficient rate results in a negative bias of the estimated cross section. This error is found to be as large as 4 dB using observations from a high-altitude airborne radar. An algorithm for mitigating the error is developed that is based upon the shape of the surface echo and uses the returned signal at the three range gates nearest the peak surface echo.

  11. Clinical results of Trabectome surgery for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Takanori; Nishigaki, Shiro; Sato, Tomoki; Wakiyama, Harumi; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes when using Trabectome surgery and to evaluate factors associated with its effects in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and exfoliation glaucoma (EXG). Methods This was a prospective, non-randomized, observational, comparative cohort study in which Trabectome surgery was used alone in patients with POAG or EXG. Trabectome surgery was considered to have failed when at least one of the following three criteria was fulfilled: intraocular pressure (IOP) ≥21 mmHg and a <20% reduction below the baseline IOP on two consecutive follow-up visits 3 months or more after surgery; need for additional glaucoma surgery; and an increase in number of medications compared with baseline. Results The subjects were 32 males (34 eyes) and 46 females (48 eyes). POAG was observed in 43 eyes and EXG in 39 eyes. IOP after Trabectome surgery decreased significantly from 22.3±6.8 mmHg at baseline to 14.0±3.9 mmHg (23.0% reduction) at month 24 in all cases (P<0.0000). The success rate at 2 years was 51.2% for all cases (POAG, 50.9%; EXG, 49.2%). There was no significant difference in success rate between POAG and EXG (P=0.91). Preoperative IOP (P=0.033) and number of medications (P=0.041) were significant factors for surgical success/failure in multivariate logistic regression. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion Trabectome surgery achieved favorable IOP control and was equally effective in patients with POAG and those with EXG. Its effects were influenced by preoperative IOP and number of preoperative medications. PMID:26487799

  12. Angled Injection: Turbulent Flow Hybrid Bearings Comparison to Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis; Childs, Dara

    1997-01-01

    Hydrostatic/hydrodynamic (hybrid) journal bearings handling process liquids have limited dynamic stability characteristics and their application as support elements to high speed flexible rotating systems is severely restricted. Measurements on water hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection have demonstrated improved rotordynamic performance with virtual elimination of cross-coupled stiffness coefficients and null or negative whirl frequency ratios. A bulk-flow model for prediction of the static performance and force coefficients of hybrid bearings with angled orifice injection is advanced. The analysis reveals that the fluid momentum exchange at the orifice discharge produces a pressure rise in the hydrostatic recess retards the shear flow induced by journal rotation, and thus, reduces cross-coupling forces. The predictions from the model are compared with experimental measurements for a 45 deg. angled orifice injection, 5 recess water hybrid bearing operating at 10.2, 17.4, and 24.6 krpm and with supply pressures of 4, 5.5, and 7 MPa. The correlations include recess pressures, flow rates, and rotordynamic force coefficients at the journal centered position.

  13. The Peruvian Continental Margin: Results from wide angle seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoeft, A.; Bialas, J.; Kopp, H.; Kukowski, N.; Huebscher, C.

    2003-04-01

    Within the scope of the GEOPECO (Geophysical Experiments at the Peruvian Continental Margin) project, seismic investigations along the Pacific margin of Peru were carried out using ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) and seismometers (OBS) recording marine airgun shots. The structure and the P- wave velocity of the oblique subducting Nazca and overriding South-American Plates from 8°S to 15°S were determined by forward modeling and tomographic inversion of the wide-angle seismic data combined with the analysis of reflection seismic data. The region south of 12°S has been influenced by the southward migration of the aseismic Nazca Ridge the past 11 Ma. The oceanic Nazca Plate is divided by Mendana Fracture Zone (MFZ) which marks a transition zone of a different crustal age of approximately 28 Ma in the north to 38 Ma in the south at the Peruvian trench. North of MFZ the oceanic crust is influenced by Trujillo Trough trending N15E and the surrounding extensional stresses leading to a crustal thinning as can be seen in the northernmost refraction seismic model. The oceanic crust south of MFZ is overall homogeneous with a thin pelagic sedimentary layer and normal oceanic crustal layers. The P-wave velocity of the mantle is overall 7.9-8.1km/s. The Peruvian Continental Margin is characterized by the continental slope and several basins, Trujillo and Yaquina basin, Lima basin and Pisco basin, which are partly affected by the southward migration of the subducting Nazca Ridge. This caused uplift and subsidence along the margin leading to erosional tectonic features. The basins and continental basement could be mapped with forward modeling and tomographic inversion as well as the continental backstop on each profile. An accretionary prism is set up with a width of 20 to 30 km and 4 to 5 km thickness which does not further increase in size as revealed by the profiles recorded further north of Nazca Ridge. This and a taper of 14- 17 degrees at the collision zone indicates that

  14. Using Microwave and Infrared Radiances from Off-Nadir Pixels: Application of Radiative Transfer to Slanted Line-of-Sight and Comparisons with NASA EOS Aqua Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    The passive infrared and microwave nadir sounders such as (A)TOVS observe the atmosphere from a polar orbit by directing their scan pointed at the ground up to about 49 degrees from nadir. Except for the pixels located right on the satellite ground track, the radiance measurements collected by these instruments characterize hence atmospheric emission paths which are slanted with respect to the zenithal direction at the ground. At the outer swath edges, the deviations from nadir reach about 60 degrees in terms of Satellite Zenith Angle (SZA). The radiative transfer codes used in operational Numerical Weather Prediction applications make the appropriate corrections to account for the extra path induced by the non-zero SZA. However, no corrections are made to account for the fact that the atmospheric profiles along the slanted line-of-sight (LOS) are different from the vertical because of horizontal gradients in the atmosphere. Using NASA EOS Aqua satellite's orbits, zenith and azimuth angles, as well as three-dimensional fields of temperature, water vapor, and ozone produced by the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, we extracted slanted atmospheric profiles for actual soundings performed by the AIRS and AMSU-A instruments onboard EOS Aqua. We will present the results of our study comparing the calculated brightness temperatures along slanted LOS and vertical LOS with AIRS and AMSU-A observations.

  15. Impact of Footprint Diameter and Off-Nadir Pointing on the Precision of Canopy Height Estimates from Spaceborne Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Yong; Lefskky, Michael; Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, Jon

    2011-01-01

    A spaceborne lidar mission could serve multiple scientific purposes including remote sensing of ecosystem structure, carbon storage, terrestrial topography and ice sheet monitoring. The measurement requirements of these different goals will require compromises in sensor design. Footprint diameters that would be larger than optimal for vegetation studies have been proposed. Some spaceborne lidar mission designs include the possibility that a lidar sensor would share a platform with another sensor, which might require off-nadir pointing at angles of up to 16 . To resolve multiple mission goals and sensor requirements, detailed knowledge of the sensitivity of sensor performance to these aspects of mission design is required. This research used a radiative transfer model to investigate the sensitivity of forest height estimates to footprint diameter, off-nadir pointing and their interaction over a range of forest canopy properties. An individual-based forest model was used to simulate stands of mixed conifer forest in the Tahoe National Forest (Northern California, USA) and stands of deciduous forests in the Bartlett Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Waveforms were simulated for stands generated by a forest succession model using footprint diameters of 20 m to 70 m. Off-nadir angles of 0 to 16 were considered for a 25 m diameter footprint diameter. Footprint diameters in the range of 25 m to 30 m were optimal for estimates of maximum forest height (R(sup 2) of 0.95 and RMSE of 3 m). As expected, the contribution of vegetation height to the vertical extent of the waveform decreased with larger footprints, while the contribution of terrain slope increased. Precision of estimates decreased with an increasing off-nadir pointing angle, but off-nadir pointing had less impact on height estimates in deciduous forests than in coniferous forests. When pointing off-nadir, the decrease in precision was dependent on local incidence angle (the angle between the off-nadir

  16. Flight Test Results of an Angle of Attack and Angle of Sideslip Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Marie-Michele; Martos, Borja; Foster, John V.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a joint partnership between the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) and the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), research on advanced air data calibration methods has been in progress. This research was initiated to expand a novel pitot-static calibration method that was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) facility. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. Subscale flight tests demonstrated small 2-s error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. Recent UTSI full scale flight tests have shown airspeed calibrations with the same accuracy or better as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted GPS 'four-leg' method in a smaller test area and in less time. The current research was motivated by the desire to extend this method for inflight calibration of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) flow vanes. An instrumented Piper Saratoga research aircraft from the UTSI was used to collect the flight test data and evaluate flight test maneuvers. Results showed that the output-error approach produces good results for flow vane calibration. In addition, maneuvers for pitot-static and flow vane calibration can be integrated to enable simultaneous and efficient testing of each system.

  17. Bidirectional measurements of surface reflectance for view angle corrections of oblique imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Teillet, P. M.; Slater, P. N.; Fedosejevs, G.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring bidirectional reflectance-factor data was constructed and used over four surface types. Data sets were obtained over a headed wheat canopy, bare soil having several different roughness conditions, playa (dry lake bed), and gypsum sand. Results are presented in terms of relative bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) as a function of view angle at a number of solar zenith angles, nadir BRFs as a function of solar zenith angles, and, for wheat, vegetation indices as related to view and solar zenith angles. The wheat canopy exhibited the largest BRF changes with view angle. BRFs for the red and the NIR bands measured over wheat did not have the same relationship with view angle. NIR/Red ratios calculated from nadir BRFs changed by nearly a factor of 2 when the solar zenith angle changed from 20 to 50 degs. BRF versus view angle relationships were similar for soils having smooth and intermediate rough surfaces but were considerably different for the roughest surface. Nadir BRF versus solar-zenith angle relationships were distinctly different for the three soil roughness levels. Of the various surfaces, BRFs for gypsum sand changed the least with view angle (10 percent at 30 degs).

  18. Resonant scattering and resultant pitch angle evolution of relativistic electrons by plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Chen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Adopting several realistic models for the wave distribution and ambient plasmaspheric density, we perform a comprehensive analysis to evaluate hiss-induced scattering coefficients, the relative role of each resonant harmonic, and the overall effect of hiss scattering on the pitch angle evolution and associated decay (loss) processes of relativistic electrons. The results show that scattering by the equatorial, highly oblique component of the hiss emission is negligible. A quasi-parallel propagating wave model of hiss emissions provides a good approximation for evaluation of scattering rates of ≤ 2 MeV electrons. However, realistic wave propagation angles as a function of latitude along the field line must be taken into account to accurately quantify the rates of hiss scattering above 2 MeV. Ambient plasma density is also a critical parameter that can influence hiss scattering rates and resultant pitch angle evolution of electron flux. While the first order cyclotron and the Landau resonances are dominant for hiss-induced scattering of less than 2 MeV electrons, higher order resonances become important and even dominant at intermediate equatorial pitch angles for ultra-relativistic (≥ 3 MeV) electrons. Hiss induced electron pitch angle evolution consistently shows a relatively rapid initial transport of electrons from high to lower pitch angles, with a gradual approach towards an equilibrium shape, and a final state where the entire distribution decays exponentially with time. Although hiss scattering rates near the loss cone control the pitch angle evolution and the ultimate loss of ultra-relativistic electrons, the presence of a scattering bottleneck (a pronounced drop in diffusion rate at intermediate pitch angles) significantly affects the loss rate and leads to characteristic top hat shaped pitch angle distributions at energies below ~1 MeV. Decay timescales are determined to be on the order of a few days, tens of days, and > 100 days for 500 keV, 2 Me

  19. An improved tropospheric ozone database retrieved from SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Rozanov, Alexei; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rahpoe, Nabiz; Bötel, Stefan; Burrows, John

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most important green-house gases and the main component of photochemical smog. It is either transported from the stratosphere or photochemically produced during pollution events in the troposphere that threaten the respiratory system. To investigate sources, transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, limb nadir matching (LNM) technique applied with SCIAMACHY instrument is used to retrieve tropospheric ozone. With the fact that 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only about 10% can be observed in the troposphere, the usage of satellite data requires highly qualified nadir and limb data. In this study we show an improvement of SCIAMACHY limb data as well as its influence on tropospheric ozone results. The limb nadir matching technique is also refined to increase the quality of the tropospheric ozone. The results are validated with ozone sonde measurements.

  20. Results of Monocular Surgery Under Peribulbar Anesthesia for Large-Angle Horizontal Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Tatiana; de Carvalho, Keila Monteiro; Minguini, Nilza

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of monocular surgery under peribulbar anesthesia for large-angle horizontal strabismus. INTRODUCTION: Monocular surgery may preserve some muscles if a repeat operation is required, may help to avoid the exposure of the dominant eye to the inherent risks of a surgical procedure and may reduce surgical time. METHODS: We evaluated ninety-two consecutive patients who underwent monocular surgery under peribulbar anesthesia for large-angle horizontal strabismus (angle of 40 prism diopters or greater). Patients were divided into group 1- esotropia and group 2 –exotropia. The postoperative follow-up was at 6 months, when the residual deviation was evaluated. In cases of residual deviations of over 15 PD (prism diopter), a second procedure was indicated. RESULTS: In all patients with preoperative deviations up to 60 PD, residual deviations were under 15 PD. Some patients with preoperative deviations of 65 PD (two in group 1 and four in group 2) and all patients with deviations over 65 PD had residual deviations over 15 PD. The 13 patients who underwent a second procedure experienced successful outcomes. Our ROC curve analysis showed that the cutoff point for obtaining a successful surgical result was 62.5 PD. No patient presented with a major limitation in respect of ocular movement. CONCLUSIONS: Monocular surgery under peribulbar anesthesia can be an alternative for horizontal large-angle strabismus given deviations of up to 60 PD. Monocular surgery did not result in successful outcomes for deviations of over 65 PD. PMID:19488586

  1. Assessing impacts of off-nadir observation on remote sensing of vegetation - Use of the Suits model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. S.; Johnson, R. W.; Hardisky, M. A.; Klemas, V.

    1986-01-01

    The use of Suits' (1972a, b) digital radiative transfer model to simulate the effect of nonLambertian canopy reflectance on off-nadir observations of vegetation is discussed. Canopy reflectances of cord grass are calculated using the radiative transfer model, field radiometric measurements, and airborne multispectral scanner data. The effects of varying view angles on canopy reflectance are analyzed and compared. The comparison reveals that the model is effective in simulating the sense and magnitude of reflectance change due to variable angles of observations; however, the model does not reproduce the observed dependence of nadir canopy reflectance on solar zenith angle. It is concluded that the radiative transfer model is applicable for predicting the variation in canopy reflectance due to changing view zenith angles.

  2. Nadir infrared measurements with SPICAM experiment on Mars-Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korablev, O.; Fedorova, A.; Bertaux, J. L.; Perrier, S.; Reberac, A.; Lefevre, F.; Montmessin, F.; Rodin, A.

    The SPICAM IR spectrometer 1 0-1 7 mu m resolution 0 5-1 2 nm mass 0 7 kg is dedicated primarily to nadir measurements of H 2 O abundances simultaneously with ozone measured in the UV for a better description and understanding of the chemical coupling H 2 O-O 3 The IR channel of SPICAM is a separate spectrometer integrated in SPICAM along with the UV spectrometer We present the overview of the scientific results obtained in nadir mapping mode from January 2004 L s 330 r to November 2005 L s 331 r covering the entire Martian year The seasonal trend of water vapor measured by SPICAM IR is consistent with TES results and reveals disagreement with MAWD results related to South Pole maximum The main feature of SPICAM measurements is globally smaller water vapor abundance for all seasons and locations including polar regions if compared to TES The maximum abundance is 50-55 precipitable microns at the North Pole and 10-15 pr microns at the South Pole The northern tropical maximum amounts to 10-15 pr microns Possible reasons for the disagreements are discussed Oxygen dayglow O 2 a 1 Delta g is a result of photodissociation of ozone in the Martian atmosphere The IR SPICAM allows to observe ozone from O 2 emission at 1 27 mu m simultaneously with H 2 O We present the first seasonal map of O 2 emission Maximal values of O 2 emission are observed during late winter to early spring at high latitudes in both hemispheres Other results of the SPICAM IR measurements such as maps of

  3. Determination of Optimum Viewing Angles for the Angular Normalization of Land Surface Temperature over Vegetated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huazhong; Yan, Guangjian; Liu, Rongyuan; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Nerry, Françoise; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Multi-angular observation of land surface thermal radiation is considered to be a promising method of performing the angular normalization of land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from remote sensing data. This paper focuses on an investigation of the minimum requirements of viewing angles to perform such normalizations on LST. The normally kernel-driven bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is first extended to the thermal infrared (TIR) domain as TIR-BRDF model, and its uncertainty is shown to be less than 0.3 K when used to fit the hemispheric directional thermal radiation. A local optimum three-angle combination is found and verified using the TIR-BRDF model based on two patterns: the single-point pattern and the linear-array pattern. The TIR-BRDF is applied to an airborne multi-angular dataset to retrieve LST at nadir (Te-nadir) from different viewing directions, and the results show that this model can obtain reliable Te-nadir from 3 to 4 directional observations with large angle intervals, thus corresponding to large temperature angular variations. The Te-nadir is generally larger than temperature of the slant direction, with a difference of approximately 0.5~2.0 K for vegetated pixels and up to several Kelvins for non-vegetated pixels. The findings of this paper will facilitate the future development of multi-angular thermal infrared sensors. PMID:25825975

  4. Post-launch performance evaluation of the OMPS Nadir Mapper and Nadir Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotenhuis, Michael G.; Wu, Xiangqian; Flynn, Larry; Beach, Eric; Niu, Jianguo; Yu, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) represents the latest generation of polar-orbiting satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The first in the JPSS series of satellites, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) spacecraft was launched in November 2011 to bridge the gap between the current Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and the future JPSS-1. The Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) is a suite of hyperspectral instruments onboard the Suomi NPP spacecraft designed to continue atmospheric ozone records through both atmospheric profiles and global distribution mapping. OMPS will also be included on the future JPSS payloads. In order to properly extend measurements from previous ozone instruments, including the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument on POES, proper OMPS calibration is necessary. In this study, the postlaunch performance of the OMPS Nadir Mapper (NM) and Nadir Profiler (NP) are evaluated through their Sensor Data Records (SDRs), which validates their end-to-end calibration. This is achieved through stability monitoring and intercomparison.

  5. The structure of continental crust: comparison of body wave apparent incidence angle and receiver function results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, E. E.; Lekic, V.

    2015-12-01

    The dense coverage of the EarthScope USArray presents an unprecedented opportunity to systematically investigate the structure of the continental crust across different tectonic regimes. Receiver function analysis of body wave arrivals can isolate converted phases (Ps or Sp) produced across velocity discontinuities beneath a seismometer and constrain relative vertical density and seismic velocity variations. Analysis of receiver functions computed for stations across the footprint of the USArray can be used to constrain both the strength and topography of crustal interfaces. However, complications in receiver function analysis arise from trade-offs among compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity variations, as well as reverberations caused by sediment-dominated regions within the United States. We show that by measuring the apparent incidence angle of P waves - their relative amplitude on the vertical and radial components of the seismogram - computed for different time-windows, we can obtain an estimate of crustal Vs layering at each station. The calculated Vs estimate is in terms of absolute as opposed to relative velocity variations and is independent of Vp. Using synthetic waveforms, we quantify to what extent absolute velocity inferences obtained using the apparent-incidence angle method are affected by multiple reverberations in shallow layers. We then use both synthetics and data to evaluate the potential of the apparent incidence method for constraining anisotropy, and compare it to receiver functions. Finally, we compare and contrast results from receiver function and apparent incidence angle analyses in different tectonic settings across North America.

  6. Measurement of the CKM angle γ from a combination of LHCb results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-12-01

    A combination of measurements sensitive to the CKM angle γ from LHCb is performed. The inputs are from analyses of time-integrated B + → DK +, B 0 → DK ∗0, B 0 → DK +π- and B + → DK +π+π- tree-level decays. In addition, results from a time-dependent analysis of B s 0 → D s ∓ K ± decays are included. The combination yields γ = (72. 2 - 7.3 + 6.8 ) °, where the uncertainty includes systematic effects. The 95.5% confidence level interval is determined to be γ ∈ [55 .9 , 85 .2]°. A second combination is investigated, also including measurements from B + → Dπ+ and B + → Dπ+π-π+ decays, which yields compatible results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Lateral and axial resolutions of an angle-deviation microscope for different numerical apertures: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Lai, Chin-Fa; Tan, Chen-Tai; Lin, Yi-Zhi

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the lateral and axial resolutions of a transmission laser-scanning angle-deviation microscope (TADM) with different numerical aperture (NA) values. The TADM is based on geometric optics and surface plasmon resonance principles. The surface height is proportional to the phase difference between two marginal rays of the test beam, which is passed through the test medium. We used common-path heterodyne interferometry to measure the phase difference in real time, and used a personal computer to calculate and plot the surface profile. The experimental results showed that the best lateral and axial resolutions for NA = 0.41 were 0.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively, and the lateral resolution breaks through the diffraction limits.

  8. Postlaunch Performance of the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seftor, C. J.; Jaross, G.; Kowitt, M.; Haken, M.; Li, J.; Flynn, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    The prelaunch specifications for nadir sensors of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) were designed to ensure that measurements from them could be used to retrieve total column ozone and nadir ozone profile information both for operational use and for use in long-term ozone data records. In this paper, we will show results from our extensive analysis of the performance of the nadir mapper (NM) and nadir profiler (NP) sensors during the first year and a half of OMPS nadir operations. In most cases, we determined that both sensors meet or exceed their prelaunch specifications. Normalized radiance (radiance divided by irradiance) measurements have been determined to be well within their 2% specification for both sensors. In the case of stray light, the NM sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the shortest wavelengths, while the NP sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the longest wavelengths. Artifacts that negatively impacted the sensor calibration due to diffuser features were reduced to less than 1% through changes made in the solar calibration sequence. Preliminary analysis of the disagreement between measurements made by the NM and NP sensors in the region where their wavelengths overlap indicates that it is due to shifts in the shared dichroic filter after launch and that it can be corrected. In general, our analysis indicates that both the NM and NP sensors are performing well, that they are stable, and that any deviations from nominal performance can be well characterized and corrected.

  9. Interpreting vegetation reflectance measurements as a function of solar zenith angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Ranson, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Spectral hemispherical-conical reflectances of a nadir looking sensor were taken throughout the day for a lodgepole pine and two grass canopies. Mathematical simulations of both spectral hemispherical-conical and bi-hemispherical reflectances were performed for two theoretical canopies of contrasting geometric structure. These results and comparisons with literature studies showed a great amount of variability of vegetation canopy reflectances as a function of solar zenith angle. Explanations for this variability are discussed and recommendations for further measurements are proposed.

  10. Limb-Nadir Matching for Tropospheric NO2: A New Algorithm in the SCIAMACHY Operational Level 2 Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meringer, Markus; Gretschany, Sergei; Lichtenberg, Gunter; Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.

    2015-11-01

    SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric ChartographY) aboard ESA's environmental satellite ENVISAT observed the Earth's atmosphere in limb, nadir, and solar/lunar occultation geometries covering the UV–Visible to NIR spectral range. Limb and nadir geometries were the main operation modes for the retrieval of scientific data. The new version 6 of ESA's level 2 processor now provides for the first time an operational algorithm to combine measurements of these two geometries in order to generate new products. As a first instance the retrieval of tropospheric NO2 has been implemented based on IUP–Bremen's reference algorithm. We will detail the single processing steps performed by the operational limb–nadir matching algorithm and report the results of comparisons with the scientific tropospheric NO2 products of IUP and the Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS).

  11. Nadir Sounding of Carbon Gases using SCIAMACHY Near Infrared Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno García, Sebastián; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Günter; Slijkhuis, Sander; Hess, Michael; Aberle, Bernd

    The Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm (BIRRA) and Column EstimatoR Vertical InfraRed Sounding Atmosphere (CERVISA) codes have been designed to retrieve vertical column den-sities (VCDs) of atmospheric gases in the near and thermal infrared (NIR,TIR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum by means of non-linear least squares fitting of radiances. As part of the operational SCIAMACHY level 1-2 processor, BIRRA is currently used for the specific retrieval of carbon monoxide (CO) VCDs exploiting the fitting window 4282-4301 cm-1 within the SCIAMACHY channel 8. Using appropriate fitting windows in channel 6, BIRRA also allows to gain information on greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, the increasing number of dead and bad pixels -specially in the NIR channels -reduces the available spectral information and consequently makes the VCDs retrieval more and more challenging. The proper choice of the pixel mask, fitting window, auxiliary fit parameters, as well as the filtering of the Level 2 data is crucial for obtaining a high quality atmospheric product. For validation of BIRRA the closely related CERVISA code is used to retrieve CO and CH4 from nadir infrared sounding data of AIRS, IASI, or TES. BIRRA and CERVISA share a large portion of modules, e.g., for line-by-line absorption and the nonlinear least squares solver; the essential difference is the part of the forward model devoted to radiative transfer through the atmosphere, i.e., Beer's law for the NIR versus Schwarzschild's equation for the TIR. CERVISA retrieval results are compared both to the operational products of the TIR sounder and to the SCIAMACHY-BIRRA product. In this work, we present recent results of carbon monoxide and methane retrievals.

  12. Tropospheric ozone retrieval by using SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Ladstätter-Weissenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John

    2014-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced during pollution events and transported from the stratosphere towards the troposphere. It is the third most important green house gases and the main component of summer smog. Global covered satellite measurements are well suitable to investigate sources, sinks, and transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, and to study a characteristic behaviour of the tropospheric ozone in regions. However, the usage of satellite data is associated to a large uncertainty as 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only the remaining part of 10% can be observed in the troposphere. The limb-nadir matching (LNM) technique is one of the methods suitable to retrieve tropospheric ozone distributions from space borne observations of the scattered solar light in the UV-visible spectral range. In this study we apply the LNM approach to alternating limb and nadir measurements performed by the SCIAMACHY instrument. A precise tropopause height is used to subtract the stratospheric ozone from the total ozone amount for each matching point. The focus of this work is to reduce the uncertainty of the resulting tropospheric ozone distributions by analysing possible error sources, refining both limb and nadir retrievals and the matching technique.

  13. Clinical assessment of oral mucositis and candidiasis compare to chemotherapic nadir in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Patussi, Cleverson; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir; Munhoz, Eduardo Ciliao; Zanicotti, Roberta Targa Stramandinoli; Schussel, Juliana Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a chief complication in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It is considered a toxic inflammatory reaction that interferes with the patient's recuperation and quality of life. Oral candidiasis is a common fungal infection observed in dental practice, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral mucositis and oral candidiasis in patients who underwent HSCT and their correlation with the chemotherapeutic nadir (lowest possible outcome). We evaluated patients with different diagnoses who underwent HSCT at the Hospital Erasto Gaertner. No chemotherapeutic nadir curves could be associated with mucositis, and patients had different presentations of mucositis. No patient developed oral candidiasis during hospitalization. Together with cell counts, we collected demographic data including age, oral hygiene, habits harmful to health, and the use of oral prostheses. It was observed that patients who smoked cigarettes before hospitalization showed less mucositis, resulting in no feeding problems or other comorbid conditions due to the effect of mucositis. However, the nadir of the chemotherapy curve, in isolation, is not a predictive tool for the appearance (or no appearance) of oral mucositis.

  14. New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR): Status and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.

    2015-09-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) has been developed at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National Institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives), as an evolution of the previous archiving and distribution system, used on several telescopes (LBT, TNG, Asiago, etc.) to improve performance, efficiency and reliability. At the present, NADIR system is running on LBT telescope and Vespa (Italian telescopes network for outreach) Ramella et al. (2014), and will be used on TNG, Asiago and IRA (Istituto Radio Astronomia) archives of Medicina, Noto and SRT radio telescopes Zanichelli et al. (2014) as the data models for radio data will be ready. This paper will discuss the progress status, the architectural choices and the solutions adopted, during the development and the commissioning phase of the project. A special attention will be given to the LBT case, due to some critical aspect of data flow and policies and standards compliance, adopted by the LBT organization.

  15. Three-dimensional limited-angle microtomography of blood cells: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Gennady G.; Vishnyakov, Gennady N.; Zakarian, Constantin S.; Likhachov, Alexey V.; Pickalov, Valery V.; Kozinets, Gennady I.; Novoderzhkina, Julia K.; Streletskaya, Elena A.

    1998-06-01

    Tomographic measurements of the 3D refractive index spatial distribution within optically transparent phase samples with computerized interferometric microscopes are proposed. Phase shifting interferometric microtomography applications for the 3D image reconstruction of the blood cells are represented. The immersion 100x, N.A. equals 1.25 objective was used to increase the spatial resolution and observation angle range to 90 degree. ART, combined ART and iterative Gerchberg-Papoulis 3D algorithm were used for the tomogram reconstruction. To determine the accuracy and spatial resolution of the blood cells image reconstruction by means of the interferometric microtomographic method the numerical simulations were implemented.

  16. Measurement of nadir and near-nadir 94-GHz brightness temperatures of several tactical-scene clutter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikner, David A.; Pizzillo, Thomas J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors present 94-GHz radiometric brightness temperatures of various clutter materials at nadir. The clutter materials measured include field vegetation, asphalt pavement, and an asphalt shingle roof and data is presented for each clutter type. We also report measurements that quantify the effect of water on the brightness temperature of metal. These measurements were made by adding calibrated quantities of water to a metal plate while recording the plate's millimeter-wave brightness temperature. Off-nadir data out to 45 deg is also presented for the field vegetation and asphalt pavement. Using a simple rough scattering model for the materials, we made estimates of the emissivity of the field vegetation and asphalt. The emissivity of the roof was determined by measuring its brightness temperature as it was heated.

  17. Crown depth as a result of evolutionary games: decreasing solar angle should lead to shallower, not deeper crowns.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Peter Johannes

    2014-06-01

    There is a general notion in the literature that, with increasing latitude, trees have deeper crowns as a result of a lower solar elevation angle. However, these predictions are based on models that did not include the effects of competition for light between individuals. Here, I argue that there should be selection for trees to increase the height of the crown base, as this decreases shading by neighbouring trees, leading to an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Because the level of between-tree shading increases with decreasing solar angle, the predicted ESS will shift to higher crown base height. This argument is supported by a simulation model to check for the effects of crown shape and the change of light intensity that occurs with changing solar angle on model outcomes. So, the lower solar angle at higher latitudes would tend to select for shallower, and not deeper, crowns. This casts doubt on the common belief that a decreasing solar angle increases crown depth. More importantly, it shows that different assumptions about what should be optimized can lead to different predictions, not just for absolute trait values, but for the direction of selection itself.

  18. Driven isotropic Heisenberg spin chain with arbitrary boundary twisting angle: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, V.; Karevski, D.; Schütz, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    We consider an open isotropic Heisenberg quantum spin chain, coupled at the ends to boundary reservoirs polarized in different directions, which sets up a twisting gradient across the chain. Using a matrix product ansatz, we calculate the exact magnetization profiles and magnetization currents in the nonequilibrium steady state of a chain with N sites. The magnetization profiles are harmonic functions with a frequency proportional to the twisting angle θ. The currents of the magnetization components lying in the twisting plane and in the orthogonal direction behave qualitatively differently: In-plane steady-state currents scale as 1/N2 for fixed and sufficiently large boundary coupling, and vanish as the coupling increases, while the transversal current increases with the coupling and saturates to 2θ/N.

  19. NADIR: Monitoring, Error Handling, and Logging with Tango

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.

    2014-05-01

    The ingest and transport of a large amount of astronomical data, in geographically distributed archives, imply some challenging issues, like remote control and configuration, monitoring and logging anomalous conditions, fault tolerance and error handling. Based on this considerations and on our experience in data management, we started development of a New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR), using Tango (Team 2013; S. Gara 2012), a well known distributed control system (DCSs) within scientific environments, taking advantage of its key features, like reliability, scalability, logging and alarm system, consolidated pattern and template, to solve this complexity. In this paper we discuss about design choices and technical aspects around this project.

  20. Association of Hematological Nadirs and Survival in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Hematopoietic Syndrome of Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gluzman-Poltorak, Zoya; Vainstein, Vladimir; Basile, Lena A

    2015-08-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-12 (rHuIL-12) mitigates the hematopoietic subsyndrome of acute radiation syndrome (HSARS) after total body irradiation (TBI) in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of HSARS. The mechanism for this effect appears to involve multiple effects of rHuIL-12 on hematopoiesis. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine hematological nadirs and survival across our three NHP completed studies. Animals were irradiated (700 cGy) and treated with a single subcutaneous injection of vehicle (n = 64) or rHuIL-12 (50-500 ng/kg; n = 108) 24-25 h after irradiation, or with daily subcutaneous injections of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF; 10 μg/kg/day) for 18 days starting 24-25 h after exposure (n = 26). Blood samples were obtained at various time points up to day 60 after TBI. Lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors in the overall sample and in each treatment group (P < 0.001 for each comparison, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Lymphocyte nadir was the strongest and most consistent predictor of death by Spearman's rank correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of death and threshold hematologic nadir values (where nadir values less than or equal the threshold are predictive of death) showed that a threshold of 0.08 × 10(9)/L for lymphocytes had the largest positive predictive value of death (97.2% and 92.5% for the control and rHuIL-12 groups, respectively) and high sensitivity (76.1% and 62.7%, respectively), consistent with human radiation victims data. The current findings suggest that enhanced early bone marrow regeneration resulting in increases in nadir values for all major blood cell types may be the main mechanism of action by which rHuIL-12 mitigates the lethality of HSARS.

  1. Mediterranean Diet and Phase Angle in a Sample of Adult Population: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barrea, Luigi; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Di Somma, Carolina; Falco, Andrea; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is a healthy dietary pattern known to actively modulate the cell membrane properties. Phase angle (PhA) is a direct measure by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) used as marker of cell membrane integrity. Both food behaviour and PhA are influenced by age, sex and body weight. The aim of this study was to cross-sectionally evaluate the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and PhA in 1013 healthy adult patients stratified according to sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. PhA was calculated by BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy Akern). In both sexes, at ROC analysis a PREDIMED score ≥ 6 predicted a PhA beyond the median value. At the multivariate analysis, among PREDIMED score, age, and BMI, the PREDIMED score was the major determinant of PhA, explaining 44.5% and 47.3% of PhA variability, in males and females respectively (p < 0.001). A novel association was reported between the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and PhA, independently of sex, age, and body weight. This association uncovered a new potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet on health outcomes, as in both sexes higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated to larger PhAs, as expression of cell membrane integrity. PMID:28218645

  2. Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT): 1-year results in early and advanced open angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Schlote, Torsten; Kynigopoulos, Myron

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in eyes with early and more advanced stages of open angle glaucoma within 1 year of follow-up. Retrospective chart review in a consecutive series of patients treated by SLT to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) or decrease number of topical medications in cases of discomfort and allergy. The cup-to-disc ratio of the optic nerve and the GSS 2 (glaucoma staging system 2) was used to differentiate between early (group 1) and more advanced (group 2) stages of glaucoma. At the time of SLT treatment, no new signs of glaucoma progression were seen. Only the first treated eye of every patient was included in the analysis. In group 1 (early glaucoma), 27 eyes were included. IOP reduction <21 mmHg/>20 % of the preoperative IOP-value and reduction of medication were achieved in 17 eyes (62.96 %). Successful re-treatment was necessary in 2 eyes (7.4 %). In group 2 (advanced glaucoma), 44 eyes underwent SLT. In eight eyes (18.18 %), filtrating surgery was necessary after initial SLT. In the remaining 36 eyes, IOP reduction <21 mmHg/>20 % of the baseline IOP was achieved in 26 eyes (59.09 % of 44 eyes) and IOP reduction <18 mmHg/> 30 % of the baseline IOP in 22 eyes (50 % of 44 eyes). SLT was safe and effective in nearly 2/3 of early glaucoma patients and also in 50 % of advanced glaucoma patients using stronger criteria of success. Failure of SLT in advanced glaucoma should lead to immediate filtrating surgery, which seems not to be associated with higher risk of fibrosis.

  3. Mediterranean Diet and Phase Angle in a Sample of Adult Population: Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Barrea, Luigi; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Di Somma, Carolina; Falco, Andrea; Savanelli, Maria Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia

    2017-02-17

    The Mediterranean diet is a healthy dietary pattern known to actively modulate the cell membrane properties. Phase angle (PhA) is a direct measure by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) used as marker of cell membrane integrity. Both food behaviour and PhA are influenced by age, sex and body weight. The aim of this study was to cross-sectionally evaluate the association between the adherence to Mediterranean diet and PhA in 1013 healthy adult patients stratified according to sex, age, and body mass index (BMI). The adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated using the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. PhA was calculated by BIA phase-sensitive system (50 kHz BIA 101 RJL, Akern Bioresearch, Florence, Italy Akern). In both sexes, at ROC analysis a PREDIMED score ≥ 6 predicted a PhA beyond the median value. At the multivariate analysis, among PREDIMED score, age, and BMI, the PREDIMED score was the major determinant of PhA, explaining 44.5% and 47.3% of PhA variability, in males and females respectively (p < 0.001). A novel association was reported between the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and PhA, independently of sex, age, and body weight. This association uncovered a new potential benefit of the Mediterranean diet on health outcomes, as in both sexes higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated to larger PhAs, as expression of cell membrane integrity.

  4. ICU Blood Pressure Variability May Predict Nadir of Respiratory Depression After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Anne S. M.; Costa, Paulo H. M.; de Lima, Carlos E. B.; Pádua, Luiz E. M.; Campos, Luciana A.; Baltatu, Ovidiu C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical stress induces alterations on sympathovagal balance that can be determined through assessment of blood pressure variability. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is associated with postoperative respiratory depression. In this study we aimed at investigating ICU blood pressure variability and other perioperative parameters that could predict the nadir of postoperative respiratory function impairment. Methods: This prospective observational study evaluated 44 coronary artery disease patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). At the ICU, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was monitored every 30 min for 3 days. MAP variability was evaluated through: standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (CV), variation independent of mean (VIM), and average successive variability (ASV). Respiratory function was assessed through maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressures and peak expiratory flow (PEF) determined 1 day before surgery and on the postoperative days 3rd to 7th. Intraoperative parameters (volume of cardioplegia, CPB duration, aortic cross-clamp time, number of grafts) were also monitored. Results: Since, we aimed at studying patients without confounding effects of postoperative complications on respiratory function, we had enrolled a cohort of low risk EuroSCORE (European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation) with < 2. Respiratory parameters MIP, MEP, and PEF were significantly depressed for 4–5 days postoperatively. Of all MAP variability parameters, the ASV had a significant good positive Spearman correlation (rho coefficients ranging from 0.45 to 0.65, p < 0.01) with the 3-day nadir of PEF after cardiac surgery. Also, CV and VIM of MAP were significantly associated with nadir days of MEP and PEF. None of the intraoperative parameters had any correlation with the postoperative respiratory depression. Conclusions: Variability parameters ASV, CV, and VIM of the MAP

  5. A comparative analysis of UV nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragani, Rossana

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative assessment of ultraviolet nadir-backscatter and infrared limb-emission ozone profile assimilation. The Meteorological Operational Satellite A (MetOp-A) Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) nadir and the ENVISAT Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) limb profiles, generated by the ozone consortium of the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA O3-CCI), were individually added to a reference set of ozone observations and assimilated in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) data assimilation system (DAS). The two sets of resulting analyses were compared with that from a control experiment, only constrained by the reference dataset, and independent, unassimilated observations. Comparisons with independent observations show that both datasets improve the stratospheric ozone distribution. The changes inferred by the limb-based observations are more localized and, in places, more important than those implied by the nadir profiles, albeit they have a much lower number of observations. A small degradation (up to 0.25 mg kg-1 for GOME-2 and 0.5 mg kg-1 for MIPAS in the mass mixing ratio) is found in the tropics between 20 and 30 hPa. In the lowermost troposphere below its vertical coverage, the limb data are found to be able to modify the ozone distribution with changes as large as 60 %. Comparisons of the ozone analyses with sonde data show that at those levels the assimilation of GOME-2 leads to about 1 Dobson Unit (DU) smaller root mean square error (RMSE) than that of MIPAS. However, the assimilation of MIPAS can still improve the quality of the ozone analyses and - with a reduction in the RMSE of up to about 2 DU - outperform the control experiment thanks to its synergistic assimilation with total-column ozone data within the DAS. High vertical resolution ozone profile observations are essential to accurately monitor and forecast ozone concentrations in a DAS

  6. The impact of ozone field horizontal inhomogeneities on nadir-viewing orbital backscatter UV measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Martin D.; Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations for nadir-viewing satellites normally assume the atmosphere to be horizontally homogeneous. Yet it has been shown recently that horizontal gradients can lead to significant errors in satellite infrared and microwave soundings. We extend the methodology to backscatter ultra-violet observations of ozone, and present a first estimate of the effect s magnitude. The Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument, a pure nadir sounder, serves as our test bed. Our results indicate that in a vast majority of cases the abovementioned errors can be neglected. However, occurrence of higher errors, particularly at wavelengths longer than 300 nm, coincides with some of the most interesting atmospheric phenomena like tropopause folds and the South polar ozone hole. This leads to a seasonal variation of the magnitude of the effect. Due to the mostly zonal geometry of the ozone distribution, there is also the possibility that biases may be introduced, which is particularly critical if the data are to be assimilated or used to determine trends. The results presented are tested for robustness using different model atmospheres. The influence of horizontal inhomogeneities will be even more pronounced for cross-track sounders and limb viewers, and easier to detect once higher resolution atmospheric models are available. This will be investigated in future studies.

  7. Precipitation measurement using SIR-C: A feasibility study. Investigation at nadir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahamad, Atiq; Moore, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    The most significant limitation of the imaging SAR in rain measurements is the ground return coupled to the rain cell. Here we report a study of the possibility of using the X-SAR and the C-band channel of SIR-C for rain measurement. Earlier signal-to-clutter calculations rule out the use of X-SAR at steeper off-vertical angles of incidence (i.e., 20 less than theta less than 50). Only rain rates greater than 30 mm/hr at angles of incidence greater than 60 degrees showed good signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). This study involved calculations at vertical incidence. There is adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at vertical incidence, but the presence of high-range side-lobe levels leads to small SCR for measurement over oceans at both X and C bands. For larger rain thickness (greater than two km), the SCR gets better and smaller rain rates (greater than 10 mm/hr) can be measured. However, rain measurements over forests seem to be feasible at nadir even for smaller rain thickness (less than two km). We conclude that X band may be usable over the forest at vertical incidence to measure rain rates greater than five mm/hr even for shallow rain thickness and over ocean for large rain thickness.

  8. Understanding angular effects in VHR imagery and their significance for urban land-cover model portability: A study of two multi-angle in-track image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, Giona; Longbotham, Nathan; Pacifici, Fabio; Kanevski, Mikhail; Tuia, Devis

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the angular effects causing spectral distortions in multi-angle remote sensing imagery. We study two WorldView-2 multispectral in-track sequences acquired over the cities of Atlanta, USA, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, consisting of 13 and 20 co-located images, respectively. The sequences possess off-nadir acquisition angles up to 47.5° and bear markedly different sun-satellite configurations with respect to each other. Both scenes comprise classic urban structures such as buildings of different size, road networks, and parks. First, we quantify the degree of distortion affecting the sequences by means of a non-linear measure of distance between probability distributions, the Maximum Mean Discrepancy. Second, we assess the ability of a classification model trained on an image acquired at a certain view angle to predict the land-cover of all the other images in the sequence. The portability across the sequence is investigated for supervised classifiers of different nature by analyzing the evolution of the classification accuracy with respect to the off-nadir look angle. For both datasets, the effectiveness of physically- and statistically-based normalization methods in obtaining angle-invariant data spaces is compared and synergies are discussed. The empirical results indicate that, after a suitable normalization (histogram matching, atmospheric compensation), the loss in classification accuracy when using a model trained on the near-nadir image to classify the most off-nadir acquisitions can be reduced to as little as 0.06 (Atlanta) or 0.03 (Rio de Janeiro) Kappa points when using a SVM classifier.

  9. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Lister, T.; Collier Cameron, A.; Street, R. A.; Pollacco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.

    2004-12-01

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extra-solar planets across the face of their parent star. We present some recent results from the WASP0 camera, including observations of the known transiting planet around HD 209458. The current status of the next generation camera (SuperWASP) located on La Palma is briefly outlined.

  10. NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS RSB Comparison Using Observations from Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Wu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership) satellite (http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/viirs.html) began to daily collect global data following its successful launch on October 28, 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key NPP sensor. Similar to the design of the OLS, SeaWiFS and MODIS instruments, VIIRS has on-board calibration components including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) for the reflective solar bands (RSB), a V-groove blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a space view (SV) port for background subtraction. Immediately after the VIIRS nadir door s opening on November 21, 2011, anomalously large degradation in the SD response was identified in the near-IR wavelength region, which was unexpected as decreases in the SD reflectance usually occur gradually in the blue (0.4 m) wavelength region based on past experience. In this study, we use a well-calibrated Aqua MODIS as reference to track and evaluate VIIRS RSB stability and performance. Reflectances observed by both sensors from simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNO) are used to determine VIIRS to MODIS reflectance ratios for their spectral matching bands. Results of this study provide an immediate post-launch assessment, independent validation of the anomalous degradation observed in SD measurements at near-IR wavelengths and initial analysis of calibration stability and consistency.

  11. Tropical simultaneous nadir observations for IR sounder evaluation and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Evan M.; Aumann, Hartmut H.

    2015-09-01

    Simultaneous Nadir Observations (SNOs) contain thousands of pairs of observations taken within 8 km and 10 minutes. SNOs have been very useful for comparisons in polar conditions. But classic SNO pairing criteria have very low yield in the tropics, making these SNOs less useful for investigating instrument performance for hotter scenes or scenes with high contrast. We introduce a modified methodology, which finds pairs of matched spectra in a wider angular range but is restricted to the tropics. We illustrate this with AIRS and CrIS data. Insight into instrument differences is gained from statistical distributions of the residual differences between the matched pairs. A sample analysis compares AIRS and CrIS brightness temperature at 900 cm-1 as function of scene brightness temperature. The proposed method may be applicable to matchups of other sensors on different spacecraft.

  12. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Street, R. A.; Pollaco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Collier Cameron, A.

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extrasolar planets across the face of their parent star. The WASP0 instrument is a wide-field (9-degree) 6.3 cm aperture F/2.8 Apogee 10 CCD camera (2Kx2K chip, 16-arcsec pixels). The camera is mounted piggy-back on a commercial 10-inch Meade telescope. We present some recent results from the WASP camera, including observations from La Palma of the known transiting planet around HD 209458 and preliminary analysis of other stars located in the same field. We also outline further problems which restrict the ability to achieve photon limited precision with a wide-field commercial CCD.

  13. Scan Angle Dependence Of Radiance Recorded By The NOAA-AVHRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Piwinski, D.; Whitehead, V.; Ryland, G.

    1983-08-01

    NOAA-AVHRR data is being used to monitor global vegetation type and condition and to study various environmental factors in addition to performance of meteorological functions. The AVHRR instrument has +/-54° as a maximum scan angle limits and it is necessary to be aware of the effects of sun-target-sensor geometry at extreme scan angles to be able to properly interpret the satellite images. In order to interpret the images for vegetation type and condition analysis it is necessary to calibrate back to the nadir view position. Both simulation studies and empirical investigations with digital scanner data have been performed in order to sufficiently understand the effects of scan angle and sun angle, as well as the effects of atmospheric scattering, to eventually perform adequate calibrations. Not suprisingly, the effects are large and studies are continuing to provide improved calibrations. It is the results of these investigations which we describe in this paper.

  14. TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Lite Nadir (TL2MTLLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Lite Nadir (TL2MTLLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Methanol Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methanol Order Data:  Search and Order:   Earthdata Search ...

  15. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Search and Order:   Order Data ...

  16. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-31

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Search and Order:   Order Data ...

  17. Results of multiband (L, S, Ku band) propagation measurements and model for high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, M. A. N.; Butt, G.; Evans, Barry G.; Richharia, M.

    1993-01-01

    Signal propagation in the land mobile satellite (LMS) service is an important consideration due to its critical impact on the overall economic and commercial viability of the system. At frequencies allocated for LMS systems, shadowing of the line-of-sight (LOS) signal as well as multipath propagation phenomena can severely impair the link availability. In particular, as most of the studies have shown, the shadowing of LOS signal causes long and deep fades in a variety of mobile environments due to the inherent nature of the channel between the satellite and a mobile. Roadside obstacles, such as buildings, trees, utility poles etc., in the immediate vicinity of a mobile and the surrounding terrain are major sources of signal shadowing in LMS links. Therefore, a proper knowledge of link degradation is essential for cost-effective planning of a satellite based mobile communication system. The results of a propagation campaign undertaken to characterize the fading nature of LMS channel at high elevation angles is presented. It was envisaged that one of the most important physical variables contributing to the amount of LOS signal shadowing is the elevation angle of the satellite. At higher elevation angles to the satellite, less obstructions in the direct satellite-to-mobile path would therefore amount to statistically better link availability. Narrowband channel measurements were carried out at three RF frequencies corresponding to L (1.3 GHz), S (2.32/2.45 GHz), and Ku (10.4 GHz) bands. The campaign itself was divided into two phases to observe the effects of seasonal variation of foliage on the roadside trees. Phase measurements were carried out in September 1991 and in April 1992. Some important aspects from the statistical analysis of the propagation data are presented.

  18. Results of multiband (L, S, Ku band) propagation measurements and model for high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, M. A. N.; Butt, G.; Evans, Barry G.; Richharia, M.

    1993-08-01

    Signal propagation in the land mobile satellite (LMS) service is an important consideration due to its critical impact on the overall economic and commercial viability of the system. At frequencies allocated for LMS systems, shadowing of the line-of-sight (LOS) signal as well as multipath propagation phenomena can severely impair the link availability. In particular, as most of the studies have shown, the shadowing of LOS signal causes long and deep fades in a variety of mobile environments due to the inherent nature of the channel between the satellite and a mobile. Roadside obstacles, such as buildings, trees, utility poles etc., in the immediate vicinity of a mobile and the surrounding terrain are major sources of signal shadowing in LMS links. Therefore, a proper knowledge of link degradation is essential for cost-effective planning of a satellite based mobile communication system. The results of a propagation campaign undertaken to characterize the fading nature of LMS channel at high elevation angles is presented. It was envisaged that one of the most important physical variables contributing to the amount of LOS signal shadowing is the elevation angle of the satellite. At higher elevation angles to the satellite, less obstructions in the direct satellite-to-mobile path would therefore amount to statistically better link availability. Narrowband channel measurements were carried out at three RF frequencies corresponding to L (1.3 GHz), S (2.32/2.45 GHz), and Ku (10.4 GHz) bands. The campaign itself was divided into two phases to observe the effects of seasonal variation of foliage on the roadside trees. Phase measurements were carried out in September 1991 and in April 1992. Some important aspects from the statistical analysis of the propagation data are presented.

  19. Validation of Carbon Monoxide Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY InfraRed Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, P.; Gimeno Garcia, S.; Schreier, F.; Hamidouche, M.; Lichtenberg, G.

    2016-08-01

    This validation study examines the accuracy of carbon monoxide (CO) total columns derived from nadir measurements of the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY). Therefore, an intercomparison of the CO columns estimated from SCIAMACHY measurements with coincidented and colocated retrievals provided by several ground-based (g-b) stations affiliated to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) had been performed. The study demonstrated that the SCIAMACHY CO total column validation results depend on many aspects. The results indicate particularly the importance of appropriate post- processing of the BIRRA retrievals (esp. filtering). It shows that the CO product is sensitive to settings in retrieval algorithm. Furthermore, the analysis gives evidence of a degrading channel 8 detector in later years. In conclusion, for most cases monthly mean SCIAMACHY CO total columns agree within the standard deviation when compared to g-b measurements.

  20. Tropospheric Ozone Near-Nadir-Viewing IR Spectral Sensitivity and Ozone Measurements from NAST-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared ozone spectra from near nadir observations have provided atmospheric ozone information from the sensor to the Earth's surface. Simulations of the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (approximately 20 km altitude) with a spectral resolution of 0.25/cm were used for sensitivity analysis. The spectral sensitivity of ozone retrievals to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and water vapor is assessed in order to understand the relationship between the IR emissions and the atmospheric state. In addition, ozone spectral radiance sensitivity to its ozone layer densities and radiance weighting functions reveals the limit of the ozone profile retrieval accuracy from NAST-I measurements. Statistical retrievals of ozone with temperature and moisture retrievals from NAST-I spectra have been investigated and the preliminary results from NAST-I field campaigns are presented.

  1. Identifying the occurrence of lightning and transient luminous events by nadir spectrophotometric observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Toru; Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Makoto; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Inan, Umran S.; Linscott, Ivan; Hobara, Yasuhide; Frey, Harald U.; Mende, Stephen B.; Chen, Alfred B.; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Kusunoki, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new technique to identify the occurrence of lightning and transient luminous events (TLEs) using multicolor photometric data obtained by space borne nadir measurements. We estimate the spectral characteristics of lightning and TLEs by converting the optical data obtained by the ISUAL limb experiment to the GLIMS nadir geometry. We find that the estimated spectral shapes of TLE-accompanied lightning are clearly different from those of pure lightning. The obtained results show that (1) the intensity of FUV signals and (2) the ratio of 337/red (609-753 nm) spectral irradiance are useful to identify the occurrence of TLEs. The occurrence probabilities of TLEs are 10%, 40%, 80%, in the case of lightning events having the 337/red spectral irradiance ratio of 0.95, 2.95, 14.79, respectively. By using the 60% criterion of the 337/red ratio and the existence of FUV emissions, we classify the 1039 GLIMS-observed lightning events into 828 pure lightning and 211 TLE-accompanied lightning. Since the GLIMS trigger level is adjusted to observe extremely-bright events, the occurrence probability of TLEs obtained here most probably reflects the characteristics of energetic lightning. The estimated global map is consistent with previously determined distributions: the highest activities of lightning and TLEs are found over the North/South American continents, African continent, and Asian maritime regions. While the absolute occurrence number of pure lightning and TLE-accompanied lightning are found to maximize in the equatorial region, the occurrence probability of TLEs possibly increase somewhat in the mid-latitude region. Since the occurrence probabilities of TLEs are higher over the ocean than over land, it is likely that the GLIMS-observed TLEs are due primarily to elves which tends to occur more frequently over the ocean.

  2. Backscattering enhancement for Marshall-Palmer distributed rains for a W-band nadir-pointing radar with a finite beam width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we expand the previous theory to be applied to a generic drop size distribution with spheroidal raindrops including spherical raindrops. Results will be used to discuss the multiple scattering effects on the backscatter measurements acquired by a W-band nadir-pointing radar.

  3. TES/Aura L2 Carbonyl Sulfide Nadir (TL2OCSN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-01

    ... TES/Aura L2 Carbonyl Sulfide Nadir (TL2OCSN) Project Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric ... Earth Science Atmosphere Air Quality Atmospheric Chemistry/Sulfur Compounds Order Data:  Earthdata Search:   ...

  4. TES/Aura L2 Peroxyacyl Nitrate Nadir (TL2PANN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-01

    ... TES/Aura L2 Peroxyacyl Nitrate Nadir (TL2PANN) Project Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric ... Earth Science Atmosphere Air Quality Atmospheric Chemistry/Nitrogen Compounds Order Data:  Earthdata Search:   ...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    ... TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) Project Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric ... Earth Science Atmosphere Atmospheric Chemistry/Carbon and Hydrocarbon Compounds Order Data:  ...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Peroxyacyl Nitrate Nadir (TL2PANNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-01

    ... TES/Aura L2 Peroxyacyl Nitrate Nadir (TL2PANNS) Project Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric ... Earth Science Atmosphere Air Quality Atmospheric Chemistry/Nitrogen Compounds Order Data:  Earthdata Search:   ...

  7. TES/Aura L2 Carbonyl Sulfide Nadir (TL2OCSNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-01

    ... TES/Aura L2 Carbonyl Sulfide Nadir (TL2OCSNS) Project Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric ... Earth Science Atmosphere Air Quality Atmospheric Chemistry/Sulfur Compounds Order Data:  Earthdata Search:   ...

  8. The Grenville Front Tectonic Zone: Results from the 1986 Great Lakes Onshore Seismic Wide-Angle Reflection and Refraction Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.

    1991-09-01

    The Grenville Front, which marks the orogenic boundary between the Archean Superior Structural Province and the much younger Grenville Province to the southeast, is one of the major tectonic features of the Canadian Shield. Within Canada, it is approximately 1900 km in length extending from the north shore of Lake Huron across Ontario and Quebec to Labrador. In 1986, a major coincident onship near-vertical reflection and onshore wide-angle reflection/refraction experiment (GLIMPCE-Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution) was conducted along a series of lines across the Great lakes. One of the lines, line J, ran across Georgian Bay and Lake Huron for a distance of 350 km and crossed the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone (GFTZ). The seismic signals from the air gun array source were well recorded by the onshore stations up to distances of 250 km with a seismic trace spacing of 50-62.5 m. The GFTZ had a profound effect on the nature of the reflector patterns observed on the onshore seismic sections. Data recorded by the stations on the east end of the line indicate that the crustal P phases are very complex and form a "shinglelike" pattern of reflected waves. Data recorded by stations at the center and at the western end of the line show that the Pg phases are normal and lack the shinglelike appearance. This character of arrivals was also observed on the corresponding S wave sections. A combined P and S wave forward modeling analysis shows that the GFTZ is composed of bands of reflectors dipping at angles of 20°-35° extending to the lower crust. These reflectors were also well imaged on the coincident near-vertical reflection data. Reflectors under the Britt domain to the east of the GFTZ have a shallower dip than those along the zone. The structure of the crust under the Manitoulin terrane to the west of the GFTZ is laterally homogeneous with a major intracrustal reflector at a depth of 17-20 km below the surface. Poisson's ratio is

  9. TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Methanol Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methanol Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  10. TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLNS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Methanol Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methanol Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  11. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Search and Order:   Earthdata ...

  12. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-27

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.2 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Search and Order:   Earthdata ...

  13. TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ozone Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ozone Order Data:  Search and Order:   Earthdata Search ...

  14. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Search and Order:   Order Data ...

  15. Spatial and Temporal distribution of CO_{2} 4.3-mu m NLTE Emission from nadir VIRTIS-H/Venus Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Javier; Ángel López-Valverde, Miguel; Gilli, Gabriella; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) emissions are known to play a key role in the radiative heating and cooling of the Venus mesosphere and lower thermosphere (Dickinson, JAS, 1973; Roldan et al., Icarus, 2000). In the case of the Venusian atmosphere, CO2 vibrational-rotational emissions at 4.3 μm and 2.7 μm were predicted to give intense emissions, and since they are originated between 80 and 150 km, their observation might give information on the atmospheric parameters at those altitudes, depending on sensitivity and spectral resolution. The VIRTIS spectrometer on board Venus Express allows for the first time the systematic sounding of these bands in the Venus atmosphere, both in nadir and limb observing geometries. The limb data by VIRTIS has been recently studied by our team (Gilli et al., JGR, 2009; López-Valverde et al., 2010 submitted; Gilli et al., 2010 submitted), focusing on its vertical distribution and the validation of non-LTE models, but an exhaustive study of nadir observations has not been presented so far, except for the detection of gravity waves by García et al. (2008; 2009). In this work, we have used the nadir observations to study the horizontal distribution of the CO2 non-LTE emissions at 4.3 μm, mainly originated at altitudes about ~110 km. The analyzed dataset comprises the whole nadir measurements with VIRTIS-H (the highest spectral resolution channel) obtained up to September 2009, covering nearly 900 days of observations and more than 140,000 spectra. Similarly to the case of limb data, it was found that the nadir radiance depends not only on the Solar Zenith Angle, but also on the Emission Angle, as predicted by our non-LTE model. After careful radiance averages, the small dispersion found in the mean emission of this band suggests that the Venus lower thermosphere is more stable than expected, with scarce episodes of significant variation during the studied period. Since the spectral resolution of VIRTIS-H allows

  16. The new small-angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-1 at MLZ-characterization and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, S.; Heinemann, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Karge, L.; Ostermann, A.; Defendi, I.; Schreyer, A.; Petry, W.; Gilles, R.

    2016-10-01

    A thorough characterization of the key features of the new small-angle neutron scattering instrument SANS-1 at MLZ, a joint project of Technische Universität München and Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, is presented. Measurements of the neutron beam profile, divergency and flux are given for various positions along the instrument including the sample position, and agree well with Monte Carlo simulations of SANS-1 using the program McStas. Secondly, the polarization option of SANS-1 is characterized for a broad wavelength band. A key feature of SANS-1 is the large accessible Q-range facilitated by the sideways movement of the detector. Particular attention is hence paid to the effects that arise due to large scattering angles on the detector where a standard cos3 solid angle correction is no longer applicable. Finally the performance of the instrument is characterized by a set of standard samples.

  17. PSA nadir as a predictive factor for biochemical disease-free survival and overall survival following whole-gland salvage HIFU following radiotherapy failure

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Taimur; Peters, Max; Kanthabalan, Abi; McCartan, Neil; Fatola, Yomi; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; van Vulpen, Marco; Freeman, Alex; Moore, Caroline M.; Arya, Manit; Emberton, Mark; Ahmed, Hashim U.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment options for radio-recurrent prostate cancer are either androgen deprivation therapy or salvage prostatectomy. Whole-gland HIFU might have a role in this setting. Methods An independent HIFU registry collated consecutive cases of HIFU. Between 2005 and 2012 we identified 50 men who underwent whole-gland HIFU following histological confirmation of localized disease following prior external beam radiotherapy (2005-2012). No upper threshold was applied for risk category, Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), or Gleason grade either at presentation or at time of failure. Progression was defined as a composite with either biochemical failure (Phoenix criteria [PSA>nadir+2ng/mL]), start of systemic therapies or metastases. Results Median age (IQR), pre-treatment PSA (IQR), and Gleason score (range), were 68years (64-72), 5.9ng/mL (2.2-11.3), and 7 (6-9), respectively. Median follow-up was 64months (49-84). 24/50 (48%) avoided androgen deprivation therapies. 28/50 (56%) achieved a PSA-nadir <0.5ng/ml. 15/50 (30%) had a nadir ≥0.5ng/ml. 7/50 (14%) did not nadir (PSA non-responders). Actuarial 1, 3 and 5-year PFS was 72%, 40% and 31%, respectively. Actuarial 1, 3, and 5-year OS was 100%, 94% and 87%, respectively. When comparing patients with PSA nadir <0.5ng/ml, nadir ≥0.5 and non-responders a statistically significant difference in PFS was seen (p<0.0001). 3-year PFS in each group was 57%, 20% and 0%, respectively. 5-year overall survival was 96%, 100% and 38%, respectively. Early in the learning curve, between 2005-2007, 3/50 (6%) developed a fistula. Intervention for bladder outlet obstruction was needed in 27/50 (54%). Patient-reported outcome measures questionnaires showed incontinence (any pad-use) as 8/26 (31%). Conclusions In our series of high-risk patients, in whom 30-50% may have micro-metastases, disease control rates were promising in PSA-responders, however with significant morbidity. Additionally, post-HIFU PSA-nadir appears to be an

  18. Effect of collimator angles on the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy planning for patients with a locally-advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Dahl; Park, Ha Ryung; Kim, Won Taek; Kim, Dong Hyun; Bae, Jin Suk; Jeon, Gye Rok; Ro, Jung Hoon; Ki, Yongkan

    2017-03-01

    In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning, usually the collimator is rotated to minimize interleaf leakage and the tongue-and-groove effect. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of collimator angle on the dosimetric results of VMAT plans for patients with a locally-advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (LA-NPC). VMAT treatment planning sets were generated using the same planning parameters, but with different collimator angles for 11 LA-NPC patients. Each set was composed of 10 plans with collimator angles at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 35, 40, and 45 degrees. Dosimetric parameters, such as target coverage, organs at risk (OAR), and dose conformity, were analyzed at various collimator angles. With increasing collimator angles, the absorbed doses to the optic apparatus were increased by up to 35% comparing to that at a collimator angle of 0°. The best value of the conformity index (CI) was 0.971 ± 0.023 at collimator angles of 20° and 30°. The worst value of CI was 0.917 ± 0.051 at a collimator angle of 0°. The homogeneity index (HI)95 and HI98 had the best values of 0.106 ± 0.040 and 0.079 ± 0.031, respectively, at a collimator angle of 25°. The worst values of HI95 and HI98 were 0.136 ± 0.039 and 0.105 ± 0.032, respectively, at a collimator angle of of 0°. The maximum doses for some OARs (body, ear, parotid gland, mandible, and brainstem) and the HI did not show any statistically significant differences. However, the mean doses had positive correlations ( r = 0.449 0.773, p<0.001) with the irradiated volume. The CI had a weak positive correlation ( r = 0.316, p<0.001) with the irradiated volume. Other comparison parameters were evaluated as functions of the collimator angle. These findings will give useful information for choosing the collimator angle in VMAT plans for patients with a LA-NPC.

  19. Comparing nadir and limb observations of polar mesospheric clouds: The effect of the assumed particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry D.; Randall, Cora E.; Carstens, Justin N.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Rusch, David W.; Russell, James M.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2015-05-01

    Nadir viewing observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft are compared to Common Volume (CV), limb-viewing observations by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) also on AIM. CIPS makes multiple observations of PMC-scattered UV sunlight from a given location at a variety of geometries and uses the variation of the radiance with scattering angle to determine a cloud albedo, particle size distribution, and Ice Water Content (IWC). SOFIE uses IR solar occultation in 16 channels (0.3-5 μm) to obtain altitude profiles of ice properties including the particle size distribution and IWC in addition to temperature, water vapor abundance, and other environmental parameters. CIPS and SOFIE made CV observations from 2007 to 2009. In order to compare the CV observations from the two instruments, SOFIE observations are used to predict the mean PMC properties observed by CIPS. Initial agreement is poor with SOFIE predicting particle size distributions with systematically smaller mean radii and a factor of two more albedo and IWC than observed by CIPS. We show that significantly improved agreement is obtained if the PMC ice is assumed to contain 0.5% meteoric smoke by mass, in agreement with previous studies. We show that the comparison is further improved if an adjustment is made in the CIPS data processing regarding the removal of Rayleigh scattered sunlight below the clouds. This change has an effect on the CV PMC, but is negligible for most of the observed clouds outside the CV. Finally, we examine the role of the assumed shape of the ice particle size distribution. Both experiments nominally assume the shape is Gaussian with a width parameter roughly half of the mean radius. We analyze modeled ice particle distributions and show that, for the column integrated ice distribution, Log-normal and Exponential distributions better represent the range

  20. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3μm at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8μm at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive

  1. Towards 3D Matching of Point Clouds Derived from Oblique and Nadir Airborne Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    Because of the low-expense high-efficient image collection process and the rich 3D and texture information presented in the images, a combined use of 2D airborne nadir and oblique images to reconstruct 3D geometric scene has a promising market for future commercial usage like urban planning or first responders. The methodology introduced in this thesis provides a feasible way towards fully automated 3D city modeling from oblique and nadir airborne imagery. In this thesis, the difficulty of matching 2D images with large disparity is avoided by grouping the images first and applying the 3D registration afterward. The procedure starts with the extraction of point clouds using a modified version of the RIT 3D Extraction Workflow. Then the point clouds are refined by noise removal and surface smoothing processes. Since the point clouds extracted from different image groups use independent coordinate systems, there are translation, rotation and scale differences existing. To figure out these differences, 3D keypoints and their features are extracted. For each pair of point clouds, an initial alignment and a more accurate registration are applied in succession. The final transform matrix presents the parameters describing the translation, rotation and scale requirements. The methodology presented in the thesis has been shown to behave well for test data. The robustness of this method is discussed by adding artificial noise to the test data. For Pictometry oblique aerial imagery, the initial alignment provides a rough alignment result, which contains a larger offset compared to that of test data because of the low quality of the point clouds themselves, but it can be further refined through the final optimization. The accuracy of the final registration result is evaluated by comparing it to the result obtained from manual selection of matched points. Using the method introduced, point clouds extracted from different image groups could be combined with each other to build a

  2. An Overview of Three-year JEM-GLIMS Nadir Observations of Lightning and TLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Ushio, T.; Morimoto, T.; Adachi, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Hobara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    JEM-GLIMS nadir observations of lightning and TLEs at the ISS started from November 2012 and successfully ended on August 2015. For three-year observation period, JEM-GLIMS succeeded in detecting over 8,000 lightning events and 670 TLEs. The detected optical emissions of sprites showed clear horizontal displacement with the range of 10-20 km from the peak location of the +CG emissions and from the +CG locations detected by NLDN and WWLLN. Using VITF electric field waveform data, source locations of VHF pulses excited by the parent CG discharges are estimated. It is found that the possible VHF source locations were mostly located within the area of the parent lightning emissions. These facts may imply that the center region of the neutralized charge by CG discharges in the thundercloud located near the return stroke point and that the some seed conditions were established in advance at the sprite location before the occurrence of sprites. The global occurrence distributions and rates of lightning discharges and TLEs are also estimated. The estimated mean global occurrence rate of lightning discharges is ~1.5 events/s, which is smaller number than that derived from MicroLab-1/OTD and TRMM/LIS measurements. This may be originated in the fact that JEM-GLISM detected only intense lightning optical events due to the high threshold level for the event triggering. To the contrary, the estimated mean global occurrence rate of TLEs is ~9.8 events/min, which is two times higher than the ISUAL result. It is likely that JEM-GLIMS could detect dimmer optical emissions of TLEs than ISUAL since the distance between the JEM-GLIMS instruments and TLEs is much closer. At the presentation, we will summarize the results derived from three-year JEM-GLIMS nadir observations. We will discuss possible occurrence conditions of sprites, properties of global occurrence rates of lightning and TLEs, and their LT dependences more in detail.

  3. Vertical information content of nadir measurements of tropospheric NO2 from satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.

    2014-05-01

    When applying satellite measurements in atmospheric pollution research, one commonly used species are tropospheric NO2 columns. They can be useful for the identification and evaluation of natural and anthropogenic NOx emissions and their changes over time as well as for process studies and for the investigation of atmospheric transport events. However, the lack of vertical resolution is one major limitation of the commonly used DOAS retrievals of NO2 columns from satellite observed radiances. Combined with the altitude-dependence of retrieval sensitivity, this entails the use of a priori information on the NO2 vertical profile. This significantly contributes to the retrieval uncertainties, which could be reduced if information on the vertical location of the NO2 could be retrieved from the measurements themselves. In this study, we investigate the vertical information content of nadir NO2 observations in the UV/visible wavelength range. For this purpose, we revisit the vertical sensitivity of DOAS retrievals of NO2, which is encoded in the averaging kernels, and contrast these findings with the results from a formal solution to the inverse radiative transfer problem, using synthetic spectra representing measurements over polluted regions. As a result, we can show that in certain cases, it is indeed possible to derive information on the vertical distribution of NO2 from the DOAS analysis alone, reducing the dependence of the retrievals on a priori information in these situations.

  4. Subduction processes off chile (SPOC) - results from The amphibious wide-angle seismic experiment across The chilean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueth, S.; Spoc Resaerch Group

    2003-04-01

    One component of the onshore-offshore, active-passive seismic experiment SPOC (Krawczyk et al., Stiller et al., this vol.) was a 2-D wide-angle seismic experiment covering the Chilean subduction zone from the Nazca Plate to the Magmatic Arc in the main cordillera. Three W-E-profiles of 52 stations each and up to 240 km long were deployed between 36° and 39° S. These profiles recorded chemical shots at their ends and, in order to extend the onshore profiles, the airgun pulses from RV SONNE cruising simultaneously on offshore profiles. On the southernmost of the three profiles OBHs/OBSs were deployed offshore, thus providing continuous wide-angle seismic data from the Nazca Plate to the South-American continent. Data examples, correlations, and velocity models along the three transects will be presented. The Moho of the subducted oceanic crust can be constrained by PmP-reflections down to 45 km depth under the coastal cordillera. The P-wave velocity field of the crust of the upper plate is characterized by gradually increasing P-wave velocities from East to West. Low seismic velocities (Vp < ~5 km/s) indicate the location of a young accretionary complex at the western tip of the continent. The highest seismic velocities (Vp > ~6.5 km/s below 10 km depth) are observed at the eastern margin of the investigated area.

  5. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2.3 μm. Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  6. NLC occurrence frequency retrieval from SCIAMACHY, GOME and GOME-2 nadir data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langowski, Martin; Von Savigny, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Noctilucent clouds NLCs are clouds occurring in the polar summer mesopause region at about 82-86 km altitude, and they can be observed poleward of about 50 degrees latitude. Due to their high altitude, they can scatter sunlight to the ground, even if it is dark at the ground, which makes them a fascinating bright phenomenon in the summer night sky. First observations of NLCs were reported in the 1880ies after the eruption of the Krakatau volcano. Afterwards they were seen every year and current long time studies show, that their occurrence rate is well anticorrelated with solar activity and it increased over time for the last decades. Ever since the NLCs were observed it was discussed whether their increasing occurrence rate can be interpreted as a sign of climate change in the upper atmosphere. With the SCIAMACHY, GOME and GOME 2 nadir measurements, which are very similar for each instrument a long time dataset of over 20 years of data is available to retrieve NLC occurrence frequencies. All three instruments have a very stable local times with descending nodes ranging between 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.. We present the algorithm to retrieve NLC occurrence frequencies from these instruments and results of this retrieval.

  7. Understanding intersatellite biases of microwave humidity sounders using global simultaneous nadir overpasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Viju O.; Holl, Gerrit; Buehler, Stefan A.; Candy, Brett; Saunders, Roger W.; Parker, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs) of polar-orbiting satellites are most frequent in polar areas but can occur at any latitude when the equatorial crossing times of the satellites become close owing to orbital drift. We use global SNOs of polar orbiting satellites to evaluate the intercalibration of microwave humidity sounders from the more frequent high-latitude SNOs. We have found based on sensitivity analyses that optimal distance and time thresholds for defining collocations are pixel centers less than 5 km apart and time differences less than 300 s. These stringent collocation criteria reduce the impact of highly variable surface or atmospheric conditions on the estimated biases. Uncertainties in the estimated biases are dominated by the combined radiometric noise of the instrument pair. The effects of frequency changes between different versions of the humidity sounders depend on the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. There are significant scene radiance and thus latitude dependencies in the estimated biases and this has to taken into account while intercalibrating microwave humidity sounders. Therefore the results obtained using polar SNOs will not be representative for moist regions, necessitating the use of global collocations for reliable intercalibration.

  8. Preliminary results from a subsonic high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system: Design, calibration, and flight test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Moes, Timothy R.; Larson, Terry J.

    1990-01-01

    A nonintrusive high angle-of-attack flush airdata sensing (HI-FADS) system was installed and flight-tested on the F-18 high alpha research flight vehicle. The system is a matrix of 25 pressure orifices in concentric circles on the nose of the vehicle. The orifices determine angles of attack and sideslip, Mach number, and pressure altitude. Pressure was transmitted from the orifices to an electronically scanned pressure module by lines of pneumatic tubing. The HI-FADS system was calibrated and demonstrated using dutch roll flight maneuvers covering large Mach, angle-of-attack, and sideslip ranges. Reference airdata for system calibration were generated by a minimum variance estimation technique blending measurements from two wingtip airdata booms with inertial velocities, aircraft angular rates and attitudes, precision radar tracking, and meteorological analyses. The pressure orifice calibration was based on identifying empirical adjustments to modified Newtonian flow on a hemisphere. Calibration results are presented. Flight test results used all 25 orifices or used a subset of 9 orifices. Under moderate maneuvering conditions, the HI-FADS system gave excellent results over the entire subsonic Mach number range up to 55 deg angle of attack. The internal pneumatic frequency response of the system is accurate to beyond 10 Hz. Aerodynamic lags in the aircraft flow field caused some performance degradation during heavy maneuvering.

  9. Using SOURCES to Examine the Nadir of Race Relations (1890-1920)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVallee, Carol; Waring, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The "nadir of race relations" is a term used by historians to describe the time period after Reconstruction, 1890-1920. During this time, African Americans were free; some argue, however, that it was a worse time than when these individuals were enslaved (Brundage 1990; Woodward 2002). There is a debate whether this time period…

  10. Ultrafast laser irradiation of spherical nanoparticles: molecular-dynamics results on fragmentation and small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahdiran, Riser; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-02-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation we study the response of a spherical nanoparticle to a sudden homogeneous energization, such as effected by ultrashort pulse laser irradiation. We consider a Lennard-Jones model system and two different values of the energization. For the smaller one, the sphere expands while a multitude of voids are created inside; the sphere develops finally into an external shell filled with gas and small clusters. For the higher energization, the sphere expands uniformly and no shell structure is formed. An analysis of the pressure generated confirms that in the latter case the pressure is compressive throughout the sphere expansion, while it is temporarily tensile for the lower energization leading to void formation. The final state of both systems shows the fragmentation of the sphere into a multitude of clusters. With increasing fragmentation the cluster distribution becomes shifted to smaller sizes. Simulated small-angle scattering functions of the exploding NP are presented. The distribution of minima allows for an easy determination of the particle size during expansion.

  11. The impact of particle shape on friction angle and resulting critical shear stress: an example from a coarse-grained, steep, megatidal beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, N.; Hay, A. E.; Cheel, R.; Lake, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of particle shape on the friction angle, and the resulting critical shear stress on sediment dynamics, is still poorly understood. In areas characterized by sediments of specific shape, particularly non-rounded particles, this can lead to large departures from the expected sediment dynamics. The steep slope (1:10) of the mixed sand-gravel beach at Advocate Harbour was found stable in large-scale morphology over decades, despite a high tidal range of ten meters or more, and strong shorebreak action during storms. The Advocate sand (d < 2 mm) was found to have an elliptic, plate-like shape. Exceptionally high friction angles of the material were determined using direct shear, ranging from φ ≈ 41-46°, while the round to angular gravel was characterized by φ = 33°. The addition of 25% of the elliptic sand to the gravel led to an immediate increase of the friction angle to φ = 38°. Furthermore, re-organization of the particles occurred during shearing, being characterized by a short phase of settling and compaction, followed by a pronounced strong dilatory behavior and an accompanying strong increase of shear stress. Long-term shearing (24 h) using a ring shear apparatus led to destruction of the particles without re-compaction. Finally, submerged particle mobilization was simulated using a tilted tray in a tank. Despite a smooth tray surface, particle motion was not initiated until reaching tray tilt angles of 31° and more, being 7° steeper than the latest gravel motion initiation. In conclusion, geotechnical laboratory experiments quantified the important impact of the elliptic, plate-like shape of Advocate Beach sand on the friction angles of both pure sand and sand-gravel mixtures. The resulting effect on initiation of particle motion was confirmed in tilting tray experiments. This makes it a vivid example of how particle shape can contribute to the stabilization of the beachface.

  12. Integrating Chlorophyll fapar and Nadir Photochemical Reflectance Index from EO-1/Hyperion to Predict Cornfield Daily Gross Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qingyuan; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Cook, Bruce D.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Kustas, William P.; Russ, Andrew L.; Prueger, John H.; Yao, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The concept of light use efficiency (Epsilon) and the concept of fraction of photosynthetically active ration (PAR) absorbed for vegetation photosynthesis (PSN), i.e., fAPAR (sub PSN), have been widely utilized to estimate vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP). It has been demonstrated that the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) is empirically related to e. An experimental US Department of Agriculture (USDA) cornfield in Maryland was selected as our study field. We explored the potential of integrating fAPAR(sub chl) (defined as the fraction of PAR absorbed by chlorophyll) and nadir PRI (PRI(sub nadir)) to predict cornfield daily GPP. We acquired nadir or near-nadir EO-1/Hyperion satellite images that covered the cornfield and took nadir in-situ field spectral measurements. Those data were used to derive the PRI(sub nadir) and fAPAR (sub chl). The fAPAR (sub chl) is retrieved with the advanced radiative transfer model PROSAIL2 and the Metropolis approach, a type of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation procedure. We define chlorophyll light use efficiency Epsilon (sub chl) as the ratio of vegetation GPP as measured by eddy covariance techniques to PAR absorbed by chlorophyll (Epsilon(sub chl) = GPP/APAR (sub chl). Daily Epsilon (sub chl) retrieved with the EO-1 Hyperion images was regressed with a linear equation of PRI (sub nadir) Epsilon (sub chl) = Alpha × PRI (sub nadir) + Beta). The satellite Epsilon(sub chl- PRI (sub nadir) linear relationship for the cornfield was implemented to develop an integrated daily GPP model [GPP = (Alpha × PRI(sub nadir) + Beta) × fAPAR (sub chl) × PAR], which was evaluated with fAPAR (sub chl) and PRI (sub nadir) retrieved from field measurements. Daily GPP estimated with this fAPAR (sub chl-) PRI (nadir) integration model was strongly correlated with the observed tower in-situ daily GPP (R(sup 2) = 0.93); with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.71 g C mol-(sup -1) PPFD and coefficient of variation (CV) of 16

  13. Rifting in the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea: Results from a combined wide-angle and multichannel seismic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Stefan; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Ranero, Cesar R.; Berndt, Christian; Klaeschen, Dirk; Sallares, Valenti; Zitellini, Nevio; de Franco, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Extension in the continental lithosphere leads to the formation of rift basins or finally to passive continental margins where plates fully broke apart. The extensional processes at basins and passive margins are still not fully understood. One of the reasons is that the observed amount of crustal thinning is often much higher than the horizontal extension in the brittle upper crust that can be accounted by faulting. Moreover, conjugated margins are often observed to be asymmetric in tectonic style. Regarding these objective we present an analysis of two W-E striking multichannel- and wide-angle seismic sections from the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea. The new data were acquired onboard the Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa and Italian R/V Urania in spring 2010, within the framework of the MEDOC project. The lines cross the basin from the Corsica and Sardinia Margins towards the conjugated Latium and Campania Margins (Italy). The transects are divided in four zones distinguishable in tectonic style, velocity distribution, heat-flow and crustal thickness: 1) The deep sedimentary Corsica and Sardinia basins in the West which formed during Oligocene (~30 Ma) and reveal a fan-shaped sedimentary infill that is sealed by a Messinian erosional unconformity on top (~5-7 Ma). 2) Large rotated blocks bounding the deepest sub-basins along the entire transects and contain Messinian syn-tectonic sediments. 3) A zone of highly fractured continental crust broadens to the south and is indicated by a high number of faults and coincident with a velocity reduction. Furthermore, magmatic activity during Pliocene age in the southern line is evident in the southern line. 4) Flat summits at the Latium Margin indicate that this zone was above seal-level during rifting whereas the southern region was sub-sealevel. Faults cutting the seafloor indicate recent tectonic activity. To quantify the amount of horizontal extension we identified pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic sedimentary units in the northern

  14. Rifting in the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea: Results from a combined wide-angle and multichannel seismic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, S.; Grevemeyer, I.; Ranero, C. R.; Berndt, C.; Klaeschen, D.; Sallares, V.; Zitellini, N.; de Franco, R.

    2012-12-01

    Extension in the continental lithosphere leads to the formation of rift basins or finally to passive continental margins where plates fully broke apart. The extensional processes at basins and passive margins are still not fully understood. One of the reasons is that the observed amount of crustal thinning is often much higher than the horizontal extension in the brittle upper crust that can be accounted by faulting. Regarding this objective we present an analysis of two W-E striking depth-migrated multichannel- and wide-angle seismic sections from the Northern Tyrrhenian Sea. The new data were acquired onboard the Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa and Italian R/V Uraniain spring 2010, within the framework of the MEDOC project. The lines cross the basin from the Corsica and Sardinia margins towards the conjugated Latium/Campania margins (Italy). Along the transects we found two distinct domains distinguishable in tectonic style, heat-flow and crustal thickness: 1) The deep sedimentary Corsica and Sardinia basins in the West which formation started in the Oligocene (~30 Ma) and reveal a fan-shaped sedimentary infill with the Messinian erosional unconformity on top (~5-7 Ma) and 2) rifted crystalline continental crust expressed by horst and graben structures towards the East. These two domains are separated by a deep reaching (~10 km) and westward dipping fault/thrust complex. To quantify the amount of horizontal extension we identified pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic sedimentary units in the northern line A-B (Figure 1), calculated the relative extension factor by large faults as well as balancing the length of the pre-tectonic basement. The Messinian reflector can be well identified throughout the complete section and is therefore an excellent time-marker within the syn-tectonic sequence. The syn-tectonic sequence is limited by a reflector of Pliocene age. The above lying Pleistocene to Quaternary sediments are undisturbed and identified as the post-tectonic sequence

  15. In-flight Performance and Initial Results of Plasma Energy Angle and Composition Experiment (PACE) on SELENE (Kaguya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Asamura, Kazushi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Nishino, Masaki N.; Yamamoto, Tadateru; Terakawa, Yuta; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hajime; Hirahara, Masafumi; Hoshino, Masahiro; Machida, Shinobu; Mukai, Toshifumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Masato; Oyama, Koh-Ichiro; Sagawa, Eiichi; Sasaki, Susumu; Seki, Kanako; Shinohara, Iku; Terasawa, Toshio; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Takahashi, Futoshi

    2010-07-01

    MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment—Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) on SELENE (Kaguya) has completed its ˜1.5-year observation of low-energy charged particles around the Moon. MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measured the distribution function of low-energy electrons in the energy range 6 eV-9 keV and 9 eV-16 keV, respectively. IMA and IEA measured the distribution function of low-energy ions in the energy ranges 7 eV/q-28 keV/q and 7 eV/q-29 keV/q. All the sensors performed quite well as expected from the laboratory experiment carried out before launch. Since each sensor has a hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors installed on the spacecraft panels opposite each other could cover the full 3-dimensional phase space of low-energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA is an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measured mass-specific ion energy spectra that have never before been obtained at a 100 km altitude polar orbit around the Moon. The newly observed data show characteristic ion populations around the Moon. Besides the solar wind, MAP-PACE-IMA found four clearly distinguishable ion populations on the dayside of the Moon: (1) Solar wind protons backscattered at the lunar surface, (2) Solar wind protons reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, (3) Reflected/backscattered protons picked-up by the solar wind, and (4) Ions originating from the lunar surface/lunar exosphere.

  16. The influence of polarization on box air mass factors for UV/vis nadir satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric abundances of pollutant trace gases like, e.g., NO2, are often derived by applying the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method to space-borne measurements of back-scattered and reflected solar radiation. The resulting quantity, the slant column density (SCD), subsequently has to be converted to more easily interpretable vertical column densities by means of the so-called box air mass factor (BAMF). The BAMF describes the ratio of SCD and VCD within one atmospheric layer and is calculated by a radiative transfer model. Current operational and scientific data products of satellite-derived trace gas VCDs do not include the effect of polarization in their radiative transfer models. However, the various scattering processes in the atmosphere do lead to a distinctive polarization pattern of the observed Earthshine spectra. This study investigates the influence of these polarization patterns on box air mass factors for satellite nadir DOAS measurements of NO2 in the UV/vis wavelength region. NO2 BAMFs have been simulated for a multitude of viewing geometries, surface albedos, and surface altitudes, using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. The results show a potentially large influence of polarization on the BAMF, which can reach 10% and more close to the surface. A simple correction for this effect seems not to be feasible, as it strongly depends on the specific measurement scenario and can lead to both high and low biases of the resulting NO2 VCD. We therefore conclude that all data products of NO2 VCDs derived from space-borne DOAS measurements should include polarization effects in their radiative transfer model calculations, or at least include the errors introduced by using linear models in their uncertainty estimates.

  17. View angle dependence of MODIS liquid water path retrievals in warm oceanic clouds

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Ákos; Seethala, Chellappan; Deneke, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the view angle dependence of domain mean Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) liquid water path (LWP) and that of corresponding cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and liquid cloud fraction as proxy for plane-parallel retrieval biases. Independent Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer–EOS LWP was used to corroborate that the observed variations with sun-view geometry were not severely affected by seasonal/latitudinal changes in cloud properties. Microwave retrievals showed generally small (<10%) cross-swath variations. The view angle (cross-swath) dependence of MODIS optical thickness was weaker in backscatter than forward scatter directions and transitioned from mild ∩ shape to stronger ∪ shape as heterogeneity, sun angle, or latitude increased. The 2.2 µm effective radius variations always had a ∪ shape, which became pronounced and asymmetric toward forward scatter in the most heterogeneous clouds and/or at the lowest sun. Cloud fraction had the strongest and always ∪-shaped view angle dependence. As a result, in-cloud MODIS cloud liquid water path (CLWP) showed surprisingly good view angle (cross-swath) consistency, usually comparable to that of microwave retrievals, due to cancelation between optical thickness and effective radius biases. Larger (20–40%) nadir-relative increases were observed in the most extreme heterogeneity and sun angle bins, that is, typically in the polar regions, which, however, constituted only 3–8% of retrievals. The good consistency of MODIS in-cloud CLWP was lost for gridbox mean LWP, which was dominated by the strong cloud fraction increase with view angle. More worryingly, MODIS LWP exhibited significant and systematic absolute increases with heterogeneity and sun angle that is not present in microwave LWP. Key Points Microwave LWP shows small overall and cross-swath variations MODIS in-cloud LWP also shows good view angle consistency in most cases MODIS retrievals show strong

  18. Limb-nadir matching using non-coincident NO2 observations: proof of concept and the OMI-minus-OSIRIS prototype product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Cristen; Normand, Elise N.; McLinden, Chris A.; Bourassa, Adam E.; Lloyd, Nicholas D.; Degenstein, Douglas A.; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Belmonte Rivas, Maria; Folkert Boersma, K.; Eskes, Henk

    2016-08-01

    A variant of the limb-nadir matching technique for deriving tropospheric NO2 columns is presented in which the stratospheric component of the NO2 slant column density (SCD) measured by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is removed using non-coincident profiles from the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS). In order to correct their mismatch in local time and the diurnal variation of stratospheric NO2, OSIRIS profiles, which were measured just after sunrise, were mapped to the local time of OMI observations using a photochemical box model. Following the profile time adjustment, OSIRIS NO2 stratospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) were calculated. For profiles that did not reach down to the tropopause, VCDs were adjusted using the photochemical model. Using air mass factors from the OMI Standard Product (SP), a new tropospheric NO2 VCD product - referred to as OMI-minus-OSIRIS (OmO) - was generated through limb-nadir matching. To accomplish this, the OMI total SCDs were scaled using correction factors derived from the next-generation SCDs that improve upon the spectral fitting used for the current operational products. One year, 2008, of OmO was generated for 60° S to 60° N and a cursory evaluation was performed. The OmO product was found to capture the main features of tropospheric NO2, including a background value of about 0.3 × 1015 molecules cm-2 over the tropical Pacific and values comparable to the OMI operational products over anthropogenic source areas. While additional study is required, these results suggest that a limb-nadir matching approach is feasible for the removal of stratospheric NO2 measured by a polar orbiter from a nadir-viewing instrument in a geostationary orbit such as Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) or Sentinel-4.

  19. Influence of subaqueous shelf angle on coastal plain-shelf-slope deposits resulting from a rise or fall in base-level

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.J.; Ethridge, F.G.; Schumm, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Extensive research in the past decade concerning the effects of base-level fluctuations on coastal plain-shelf-slope systems along passive margins has failed to properly assess the influence of the subaqueous shelf angle on the development, character, and preservation of the resulting deposits. A series of experiments were performed in a 4 m by 7 m flume to examine the effect that differing shelf angles have on a simulated coastal plain-shelf-slope system undergoing a cycle of base-level rise and fall. Results of the experiments indicate that the angle of the shelf affects (1) the amount of sediment available for deposition, (2) the timing of the influx of drainage basin sediment into the lower portions of the fluvial system, and (3) the width to depth ratio and sinuosity of fluvial systems that develop on the shelf. Base-level fall over a steep shelf results in deep, narrow, straight fluvial channels on the shelf and fine-grained, thick shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems show high sedimentation rates, but a low ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are rapidly abandoned for a single incised valley. In contrast, gentle shelf angles result in shallow, wide, meandering fluvial channels on the shelf and coarser-grained, thinner shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems have a lower sedimentation rate, but a high ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are active for a longer period of time. During subsequent base-level rise, deposits have a low potential for preservation owing to their thin nature and the slower rate at which transgression occurs over the shelf.

  20. Photometric Characteristics of Sprites and Elves Derived from JEM-GLIMS Nadir Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Adachi, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Mihara, M.; Ushio, T.; Morimoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of the JEM-GLIMS mission is to identify the horizontal structures of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) and spatiotemporal relationship between TLEs and their parent lightning discharges based on the nadir observations from the International Space Station (ISS). For this purpose JEM-GLIMS equips two sets of optical instruments (LSI: CMOS camera, and PH: spectrophotometers) and two sets of radio wave receivers (VLFR: VLF receiver, and VITF: VHF interferometer). As all these instruments are installed at the bottom plane of the bus module facing to the Earth, JEM-GLIMS can carry out the nadir observations continuously. JEM-GLIMS was launched by HTV3 and was successfully installed at the exposed facility of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on August 9, 2012. After the initial checkout operations, JEM-GLIMS finally started continuous observations on November 20, 2012. In the period from November 20, 2012 to June 30, 2013, totally 1597 transient optical events related to lightning flashes and/or TLE emissions were detected by the optical instruments. In 578 of these events, both LSI and PH detected clear transient optical signals well above the noise level. In order to derive sprite events from the detected transient optical events, we analyzed PH light-curve data first and estimated the peak irradiance related to the transient optical flashes. Then, we compared these intensities with the atmospheric transmittance. Finally, LSI image data are examined to clarify the morphological properties of the optical emission. We analyzed a transient optical event detected at 00:56:29.198 UT on December 15, 2012. The peak intensities of PH channels are estimated to be 1.4E-2 W/m2 (150-280 nm), 2.3E-4 W/m2 (316 nm), 5.9E-4 W/m2 (337 nm), 4.0E-4 W/m2 (392 nm), 4.2E-4 W/m2 (762 nm), and 6.3E-2 W/m2 (600-900 nm), respectively. It is found that all these intensities are significantly stronger than the lightning emission affected by the atmospheric transmittance. This fact

  1. S-NPP OMPS Nadir In-Flight Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S.; Flynn, L. E.; Niu, J.; Grotenhuis, M.; Beck, C. T.; Beach, E.; Zhang, Z.; Tolea, A.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation describes the results of in-flight characterization of the S-NPP Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) charge-coupled device (CCD) performance during the first nearly three years of the OMPS mission in orbit. Data from OMPS's three two-dimension CCD arrays have been collected to characterize in-flight detector behaviors. Our results show that offset, gain, and dark current rate trends remain within sensor requirement limits. System linearity performance trends are stable. The distribution of individual pixel dark rates is slowly growing as expected from pre-launch analyses. The current in-flight dark and linearity calibration corrections provide Sensor Data Records (SDRs) with insignificant error after correction of less than an average of ~0.1% in the Earth radiance retrieval. The instrument optics is less stable than predicted leading to intra-orbit wavelength scale variations as the temperature gradients vary across the instrument. Measurement-based estimates of these effects are as large a ±0.02 nm and are used to make corrections to within +-0.005 nm on a granule by granule basis. Examination of reflectivity, aerosol and ozone EDRs provide evidence of absolute calibration errors with a significant cross track variation. A soft calibration adjustment is under development to remove them.

  2. Effect of Nadir CD4+ T Cell Count on Clinical Measures of Periodontal Disease in HIV+ Adults before and during Immune Reconstitution on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Lance T.; Demko, Catherine A.; Babineau, Denise C.; Wang, Xuelei; Toossi, Zahra; Weinberg, Aaron; Rodriguez, Benigno

    2013-01-01

    Background The contribution of HIV-infection to periodontal disease (PD) is poorly understood.  We proposed that immunological markers would be associated with improved clinical measures of PD. Methods We performed a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-infected adults who had started highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) <2 years. PD was characterized clinically as the percent of teeth with ≥1 site with periodontal probing depth (PPD) ≥5.0mm, recession (REC) >0mm, clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥4.0mm, and bleeding on probing (BOP) at ≥4 sites/tooth and microbiologically as specific periodontopathogen concentration. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the associations between immune function and PD. Results Forty (40) subjects with median 2.7 months on HAART and median nadir CD4+ T-cell count of 212 cells/μl completed a median 3 visits. Over 24 months, CD4+ T-cell count increased by a mean 173 cells/µl (p<0.001) and HIV RNA decreased by 0.5 log10 copies/ml (p<0.001); concurrently, PPD, CAL and BOP decreased by a mean 11.7%, 12.1%, and 14.7% respectively (all p<0.001). Lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with worse baseline REC (-6.72%; p=0.04) and CAL (9.06%; p<0.001). Further, lower nadir CD4+ T-cell count was associated with a greater relative longitudinal improvement in PPD in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis (p=0.027), and BOP in subjects with higher baseline levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Treponema denticola (p=0.001 and p=0.006 respectively). Longitudinal changes from baseline in CD4+ T-cell count and level of HIV RNA were not independently associated with longitudinal changes in any clinical markers of PD. Conclusion Degree of immunosuppression was associated with baseline gingival recession. After HAART initiation, measures of active PD improved most in those with lower nadir CD4+ T-cell counts and higher baseline levels of specific periodontopathogens. Nadir CD4+ T-cell count

  3. OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF PROXIMAL HUMERAL END FRACTURES WITH FIXED-ANGLE PLATE AND LOCKING SCREWS: TECHNIQUE AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marcio; Amaral, Marcus Vinicius; Monteiro, Martim; Brandão, Bruno Lobo; Motta Filho, Geraldo Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Describe the results of proximal humeral fractures surgically treated with the Philos locking plate system. Method: Between March 2003 and October 2004 we prospectively reviewed 24 of 26 patients with proximal humerus fractures treated with a Philos plate. The mean follow-up time was 12 months and the mean age of patients was 57 years. Six patients had four-part proximal humerus fractures, 11 patients had three-part proximal humerus fractures, and nine patients had two-part proximal humerus fractures. Clinical evaluation was performed using the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: The mean UCLA score was 30 points (17-34). All fractures showed union. Three patients showed fracture union at varus position. The mean UCLA score for these patients was 27 points. Conclusion: Osteosynthesis with Philos plate provides a stable fixation method with good functional outcome. PMID:26998460

  4. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Patel, M. R.; Bellucci, G.; Daerden, F.; Drummond, R.; Neefs, E.; Rodriguez Gomez, J.

    2011-10-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite has been selected by ESA and NASA to be part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The nadir mode will provide detailed trace gas mapping. (see also Daerden et al., same session)

  5. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for nadir and solar occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter E NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for nadir and solar occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C. R.; Rodriguez-Gomez, J.

    2013-09-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite was selected as part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations.

  6. Early-stage rifting of the northern Tyrrhenian Sea Basin: Results from a combined wide-angle and multichannel seismic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, S.; Grevemeyer, I.; Ranero, C. R.; Berndt, C.; Klaeschen, D.; Sallares, V.; Zitellini, N.; Franco, R.

    2013-08-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere leads to the formation of rift basins and ultimately may create passive continental margins. The mechanisms that operate during the early stage of crustal extension are still intensely debated. We present the results from coincident multichannel seismic and wide-angle seismic profiles that transect across the northern Tyrrhenian Sea Basin. The profiles cross the Corsica Basin (France) to the Latium Margin (Italy) where the early-rift stage of the basin is well preserved. We found two domains, each with a distinct tectonic style, heat flow and crustal thickness. One domain is the Corsica Basin in the west that formed before the main rift phase of the northern Tyrrhenian Sea opening (˜8-4 Ma). The second domain is rifted continental crust characterized by tilted blocks and half-graben structures in the central region and at the Latium Margin. These two domains are separated by a deep (˜10 km) sedimentary complex of the eastern portion of the Corsica Basin. Travel-time tomography of wide-angle seismic data reveals the crustal architecture and a subhorizontal 15-17 ± 1 km deep Moho discontinuity under the basin. To estimate the amount of horizontal extension we have identified the pre-, syn-, and post-tectonic sedimentary units and calculated the relative displacement of faults. We found that major faults initiated at angles of 45°-50° and that the rifted domain is horizontally stretched by a factor of β ˜ 1.3 (˜8-10 mm/a). The crust has been thinned from ˜24 to ˜17 km indicating a similar amount of extension (˜30%). The transect represents one of the best imaged early rifts and implies that the formation of crustal-scale detachments, or long-lived low-angle normal faults, is not a general feature that controls the rift initiation of continental crust. Other young rift basins, like the Gulf of Corinth, the Suez Rift or Lake Baikal, display features resembling the northern Tyrrhenian Basin, suggesting that half

  7. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Roach, Mack

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  8. Assessment of the stratospheric NO2 column using long-term ground-based UV-visible and satellite nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinardi, Gaia; Van Roozendael, Michel; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Hendrick, Francois; Granville, José; Tack, Frederik; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Pazmino, Andrea; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Wagner, Thomas; Gu, Myojeong; Friess, Udo; Navarro, Monica; Puentedura, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Zenith-sky UV-visible instruments have been used to monitor stratospheric NO2 columns from pole to pole for more than 2 decades, as part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Long-term monitoring and fit-for-purpose data quality are essential commitments of the network. Recently, recommendations were made for a better harmonization of the retrieval of NO2 stratospheric vertical columns (Van Roozendael and Hendrick 2012, http://ndacc-uvvis-wg.aeronomie.be/tools/NDACC_UVVIS-WG_NO2settings_v4.pdf). Those include, in addition to the use of harmonized SCD settings, a common approach to the air-mass factor (AMF) calculation, based on pre-calculated look-up tables of climatological AMFs resolved in latitude, time, wavelength, surface albedo, solar zenith angle and station altitude. The impact of the NDACC recommendations on the quality of the zenith-sky UV-visible stratospheric NO2 columns is first illustrated based on 10 SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales) instruments deployed from the Arctic to the Antarctic. The long-term time-series of SAOZ and other ground-based NDACC zenith-sky measurements are then used in synergy with data from an ensemble of satellite UV-vis nadir sensors (GOME-2, SCIAMACHY and OMI), for characterising the stratospheric NO2 columns on the global scale. Appropriate photochemical state matching is applied whenever necessary to combine/compare the different data sets. Results are interpreted in terms of ground-based network data homogeneity, and accuracy, consistency and long-term stability of space-borne stratospheric NO2 columns. The consistency with previously published studies including stratospheric NO2 column measurements from limb sensors such as MIPAS and SCIAMACHY is also discussed. These quality-assessed ground-based and satellite data sets offer new perspectives for the analysis of the variability and trends of stratospheric NO2 at the global scale.

  9. EP3/FP dual receptor agonist ONO-9054 administered morning or evening to patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension: results of a randomised crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Michael S; Rowe-Rendleman, Cheryl; Ahmed, Ike; Ross, Douglas T; Fujii, Akifumi; Ouchi, Takafumi; Quach, Christine; Wood, Andrew; Ward, Caroline L

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims The novel prostaglandin E (EP) 3 and prostaglandin F (FP) receptor agonist ONO-9054 is effective in lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension and open-angle glaucoma when administered once daily. This study compares the effects of morning (AM) versus evening (PM) dosing of ONO-9054 on tolerability and IOP lowering. Methods This was a single-centre, randomised, double-masked, two-sequence, placebo-controlled crossover study in 12 subjects with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Two 14-day crossover regimens were separated by a 2-week washout: ONO-9054 (1 drop to each eye) in the morning (07:00) and vehicle in the evening (19:00) and vice versa. IOP was measured multiple times during select days. Ocular examinations also evaluated safety and tolerability. Results Mild ocular hyperaemia, reported by six subjects with PM dosing, was the most frequent adverse event. Mild to moderate dryness was also slightly more frequent after PM dosing. Maximum IOP reduction from baseline occurred on day 2 with decreases from baseline of −7.4 mm Hg (−30.8%) for AM dosing and −9.1 mm Hg, (−38.0%) for PM dosing; after 14 days, mean reduction in IOP was −6.8 mm Hg (−28.6%) for AM dosing and −7.5 mm Hg (−31.0%) for PM dosing. Conclusions PM dosing of ONO-0954 was associated with a slightly increased frequency of mild hyperaemia and mild to moderate dryness. Both dosing schedules provided sustained reduction in IOP. Trial registration number NCT01670266. PMID:26453641

  10. Trace gas column retrieval from IR nadir spectra - a model study for SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beek, R.; Buchwitz, M.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) is part of the European satellite ENVISAT launched at 1st March 2002. It is a follow-on instrument of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) flying on ERS-2 and, compared to GOME, has extended capabilities. Using measurements of the direct extra-terrestrial solar spectrum and sun-light reflected and scattered by the earth atmosphere or surface SCIAMACHY detects atmospheric absorption of several trace species absorbing in spectral regions from the ultraviolet to the near infrared (240-2380 nm). Vertical columns of H 2O, N 2O, CO, and CH 4 can be retrieved using SCIAMACHY Channel 8 near-infrared nadir measurements. In this study, selected atmospheric and instrument specific errors relevant for the retrieval are analysed. Spectral windows of Channel 8 are considered, which are currently used for the operational near-real-time processing. For this purpose, spectral error patterns have been simulated as well as sun-normalised model radiances for nadir scanning mode, the latter using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. Focus are the polarisation sensitivity and dark signals of the instrument. Further on, accuracy estimates for a number of different atmospheric scenarios are presented.

  11. Characterisation of a stratospheric sulphate plume from the Nabro volcano using a combination of passive satellite measurements in nadir and limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Dörner, S.; Puķīte, J.; Hörmann, C.; Fromm, M. D.; Wagner, T.

    2014-03-01

    The eruption of the Nabro volcano (Eritrea), which started on 12 June 2011, caused the introduction of large quantities of SO2 into the lower stratosphere. The subsequently formed sulphate aerosols could be detected for several months following the eruption. It is generally assumed that the formation of sulphate aerosols in the stratosphere takes about a month, but in plumes from explosive eruptions significant amounts of aerosols have been seen to form within a few hours. We show that sulphate aerosols were present in the lower stratosphere within hours of the onset of the eruption of Nabro. Evidence comes from nadir UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) and SO2 measurements by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI, and limb aerosol measurements by SCIAMACHY. The sulphate plume displays negative UVAI in the western part of OMI's swath and positive UVAI in the eastern part - an effect that is due to the strong viewing angle dependence of UVAI and can only be caused by a high-altitude (>11 km), non-absorbing (single-scattering albedo >0.97) aerosol plume. For the retrieval of the aerosol profile from limb measurements, the horizontal dimensions and the position of the aerosol plume need to be taken into account, otherwise both extinction and layer height may be underestimated appreciably. By combining nadir SO2 column density and UVAI with limb aerosol profiles, a stratospheric plume from Nabro could be tracked from 13 to 17 June, before the plumes from later, lower-altitude explosions started interfering with the signal. Our findings are in agreement with ground-based lidar and sun-photometer data from an MPLNET/AERONET station in Israel and with data from the satellite-borne CALIOP lidar.

  12. Characterisation of a stratospheric sulfate plume from the Nabro volcano using a combination of passive satellite measurements in nadir and limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Dörner, S.; Puķīıte, J.; Hörmann, C.; Fromm, M. D.; Wagner, T.

    2014-08-01

    The eruption of the Nabro volcano (Eritrea), which started on 12 June 2011, caused the introduction of large quantities of SO2 into the lower stratosphere. The subsequently formed sulfate aerosols could be detected for several months following the eruption. It is generally assumed that the formation of sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere is a relatively slow process, but in plumes from explosive eruptions significant amounts of aerosols have been seen to form within a few hours. We show that sulfate aerosols were present in the lower stratosphere within hours of the onset of the eruption of Nabro. Evidence comes from nadir UV Aerosol Index (UVAI) and SO2 measurements by SCIAMACHY, GOME-2 and OMI, and limb aerosol measurements by SCIAMACHY. The sulfate plume displays negative UVAI in the western part of OMI's swath and positive UVAI in the eastern part - an effect that is due to the strong viewing angle dependence of UVAI and can only be caused by a high-altitude (>11 km), non-absorbing (single-scattering albedo >0.97) aerosol plume. For the retrieval of the aerosol profile from limb measurements, the horizontal dimensions and the position of the aerosol plume need to be taken into account, otherwise both extinction and layer height may be underestimated appreciably. By combining nadir SO2 column density and UVAI with limb aerosol profiles, a stratospheric plume from Nabro could be tracked from 13 to 17 June, before the plumes from later, lower-altitude explosions started interfering with the signal. Our findings are in agreement with ground-based lidar and sun-photometer data from an MPLNET/AERONET station in Israel and with data from the satellite-borne CALIOP lidar.

  13. Assesment of water elevation measurement quality from multi nadir altimetry missions over a 'small' river: the Garonne River case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancamaria, S.; Leleu, A. S.; Frappart, F.; Blumstein, D.; Marieu, V.; Sottolichio, A.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2015-12-01

    For two decades, nadir altimetry mission measurements have been used to derive water elevation over rivers. It has been proven to be a powerful tool to estimate water elevation over big rivers (> 500 m), providing useful complementary data to in-situ gage networks. More recently, nadir altimetry data have been used successfully for some smaller rivers. It is therefore needed to assess potential errors from these measurements for these kind of river, using a well gaged basin.That's why we have investigated water elevations estimates from three altimetry missions (ENVISAT, Jason-2 and SARAL) over the Garonne River (South West of France). River width at studied river goes from 160 to 230 m.By comparison to nearby in-situ gages (IG), it has been shown that measurements from ENVISAT and Jason-2 virtual stations (VS) 100 km upstream of the estuary have errors between 20 to 70 cm for water anomaly, whereas most of the bias comes from river slope between IG and VS. 160 km upstream, the few usable ENVISAT VS have errors spanning from 80 to 160 cm. SARAL/AltiKa however, does not provide any water elevation information: there are rather no data in the record or measurements have huge bias with no correlation with water level variations. This is mainly due to high reliefs surrounding the river valley (up to 100 m difference between the valley and the top of the hills over few 10 km). SARAL/AlitKa, compared to previous instruments, has higher pulse bandwidth which results in a smaller range detection window of 30 m. It allows a higher vertical accuracy, but causes loss of data or to be 'locked' on the top of the hill even when it flies over the river valley, when there are important soil elevation variation over 'short' distance. This fact could also be observed for some Jason-2 and ENVISAT VS but to a much lower extent.Besides, water elevations time series has high frequencies due to local and upstream precipitation events. Therefore, it is more difficult to discriminate only

  14. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  15. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherap*

    PubMed Central

    Franca, Carlos Antônio da Silva; Vieira, Sérgio Lannes; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Bernabe, Antonio Jose Serrano; Penna, Antonio Belmiro Rodrigues Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn) after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%), and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%). Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%), and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%). Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%), and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2%) (p < 0.02). The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02), respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence. PMID:25741055

  16. Preliminary Results on the Mechanics of the Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault (Dayman Dome), Woodlark Rift, SE Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Boulton, C. J.; Mizera, M.; Webber, S. M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.; Norton, K. P.; Wallace, L. M.; Biemiller, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid slip on the Mai'iu low-angle normal fault (LANF) has exhumed a smooth, corrugated fault surface contiguous for >24 km up-dip, rising from near sea level to ~2900 m. The fault emerges from the ground dipping ~21° N and flattens over the crest of the dome to dip south. Geomorphic analysis reveals a progressive back-tilting of the surface during exhumation accompanied by cross-cutting antithetic-sense high-angle faults—features that we attribute to "rolling-hinge" deformation of a once more steeply-dipping fault. Near the scarp base, the footwall exposes mafic mylonites that deformed at ~400-450°C. The younger Mai'iu fault cross-cuts this ductile mylonite zone, with most brittle slip being localized into a ~20 cm-thick, gouge-filled core. Near the range front, active faults bite across both the hangingwall and footwall of the Mai'iu fault and record overprinting across a dying, shallow (<~1 km deep) part of the fault by more optimally oriented, steeper faults. Such depth-dependent locking up of the fault suggests it weakens primarily by friction reduction rather than cohesion loss. Outcrop-scale fractures in the exhumed footwall reflect formation in an Andersonian stress regime. Previous campaign GPS data suggest the fault slips at up to ~1 cm/yr. To improve resolution and test for aseismic creep, we installed 12 GPS sites across the fault trace in 2015. Quantitative XRD indicates the gouges were derived primarily from mafic footwall, containing up to 65% corrensite and saponite. Hydrothermal friction experiments on two gouges from a relict LANF strand were done at varying normal stresses (30-120 MPa), temperatures (50-200oC), and sliding velocities (0.3-100 μm/s). Results reveal very weak frictional strength (μ=0.13-0.15 and 0.20-0.28) and velocity-strengthening behavior conducive to fault creep. At the highest temperatures (T≥150oC) and lowest sliding velocities (<3 μm/s), a transition to velocity-weakening behavior indicates the potential for

  17. Results of a study of Mach number and Reynolds number effects on the lee side vortex flow field characteristics of an ogive-cylinder-frustum-cylinder at angles of attack to 25 degrees, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to survey the lee side vortex flow field about an ogive-cylinder-frustum-cylinder at angles of attack to 25 degrees for two Reynolds numbers at Mach number 0.8, and one Reynolds number at Mach number 1.96. The data were obtained using miniature 5-port conical pressure probes calibrated for angle of attack and roll angle over a Mach number range of 0.6 to 3.0. The results are presented here as local flow field properties and circulation strengths for various body stations.

  18. The inference of atmospheric ozone using satellite nadir measurements in the 1042/cm band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    A description and detailed analysis of a technique for inferring atmospheric ozone information from satellite nadir measurements in the 1042 cm band are presented. A method is formulated for computing the emission from the lower boundary under the satellite which circumvents the difficult analytical problems caused by the presence of atmospheric clouds and the watervapor continuum absorption. The inversion equations are expanded in terms of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a least-squares-solution matrix, and an analysis is performed to determine the information content of the radiance measurements. Under favorable conditions there are only two pieces of independent information available from the measurements: (1) the total ozone and (2) the altitude of the primary maximum in the ozone profile.

  19. Sun-view angle effects on reflectance factors of corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sun and view angles on reflectance factors of corn (Zea mays L.) canopies ranging from the six leaf stage to harvest maturity were studied on the Purdue University Agronomy Farm by a multiband radiometer. The two methods of acquiring spectral data, the truck system and the tower systrem, are described. The analysis of the spectral data is presented in three parts: solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at nadir; solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at a fixed sun angle; and both sun and view angles effect on reflectance factors. The analysis revealed that for nadir-viewed reflectance factors there is a strong solar angle dependence in all spectral bands for canopies with low leaf area index. Reflectance factors observed from the sun angle at different view azimuth angles showed that the position of the sensor relative to the sun is important in determining angular reflectance characteristics. For both sun and view angles, reflectance factors are maximized when the sensor view direction is towards the sun.

  20. Detection Method of Lightning and TLEs by JEM-GLIMS Nadir Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Sato, M.; Ushio, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Suzuki, M.; Masayuki, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Inan, U.; Linscott, I.; Hobara, Y.

    2013-12-01

    A scientific payload named JEM-GLIMS aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is aimed at observing lightning and Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) globally. Keeping its field-of-view toward the nadir direction, GLIMS clarifies the horizontal structures of lightning and TLEs, which is a crucial issue to understand the electrodynamic coupling between the troposphere and ionosphere. A difficult point, however, is that careful analyses are necessary to separate the emissions of lightning and TLEs which spatially overlap along the line-of-sights in the case of nadir observation. In this study, we analyze the multi-wavelength optical data obtained by GLIMS to identify lightning and TLEs. The main data analyzed are those of imager (LSI) and spectrophotometer (PH). LSI consists of two cameras equipped with a broadband red filter and a narrowband 762-nm filter, respectively, and obtains imagery at a spatial resolution of 400 m/pixel on the ground surface. PH detects time-resolved emission intensity at a sampling rate of 20 kHz by six photometer channels measuring at 150-280, 337, 762, 600-900, 316 and 392 nm, respectively. During a period between November 2012 and June 2013, GLIMS observed 815 lightning and/or TLE events, and in 494 of them, both LSI and PH data showed clear signals above the noise level. As the first step, we carried out case study using an event observed at 09:50:47UT on Jan 29 2013 which did not cause strong saturation on the LSI and PH data. The estimated peak irradiance was 1.38x10^(-3) W/m^(2) at 600-900 nm, which is equivalent to the top 10 % bright lightning events observed by FORTE satellite in the past. This finding suggests that GLIMS selectively observes the most optically-powerful events. The peak irradiance was estimated also for the other PH channels. At all visible channels other than a far ultra violet (FUV) channel, the peak irradiance was estimated to be in good agreement with the atmospheric transmittance curve calculated between 10

  1. Influence of Solid Target Reflectivity and Incident Angle on Depolarization Ratio and Reflected Energy from Polarized Lights: Experimental Results of the May 2008 Field Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    incident angle on depolarization ratio and reected energy from polarized lights is also provided. DRDC Valcartier TR 2008-394 i Résumé Des capteurs ...41.5 -22 10 Laiton Brass 10 -37.5 11 Aluminium Aluminum 26 -37.5 12 Acier "sand-blasté" Sandblasted steel 41.5 -37.5 13 Acier naturel Natural steel 10

  2. Angle performance on optima MDxt

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jonathan; Kamenitsa, Dennis

    2012-11-06

    Angle control on medium current implanters is important due to the high angle-sensitivity of typical medium current implants, such as halo implants. On the Optima MDxt, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through six narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by electrostatically steering the beam, while cross-wafer beam parallelism is adjusted by changing the focus of the electrostatic parallelizing lens (P-lens). In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightly tilting the wafer platen prior to implant. A variety of tests were run to measure the accuracy and repeatability of Optima MDxt's angle control. SIMS profiles of a high energy, channeling sensitive condition show both the cross-wafer angle uniformity, along with the small-angle resolution of the system. Angle repeatability was quantified by running a channeling sensitive implant as a regular monitor over a seven month period and measuring the sheet resistance-to-angle sensitivity. Even though crystal cut error was not controlled for in this case, when attributing all Rs variation to angle changes, the overall angle repeatability was measured as 0.16 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}). A separate angle repeatability test involved running a series of V-curves tests over a four month period using low crystal cut wafers selected from the same boule. The results of this test showed the angle repeatability to be <0.1 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}).

  3. Characteristics of Deep Tropical and Subtropical Convection from Nadir-Viewing High-Altitude Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Li, Lihua; Guimond, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents observations of deep convection characteristics in the tropics and subtropics that have been classified into four categories: tropical cyclone, oceanic, land, and sea breeze. Vertical velocities in the convection were derived from Doppler radar measurements collected during several NASA field experiments from the nadir-viewing high-altitude ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP). Emphasis is placed on the vertical structure of the convection from the surface to cloud top (sometimes reaching 18-km altitude). This unique look at convection is not possible from other approaches such as ground-based or lower-altitude airborne scanning radars. The vertical motions from the radar measurements are derived using new relationships between radar reflectivity and hydrometeor fall speed. Various convective properties, such as the peak updraft and downdraft velocities and their corresponding altitude, heights of reflectivity levels, and widths of reflectivity cores, are estimated. The most significant findings are the following: 1) strong updrafts that mostly exceed 15 m/s, with a few exceeding 30 m/s, are found in all the deep convection cases, whether over land or ocean; 2) peak updrafts were almost always above the 10-km level and, in the case of tropical cyclones, were closer to the 12-km level; and 3) land-based and sea-breeze convection had higher reflectivities and wider convective cores than oceanic and tropical cyclone convection. In addition, the high-resolution EDOP data were used to examine the connection between reflectivity and vertical velocity, for which only weak linear relationships were found. The results are discussed in terms of dynamical and microphysical implications for numerical models and future remote sensors.

  4. Estimating errors in cloud amount and cloud optical thickness due to limited spatial sampling using a satellite imager as a proxy for nadir-view sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yinghui

    2015-07-01

    Cloud climatologies from space-based active sensors have been used in climate and other studies without their uncertainties specified. This study quantifies the errors in monthly mean cloud amount and optical thickness due to the limited spatial sampling of space-based active sensors. Nadir-view observations from a satellite imager, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), serve as a proxy for those active sensors and observations within 10° of the sensor's nadir view serve as truth for data from 2003 to 2013 in the Arctic. June-July monthly mean cloud amount and liquid water and ice cloud optical thickness from MODIS for both observations are calculated and compared. Results show that errors increase with decreasing sample numbers for monthly means in cloud amount and cloud optical thickness. The root-mean-square error of monthly mean cloud amount from nadir-view observations increases with lower latitudes, with 0.7% (1.4%) at 80°N and 4.2% (11.2%) at 60°N using data from 2003 to 2013 (from 2012). For a 100 km resolution Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) cell of 1000 sample numbers, the absolute differences in these two monthly mean cloud amounts are less than 6.5% (9.0%, 11.5%) with an 80 (90, 95)%chance; such differences decrease to 4.0% (5.0%, 6.5%) with 5000 sample numbers. For a 100 km resolution EASE-Grid of 1000 sample numbers, the absolute differences in these two monthly mean cloud optical thicknesses are less than 2.7 (3.8) with a 90% chance for liquid water cloud (ice cloud); such differences decrease to 1.3 (1.0) for 5000 sample numbers. The uncertainties in monthly mean cloud amount and optical thickness estimated in this study may provide useful information for applying cloud climatologies from active sensors in climate studies and suggest the need for future spaceborne active sensors with a wide swath.

  5. Towards a NNORSY Ozone Profile ECV from European Nadir UV/VIS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Martin; Kaifel, Anton; Huckle, Roger

    2010-12-01

    The Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) has been adapted and applied to several different satellite instruments, including the backscatter UV/VIS instruments ERS2-GOME, SCIAMACHY and METOP-GOME-2. The retrieved long term ozone field hence spans the years 1995 till now. To provide target data for training the neural networks, the lower parts of the atmosphere are sampled by ozone sondes from the WOUDC and SHADOZ data archives. Higher altitudes are covered by a variety of limb-sounding instruments, including the SAGE and POAM series, HALOE, ACE-FTS and AURA-MLS. In this paper, we show ozone profile time series over the entire time range to demonstrate the "out-of-the-box" consistency and homogeneity of our data across the three different nadir sounders, i.e. without any kind of tuning applied. These features of Essential Climate Variable (ECV) datasets [1] also lie at the heart of the recently announced ESA Climate Change Initiative, to which we hope to contribute in the near future.

  6. Trace Gas Column Retrieval From IR Nadir Spectra - A Model Study For SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beek, R.; Buchwitz, M.; Rozanov, V.; Burrows, J.

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) is based on the European satellite ENVISAT launched at 1st March 2002. It is a follow-on instrument of the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), which has reduced capabilities and has already been flying on ERS-2. Using measurements of the direct extraterrestrial solar spectrum and sun-light reflected and scattered by the earth atmosphere or surface SCIAMACHY detects atmospheric absorption of several trace species absorbing in spectral regions from the ultraviolet to the near infrared (240 nm - 2380 nm). Focus of this study is the analysis of errors of the retrieval of H2O, N2O, CO, CO2, and CH4 using sun-normalised model radiances in spectral regions of SCIAMACHY channel 7 (1940-2040 nm) and 8 (2260-2380 nm), simulated for nadir scanning mode using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. Dedicated atmospheric and instrument specific error sources have been investigated. Accuracy and precision estimates for a number of different atmospheric scenarios will be presented.

  7. Modelling Steep Surfaces by Various Configurations of Nadir and Oblique Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, V.; Franzini, M.

    2016-06-01

    Among the parts of the territory requiring periodical and careful monitoring, many have steep surfaces: quarries, river basins, land-slides, dangerous mountainsides. Aerial photogrammetry based on lightweight unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is rapidly becoming the tool of election to survey limited areas of land with a high level of detail. Aerial photogrammetry is traditionally based on vertical images and only recently the use of significantly inclined imagery has been considered. Oblique photogrammetry presents peculiar aspects and offers improved capabilities for steep surface reconstruction. Full comprehension of oblique photogrammetry still requires research efforts and the evaluation of diverse case studies. In the present paper, the focus is on the photogrammetric UAS-based survey of a part of a large sandpit. Various flight configurations are considered: ordinary linear strips, radial strips (as the scarp considered has a semi-circular shape) and curved ones; moreover, nadir looking and oblique image blocks were acquired. Around 300 control points were measured with a topographic total station. The various datasets considered are evaluated in terms of density of the extracted point cloud and in terms of the distance between the reconstructed surface and a number of check points.

  8. Tropospheric water vapor retrieval from a nadir THz/FIR sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Mendrok, Jana; Dupuy, Eric; Kasai, Yasuko

    2008-12-01

    This work presents clear-sky simulations to study water vapor (H2O) retrieval from a nadir sounder operating in the TeraHertz (THz) and Far-Infrared (FIR) spectral domains (100-500 cm-1). The THz/FIR retrieval is compared with retrieval from the mid-InfraRed (IR) 7μm H2O band (1200-2000 cm-1). The THz/FIR observations are more sensitive in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the IR measurements. On the other hand, the IR sounder has better performance in the lower troposphere. The retrieval error due to uncertainties on the temperature profile are of the same order of magnitude in the THz/FIR and IR bands. No significant retrieval errors from contaminating species have been found. The calculations for several atmospheric scenarios show that retrieval performances are not only dependent on the H2O abundance but also on the temperature gradient. Hence, sensitivity in the UT/LS layer, with a low temperature gradient, is poor. The combination of FIR and IR merges the advantages of both bands, and allows to slightly decorrelate temperature and H2O VMR.

  9. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) study of "two-line" ferrihydrite structure: Effect of arsenate sorption and counterion variation and comparison with EXAFS results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Rea, B.A.; Davis, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements have been made on a suite of "two-line" ferrihydrite (FHY2) samples containing varying amounts of coprecipitated arsenate. Samples prepared at pH 8 with counter ions chloride, nitrate, and a mixture of both also were examined. The raw WAXS scattering functions show that "two-line" ferrihydrite actually has a large number of non-Bragg (i.e., diffuse scattering) maxima up to our observation limit of 16 A??-1. The type of counter ion used during synthesis produces no significant change in this function. In unarsenated samples, Radial Distribution Functions (RDFs) produced from the scattering functions show a well-defined Fe-O peak at 2.02 A?? in excellent agreement with the mean distance of 2.01 A?? from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. The area under the Fe-O peak is consistent with only octahedral oxygen coordination about iron, and an iron coordination about oxygen of 2.2, in agreement with the EXAFS results, the sample composition, and XANES measurements. The second peak observed in the RDFs is clearly divided into two populations of correlations, at 3.07 and 3.52 A??, respectively. These distances are close to the EXAFS-derived Fe-Fe subshell distances of 3.02-3.05 and 3.43-3.46 A??, respectively, though this is misleading as the RDF peaks also include contributions from O-Fe and O-O correlations. Simulated RDFs of the FeOOH polymorphs indicate how the observed RDF structure relates to the EXAFS pair-correlation function, and allow comparisons with an ordered ferrihydrite structure. The effect of increasing arsenate content is dramatic, as the RDF peaks are progressively smeared out, indicating a wider range of interatomic distances even at moderate surface coverages, and a loss of longer range correlations. At an As/Fe ratio of 0.68, the surface saturation level of arsenate, the RDF shows little order beyond what would be expected from small pieces of dioctahedral Fe oxyhydroxyl chains or

  10. Evaluation of the Sensor Data Record from the Nadir Instruments of the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Liu, Quanhua; Zeng, Jian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng; Caponi, Maria; Flynn, Larry; Jaross, Glen; Sen, Bhaswar; Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Johnsen, William; Janz, Scott; Pan, Chunhui; Niu, Jianguo; Beck, Trevor; Beach, Eric; Yu, Wei; Raja, M. K. Rama Varma; Stuhmer, Derek; Cumpton, Daniel; Owen, Cristina; Li, Wen-Hao

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the first 15 months of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) acquired by the nadir sensors and processed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Interface Data Processing Segment. The evaluation consists of an inter-comparison with a similar satellite instrument, an analysis using a radiative transfer model, and an assessment of product stability. This is in addition to the evaluation of sensor calibration and the Environment Data Record product that are also reported in this Special Issue. All these are parts of synergetic effort to provide comprehensive assessment at every level of the products to ensure its quality. It is found that the OMPS nadir SDR quality is satisfactory for the current Provisional maturity. Methods used in the evaluation are being further refined, developed, and expanded, in collaboration with international community through the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System, to support the upcoming long-term monitoring.

  11. Evaluation of the Sensor Data Record from the nadir instruments of the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Liu, Quanhua; Zeng, Jian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng; Caponi, Maria; Flynn, Larry; Jaross, Glen; Sen, Bhaswar; Buss, Richard H.; Johnsen, William; Janz, Scott; Pan, Chunhui; Niu, Jianguo; Beck, Trevor; Beach, Eric; Yu, Wei; Rama Varma Raja, M. K.; Stuhmer, Derek; Cumpton, Daniel; Owen, Cristina; Li, Wen-Hao

    2014-05-01

    This paper evaluates the first 15 months of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) acquired by the nadir sensors and processed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Interface Data Processing Segment. The evaluation consists of an inter-comparison with a similar satellite instrument, an analysis using a radiative transfer model, and an assessment of product stability. This is in addition to the evaluation of sensor calibration and the Environment Data Record product that are also reported in this Special Issue. All these are parts of synergetic effort to provide comprehensive assessment at every level of the products to ensure its quality. It is found that the OMPS nadir SDR quality is satisfactory for the current Provisional maturity. Methods used in the evaluation are being further refined, developed, and expanded, in collaboration with international community through the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System, to support the upcoming long-term monitoring.

  12. Utility of BRDF Models for Estimating Optimal View Angles in Classification of Remotely Sensed Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, P. F.; Donohoe, G. W.

    1997-01-01

    Statistical classification of remotely sensed images attempts to discriminate between surface cover types on the basis of the spectral response recorded by a sensor. It is well known that surfaces reflect incident radiation as a function of wavelength producing a spectral signature specific to the material under investigation. Multispectral and hyperspectral sensors sample the spectral response over tens and even hundreds of wavelength bands to capture the variation of spectral response with wavelength. Classification algorithms then exploit these differences in spectral response to distinguish between materials of interest. Sensors of this type, however, collect detailed spectral information from one direction (usually nadir); consequently, do not consider the directional nature of reflectance potentially detectable at different sensor view angles. Improvements in sensor technology have resulted in remote sensing platforms capable of detecting reflected energy across wavelengths (spectral signatures) and from multiple view angles (angular signatures) in the fore and aft directions. Sensors of this type include: the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), the multiangle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR), and the airborne solid-state array spectroradiometer (ASAS). A goal of this paper, then, is to explore the utility of Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models in the selection of optimal view angles for the classification of remotely sensed images by employing a strategy of searching for the maximum difference between surface BRDFs. After a brief discussion of directional reflect ante in Section 2, attention is directed to the Beard-Maxwell BRDF model and its use in predicting the bidirectional reflectance of a surface. The selection of optimal viewing angles is addressed in Section 3, followed by conclusions and future work in Section 4.

  13. Postradiotherapy PSA nadirs fail to support dose escalation study in patients with pretreatment PSA values < 10 ng/ml.

    PubMed

    Herold, D; Hanks, G; Movsas, B; Hanlon, A

    1997-01-01

    With three-dimensional conformal therapy, doses > 75 Gy have been delivered to the prostate with acceptable levels of morbidity; however, higher doses do appear to increase late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) morbidity. Because patients with pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values < 10 ng/ml can achieve 3-year actuarial bNED control rates of 90% after treatment with external beam radiotherapy to doses < 71 Gy, one might question the need for further dose escalation in this population. In this report, we examined the relationship between dose and PSA nadir for 90 patients with pretreatment PSA values < 10 ng/ml entered into a dose escalation study from March 1987 to October 1992. We wanted to see if nadir response data would predict a different outcome from our 3-year bNED control reports. All patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy to ICRU reporting point doses of 6,598 cGy to 7,895 cGy (median of 7,068 cGy). Minimum follow-up was 36 months (median, 47 months). Seven hundred thirty-nine posttreatment PSA nadir values were analyzed, yielding an average of 8.2 values per patient. Estimates of rates of bNED control and time to reach a posttreatment PSA of 1.0 ng/ml were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method. The log-rank test was used to evaluate differences in rates according to dose levels. Linear regression and Cox proportional hazard modeling were used to relate dose to bNED control on a continuum. Escalating doses from 66 to 79 Gy failed to increase the percentage of patients achieving nadir values < 1 ng/ml and similarly failed to increase the 3-year actuarial bNED control. Linear regression (P = .81) and the chi-square test of association (P = .23) supported the lack of a dose effect on nadir continuously and categorically, respectively, and the Cox regression model supported the conclusion that dose on a continuum has no effect on bNED control (P = .34). Furthermore, time to reach a posttreatment PSA

  14. Second-Generation Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven; Hovland, Larry; Preston, Daniel; Zellers, Brian; Downing, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses an early phase in the development of the MISR-2 C, a second, improved version of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), which has been in orbit around the Earth aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft since 1999. Like the MISR, the MISR-2 would contain a pushbroom array of nine charge-coupled- device (CCD) cameras one aimed at the nadir and the others aimed at different angles sideways from the nadir. The major improvements embodied in the MISR-2 would be the following: A new folded-reflective-optics design would render the MISR-2 only a third as massive as the MISR. Smaller filters and electronic circuits would enable a reduction in volume to a sixth of that of the MISR. The MISR-2 would generate images in two infrared spectral bands in addition to the blue, green, red, and near-infrared spectral bands of the MISR. Miniature polarization filters would be incorporated to add a polarization-sensing capability. Calibration would be performed nonintrusively by use of a gimbaled tenth camera. The main accomplishment thus far has been the construction of an extremely compact all-reflective-optics CCD camera to demonstrate feasibility.

  15. Seismic Images of the Crust across D-E Seismic Profile (TS04-Tsujal Project): Results of Reflection and Wide-Angle Seismic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, D.; Lopez Ortiz, J. Y.; Bartolome, R.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Danobeitia, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Escudero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a part of TSUJAL Project (Crustal characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block boundary and its implications for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment), a geophysical study has been carried out during February and March 2014 in western continental margin of Jalisco where seismic reflection, wide-angle seismic, bathymetry and potential fields (gravity and magnetism) data have been obtained. Eight land seismic stations vertical component and 4.5 Hz model TEXAN 125A (REFTEK), were deployed along an offshore-onshore seismic profile of 140 km length in SW-NE orientation. These stations registered, in continuous model, the airgun shots provided by RRS James Cook used for Multichannel Seismic Reflection data acquisition every 50 m of distance interval and total capacity of 5800 ci along seismic profile D-E (TS04). In the onshore region, these stations were deployed every 20 km from Pérula to Nacastillo (Jalisco, Mexico). The study region corresponds to onshore-offshore line limited by (18o 54'N, 105o 59'W) (19o 26'N, 105o7'W) coordinates. In this work, seismic images of the crust along a deep seismic profile of 140 km length are presented. These images provide new cortical information about the southern part of Rivera Plate, continental accretionary wedge and first kilometers of Jalisco Block continental zone.

  16. Generalization of the Euler Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor); Shuster, Malcolm D.; Markley, F. Landis

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the Euler angles can be generalized to axes other than members of an orthonormal triad. As first shown by Davenport, the three generalized Euler axes, hereafter: Davenport axes, must still satisfy the constraint that the first two and the last two axes be mutually perpendicular if these axes are to define a universal set of attitude parameters. Expressions are given which relate the generalized Euler angles, hereafter: Davenport angles, to the 3-1-3 Euler angles of an associated direction-cosine matrix. The computation of the Davenport angles from the attitude matrix and their kinematic equation are presented. The present work offers a more direct development of the Davenport angles than Davenport's original publication and offers additional results.

  17. Atmospheric correction for ocean spectra retrievals from high-altitude multi-angle, multi-spectral photo-polarimetric remote sensing observations: Results for coastal ocean waters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; McCubbin, I.

    2015-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS.To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed to increase the aerosol information content for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry. However few systematic studies have been performed to quantify the improvement such measurements bring to atmospheric correction. To study the polarimetric atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we conducted field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude (65,000 ft) and ship-based observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and multi-spectral multi-angle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss examples of retrieved atmosphere and ocean state vectors, and of corresponding ocean color spectra obtained by subtracting the computed atmospheric scattering contribution from the high-altitude radiance measurements. The ocean color spectra thus obtained are compared with those measured from the ship.

  18. On Orbit Measurement of Response vs. Scan Angle for the Infrared Bands on TRMM/VIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, William L.; Lyu, Cheng-Hsuan; Barnes, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The Visible and Infrared Scanner on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/VIRS) is a whiskbroom imaging radiometer with two reflected solar bands and three emissive infrared bands. All five detectors are on a single cooled focal plane. This configuration necessitated the use of a paddlewheel scan mirror to avoid the effects of focal plane rotation that arise when using a scan mirror that is inclined to its axis of rotation. System radiometric requirements led to the need for protected silver as the mirror surface. Unfortunately, the SiO(x) coatings currently used to protect silver from oxidation introduce a change in reflectance with angle of incidence (AOI). This AOI dependence results in a modulation of system level response with scan angle. Measurement of system response vs. scan angle (RVS) was not difficult for the VIRS reflected solar bands, but attaining the required accuracy for the IR bands in the laboratory was not possible without a large vacuum chamber and a considerable amount of custom designed testing apparatus. Therefore, the decision was made to conduct the measurement on-orbit. On three separate occasions, the TRMM spacecraft was rotated about its pitch axis and, after the nadir view passed over the Earth's limb, the VIRS performed several thousand scans while viewing deep space. The resulting data has been analyzed and the RVS curves generated for the three IR bands are being used in the VIRS radiometric calibration algorithm. This, to our knowledge, the first time this measurement has been made on-orbit. Similar measurements are planned for the EOS-AM and EOS-PM MODIS sensors and are being considered for several systems under development. The VIRS on-orbit results will be compared to VIRS and MODIS system level laboratory measurements, MODIS scan mirror witness sample measurements and modeled data.

  19. Nadir Testosterone Within First Year of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy (ADT) Predicts for Time to Castration-Resistant Progression: A Secondary Analysis of the PR-7 Trial of Intermittent Versus Continuous ADT

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Laurence; O'Callaghan, Chris; Ding, Keyue; Toren, Paul; Dearnaley, David; Higano, Celestia S.; Horwitz, Eric; Malone, Shawn; Goldenberg, Larry; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Crook, Juanita M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Three small retrospective studies have suggested that patients undergoing continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) have superior survival and time to progression if lower castrate levels of testosterone (< 0.7 nmol/L) are achieved. Evidence from prospective large studies has been lacking. Patients and Methods The PR-7 study randomly assigned patients experiencing biochemical failure after radiation therapy or surgery plus radiation therapy to CAD or intermittent androgen deprivation. The relationship between testosterone levels in the first year and cause-specific survival (CSS) and time to androgen-independent progression in men in the CAD arm was evaluated using Cox regression. Results There was a significant difference in CSS (P = .015) and time to hormone resistance (P = .02) among those who had first-year minimum nadir testosterone ≤ 0.7, > 0.7 to ≤ 1.7, and ≥ 1.7 nmol/L. Patients with first-year nadir testosterone consistently > 0.7 nmol/L had significantly higher risks of dying as a result of disease (0.7 to 1.7 nmol/L: hazard ratio [HR], 2.08; 95% CI, 1.28 to 3.38; > 1.7 nmol/L: HR, 2.93; 95% CI, 0.70 to 12.30) and developing hormone resistance (0.7 to 1.7 nmol/L: HR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20 to 2.18; ≥ 1.7 nmol/L: HR, 1.90; 95% CI, 0.77 to 4.70). Maximum testosterone ≥ 1.7 nmol/L predicted for a higher risk of dying as a result of disease (P = .02). Conclusion Low nadir serum testosterone (ie, < 0.7 mmol/L) within the first year of androgen-deprivation therapy correlates with improved CSS and duration of response to androgen deprivation in men being treated for biochemical failure undergoing CAD. PMID:25732157

  20. VHF Radar Measurements of Tropical Forests in Panama: Results from the BioSAR Deployment in Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc; Lawrence, William; Condit, Richard; Wright, Joseph; Johnson, Patrick; Holford, Warren; Hyer, Joseph; May, Lisa; Carson, Steven

    2000-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar sensor operating in 5 bands between 80 and 120 MHz was flown over forested areas in the canal zone of the Republic of Panama in an experiment to measure biomass in heavy tropical forests. The sensor is a pulse coherent SAR flown on a small aircraft and oriented straight down. The doppler history is processed to collect data on the ground in rectangular cells of varying size over a range of incidence angles fore and aft of nadir (+45 to - 45 degrees). Sensor data consists of 5 frequency bands with 20 incidence angles per band. Sensor data for over 12+ sites were collected with forest stands having biomass densities ranging from 50 to 300 tons/ha dry above ground biomass. Results are shown exploring the biomass saturation thresholds using these frequencies, the system design is explained, and preliminary attempts at data visualization using this unique sensor design are described.

  1. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, A. C.; López-Moreno, J.-J.; Patel, M. R.; Bellucci, G.; Daerden, F.; Drummond, R.; Neefs, E.; Robert, S.; Rodriguez Gomez, J.

    2012-04-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite has been selected by ESA and NASA to be part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 μm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The NOMAD instrument is composed of 3 channels: a solar occultation only channel (SO) operating in the infrared wavelength domain, a second infrared channel capable of doing nadir, but also solar occultation and limb observations (LNO), and an ultraviolet/visible channel (UVIS) that can work in all observation modes. The spectral resolution of SO and LNO surpasses previous surveys in the infrared by more than one order of magnitude. NOMAD offers an integrated instrument combination of a flight-proven concept (SO is a copy of SOIR on Venus Express), and innovations based on existing and proven instrumentation (LNO is based on SOIR/VEX and UVIS has heritage from the ExoMars lander), that will provide mapping and vertical profile information at high spatio-temporal resolution. The three channels have each their own ILS and optical bench, but share the same single interface to the S/C. We will present the instrument and its capabilities in term of detection of a broad suite of species, its possibilities to improve our knowledge on vertical structure of the atmosphere as well as its mapping possibilities.

  2. NOMAD, a spectrometer suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation observations on the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Rachel; Robert, Severine; Vandaele, Ann-Carine; Willame, Yannick; Lopez-Moreno, Jose Juan; Patel, Manish; Belluci, Giancarlo; Daerden, Frank; Neefs, Eddy; Rodriguez-Gomez, Julio

    2013-04-01

    NOMAD, the "Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery" spectrometer suite was selected as part of the payload of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission 2016. This instrument suite will conduct a spectroscopic survey of Mars' atmosphere in the UV, visible and IR regions covering the 0.2-0.65 and 2.2-4.3 µm spectral ranges. NOMAD's observation modes include solar occultation, nadir and limb observations. The NOMAD instrument is composed of 3 channels: a solar occultation only channel (SO) operating in the infrared wavelength domain, a second infrared channel capable of doing nadir, but also solar occultation and limb observations (LNO), and an ultraviolet/visible channel (UVIS) that can work in all observation modes. The spectral resolution of SO and LNO surpasses previous surveys in the infrared by more than one order of magnitude. NOMAD offers an integrated instrument combination of a flight-proven concept (SO is a copy of SOIR on Venus Express), and innovations based on existing and proven instrumentation (LNO is based on SOIR/VEX and UVIS has heritage from the ExoMars lander), that will provide mapping and vertical profile information at high spatio-temporal resolution. The three channels have each their own ILS and optical bench, but share the same single interface to the S/C. We will present the instrument and its capabilities in term of detection of a broad suite of species, its possibilities to improve our knowledge on vertical structure of the atmosphere as well as its mapping possibilities. Since last year's abstract, much progress has been made on the instrument design and prototypes have been tested, especially concerning the very challenging thermal needs of the instrument. This paper will concentrate on the developments in the last year that prove NOMAD will be a very powerful, sensitive instrument.

  3. Seismic structure and crustal nature of the geological provinces off the SW Iberian margin: results of the NEAREST-SEIS wide-angle seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, V.; Martinez, S.; Gailler, A.; Gutscher, M.; Bartolome, R.; Gracia, E.; Diaz, J.

    2010-12-01

    The region offshore the SW Iberian margin hosts the present-day NW-SE plate convergence between the European and African Plates causing continuous seismic activity of moderate magnitude. In autumn 2008 a Spanish-French team carried out a wide-angle seismic survey in the area (NEAREST-SEIS cruise), in the framework of the EU-funded NEAREST project. During the survey two long profiles were acquired using a pool of 36 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS), to provide information about the crustal structure and nature of the different geological provinces, and to reveal the deep geometry of the main fault interfaces. A total of 30 OBS were deployed along profile P1, which is 356 km long and trends NW-SE from the Tagus abyssal plain (TAP), crossing the Gorringe bank (GB), the Horseshoe abyssal plain (HAP) and the Coral Patch Ridge (CPR), up to the thrust-and-fold belt of the Seine abyssal plain (SAP). The inverted model along this profile show four different domains. In the TAP a 3-4 km-thick, low velocity sedimentary layer covers the basement, which shows a velocity >7 km/s just 2-3 km below its top, similarly to that of the basement outcropping in the Gorringe bank. In the HAP the sedimentary cover is thicker, showing an upper unit with low velocity corresponding to the Horseshoe gravitational unit, on top of a higher velocity lower unit, which may represent the highly consolidated Mesozoic sedimentary sequence, with a total thickness of 5 km. The basement shows the same velocity distribution as in TAP and GB, suggesting a common nature and origin. According to its seismic structure, we interpret this basement as highly serpentinized, exhumed mantle. In contrast, the CPR and SAP show evidences for the presence of a well-developed, 6-7 km-thick oceanic crust, underlying the sedimentary sequence. Profile P2 is 256 km long, and trends S-N from the easternmost SAP beyond the NW Moroccan margin, crossing the Gulf of Cadiz imbricated wedge and the Portimao bank ending at the

  4. Seismic structure of the main geological provinces off the SW Iberian margin: first results from the NEAREST-SEIS wide-angle seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallarès, Valentí; Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Gailler, Audrey; Bartolomé, Rafael; Gutscher, Marc-André; Graindorge, David; Lia Grácia, Eulà; Díaz, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    The region offshore the SW Iberian margin hosts the present-day NW-SE plate convergence between the European and African Plates at a rate of 4.5 mm/yr, fact that causes continuous seismic activity of moderate magnitude. In autumn 2008 a Spanish-French team carried out a refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic survey in the area (NEAREST-SEIS cruise), in the framework of the EU, FP6-funded NEAREST project. During the survey two long seismic profiles were acquired using a pool of 36 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS), with the objectives of providing information about the geometry of the crust-mantle boundary and the physical properties of the crust, revealing the deep geometry of the main fault interfaces, and identifying the nature of the basement and the limits of the different geological provinces in the region. A total of 30 OBS were deployed along profile P1, which is 356 km long and trends NW-SE from the Tagus abyssal plain (TAP), crossing the Gorringe bank (GB), the Horseshoe abyssal plain (HAP) and the Coral Patch Ridge (CPR), up to the thrust-and-fold belt of the Seine abyssal plain (SAP). The acquired data were modeled by joint refraction and reflection travel time inversion, following a layer-stripping strategy. The inverted model show four well-differentiated domains in terms of its seismic structure: In the TAP a 3-4 km-thick, low velocity sedimentary layer covers the basement, which shows a remarkably high velocity (>7 km/s), similar to that of the basement outcropping in the Gorringe bank. In the HAP the sedimentary cover is thicker, showing an upper unit with low velocity corresponding to the Horseshoe gravitational unit, on top of a higher velocity lower unit, which may represent the highly consolidated Mesozoic sedimentary sequence. The thickness of the two units together exceeds 5 km. The basement shows the same velocity distribution as in TAP and GB, suggesting a common nature and origin. According to its seismic structure, and considering that

  5. Refining the Concept of Combining Hyperspectral and Multi-Angle Sensors for Land Surface Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simic, Anita

    Assessment of leaf and canopy chlorophyll content provides information on plant physiological status; it is related to nitrogen content and hence, photosynthesis process, net primary productivity and carbon budget. In this study, a method is developed for the retrieval of total chlorophyll content (Chlorophyll a+b) per unit leaf and per unit ground area based on improved vegetation structural parameters which are derived using multispectral multi-angle remote sensing data. Structural characteristics such as clumping and gaps within a canopy affect its solar radiation absorption and distribution and impact its reflected radiance acquired by a sensor. One of the main challenges for the remote sensing community is to accurately estimate vegetation structural parameters, which inevitably influence the retrieval of leaf chlorophyll content. Multi-angle optical measurements provide a means to characterize the anisotropy of surface reflectance, which has been shown to contain information on vegetation structural characteristics. Hyperspectral optical measurements, on the other hand, provide a fine spectral resolution at the red-edge, a narrow spectral range between the red and near infra-red spectra, which is particularly useful for retrieving chlorophyll content. This study explores a new refined measurement concept of combining multi-angle and hyperspectral remote sensing that employs hyperspectral signals only in the vertical (nadir) direction and multispectral measurements in two additional (off-nadir) directions within two spectral bands, red and near infra-red (NIR). The refinement has been proposed in order to reduce the redundancy of hyperspectral data at more than one angle and to better retrieve the three-dimensional vegetation structural information by choosing the two most useful angles of measurements. To illustrate that hyperspectral data acquired at multiple angles exhibit redundancy, a radiative transfer model was used to generate off-nadir hyperspectral

  6. Off-nadir antenna bias correction using Amazon rain forest sigma deg data. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrer, I. J.; Bracalente, E. M.; Dome, G. J.; Sweet, J.; Berthold, G.; Moore, R. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The radar response from the Amazon rain forest was studied to determine the suitability of this region for use as a standard target to calibrate a scatterometer like that proposed for the National Ocean Satellite System (NOSS). Backscattering observations made by the SEASAT-1 scatterometer system show the Amazon rain forest to be a homogeneous, azimuthally-isotropic, radar target which is insensitive to polarization. The variation with angle of incidence may be adequately modeled as sigma deg (dB) = alpha theta + beta with typical values for the incidence-angle coefficient from 0.07 dB deg to 0.15 dB/deg. A small diurnal effect occurs, with measurements at sunrise being 0.5 dB to 1 dB higher than the rest of the day. Maximum likelihood estimation algorithms are presented which permit determination of relative bias and true pointing angle for each beam. Specific implementation of these algorithms for the proposed NOSS scatterometer system is also discussed.

  7. Off-nadir antenna bias correction using Amazon rain sigma(0) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrer, I. J.; Dome, G. J.; Sweet, J.; Berthold, G.; Moore, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The radar response from the Amazon rain forest was studied to determine the suitability of this region for use as a standard target to calibrate a scatterometer like that proposed for the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS). Backscattering observations made by the SEASAT Scatterometer System (SASS) showed the Amazon rain forest to be a homogeneous, azimuthally-isotropic, radar target which was insensitive to polarization. The variation with angle of incidence was adequately modeled as scattering coefficient (dB) = a theta b with typical values for the incidence-angle coefficient from 0.07 to 0.15 dB/deg. A small diurnal effect occurs, with measurements at sunrise being 0.5 dB to 1 dB higher than the rest of the day. Maximum-likelihood estimation algorithms presented here permit determination of relative bias and true pointing angle for each beam. Specific implementation of these algorithms for the proposed NOSS scatterometer system is also discussed.

  8. The topographic effect on spectral response from nadir-pointing sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Justice, C. O.

    1980-01-01

    It is difficult to interpret multispectral Landsat earth resources data in areas of rugged and mountainous terrain because of the topographic effect on the sensor response. The objectives of this study were to examine and quantify the topographic effect on the sensor response from a uniform sand surface, to assess a simple theoretical incidence model for modeling the radiance from the surface, and to simulate Landsat sensor response due to the topographic effect. A field experiment was designed to collect data from a large range of slope angles and aspects at a range of solar elevations, using a hand-held radiometer. Analysis of these data showed that the magnitude of the topographic effect varied as a function of the solar elevation, the azimuthal orientation of the slope, and the slope inclination. The field measured variations in spectral response were found to have generally strong correlations with the theoretical model, and it was shown that the applicability of the Lambertian assumption varied within and between data sets. It is concluded that if slope angle, aspect, and solar zenith angle and azimuth are known, a technique incorporating a model to reduce the topographic effect prior to multispectral classification may be developed.

  9. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  10. Round-robin evaluation of nadir ozone profile retrievals: methodology and application to MetOp-A GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Granville, J.; Miles, G.; Siddans, R.; van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Delcloo, A.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Kivi, R.; Stubi, R.; Zehner, C.

    2015-05-01

    A methodology for the round-robin evaluation and the geophysical validation of ozone profile data retrieved from nadir UV backscatter satellite measurements is detailed and discussed, consisting of data set content studies, information content studies, co-location studies, and comparisons with reference measurements. Within the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative on ozone (Ozone_cci project), the proposed round-robin procedure is applied to two nadir ozone profile data sets retrieved at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL, United Kingdom), using their respective OPERA v1.26 and RAL v2.1 optimal estimation algorithms, from MetOp-A GOME-2 (i.e. the second generation Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment on the first Meteorological Operational Satellite) measurements taken in 2008. The ground-based comparisons use ozonesonde and lidar profiles as reference data, acquired by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde programme (SHADOZ), and other stations of the World Meteorological Organisation's Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO GAW). This direct illustration highlights practical issues that inevitably emerge from discrepancies in e.g. profile representation and vertical smoothing, for which different recipes are investigated and discussed. Several approaches for information content quantification, vertical resolution estimation, and reference profile resampling are compared and applied as well. The paper concludes with compliance estimates of the two GOME-2 ozone profile data sets with user requirements from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and from climate modellers.

  11. Round-robin evaluation of nadir ozone profile retrievals: methodology and application to MetOp-A GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, A.; Lambert, J.-C.; Granville, J.; Miles, G.; Siddans, R.; van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Hubert, D.; Verhoelst, T.; Delcloo, A.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Kivi, R.; Stübi, R.; Zehner, C.

    2014-11-01

    A methodology for the round-robin evaluation and geophysical validation of ozone profile data retrieved from nadir UV backscatter satellite measurements is detailed and discussed, consisting of dataset content studies, information content studies, co-location studies, and comparisons with reference measurements. Within ESA's Climate Change Initiative on ozone (Ozone_cci project), the proposed round-robin procedure is applied to two nadir ozone profile datasets retrieved at KNMI and RAL, using their respective OPERA v1.26 and RAL v2.1 optimal estimation algorithms, from MetOp-A GOME-2 measurements taken in 2008. The ground-based comparisons use ozonesonde and lidar profiles as reference data, acquired by the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesonde programme (SHADOZ), and other stations of WMO's Global Atmosphere Watch. This direct illustration highlights practical issues that inevitably emerge from discrepancies in e.g. profile representation and vertical smoothing, for which different recipes are investigated and discussed. Several approaches for information content quantification, vertical resolution estimation, and reference profile resampling are compared and applied as well. The paper concludes with compliance estimates of the two GOME-2 ozone profile datasets with user requirements from GCOS and from climate modellers.

  12. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  13. The Feasibility of Tropospheric and Total Ozone Determination Using a Fabry-perot Interferometer as a Satellite-based Nadir-viewing Atmospheric Sensor. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen Maurice

    1993-01-01

    Monitoring of the global distribution of tropospheric ozone (O3) is desirable for enhanced scientific understanding as well as to potentially lessen the ill-health impacts associated with exposure to elevated concentrations in the lower atmosphere. Such a capability can be achieved using a satellite-based device making high spectral resolution measurements with high signal-to-noise ratios; this would enable observation in the pressure-broadened wings of strong O3 lines while minimizing the impact of undesirable signal contributions associated with, for example, the terrestrial surface, interfering species, and clouds. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) provides high spectral resolution and high throughput capabilities that are essential for this measurement task. Through proper selection of channel spectral regions, the FPI optimized for tropospheric O3 measurements can simultaneously observe a stratospheric component and thus the total O3 column abundance. Decreasing stratospheric O3 concentrations may lead to an increase in biologically harmful solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface, which is detrimental to health. In this research, a conceptual instrument design to achieve the desired measurement has been formulated. This involves a double-etalon fixed-gap series configuration FPI along with an ultra-narrow bandpass filter to achieve single-order operation with an overall spectral resolution of approximately .068 cm(exp -1). A spectral region of about 1 cm(exp -1) wide centered at 1054.73 cm(exp -1) within the strong 9.6 micron ozone infrared band is sampled with 24 spectral channels. Other design characteristics include operation from a nadir-viewing satellite configuration utilizing a 9 inch (diameter) telescope and achieving horizontal spatial resolution with a 50 km nadir footprint. A retrieval technique has been implemented and is demonstrated for a tropical atmosphere possessing enhanced tropospheric ozone amounts. An error analysis

  14. Prognostic value of PSA nadir {<=}4 ng/mL within 4 months of high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nickers, Philippe . E-mail: philippe.nickers@skynet.be; Albert, Adelin; Waltregny, David; Deneufbourg, Jean-Marie

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after high radiation doses of 85 Gy on locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 201 patients were prospectively and consecutively treated with external beam radiotherapy and a brachytherapy boost. Of the 201 patients, 104 received concomitant hormonal therapy on the decision of the referring urologist and were excluded, yielding a study population of 97 patients. The first posttreatment PSA analysis was performed not earlier than 1 month after treatment completion but within the first 4 months, and then every 4 months. Analysis of PSA kinetics included the PSA nadir (nPSA) at values of {<=}4 ng/mL to {<=}0.5 ng/mL. The nPSA at {<=}4 ng/mL within 4 months (nPSA {<=}4/4m) was the variable of interest. Results: We established highly significant associations between an nPSA of {<=}1 and {<=}0.5 ng/mL and the nPSA {<=}4/4m (p <0.0001). A hazard ratio of 0.33 (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.12-0.91) underlined the lower risk of recurrence related to nPSA {<=}4/4m achievement (p = 0.033). Using time-dependent covariate models for patients who did not reach an nPSA {<=}4/4m, an nPSA of {<=}1 ng/mL remained without prognostic significance (p = 0.06). However, for patients who reached an nPSA {<=}4/4m, an nPSA of {<=}1 ng/mL did significantly improve the prognosis (p <0.001), but much later after treatment. The same analysis was repeated for nPSA {<=}0.5 ng/mL with similar conclusions as when nPSA {<=}4/4m was obtained (p <0.01). Conclusion: The nPSA {<=}4/4m has been demonstrated to be a significant predictor of biochemical no evidence of disease after high radiation doses of 85 Gy. Its major advantage is that it was available earlier than the other nadirs.

  15. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  16. Angle closure in younger patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Brian M; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Angle-closure glaucoma is rare in children and young adults. Only scattered cases associated with specific clinical entities have been reported. We evaluated the findings in patients in our database aged 40 or younger with angle closure. METHODS: Our database was searched for patients with angle closure who were 40 years old or younger. Data recorded included age at initial consultation; age at the time of diagnosis; gender; results of slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, and ultrasound biomicroscopy (from 1993 onward); clinical diagnosis; and therapy. Patients with previous incisional surgery were excluded, as were patients with anterior chamber proliferative mechanisms leading to angle closure. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients (49 females, 18 males) met entry criteria. Mean age (+/- SD) at the time of consultation was 34.4 +/- 9.4 years (range, 3-68 years). Diagnoses included plateau iris syndrome (35 patients), iridociliary cysts (8 patients), retinopathy of prematurity (7 patients), uveitis (5 patients), isolated nanophthalmos (3 patients), relative pupillary block (2 patients), Weill-Marchesani syndrome (3 patients), and 1 patient each with Marfan syndrome, miotic-induced angle closure, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, and idiopathic lens subluxation. CONCLUSION: The etiology of angle closure in young persons is different from that in the older population and is typically associated with structural or developmental ocular anomalies rather than relative pupillary block. Following laser iridotomy, these eyes should be monitored for recurrent angle closure and the need for additional laser or incisional surgical intervention. PMID:12545694

  17. Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL): Theory of Operation and Results from Cross-Platform Validation at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonsky, I. N.; Davis, A. B.; Love, S. P.

    2004-05-01

    WAIL was designed to determine physical and geometrical characteristics of optically thick clouds using the off-beam component of the lidar return that can be accurately modeled within the 3D photon diffusion approximation. The theory shows that the WAIL signal depends not only on the cloud optical characteristics (phase function, extinction and scattering coefficients) but also on the outer thickness of the cloud layer. This makes it possible to estimate the mean optical and geometrical thicknesses of the cloud. The comparison with Monte Carlo simulation demonstrates the high accuracy of the diffusion approximation for moderately to very dense clouds. During operation WAIL is able to collect a complete data set from a cloud every few minutes, with averaging over horizontal scale of a kilometer or so. In order to validate WAIL's ability to deliver cloud properties, the LANL instrument was deployed as a part of the THickness from Off-beam Returns (THOR) validation IOP. The goal was to probe clouds above the SGP CART site at night in March 2002 from below (WAIL and ARM instruments) and from NASA's P3 aircraft (carrying THOR, the GSFC counterpart of WAIL) flying above the clouds. The permanent cloud instruments we used to compare with the results obtained from WAIL were ARM's laser ceilometer, micro-pulse lidar (MPL), millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR), and micro-wave radiometer (MWR). The comparison shows that, in spite of an unusually low cloud ceiling, an unfavorable observation condition for WAIL's present configuration, cloud properties obtained from the new instrument are in good agreement with their counterparts obtained by other instruments. So WAIL can duplicate, at least for single-layer clouds, the cloud products of the MWR and MMCR together. But WAIL does this with green laser light, which is far more representative than microwaves of photon transport processes at work in the climate system.

  18. Discrimination of geometric angles by adult humans.

    PubMed

    Reichert, James F; Kelly, Debbie M

    2012-03-01

    Men and women learned to discriminate between two different size angles presented to them as objects within a real-world task. During Experiment 1, participants in group 50 were trained to choose a 50° angle and participants in group 75 were trained to choose a 75° angle. During testing, both groups were provided with a choice between their training angle and one of a set of test angles that was either smaller or larger than the training angle. Results showed a generalized pattern of responding, with group 50 showing increased responding to test angles smaller than 50° and group 75 showing increased responding to test angles larger than 75°. Further analysis of the response patterns revealed that participants in group 50 showed evidence of absolute learning, whereas participants in group 75 showed evidence of relational learning. During Experiment 2, a third group of participants (group 25) trained to choose a smaller angle (25°) was included in addition to group 50 and group 75. Participants were trained with three angles present and tested with just two, one being their training angle and the other being one of a set of novel test angles. Similar to the participants from Experiment 1, group 75 showed evidence of relational learning. Group 50, for which no relational rule could be applied during training, showed an absolute learning pattern with no response shift to test angles smaller or larger than their training angle. Group 25 showed evidence of absolute responding that was more pronounced than that found for the smallest training angle during Experiment 1. These findings suggest differential learning of geometric angles based on amplitude with smaller angles perceived as more distinct and thus more resistant to broader generalization than larger angles. Implications of these results are that certain geometric properties may be subject to different learning processes based on the specific magnitude of that property.

  19. MISR Multi-angle Views of Sunday Morning Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Hot, dry Santa Ana winds began blowing through the Los Angeles and San Diego areas on Sunday October 21, 2007. Wind speeds ranging from 30 to 50 mph were measured in the area, with extremely low relative humidities. These winds, coupled with exceptionally dry conditions due to lack of rainfall resulted in a number of fires in the Los Angeles and San Diego areas, causing the evacuation of more than 250,000 people.

    These two images show the Southern California coast from Los Angeles to San Diego from two of the nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the NASA EOS Terra satellite. These images were obtained around 11:35 a.m. PDT on Sunday morning, October 21, 2007 and show a number of plumes extending out over the Pacific ocean. In addition, locations identified as potential hot spots from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the same satellite are outlined in red.

    The left image is from MISR's nadir looking camera and the plumes appear very faint. The image on the right is from MISR's 60o forward looking camera, which accentuates the amount of light scattered by aerosols in the atmosphere, including smoke and dust. Both these images are false color and contain information from MISR's red, green, blue and near-infrared wavelengths, which makes vegetated land appear greener than it would naturally. Notice in the right hand image that the color of the plumes associated with the MODIS hot spots is bluish, while plumes not associated with hot spots appear more yellow. This is because the latter plumes are composed of dust kicked up by the strong Santa Ana winds. In some locations along Interstate 5 on this date, visibility was severely reduced due to blowing dust. MISR's multiangle and multispectral capability give it the ability to distinguish smoke from dust in this situation.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days

  20. Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectrometry Studies of the Autoionization of the 2s{sup 2}2p {sup 2}P Triply Excited State of Atomic Lithium: Experimental Results and R -Matrix Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.; Cubaynes, D.; Zhou, H. L.; VoKy, L.; Wuilleumier, F. J.; Kennedy, E. T.; Bizau, J. M.; Manson, S. T.; Morgan, T. J.; Blancard, C.

    2000-02-21

    We have measured the angle-resolved energy dependence of the electrons emitted over the energy range of the triply excited 2s{sup 2}2p P{sup 2} lithium resonance using synchrotron radiation. We have also calculated the behavior of the angular distribution parameter {beta} using the R -matrix approximation. Experimental and theoretical results are in good agreement and show deep minima in the 1s2p P{sup 1,} {sup 3} ionic channels. The energy at which the minima occur does not coincide with the resonance energy, but is shifted towards higher energy. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Effects of skylight polarization, cloudiness, and view angle on the detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three passive radiometric techniques, which use the contrast of sunlight reflected and backscattered from oil and water in specific wavelength regions, have potential application for remote sensing of oil spills. These techniques consist of measuring (1) total radiance, (2) the polarization components (normal and parallel) of radiance, and (3) the difference between the normal and parallel components. In this paper, the best view directions for these techniques are evaluated, conclusions are drawn as to the most promising technique, and explanations are developed to describe why previous total-radiance measurements yielded highest contrast between oil and water under overcast skies. The technique based on measurement of only the normal polorization component appears to be the most promising. The differential technique should be further investigated because of its potential to reduce the component of backscattered light from below the surface of the water. Measurements should be made about 45 deg nadir view angle in the direction opposite the sun. Overcast sky conditions provide a higher intensity of skylight relative to clear sky conditions and a lower intensity of backscatter within the water relative to surface reflectance. These factors result in higher contrast between oil and water under overcast skies.

  2. Laser angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.; Wilbert, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a laser angle measurement system is described. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the mode. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. Optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures are included, and the results of a demonstration test are given.

  3. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  4. Multi-Angle Views of the Appalachian Mountains, 6 March 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The true-color image at left is a downward-looking (nadir) view of the eastern United States, stretching from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The three images to the right are also in true-color, taken by the forward 45.6-degree, 60.0-degree, and 70.5-degree cameras, respectively, of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. As the slant angle increases, the line-of-sight through the atmosphere grows longer, and a pall of haze over the Appalachians becomes progressively more apparent. You can see a similar effect by scanning from near-nadir to the horizon when standing on a mountain top or looking out an airplane window. MISR uses this multi-angle technique to monitor particulate pollution and to distinguish different types of haze. These observations reveal how airborne particles are interacting with sunlight, a measure of their impact on Earth's climate system. The images are about 400 km (250 miles) wide, and the spatial resolution is 1.1 kilometers (1,200 yards). North is toward the top. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  5. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  6. Individualized optimal release angles in discus throwing.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Steve; Liu, Hui; Hubbard, Mont; Yu, Bing

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine individualized optimal release angles for elite discus throwers. Three-dimensional coordinate data were obtained for at least 10 competitive trials for each subject. Regression relationships between release speed and release angle, and between aerodynamic distance and release angle were determined for each subject. These relationships were linear with subject-specific characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between release speed and release angle may be due to subjects' technical and physical characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between aerodynamic distance and release angle may be due to interactions between the release angle, the angle of attack, and the aerodynamic distance. Optimal release angles were estimated for each subject using the regression relationships and equations of projectile motion. The estimated optimal release angle was different for different subjects, and ranged from 35 degrees to 44 degrees . The results of this study demonstrate that the optimal release angle for discus throwing is thrower-specific. The release angles used by elite discus throwers in competition are not necessarily optimal for all discus throwers, or even themselves. The results of this study provide significant information for understanding the biomechanics of discus throwing techniques.

  7. The Retroacetabular Angle Determines the Safe Angle for Screw Placement in Posterior Acetabular Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Ayman M. A.; Oxland, Thomas R.; O'Brien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A method for the determination of safe angles for screws placed in the posterior acetabular wall based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) is described. It defines a retroacetabular angle and determines its variation in the population. Methods. The retroacetabular angle is the angle between the retroacetabular surface and the tangent to the posterior acetabular articular surface. Screws placed through the marginal posterior wall at an angle equal to the retroacetabular angle are extraarticular. Medial screws can be placed at larger angles whose difference from the retroacetabular angle is defined as the allowance angles. CT scans of all patients with acetabular fractures treated in our institute between September 2002 to July 2007 were used to measure the retroacetabular angle and tangent. Results. Two hundred thirty one patients were included. The average (range) age was 42 (15–74) years. The average (range) retroacetabular angle was 39 (30–47) degrees. The average (range) retroacetabular tangent was 36 (30–45) mm. Conclusions. Placing the screws at an average (range) angle of 39 (33–47) degrees of anterior inclination with the retroacetabular surface makes them extraarticular. Angles for medial screws are larger. Safe angles can be calculated preoperatively with a computer program. PMID:24959359

  8. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  9. Sensitivity of thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of UTLS secondary sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring upper-tropospheric-lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS sulfate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulfuric acid/water droplets, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulfate and bisulfate ions and the undissociated sulfuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulfuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interfering parameters like the ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile uncertainties

  10. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  11. Wide-Angle Quasar Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, George; Strickland, Sarah

    We present results from the detection of relativistic winds launched near the innermost stable circular orbits of supermassive black holes. A recent detection of a powerful wind in the X-ray-bright narrow absorption line (NAL) z=1.51 quasar HS 0810+2554 strengthens the case that quasars play a significant role in feedback. In both deep Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of HS 0810 we detected blueshifted absorption lines implying outflowing velocities ranging from 0.1c and 0.4c. The presence of both an emission line at 6.8 keV and an absorption line at 7.8 keV in the spectral line profile of HS 0810 is a characteristic feature of a P-Cygni profile supporting the presence of an expanding outflowing highly ionized Fe absorber. A hard excess component is detected in the XMM-Newton observation of HS 0810 possibly originating from reflection off the disk. Modelling of the XMM-Newton spectrum constrains the inclination angle to be < 35° (68% confidence). The presence of relativistic winds in both low inclination angle NAL quasars as well as in high inclination angle BAL quasars implies that the solid angle of quasar winds may be quite large. The larger solid angle of quasar winds would also indicate that their contribution to the regulation of the host galaxy may be more important than previously thought.

  12. Influences of twilight on diurnal variation of core temperature, its nadir, and urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate during nocturnal sleep and morning drowsiness.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Masayuki; Tokura, Hiromi; Wakamura, Tomoko; Hyun, Ki-Ja; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Morita, Takeshi; Oishi, Tadashi

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed at elucidating the physiological significance of dusk and dawn in the circadian rhythm of core temperature (T(core)) and urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate in humans during sleep and the waking sensation just after rising. Seven female and four male students served as participants. Participants retired at 2300 h and rose at 0700 h. They were requested to sit on a chair and spend time as quietly as possible during wakefulness, reading a book or listening to recorded light music. Two lighting conditions were provided for each participant: 1) Light-Dark (LD)-rectangular light change with abrupt decrease from 3,000 lx to 100 lx at 1800 h, abrupt increase from 0 lx to 3,000 lx at 0700 h. 2) LD-twilight light change with gradual decrease from 3,000 lx to 100 lx starting at 1700 h (twilight period about 2 h), with gradual increase from 0 lx to 3,000 lx starting at 0500 h (twilight period about 2 h). The periods of 0 lx at night were from 2300 h to 0700 h on the first day and from 2300 to 0500 h on the second day. Nadir time advanced significantly under the influence of the LD-twilight condition. The amount of 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate in urine collected at 0200 h was significantly higher under LD-twilight in comparison with LD-rectangular light. Morning drowsiness tended to be lower under LD-twilight. Our results suggest that in architectural design of indoor illumination it is important to provide LD-twilight in the evening and early morning for sleep promotion in healthy normal people and/or light treatment in elderly patients with advanced dementia.

  13. A Nadir-adjusted Airborne Multi Spectral Imaging System (NAMSIS) for high-resolution remote sensing of carbon fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Scott, S.; Rahman, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing is widely used in vegetation monitoring, water stress detection and carbon cycle modeling. However, image pixels from high temporal resolution satellite sensors (such as MODIS) have coarse spatial resolution, much larger than the canopies they are supposed to characterize. An alternative solution for on-demand high spatial resolution remote sensing is sensors onboard low-flying aircrafts. Airborne remote sensing has been traditionally used in crop management studies. In this presentation we demonstrate the application of a relatively low-cost airborne sensor system with customized spectral band combinations for studying forest carbon fluxes. Our team has developed an Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU) controlled automated system to detach aircraft movements (pitch and roll) and engine vibration from the six-band programmable imager, in order to maintain the sensor at nadir view at all times during the flight. Flight lines are configured by a GPS-controleld system to simulate MODIS pixels. A feature-based algorithm is used to automatically generate a mosaic of individual images along the flight lines. This algorithm eliminates the need to mosiac and georeference images manually. An empirical line method is used to calculate reflectance from the raw data. Images from this airborne system produce reflectance values that are comparable with MODIS reflectance product. These high spatial resolution (~0.5 m) images deliver detailed information about tree species and phenological conditions within each MODIS pixel, and thus permit a high resolution spatio-temporal assessment of forest carbon fluxes.

  14. Viewing angle changeable display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinbi; Huang, Ziqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaoxi

    2010-10-01

    Viewing angle changeable display can change the display viewing angle as needed: In the public place the display could have a narrow viewing angle for privacy, while in the private place the displays could have a wide viewing angle for the convenience of the operation and better viewing experience. This article propose a novel adjustable optical transmission device to realize the viewing angle changes for LCD by using the principle of guest- host effect of liquid crystal. The major technology is to insert a special equipment between the backlight and the LCD, through which the backlight will display either parallel or scattered features to get an either narrow or wide viewing angle. The equipment is an adjustable transmission cell (ATC) which is actually a black G-H LC cell. This ATC is the main focus of our invention. The ATC consists of a polarizer sheet and a special guest-host liquid crystal device filled with the two-phase dye (called as GH-LC in this report), to achieve the viewing angle change in the LCD. When an electrical field charges to the ATC, only the so-called near-axis lights can pass through the ATC within a relatively small angle, while the other scattered lights are absorbed sequentially by GH-LC and the polarizer sheet. On the other hand, when there is no electrical charge to the ATC, the cell behaves like a normal polarizer; and the scattered light can pass through the cell and polarizer in a normal way. This paper describes the principle and structure of the device, applies the electric field on the sample to observe the electro-optical properties, combine the theoretical and experimental research, getting the viewing angle effects of the display.

  15. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  16. Meteorite incidence angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    1993-06-01

    Think about an asteroid smashing into the surface of the Moon and excavating a crater; or hitting Earth and scattering meteorite fragments over a strewn field. Imagine a fragment of cometary dust burning out in the Earth's atmosphere and producing a meteor. These bodies have paths that are inclined at some angle to the vertical. But what is the predominant value of this angle of incidence, i? How does the number of incident bodies vary as a function of angle i? And how do both these affect the prevalence of non- circular lunar craters and the ellipticity of meteorite strewn fields?

  17. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  18. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  19. Measurement of Peak Esophageal Luminal Cross Sectional Area Utilizing Nadir Intraluminal Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali; Ledgerwood-Lee, Melissa; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) is currently used to monitor gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal bolus clearance. We describe a novel methodology to measure maximal luminal CSA during bolus transport from MII measurements. METHODS Studies were conducted in-vitro (test tubes) and in-vivo (healthy subjects). Concurrent MII, HRM, and intraluminal ultrasound (US) were recorded 7 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallows with two concentrations of saline, 0.1N and 0.5N, of bolus volumes 5cc, 10cc and 15cc were performed. The CSA was estimated by solving two algebraic Ohm’s law equations, resulting from the two saline solutions. The CSA calculated from impedance method was compared with the CSA measured from the intraluminal US images. KEY RESULTS The CSA measured in duplicate from B-mode US images showed a mean difference between the two manual delineations to be near zero, and the repeatability coefficient was within 7.7% of the mean of the two CSA measurements. The calculated CSA from the impedance measurements strongly correlated with the US measured CSA (R2 ≅ 0.98). A detailed statistical analysis of the impedance and US measured CSA data indicated that the 95% limits of agreement between the two methods ranged from −9.1 to 13mm2. The root mean square error (RMS) of the two measurements was 4.8% of the mean US-measured CSA. CONCLUSIONS We describe a novel methodology to measure peak esophageal luminal CSA during peristalsis. Further studies are needed to determine if it is possible to measure patterns of luminal distension during peristalsis across the entire length of the esophagus. PMID:25930157

  20. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  1. Later endogenous circadian temperature nadir relative to an earlier wake time in older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Klerman, E. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the circadian timing system to the age-related advance of sleep-wake timing was investigated in two experiments. In a constant routine protocol, we found that the average wake time and endogenous circadian phase of 44 older subjects were earlier than that of 101 young men. However, the earlier circadian phase of the older subjects actually occurred later relative to their habitual wake time than it did in young men. These results indicate that an age-related advance of circadian phase cannot fully account for the high prevalence of early morning awakening in healthy older people. In a second study, 13 older subjects and 10 young men were scheduled to a 28-h day, such that they were scheduled to sleep at many circadian phases. Self-reported awakening from scheduled sleep episodes and cognitive throughput during the second half of the wake episode varied markedly as a function of circadian phase in both groups. The rising phase of both rhythms was advanced in the older subjects, suggesting an age-related change in the circadian regulation of sleep-wake propensity. We hypothesize that under entrained conditions, these age-related changes in the relationship between circadian phase and wake time are likely associated with self-selected light exposure at an earlier circadian phase. This earlier exposure to light could account for the earlier clock hour to which the endogenous circadian pacemaker is entrained in older people and thereby further increase their propensity to awaken at an even earlier time.

  2. Coastal applications from nadir altimetry: Example of the X-TRACK regional products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, F.; Fuller, N.; Lyard, F.; Cancet, M.; Niño, F.; Delebecque, C.; Fleury, S.; Toublanc, F.; Melet, A.; Saraceno, M.; Léger, F.

    2017-02-01

    In the coastal ocean zones, satellite altimetry data processing and interpretation poses specific difficulties, due to the interaction of the radar signal with land topography, inaccuracies in some of the geophysical corrections and to the fast changes in the sea level. In order to optimize the completeness and the accuracy of the sea surface height information derived from satellite altimetry in coastal ocean areas, a dedicated post-processing software, called X-TRACK, has been developed by the Center of Topography of the Ocean and Hydrosphere in Toulouse. It is tailored for extending the use of altimetry data to coastal ocean applications and provides freely available along-track Sea Level Anomaly time series that cover today all the coastal oceans. Here, we present the improvements made in version 2016 of X-TRACK and show the gain in near-coastal data accuracy using in situ tide gauge observations. The correlations between altimeter and tide gauge sea level anomalies are higher (by 15% in average) compared with the previous version of X-TRACK. Three examples of applications are shown. The recent evolutions done in the X-TRACK processing result in an improved observation of the seasonal variations of the boundary circulation in the Bay of Biscay. Along Western Africa, sea-level variations derived from X-TRACK data are observed closer to land (5 km) compared to AVISO (10 km), and the sea-level statistics are more robust due to the larger and more stable data availability. Along-track empirical tidal constants derived from X-TRACK Sea Level Anomaly time series are also used to validate tidal models. By improving the altimetric data accuracy in coastal areas, we extend the field of marine applications.

  3. Raised-angle discrimination under passive finger movement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglong; Yang, Jiajia; Ogasa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of raised-line drawing discrimination can be defined as the sum of the discriminability of the length, curvature, and angles of the edges. The size of the angle between two edges constitutes an important feature of these tactile stimuli. In the first experiment, five standard angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 150 degrees) and twenty comparison angles for each standard angle were used to investigate the human capacity for tactile discrimination of raised angles by passive finger movement. The subjects in this study were asked to identify the larger angle of each pair by passive finger movement. We found that the threshold doubled when the standard angle was increased from 30 degrees to 90 degrees; however, the threshold remained unchanged when the standard angle was greater than 90 degrees. In the second experiment, to investigate the influence of the endpoints on angle discriminability, we used one standard angle (60 degrees) and seven comparison angles that changed in four bisector orientations. The results indicate that cutaneous feedback from the local apex and endpoints of the angle contributed to the discrimination of acute angles. Taken together, these results suggest that, when an acute angle is presented, both local apex and endpoint informations are used, while cutaneous mechanoreceptors rely more on apex information to discriminate the angle size when an obtuse angle is presented.

  4. Signature extension for sun angle, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (Principal Investigator); Berry, J. K.; Heimes, F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Within a restricted zenith sun angle range of 35 - 50 degrees, it was empirically observed that canopy reflectance is mainly Lambertian. Reflectance changes with crop stage were simple shifts in scale in the sun angle range. It was noted that sun angle variations depend on canopy characteristics. Effects of the vegetative canopy were most pronounced at the larger solar zenith angles (20 %). The linear sun angle correction coefficients demonstrate a dependency on both crop stage (15-20 %) and crop type (10-20 %). The use of canopy reflectance modeling allowed for the generation of a simulated data set over an extremely broad envelope of sun angles.

  5. Effect of flying altitude, scanning angle and scanning mode on the accuracy of ALS based forest inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, Juha; Maltamo, Matti; Packalen, Petteri

    2016-10-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely used technology in the mapping of environment and forests. Data acquisition costs and the accuracy of the forest inventory are closely dependent on some extrinsic parameters of the ALS survey. These parameters have been assessed in numerous studies about a decade ago, but since then ALS devices have developed and it is possible that previous findings do not hold true with newer technology. That is why, the effect of flying altitudes (2000, 2500 or 3000 m), scanning angles (±15° and ±20° off nadir) and scanning modes (single- and multiple pulses in air) with the area-based approach using a Leica ALS70HA-laser scanner was studied here. The study was conducted in a managed pine-dominated forest area in Finland, where eight separate discrete-return ALS data were acquired. The comparison of datasets was based on the bootstrap approach with 5-fold cross validation. Results indicated that the narrower scanning angle (±15° i.e. 30°) led to slightly more accurate estimates of plot volume (RMSE%: 21-24 vs. 22.5-25) and mean height (RMSE%: 8.5-11 vs. 9-12). We also tested the use case where the models are constructed using one data and then applied to other data gathered with different parameters. The most accurate models were identified using the bootstrap approach and applied to different datasets with and without refitting. The bias increased without refitting the models (bias%: volume 0 ± 10, mean height 0 ± 3), but in most cases the results did not differ much in terms of RMSE%. This confirms previous observations that models should only be used for datasets collected under similar data acquisition conditions. We also calculated the proportions of echoes as a function of height for different echo categories. This indicated that the accuracy of the inventory is affected more by the height distribution than the proportions of echo categories.

  6. Pitch Angle Survey of GOODS Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boe, Benjamin; Kennefick, Daniel; Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey, Arkansas CenterSpace; Planetary Sciences

    2015-01-01

    This research looks at how the pitch angles of galaxies change over scales of cosmic time. We measure the pitch angle, or tightness of spiral winding, using a new code, Spirality. We then compare the results to those obtained from established software, 2DFFT (2 Dimensional Fast Fourier Transform). We investigate any correlation between pitch angle and redshift, or distance from Earth. Previous research indicates that the pitch angle of a galaxy correlates with its central bulge mass and the mass of its central black hole. Thus any evolution in the distribution of pitch angles could ultimately prove to be indicative of evolution in the supermassive black hole mass function. Galaxies from the Hubble GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey) North and South were measured. We found that there was strong agreement between Spirality and 2DFFT measurements. Spirality measured the pitch angle of the GOODS galaxies with a lower error than 2DFFT on average. With both software a correlation between pitch angle and redshift was found. Spirality observed a 6.150 increase in pitch per unit redshift. The increase in pitch angle with redshift suggests that in the past galaxies had higher pitch angles, which could be indicative of lower central black hole masses (or, more directly, central bulge masses).

  7. Detecting blind building façades from highly overlapping wide angle aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burochin, Jean-Pascal; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Mallet, Clément; Brosset, Thomas; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the identification of blind building façades, i.e. façades which have no openings, in wide angle aerial images with a decimeter pixel size, acquired by nadir looking cameras. This blindness characterization is in general crucial for real estate estimation and has, at least in France, a particular importance on the evaluation of legal permission of constructing on a parcel due to local urban planning schemes. We assume that we have at our disposal an aerial survey with a relatively high stereo overlap along-track and across-track and a 3D city model of LoD 1, that can have been generated with the input images. The 3D model is textured with the aerial imagery by taking into account the 3D occlusions and by selecting for each façade the best available resolution texture seeing the whole façade. We then parse all 3D façades textures by looking for evidence of openings (windows or doors). This evidence is characterized by a comprehensive set of basic radiometric and geometrical features. The blindness prognostic is then elaborated through an (SVM) supervised classification. Despite the relatively low resolution of the images, we reach a classification accuracy of around 85% on decimeter resolution imagery with 60 × 40 % stereo overlap. On the one hand, we show that the results are very sensitive to the texturing resampling process and to vegetation presence on façade textures. On the other hand, the most relevant features for our classification framework are related to texture uniformity and horizontal aspect and to the maximal contrast of the opening detections. We conclude that standard aerial imagery used to build 3D city models can also be exploited to some extent and at no additional cost for facade blindness characterisation.

  8. On the effect of emergence angle on emissivity spectra: application to small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; Ferrari, Sabrina; D'Amore, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Dependence of laboratory-measured emissivity spectra from the emergence angle is a subject that still needs a lot of investigations to be fully understood. Most of the previous work is based on reflectance measurements in the VIS-NIR spectral region and on emissivity measurements of flat, solid surfaces (mainly metals), which are not directly applicable to the analysis of remote sensing data. Small bodies in particular (c.f. asteroids Itokawa and 1999JU3, the respective targets of JAXA Hayabusa and Hayabusa 2 missions) have a very irregular surface; hence, the spectra from those rough surfaces are difficult to compare with laboratory spectra, where the observing geometry is always close to "nadir." At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), we have set up a series of spectral measurements to investigate this problem in the 1- to 16-µm spectral region. We measured the emissivity for two asteroid analogue materials (meteorite Millbillillie and a synthetic enstatite) in vacuum and under purged air, at surface temperature of 100 °C, for emergence angles of 0°, 5°, 10°, 20°, 30°, 40°, 50°, and 60°. Emissivity of a serpentinite slab, already used as calibration target for the MARA instrument on Hayabusa 2 MASCOT lander and for the thermal infrared imager spectrometer on Hayabusa 2 orbiter, was measured under the same conditions. Additionally, a second basalt slab was measured. Both slabs were not measured at 5° inclination. Complementary reflectance measurements of the four samples were taken. For all the samples measured, we found that for calibrated emissivity, significant variations from values obtained at nadir (0° emergence angle) appear only for emergence angles ≥40°. Reflectance measurements confirmed this finding, showing the same trend of variations.

  9. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  10. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille

    The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on casting and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club…

  11. Relationships Between Lower Extremity Alignment and the Quadriceps Angle

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Boling, Michelle C.; Levine, Beverly; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which select lower extremity alignment characteristics of the pelvis, hip, knee, and foot are related to the Q angle. Design Descriptive cohort study design. Setting Applied Neuromechanics Research Laboratory. Participants Two hundred eighteen participants (102 males, 116 females). Assessment of Risk Factors Eight clinical measures of static alignment of the left lower extremity were measured by a single examiner to determine the impact of lower extremity alignment on the magnitude of Q angle. Main Outcome Measures Q angle, pelvic angle, hip anteversion, tibiofemoral angle, genu recurvatum, tibial torsion, navicular drop, and femur and tibia length. Results Once all alignment variables were accounted for, greater tibiofemoral angle and femoral anteversion were significant predictors of greater Q angle in both males and females. Pelvic angle, genu recurvatum, tibial torsion, navicular drop, and femur to tibia length ratio were not significant independent predictors of Q angle in males or females. Conclusions Greater femoral anteversion and tibiofemoral angle result in greater Q angle, with changes in tibiofemoral angle having a substantially greater impact on the magnitude of the Q angle compared with femoral anteversion. As such, the Q angle seems to largely represent a frontal plane alignment measure. As many knee injuries seem to result from a combination of both frontal and transverse plane motions and forces, this may in part explain why Q angle has been found to be a poor independent predictor of lower extremity injury risk. PMID:19423972

  12. Utilizing the US Lab Nadir Research Window for Remote Sensing Operations with The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Richard; Barley, Bryan; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) is an ISPR-based rack facility designed to take advantage of the high optical quality US Lab Nadir research window. The WORF is based on the ISS Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack mechanical structure and electronic systems. The WORF has a unique payload volume located at the center of the rack that provides access to the window. The interior dimensions of the payload volume are 34-in. (86.36 cm) wide by 33-in. (83.82 cm) high by 23-in. (58.42 cm) deep. This facility supports the deployment of payloads such as 9 in. aerial photography cameras and 12 in. diameter optical equipment. The WORF coupled with the optical quality of the United States Lab window support the deployment of various payload disciplines. The WORF provides payloads with power, data command and control, air cooling, water cooling, and video processing. The WORF's payload mounting surfaces and interfaces include the interior payload mounting shelf and the interior and exterior aircraft-like seat tracks. The payload mounting shelf is limited to a maximum mass of 136 kg (299 pounds). The WORF can accommodate large payloads such as the commonly used Leica-Heerbrug RC-30 aerial photography camera (whose dimensions are 53.3 cm (21-in.) wide by 50.8 cm (20-in.) deep by 76.2 cm (30-in.) long). The performance characteristics of the WORF allow it to support an array of payload disciplines. The WORF provides a maximum of 3 Kw at 28 Vdc and has a maximum data rate of 10 Mbps. The WORF's unique payload volume is designed to be light-tight, down to 2.8 x 10(exp -11) Watts/cm2/steradian, and have low-reflective surfaces. This specially designed WORF interior supports payload investigations that observe low-light-level phenomenon such as aurora. Although the WORF rack does not employ any active rack isolation (i.e., vibration dampening) technology, the rack provides a very stable environment for payload operations (on the order

  13. Meridional Distribution of CH3C2H and C4H2 in Saturn's Stratosphere from CIRS/Cassini Limb and Nadir Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Fouchet, Thierry; Bezard, Bruno; Moses, Julianne I.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Limb and nadir spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) are analyzed in order to derive, for the first time, the meridional variations of diacetylene (C4H2) and methylacetylene (CH3C2H) mixing ratios in Saturn's stratosphere, from 5 hPa up to 0.05 hPa and 80 deg S to 45 deg N. We find that the C4H2 and CH3C2H meridional distributions mimic that of acetylene (C2H2), exhibiting small-scale variations that are not present in photochemical model predictions. The most striking feature of the meridional distribution of both molecules is an asymmetry between mid-southern and mid-northern latitudes. The mid-southern latitudes are found depleted in hydrocarbons relative to their northern counterparts. In contrast, photochemical models predict similar abundances at north and south mid-latitudes. We favor a dynamical explanation for this asymmetry, with upwelling in the south and downwelling in the north, the latter coinciding with the region undergoing ring shadowing. The depletion in hydrocarbons at mid-southern latitudes could also result from chemical reactions with oxygen-bearing molecules. Poleward of 60 deg S, at 0.1 and 0.05 hPa, we find that the CH3C2H and C4H2 abundances increase dramatically. This behavior is in sharp contradiction with photochemical model predictions, which exhibit a strong decrease towards the south pole. Several processes could explain our observations, such as subsidence, a large vertical eddy diffusion coefficient at high altitudes, auroral chemistry that enhances CH3C2H and C4H2 production, or shielding from photolysis by aerosols or molecules produced from auroral chemistry. However, problems remain with all these hypotheses, including the lack of similar behavior at lower altitudes. Our derived mean mixing ratios at 0.5 hPa of (2.4 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -10) for C4H2 and of (1.1 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -9) for CH3C2H are compatible with the analysis of global-average ISO observations performed by Moses et al. Finally, we provide

  14. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  15. Skylab S-193 radar altimeter experiment analyses and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    The design of optimum filtering procedures for geoid recovery is discussed. Statistical error bounds are obtained for pointing angle estimates using average waveform data. A correlation of tracking loop bandwidth with magnitude of pointing error is established. The impact of ocean currents and precipitation on the received power are shown to be measurable effects. For large sea state conditions, measurements of sigma 0 deg indicate a distinct saturation level of about 8 dB. Near-nadir less than 15 deg values of sigma 0 deg are also presented and compared with theoretical models. Examination of Great Salt Lake Desert scattering data leads to rejection of a previously hypothesized specularly reflecting surface. Pulse-to-pulse correlation results are in agreement with quasi-monochromatic optics theoretical predictions and indicate a means for estimating direction of pointing error. Pulse compression techniques for and results of estimating significant waveheight from waveform data are presented and are also shown to be in good agreement with surface truth data. A number of results pertaining to system performance are presented.

  16. Contact angle hysteresis on fluoropolymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tavana, H; Jehnichen, D; Grundke, K; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2007-10-31

    Contact angle hysteresis of liquids with different molecular and geometrical properties on high quality films of four fluoropolymers was studied. A number of different causes are identified for hysteresis. With n-alkanes as probe liquids, contact angle hysteresis is found to be strongly related to the configuration of polymer chains. The largest hysteresis is obtained with amorphous polymers whereas the smallest hysteresis occurs for polymers with ordered molecular chains. This is explained in terms of sorption of liquid by the solid and penetration of liquid into the polymer film. Correlation of contact angle hysteresis with the size of n-alkane molecules supports this conclusion. On the films of two amorphous fluoropolymers with different molecular configurations, contact angle hysteresis of one and the same liquid with "bulky" molecules is shown to be quite different. On the surfaces of Teflon AF 1600, with stiff molecular chains, the receding angles of the probe liquids are independent of contact time between solid and liquid and similar hysteresis is obtained for all the liquids. Retention of liquid molecules on the solid surface is proposed as the most likely cause of hysteresis in these systems. On the other hand, with EGC-1700 films that consist of flexible chains, the receding angles are strongly time-dependent and the hysteresis is large. Contact angle hysteresis increases even further when liquids with strong dipolar intermolecular forces are used. In this case, major reorganization of EGC-1700 chains due to contact with the test liquids is suggested as the cause. The effect of rate of motion of the three-phase line on the advancing and receding contact angles, and therefore contact angle hysteresis, is investigated. For low viscous liquids, contact angles are independent of the drop front velocity up to approximately 10 mm/min. This agrees with the results of an earlier study that showed that the rate-dependence of the contact angles is an issue only

  17. Reliable measurement of the receding contact angle.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Juuso T; Huhtamäki, Tommi; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2013-03-26

    Surface wettability is usually evaluated by the contact angle between the perimeter of a water drop and the surface. However, this single measurement is not enough for proper characterization, and the so-called advancing and receding contact angles also need to be measured. Measuring the receding contact angle can be challenging, especially for extremely hydrophobic surfaces. We demonstrate a reliable procedure by using the common needle-in-the-sessile-drop method. Generally, the contact line movement needs to be followed, and true receding movement has to be distinguished from "pseudo-movement" occurring before the receding angle is reached. Depending on the contact angle hysteresis, the initial size of the drop may need to be surprisingly large to achieve a reliable result. Although our motivation for this work was the characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces, we also show that this method works universally ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic surfaces.

  18. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  19. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  20. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  1. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  2. No differences in metabolic outcomes between nadir GH 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL during OGTT in surgically cured acromegalic patients (observational study)

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cheol Ryong; Choe, Eun Yeong; Hong, Jae Won; Kim, Eui Hyun; Park, Se Hee; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Eun Jig

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic impairment is the common cause for mortality in acromegalic patients. In this study, long-term improvements of metabolic parameters were evaluated according to 2 different remission criteria. This was an observational cohort study before and up to 1 year after transsphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA). Participants were 187 patients with acromegaly. At 6 months after TSA, remitted patients with age- and sex-matched normalized IGF-1 were divided into 2 groups: remission 1 (R1), nadir growth hormone (GH) below 0.4 ng/mL; and remission 2 (R2), nadir GH between 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Metabolic parameters during serial OGTTs were evaluated for 12 months. Remission was achieved in 157 (R1–136; R2–21) patients. Immediate postoperative metabolic parameters including body weight, body mass index, glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid in OGTT were all significantly improved in R1 and R2. HOMA-%β and HOMA-IR scores also improved in both R1 and R2. These improvements persisted for duration (12 months) of this study. However, no difference was present in metabolic parameters between R1 and R2. Although the patients with preoperative adrenal insufficiency presented significantly increased HOMA scores before TSA, there was no difference between classifications of deficient pituitary axes and changes of metabolic parameters after TSA. Remitted patients exhibited rapid restoration of metabolic parameters immediate postoperative period. Long-term improvements in metabolic parameters were not different between the 2 different nadir GH cut-offs, 0.4 and 1.0 ng/mL. PMID:27310957

  3. Near-Nadiral Normalized Radar Cross Section of the SEA Surface at Ku, Ka, and W-Bands: Comparison of Measurements and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majurec, Ninoslav; Johnson, Joel T.; Tanelli, Simone; Durden, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between wind speed and direction and the near-nadiral normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of the sea surface is important in many oceanographic and atmospheric remote sensing applications: (1) wind speed retrievals in traditional altimeter systems (2) assistance in calibration and path integrated attenuation processing for atmospheric profiling radars The desired wind speed (and direction in some cases) retrieval requires a clear understanding of the relationship between the relevant geophysical quantities and the observed NRCS Such understanding is available from existing electromagnetic models, but the presence of many such models, as well as implicit descriptions of the sea surface, motivates continued evaluation of model performance.

  4. Deflection Angle and R-Charged Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we consider R-charged black holes with three electrical charges and study deflection angle. We confirmed result of previous study that the black hole charges increased the deflection angle.

  5. Angle amplifier based on multiplexed volume holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Yifei; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2008-03-01

    Angle amplifier of laser beam scanner is a widely used device in optical systems. Volume holographic optical elements can be applied in the angle amplifier. Compared with the traditional angle amplifier, it has the advantages of high angle resolution, high diffraction efficiency, small size, and high angle magnification and flexible design. Bragg anglewavelength- compensating recording method is introduced. Because of the Bragg compensatory relation between angle and wavelength, this device could be recorded at another wavelength. The design of the angle amplifier recording at the wavelength of 514.2nm for the working wavelength of 632.8nm is described. An optical setup for recording the angle amplifier device is designed and discussed. Experimental results in the photorefractive crystal Fe:LiNbO 3 demonstrate the feasibility of the angle amplifier scheme.

  6. Bayesian AVO inversion with consistent angle parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Jinmiao; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2017-04-01

    Amplitude versus offset (AVO) inversion has been extensively used in seismic exploration. Many different elastic parameters can be inverted by incorporating corresponding reflection coefficient approximations. Although efforts have been made to improve the accuracy of AVO inversions for years, there is still one problem that has long been ignored. In most methods, the angle in the approximation and the angle used in seismic angle gather extractions are not the same one. This inconsistency leads to inaccurate inversion results. In this paper, a Bayesian AVO inversion method with consistent angles is proposed to solve the problem and improve inversion accuracy. Firstly, a linearized P-wave reflection coefficient approximation with consistent angles is derived based on angle replacements. The equivalent form of the approximation in terms moduli and density is derived so that moduli can be inverted for reservoir characterization. Then, by convoluting it with seismic wavelets as the forward solver, a probabilistic prestack seismic inversion method with consistent angles is presented in a Bayesian scheme. The synthetic test proves that the accuracy of this method is higher than the traditional one. The real data example shows that the inversion result fits better with well log interpretation data, which verifies the feasibility of the proposed method.

  7. Study on self-calibration angle encoder using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Zi; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    The angle measurement technology is very important in precision manufacture, optical industry, aerospace, aviation and navigation, etc. Further, the angle encoder, which uses concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' and transforms the angle into number of electronic pulse, is the most common instrument for angle measurement. To improve the accuracy of the angle encoder, a novel self-calibration method was proposed that enables the angle encoder to calibrate itself without angle reference. An angle deviation curve among 0° to 360° was simulated with equal weights Fourier components for the study of the self-calibration method. In addition, a self-calibration algorithm was used in the process of this deviation curve. The simulation result shows the relationship between the arrangement of multi-reading heads and the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. Besides, an actual self-calibration angle encoder was calibrated by polygon angle standard in national institute of metrology, China. The experiment result indicates the actual self-calibration effect on the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. In the end, the comparison, which is between the simulation self-calibration result and the experiment self-calibration result, reflects good consistency and proves the reliability of the self-calibration angle encoder.

  8. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  9. Characteristics of lightning, sprites, and human-induced emissions observed by nadir-viewing cameras on board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    The Lightning and Sprites Observation (LSO) experiment was designed to test a new concept of nadir-viewing sprite measurement on board the International Space Station using spectral differentiation methods for lightning and sprite identification. It was composed of two calibrated cameras: one equipped with a narrowband filter at 763 nm to maximize the contrast between sprites and lightning, and the other to monitor lightning. The LSO was operated at night during 15 days from 2001 to 2004 during which 197 lightning flashes, several sprites, hundreds of gas flares, and tens of cities were analyzed. The main strength of this experiment was its high spatial resolution of about 400 m. The structural details of some lightning are thus observed highlighting complex systems. Some features such as the nonlinear increase of the lightning-illuminated cloud top area with the peak radiance and the radial decrease of the lightning flash radiance were quantified. The median area is 129 km2 with median minor and major axes of 12 and 16 km. Two methods of sprite identification are presented and applied to the most intense sprite events observed by LSO. The sprite diameter is 5 km and it is shifted of about 22 km from the center of the parent lightning. A ratio of 1.7% is deduced for lightning flashes between the radiances measured by both cameras. These observations should be useful for the preparation or the analysis of future space missions dedicated to nadir-viewing observations of sprites.

  10. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Kyo

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  11. A Note on Angle Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1978-01-01

    The author investigates the construction of angles (using Euclidean tools) through a numerical approach. He calls attention to the surprising impossibility of constructing the conventional units of angle measure--the degree, minute, second, radian, and mil. (MN)

  12. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  13. Angle only tracking with particle flow filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-09-01

    We show the results of numerical experiments for tracking ballistic missiles using only angle measurements. We compare the performance of an extended Kalman filter with a new nonlinear filter using particle flow to compute Bayes' rule. For certain difficult geometries, the particle flow filter is an order of magnitude more accurate than the EKF. Angle only tracking is of interest in several different sensors; for example, passive optics and radars in which range and Doppler data are spoiled by jamming.

  14. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  15. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  16. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  17. Metric analysis of basal sphenoid angle in adult human skulls

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Dante Simionato; Nascimento, Sergio Ricardo Rios; Ruiz, Cristiane Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the variations in the angle basal sphenoid skulls of adult humans and their relationship to sex, age, ethnicity and cranial index. Methods The angles were measured in 160 skulls belonging to the Museum of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo Department of Morphology. We use two flexible rules and a goniometer, having as reference points for the first rule the posterior end of the ethmoidal crest and dorsum of the sella turcica, and for the second rule the anterior margin of the foramen magnum and clivus, measuring the angle at the intersection of two. Results The average angle was 115.41°, with no statistical correlation between the value of the angle and sex or age. A statistical correlation was noted between the value of the angle and ethnicity, and between the angle and the horizontal cranial index. Conclusions The distribution of the angle basal sphenoid was the same in sex, and there was correlation between the angle and ethnicity, being the proportion of non-white individuals with an angle >125° significantly higher than that of whites with an angle >125°. There was correlation between the angle and the cranial index, because skulls with higher cranial index tend to have higher basiesfenoidal angle too. PMID:25295452

  18. Particle chaos and pitch angle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Pitch angle scattering is a factor that helps determine the dawn-to-dusk current, controls particle energization, and it has also been used as a remote probe of the current sheet structure. Previous studies have interpreted their results under the exception that randomization will be greatest when the ratio of the two timescales of motion (gyration parallel to and perpendicular to the current sheet) is closet to one. Recently, the average expotential divergence rate (AEDR) has been calculated for particle motion in a hyperbolic current sheet (Chen, 1992). It is claimed that this AEDR measures the degree of chaos and therefore may be thought to measure the randomization. In contrast to previous expectations, the AEDR is not maximized when Kappa is approximately equal to 1 but instead increases with decreasing Kappa. Also contrary to previous expectations, the AEDR is dependent upon the parameter b(sub z). In response to the challenge to previous expectations that has been raised by this calculation of the AEDR, we have investigated the dependence of a measure of particle pitch angle scattering on both the parameters Kappa and b(sub z). We find that, as was previously expected, particle pitch angle scattering is maximized near Kappa = 1 provided that Kappa/b(sub z) greater than 1. In the opposite regime, Kappa/b(sub z) less than 1, we find that particle pitch angle scattering is still largest when the two timescales are equal, but the ratio of the timescales is proportional to b(sub z). In this second regime, particle pitch angle scattering is not due to randomization, but is instead due to a systematic pitch angle change. This result shows that particle pitch angle scattering need not be due to randomization and indicates how a measure of pitch angle scattering can exhibit a different behavior than a measure of chaos.

  19. Closed angle glaucoma detection in RetCam images.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Jiang; Lee, Beng Hai; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Yin, Fengshou; Aung, Tin; Baskaran, Mani; Shamira, Perera; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-01-01

    Closed/Open angle glaucoma classification is important for glaucoma diagnosis. RetCam is a new imaging modality that captures the image of iridocorneal angle for the classification. However, manual grading and analysis of the RetCam image is subjective and time consuming. In this paper, we propose a system for intelligent analysis of iridocorneal angle images, which can differentiate closed angle glaucoma from open angle glaucoma automatically. Two approaches are proposed for the classification and their performances are compared. The experimental results show promising results.

  20. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Feoktistov, Dmitriy; Kuznetsov, Geniy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  1. The impact of inlet angle and outlet angle of guide vane on pump in reversal based hydraulic turbine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F. X.; Yang, J. H.; Wang, X. H.; Zhang, R. H.; Li, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, in order to research the impact of inlet angle and outlet angle of guide vane on hydraulic turbine performance, a centrifugal pump in reversal is adopted as turbine. A numerical simulation method is adopted for researching outer performance and flow field of turbine. The results show: inlet angle has a crucial role to turbine, to the same flow, there is a noticeable decline for the efficiency and head of turbine with the inlet angle increases. At the best efficiency point(EFP),to a same inlet angle, when the inlet angle greater than inlet angle, velocity circulation in guide vane outlet decreases, which lead the efficiency of turbine to reduce, Contrarily, the efficiency rises. With the increase of inlet angle and outlet angle, the EFP moves to the big flow area and the uniformity of pressure distribution becomes worse. The paper indicates that the inlet angle and outlet angle have great impact on the turbine performance, and the best combination exists for the inlet angle and outlet angle of the guide vane.

  2. Does gallbladder angle affect gallstone formation?

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, Bekir; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Zeren, Sezgin; Can, Fatma; Elmali, Ferhan; Bayhan, Zulfu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Morphology of gallbladder varies considerably from person to person. We believe that one of the morphological variations of gallbladder is the “gallbladder angle”. Gallbladder varies also in “angle”, which, to the best of our knowledge, has never been investigated before. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of gallbladder angle on gallstone formation. Methods in this study, 1075 abdominal computed tomography (CT) images were retrospectively examined. Patients with completely normal gallbladders were selected. Among these patients, those with both abdominal ultrasound and blood tests were identified in the hospital records and included in the study. Based on the findings of the ultrasound scans, patients were divided into two groups as patients with gallstones and patients without gallstones. Following the measurement of gallbladder angles on the CT images, the groups were statistically evaluated. Results The gallbladder angle was smaller in patients with gallstones (49 ± 21 degrees and 53 ± 19 degrees) and the gallbladder with larger angle was 1.015 (1/0.985) times lower the risk of gallstone formation. However, these were not statistically significant (p>0,05). Conclusion A more vertically positioned gallbladder does not affect gallstone formation. However, a smaller gallbladder angle may facilitate gallstone formation in patients with the risk factors. Gallstones perhaps more easily and earlier develop in gallbladders with a smaller angle. PMID:27795762

  3. Pressure dependence of the contact angle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiyu; Farouk, T; Ward, C A

    2007-06-07

    When a liquid and its vapor contact a smooth, homogeneous surface, Gibbsian thermodynamics indicates that the contact angle depends on the pressure at the three-phase line of an isothermal system. When a recently proposed adsorption isotherm for a solid-vapor interface is combined with the equilibrium conditions and the system is assumed to be in a cylinder where the liquid-vapor interface can be approximated as spherical, the contact-angle-pressure relation can be made explicit. It indicates that a range of contact angles can be observed on a smooth homogeneous surface by changing the pressure at the three-phase line, but it also indicates that the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is negative, and leads to the prediction that the contact angle increases with pressure. The predicted dependence of the contact angle on pressure is investigated experimentally in a system that has an independent mechanism for determining when thermodynamic equilibrium is reached. The predictions are in agreement with the measurements. The results provide a possible explanation for contact angle hysteresis.

  4. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  5. Angle Performance on Optima XE

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jonathan; Satoh, Shu

    2011-01-07

    Angle control on high energy implanters is important due to shrinking device dimensions, and sensitivity to channeling at high beam energies. On Optima XE, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through a series of narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by steering the beam with the corrector magnet. In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightly tilting the wafer platen during implant.Using a sensitive channeling condition, we were able to quantify the angle repeatability of Optima XE. By quantifying the sheet resistance sensitivity to both horizontal and vertical angle variation, the total angle variation was calculated as 0.04 deg. (1{sigma}). Implants were run over a five week period, with all of the wafers selected from a single boule, in order to control for any crystal cut variation.

  6. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  7. Mandibular advancement surgery in high-angle and low-angle class II patients: different long-term skeletal responses.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, K A; Espeland, L; Krogstad, O; Lyberg, T

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this cephalometric study was to compare skeletal stability and the time course of postoperative changes in high-angle and low-angle Class II patients after mandibular advancement surgery. The subjects were 61 consecutive mandibular retrognathism patients whose treatment included bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and rigid fixation. The patients were divided according to the preoperative mandibular plane angle; the 20 patients with the lowest mandibular plane angle (20.8 degrees +/- 4.9 degrees ) constituted the low-angle group, while the 20 cases with the highest mandibular plane angle (43.0 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees ) represented the high-angle group. Lateral cephalograms were taken on 6 occasions: immediately before surgery, immediately after surgery, 2 and 6 months after surgery, and 1 and 3 years after surgery. Results demonstrated that the high-angle and low-angle groups had different patterns of surgical and postoperative changes. High-angle patients were associated with both a higher frequency and a greater magnitude of horizontal relapse. While 95% of the total relapse took place during the first 2 months after surgery in the low-angle group, high-angle patients demonstrated a more continuous relapse pattern, with a significant proportion (38%) occurring late in the follow-up period. Possible reasons for the different postsurgical response are discussed.

  8. Solar cell angle of incidence corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on solar array angle of incidence corrections was found to be sparse and contained no tabular data for support. This lack along with recent data on 27 GaAs/Ge 4 cm by 4 cm cells initiated the analysis presented in this paper. The literature cites seven possible contributors to angle of incidence effects: cosine, optical front surface, edge, shadowing, UV degradation, particulate soiling, and background color. Only the first three are covered in this paper due to lack of sufficient data. The cosine correction is commonly used but is not sufficient when the incident angle is large. Fresnel reflection calculations require knowledge of the index of refraction of the coverglass front surface. The absolute index of refraction for the coverglass front surface was not known nor was it measured due to lack of funds. However, a value for the index of refraction was obtained by examining how the prediction errors varied with different assumed indices and selecting the best fit to the set of measured values. Corrections using front surface Fresnel reflection along with the cosine correction give very good predictive results when compared to measured data, except there is a definite trend away from predicted values at the larger incident angles. This trend could be related to edge effects and is illustrated by a use of a box plot of the errors and by plotting the deviation of the mean against incidence angle. The trend is for larger deviations at larger incidence angles and there may be a fourth order effect involved in the trend. A chi-squared test was used to determine if the measurement errors were normally distributed. At 10 degrees the chi-squared test failed, probably due to the very small numbers involved or a bias from the measurement procedure. All other angles showed a good fit to the normal distribution with increasing goodness-of-fit as the angles increased which reinforces the very small numbers hypothesis. The contributed data only went to 65 degrees

  9. Contact angle hysteresis: study by dynamic cycling contact angle measurements and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry on polyimide.

    PubMed

    Hennig, A; Eichhorn, K-J; Staudinger, U; Sahre, K; Rogalli, M; Stamm, M; Neumann, A W; Grundke, K

    2004-08-03

    The phenomenon of contact angle hysteresis was studied on smooth films of polyimide, a polymer type used in the microelectronic industry, by dynamic cycling contact angle measurements based on axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile in combination with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). It was found that both advancing and receding contact angles became smaller with increasing the number of cycles and are, therefore, not a property of the dry solid alone. The changes of the wetting behavior during these dynamic cycling contact angle measurements are attributed mainly to swelling and/or liquid retention. To reveal the water-induced changes of the polymer film, the polyimide surface was studied before and after the contact with a water droplet by VASE. Both the experimental ellipsometric spectrum for Delta and that for Psi as well as the corresponding simulations show characteristic shifts due to the contact with water. The so-called effective medium approximation was applied to recover information about the thickness and effective optical constants of the polymer layer from the ellipsometrically measured values of Delta and Psi. On the basis of these results, the swelling and retention behavior of the polyimide films in contact with water droplets were discussed.

  10. Optimal Number of Angle Images for Calculating Anterior Angle Volume and Iris Volume Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Blieden, Lauren S.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Baker, Laura A.; Bell, Nicholas P.; Fuller, Timothy S.; Mankiewicz, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We determined the optimal number of angle images required to obtain reliable measurements of trabecular-iris circumferential volume (TICV) and iris volume (IV) using swept-source Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SSFD-ASOCT) scans in narrow angle eyes. Methods. Scleral spur landmarks (SSL) were manually identified on ASOCT angle images from 128 meridians from each of 24 eyes with chronic primary angle closure (PAC) spectrum of disease. The anterior and posterior corneal curves, and the anterior and posterior iris surfaces were identified automatically by the anterior chamber analysis and interpretation (ACAI) software, then manually examined and edited by the reader if required. Trabecular-iris circumferential volume at 750 μm from SSL (TICV750) and IV were subsequently calculated using varying numbers of angle images. Threshold error was determined to be less than the lower 95% confidence limit of mean absolute percent error (MAPE) of the change in TICV or IV resulting from laser peripheral iridotomy, which would be 17% for TICV and 5% for IV, based on previous studies. The optimal number of angle images was the smallest number of images where MAPE was less than this threshold for TICV and IV. Results. A total of 32 equally-spaced angle images (16 meridians) was required to estimate TICV750 and 16 angle images (8 meridians) to estimate IV. Both were within 4.6% and 1.6% of MAPE, respectively. Conclusions. It is possible to determine TICV and IV parameters reliably in narrow angles without evaluating all 128 meridians obtained with SSFD-ASOCT. PMID:25829412

  11. Michelson interferometer for precision angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Ikram, M; Hussain, G

    1999-01-01

    An angle-measuring technique based on an optical interferometer is reported. The technique exploits a Michelson interferometric configuration in which a right-angle prism and a glass strip are introduced into a probe beam. Simultaneous rotation of both components along an axis results in an optical path difference between the reference and the probe beams. In a second arrangement two right-angle prisms and glass strips are introduced into two beams of a Michelson interferometer. The prisms and the strips are rotated simultaneously to introduce an optical path difference between the two beams. In our arrangement, optimization of various parameters makes the net optical path difference between the two beams approximately linear for a rotation as great as +/-20 degrees . Results are simulated that show an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude in error and nonlinearity compared with a previously reported technique.

  12. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  13. Sun Incidence Angle Analysis of KOMPSAT-2 Payload during Normal Mission Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung-Hyun; Yong, Ki-Lyuk; Lee, Sang-Ryool

    2000-12-01

    KOMPSAT-2 will carry MSC (Multi-Spectral Camera) which provides 1m resolution panchromatic and 4m resolution multi-spectral images at the altitude of 685km sun-synchronous mission orbit. The mission operation of KOMSPAT-2 is to provide the earth observation using MSC with nadir pointing. KOMPSAT-2 will also have the capability of roll/pitch tilt maneuver using reaction wheel of satellite as required. In order to protect MSC from thermal distortion as well as direct sunlight, MSC shall be operated within the constraint of sun incidence angle. It is expected that the sunlight will not violate the constraint of sun incidence angle for normal mission operations without roll/pitch maneuver. However, during roll/pitch tilt operations, optical module of MSC may be damaged by the sunlight. This study analyzed sun incidence angle of payload using KOMPSAT-2 AOCS (Attitude and Orbit Control Subsystem) Design and Performance Analysis Software for KOMPSAT-2 normal mission operations.

  14. Study of the advancing and receding contact angles: liquid sorption as a cause of contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lam, C N C; Wu, R; Li, D; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2002-02-25

    Two types of experiments were used to study the behavior of both advancing and receding contact angles, namely the dynamic one-cycle contact angle (DOCA) and the dynamic cycling contact angle (DCCA) experiments. For the preliminary study, DOCA measurements of different liquids on different solids were performed using an automated axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P). From these experimental results, four patterns of receding contact angle were observed: (1) time-dependent receding contact angle; (2) constant receding contact angle; (3) 'stick/slip'; (4) no receding contact angle. For the purpose of illustration, results from four different solid surfaces are shown. These solids are: FC-732-coated surface; poly(methyl methacrylate/n-butyl methacrylate) [P(MMA/nBMA)]; poly(lactic acid) (DL-PLA); and poly(lactic/glycolic acid) 50/50 (DL-PLGA 50/50). Since most of the surfaces in our studies exhibit time dependence in the receding contact angle, a more extended study was conducted using only FC-732-coated surfaces to better understand the possible causes of decreasing receding contact angle and contact angle hysteresis. Contact angle measurements of 21 liquids from two homologous series (i.e. n-alkanes and 1-alcohols) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCMTS) on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. It is apparent that the contact angle hysteresis decreases with the chain length of the liquid. It was found that the receding contact angle equals the advancing angle when the alkane molecules are infinitely large. These results strongly suggest that the chain length and size of the liquid molecule could contribute to contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Furthermore, DCCA measurements of six liquids from the two homologous series on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. With these experimental results, one can construe that the time dependence of contact angle hysteresis on relatively smooth and homogeneous surfaces is mainly caused by liquid retention

  15. Bicycle helmet ventilation and comfort angle dependence.

    PubMed

    Brühwiler, Paul A; Ducas, Charline; Huber, Roman; Bishop, Phillip A

    2004-09-01

    Five modern bicycle helmets were studied to elucidate some of the variations in ventilation performance, using both a heated manikin headform and human subjects (n = 7). Wind speed and head angle were varied to test their influence on the measured steady-state heat exchange (cooling power) in the skull section of the headform. The cooling power transmitted by the helmets varied from about 60% to over 90% of that of the nude headform, illustrating the range of present manufacturer designs. Angling the head forward by 30 degrees was found to provide better cooling power to the skull (up to 25%) for three of the helmets and almost equal cooling power in the remaining two cases. Comparisons of skull ventilation at these angles with human subjects strongly supported the headform results.

  16. High Angle of Attack Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK IN A VERY LOW TURBULENCE LEVEL AIR STREAM by B.L.Hunt and P.C.Dexter 17 WIND AND WATER TUNNEL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF...FIGURE 1. TYPICAL FIGffTER FOREBODY LENGTHS It baa been convincingly shown in small-scale wind tunnel and water tunnel experiments that the apfro...attack taken during a water tunnel test. jn asymmetric vor~ox pattern io clearly ubewn. LOW ANGLE OF ATTACKC HIGH ANGLE OF ATTACK (SYMMETRIC

  17. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  18. Methodology for high accuracy contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Kalantarian, A; David, R; Neumann, A W

    2009-12-15

    A new version of axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) called ADSA-NA (ADSA-no apex) was developed for measuring interfacial properties for drop configurations without an apex. ADSA-NA facilitates contact angle measurements on drops with a capillary protruding into the drop. Thus a much simpler experimental setup, not involving formation of a complete drop from below through a hole in the test surface, may be used. The contact angles of long-chained alkanes on a commercial fluoropolymer, Teflon AF 1600, were measured using the new method. A new numerical scheme was incorporated into the image processing to improve the location of the contact points of the liquid meniscus with the solid substrate to subpixel resolution. The images acquired in the experiments were also analyzed by a different drop shape technique called theoretical image fitting analysis-axisymmetric interfaces (TIFA-AI). The results were compared with literature values obtained by means of the standard ADSA for sessile drops with the apex. Comparison of the results from ADSA-NA with those from TIFA-AI and ADSA reveals that, with different numerical strategies and experimental setups, contact angles can be measured with an accuracy of less than 0.2 degrees. Contact angles and surface tensions measured from drops with no apex, i.e., by means of ADSA-NA and TIFA-AI, were considerably less scattered than those from complete drops with apex. ADSA-NA was also used to explore sources of improvement in contact angle resolution. It was found that using an accurate value of surface tension as an input enhances the accuracy of contact angle measurements.

  19. Numerical aperture characteristics of angle-ended plastic optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Farrell, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    With the increasing information rates demanded in consumer, automotive and aeronautical applications, a low cost and high performance physical transmission medium is required. Compared with Silica Optical Fiber, Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) offers an economic solution for a range of high-capacity, short-haul applications in industrial and military environments. Recently, a new type of POF, the perfluorinated graded-index plastic optical fiber (PF GI-POF), has been introduced that has low losses and high bandwidth at the communication wavelengths 850 nm and 1300nm. POF is normally terminated perpendicular to the fiber axis. We propose an angle-ended POF, which is terminated at non-perpendicular angles to the fiber axis. The aim of the research is to investigate the numerical aperture (NA) characteristics of angle-ended POF along the major axis of the elliptical endface. A theoretical model indicates that the NA of the angle-ended POF will increase nonlinearly with tilt-angle and the acceptance cone will be deflected with the angle of the deflection increasing nonlinearly with tilt-angle. We present results for the measured NA and the measured deflection angle using the far-field radiation method. Results are presented for 13 angle-ended SI-POF tilt-angles. We also present results for theoretical value of NA and deflection angle as a function of tilt-angle. The agreement between the measured and theoretical value is good up to tilt-angles of about 15 degrees, beyond which deviation occurs.

  20. HIV-HCV co-infected patients with low CD4+ cell nadirs are at risk for faster fibrosis progression and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiberger, T; Ferlitsch, A; Sieghart, W; Kreil, A; Breitenecker, F; Rieger, A; Schmied, B; Gangl, A; Peck-Radosavljevic, M

    2010-06-01

    Patients co-infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are fraught with a rapid fibrosis progression rate and with complications of portal hypertension (PHT) We aimed to assess the influence of immune function [Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stage] on development of PHT and disease progression in HIV-HCV co-infection. Data of 74 interferon-naïve HIV-HCV co-infected patients undergoing liver biopsy, measurement of portal pressure and of liver stiffness and routine laboratory tests (including CD4+ cell count, HIV and HCV viral load) were analysed. Time of initial exposure (risk behaviour) was used to assess fibrosis progression. Fibrosis progression, time to cirrhosis and portal pressure were correlated with HIV status (CDC stage). HIV-HCV patients had rapid progression of fibrosis [0.201 +/- 0.088 METAVIR fibrosis units/year (FU/y)] and accelerated time to cirrhosis (24 +/- 13 years), high HCV viral loads (4.83 x 10(6) IU/mL) and a mean HVPG at the upper limit of normal (5 mmHg). With moderate or severe immunodeficiency, fibrosis progression was even higher (CDC-2 = 0.177 FU/y; CDC-3 = 0.248 FU/y) compared with patients with higher CD4+ nadirs (CDC-1 = 0.120 FU/y; P = 0.0001). An indirect correlation between CD4+ cell count and rate of fibrosis progression (R = -0.6654; P < 0.001) could be demonstrated. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) showed early elevation of portal pressure with median values of 4, 8 and 12 mmHg after 10, 15 and 20 years of HCV infection for CDC-3 patients. Patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) had similar rates of progression and portal pressure values than patients without HAART. Progression of HCV disease is accelerated in HIV-HCV co-infection, being more pronounced in patients with low CD4+ cell count. A history of a CD4+ cell nadir <200/microL is a risk factor for rapid development of cirrhosis and PHT. Thus, HCV treatment should be considered

  1. Methane Cross-Validation Between Spaceborne Solar Occultation Observations from ACE-FTS, Spaceborne Nadir Sounding from Gosat, and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Measurements, at a High Arctic Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S. A.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing observations of methane profiles in the Canadian High Arctic. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas on Earth, and second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to anthropogenic global warming. Accurate and precise observations of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. The Arctic is a particular region of concern, as melting permafrost and disappearing sea ice might lead to accelerated release of methane into the atmosphere. Global observations require spaceborne instruments, in particular in the Arctic, where surface measurements are sparse and expensive to perform. Satellite-based remote sensing is an underconstrained problem, and specific validation under Arctic circumstances is required. Here, we show a cross-validation between two spaceborne instruments and ground-based measurements, all Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS). We consider the Canadian SCISAT ACE-FTS, a solar occultation spectrometer operating since 2004, and the Japanese GOSAT TANSO-FTS, a nadir-pointing FTS operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W) since 2006. Measurements are collocated considering temporal, spatial, and geophysical criteria and regridded to a common vertical grid. We perform smoothing on the higher-resolution instrument results to account for different vertical resolutions. Then, profiles of differences for each pair of instruments are examined. Any bias between instruments, or any accuracy that is worse than expected, needs to be understood prior to using the data. The results of the study will serve as a guideline on how to use the vertically resolved methane products from ACE and

  2. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  3. Camber Angle Inspection for Vehicle Wheel Alignments

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jieh-Shian; Hsu, Hong-Yi; Chuang, Chih-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces an alternative approach to the camber angle measurement for vehicle wheel alignment. Instead of current commercial approaches that apply computation vision techniques, this study aims at realizing a micro-control-unit (MCU)-based camber inspection system with a 3-axis accelerometer. We analyze the precision of the inspection system for the axis misalignments of the accelerometer. The results show that the axes of the accelerometer can be aligned to the axes of the camber inspection system imperfectly. The calibrations that can amend these axis misalignments between the camber inspection system and the accelerometer are also originally proposed since misalignments will usually happen in fabrications of the inspection systems. During camber angle measurements, the x-axis or z-axis of the camber inspection system and the wheel need not be perfectly aligned in the proposed approach. We accomplished two typical authentic camber angle measurements. The results show that the proposed approach is applicable with a precision of ±0.015∘ and therefore facilitates the camber measurement process without downgrading the precision by employing an appropriate 3-axis accelerometer. In addition, the measured results of camber angles can be transmitted via the medium such as RS232, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi. PMID:28165365

  4. Camber Angle Inspection for Vehicle Wheel Alignments.

    PubMed

    Young, Jieh-Shian; Hsu, Hong-Yi; Chuang, Chih-Yuan

    2017-02-03

    This paper introduces an alternative approach to the camber angle measurement for vehicle wheel alignment. Instead of current commercial approaches that apply computation vision techniques, this study aims at realizing a micro-control-unit (MCU)-based camber inspection system with a 3-axis accelerometer. We analyze the precision of the inspection system for the axis misalignments of the accelerometer. The results show that the axes of the accelerometer can be aligned to the axes of the camber inspection system imperfectly. The calibrations that can amend these axis misalignments between the camber inspection system and the accelerometer are also originally proposed since misalignments will usually happen in fabrications of the inspection systems. During camber angle measurements, the x-axis or z-axis of the camber inspection system and the wheel need not be perfectly aligned in the proposed approach. We accomplished two typical authentic camber angle measurements. The results show that the proposed approach is applicable with a precision of ± 0.015 ∘ and therefore facilitates the camber measurement process without downgrading the precision by employing an appropriate 3-axis accelerometer. In addition, the measured results of camber angles can be transmitted via the medium such as RS232, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi.

  5. Angles of multivariable root loci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized eigenvalue problem is demonstrated to be useful for computing the multivariable root locus, particularly when obtaining the arrival angles to finite transmission zeros. The multivariable root loci are found for a linear, time-invariant output feedback problem. The problem is then employed to compute a closed-loop eigenstructure. The method of computing angles on the root locus is demonstrated, and the method is extended to a multivariable optimal root locus.

  6. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three- dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  7. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FbG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three-dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  8. Determination of detector rotation angle in the experiment based on the total internal reflection using an equilateral right angle prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendro, Viridi, S.; Pratama, Y.

    2015-04-01

    We present a relation between incident angle and rotation angle detector in the Total Internal Reflection (TIR) experiments when using a right angle prism. In the TIR method, the light coming toward the prism will experience reflection and out of the prism at a certain angle direction. Results of analysis of the geometry and Snell's law shows that the angular position of the detector is not only determined by the angle of incidence of light alone but also by the size of the prism and the detector position from the rotation axis of goniometer. The experimental results show relation between the angle of detector and angle of goniometer. When the prism rotated 45 °, position of goniometer detector is 2×45 °. However, when the prism rotated at an angle instead of 45 °, detector position µ is not always equal to twice the rotation angle goniometer ψ, so that this relationship needs to be corrected. This correction is also determined by the value of the refractive index of the prism is used. By knowing the relationship between detector position and the incident angle of light, this formulation can be used to control the position of the sample and the detector in the experiments based on ATR.

  9. THE EFFECT OF LIQUID STRUCTURE ON CONTACT ANGLE HYSTERESIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contact angle hysteresis was measured for a variety of liquids on condensed monolayers of 17-(perfluoroheptyl)-heptadecanoic acid adsorbed on...into the porous monolayer. However, contact angle hysteresis was negligible when the average diameter of the liquid molecules was larger than the...monolayers by contact angle hysteresis measurements on a series of liquids having gradations in molecular volume. The results of this investigation

  10. What we Hope to Learn about Global Mineral Dust Aerosols from EOS Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    On global scales, just a few broad atmospheric aerosol compositional groups are commonly observed. Of these, "mineral dust" is the only group which both contains non-spherical particles, and typically has size distributions with enough large particles for particle shape to affect its visible-light-scattering properties. The MISR instrument is scheduled for launch into a 10:30 AM sun-synchronous, polar orbit aboard the EOS Terra satellite in 1999. MISR will measure the upwelling visible radiance from Earth in 4 spectral bands centered at 446, 558, 672, and 866 nm, at each of 9 emission angles spread out in the forward and aft directions along the flight path at +/-70.5 deg, +/-60.0 deg, +/-45.6 deg, +/-26.1deg, and nadir. Over a period of 7 minutes, as the spacecraft flies along, a 360 km wide swath of Earth will successively be viewed by each of the cameras, allowing MISR to sample a very large range of scattering angles; in mid latitudes, the instrument will observe scattering angles between about 60 deg and 160 deg. Global coverage will be acquired about once in 9 days at the equator; the nominal mission lifetime is 6 years. The distinction in single scattering phase function between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles, with a broad range of aspect ratios, shows up strongly for scattering angles ranging from about 90 deg to near 180 deg. For non-spherical particle distributions, single scattering phase functions tend to be much flatter in this region than for spherical particles. Since MISR samples the relevant range of scattering angles very well, we expect to be able to make critical distinctions between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles with MISR data. We anticipate that the new multiangle, multispectral data from MISR will also contain other information about particle properties, a major step beyond current spacecraft remote sensing retrievals, which obtain aerosol

  11. Measurement of incidence angle dependence of solar absorptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, A.; Hayashi, T.

    1983-12-01

    For measuring solar absorptance dependence on incidence angle, an integrating sphere, in which the sample is fixed on the surface of the sphere, and the incident angle for the monochromatic beam on the surface is adjusted by the rotation of the integrating sphere, is proposed. Results for spacecraft materials are presented. Results for aluminized Teflon are 4% better compared with the standard method.

  12. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods.

  13. Aspect angle dependence of the E region irregularity velocity at large flow angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, R. A.; Koustov, A. V.; Senior, A.; Uspensky, M.; Honary, F.; Dyson, P. L.

    2007-11-01

    We present the Doppler velocity observations of 1-m plasma waves in the auroral E region by the Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (STARE) Norway VHF coherent radar in the context of simultaneous and coincident measurements of electron and ion drift velocities determined by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) tristatic radar facility. The measurements were performed in the afternoon sector (1500-2000 MLT) at seven locations along the STARE radar beam 2 with different values of the magnetic off-perpendicular (aspect) angle α between 0.48° and 2.63° and at large angles with respect to the electron background drift (θ = 55°-90°). It is demonstrated that the STARE line-of-sight velocity, normalized to the EISCAT-derived electron drift speed at large flow angles, exhibits a decrease with increasing aspect angle, and the rate of decrease is investigated as a function of the flow angle. We also compare the STARE velocity with the electron and ion drift velocity components along the STARE radar beam look direction and show that, at large aspect angles, the E region velocity is correlated (anticorrelated) with the ion (electron) drift velocity component. The results are discussed in the contexts of the linear fluid theory of the modified two-stream plasma instability and the theory of anomalous collisions.

  14. Foot Progression Angle Walking Test

    PubMed Central

    Ranawat, Anil S.; Gaudiani, Michael A.; Slullitel, Pablo A.; Satalich, James; Rebolledo, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Determining an accurate clinical diagnosis for nonarthritic hip pain may be challenging, as symptoms related to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or hip instability can be difficult to elucidate with current testing methods. In addition, commonly utilized physical examination maneuvers are static and do not include a dynamic or weightbearing assessment to reproduce activity-related symptoms. Therefore, implementing a dynamic assessment for FAI and hip instability could help to improve diagnostic accuracy for routine clinical examinations of patients with nonarthritic hip pain. Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a novel diagnostic foot progression angle walking (FPAW) test for identifying hip pathology related to FAI or hip instability. Study Design: Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This prospective study included 199 consecutive patients who were evaluated for unilateral hip pain and who underwent FPAW testing along with standard physical examination testing. Demographic data, including age, sex and hip laterality, were collected from each patient. FPAW testing was performed with directed internal and external foot progression angles from their baseline measurements, with a positive test reproducing pain and/or discomfort. Comparisons were then made with flexion adduction internal rotation (FADIR) and flexion abduction external rotation (FABER) tests as the designated diagnostic standard examinations for FAI and hip instability, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity, along with the McNemar chi-square test for group comparison, were used to generate summary statistics. In addition, areas under the combined receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) of test performance were calculated for both FPAW and the designated standard examination tests (FADIR, FABER). Radiographic imaging was used subsequently to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The average age of the study cohort was 35.4 ± 11.8 years, with 114 patients being

  15. Statistical analysis of Contact Angle Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardan, Nachiketa; Panchagnula, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a new statistical approach to determining Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) by studying the nature of the triple line. A statistical distribution of local contact angles on a random three-dimensional drop is used as the basis for this approach. Drops with randomly shaped triple lines but of fixed volumes were deposited on a substrate and their triple line shapes were extracted by imaging. Using a solution developed by Prabhala et al. (Langmuir, 2010), the complete three dimensional shape of the sessile drop was generated. A distribution of the local contact angles for several such drops but of the same liquid-substrate pairs is generated. This distribution is a result of several microscopic advancing and receding processes along the triple line. This distribution is used to yield an approximation of the CAH associated with the substrate. This is then compared with measurements of CAH by means of a liquid infusion-withdrawal experiment. Static measurements are shown to be sufficient to measure quasistatic contact angle hysteresis of a substrate. The approach also points towards the relationship between microscopic triple line contortions and CAH.

  16. Association between Bolton discrepancy and Angle malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Cançado, Rodrigo Hermont; Gonçalves Júnior, Waldir; Valarelli, Fabrício Pinelli; Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore de; Crêspo, Janaina Aparecida Lima

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the overall and anterior ratios of tooth size discrepancies in all Angle malocclusion groups. The following null hypothesis (H0) was tested: no difference between tooth size discrepancies (overall and anterior) would be observed among Angle malocclusion groups. The sample comprised of 711 pre-orthodontic treatment study casts of Brazilian patients with a mean age of 17.42 years selected from private practices in Brazil. The casts were divided into 3 groups according to the type of malocclusion: Class I (n = 321), Class II (n = 324), and Class III patients (n = 66). The measurement of the greatest mesiodistal width of the teeth was performed using a centesimal precision digital caliper directly on the study casts, from the distal surface of the left first molar to the distal surface of the right first molar. The overall and anterior ratios between the maxillary and mandibular teeth were evaluated using Bolton's method. The following statistical tests were applied: chi-square, independent t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results showed that all Angle malocclusions groups exhibited a ratio compatible with those recommended by Bolton. With respect to the overall and anterior ratios among the malocclusion groups, no statistically significant differences were found. The null hypothesis was accepted because the results showed no differences in the overall and anterior ratios of tooth size discrepancies among different Angle malocclusion groups.

  17. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single

  18. The Semiotic and Conceptual Genesis of Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguay, Denis; Venant, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we try to understand how students at the end of primary school conceive of angle: Is an angle a magnitude for them or a geometric figure, and how do they manage to coordinate the two aspects in their understanding of the concepts of angle and of angle measurement? With the aim of better grasping the way "angle" is…

  19. An Experimental Study on the Iso-Content-Based Angle Similarity Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    2002-01-01

    Retrieval performance of the iso-content-based angle similarity measure within the angle, distance, conjunction, disjunction, and ellipse retrieval models is compared with retrieval performance of the distance similarity measure and the angle similarity measure. Results show the iso-content-based angle similarity measure achieves satisfactory…

  20. As-placed contact angles for sessile drops.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Rafael; Yadav, Preeti S

    2008-01-01

    As-placed contact angle is the contact angle a drop adapts as a result of its placement on a surface. As expected, the as-placed contact angle, thetaAP, of a sessile drop on a horizontal surface decreases with the drop size due to the increase in hydrostatic pressure. We present a theoretical prediction for thetaAP which shows that it is a unique function of the advancing contact angle, thetaA, drop size, and material properties (surface tensions and densities). We test our prediction with published and new data. The theory agrees with the experiments. From the relation of the as-placed contact angle to drop size the thermodynamic equilibrium contact angle is also calculated.

  1. Variable angle transmittance of silver grid transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-10-01

    We focus on investigating the optical transmittance of silver grid transparent electrodes (SGTEs) in variable angle view theoretically and experimentally, rather than the optical transmittance under the normal incidence. The variable angle transmittance (VAT) values of SGTEs are measured on a home-made experimental setup. The experimental results about difference of the transmittance difference under different angles are small and negligible, although the measured angle is changed. Theoretically, the physical mechanism on nearly constant transmittance for different angle view can be well explained according to the theory of geometrical optics. This study provides an approach for investigating the VAT values of SGTEs in a controllable fashion and the influence of viewing angle of the touch screen.

  2. Creation of a multi-reference-angle comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bručas, Domantas; Giniotis, Vytautas

    2009-03-01

    Many geodetic and industrial instruments utilize precise angle determination. Metrological calibration and testing of such devices is very complicated, due to the large number of angular position values generated, and often cannot be accomplished using classical means of angle determination. Therefore a special comparator (test rig) capable of calibration geodetic and other angle-measuring instruments and implementing multiple references for angle determination has been created. Several modernized optical devices were used on the test rig, together with the implementation of a special calibration method. In this paper the construction of the rig, modernization of the optical devices, calibration, and some results of measurements are presented.

  3. Contact angle distribution of particles at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Snoeyink, Craig; Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2015-01-27

    Recent measurements have implied a distribution of interfacially adsorbed particles' contact angles; however, it has been impossible to measure statistically significant numbers for these contact angles noninvasively in situ. Using a new microscopy method that allows nanometer-scale resolution of particle's 3D positions on an interface, we have measured the contact angles for thousands of latex particles at an oil/water interface. Furthermore, these measurements are dynamic, allowing the observation of the particle contact angle with high temporal resolution, resulting in hundreds of thousands of individual contact angle measurements. The contact angle has been found to fit a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 19.3°, which is much larger than previously recorded. Furthermore, the technique used allows the effect of measurement error, constrained interfacial diffusion, and particle property variation on the contact angle distribution to be individually evaluated. Because of the ability to measure the contact angle noninvasively, the results provide previously unobtainable, unique data on the dynamics and distribution of the adsorbed particles' contact angle.

  4. Recent Flight Results of the TRMM Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Bilanow, Stephen; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls the roll and pitch attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. TRMM's nominal orbit altitude was 350 km, until raised to 402 km to prolong mission life. During the boost, the ESA experienced a decreasing signal to noise ratio, until sun interference at 393 km altitude made the ESA data unreliable for attitude determination. At that point, the backup attitude determination algorithm, an extended Kalman filter, was enabled. After the boost finished, TRMM reacquired its nadir-pointing attitude, and continued its mission. This paper will briefly discuss the boost and the decision to turn on the backup attitude determination algorithm. A description of the extended Kalman filter algorithm will be given. In addition, flight results from analyzing attitude data and the results of software changes made onboard TRMM will be discussed. Some lessons learned are presented.

  5. Critical rolling angle of microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzi, Bahman; Vallabh, Chaitanya K. P.; Stephens, James D.; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    At the micrometer-scale and below, particle adhesion becomes particularly relevant as van der Waals force often dominates volume and surface proportional forces. The rolling resistance of microparticles and their critical rolling angles prior to the initiation of free-rolling and/or complete detachment are critical in numerous industrial processes and natural phenomenon involving particle adhesion and granular dynamics. The current work describes a non-contact measurement approach for determining the critical rolling angle of a single microparticle under the influence of a contact-point base-excitation generated by a transient displacement field of a prescribed surface acoustic wave pulse and reports the critical rolling angle data for a set of polystyrene latex microparticles.

  6. A robust polynomial fitting approach for contact angle measurements.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Mann, J Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2013-05-14

    Polynomial fitting to drop profile offers an alternative to well-established drop shape techniques for contact angle measurements from sessile drops without a need for liquid physical properties. Here, we evaluate the accuracy of contact angles resulting from fitting polynomials of various orders to drop profiles in a Cartesian coordinate system, over a wide range of contact angles. We develop a differentiator mask to automatically find a range of required number of pixels from a drop profile over which a stable contact angle is obtained. The polynomial order that results in the longest stable regime and returns the lowest standard error and the highest correlation coefficient is selected to determine drop contact angles. We find that, unlike previous reports, a single polynomial order cannot be used to accurately estimate a wide range of contact angles and that a larger order polynomial is needed for drops with larger contact angles. Our method returns contact angles with an accuracy of <0.4° for solid-liquid systems with θ < ~60°. This compares well with the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) methodology results. Above about 60°, we observe significant deviations from ADSA-P results, most likely because a polynomial cannot trace the profile of drops with close-to-vertical and vertical segments. To overcome this limitation, we implement a new polynomial fitting scheme by transforming drop profiles into polar coordinate system. This eliminates the well-known problem with high curvature drops and enables estimating contact angles in a wide range with a fourth-order polynomial. We show that this approach returns dynamic contact angles with less than 0.7° error as compared to ADSA-P, for the solid-liquid systems tested. This new approach is a powerful alternative to drop shape techniques for estimating contact angles of drops regardless of drop symmetry and without a need for liquid properties.

  7. Return of hunger following a relatively high carbohydrate breakfast is associated with earlier recorded glucose peak and nadir.

    PubMed

    Chandler-Laney, Paula C; Morrison, Shannon A; Goree, Laura Lee T; Ellis, Amy C; Casazza, Krista; Desmond, Renee; Gower, Barbara A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that a breakfast meal with high carbohydrate/low fat results in an earlier increase in postprandial glucose and insulin, a greater decrease below baseline in postprandial glucose, and an earlier return of appetite, compared with a low carbohydrate/high fat meal. Overweight but otherwise healthy adults (n = 64) were maintained on one of two eucaloric diets: high carbohydrate/low fat (HC/LF; 55:27:18% kcals from carbohydrate:fat:protein) versus low carbohydrate/high fat (LC/HF; 43:39:18% kcals from carbohydrate:fat:protein). After 4 weeks of acclimation to the diets, participants underwent a meal test during which circulating glucose and insulin and self-reported hunger and fullness, were measured before and after consumption of breakfast from their assigned diets. The LC/HF meal resulted in a later time at the highest and lowest recorded glucose, higher glucose concentrations at 3 and 4 hours post meal, and lower insulin incremental area under the curve. Participants consuming the LC/HF meal reported lower appetite 3 and 4 hours following the meal, a response that was associated with the timing of the highest and lowest recorded glucose. Modest increases in meal carbohydrate content at the expense of fat content may facilitate weight gain over the long-term by contributing to an earlier rise and fall of postprandial glucose concentrations and an earlier return of appetite.

  8. Cydonia: Wide Angle Color Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Although the resolution of the MOC wide angle cameras is too low to tell much about the geomorphology of the Cydonia region, the images from the red and blue wide angle cameras provide us with two types of information that is of interest in their own right: color and stereoscopic data. Above are a color view and a stereoscopic anaglyph rendition of Geodesy Campaign images acquired by MGS MOC in May 1999. To view the stereo image, you need red/blue '3-D' glasses.

  9. Angle parameter changes of phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy for acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Wei; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Lu, Bin; Wang, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the difference in angle parameters and clinical outcome following phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy in patients with acute primary angle closure (APAC) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). METHODS Patients (n=23, 31 eyes) were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or combined phacotrabeculectomy (n=24, 31 eyes). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), the main complications following surgery, and indentation gonioscopy and angle parameters measured using UBM were documented preoperatively and postoperatively. RESULTS The improvement in BCVA in the phacoemulsification group was significantly greater than in the combined group (P<0.05). IOP in the phacoemulsification group was slightly higher than in the combined group following 1wk of follow-up (P<0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups at the latter follow-up (P>0.05). Phacoemulsification alone resulted in a slight increase in the trabecular ciliary processes distance compared with the combined surgery (P<0.05), whereas the other angle parameters showed no significant difference between the groups. Complications in combined group were greater than phacoemulsification only group. CONCLUSION Both surgeries effectively opened the drainage angle and deepened the anterior chamber, and IOP was well controlled postoperatively. However, phacoemulsification showed better efficacy in improving visual function and showed reduced complications following surgery. PMID:26309873

  10. Can a surgeon drill accurately at a specified angle?

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Valentina; Cook, Jodie; Arthurs, Gareth I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether a surgeon can drill accurately a specified angle and whether surgeon experience, task repetition, drill bit size and perceived difficulty influence drilling angle accuracy. Methods The sample population consisted of final-year students (n=25), non-specialist veterinarians (n=22) and board-certified orthopaedic surgeons (n=8). Each participant drilled a hole twice in a horizontal oak plank at 30°, 45°, 60°, 80°, 85° and 90° angles with either a 2.5  or a 3.5 mm drill bit. Participants then rated the perceived difficulty to drill each angle. The true angle of each hole was measured using a digital goniometer. Results Greater drilling accuracy was achieved at angles closer to 90°. An error of ≤±4° was achieved by 84.5 per cent of participants drilling a 90° angle compared with approximately 20 per cent of participants drilling a 30–45° angle. There was no effect of surgeon experience, task repetition or drill bit size on the mean error for intended versus achieved angle. Increased perception of difficulty was associated with the more acute angles and decreased accuracy, but not experience level. Clinical significance This study shows that surgeon ability to drill accurately (within ±4° error) is limited, particularly at angles ≤60°. In situations where drill angle is critical, use of computer-assisted navigation or custom-made drill guides may be preferable. PMID:27547423

  11. The Effect of Incidence Angle on Stereo DTM Quality: Simulations in Support of Europa Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T. M.; Jorda, L.

    2015-12-01

    Many quality factors for digital topographic models (DTMs) from stereo imaging can be predicted geometrically. For example, pixel scale is related to instantaneous field of view and range, and vertical precision is a known function of the pixel scale and convergence angle if the image quality is high so that automated image matching reaches its optimal precision (~0.2 pixel). The influence of incidence angle is harder to predict. Reduced quality is expected both at low incidence (where topographic shading disappears) and high incidence (where signal/noise ratio is low and shadows occur). This problem is of general interest, but critical for NASA's Europa mission. The REASON instrument will obtain a radar sounding profile on each Europa flyby. Stereo images collected simultaneously by the EIS camera will be used to make DTMs needed to distinguish off-nadir surface echos (clutter) from subsurface features. The question is, how much of this DTM strip will be useful, given that incidence angle will vary substantially? We are using simulations to answer this question. We mosaicked 220 m/pixel Galileo images of the Castalia Macula region of Europa and made a DTM by photoclinometry, using a low-incidence image to correct for albedo variations. With the simulation software OASIS we generated synthetic stereopairs that are realistic in terms of image resolution, noise, photometry (including albedo variations based on the low incidence image), and cast shadows. We then use the commercial stereo software SOCET SET (® BAE Systems), which we have used for a wide variety of planetary mapping projects, to produce DTMs. These are compared to the input DTM as "truth" to quantify the dependence of DTM resolution and vertical precision on illumination, and to document the ways that DTMs degrade at high and low incidence angles. This methodology is immediately applicable to other planetary targets, and in particular can be used to address how much difference in illumination can be

  12. Contact-angle hysteresis on super-hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    McHale, G; Shirtcliffe, N J; Newton, M I

    2004-11-09

    The relationship between perturbations to contact angles on a rough or textured surface and the super-hydrophobic enhancement of the equilibrium contact angle is discussed theoretically. Two models are considered. In the first (Wenzel) case, the super-hydrophobic surface has a very high contact angle and the droplet completely contacts the surface upon which it rests. In the second (Cassie-Baxter) case, the super-hydrophobic surface has a very high contact angle, but the droplet bridges across surface protrusions. The theoretical treatment emphasizes the concept of contact-angle amplification or attenuation and distinguishes between the increases in contact angles due to roughening or texturing surfaces and perturbations to the resulting contact angles. The theory is applied to predicting contact-angle hysteresis on rough surfaces from the hysteresis observable on smooth surfaces and is therefore relevant to predicting roll-off angles for droplets on tilted surfaces. The theory quantitatively predicts a "sticky" surface for Wenzel-type surfaces and a "slippy" surface for Cassie-Baxter-type surfaces.

  13. Angle Closure Scoring System (ACSS)-A Scoring System for Stratification of Angle Closure Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Aparna; Padhy, Debananda; Sarangi, Sarada; Das, Gopinath

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the angle closure scoring system (ACSS) for stratifying primary angle course disease. Methods This observational cross sectional institutional study included patients with primary open angle glaucoma suspects (n = 21) and primary angle closure disease (primary angle closure, PAC, n = 63 and primary angle course glaucoma, PACG, n = 58 (defined by International society of Geographical and Epidemiological Ophthalmology, ISGEO). Two independent examiners blinded to clinical details, graded good quality pre-laser goniophotographs of the patients incorporating quadrants of peripheral anterior synechieae (PAS), non-visibility of posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM) and blotchy pigments (ranging from 1–4 quadrants), iris configuration, angle recess (sum of above depicting ACSSg) and lens thickness/axial length ratio (LT/AL), cup disc ratio and baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) to give total score (ACSSt). Result There were significant differences in ACSSg scores within the same ISGEO stage of PAC and PACG between eyes that required nil or >1medicines after laser iridotomy, p<0.001. The ACSSg was associated with need for >1 medicines in both PAC and PACG eyes, p<0.001. An ACSSg score>12 and 14 in PAC (odds ratio = 2.7(95% CI-1.7–5.9) and PACG (Odds ratio = 1.6(95%CI-1.19–2.2) predicted need for single medicines while ACSSg scores >14 and 19 predicted need for ≥2 medicines in PAC and PACG eyes, respectively. The LT/Al ratio, IOP score or cup disc score did not influence the need for medical treatment independently. Conclusion The ACSS can be a useful clinical adjunct to the ISGEO system to predict need for medicines and prognosticate each stage more accurately. PMID:27788183

  14. Initial flight results of the TRMM Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. After a potential single point failure in the ESA was identified, the contingency attitude determination method chosen to backup the ESA-based system was a sixth-order extended Kalman filter that uses magnetometer and digital sun sensor measurements. A brief description of the TRMM Kalman filter will be given, including some implementation issues and algorithm heritage. Operational aspects of the Kalman filter and some failure detection and correction will be described. The Kalman filter was tested in a sun pointing attitude and in a nadir pointing attitude during the in-orbit checkout period, and results from those tests will be presented. This paper will describe some lessons learned from the experience of the TRMM team.

  15. Initial Flight Results of the TRMM Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. After a potential single point failure in the ESA was identified, the contingency attitude determination method chosen to backup the ESA-based system was a sixth-order extended Kalman filter that uses magnetometer and digital sun sensor measurements. A brief description of the TRMM Kalman filter will be given, including some implementation issues and algorithm heritage. Operational aspects of the Kalman filter and some failure detection and correction will be described. The Kalman filter was tested in a sun pointing attitude and in a nadir pointing attitude during the in-orbit checkout period, and results from those tests will be presented. This paper will describe some lessons learned from the experience of the TRMM team.

  16. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  17. Evaluation of arctic multibeam sonar data quality using nadir crossover error analysis and compilation of a full-resolution data product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Ashton F.; Mayer, Larry A.; Calder, Brian A.; Armstrong, Andrew A.

    2014-05-01

    We document a new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry compilation for the Canada Basin and Chukchi Borderland in the Arctic Ocean - United States Arctic Multibeam Compilation (USAMBC Version 1.0). The compilation preserves the highest native resolution of the bathymetric data, allowing for more detailed interpretation of seafloor morphology than has been previously possible. The compilation was created from multibeam bathymetry data available through openly accessible government and academic repositories. Much of the new data was collected during dedicated mapping cruises in support of the United States effort to map extended continental shelf regions beyond the 200 nm Exclusive Economic Zone. Data quality was evaluated using nadir-beam crossover-error statistics, making it possible to assess the precision of multibeam depth soundings collected from a wide range of vessels and sonar systems. Data were compiled into a single high-resolution grid through a vertical stacking method, preserving the highest quality data source in any specific grid cell. The crossover-error analysis and method of data compilation can be applied to other multi-source multibeam data sets, and is particularly useful for government agencies targeting extended continental shelf regions but with limited hydrographic capabilities. Both the gridded compilation and an easily distributed geospatial PDF map are freely available through the University of New Hampshire's Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (ccom.unh.edu/theme/law-sea). The geospatial pdf is a full resolution, small file-size product that supports interpretation of Arctic seafloor morphology without the need for specialized gridding/visualization software.

  18. Discovering the Inscribed Angle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to play tennis is difficult. It takes practice, but it also helps to have a coach--someone who gives tips and pointers but allows the freedom to play the game on one's own. Learning to act like a mathematician is a similar process. Students report that the process of proving the inscribed angle theorem is challenging and, at times,…

  19. [Morphologic aspects of angle grinder injury].

    PubMed

    Thurner, W; Pollak, S

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on soft-tissue and bone preparations to determine the morphological characteristics of angle grinder injuries. The grinding effect of the rotating cutting-off wheel causes severances with local loss of tissue, resulting in tool-specific wound features. Superficial skin notches and (incomplete) severances of bony structures are of particular significance. Mutual trace transfer is a valuable means for determining the tool used and for interpreting the scene.

  20. On accurate determination of contact angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  1. Tilt angle control of nanocolumns grown by glancing angle sputtering at variable argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Cebollada, A.; Alvarez, R.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Palmero, A.

    2010-10-25

    We show that the tilt angle of nanostructures obtained by glancing angle sputtering is finely tuned by selecting the adequate argon pressure. At low pressures, a ballistic deposition regime dominates, yielding high directional atoms that form tilted nanocolumns. High pressures lead to a diffusive regime which gives rise to vertical columnar growth. Monte Carlo simulations reproduce the experimental results indicating that the loss of directionality of the sputtered particles in the gas phase, together with the self-shadowing mechanism at the surface, are the main processes responsible for the development of the columns.

  2. Kernel density estimation applied to bond length, bond angle, and torsion angle distributions.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Patrick; Korb, Oliver; Cole, Jason

    2014-05-27

    We describe the method of kernel density estimation (KDE) and apply it to molecular structure data. KDE is a quite general nonparametric statistical method suitable even for multimodal data. The method generates smooth probability density function (PDF) representations and finds application in diverse fields such as signal processing and econometrics. KDE appears to have been under-utilized as a method in molecular geometry analysis, chemo-informatics, and molecular structure optimization. The resulting probability densities have advantages over histograms and, importantly, are also suitable for gradient-based optimization. To illustrate KDE, we describe its application to chemical bond length, bond valence angle, and torsion angle distributions and show the ability of the method to model arbitrary torsion angle distributions.

  3. Automated small tilt-angle measurement using Lau interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Shashi; Singh, Sumitra; Rana, Santosh

    2005-10-01

    A technique for a tilt-angle measurement of reflecting objects based on the Lau interferometry coupled with the moire readout has been proposed. A white-light incoherent source illuminates a set of two gratings, resulting in the generation of the Fresnel image due to the Lau effect. The Fresnel image is projected onto a reflecting object. The image reflected from the object is superimposed onto an identical grating, which results in the formation of a moire fringe pattern. The inclination angle of moire fringes is a function of tilt angle of the object. Theory and experimental arrangement of the proposed technique is presented and results of the investigation are reported.

  4. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  5. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p < 0.05) for text messaging than for the other tasks, and significantly larger while sitting than while standing. Study results suggest that text messaging, which is one of the most frequently used app categories of smartphone, could be a main contributing factor to the occurrence of neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions.

  6. Off-Angle Iris Correction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph T; Karakaya, Mahmut; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2016-01-01

    In many real world iris recognition systems obtaining consistent frontal images is problematic do to inexperienced or uncooperative users, untrained operators, or distracting environments. As a result many collected images are unusable by modern iris matchers. In this chapter we present four methods for correcting off-angle iris images to appear frontal which makes them compatible with existing iris matchers. The methods include an affine correction, a retraced model of the human eye, measured displacements, and a genetic algorithm optimized correction. The affine correction represents a simple way to create an iris image that appears frontal but it does not account for refractive distortions of the cornea. The other method account for refraction. The retraced model simulates the optical properties of the cornea. The other two methods are data driven. The first uses optical flow to measure the displacements of the iris texture when compared to frontal images of the same subject. The second uses a genetic algorithm to learn a mapping that optimizes the Hamming Distance scores between off-angle and frontal images. In this paper we hypothesize that the biological model presented in our earlier work does not adequately account for all variations in eye anatomy and therefore the two data-driven approaches should yield better performance. Results are presented using the commercial VeriEye matcher that show that the genetic algorithm method clearly improves over prior work and makes iris recognition possible up to 50 degrees off-angle.

  7. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  8. The Pluto System At Small Phase Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Buie, Marc W.; Binzel, Richard; Ennico, Kimberly; Grundy, William M.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of the Pluto system acquired during the New Horizons encounter epoch (HST Program 13667, M. Buie, PI) span the phase angle range from 0.06 to 1.7 degrees, enabling the measurement and characterization of the opposition effect for Pluto and its satellites at 0.58 microns using HST WFC3/UVIS with the F350LP filter, which has a broadband response and a pivot wavelength of 0.58 microns. At these small phase angles, differences in the opposition effect width and amplitude appear. The small satellites Nix and Hydra both exhibit a very narrow opposition surge, while the considerably larger moon Charon has a broader opposition surge. Microtextural surface properties derived from the shape and magnitude of the opposition surge of each surface contain a record of the collisional history of the system. We combine these small phase angle observations with those made at larger phase angles by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), which also has a broadband response with a pivot wavelength of 0.61 microns, to produce the most complete disk-integrated solar phase curves that we will have for decades to come. Modeling these disk-integrated phase curves generates sets of photometric parameters that will inform spectral modeling of the satellite surfaces as well as terrains on Pluto from spatially resolved New Horizons Ralph Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) data from 1.2 to 2.5 microns. Rotationally resolved phase curves of Pluto reveal opposition effects that only appear at phase angles less than 0.1 degree and have widths and amplitudes that are highly dependent on longitude and therefore on Pluto's diverse terrains. The high albedo region informally known as Sputnik Planum dominates the disk-integrated reflectance of Pluto on the New Horizons encounter hemisphere. These results lay the groundwork for observations at true opposition in 2018, when the Pluto system will be observable at phase angles so small that

  9. Numerical investigation of the angle of repose of monosized spheres.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y C; Xu, B H; Yu, A B; Zulli, P

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the angle of repose, a most important macroscopic parameter in characterizing granular materials, by means of a modified distinct element method. Emphasis is given to the effect of variables related to factors such as particle characteristics, material properties, and geometrical constraints. The results show that sliding and rolling frictions are the primary reasons for the formation of a sandpile; particle size and container thickness significantly influence the angle of repose; and the angle of repose is not so sensitive to density, Poisson's ratio, damping coefficient, and Young's modulus. Increasing rolling friction coefficient or sliding friction coefficient increases the angle of repose. Conversely, increasing particle size or container thickness decreases the angle of repose. The underlying mechanisms for these effects are discussed in terms of particle-particle and particle-wall interactions.

  10. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  11. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, J. B.; Carter, D. L.; Thompson, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them.

  12. Multiple incidence angle SIR-B experiment over Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, Jobea; Casey, Daren; Wall, Stephen; Brandani, Aldo; Domik, Gitta; Leberl, Franz

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), the second synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to fly aboard a shuttle, was launched on October 5, 1984. One of the primary goals of the SIR-B experiment was to use multiple incidence angle radar images to distinguish different terrain types through the use of their characteristic backscatter curves. This goal was accomplished in several locations including the Chubut Province of southern Argentina. Four descending image acquisitions were collected providing a multiple incidence angle image set. The data were first used to assess stereo-radargrammetric techniques. A digital elevation model was produced using the optimum pair of multiple incidence angle images. This model was then used to determine the local incidence angle of each picture element to generate curves of relative brightness vs. incidence angle. Secondary image products were also generated using the multi-angle data. The results of this work indicate that: (1) various forest species and various structures of a single species may be discriminated using multiple incidence angle radar imagery, and (2) it is essential to consider the variation in backscatter due to a variable incidence angle when analyzing and comparing data collected at varying frequencies and polarizations.

  13. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Xiong; Liu, Qi-Fan; Hong, Ru-Jia; Pan, Ping-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Miao

    2016-01-01

    Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP) of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF). Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars. PMID:27271629

  14. A Novel Monopulse Angle Estimation Method for Wideband LFM Radars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Xiong; Liu, Qi-Fan; Hong, Ru-Jia; Pan, Ping-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Miao

    2016-06-03

    Traditional monopulse angle estimations are mainly based on phase comparison and amplitude comparison methods, which are commonly adopted in narrowband radars. In modern radar systems, wideband radars are becoming more and more important, while the angle estimation for wideband signals is little studied in previous works. As noise in wideband radars has larger bandwidth than narrowband radars, the challenge lies in the accumulation of energy from the high resolution range profile (HRRP) of monopulse. In wideband radars, linear frequency modulated (LFM) signals are frequently utilized. In this paper, we investigate the monopulse angle estimation problem for wideband LFM signals. To accumulate the energy of the received echo signals from different scatterers of a target, we propose utilizing a cross-correlation operation, which can achieve a good performance in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. In the proposed algorithm, the problem of angle estimation is converted to estimating the frequency of the cross-correlation function (CCF). Experimental results demonstrate the similar performance of the proposed algorithm compared with the traditional amplitude comparison method. It means that the proposed method for angle estimation can be adopted. When adopting the proposed method, future radars may only need wideband signals for both tracking and imaging, which can greatly increase the data rate and strengthen the capability of anti-jamming. More importantly, the estimated angle will not become ambiguous under an arbitrary angle, which can significantly extend the estimated angle range in wideband radars.

  15. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Mekking, J.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.; Monteiro, D.

    2013-09-01

    The Gaia mission1 will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft2, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the `Basic Angle', at an operational temperature of 100 K. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability at cryogenic conditions, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system3 for this mission, measuring the relative motion of Gaia's telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to detect Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction on Gaia and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material this paper addresses the specific challenges towards the cryogenic application of the Gaia BAM including design, integration and verification/qualification by testing.

  16. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  17. Preferred viewing distance and screen angle of electronic paper displays.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Kong-King; Lee, Der-Song

    2007-09-01

    This study explored the viewing distance and screen angle for electronic paper (E-Paper) displays under various light sources, ambient illuminations, and character sizes. Data analysis showed that the mean viewing distance and screen angle were 495 mm and 123.7 degrees. The mean viewing distances for Kolin Chlorestic Liquid Crystal display was 500 mm, significantly longer than Sony electronic ink display, 491 mm. Screen angle for Kolin was 127.4 degrees, significantly greater than that of Sony, 120.0 degrees. Various light sources revealed no significant effect on viewing distances; nevertheless, they showed significant effect on screen angles. The screen angle for sunlight lamp (D65) was similar to that of fluorescent lamp (TL84), but greater than that of tungsten lamp (F). Ambient illumination and E-paper type had significant effects on viewing distance and screen angle. The higher the ambient illumination was, the longer the viewing distance and the lesser the screen angle. Character size had significant effect on viewing distances: the larger the character size, the longer the viewing distance. The results of this study indicated that the viewing distance for E-Paper was similar to that of visual display terminal (VDT) at around 500 mm, but greater than normal paper at about 360 mm. The mean screen angle was around 123.7 degrees, which in terms of viewing angle is 29.5 degrees below horizontal eye level. This result is similar to the general suggested viewing angle between 20 degrees and 50 degrees below the horizontal line of sight.

  18. Angle-resolved optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien Emmanuel

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a powerful tool for probing the microstructure of biological tissue non-invasively at high-speed. OCT measures depth-resolved reflectance of infrared light, generating cross-sectional images non-invasively with micron-scale resolution. As with other imaging modalities that employ coherent detection, OCT images are confounded by speckle noise. Speckle imposes a grainy texture on images that reduces the signal-to-noise ratio to near unity values. As a result, it conceals subtle differences in scattering properties known to be crucial for differentiating normal from diseased tissue states. In this thesis, we developed a novel OCT modality called "Angle-Resolved OCT" in which depth scans (A-lines) are obtained simultaneously from a broad range of backscattering angles. We demonstrated that high levels of speckle reduction can be achieved by averaging the magnitudes of A-lines corresponding to the same transverse locations. With both experimental and analytic approaches, we demonstrated that this averaging method does not lead to a substantial loss in spatial resolution. We developed two different imaging systems for performing Angle-Resolved OCT. With the first system, angular data was acquired simultaneously; with the second, it was acquired sequentially. The first system had superior speckle-reduction capabilities but image quality degraded significantly with small sample movements. The second system allowed for in vivo imaging, as demonstrated with Resolved OCT systems, the speckle-reduced images showed hitherto unprecedented delineation of tissue microstructure.

  19. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  20. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  1. Dayside temperatures in the Venus upper atmosphere from Venus Express/VIRTIS nadir measurements at 4.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Gilli, G.; Piccialli, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed nadir observations of atmospheric infrared emissions carried out by VIRTIS, a high-resolution spectrometer on board the European spacecraft Venus Express. We focused on the ro-vibrational band of CO2 at 4.3 μm on the dayside, whose fluorescence originates in the Venus upper mesosphere and above. This is the first time that a systematic sounding of these non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) emissions has been carried out in Venus using this geometry. As many as 143,218 spectra have been analysed on the dayside during the period 14/05/2006 to 14/09/2009. We designed an inversion method to obtain the atmospheric temperature from these non-thermal observations, including a NLTE line-by-line forward model and a pre-computed set of spectra for a set of thermal structures and illumination conditions. Our measurements sound a broad region of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere of Venus ranging from 10-2-10-5 mb (which in the Venus International Reference Atmosphere, VIRA, is approximately 100-150 km during the daytime) and show a maximum around 195 ± 10 K in the subsolar region, decreasing with latitude and local time towards the terminator. This is in qualitative agreement with predictions by a Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) after a proper averaging of altitudes for meaningful comparisons, although our temperatures are colder than the model by about 25 K throughout. We estimate a thermal gradient of about 35 K between the subsolar and antisolar points when comparing our data with nightside temperatures measured at similar altitudes by SPICAV, another instrument on Venus Express (VEx). Our data show a stable temperature structure through five years of measurements, but we also found episodes of strong heating/cooling to occur in the subsolar region of less than two days. The table with numerical data and averaged temperatures displayed in Fig. 7A provided as a CSV data file is only available at the CDS via

  2. SU-E-T-446: Group-Sparsity Based Angle Generation Method for Beam Angle Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This work is to develop the effective algorithm for beam angle optimization (BAO), with the emphasis on enabling further improvement from existing treatment-dependent templates based on clinical knowledge and experience. Methods: The proposed BAO algorithm utilizes a priori beam angle templates as the initial guess, and iteratively generates angular updates for this initial set, namely angle generation method, with improved dose conformality that is quantitatively measured by the objective function. That is, during each iteration, we select “the test angle” in the initial set, and use group-sparsity based fluence map optimization to identify “the candidate angle” for updating “the test angle”, for which all the angles in the initial set except “the test angle”, namely “the fixed set”, are set free, i.e., with no group-sparsity penalty, and the rest of angles including “the test angle” during this iteration are in “the working set”. And then “the candidate angle” is selected with the smallest objective function value from the angles in “the working set” with locally maximal group sparsity, and replaces “the test angle” if “the fixed set” with “the candidate angle” has a smaller objective function value by solving the standard fluence map optimization (with no group-sparsity regularization). Similarly other angles in the initial set are in turn selected as “the test angle” for angular updates and this chain of updates is iterated until no further new angular update is identified for a full loop. Results: The tests using the MGH public prostate dataset demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed BAO algorithm. For example, the optimized angular set from the proposed BAO algorithm was better the MGH template. Conclusion: A new BAO algorithm is proposed based on the angle generation method via group sparsity, with improved dose conformality from the given template. Hao Gao was partially supported by the

  3. Variations of refraction angles from observations of the Moon from space.

    PubMed

    Kireev, S V; Sokolovskiy, S V

    1994-12-20

    We present the results of measurements of optical refraction angles from photographs of the Moon taken from the orbital station Mir. We made estimations of rms fluctuations of refraction angles and of the characteristics of multipath propagation.

  4. Aircraft flight path angle display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A display system for use in an aircraft control wheel steering system provides the pilot with a single, quickened flight path angle display to overcome poor handling qualities due to intrinsic flight path angle response lags, while avoiding multiple information display symbology. The control law for the flight path angle control system is designed such that the aircraft's actual flight path angle response lags the pilot's commanded flight path angle by a constant time lag .tau., independent of flight conditions. The synthesized display signal is produced as a predetermined function of the aircraft's actual flight path angle, the time lag .tau. and command inputs from the pilot's column.

  5. Theta angle in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, Matti

    2017-03-01

    V-QCD is a class of effective holographic models for QCD which fully includes the backreaction of quarks to gluon dynamics. The physics of the θ-angle and the axial anomaly can be consistently included in these models. We analyze their phase diagrams over ranges of values of the quark mass, Nf/Nc, and θ, computing observables such as the topological susceptibility and the meson masses. At small quark mass, where effective chiral Lagrangians are reliable, they agree with the predictions of V-QCD.

  6. Pair Creation at Large Inherent Angles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T.; Schroeder, D.V.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    In the next-generation linear colliders, the low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs created during the collision of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} beams would cause potential deleterious background problems to the detectors. At low collider energies, the pairs are made essentially by the incoherent process, where the pair is created by the interaction of beamstrahlung photons on the individual particles in the oncoming beam. This problem was first identified by Zolotarev, et al[1]. At energies where the beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon} lies approximately in the range 0.6 {approx}< {Upsilon} {approx}< 100, pair creation from the beamstrahlung photons is dominated by a coherent process, first noted by Chen[2]. The seriousness of this pair creation problem lies in the transverse momenta that the pair particles carry when leaving the interaction point (IP) with large angles. One source of transverse momentum is from the kick by the field of the oncoming beam which results in an outcoming angle {theta} {proportional_to} 1/{radical}x, where x is the fractional energy of the particle relative to the initial beam particle energy[2,3]. As was shown in Ref. 131, there in fact exists an energy threshold for the coherent pairs, where x{sub th} {approx}> 1/2{Upsilon}. Thus within a tolerable exiting angle, there exists an upper limit for {Upsilon} where all coherent pairs would leave the detector through the exhaust port[4]. A somewhat different analysis has been done by Schroeder[5]. In the next generation of linear colliders, as it occurs, the coherent pairs can be exponentially suppressed[2] by properly choosing the {Upsilon}({approx}< 0.6). When this is achieved, the incoherent pairs becomes dominant. Since the central issue is the transverse momentum for particles with large angles, we notice that there is another source for it. Namely, when the pair particles are created at low energies, the intrinsic angles of these pairs when produced may already be large. This issue was

  7. Optimum Projection Angle for Attaining Maximum Distance in a Soccer Punt Kick

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Patel, Dipesh S.

    2011-01-01

    To produce the greatest horizontal distance in a punt kick the ball must be projected at an appropriate angle. Here, we investigated the optimum projection angle that maximises the distance attained in a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper. Two male players performed many maximum-effort kicks using projection angles of between 10° and 90°. The kicks were recorded by a video camera at 100 Hz and a 2 D biomechanical analysis was conducted to obtain measures of the projection velocity, projection angle, projection height, ball spin rate, and foot velocity at impact. The player’s optimum projection angle was calculated by substituting mathematical equations for the relationships between the projection variables into the equations for the aerodynamic flight of a soccer ball. The calculated optimum projection angles were in agreement with the player’s preferred projection angles (40° and 44°). In projectile sports even a small dependence of projection velocity on projection angle is sufficient to produce a substantial shift in the optimum projection angle away from 45°. In the punt kicks studied here, the optimum projection angle was close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball remained almost constant across all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing projection angle and so the optimum projection angle is well below 45°. Key points The optimum projection angle that maximizes the distance of a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper is about 45°. The optimum projection angle is close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball is almost the same at all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the optimum projection angle is well below 45° because the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing

  8. Measurement of critical contact angle in a microgravity space experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1999-06-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the NASA USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's double proboscis containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  9. [Effect of impeller vane number and angles on pump hemolysis].

    PubMed

    Qian, Kunxi; Feng, Zhigang; Zeng, Pei; Ru, Weimin; Yuan, Haiyu

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of impeller design on pump hemolysis, five impellers with different number of vanes or different vane angles were manufactured and tested in one pump for hemolysis comparison. The impellers are made to have the same dimension and same logarithmic spiral vane from which coincide with the stream surfaces in the pump, according to the analytical and three-dimensional design method developed by the authors. Consequently, an impeller with 6 vanes and 30 degrees vane angle has the lowest hemolysis index. This result agrees with the theoretical analyses of other investigators searching optimal number of vanes and vane angle to achieve the highest efficiency of the pump.

  10. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USMT,2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  11. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  12. Modulation of organic interfacial spin polarization by interfacial angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Ying; Zhang, Guang-ping; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui; Hu, Gui-chao

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio theory, we theoretically investigated the interfacial spin polarization by adsorbing a benzene-dithiolate molecule onto a nickel surface with different interfacial angles. A variable magnitude and even an inversion of the interfacial spin polarization are observed with the increase of the interfacial angle. The orbital analysis shows that the interfacial spin polarization is codetermined by two kinds of orbital hybridization between the molecule and the ferromagnet, the pz-d hybridization and the sp3-d hybridization, which show different dependence on the angle. These results indicate a new way to manipulate the spin polarization at organic spinterface.

  13. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Meijer, E.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Monteiro, D.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.

    2012-09-01

    The Gaia mission will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the ‘Basic Angle’. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system for this mission. The BAM measures the relative motion of Gaia’s telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to measure Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction to the Gaia mission, the Payload Module (PLM) and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material, this presentation will address an overview of the challenges towards the key requirements, design, integration and testing (including space-level qualification) of the Gaia BAM.

  14. Defined solid angle alpha counting at NPL.

    PubMed

    Arinc, Arzu; Parfitt, Michael J; Keightley, John D; Wilson, Alan

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the design of and first measurements with the new defined solid angle (DSA) alpha counter at the National Physical Laboratory, UK, with the aim of enabling high-precision radionuclide standardisations for alpha-emitting radionuclides and half-life measurements. The counter may be employed at three source-detector distances in order to monitor the measured activities with calculated geometrical efficiencies. Initial results are promising but further work is required to reduce the dominant uncertainty associated with the source activity distribution.

  15. Characterization of angled tapered superluminescent LEDs.

    PubMed

    Causa, Federica; Sarma, Jayanta; Yunus, Sharina

    2002-08-20

    We present a detailed analysis of the output beam of high-power edge-emitting angled tapered superluminescent LEDs (A-TSLEDs). A device model, including spontaneous and stimulated emission processes as well as the typical nonuniform carrier-density distribution due to current spreading and carrier diffusion, has been developed and used to interpret the experimentally obtained characteristics of inhouse-fabricated A-TSLEDs. The good match between measured and theoretical results indicates that the model reproduces the A-TSLED operation very satisfactorily and clearly explains the role of the collecting lens on the pronounced asymmetry of some of the measured optical intensity profiles.

  16. Finite-time intercept-angle guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kunfeng; Xia, Yuanqing; Yu, Chunmei; Chen, Rongfang

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, new nonsingular terminal sliding mode control guidance laws (NTSMCGLs) to unknown maneuvering target intercept are proposed and their finite-time convergences are proved. A novel nonsingular terminal sliding mode surface based on a predefined angle is designed to improve intercept performance and avoid singularity problem. The presented guidance law requires no information on maneuvering target that is estimated and compensated by extended state observer (ESO), and it can be used in practical systems where the target can evade freely. Also, undesired chattering is restrained effectively by real-time estimation and compensation of ESO. Simulation results show that the NTSMCGLs can achieve exact interception.

  17. Laser interferometric high-precision angle monitor for JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Yoshito; Arai, Koji; Sakagami, Masaaki; Gouda, Naoteru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Taihei

    2006-06-01

    The JASMINE instrument uses a beam combiner to observe two different fields of view separated by 99.5 degrees simultaneously. This angle is so-called basic angle. The basic angle of JASMINE should be stabilized and fluctuations of the basic angle should be monitored with the accuracy of 10 microarcsec in root-mean-square over the satellite revolution period of 5 hours. For this purpose, a high-precision interferometric laser metrogy system is employed. One of the available techniques for measuring the fluctuations of the basic angle is a method known as the wave front sensing using a Fabry-Perot type laser interferometer. This technique is to detect fluctuations of the basic angle as displacement of optical axis in the Fabry-Perot cavity. One of the advantages of the technique is that the sensor is made to be sensitive only to the relative fluctuations of the basic angle which the JASMINE wants to know and to be insensitive to the common one; in order to make the optical axis displacement caused by relative motion enhanced the Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by two mirrors which have long radius of curvature. To verify the principle of this idea, the experiment was performed using a 0.1m-length Fabry-Perot cavity with the mirror curvature of 20m. The mirrors of the cavity were artificially actuated in either relative way or common way and the resultant outputs from the sensor were compared.

  18. Bilarge neutrino mixing and the Cabibbo angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucenna, S. M.; Morisi, S.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2012-09-01

    Recent measurements of the neutrino mixing angles cast doubt on the validity of the so-far popular tribimaximal mixing Ansatz. We propose a parametrization for the neutrino mixing matrix where the reactor angle seeds the large solar and atmospheric mixing angles, equal to each other in first approximation. We suggest such a bilarge mixing pattern as a model-building standard, realized when the leading order value of θ13 equals the Cabibbo angle λC.

  19. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  20. Optoelectronic Shaft-Angle Encoder Tolerates Misalignments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic shaft-angle encoder measures angle of rotation of shaft with high precision while minimizing effects of eccentricity and other misalignments. Grooves on disk serve as reference marks to locate reading heads and measure increments of rotation of disk. Shaft-angle encoder, resembling optical compact-disk drive, includes two tracking heads illuminating grooves on disk and measures reflections from them.

  1. The effect of asymmetric attack on trim angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Ballistic range tests were conducted to determine the effect of an asymmetrically ablated heat shield on the trim angle of attack of an entry vehicle. The tests, which were in support of Project Galileo, were conducted in atmospheric air at Mach numbers from 0.7 to 2.0. For the results for the configuration that was tested, the deduced trim angle varied between 13 deg and 21 deg.

  2. Collisionless pitch-angle scattering of runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; Qin, Hong

    2016-06-01

    It is discovered that the tokamak field geometry generates a toroidicity induced broadening of the pitch-angle distribution of runaway electrons. This collisionless pitch-angle scattering is much stronger than the collisional scattering and invalidates the gyro-center model for runaway electrons. As a result, the energy limit of runaway electrons is found to be larger than the prediction of the gyro-center model and to depend heavily on the background magnetic field.

  3. Extracting Accurate and Precise Topography from Lroc Narrow Angle Camera Stereo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, M. R.; Manheim, M. R.; Speyerer, E. J.; Robinson, M. S.; LROC Team

    2016-06-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) includes two identical Narrow Angle Cameras (NAC) that acquire meter scale imaging. Stereo observations are acquired by imaging from two or more orbits, including at least one off-nadir slew. Digital terrain models (DTMs) generated from the stereo observations are controlled to Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) elevation profiles. With current processing methods, digital terrain models (DTM) have absolute accuracies commensurate than the uncertainties of the LOLA profiles (~10 m horizontally and ~1 m vertically) and relative horizontal and vertical precisions better than the pixel scale of the DTMs (2 to 5 m). The NAC stereo pairs and derived DTMs represent an invaluable tool for science and exploration purposes. We computed slope statistics from 81 highland and 31 mare DTMs across a range of baselines. Overlapping DTMs of single stereo sets were also combined to form larger area DTM mosaics, enabling detailed characterization of large geomorphic features and providing a key resource for future exploration planning. Currently, two percent of the lunar surface is imaged in NAC stereo and continued acquisition of stereo observations will serve to strengthen our knowledge of the Moon and geologic processes that occur on all the terrestrial planets.

  4. Analysis of Ku-band cross section at low incidence angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapron, B.; Vandemark, D.

    1993-01-01

    This study is using airborne Ku-band data to address questions which have implications for both model function development and for advancing our physical understanding of the sea surface. Concurrent measurements of ocean directional spectra, significant wave height, and mean surface roughness are made using the capabilities of the radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS). The NASA/GSFC's ROWS is a 15 GHz pulse compressed radar which is a radar sensor designed to measure the direction of the long wave components using spectral analysis of the tilt induced reflectively modulation. The ROWS are modified to cycle at 50 Hz for the scanning spectrometer antenna and a wide beamwidth nadir altimeter mode. This change allows the sensor to simultaneously measure directional wave spectra, wave height, mean square slope parameter, and small scale surface roughness. The surface stress caused by the wind is widely believed to be the predominant quantity related to the Ku-band radar cross section for a wide range of incidence angles. The complete coverage in the quasi specular region provided by one sensor is essential to understand the uncertainties between the scattering model and what is happening on the surface. For this presentation, special attention is devoted to sort out some measurement of the anisotropy associated with the band of high frequencies. Using the other geophysical parameters, comparisons are then made with the classic spectral form currentlyused to describe the wind impact on the sea surface.

  5. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb’s angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson’s product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=−0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  6. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer.

  7. Amplitude-versus-angle analysis and wide-angle-inversion of crosswell seismic data in a carbonate reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed S.

    Crosswell data set contains a range of angles limited only by the geometry of the source and receiver configuration, the separation of the boreholes and the depth to the target. However, the wide angles reflections present in crosswell imaging result in amplitude-versus-angle (AVA) features not usually observed in surface data. These features include reflections from angles that are near critical and beyond critical for many of the interfaces; some of these reflections are visible only for a small range of angles, presumably near their critical angle. High-resolution crosswell seismic surveys were conducted over a Silurian (Niagaran) reef at two fields in northern Michigan, Springdale and Coldspring. The Springdale wells extended to much greater depths than the reef, and imaging was conducted from above and from beneath the reef. Combining the results from images obtained from above with those from beneath provides additional information, by exhibiting ranges of angles that are different for the two images, especially for reflectors at shallow depths, and second, by providing additional constraints on the solutions for Zoeppritz equations. Inversion of seismic data for impedance has become a standard part of the workflow for quantitative reservoir characterization. Inversion of crosswell data using either deterministic or geostatistical methods can lead to poor results with phase change beyond the critical angle, however, the simultaneous pre-stack inversion of partial angle stacks may be best conducted with restrictions to angles less than critical. Deterministic inversion is designed to yield only a single model of elastic properties (best-fit), while the geostatistical inversion produces multiple models (realizations) of elastic properties, lithology and reservoir properties. Geostatistical inversion produces results with far more detail than deterministic inversion. The magnitude of difference in details between both types of inversion becomes increasingly

  8. Proper Angle of Sono-guided Central Venous Line Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Barzegari, Hassan; Forouzan, Arash; Fahimi, Mohammad Ali; Zohrevandi, Behzad; Ghanavati, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Determining the proper angle for inserting central venous catheter (CV line) is of great importance for decreasing the complications and increasing success rate. The present study was designed to determine the proper angle of needle insertion for internal jugular vein catheterization. Methods: In the present case series study, candidate patients for catheterization of the right internal jugular vein under guidance of ultrasonography were studied. At the time of proper placing of the catheter, photograph was taken and Auto Cad 2014 software was used to measure the angles of the needle in the sagittal and axial planes, as well as patient’s head rotation. Result: 114 patients with the mean age of 56.96 ± 14.71 years were evaluated (68.4% male). The most common indications of catheterization were hemodialysis (55.3%) and shock state (24.6%). The mean angles of needle insertion were 102.15 ± 6.80 for axial plane, 36.21 ± 3.12 for sagittal plane and the mean head rotation angle was 40.49 ± 5.09. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study it seems that CV line insertion under the angles 102.15 ± 6.80 degrees in the axial plane, 36.21 ± 3.12 in the sagittal plane and 40.49 ± 5.09 head rotation yield satisfactory results. PMID:27299146

  9. Capillary rise with velocity-dependent dynamic contact angle.

    PubMed

    Popescu, M N; Ralston, J; Sedev, R

    2008-11-04

    The classic description of the rate of capillary rise given by the Washburn equation, which assumes that the contact angle preserves the equilibrium value at all times, has been recently questioned in the light of the known experimental dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the velocity of the contact line. For a number of such proposed functions of velocity for the dynamic contact angle, we analyze the resulting dependences of the contact angle and of the time of rise, respectively, on the height of the capillary rise. By applying our results to the particular cases of a high-viscosity silicone oil and water, respectively, in a glass capillary, we show that, in general, strong similarities arise between the various approaches and the classic theory in what concerns the time dependence of the capillary rise, which explains the lack of consistent experimental evidence for deviations in the rate of capillary rise from the Washburn equation. However, for a strong dependency of the contact angle on the velocity in the range of small velocities, as in the case of water on glass, one of the models predicts significant deviations even for the time dependence of the capillary rise. Moreover, our results show that the time or height dependence of the contact angle during the capillary rise can clearly discriminate between the various models.

  10. Measuring static and dynamic contact angles using a liquid needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanedrin, Raymond; Jin, Ming; Frese, Daniel; Scheithauer, Carsten; Willers, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The optical determination of static and advancing contact angle is made on drops applied or extended, respectively, onto a substrate through the use of thin solid needles. Although this method has been used extensively, this method of dosing can be time consuming, cumbersome and if not meticulously performed can lead to erroneous contact angle results. Herein, we present an alternative way of applying drops onto substrates using a small liquid jet, which is produced by a liquid pressure dosing system acting as a "liquid needle." A comparative static contact angle study on 14 different surfaces with two different liquids were performed utilizing two different ways of dosing: the conventional solid and a novel liquid needle based technique. We found, for all but one sample, that the obtained results were highly comparable. Observed differences can be explained by the characteristics of either way of dosing. In addition, we used the liquid pressure based dosing system for optical advancing contact angle measurement on two different samples. The liquid needle based method facilitates the expansion of a drop from 0.1 to 22 μL within less than 1.2 seconds, which provided constant contact angle versus drop base diameter curves. The obtained results were highly comparable with dynamic Wilhelmy contact angle measurements.

  11. Primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Robert N; Khaw, Peng Tee

    2004-05-22

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy and, perhaps, the most common form of glaucoma. Because the disease is treatable, and because the visual impairment caused by glaucoma is irreversible, early detection is essential. Early diagnosis depends on examination of the optic disc, retinal nerve fibre layer, and visual field. New imaging and psychophysical tests can improve both detection and monitoring of the progression of the disease. Recently completed long-term clinical trials provide convincing evidence that lowering intraocular pressure prevents progression at both the early and late stages of the disease. The degree of protection is related to the degree to which intraocular pressure is lowered. Improvements in therapy consist of more effective and better-tolerated drugs to lower intraocular pressure, and more effective surgical procedures. New treatments to directly treat and protect the retinal ganglion cells that are damaged in glaucoma are also in development.

  12. The Effect of Incidence Angle on Stereo DTM Quality: Simulations in Support of Europa Clipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T. M.; Jorda, L.

    2014-12-01

    Many quality factors for digital topographic models (DTMs) from stereo imaging can be predicted geometrically. For example, pixel scale is related to instantaneous field of view and to range. DTM resolution can be no better than a few times this pixel scale. Even vertical precision is a known function of the pixel scale and convergence angle, providedthe image quality is high enough that automated image matching reaches its optimal precision (~0.2 pixel). The influence of incidence angle is harder to predict. Reduced quality is expected both at low incidence (where topographic shading disappears) and high incidence (where signal/noise ratio is low and shadows occur). This problem is of general interest, but especially critical for the Europa Clipper mission profile. Clipper would obtain a radar sounding profile on each Europa flyby. Stereo images collected simultaneously would be used to produce a DTM needed to distinguish off-nadir surface echos (clutter) from subsurface features. The question is, how much of this DTM strip will be useful, given that incidence angle will vary substantially? We are using simulations to answer this question. We produced a 210 m/post DTM of the Castalia Macula region of Europa from 6 Galileo images by photoclinometry. A low-incidence image was used to correct for albedo variations before photoclinometry. We are using the image simulation software OASIS to generate synthetic stereopairs of the region at a full range of incidence angles. These images will be realistic in terms of image resolution, noise, photometry including albedo variations (based on the low incidence image), and cast shadows. The pairs will then be analyzed with the commercial stereomapping software SOCET SET (® BAE Systems), which we have used for a wide variety of planetary mapping projects. Comparing the stereo-derived DTMs to the input ("truth") DTM will allow us to quantify the dependence of true DTM resolution and vertical precision on illumination, and to

  13. Correlations between Preoperative Angle Parameters and Postoperative Unpredicted Refractive Errors after Cataract Surgery in Open Angle Glaucoma (AOD 500)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonseok; Bae, Hyoung Won; Lee, Si Hyung; Kim, Chan Yun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of intraocular lens (IOL) power prediction for cataract surgery with open angle glaucoma (OAG) and to identify preoperative angle parameters correlated with postoperative unpredicted refractive errors. Materials and Methods This study comprised 45 eyes from 45 OAG subjects and 63 eyes from 63 non-glaucomatous cataract subjects (controls). We investigated differences in preoperative predicted refractive errors and postoperative refractive errors for each group. Preoperative predicted refractive errors were obtained by biometry (IOL-master) and compared to postoperative refractive errors measured by auto-refractometer 2 months postoperatively. Anterior angle parameters were determined using swept source optical coherence tomography. We investigated correlations between preoperative angle parameters [angle open distance (AOD); trabecular iris surface area (TISA); angle recess area (ARA); trabecular iris angle (TIA)] and postoperative unpredicted refractive errors. Results In patients with OAG, significant differences were noted between preoperative predicted and postoperative real refractive errors, with more myopia than predicted. No significant differences were recorded in controls. Angle parameters (AOD, ARA, TISA, and TIA) at the superior and inferior quadrant were significantly correlated with differences between predicted and postoperative refractive errors in OAG patients (-0.321 to -0.408, p<0.05). Superior quadrant AOD 500 was significantly correlated with postoperative refractive differences in multivariate linear regression analysis (β=-2.925, R2=0.404). Conclusion Clinically unpredicted refractive errors after cataract surgery were more common in OAG than in controls. Certain preoperative angle parameters, especially AOD 500 at the superior quadrant, were significantly correlated with these unpredicted errors. PMID:28120576

  14. Adaptive control of a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control algorithm for realizing a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope so that rotation angle can be directly measured without integration of angular rate, thus eliminating the accumulation of numerical integration errors. The proposed control algorithm uses a trajectory following approach and the reference trajectory is generated by an ideal angle measuring gyroscope driven by the estimate of angular rate and the auxiliary sinusoidal input so that the persistent excitation condition is satisfied. The developed control algorithm can compensate for all types of fabrication imperfections such as coupled damping and stiffness, and mismatched stiffness and un-equal damping term in an on-line fashion. The simulation results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control algorithm that is capable of directly measuring rotation angle without the integration of angular rate.

  15. ILC Extraction Line for 14 mrad Crossing Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; Seryi, A.; Parker, B.; /Brookhaven

    2005-12-08

    The earlier studies of the ILC extraction line for 20 mrad and 2 mrad crossing angle options [1]-[5] showed that the 20 mrad design has an advantage of a simpler beamline and lower extraction beam loss because of the independent incoming and extraction optics. However, the large 20 mrad crossing angle requires the use of a crab cavity correction, increases synchrotron radiation emittance growth in the solenoid, and increases photon backscattering from the forward calorimeter of the detector. To reduce these effects, an attempt has been made to minimize the crossing angle while keeping the extraction and incoming lines separate. A new quadrupole scheme near the interaction point has been proposed which allows a reduction of the crossing angle to 14 mrad [6]. The optics design and results of tracking and background simulations for the 14 mrad extraction line are presented.

  16. Measuring the Contact Angle of Individual Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Preuss; Butt

    1998-12-15

    The aim of this study was to measure the contact angles of individual colloidal spheres ( solidus in circle 4.4 µm) and compare it to contact angles obtained on similarly prepared planar surfaces. For this purpose the particles were attached to atomic force microscope cantilevers. Then the force between the particle in aqueous medium and an air bubble was measured versus the distance. From the resulting force curves we obtained contact angles and detachment forces of single particles. Contact angles of gold coated silica particles were adjusted between 20 degrees and 100 degrees by self-assembling monolayers from different mixtures of undecanethiols and omega-hydroxy undecanethiols from solution. In parallel, contact angles on flat gold surfaces prepared in the same way were determined by the sessile drop method. A systematic difference between contact angles measured with particles and on planar surfaces was observed. Results are discussed in terms of line tension of the three-phase contact line. In addition, detachment forces were measured. Detachment forces were slightly higher than predicted from flotation theory. This might be caused by a pinning of the three phase contact line. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  17. Effects of Angle Variations in Suspension Push-up Exercise.

    PubMed

    Gulmez, Irfan

    2017-04-01

    Gulmez, I. Effects of angle variations in suspension push-up exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1017-1023, 2017-This study aimed to determine and compare the amount of loads on the TRX Suspension Trainer (TRX) straps and ground reaction forces at 4 different angles during TRX push-ups. Twenty-eight male (mean age, 24.1 ± 2.9 years; height, 179.4 ± 8.0 m; weight, 78.8 ± 9.8 kg) physical education and sports university students participated in this study. The subjects were tested at TRX angles (0, 15, 30, 45°) during the TRX push-ups. Force data were recorded by a force platform and load cells integrated into the TRX straps. The results show that as the TRX angle was reduced, the load applied to the TRX straps increased and simultaneously the load measured by the force platform decreased. This was true for both the elbow joint changing from flexion to extension and vice versa. When the TRX angle was set at 0° and subjects' elbows were at extension during TRX push-up, 50.4% of the subjects' body weight, and when the elbows were at flexion, 75.3% of the body weight was registered by the sensors on the TRX straps. The results of this study can be used in the calculation of the training load and volume (resistance training programming) during TRX push-up exercises at varying angles.

  18. Meningiomas of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Matthies, C; Carvalho, G; Tatagiba, M; Lima, M; Samii, M

    1996-01-01

    Meningiomas of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represent a clinically and surgically interesting entity. The opportunity of complete surgical excision and the incidence of impairment of nerval structures largely depend on the tumour biology that either leads to displacement of surrounding structures by an expansive type of growth or to an enveloping of nerval and vascular structures by an en plaque type of growth. As the origin and the direction of growth are very variable, the exact tumour extension in relation to the nerval structures and the tumour origin can be identified sometimes only at the time of surgery. Out of a series of 230 meningiomas of the posterior skull base operated between 1978 and 1993, data of 134 meningiomas involving the cerebellopontine angle are presented. There were 20% male and 80% female patients, age at the time of surgery ranging from 18 to 76 years, on the average 51 years. The clinical presentation was characterized by a predominant disturbance of the cranial nerves V (19%), VII (11%), VIII (67%) and the caudal cranial nerves (6%) and signs of ataxia (28%). 80% of the meningiomas were larger than 30 mm in diameter, 53% led to evident brainstem compression or dislocation and 85% extended anteriorly to the internal auditory canal. Using the lateral suboccipital approach in the majority of cases and a combined presigmoidal or combined suboccipital and subtemporal approaches in either sequence in 5%, complete tumour removal (Simpson I and II) was accomplished in 95% and subtotal tumour removal in 5%. Histologically the meningiotheliomatous type was most common (49%) followed by the mixed type (19%), fibroblastic (16%), psammomatous (7%), hemangioblastic (7%) and anaplastic (2%) types. Major post-operative complications were CSF leakage (8%) requiring surgical revision in 2% and hemorrhage (3%) requiring revision in 2%. While the majority of neurological disturbances showed signs of recovery, facial nerve paresis or paralysis was

  19. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  1. Wave-angle control of delta evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2011-07-01

    Wave-influenced deltas, with large-scale arcuate shapes and demarcated beach ridge complexes, often display an asymmetrical form about their river channel. Here, we use a numerical model to demonstrate that the angles from which waves approach a delta can have a first-order influence upon its plan-view morphologic evolution and sedimentary architecture. The directional spread of incoming waves plays a dominant role over fluvial sediment discharge in controlling the width of an active delta lobe, which in turn affects the characteristic rates of delta progradation. Oblique wave approach (and a consequent net alongshore sediment transport) can lead to the development of morphologic asymmetry about the river in a delta's plan-view form. This plan-form asymmetry can include the development of discrete breaks in shoreline orientation and the appearance of self-organized features arising from shoreline instability along the downdrift delta flank, such as spits and migrating shoreline sand waves—features observed on natural deltas. Somewhat surprisingly, waves approaching preferentially from one direction tend to increase sediment deposition updrift of the river. This ‘morphodynamic groin effect’ occurs when the delta's plan-form aspect ratio is sufficiently large such that the orientation of the shoreline on the downdrift flank is rotated past the angle of maximum alongshore sediment transport, resulting in preferential redirection of fluvial sediment updrift of the river mouth.

  2. Least-Squares Multi-Angle Doppler Estimators for Plane Wave Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-06-20

    Designing robust Doppler vector estimation strategies for use in plane wave imaging schemes based on unfocused transmissions is a topic that has yet to be studied in depth. One potential solution is to use a multi-angle Doppler estimation approach that computes flow vectors via least-squares fitting, but its performance has not been established. Here, we investigated the efficacy of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators by: (i) comparing its performance with respect to the classical dual-angle (cross-beam) Doppler vector estimator; (ii) examining the working effects of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators on flow visualization quality in the context of dynamic flow path rendering. Implementing Doppler vector estimators that use different combinations of transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) steering angles, our analysis has compared the classical dual-angle Doppler method, a 5-Tx version of dual-angle Doppler, and various multi-angle Doppler configurations based on 3 Tx and 5 Tx. Two angle spans (10°, 20°) were examined in forming the steering angles. In imaging scenarios with known flow profiles (rotating disc and straight-tube parabolic flow), the 3-Tx, 3-Rx and 5-Tx, 5-Rx multi-angle configurations produced vector estimates with smaller variability comparing to the dual-angle method, and the estimation results were more consistent with the use of a 20° angle span. Flow vectors derived from multi-angle Doppler estimators were also found to be effective in rendering the expected flow paths in both rotating disc and straight-tube imaging scenarios, while the ones derived from the dual-angle estimator yielded flow paths that deviated from the expected course. These results serve to attest that, using multi-angle least-squares Doppler vector estimators, flow visualization can be consistently achieved.

  3. Least-Squares Multi-Angle Doppler Estimators for Plane-Wave Vector Flow Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-11-01

    Designing robust Doppler vector estimation strategies for use in plane-wave imaging schemes based on unfocused transmissions is a topic that has yet to be studied in depth. One potential solution is to use a multi-angle Doppler estimation approach that computes flow vectors via least-squares fitting, but its performance has not been established. Here, we investigated the efficacy of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators by: 1) comparing its performance with respect to the classical dual-angle (cross-beam) Doppler vector estimator and 2) examining the working effects of multi-angle Doppler vector estimators on flow visualization quality in the context of dynamic flow path rendering. Implementing Doppler vector estimators that use different combinations of transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) steering angles, our analysis has compared the classical dual-angle Doppler method, a 5-Tx version of dual-angle Doppler, and various multi-angle Doppler configurations based on 3 Tx and 5 Tx. Two angle spans (10°, 20°) were examined in forming the steering angles. In imaging scenarios with known flow profiles (rotating disk and straight-tube parabolic flow), the 3-Tx, 3-Rx and 5-Tx, 5-Rx multi-angle configurations produced vector estimates with smaller variability compared with the dual-angle method, and the estimation results were more consistent with the use of a 20° angle span. Flow vectors derived from multi-angle Doppler estimators were also found to be effective in rendering the expected flow paths in both rotating disk and straight-tube imaging scenarios, while the ones derived from the dual-angle estimator yielded flow paths that deviated from the expected course. These results serve to attest that using multi-angle least-squares Doppler vector estimators, flow visualization can be consistently achieved.

  4. The influence of incident angle on physical properties of a novel back contact prepared by oblique angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yue; Feng, Yue; Shen, Jiesheng; Liang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Jian; Min, Jiahua; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, oblique vacuum thermal evaporation and direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering technique are used to produce a novel back contact electrode (BCE) of CuInS2 solar cell. These novel back contact electrodes (BCEs) are based on a layered structure of Mo/Ag/Mo (MAM). The influence of vapor source incidence angle θ on optical-electrical properties of novel BCE is investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Surface Profiler, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), UV-vis-IR Spectrometer, and Four-point Probe Method. According to the analysis of AFM images of BCEs, the variation tendencies of surface roughness and uniformity are closely related to the incidence angle θ. The surface roughness increases with the increase of incidence angle θ, but the uniformity becomes poor at same time. This phenomenon can be attributed to the variation of interlayer Ag films (the density and inclined angle of Ag nanorods). The results of four-point probe test show that the novel BCE deposited by vapor source incidence angle θ equal to 45° owns the lowest resistance value of 3.71 × 10-8 Ω m, which is probably due to a loose and multi-point contact interface between Ag layer and top layer (Mo2). The reflectance of novel BCEs deposited by incident angle less than 45° is higher than that of normal bi-layer Mo (Mo12) BCE. As a result, the efficiency of corresponding solar cell may be upgraded.

  5. Results of the Second SeaWiFS Data Analysis Round Robin, March 2000 (DARR-00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; D'Alimonte, Davide; Maritorena, Stephane; McLean, Scott; Sildam, Juri; McClain, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate determination of upper ocean apparent optical properties (AOPs) is essential for the vicarious calibration of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument and the validation of the derived data products. To evaluate the importance of data analysis methods upon derived AOP values, the Second Data Analysis Round Robin (DARR-00) activity was planned during the latter half of 1999 and executed during March 2000. The focus of the study was the intercomparison of several standard AOP parameters: (1) the upwelled radiance immediately below the sea surface, L(sub u)(0(-),lambda); (2) the downward irradiance immediately below the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(-),lambda); (3) the diffuse attenuation coefficients from the upwelling radiance and the downward irradiance profiles, L(sub L)(lambda) and K(sub d)(lambda), respectively; (4) the incident solar irradiance immediately above the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(+),lambda); (5) the remote sensing reflectance, R(sub rs)(lambda); (6) the normalized water-leaving radiance, [L(sub W)(lambda)](sub N); (7) the upward irradiance immediately below the sea surface, E(sub u)(0(-)), which is used with the upwelled radiance to derive the nadir Q-factor immediately below the sea surface, Q(sub n)(0(-),lambda); and (8) ancillary parameters like the solar zenith angle, theta, and the total chlorophyll concentration, C(sub Ta), derived from the optical data through statistical algorithms. In the results reported here, different methodologies from three research groups were applied to an identical set of 40 multispectral casts in order to evaluate the degree to which differences in data analysis methods influence AOP estimation, and whether any general improvements can be made. The overall results of DARR-00 are presented in Chapter 1 and the individual methods used by the three groups and their data processors are presented in Chapters 2-4.

  6. Large Angle Satellite Attitude Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E.; Junkins, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Two methods are proposed for performing large angle reorientation maneuvers. The first method is based upon Euler's rotation theorem; an arbitrary reorientation is ideally accomplished by rotating the spacecraft about a line which is fixed in both the body and in space. This scheme has been found to be best suited for the case in which the initial and desired attitude states have small angular velocities. The second scheme is more general in that a general class of transition trajectories is introduced which, in principle, allows transfer between arbitrary orientation and angular velocity states. The method generates transition maneuvers in which the uncontrolled (free) initial and final states are matched in orientation and angular velocity. The forced transition trajectory is obtained by using a weighted average of the unforced forward integration of the initial state and the unforced backward integration of the desired state. The current effort is centered around practical validation of this second class of maneuvers. Of particular concern is enforcement of given control system constraints and methods for suboptimization by proper selection of maneuver initiation and termination times. Analogous reorientation strategies which force smooth transition in angular momentum and/or rotational energy are under consideration.

  7. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  8. Limbus Impact on Off-angle Iris Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Barstow, Del R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph W; Bolme, David S; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of iris recognition depends on the quality of data capture and is negatively affected by several factors such as angle, occlusion, and dilation. Off-angle iris recognition is a new research focus in biometrics that tries to address several issues including corneal refraction, complex 3D iris texture, and blur. In this paper, we present an additional significant challenge that degrades the performance of the off-angle iris recognition systems, called the limbus effect . The limbus is the region at the border of the cornea where the cornea joins the sclera. The limbus is a semitransparent tissue that occludes a side portion of the iris plane. The amount of occluded iris texture on the side nearest the camera increases as the image acquisition angle increases. Without considering the role of the limbus effect, it is difficult to design an accurate off-angle iris recognition system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that investigates the limbus effect in detail from a biometrics perspective. Based on results from real images and simulated experiments with real iris texture, the limbus effect increases the hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 depending upon the limbus height.

  9. Contact angle and local wetting at contact line.

    PubMed

    Li, Ri; Shan, Yanguang

    2012-11-06

    This theoretical study was motivated by recent experiments and theoretical work that had suggested the dependence of the static contact angle on the local wetting at the triple-phase contact line. We revisit this topic because the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter is still not widely understood and clearly known. To further clarify the relationship of the static contact angle with wetting, two approaches are applied to derive a general equation for the static contact angle of a droplet on a composite surface composed of heterogeneous components. A global approach based on the free surface energy of a thermodynamic system containing the droplet and solid surface shows the static contact angle as a function of local surface chemistry and local wetting state at the contact line. A local approach, in which only local forces acting on the contact line are considered, results in the same equation. The fact that the local approach agrees with the global approach further demonstrates the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter. Additionally, the study also suggests that the wetting described by the Wenzel and Cassie equations is also the local wetting of the contact line rather than the global wetting of the droplet.

  10. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  11. Line Tension Measurements through Drop Size Dependence of Contact Angle.

    PubMed

    Amirfazli; Kwok; Gaydos; Neumann

    1998-09-01

    Experiments with different organic liquids have been conducted to study the drop size dependence of the contact angles on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface of 1-octadecanethiol (HS(CH2)17CH3) on gold. Low-rate dynamic advancing contact angles were measured for sessile drops in vapor-saturated air using Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Profile (ADSA-P). The experiments were performed using a minimum of eight separately prepared SAM surfaces for each liquid. Although a degree of scatter in the measured contact angles existed, the general trend observed for each run was that the contact angles decreased as the radius of the three-phase line for the sessile drop increased from approximately 1 to 5 mm. To obtain a better view of the overall trend, the contact angles from all of the individual runs for each liquid were averaged at corresponding radii. Subsequently, the averaged results from these experiments were interpreted using the modified Young equation. It was found that the drop size dependence of contact angles was due to a positive line tension. The line tension values are of the order of 1 µJ/m with a trend toward larger values for higher liquid surface tensions. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. Reexamination of fault angles predicted by shear localization theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnicki, J.W.; Olsson, W.A.

    1998-02-01

    This paper reexamines orientations of shear bands (fault angles) predicted by a theory of shear localization as a bifurcation from homogeneous deformation. In contrast to the Coulomb prediction, which does not depend on deviatoric stress state, the angle between the band normal and the least (most compressive) principal stress increases as the deviatoric stress state varies from axisymmetric compression to axisymmetric extension. This variation is consistent with the data of Mogi (1967) on Dunham dolomite for axisymmetric compression, extension and biaxial compression, but the predicted angles are generally less than observed. This discrepancy may be due to anisotropy that develops due to crack growth in preferred orientations. Results from specialized constitutive relations for axisymmetric compression and plane strain that include this anisotropy indicate that it tends to increase the predicted angles. Measurements for a weak, porous sandstone (Castlegate) indicate that the band angle decreases with increasing inelastic compaction that accompanies increasing mean stress. This trend is consistent with the predictions of the theory but, for this rock, the observed angles are less than predicted.

  13. Wetting and scanning force microscopy on rough polymer surfaces: Wenzel's roughness factor and the thermodynamic contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamusewitz, H.; Possart, W.

    The influence of the surface roughness of polypropylene on the contact angle hysteresis is investigated by means of ethylene glycol drops in order to estimate the true Young's equilibrium contact angle. A new relationship between the contact angle hysteresis and Wenzel's contact angle is derived. In addition, the determination of Wenzel's roughness factor by means of scanning force microscopy opens an alternative way to obtaining Young's equilibrium contact angle without any surface manipulation. The experimental results presented verify this new approach.

  14. Uncertainties in Small-Angle Measurement Systems Used to Calibrate Angle Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack A.; Amer, Mohamed; Faust, Bryon; Zimmerman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    We have studied a number of effects that can give rise to errors in small-angle measurement systems when they are used to calibrate artifacts such as optical polygons. Of these sources of uncertainty, the most difficult to quantify are errors associated with the measurement of imperfect, non-flat faces of the artifact, causing the instrument to misinterpret the average orientation of the surface. In an attempt to shed some light on these errors, we have compared autocollimator measurements to angle measurements made with a Fizeau phase-shifting interferometer. These two instruments have very different operating principles and implement different definitions of the orientation of a surface, but (surprisingly) we have not yet seen any clear differences between results obtained with the autocollimator and with the interferometer. The interferometer is in some respects an attractive alternative to an autocollimator for small-angle measurement; it implements an unambiguous and robust definition of surface orientation in terms of the tilt of a best-fit plane, and it is easier to quantify likely errors of the interferometer measurements than to evaluate autocollimator uncertainty. PMID:27366616

  15. Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-10-01

    Dosimetric comparison of manual beam angle selection (MBS) and beam angle optimization (BAO) for IMRT plans is investigated retrospectively for 15 head and neck and prostate patients. The head and neck and prostate had planning target volumes (PTVs) ranging between 96.0 and 319.9 cm{sup 3} and 153.6 and 321.3 cm{sup 3}, whereas OAR ranged between 8.3 and 47.8 cm{sup 3} and 68.3 and 469.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. In MBS, a standard coplanar 7-9 fields equally spaced gantry angles were used. In BAO, the selection of gantry angle was optimized by the algorithm for the same number of beams. The optimization and dose-volume constraints were kept the same for both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on the Eclipse treatment planning system. Our results showed that the dose-volume histogram for PTV are nearly identical in both techniques but BAO provided superior sparing of the organs at risk compared with the MBS. Also, MBS produced statistically significant higher monitor units (MU) and segments than the BAO; 13.1 {+-} 6.6% (p = 0.012) and 10.4 {+-} 13.6% (p = 0.140), and 14.6 {+-} 5.6% (p = 1.003E-5) and 12.6 {+-} 7.4% (p = 0.76E-3) for head and neck and prostate cases, respectively. The reduction in MU translates into the reduction in total body and integral dose. It is concluded that BAO provides advantage over MBS for most intenisty-modulated radiation therapy cases.

  16. Contact angle measurement on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Meiron, Tammar S; Marmur, Abraham; Saguy, I Sam

    2004-06-15

    A new method for the measurement of apparent contact angles at the global energy minimum on real surfaces has been developed. The method consists of vibrating the surface, taking top-view pictures of the drop, monitoring the drop roundness, and calculating the contact angle from the drop diameter and weight. The use of the new method has been demonstrated for various rough surfaces, all having the same surface chemistry. In order to establish the optimal vibration conditions, the proper ranges for the system parameters (i.e., drop volume, vibration time, frequency of vibration, and amplitude of vibration) were determined. The reliability of the method has been demonstrated by the fact that the ideal contact angles of all surfaces, as calculated from the Wenzel equation using the measured apparent contact angles, came out to be practically identical. This ideal contact angle has been compared with three methods of calculation from values of advancing and receding contact angles.

  17. Contact angle measurements under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions.

    PubMed

    Lages, Carol; Méndez, Eduardo

    2007-08-01

    The precise control of the ambient humidity during contact angle measurements is needed to obtain stable and valid data. For a such purpose, a simple low-cost device was designed, and several modified surfaces relevant to biosensor design were studied. Static contact angle values for these surfaces are lower than advancing contact angles published for ambient conditions, indicating that thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are needed to avoid drop evaporation during the measurements.

  18. On the role of energy barriers in determining contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Chen, P

    2006-11-30

    The thermodynamic model of contact angles on rough, heterogeneous surfaces developed by Long et al. [J. Long, M.N. Hyder, R.Y.M. Huang and P. Chen, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 118 (2005) 173] was employed to study the role of energy barriers in determining contact angle hysteresis. Major energy barriers corresponding to metastable states and minor energy barriers corresponding to secondary metastable states were defined. Distributions of major and/or minor energy barriers as a function of apparent contact angle for various surfaces were obtained. The reproducibility of contact angle measurement, the effect of vibrational energy on contact angle hysteresis and the "stick-slip" phenomenon were discussed. Quantitative relations between contact angles and vibrational energy were obtained. It was found that receding contact angles are normally poorly reproducible for hydrophilic surfaces, but for extremely hydrophobic surfaces, advancing contact angles may have a poor reproducibility. When the vibrational energy available to a system increases, the measured advancing contact angle will decrease while the receding angle will increase until both reach a common value: the system equilibrium angle. This finding not only agrees well with the experimental observations in system equilibrium contact angle measurements, but also lays a theoretical foundation for such measurements. A small vibrational energy may result in a "stick-slip" phenomenon.

  19. Straight ladder inclined angle in a field environment: the relationship among actual angle, method of set-up and knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Chi; Brunette, Christopher; Fallentin, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ladder inclined angle is a critical factor that could lead to a slip at the base of portable straight ladders, a major cause of falls from heights. Despite several methods established to help workers achieve the recommended 75.5° angle for ladder set-up, it remains unclear if these methods are used in practice. This study explored ladder set-up behaviours in a field environment. Professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for ladder set-up at their worksites. The results showed that the actual angles of 265 ladder set-ups by 67 participants averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°. Although all the participants had training on recommended ladder set-up methods, only 3 out of 67 participants applied these methods in their daily work and even they failed to achieve the desired 75.5° angle. Therefore, ladder set-up remains problematic in real-world situations. Practitioner Summary: Professional installers of a cable company were observed for portable straight ladder set-up at their worksites. The ladder inclined angle averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°, while the recommended angle is 75.5°. Only a few participants used the methods that they learned during training in their daily work. PMID:26672809

  20. Straight ladder inclined angle in a field environment: the relationship among actual angle, method of set-up and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Chi; Brunette, Christopher; Fallentin, Nils

    2016-08-01

    Ladder inclined angle is a critical factor that could lead to a slip at the base of portable straight ladders, a major cause of falls from heights. Despite several methods established to help workers achieve the recommended 75.5° angle for ladder set-up, it remains unclear if these methods are used in practice. This study explored ladder set-up behaviours in a field environment. Professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for ladder set-up at their worksites. The results showed that the actual angles of 265 ladder set-ups by 67 participants averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°. Although all the participants had training on recommended ladder set-up methods, only 3 out of 67 participants applied these methods in their daily work and even they failed to achieve the desired 75.5° angle. Therefore, ladder set-up remains problematic in real-world situations. Practitioner Summary: Professional installers of a cable company were observed for portable straight ladder set-up at their worksites. The ladder inclined angle averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°, while the recommended angle is 75.5°. Only a few participants used the methods that they learned during training in their daily work.

  1. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  2. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  3. High Resolution Quantitative Angle-Scanning Widefield Surface Plasmon Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Han-Min; Pechprasarn, Suejit; Zhang, Jing; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction of a prismless widefield surface plasmon microscope; this has been applied to imaging of the interactions of protein and antibodies in aqueous media. The illumination angle of spatially incoherent diffuse laser illumination was controlled with an amplitude spatial light modulator placed in a conjugate back focal plane to allow dynamic control of the illumination angle. Quantitative surface plasmon microscopy images with high spatial resolution were acquired by post-processing a series of images obtained as a function of illumination angle. Experimental results are presented showing spatially and temporally resolved binding of a protein to a ligand. We also show theoretical results calculated by vector diffraction theory that accurately predict the response of the microscope on a spatially varying sample thus allowing proper quantification and interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:26830146

  4. Repulsion-based model for contact angle saturation in electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hassan Abdelmoumen Abdellah; Mohamed, Hany Ahmed; Abdelgawad, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new model for contact angle saturation phenomenon in electrowetting on dielectric systems. This new model attributes contact angle saturation to repulsion between trapped charges on the cap and base surfaces of the droplet in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line, which prevents these surfaces from converging during contact angle reduction. This repulsion-based saturation is similar to repulsion between charges accumulated on the surfaces of conducting droplets which causes the well known Coulombic fission and Taylor cone formation phenomena. In our model, both the droplet and dielectric coating were treated as lossy dielectric media (i.e., having finite electrical conductivities and permittivities) contrary to the more common assumption of a perfectly conducting droplet and perfectly insulating dielectric. We used theoretical analysis and numerical simulations to find actual charge distribution on droplet surface, calculate repulsion energy, and minimize energy of the total system as a function of droplet contact angle. Resulting saturation curves were in good agreement with previously reported experimental results. We used this proposed model to predict effect of changing liquid properties, such as electrical conductivity, and system parameters, such as thickness of the dielectric layer, on the saturation angle, which also matched experimental results.

  5. Repulsion-based model for contact angle saturation in electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new model for contact angle saturation phenomenon in electrowetting on dielectric systems. This new model attributes contact angle saturation to repulsion between trapped charges on the cap and base surfaces of the droplet in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line, which prevents these surfaces from converging during contact angle reduction. This repulsion-based saturation is similar to repulsion between charges accumulated on the surfaces of conducting droplets which causes the well known Coulombic fission and Taylor cone formation phenomena. In our model, both the droplet and dielectric coating were treated as lossy dielectric media (i.e., having finite electrical conductivities and permittivities) contrary to the more common assumption of a perfectly conducting droplet and perfectly insulating dielectric. We used theoretical analysis and numerical simulations to find actual charge distribution on droplet surface, calculate repulsion energy, and minimize energy of the total system as a function of droplet contact angle. Resulting saturation curves were in good agreement with previously reported experimental results. We used this proposed model to predict effect of changing liquid properties, such as electrical conductivity, and system parameters, such as thickness of the dielectric layer, on the saturation angle, which also matched experimental results. PMID:25759748

  6. Foreign Body Embedded in Anterior Chamber Angle

    PubMed Central

    Graffi, Shmuel; Tiosano, Beatrice; Ben Cnaan, Ran; Bahir, Jonathan; Naftali, Modi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of a metallic foreign body embedded in the anterior chamber angle. After standing in close proximity to a construction worker breaking a tile, a 26-year-old woman using soft contact lens for the correction of mild myopia presented to emergency department for evaluation of a foreign body sensation of her right eye. Methods and Results. Diagnosis was confirmed by gonioscopic examination and a noncontrast CT scan of head and orbits. The foreign body was removed by an external approach without utilizing a magnet. The patient's final outcome was favorable. Discussion. The above is a rare clinical situation, which is impossible to detect on slit-lamp examination without a gonioscopic view. Proper imaging and a specific management are mandatory in order to achieve favorable outcome. PMID:23091762

  7. Foreign body embedded in anterior chamber angle.

    PubMed

    Graffi, Shmuel; Tiosano, Beatrice; Ben Cnaan, Ran; Bahir, Jonathan; Naftali, Modi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. We present a case of a metallic foreign body embedded in the anterior chamber angle. After standing in close proximity to a construction worker breaking a tile, a 26-year-old woman using soft contact lens for the correction of mild myopia presented to emergency department for evaluation of a foreign body sensation of her right eye. Methods and Results. Diagnosis was confirmed by gonioscopic examination and a noncontrast CT scan of head and orbits. The foreign body was removed by an external approach without utilizing a magnet. The patient's final outcome was favorable. Discussion. The above is a rare clinical situation, which is impossible to detect on slit-lamp examination without a gonioscopic view. Proper imaging and a specific management are mandatory in order to achieve favorable outcome.

  8. Optical Trap Detector with Large Acceptance Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichino, Yoshiro; Saito, Terubumi; Saito, Ichiro

    We have developed a polarization-independent reflection-type silicon photodiode trap detector and characterized its performance by laser beam-based measurement. Three dimensional CAD-based modeling enables us to optimize its interior design, resulting in minimizing each distance between centers of adjacent photodiodes by rotating each photodiode by 45° along each normal axis. It is expected by a simple ray-tracing simulation and also confirmed experimentally that the trap detector incorporating a photodiode with a large active area exhibits the largest acceptance angle ever proposed as the polarization-independent trap detector for the convergent incident beam. This is suitable for the national standard detector to realize and disseminate the cryogenic radiometer-based spectral power responsivity with high accuracy. It is also applicable to various kinds of working or transfer standard detectors for collimated or non-collimated monochromatic radiation. In addition, a history of development of trap detectors at national laboratories is reviewed.

  9. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  10. Results and Lessons from MODIS Reflective Solar Bands Calibration: Pre-launch to On-orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Che, N.; Barnes, W. L.; Guenther, B.

    2006-01-01

    MODIS is a major instrument for the NASA EOS Terra (1aunched in December 1999) and Aqua (launched in May 2002) missions. It was designed and built to enhance and extend its heritage sensors' measurements and data records with applications covering a wide range of studies of the Earth's land, oceans, and atmosphere. MODIS has 36 spectral bands (0.41 - 14.4 micrometers) located on four focal plane assemblies (FPAs). It makes measurements at three nadir spatial resolutions: 250m (bands 1-2), 500m (bands 3-7), and lkm (bands 8-36). Because of instrument design complexity and stringent calibration requirements, extensive calibration and characterization activities were conducted pre-launch by the sensor vendor (Raytheon / Santa Barbara Remote Sensing) for both Tesa and Aqua MODIS. For the 20 reflective solar bands (RSB), these activities include measurements for the detectors noise characterization and radiometric performance, system level response versus scan-angle (RVS), polarization sensitivity, and relative spectral response (RSR). Key radiometric performance was evaluated using thermal vacuum observations. On-orbit MODIS RSB calibration is performed using a solar diffuser (SD) and solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system. The SD bi-directional reflectance factor (BRF) was characterized pre-launch by the sensor vendor with reference samples traceable to NIST reflectance standards. This paper provides a summary of Terra and Aqua MODIS RSB pre-launch and on-orbit calibration and characterization activities and results with focus on the detectors' noise characterization and radiometric performance. Challenging and concerning issues and lessons learned from RSB pre-launch calibration and their impact on post launch performance are also presented. A similar summary for MODIS thermal emissive bands (TEB) is reported in a separate paper in these proceedings.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of contact angles on rough, heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Hyder, M N; Huang, R Y M; Chen, P

    2005-12-30

    Theoretical modelling for contact angle hysteresis carried out to date has been mostly limited to several idealized surface configurations, either rough or heterogeneous surfaces. This paper presents a preliminary study on the thermodynamics of contact angles on rough and heterogeneous surfaces by employing the principle of minimum free energy and the concept of liquid front. Based on a two-dimensional regular model surface, a set of relations were obtained, which correlate advancing, receding and system equilibrium contact angles to surface topography, roughness and heterogeneity. It was found that system equilibrium contact angles (theta(ES)) can be expressed as a function of surface roughness factor (delta) and the Cassie contact angle (theta(C)): costheta(ES) = deltacostheta(C). This expression can be reduced to the classical Wenzel equation.: theta(ES) = theta(W) for rough but homogeneous surfaces, and the classical Cassie equation theta(ES) = theta(C) for heterogeneous but smooth surfaces. A non-dimensional parameter called surface feature factor (omega) was proposed to classify surfaces into three categories (types): roughness-dominated, heterogeneity-dominated and mixed-rough-heterogeneous. The prediction of advancing and receding contact angles of a surface is dependent on which category the surface belongs to. The thermodynamic analysis of contact angle hysteresis was further extended from the regular model surface to irregular surfaces; consistent results were obtained. The current model not only agrees well with the models previously studied by other researchers for idealized surfaces, but also explores more possibilities to explain the reported experimental results/observations that most existing theories could not explain.

  12. Aspect angle dependence of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, H.; Semeter, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    The magnetic aspect angle dependence of naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines (NEIALs) is investigated using two multibeam experiments with the 450 MHz electronically steerable Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar. In each experiment, dynamics in the accompanying auroral activity suggest that the source of free energy for the instability is equally present, in a statistical sense, in a wide portion of sky. Yet strong variations in backscattered power are observed when radar beam direction is altered by only 1°. In our observations, the strongest scattered power appears in the magnetic-zenith direction and weakens with increasing angle between the radar beam and the magnetic lines of force. NEIALs occurring above the F region peak are observed to disappear almost completely at aspect angles as small as 2°. The results are somewhat surprising since previous experiments have detected NEIALs at aspect angles up to 15°. It is shown that during dynamic geophysical conditions, such as the substorm intervals studied in this report, more than one of the generation mechanisms proposed to explain NEIALs may be operating simultaneously. The different mechanisms result in different spectral morphologies and different degrees of sensitivity to the magnetic aspect angle.

  13. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation.

  14. Constant-variable flip angles for hyperpolarized media MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Zhong, Jianping; Ruan, Weiwei; Chen, Xian; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-02-01

    The longitudinal magnetization of hyperpolarized media, such as hyperpolarized 129Xe, 3He, etc., is nonrenewable. When the MRI data acquisition begins at the k-domain center, a constant flip angle (CFA) results in an image of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) but sacrifices the accuracy of spatial information. On the other hand, a variable flip angle (VFA) strategy results in high accuracy but suffers from a low SNR. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to optimize both the SNR and accuracy, called constant-variable flip angles (CVFA). The proposed scheme suggests that hyperpolarized magnetic resonance signals are firstly acquired through a train of n∗ CFA excitation pulses, followed by a train of N-n∗ VFA excitation pulses. We simulate and optimize the flip angle used in the CFA section, the number of CFA excitation pulses, the number of VFA excitation pulses, and the initial and final variable flip angles adopted in the VFA section. Phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate the good performance of the CVFA designs and their ability to maintain both high SNR and spatial resolution.

  15. The SU(2) action-angle variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellinas, Demosthenes

    1993-01-01

    Operator angle-action variables are studied in the frame of the SU(2) algebra, and their eigenstates and coherent states are discussed. The quantum mechanical addition of action-angle variables is shown to lead to a noncommutative Hopf algebra. The group contraction is used to make the connection with the harmonic oscillator.

  16. Bilateral angle closure glaucoma following general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Raj, K Mohan; Reddy, P Arun Subhash; Kumar, Vikram Chella

    2015-04-01

    Angle closure glaucoma is one of the ophthalmic emergencies and treatment has to be given at the earliest. It is a rare complication of general anesthesia. A female patient underwent Hysterectomy under general anesthesia. Following this, patient developed bilateral angle closure glaucoma. This patient was treated with antiglaucoma medications followed by YAG laser iridotomy and patient regained vision.

  17. Nasolabial angle: a perception of treatment needs.

    PubMed

    Sukhia, Rashna Hoshang; Sukhia, Hoshang Rumi; Fida, Mubassar; Khan, Munizeh

    2012-01-01

    The nasolabial angle holds a very important position in the treatment planning process for an orthodontic case, especially in today's soft tissue paradigm. This study was therefore conducted to compare the mean preference scores for orthodontic treatment need considering the nasolabial angle among orthodontists, orthodontic patients and their parents.

  18. Classification procedure in limited angle tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Chlewicki, W.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Brykalski, A.

    2011-06-23

    In this work we propose the use of limited angle reconstruction algorithms combined with a procedure for defect detection and feature evaluation in three dimensions. The procedure consists of the following steps: acquisition of the X-ray projections, approximated limited angle 3D image reconstruction, and image preprocessing and classification.

  19. Effects Of Molecular Processes On Trim Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul; Yoon, Seokkwan

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses preliminary calculations of effects of vibrational excitation and dissociation of air molecules on trim angle of attack on blunt body flying at suborbital speed. Intended as study of feasibility and utility of such calculations, motivated by fact that trim angle of attack at suborbital and higher speeds important aerodynamic parameter for spacecraft reentering atmosphere and for future hypersonic aerospace vehicles.

  20. Wind-tunnel calibration and requirements for in-flight use of fixed hemispherical head angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted with three different fixed pressure-measuring hemispherical head sensor configurations which were strut-mounted on a nose boom. The tests were performed at free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 3.6. The boom-angle-of-attack range was -6 to 15 deg, and the angle-of-sideslip range was -6 to 6 deg. The test Reynolds numbers were from 3.28 million to 65.6 million per meter. The results were used to obtain angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip calibration curves for the configurations. Signal outputs from the hemispherical head sensor had to be specially processed to obtain accurate real-time angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip measurements for pilot displays or aircraft systems. Use of the fixed sensors in flight showed them to be rugged and reliable and suitable for use in a high temperature environment.

  1. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a strong dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as `weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  2. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces.

    PubMed

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-12-21

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as 'weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  3. Preliminary Results from the First Year of Operations of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, D.; Eldering, A.; O'Dell, C.; Fisher, B.; Wunch, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Osterman, G. B.; Mandrake, L.; Payne, V.; Natraj, V.; Frankenberg, C.; Taylor, T.; Worden, J. R.; Bloom, A. A.; Nelson, R. R.; Schwandner, F. M.; Fu, D.; Braverman, A. J.; Chatterjee, A.; Baker, I. T.; Avis, C.; Livermore, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    On September 6, 2014, OCO-2 began routinely returning almost 106 soundings over the sunlit hemisphere each day. Over 10% of these soundings are sufficiently cloud free to yield full-column estimates of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, XCO2. Nadir soundings over land yield XCO2 estimates with single-sounding random errors of 0.5 - 1 ppm at solar zenith angles (SZA) < 60° while ocean glint soundings yield precisions near 0.5 ppm at SZA < 70°. Nadir soundings over the ocean and glint soundings over high-latitude land are less precise. Initially, OCO-2 recorded only nadir soundings or glint soundings on alternate, 16-day ground-track repeat cycles. This provided adequate coverage of the globe each month, but produced 16-day gaps in ocean coverage while observing nadir, and similar gaps over high-latitude land while observing glint. In July 2015, this strategy was modified to alternate between glint and nadir soundings on consecutive orbits to yield more continuous coverage each day. While XCO2 and other products are being validated to identify and correct biases, global XCO2 maps are starting to reveal the most robust features of the atmospheric carbon cycle. XCO2 enhancements co-located with intense fossil fuel emissions in eastern U.S. and eastern China are most obvious in the fall, when the north-south XCO2 gradient is small. Enhanced XCO2 coincident with biomass burning in the Amazon, central Africa, and Indonesian is also obvious in the fall. In mid spring, when the north-south XCO2 gradient was largest, these sources were less apparent in global maps. From late May to mid-July, OCO-2 maps show a 2-3% reduction in XCO2 across the northern hemisphere, as the land biosphere rapidly absorbs CO2. As the carbon cycle community continues to analyze these OCO-2 data, quantitative estimates of regional-scale emission sources and natural sinks are expected to emerge. This presentation will summarize the OCO-2 mission status, early products, and near

  4. Clinical features and natural course of acromegaly in patients with discordance in the nadir GH level on the oral glucose test and the IGF-1 value at 3 months after adenomectomy.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yasuyuki; Tominaga, Atsushi; Usui, Satoshi; Arita, Kazunori; Sakoguchi, Tetsuhiko; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    Discordant GH and IGF-1 levels after adenomectomy are well recognized in acromegalics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and natural course of postoperative acromegaly associated with discordant GH and IGF-1 levels over a postoperative period. A total of 69 acromegalics underwent surgery with at least 1 year of follow-up and received 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at 3 months postoperatively. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the postoperative nadir GH levels and IGF-1 levels: controlled group (normal GH and normal IGF-1), high-IGF-1 group (normal GH and high IGF-1), high-GH group (high GH and normal IGF-1), and uncontrolled group (high GH and high IGF-1). The incidence of discordant GH and IGF-1 levels was 27.5%: high-IGF-1 group = 10.1% (n = 7) and high-GH group = 17.4% (n = 12). All patients in the high-IGF-1 group exhibited a decline in the IGF-1 level after surgery, with normalization observed in 71.4% of the patients without additional treatment (median 23 months). These subjects had preoperatively high IGF-1 levels despite not demonstrating higher GH levels than the patients in the controlled group. On the other hand, four patients in the high-GH group exhibited an elevated nadir GH level higher than 1.0 μg/L on repeated OGTTs after 3 months, and one patient experienced a recurrence of acromegaly. Patients in the high-IGF-1 group require no additional treatments, and their IGF-1 levels are likely to normalize within a few years. However, patients in the high-GH group should be carefully followed due to the possibility of recurrence.

  5. Physiological response of wild rainbow trout to angling: Impact of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meka, Julie M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate physiological response of wild rainbow trout to catch-and-release angling in the Alagnak River, southwest Alaska. Information was recorded on individual rainbow trout (n = 415) captured by angling including landing time and the time required to remove hooks (angling duration), the time to anesthetize fish in clove oil and withdraw blood, fish length and weight, and water temperature at capture locations. Plasma cortisol, glucose, ions (sodium, potassium, chloride), and lactate were analyzed to determine the effects of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature. Levels of plasma ions did not change significantly during the observed physiological response and levels of plasma glucose were sometimes influenced by length (2000, 2001), body condition (2001), or temperature (2001). Levels of plasma cortisol and lactate in extended capture fish (angling duration greater than 2 min) were significantly higher than levels in rapid capture fish (angling duration less than 2 min). Rapid capture fish were significantly smaller than extended capture fish, reflecting that fish size influenced landing and handling times. Fish size was related to cortisol and lactate in 2002, which corresponded to the year when larger fish were captured and there were longer landing times. Body condition (i.e., weight/length regression residuals index), was significantly related to lactate in 2000 and 2001. Water temperatures were higher in 2001 (mean temperature ± S.E., 13 ± 2oC) than in 2002 (10 ± 2oC), and fish captured in 2001 had significantly higher cortisol and lactate concentrations than fish captured in 2002. The pattern of increase in plasma cortisol and lactate was due to the amount of time fish were angled, and the upper limit of the response was due to water temperature. The results of this study indicate the importance of minimizing the duration of angling in order to reduce the sublethal physiological disturbances in wild

  6. Contact angle hysteresis of microbead suspensions.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Prashant R; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2010-11-16

    Microbead suspensions are often used in microfluidic devices for transporting biomolecules. An experimental investigation on the wettability of microbead suspension is presented in this study. The variation in the surface tension and the equilibrium contact angle with the change in the volume fraction of the microbead is presented here. The surface tension of the microbead suspension is measured with the pendant drop technique, whereas the dynamic contact angle measurements, i.e., advancing and receding contact angles, are measured with the sessile drop technique. An equilibrium contact angle of a suspension with particular volume fraction is determined by computing an average over the measured advancing and receding contact angles. It is observed that the surface tension and the equilibrium contact angle determined from advancing and receding contact angles vary with the magnitude of the microbeads volume fraction in the suspension. A decrease in the surface tension with an increase in the volume fraction of the microbead suspension is observed. The advancement and the recession in contact line for dynamic contact angle measurements are achieved with the motorized dosing mechanism. For microbead suspensions, the advancement of the contact line is faster as compared to the recession of the contact line for the same flow rate. The presence of microbeads assists in the advancement and the recession of the contact line of the suspension. A decrease in the equilibrium contact angles with an increase in the microbead suspension volume fraction is observed. Inclusion of microbeads in the suspension increases the wetting capability for the considered combination of the microbead suspension and substrate. Finally, empirical correlations for the surface tension and the contact angle of the suspension as a function of microbead volume fraction are proposed. Such correlations can readily be used to develop mechanistic models for the capillary transport of microbead

  7. Morphometric Study of Subpubic Angle in Human Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, Nafis Ahmad; Yunus, Syed Mobashir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The symphysis pubis is formed at the confluence of the pubic bones. Each pubic bone consists of a body and two rami; the superior ramus is joined with the ilium and the inferior ramus with the ischium. The two bones meet in the midline at the pubic symphysis. The two inferior rami at the lower border of pubic symphysis subtend the subpubic angle. In females the subpubic angle is more than 90° and in males it is less than 90°. Most of the previous studies on the subpubic angle have been in children or adults, therefore data on fetuses did merit. Aim The aims of the present study were to measure the subpubic angle in developing human fetuses of different gestational age, whether it is sex dependent and to compare the results with that in the adults. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Anatomy JN Medical College, AMU Aligarh, over a period of two years. A total of 41 fetuses immersion fixed in 10% formalin were obtained from the museum department of anatomy. For the purpose of study fetuses were divided into five groups according to gestational age. Group I comprises fetuses of 14–18weeks, group II 19–22weeks, group III 23–26weeks, group IV 27–30weeks, groupV >30weeks of gestation. Pubic symphyses were dissected, cleaned and subjected to radiological examination in the anteroposterior plane. With the help of radiographs subpubic angle was measured. Readings obtained were analysed statistically. Results Subpubic angle ranged between 58°-64° throughout intrauterine life. Maximum angle (63°- 64°) was observed in group I and V and in the rest of the groups it was less than 60°, with highly significant (p-value<0.001) increase in the last group. Statistically significant sexual dimorphism was observed in group I and II fetuses (p-value <0.001). Subpubic angle was more in females during the first half and in the terminal part of gestation. Conclusion Subpubic angle remained acute throughout the

  8. Feasibility of laser trabeculoplasty in angle closure glaucoma: a review of favourable histopathological findings in narrow angles.

    PubMed

    Matos, Alexis Galeno; Asrani, Sanjay G; Paula, Jayter Silva

    2017-02-28

    Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) has been indicated as a safe and efficient treatment for primary open-angle glaucoma; however, recent studies have also shown positive results with the use of SLT in some clinical conditions related to primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG). Despite the potential benefits of SLT in selected cases of PACG, the mechanisms underlying the modifications in the trabecular meshwork tissue of patients with PACG are poorly understood. This narrative review approached both the current, limited knowledge about the histological changes observed in different forms of PACG and the clinical results of SLT treatment for PACG. Favourable outcomes of SLT in patients with PACG, specifically in areas of non-occluded angle, need further substantiation through large controlled clinical trials. A deeper understanding of the biomolecular changes of those areas is essential to improve both laser technical details and the clinical efficacy of SLT therapy.

  9. Asteroid photometry: Phase-angle effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belskaya, I.; Shevchenko, V.

    2014-07-01

    We review available observational data on magnitude phase-angle dependencies of asteroids. The number of asteroids, for which good quality phase curves were measured, increases very slowly. At present, the data-set on magnitude-phase dependencies with a good phase-angle coverage and small scatter includes less than one hundred asteroids. Most part of these data is related to the ground-based observations of main-belt asteroids and covered the phase-angle range from 0.3--0.5 deg to 20--25 deg. The phase curves in the wider phase-angle range up to 120--140 deg were measured for ten asteroids observed by space missions and for several near-Earth asteroids. Ground-based and space-based observations are generally mutually consistent. For most of the observed phase-angle ranges, asteroid magnitude phase curves are found to be linear with a noticeable deviation at phase angles smaller than 5--7 deg due to the opposition effect and at phase angles larger than 70-80 deg due to the influence of large-scale surface features. The differences in the phase curves at large phase angles and their influence on the phase integral have not yet been thoroughly investigated. The measured linear phase coefficients of asteroids are in the range of 0.02--0.05 mag/deg. The opposition-effect amplitudes determined relatively to the extrapolation of the linear part of the phase curve do not exceeds 0.4 mag. Relatively small variations of asteroid phase curve parameters require accurate photometric observations and thorough account for lightcurve amplitude to distinguish phase-angle effects. The measured magnitude phase dependencies revealed essential differences in magnitude phase-angle behavior for asteroids of different surface composition both in the linear part and in the opposition effect range (Harris et al. 1989, Belskaya and Shevchenko 2000, Shevchenko et al. 2012). Maximal amplitude of the opposition effect occurs for moderate-albedo S- and M-type asteroids. Low-albedo asteroids

  10. Measuring abutment convergence angles using stereovision dental image processing system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong-Seok; Park, Ji-Man; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to develop a dental image processing system using a three-dimensional (3D) camera and stereovision technology. The reliability of the system for measuring axial wall convergence angles was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new system predicted 3D coordinate points from 2D images and calculated distances and angles between points. Two examiners measured axial wall convergence angles for seven artificial abutments using a traditional tracing-based method (TBM) and the stereovision-based method (SVBM). Five wax abutment models of simplified abutment forms were made and axial wall convergence angles of wax models were measured by both methods. The data were statistically analyzed at the level of significance, 0.05. RESULTS Intraclass correlation coefficients showed excellent intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliabilities for both methods. Bland-Altman plots and paired t-tests showed significant differences between measurements and true values using TBM; differences were not significant with SVBM. CONCLUSION This study found that the SVBM reflected true angle values more accurately than a TMB and illustrated an example of 3D computer science applied to clinical dentistry. PMID:25177468

  11. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin; Cai, Sheng; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  12. Fabrication of zero contact angle ultra-super hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jothi Prakash, C G; Clement Raj, C; Prasanth, R

    2017-06-15

    Zero contact angle surfaces have been created with the combined effect of nanostructure and UV illumination. The contact angle of titanium surface has been optimized to 3.25°±1°. with nanotubular structures through electrochemical surface modification. The porosity and surface energy of tubular TiO2 layer play critical role over the surface wettability and the hydrophilicity of the surface. The surface free energy has been enhanced from 23.72mJ/m(2) (bare titanium surface) to 87.11mJ/m(2) (nanotubular surface). Similar surface with TiO2 nanoparticles coating shows superhydrophilicity with contact angle up to 5.63°±0.95°. This implies liquid imbibition and surface curvature play a crucial role in surface hydrophilicity. The contact angle has been further reduced to 0°±0.86° by illuminating the surface with UV radiation. Results shows that by tuning the nanotube morphology, highly porous surfaces can be fabricated to reduce contact angle and enhance wettability. This study provides an insight into the inter-relationship between surface structural factors and ultra-superhydrophilic surfaces which can help to optimize thermal hydraulic and self cleaning surfaces.

  13. Revisiting the Ramachandran plot from a new angle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Alice Qinhua; O'Hern, Corey S; Regan, Lynne

    2011-07-01

    The pioneering work of Ramachandran and colleagues emphasized the dominance of steric constraints in specifying the structure of polypeptides. The ubiquitous Ramachandran plot of backbone dihedral angles (ϕ and ψ) defined the allowed regions of conformational space. These predictions were subsequently confirmed in proteins of known structure. Ramachandran and colleagues also investigated the influence of the backbone angle τ on the distribution of allowed ϕ/ψ combinations. The "bridge region" (ϕ ≤ 0° and -20° ≤ ψ ≤ 40°) was predicted to be particularly sensitive to the value of τ. Here we present an analysis of the distribution of ϕ/ψ angles in 850 non-homologous proteins whose structures are known to a resolution of 1.7 Å or less and sidechain B-factor less than 30 Ų. We show that the distribution of ϕ/ψ angles for all 87,000 residues in these proteins shows the same dependence on τ as predicted by Ramachandran and colleagues. Our results are important because they make clear that steric constraints alone are sufficient to explain the backbone dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. Contrary to recent suggestions, no additional energetic contributions, such as hydrogen bonding, need be invoked.

  14. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  15. Trim angle measurements in free-flight facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Leslie A.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1991-01-01

    The aerodynamic cofficients and trim angle for an aerobrake at Mach 9.2 and 11.8 were found using a combination of experiment and computation. Free-flight tests were performed at NASA Ames Research Center's Hypervelocity Free-Flight Aerodynamic Facility, and the forebody pressure distribution was calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with an effective specific heat ratio. Using the computed drag, lift, and moments to prescribe the number of terms in the aerodynamic coefficient expansions and to specify the values of the higher order terms, the experimental aerodynamic coefficients and trim angle were found using a six-degree-of-freedom, weighted, least-squares analysis. The experimental and computed aerodynamic coefficients and trim angles are in good agreement. The trim angle obtained from the free-flight tests, 14.7 deg, differs from the design trim angle, 17 deg, and from the Langley wind tunnel results, 12 deg in air and 17 deg in CF4. These differences are attributable to real-gas effects.

  16. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  17. The importance of craniovertebral and cervicomedullary angles in cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Çoban, Gökçen; Çöven, İlker; Çifçi, Bilal Egemen; Yıldırım, Erkan; Yazıcı, Ayşe Canan; Horasanlı, Bahriye

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Many studies have indicated that cervicogenic headache may originate from the cervical structures innervated by the upper cervical spinal nerves. To date, no study has investigated whether narrowing of the craniovertebral angle (CVA) or cervicomedullary angle (CMA) affects the three upper cervical spinal nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CVA and/or CMA narrowing on the occurrence of cervicogenic headache. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two hundred and five patients diagnosed with cervicogenic headache were included in the study. The pain scores of patients were determined using a visual analog scale. The nonheadache control group consisted of 40 volunteers. CVA and CMA values were measured on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on two occasions by two radiologists. Angle values and categorized pain scores were compared statistically between the groups. RESULTS Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was over 97% for all measurements. Pain scores increased with decreasing CVA and CMA values. Mean angle values were significantly different among the pain categories (P < 0.001). The pain score was negatively correlated with CMA (Spearman correlation coefficient, rs, −0.676; P < 0.001) and CVA values (rs, −0.725; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION CVA or CMA narrowing affects the occurrence of cervicogenic headache. There is an inverse relationship between the angle values and pain scores. PMID:24317332

  18. Non-Contact Ultrasonic Characterization of Angled Surface Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Dutton, B.; Rosli, M. H.; Clough, A. R.

    2011-06-01

    Surface ultrasonic waves have been shown to have many uses in non-destructive testing, in particular for gauging the depth of surface defects. Much of the previous work has assumed that these defects are oriented normal to the surface. However, this is not always the case; for example, rolling contact fatigue in rails propagates at an angle of around 25° to the surface, and this angle may affect the characterisation. We present results using non-contact ultrasonic methods to generate and detect ultrasound on samples with a range of defect angles, and compare these with finite element method (FEM) models. We use both electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) and laser ultrasound. The depth calibration when measuring ultrasound transmission is considered, and what affect the angle of a defect has. Several other methods of characterising crack depth and angle are also discussed, including the arrival times of reflected and mode-converted waves, the delay in the transmission of the high-frequency Rayleigh wave, and the enhancement of the signal at the defect in both the in-plane and out-of-plane components.

  19. Determination of the position angle of stellar spin axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesage, A.-L.; Wiedemann, G.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Measuring the stellar position angle provides valuable information on binary stellar formation or stellar spin axis evolution. Aims: We aim to develop a method for determining the absolute stellar position angle using spectro-astrometric analysis of high resolution long-slit spectra. The method has been designed in particular for slowly rotating stars. We investigate its applicability to existing dispersive long-slit spectrographs, identified here by their plate scale, and the size of the resulting stellar sample. Methods: The stellar rotation induces a tilt in the stellar lines whose angle depends on the stellar position angle and the orientation of the slit. We developed a rotation model to calculate and reproduce the effects of stellar rotation on unreduced high resolution stellar spectra. Then we retrieved the tilt amplitude using a spectro-astrometric extraction of the position of the photocentre of the spectrum. Finally we present two methods for analysing the position spectrum using either direct measurement of the tilt or a cross-correlation analysis. Results: For stars with large apparent diameter and using a spectrograph with a small plate scale, we show that it is possible to determine the stellar position angle directly within 10° with a signal-to-noise ratio of the order of 6. Under less favourable conditions, i.e. larger plate scale or smaller stellar diameter, the cross-correlation method yields comparable results. Conclusions: We show that with the currently existing instruments, it is possible to determine the stellar position angle of at least 50 stars precisely, mostly K-type giants with apparent diameter down to 5 milliarcseconds. If we consider errors of around 10° still acceptable, we may include stars with apparent diameter down to 2 mas in the sample that then comprises also some main sequence stars.

  20. Effect of moisture equilibration time and medium on contact angles of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Eschlbeck, Elisabeth; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Contact angle measurement of microorganisms is often described in literature, either to investigate their hydrophobic characteristic or the adhesion behavior of cells. However, in some key aspects the preparation methods differ. Thus, it is difficult to compare results and to choose a procedure for repetition of measurements. The aim of this paper is to point out some critical points during microorganism film preparation that can alter the resulting contact angles. Depending on the moisturizing medium and equilibration time, contact angles differ significantly.

  1. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  2. Creation of the π angle standard for the flat angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giniotis, V.; Rybokas, M.

    2010-07-01

    Angle measurements are based mainly on multiangle prisms - polygons with autocollimators, rotary encoders fo high accuracy and circular scales as the standards of the flat angle. Traceability of angle measurements is based on the standard of the plane angle - prism (polygon) calibrated at an appropriate accuracy. Some metrological institutions have established their special test benches (comparators) equipped with circular scales or rotary encoders of high accuracy and polygons with autocollimators for angle calibration purposes. Nevertheless, the standard (etalon) of plane angle - polygon has many restrictions for the transfer of angle unit - radian (rad) and other units of angle. It depends on the number of angles formed by the flat sides of the polygon that is restricted by technological and metrological difficulties related to the production and accuracy determination of the polygon. A possibility to create the standard of the angle equal to π rad or half the circle or the full angle is proposed. It can be created by the circular scale with the rotation axis of very high accuracy and two precision reading instruments, usually, photoelectric microscopes (PM), placed on the opposite sides of the circular scale using the special alignment steps. A great variety of angle units and values can be measured and its traceability ensured by applying the third PM on the scale. Calibration of the circular scale itself and other scale or rotary encoder as well is possible using the proposed method with an implementation of π rad as the primary standard angle. The method proposed enables to assure a traceability of angle measurements at every laboratory having appropriate environment and reading instruments of appropriate accuracy together with a rotary table with the rotation axis of high accuracy - rotation trajectory (runout) being in the range of 0.05 μm. Short information about the multipurpose angle measurement test bench developed is presented.

  3. Globographic visualisation of three dimensional joint angles.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard

    2011-07-07

    Three different methods for describing three dimensional joint angles are commonly used in biomechanics. The joint coordinate system and Cardan/Euler angles are conceptually quite different but are known to represent the same underlying mathematics. More recently the globographic method has been suggested as an alternative and this has proved particularly attractive for the shoulder joint. All three methods can be implemented in a number of ways leading to a choice of angle definitions. Very recently Rab has demonstrated that the globographic method is equivalent to one implementation of the joint coordinate system. This paper presents a rigorous analysis of the three different methods and proves their mathematical equivalence. The well known sequence dependence of Cardan/Euler is presented as equivalent to configuration dependence of the joint coordinate system and orientation dependence of globographic angles. The precise definition of different angle sets can be easily visualised using the globographic method using analogues of longitude, latitude and surface bearings with which most users will already be familiar. The method implicitly requires one axis of the moving segment to be identified as its principal axis and this can be extremely useful in helping define the most appropriate angle set to describe the orientation of any particular joint. Using this technique different angle sets are considered to be most appropriate for different joints and examples of this for the hip, knee, ankle, pelvis and axial skeleton are outlined.

  4. Deflection angle of light in an Ellis wormhole geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Koki; Asada, Hideki

    2012-05-01

    We reexamine the light deflection by an Ellis wormhole. The bending angle as a function of the ratio between the impact parameter and the throat radius of the wormhole is obtained in terms of a complete elliptic integral of the first kind. This result immediately yields asymptotic expressions in the weak field approximation. It is shown that an expression for the deflection angle derived (and used) in recent papers is valid at the leading order but it breaks down at the next order because of the nontrivial spacetime topology.

  5. Solar angles revisited using a general vector approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, Robert E.

    2010-06-15

    Rather than follow the standard technique using direction cosines or major axes vectors to define the angles of the sun, we develop the necessary formulae from a 3-tuple vector based analysis. The direction of the sun with respect to a Cartesian coordinate system is defined as a unit vector, as is the orthogonal to a surface intended to accept solar radiation. The vector formulation is powerful and universal. More importantly, the diagrams used to describe the relative motion of the sun with respect to the Earth are quite simple, leading to less confusion when translating the geometry to algebra. An interesting result on the change in solar angle with time follows. (author)

  6. Non-uniform projection angle processing in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, Yanic; Tayag, Tristan J.

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for the collection of computed tomography data. Non-uniform increments in projection angle may be used to reduce data acquisition time with minimal reduction in the accuracy of the reconstructed profile. The key is to exploit those projection angles which correspond to regions where the object contains few high spatial frequency components. This technique is applicable to optical phase computed tomography, as well as X-ray computed tomography. We present simulation results on intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

  7. Bandwidth and threshold calculations for angle-tuned parametric oscillators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, R.; Steier, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The bandwidth of angle-tuned optical parametric oscillators, in some cases, is limited by the noncolinear interaction of the pump, signal, and idler beams, which results when the nonlinear material is rotated relative to the pump beam. To determine this bandwidth, a theoretical expression for the pump power threshold is derived in the near field limit taking into account double refraction for a noncolinear interaction. Angle tuning can be done by (1) rotating the crystal and mirrors as a unit, or by (2) rotating the crystal only. Expressions for determining the tuning rate and threshold increase for both tuning methods are derived.

  8. Birefringence compensated AWG demultiplexer with angled star couplers.

    PubMed

    Lang, Tingting; He, Jian-Jun; Kuang, Jing-Guo; He, Sailing

    2007-11-12

    A new approach to birefringence compensation in arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG) is proposed. The star couplers are designed according to Rowland circle construction with an oblique incident/diffraction angle, similar to the case of an echelle grating. Such an AWG design is more general and flexible, and the conventional AWG becomes its special case when the grating angle is zero. By appropriately designing the star coupler shape, the birefringence of the arrayed waveguides can be compensated by that of the slab waveguides. The details of the design method and simulation results are presented.

  9. Design the diffractive optical element with large diffraction angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hui; Yin, Shaoyun; Zheng, Guoxing; Deng, Qiling; Shi, Lifang; Du, Chunlei

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a quite effective method is proposed for designing the diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate a pattern with large diffraction angle. Through analyze the difference between the non-paraxial Rayleigh Sommerfeld integral and the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral, we modify the desired output intensity distribution with coordinate transformation and intensity adjustment. Then the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral can be used to design the DOE, which adopts the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) algorithm to accelerate the computation. To verify our method, the simulation and the experiments are taken. And the result shows that our method can effectively rectify the pillow distortion and can achieve the exact diffraction angle.

  10. Effect of Mean Angle of Attack Modulation on Dynamic Stall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, Kyle; Corke, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments at M = 0 . 2 were conducted on a cambered airfoil instrumented with surface pressure transducers that was oscillated with two independent frequencies. The primary input, f1, corresponds to a range of reduced frequencies, while the slower, secondary input, f2, drives the modulation of the mean angle of attack, thus varying the stall-penetration angle, αpen. Various combinations transitioned different regimes of dynamic stall from "light" to "deep". Results suggest that when αpen is falling between consecutive cycles, the aerodynamic loads do not fully recover to the values seen when αpen is rising, even though the airfoil recedes to αpen < 0 during each oscillation. The experimental data is presented in terms of load coefficients, aerodynamic damping, and their phase relationships to pitch angle. APS Fellow.

  11. Digital holographic metrology based on multi-angle interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Jiang, Chao; Jia, Shuhai

    2016-09-15

    We propose a multi-angle interferometry method for digital holographic metrology. In an application of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, the hologram corresponding to a different illumination angle is recorded as the illumination angle with a single wavelength tilted at regular intervals by an electronically controlled rotating stage. A Fourier-transform-based axial depth scanning algorithm formed by the reconstructed phase is used to obtain the height point by point over the whole field of view. Hence, the 3D reconstruction can be obtained effectively; even the object has large depth discontinuities resulting from the difficulty of the phase unwrapping. Due to a monochrome source only being used, the method is available for objects with wavelength-dependent reflectivity and those that are free of chromatic aberration caused by the different wavelengths.

  12. The Dependence of the Apparent Contact Angles on Gravity.

    PubMed

    Sakai; Fujii

    1999-02-01

    We have studied theoretically the effect of gravity on the rough solid-liquid interface and have shown that its tension is enhanced by gravity when gas is adsorbed at it. As a result, the apparent contact angle on rough surfaces, which has been considered not to be influenced by gravity so far, can be raised by gravity. The calculated dependence of contact angles on gravity under the ordinary conditions of the sessile drop method is large enough to detect by experiment. The observed asymmetrical deviations from Wenzel's contact angle caused by the gas adsorption at the solid-liquid interface and by the liquid adsorption at the solid-gas interface are explained in terms of this gravitational effect. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Radiative transfer in shrub savanna sites in Niger: Preliminary results from HAPEX-Sahel. Part 3: Optical dynamics and vegetation index sensitivity to biomass and plant cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanLeeuwen, W. J. D.; Huete, A. R.; Duncan, J.; Franklin, J.

    1994-01-01

    A shrub savannah landscape in Niger was optically characterized utilizing blue, green, red and near-infrared wavelengths. Selected vegetation indices were evaluated for their performance and sensitivity to describe the complex Sahelian soil/vegetation canopies. Bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF) of plants and soils were measured at several view angles, and used as input to various vegetation indices. Both soil and vegetation targets had strong anisotropic reflectance properties, rendering all vegetation index (6) responses to be a direct function of sun and view geometry. Soil background influences were shown to alter the response of most vegetation indices. N-space greenness had the smallest dynamic range in VI response, but the n-space brightness index provided additional useful information. The global environmental monitoring index (GEMI) showed a large 6 dynamic range for bare soils, which was undesirable for a vegetation index. The view angle response of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), atmosphere resistant vegetation index (ARVI) and soil atmosphere resistant vegetation index (SARVI) were asymmetric about nadir for multiple view angles, and were, except for the SARVI, altered seriously by soil moisture and/or soil brightness effects. The soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) was least affected by surface soil moisture and was symmetric about nadir for grass vegetation covers. Overall the SAVI, SARVI and the n-space vegetation index performed best under all adverse conditions and were recommended to monitor vegetation growth in the sparsely vegetated Sahelian zone.

  14. Wide-angle vision for road views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Fehrs, K.-K.; Hartmann, G.; Klette, R.

    2013-03-01

    The field-of-view of a wide-angle image is greater than (say) 90 degrees, and so contains more information than available in a standard image. A wide field-of-view is more advantageous than standard input for understanding the geometry of 3D scenes, and for estimating the poses of panoramic sensors within such scenes. Thus, wide-angle imaging sensors and methodologies are commonly used in various road-safety, street surveillance, street virtual touring, or street 3D modelling applications. The paper reviews related wide-angle vision technologies by focusing on mathematical issues rather than on hardware.

  15. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An actuator includes a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a Stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine. The restraint link is releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft. A second embodiment incorporates a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crank fpr a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  16. Accurate Compensation of Attitude Angle Error in a Dual-Axis Rotation Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui; Yang, Gongliu; Zou, Rui; Wang, Jing; Li, Jing

    2017-03-17

    In the dual-axis rotation inertial navigation system (INS), besides the gyro error, accelerometer error, rolling misalignment angle error, and the gimbal angle error, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle also affect the attitude accuracy. Through the analysis of the structure, we can see that the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal angle will produce coning errors which cause the fluctuation of the attitude. According to the analysis of the rotation vector, it can be seen that the coning error will generate additional drift velocity along the rotating shaft, which can reduce the navigation precision of the system. In this paper, based on the establishment of the modulation average frame, the vector projection is carried out, and then the attitude conversion matrix and the attitude error matrix mainly including the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal are obtained. Because the attitude angles are given under the static condition, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle are estimated by the static Kalman filter (KF). This kind of KF method has been widely recognized as the standard optimal estimation tool for estimating the parameters such as coning angles (α₁ , α₂), initial phase angles (ϕ₁,ϕ₂), and the non-perpendicular angle (η). In order to carry out the system level verification, a dual axis rotation INS is designed. Through simulation and experiments, the results show that the amplitudes of the attitude angles' variation are reduced by about 20%-30% when the shaft rotates. The attitude error equation is reasonably simplified and the calibration method is accurate enough. The attitude accuracy is further improved.

  17. Association between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in eyes with narrow or open-angle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song-Feng; Wu, Ge-Wei; Chen, Chang-Xi; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in subjects with eyes with narrow or open-angle. METHODS The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging optical coherence tomography and anterior chamber parameters were measured with ultrasound biomicroscopy in one eye of 23 subjects with open-angle eyes and 38 subjects with narrow-angle eyes. The mean age was 59.52±7.04y for narrow-angle subjects and 60.76±7.23y for open-angle subjects (P=0.514). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and narrow-angle parameters. RESULTS There were no differences in subfoveal choroidal thickness between open- and narrow-angle subjects (P=0.231). Anterior chamber parameters, including central anterior chamber depth, trabecular iris angle, iris thickness 500 µm from the scleral spur (IT500), and ciliary body thickness at 1 mm and 2 mm from the scleral spur (CBT1, CBT2) showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Subfoveal choroidal thickness showed negative correlation (β=-0.496, P=0.016) only with anterior chamber depth in the open-angle group and with age (β=-0.442, P=0.003) and IT500 (β=-0.399, P=0.008) in the narrow-angle group. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness was not correlated with trabecular iris angle, anterior chamber depth, ciliary body thickness, or central corneal thickness in the narrow-angle group. CONCLUSION Choroidal thickness does not differ in the two groups and has not correlated with anterior chamber parameters in narrow-angle subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and primary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:27588269

  18. Influences of the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle and cone angle on the field-aligned currents in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z. W.; Shi, J. K.; Dunlop, M.; Liu, Z. X.

    2013-10-01

    The influences of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle θ and clock angle ϕ on the field-aligned currents (FACs) at the plasma sheet boundary layers (PSBLs) have been investigated using Cluster Data. The FAC occurrence increases monotonically with IMF cone angle and has two peaks at -90° and +110° clock angle, respectively. The peak at +110° is distinctly larger than that at -90°. Overall, there are more FACs between 0° < ϕ < 180°, indicating that FACs occurrence is closely associated with duskward IMF. More FACs occur when 90° < |ϕ| < 180°, implying that FAC is closely associated with southward IMF. The large FAC densities occur when 60° < |ϕ| < 120°. The density also has two peaks and the peak at +90° clock angle (duskward IMF) is larger than that at -90° (dawnward IMF). These results indicate that the IMF influence on the FACs is from all IMF components and not only from a single component.

  19. Measurements of CKM Angle Beta from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, Keith A.; /Colorado U.

    2007-05-23

    We present recent results of hadronic B meson decays related to the CKM angle beta. The data used were collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  20. Exploring Dissections of Rectangles into Right-Angled Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this article we highlight how a simple classroom activity associated with the dissection of rectangles into right-angled triangles can lead on to a number of interesting explorations for students following a post-16 mathematics course. Several results connected with this construction are obtained, and some of the educational benefits of…

  1. Exploring dissections of rectangles into right-angled triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Martin

    2013-09-01

    In this article we highlight how a simple classroom activity associated with the dissection of rectangles into right-angled triangles can lead on to a number of interesting explorations for students following a post-16 mathematics course. Several results connected with this construction are obtained, and some of the educational benefits of carrying out an investigation such as this are also discussed.

  2. Intrarater and Interrater Reliability of the Flexicurve Index, Flexicurve Angle, and Manual Inclinometer for the Measurement of Thoracic Kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to describe the interrater and intrarater reliability of the flexicurve index, flexicurve angle, and manual inclinometer in swimmers. A secondary objective was to determine the level of agreement between the inclinometer angle and the flexicurve angle and to provide an equation to approximate one angle from the other. Methods. Thirty swimmers participated. Thoracic kyphosis was measured using the flexicurve and the manual inclinometer. Intraclass correlation coefficient, 95% confidence interval, and standard error of measurement were computed. Results. The flexicurve angle and index showed excellent intrarater (ICC = 0.94) and good interrater (ICC = 0.86) reliability. The inclinometer demonstrated excellent intrarater (ICC = 0.92) and interrater (ICC = 0.90) reliability. The flexicurve angle was systematically smaller and correlated poorly with the inclinometer angle (R2 = 0.384). The following equations can be used for approximate conversions: flexicurve angle = (0.275 × inclinometer angle) + 8.478; inclinometer angle = (1.396 × flexicurve angle) + 8.694. Conclusion. The inclinometer and flexicurve are both reliable instruments for thoracic kyphosis measurement in swimmers. Although the flexicurve and inclinometer angles are not directly comparable, the approximate conversion factors provided will permit translation of flexicurve angle to inclinometer angle and vice versa. PMID:24396603

  3. Rubber hand illusion affects joint angle perception.

    PubMed

    Butz, Martin V; Kutter, Esther F; Lorenz, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    The Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) is a well-established experimental paradigm. It has been shown that the RHI can affect hand location estimates, arm and hand motion towards goals, the subjective visual appearance of the own hand, and the feeling of body ownership. Several studies also indicate that the peri-hand space is partially remapped around the rubber hand. Nonetheless, the question remains if and to what extent the RHI can affect the perception of other body parts. In this study we ask if the RHI can alter the perception of the elbow joint. Participants had to adjust an angular representation on a screen according to their proprioceptive perception of their own elbow joint angle. The results show that the RHI does indeed alter the elbow joint estimation, increasing the agreement with the position and orientation of the artificial hand. Thus, the results show that the brain does not only adjust the perception of the hand in body-relative space, but it also modifies the perception of other body parts. In conclusion, we propose that the brain continuously strives to maintain a consistent internal body image and that this image can be influenced by the available sensory information sources, which are mediated and mapped onto each other by means of a postural, kinematic body model.

  4. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.

    2014-10-01

    We use Open Geospace General Circulation Model global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30° in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger geomagnetic activity. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  5. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Raeder, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric/ magnetotail/ ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast foward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30o in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along th Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail on both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in a larger geomagnetic activity there. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to larger geomagnetic responses in the ionosphere nightside. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and even Mach number, can be differently geoeffective, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  6. Moderate positive spin Hall angle in uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Simranjeet; Anguera, Marta; Barco, Enrique del E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu; Springell, Ross; Miller, Casey W. E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu

    2015-12-07

    We report measurements of spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/uranium bilayers designed to study the efficiency of spin-charge interconversion in a super-heavy element. We employ broad-band ferromagnetic resonance on extended films to inject a spin current from the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} (permalloy) into the uranium layer, which is then converted into an electric field by the inverse spin Hall effect. Surprisingly, our results suggest a spin mixing conductance of order 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} and a positive spin Hall angle of 0.004, which are both merely comparable with those of several transition metals. These results thus support the idea that the electronic configuration may be at least as important as the atomic number in governing spin pumping across interfaces and subsequent spin Hall effects. In fact, given that both the magnitude and the sign are unexpected based on trends in d-electron systems, materials with unfilled f-electron orbitals may hold additional exploration avenues for spin physics.

  7. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  8. A Distance and Angle Similarity Measure Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Korfhage, Robert R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses similarity measures that are used in information retrieval to improve precision and recall ratios and presents a combined vector-based distance and angle measure to make similarity measurement more scientific and accurate. Suggests directions for future research. (LRW)

  9. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets.

  10. Modal propagation angles in ducts with soft walls and their connection with suppressor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The angles of propagation of the wave fronts associated with duct modes are derived for a cylindrical duct with soft walls (acoustic suppressors) and a uniform steady flow. The angle of propagation with respect to the radial coordinate (angle of incidence on the wall) is shown to be a better correlating parameter for the optimum wall impedance of spinning modes than the previously used mode cutoff ratio. Both the angle of incidence upon the duct wall and the propagation angle with respect to the duct axis are required to describe the attenuation of a propagating mode. Using the modal propagation angles, a geometric acoustics approach to suppressor acoustic performance was developed. Results from this approximate method were compared to exact modal propagation calculations to check the accuracy of the approximate method. The results are favorable except in the immediate vicinity of the modal optimum impedance where the approximate method yields about one-half of the exact maximum attenuation.

  11. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea; Purdie, Thomas G. Jaffray, David A.; Levinshtein, Alex; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Pekar, Vladimir

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume

  12. Effect of phacoemulsification on drainage angle status in angle closure eyes with or without extensive peripheral anterior synechiae.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Golshan; Moghimi, Sasan; Eslami, Yadollah; Fakhraie, Ghasem; Zarei, Reza; Lin, Shan

    2013-01-21

    Purpose. To evaluate the anatomic effects of phacoemulsification on drainage angle status in primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Methods. A total of 62 eyes of 58 patients underwent cataract surgery in Farabi Rye Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Patients were examined postoperatively on day 1, week 1, and week 6. Indentation gonioscopy and AS-OCT were performed preoperatively and at 6 weeks after surgery. Main outcome measures were angle and anterior segment parameters by AS-OCT and amount of peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS) by gonioscopy. Thirty-five eyes had PAS =180 degrees (group 1) and 27 eyes had >180-degree synechial closure (group 2). Results. Mean age of the patients was 64.3±9.0 years. The mean extent of PAS was significantly reduced from 45.9 to 32.2 degrees (p<0.03) in group 1, and from 277.4 to 159.0 degrees (p<0.001) in group 2. Group 2 showed significantly greater reduction in PAS extent (p<0.001). Angle opening distance and trabecular-iris space area at 500 µm from the scleral spur measured by AS-OCT increased significantly in both groups (p<0.001 for both). Anterior chamber depth (ACD) increased and lens vault (LV) decreased after both procedures. However, the amount of change in ACD and LV and angle parameters were not significant between the 2 groups. Conclusions. Phacoemulsification resulted in opening of the drainage angle, deepening of the anterior chamber, and reduction of PAS extent in PACG eyes with or without extensive PAS. Greater reduction of PAS could be considered in eyes with PAS >180 degrees.

  13. View angle dependence of cloud optical thicknesses retrieved by MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    This study examines whether cloud inhomogeneity influences the view angle dependence of MODIS cloud optical thickness (tau) retrieval results. The degree of cloud inhomogeneity is characterized through the local gradient in 11 microns brightness temperature. The analysis of liquid phase clouds in a one year long global dataset of Collection 4 MODIS data reveals that while optical thickness retrievals give remarkably consistent results for all view directions if clouds are homogeneous, they give much higher tau-values for oblique views than for overhead views if clouds are inhomogeneous and the sun is fairly oblique. For solar zenith angles larger than 55deg, the mean optical thickness retrieved for the most inhomogeneous third of cloudy pixels is more than 30% higher for oblique views than for overhead views. After considering a variety of possible scenarios, the paper concludes that the most likely reason for the increase lies in three-dimensional radiative interactions that are not considered in current, one-dimensional retrieval algorithms. Namely, the radiative effect of cloud sides viewed at oblique angles seems to contribute most to the enhanced tau-values. The results presented here will help understand cloud retrieval uncertainties related to cloud inhomogeneity. They complement the uncertainty estimates that will start accompanying MODIS cloud products in Collection 5 and may eventually help correct for the observed view angle dependent biases.

  14. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  15. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic stripes.

    PubMed

    Dubov, Alexander L; Mourran, Ahmed; Möller, Martin; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-08-21

    We study experimentally and discuss quantitatively the contact angle hysteresis on striped superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of a solid fraction, ϕS. It is shown that the receding regime is determined by a longitudinal sliding motion of the deformed contact line. Despite an anisotropy of the texture the receding contact angle remains isotropic, i.e., is practically the same in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The cosine of the receding angle grows nonlinearly with ϕS. To interpret this we develop a theoretical model, which shows that the value of the receding angle depends both on weak defects at smooth solid areas and on the strong defects due to the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which scales as ϕS(2)lnϕS. The advancing contact angle was found to be anisotropic, except in a dilute regime, and its value is shown to be determined by the rolling motion of the drop. The cosine of the longitudinal advancing angle depends linearly on ϕS, but a satisfactory fit to the data can only be provided if we generalize the Cassie equation to account for weak defects. The cosine of the transverse advancing angle is much smaller and is maximized at ϕS ≃ 0.5. An explanation of its value can be obtained if we invoke an additional energy due to strong defects in this direction, which is shown to be caused by the adhesion of the drop on solid sectors and is proportional to ϕS(2). Finally, the contact angle hysteresis is found to be quite large and generally anisotropic, but it becomes isotropic when ϕS ≤ 0.2.

  16. Nucleation of small-angle boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |; Wilsdorf, D.K.

    1996-12-01

    The internal stresses induced by the strain gradients in an array of lattice cells delineated by low-angle dislocation boundaries are partially relieved by the creation of new low-angle boundaries. This is shown to be a first-order transition, the new boundaries having finite misorientations. The calculated misorientations both of the new boundaries and of the existing boundaries which provoke the transition agree well with observations.

  17. Solar Cell Angle of Incidence Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission has three different solar arrays each of which sees changes in incidence angle during normal operation. When solar array angle of incidence effects was researched little published data was found. The small amount of-published data created a need to obtain and evaluate such data. The donation of the needed data, which was taken in the fall of 1994, was a major factor in the preparation of this paper.

  18. Eliminating Deadbands In Resistive Angle Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Allen, Russell O.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed shaft-angle-measuring circuit provides continuous indication of angle of rotation from 0 degree to 360 degrees. Sensing elements are two continuous-rotation potentiometers, and associated circuitry eliminates deadband that occurs when wiper contact of potentiometer crosses end contacts near 0 degree position of circular resistive element. Used in valve-position indicator or similar device in which long operating life and high angular precision not required.

  19. Determining Angle of Humeral Torsion Using Image Software Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Madhu; Vasudeva, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several researches have been done on the measurement of angles of humeral torsion in different parts of the world. Previously described methods were more complicated, not much accurate, cumbersome or required sophisticated instruments. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to determine the angles of humeral torsion with a newer simple technique using digital images and image tool software. Materials and Methods A total of 250 dry normal adult human humeri were obtained from the bone bank of Department of Anatomy. The length and mid-shaft circumference of each bone was measured with the help of measuring tape. The angle of humeral torsion was measured directly from the digital images by the image analysis using Image Tool 3.0 software program. The data was analysed statistically with SPSS version 17 using unpaired t-test and Spearman’s rank order correlation coefficient. Results The mean angle of torsion was 64.57°±7.56°. On the right side it was 66.84°±9.69°, whereas, on the left side it was found to be 63.31±9.50°. The mean humeral length was 31.6 cm on right side and 30.33 cm on left side. Mid shaft circumference was 5.79 on right side and 5.63 cm on left side. No statistical differences were seen in angles between right and left humeri (p>0.001). Conclusion From our study, it was concluded that circumference of shaft is inversely proportional to angle of humeral torsion. The length and side of humerus has no relation with the humeral torsion. With advancement of digital technology, it is better to use new image softwares for anatomical studies. PMID:27891326

  20. A Unified Low-Elevation-Angle Scintillation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Cheung, K.-M.; Ho, C.

    2011-05-01

    Enabling communications at very low elevation angles can lengthen the duration of a tracking pass between a satellite and a ground station, which in turn can increase the amount of data return and possibly reduce the number of required supporting ground station tracking passes. Link performance, especially at very low angles and high frequencies, depends heavily on terrain, atmosphere, and weather conditions. Among the different contributions to attenuation, scintillation fading plays a very significant role and can impair the performance of the link. It is therefore necessary to accurately model the overall impact to the link due to scintillation fading. The current International Telecommunication Union ITU-R P.618-10 Recommendation describes three scintillation loss models as a function of elevation angle and percentage of time for which the loss exceeds a certain threshold. Implementation of the recommendation resulted in the uncovering of several issues. Particularly, it was identified that (i) iterative solutions to an implicit nonlinear exponential model, in some cases, are not guaranteed to exist, (ii) there is a discontinuity in fading values between models at the cross-over elevation angle, (iii) at certain low elevation angles scintillation from the shallow fade model generates unrealistically small losses, and (iv) for elevation angles lying between 4 and 5 deg, there are two applicable scintillation models that yield conflicting values. In this article, we develop a new approach to unify the different fading models within the current ITU recommendation and fully remove the discrepancies. We further validated our models with ITU-adopted scintillation data measured at Goonhilly, Great Britain, and data from several recent NASA Space Shuttle launches. This improved model was provisionally approved at the ITU International Meeting in Italy, November 2010, and is being evaluated by the ITU members for adoption into the next-version ITU Recommendation.

  1. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  2. Modelling PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The accurate and traceable form measurement of optical surfaces has been greatly advanced by a new generation of surface profilometers which are based on the reflection of light at the surface and the measurement of the reflection angle. For this application, high-resolution electronic autocollimators provide accurate and traceable angle metrology. In recent years, great progress has been made at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in autocollimator calibration. For an advanced autocollimator characterisation, a novel calibration device has been built up at PTB: the Spatial Angle Autocollimator Calibrator (SAAC). The system makes use of an innovative Cartesian arrangement of three autocollimators (two reference autocollimators and the autocollimator to be calibrated), which allows a precise measurement of the angular orientation of a reflector cube. Each reference autocollimator is sensitive primarily to changes in one of the two relevant tilt angles, whereas the autocollimator to be calibrated is sensitive to both. The distance between the reflector cube and the autocollimator to be calibrated can be varied flexibly. In this contribution, we present the SAAC and aspects of the mathematical modelling of the system for deriving analytical expressions for the autocollimators' angle responses. These efforts will allow advancing the form measurement substantially with autocollimator-based profilometers and approaching fundamental measurement limits. Additionally, they will help manufacturers of autocollimators to improve their instruments and will provide improved angle measurement methods for precision engineering.

  3. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  4. Angular Distributions of Sputtered Atoms from Semiconductor Targets at Grazing Ion Beam Incidence Angles

    SciTech Connect

    Sekowski, M.; Burenkov, A.; Martinez-Limia, A.; Hernandez-Mangas, J.; Ryssel, H.

    2008-11-03

    Angular distributions of ion sputtered germanium and silicon atoms are investigated within this work. Experiments are performed for the case of grazing ion incidence angles, where the resulting angular distributions are asymmetrical with respect to the polar angle of the sputtered atoms. The performed experiments are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations from different programs. We show here an improved model for the angular distribution, which has an additional dependence of the ion incidence angle.

  5. Multiband propagation experiment for narrowband characterisation of high elevation angle land mobile-satellite channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, G.; Evans, B. G.; Richharia, M.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a recent multiband propagation measurement campaign for the high elevation angle land mobile satellite channel are reported. Simultaneous narrowband sounding of the channel has been carried out in suburban, wooded and open areas of the UK using a helicopter-mounted platform to simulate the satellite signal at various elevation angles. Propagation related link degradations in the land mobile-satellite channel have been observed to be less severe when the path elevation angle is increased or radio frequency decreases.

  6. Reliability of Beta angle in assessing true anteroposterior apical base discrepancy in different growth patterns

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Shobha; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Beta angle as a skeletal anteroposterior dysplasia indicator is known to be useful in evaluating normodivergent growth patterns. Hence, we compared and verified the accuracy of Beta angle in predicting sagittal jaw discrepancy among subjects with hyperdivergent, hypodivergent and normodivergent growth patterns. Materials and Methods: Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 179 patients belonging to skeletal Classes I, II, and III were further divided into normodivergent, hyperdivergent, and hypodivergent groups based on their vertical growth patterns. Sagittal dysplasia indicators - angle ANB, Wits appraisal, and Beta angle values were measured and tabulated. The perpendicular point of intersection on line CB (Condylion-Point B) in Beta angle was designated as ‘X’ and linear dimension XB was evaluated. Results: Statistically significant increase was observed in the mean values of Beta angle and XB distance in the vertical growth pattern groups of both skeletal Class I and Class II patients thus pushing them toward Class III and Class I, respectively. Conclusions: Beta angle is a reliable indicator of sagittal dysplasia in normal and horizontal patterns of growth. However, vertical growth patterns significantly increased Beta angle values, thus affecting their reliability as a sagittal discrepancy assessment tool. Hence, Beta angle may not be a valid tool for assessment of sagittal jaw discrepancy in patients exhibiting vertical growth patterns with skeletal Class I and Class II malocclusions. Nevertheless, Class III malocclusions having the highest Beta angle values were unaffected. PMID:25810649

  7. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    MISR views the sunlit Earth simultaneously at nine widely spaced angles and provides ongoing global coverage with high spatial detail. Its imagery is carefully calibrated to provide accurate measures of the brightness, contrast, and color of reflected sunlight. MISR provides new types of information for scientists studying Earth's climate, such as the regional and global distribution of different types of atmospheric particles and aerosols. The change in reflection at different view angles provides the means to distinguish aerosol types, cloud forms, and land surface cover. Combined with stereoscopic techniques, this enables construction of 3-D cloud models and estimation of the total amount of sunlight reflected by Earth's diverse environments. MISR was built for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. It is part of NASA's first Earth Observing System (EOS) spacecraft, the Terra spacecraft, which was launched into polar orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base on December 18, 1999. MISR has been continuously providing data since February 24, 2000. [Mission Objectives] The MISR instrument acquires systematic multi-angle measurements for global monitoring of top-of-atmosphere and surface albedos and for measuring the shortwave radiative properties of aerosols, clouds, and surface scenes in order to characterize their impact on the Earth's climate. The Earth's climate is constantly changing -- as a consequence of both natural processes and human activities. Scientists care a great deal about even small changes in Earth's climate, since they can affect our comfort and well-being, and possibly our survival. A few years of below-average rainfall, an unusually cold winter, or a change in emissions from a coal-burning power plant, can influence the quality of life of people, plants, and animals in the region involved. The goal of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is to increase our understanding of the climate changes that are occurring on our

  8. Parameter dependence of conic angle of nanofibres during electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhengping; Wu, Xiang-Fa; Gao, Xueqin; Jiang, Long; Zhao, Yong; Fong, Hao

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the dependence of conic angle of nanofibres on the processing and material parameters during electrospinning. Solutions of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in dimethylformamide (DMF) with varied PAN concentrations were studied as the model systems, and they were electrospun into nanofibres at different high direct current (dc) voltages, flow rates and needle diameters. The dynamic and transient shear viscosities of the PAN/DMF solutions were characterized by a parallel-plate rheometer at varied shear rates. Rheological measurements showed that the PAN/DMF solutions behaved as Newtonian fluids at relatively low to medium shear rates, while the solutions with high PAN concentrations of 18 and 20 wt% exhibited a significant shear-thinning behaviour at high shear rates, especially in the case of transient shear mode. Experimental results indicated that at the electrostatic field of ~80 kV m-1 and needle inner diameter of 0.48 mm (22 gauge), the conic angle of the nanofibre envelope decreased from ~160° to ~75° with an increase in PAN concentration from 12 to 20 wt%; at the PAN concentration of 16 wt%, the conic angle increased nonlinearly from ~40° to ~160° with an increase in electric field from 50 to 140 kV m-1. In addition, experimental results showed that the needle inner diameter also noticeably influenced the conic angle. This study provided the experimental evidence useful for understanding the scaling properties of electrohydrodynamic jet motion for controllable electrospinning and process modelling.

  9. A model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash ladar imaging sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Russo, Leonard E.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-11-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. 3D Flash LADAR is the latest evolution of laser radar systems and provides unique capability in its ability to provide high-resolution LADAR imagery upon a single laser pulse; rather than constructing an image from multiple pulses as with conventional scanning LADAR systems. However, accurate methods to model and simulate performance from these 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation developed and reported here is expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment, this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) atmospheric transmission; 4) atmospheric backscatter; 5) atmospheric turbulence; 6) obscurants, and; 7) obscurant path length. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel in the array. Here, noise sources are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel. Model outputs are in the form of 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array. Other outputs include power distribution from a target, signal-to-noise vs. range, probability of

  10. A model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR imaging sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Russo, Leonard E.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2005-10-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. 3D Flash LADAR is the latest evolution of laser radar systems and provides unique capability in its ability to provide high-resolution LADAR imagery upon a single laser pulse; rather than constructing an image from multiple pulses as with conventional scanning LADAR systems. However, accurate methods to model and simulate performance from these 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation developed and reported here is expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment, this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) atmospheric transmission; 4) atmospheric backscatter; 5) atmospheric turbulence; 6) obscurants, and; 7) obscurant path length. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel in the array. Here, noise sources are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel. Model outputs are in the form of 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array. Other outputs include power distribution from a target, signal-to-noise vs. range, probability of

  11. Transperineal ultrasonography in stress urinary incontinence: The significance of urethral rotation angles

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Wasan Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess, using transperineal ultrasonography (TPUS), the numerical value of the rotation of the bladder neck [represented by the difference in the anterior (α angle) and posterior urethral anglesangle)] at rest and straining, in continent women and women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), to ascertain if there are significant differences in the angles of rotation (Rα and Rβ) between the groups. Patients, subjects and methods In all, 30 women with SUI (SUI group) and 30 continent women (control group) were included. TPUS was performed at rest and straining (Valsalva manoeuver), and the threshold value for the urethral angles (α and β angles) for each group were estimated. The degree of rotation for each angle was calculated and was considered as the angle of rotation. Results Both the α and β angles were significantly different between the groups at rest and straining, and there was a significant difference in the mean increment in the value of each angle. Higher values of increment (higher rotation angles) were reported in the SUI group for both the α and β angles compared with those of the control group [mean (SD) Rα SUI group 19.43 (12.76) vs controls 10.53 (2.98) °; Rβ SUI group 28.30 (12.96) vs controls 16.33 (10.8) °; P < 0.001]. Conclusion Urethral rotation angles may assist in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with SUI, which may in turn reduce the need for more sophisticated urodynamic studies. PMID:26966596

  12. Accurate Compensation of Attitude Angle Error in a Dual-Axis Rotation Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Yang, Gongliu; Zou, Rui; Wang, Jing; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    In the dual-axis rotation inertial navigation system (INS), besides the gyro error, accelerometer error, rolling misalignment angle error, and the gimbal angle error, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle also affect the attitude accuracy. Through the analysis of the structure, we can see that the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal angle will produce coning errors which cause the fluctuation of the attitude. According to the analysis of the rotation vector, it can be seen that the coning error will generate additional drift velocity along the rotating shaft, which can reduce the navigation precision of the system. In this paper, based on the establishment of the modulation average frame, the vector projection is carried out, and then the attitude conversion matrix and the attitude error matrix mainly including the shaft swing angle and axis non-orthogonal are obtained. Because the attitude angles are given under the static condition, the shaft swing angle and the axis non-orthogonal angle are estimated by the static Kalman filter (KF). This kind of KF method has been widely recognized as the standard optimal estimation tool for estimating the parameters such as coning angles (α1 , α2), initial phase angles (ϕ1,ϕ2), and the non-perpendicular angle (η). In order to carry out the system level verification, a dual axis rotation INS is designed. Through simulation and experiments, the results show that the amplitudes of the attitude angles’ variation are reduced by about 20%–30% when the shaft rotates. The attitude error equation is reasonably simplified and the calibration method is accurate enough. The attitude accuracy is further improved. PMID:28304354

  13. Angle-independent structural colors of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Weirich, Johannes; Nørregaard, Jesper; Garnaes, Joergen; Asger Mortensen, N.; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Structural colors are optical phenomena of physical origin, where microscale and nanoscale structures determine the reflected spectrum of light. Artificial structural colors have been realized within recent years. However, multilayer structures require substantial fabrication. Instead we considered one-layer surface textures of silicon. We explored four patterns of square structures in a square lattice with periods of 500, 400, 300, and 200 nm. The reflectivity and daylight-colors were measured and compared with simulations based on rigorously coupled-wave analysis with excellent agreement. Based on the 200-nm periodic pattern, it was found that angle-independent specular colors up to 60 deg of incidence may be provided. The underlying mechanisms include (1) the suppression of diffraction and (2) a strong coupling of light to localized surface states. The strong coupling yields absorption anomalies in the visual spectrum, causing robust colors to be defined for a large angular interval. The result is a manifestation of a uniformly defined color, similar to pigment-based colors. These mechanisms hold potential for color engineering and can be used to explain and predict the structural-color appearance of silicon-based textures for a wide range of structural parameters.

  14. Segment adaptive gradient angle interpolation.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Christine M; Frakes, David H

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new edge-directed interpolator based on locally defined, straight line approximations of image isophotes. Spatial derivatives of image intensity are used to describe the principal behavior of pixel-intersecting isophotes in terms of their slopes. The slopes are determined by inverting a tridiagonal matrix and are forced to vary linearly from pixel-to-pixel within segments. Image resizing is performed by interpolating along the approximated isophotes. The proposed method can accommodate arbitrary scaling factors, provides state-of-the-art results in terms of PSNR as well as other quantitative visual quality metrics, and has the advantage of reduced computational complexity that is directly proportional to the number of pixels.

  15. Sensitivity of high-spectral resolution and broadband thermal infrared nadir instruments to the chemical and microphysical properties of secondary sulfate aerosols in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, Pasquale; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The observation of upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulfate aerosols (SSA) and their chemical and microphysical properties from satellite nadir observations (with better spatial resolution than limb observations) is a fundamental tool to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact on UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Thermal infrared (TIR) observations are sensitive to the chemical composition of the aerosols due to the strong spectral variations of the imaginary part of the refractive index in this band and, correspondingly, of the absorption, as a function of the composition Then, these observations are, in principle, well adapted to detect and characterize UTLS SSA. Unfortunately, the exploitation of nadir TIR observations for sulfate aerosol layer monitoring is today very limited. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of TIR satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealised UTLS SSA layers. The sulfate aerosol particles are assumed as binary systems of sulfuric acid/water solution droplets, with varying sulphuric acid mixing ratios. The extinction properties of the SSA, for different sulfuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indices taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. High-spectral resolution pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealised aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on

  16. Diminution of contact angle hysteresis under the influence of an oscillating force.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer

    2014-06-17

    We suggest a simple quantitative model for the diminution of contact angle hysteresis under the influence of an oscillatory force invoked by thermal fluctuations, substrate vibrations, acoustic waves, or oscillating electric fields. Employing force balance rather than the usual description of contact angle hysteresis in terms of Gibbs energy, we highlight that a wetting system, such as a sessile drop or a bubble adhered to a solid substrate, appears at long times to be partially or fully independent of contact angle hysteresis and thus independent of static friction forces, as a result of contact line pinning. We verify this theory by studying several well-known experimental observations such as the approach of an arbitrary contact angle toward the Young contact angle and the apparent decrease (or increase) in an advancing (or a receding) contact angle under the influence of an external oscillating force.

  17. Polar transfer alignment of shipborne SINS with a large misalignment angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianhua; Wang, Tongda; Guan, Dongxue; Li, Meiling

    2016-03-01

    Existing polar transfer alignment (TA) algorithms are designed based on linear Kalman filters (KF) to estimate misalignment angles. In the case of a large misalignment angle, these algorithms cannot be applied in order to achieve accurate TA. In this paper, a TA algorithm based on an unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to solve the problem of the large misalignment angle in the polar region. Based on a large misalignment angle, nonlinear navigation error equations, which are the UKF dynamic models, are derived under grid frames. This paper chooses the velocity plus attitude matching method as the TA matching method and errors of velocity and attitude as observations. The misalignment angle can be estimated by the designed UKF. The simulation results have demonstrated that the polar TA algorithm can be effective in improving the TA accuracy, especially when large misalignment angles occur.

  18. Correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Ono, Koji; Ando, Suguru; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy male (20.7 ± 2.6 years old) participated in this study. Neck slope angle was measured in a relaxed sitting posture. The deep cervical flexor muscle thickness was measured in a relaxed supine posture. The correlations between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index were determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a moderate positive correlation between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness (r = 0.414, P = 0.006). The result demonstrated that participants with lower neck slope angles had smaller muscle thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor muscles. It appears that the deep cervical flexor muscle thickness might be associated with neck slope angle in a relaxed sitting posture.

  19. Asymmetric dihedral angle offsets for large-size lunar laser ranging retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsubo, Toshimichi; Kunimori, Hiroo; Noda, Hirotomo; Hanada, Hideo; Araki, Hiroshi; Katayama, Masato

    2011-08-01

    The distribution of two-dimensional velocity aberration is off-centered by 5 to 6 microradians in lunar laser ranging, due to the stable measurement geometry in the motion of the Earth and the Moon. The optical responses of hollow-type retroreflectors are investigated through numerical simulations, especially focusing on large-size, single-reflector targets that can ultimately minimize the systematic error in future lunar laser ranging. An asymmetric dihedral angle offset, i.e. setting unequal angles between the three back faces, is found to be effective for retroreflectors that are larger than 100 mm in diameter. Our numerical simulation results reveal that the optimized return energy increases approximately 3.5 times more than symmetric dihedral angle cases, and the optimized dihedral angle offsets are 0.65-0.8 arcseconds for one angle, and zeroes for the other two angles.

  20. Development of portable and real-time self-calibration angle encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Xue, Zi; Lin, Hu; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    At National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM), a portable and real-time self-calibration angle encoder was developed to meet the requirement of angular measurement with high accuracy, high speed, and high adaptability in limited size. In the development, the special arrangement of reading heads, the structure of bearing was designed base on the novel selfcalibration method, and the corresponding signal acquisition and processing system was set up with capability of high speed and multi-channel synchronous data acquisition and processing. The max rotary speed of this angle encoder gets 18 r/min (110°/s) in real-time mode. This angle encoder was compared with NIM's primary angle standard. The calibration result shows that this angle encoder has angle measuring accuracy better than +/-4″.

  1. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  2. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  3. Noise of the SR-3 propeller model at 2 deg and 4 deg angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The noise effect of operating supersonic tip speed propellers at angle of attack with respect to the incoming flow was determined. Increases in the maximum blade passage noise were observed for the propeller operating at angle of attack. The noise increase was not symmetrical with one wall of the wind tunnel having significantly more noise increase than the other wall. This was apparently the result of the rotational direction of the propeller. The lack of symmetry of the noise at angle of attack to the use of oppositely rotating propellers on opposite sides of an airplane fuselage as a way of minimizing the noise due to operation at angle of attack.

  4. Technique to measure contact angle of micro/nanodroplets using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-07-15

    Contact angle is the primary parameter that characterizes wetting; however, the measurement techniques have been limited to droplets with a diameter as low as about 50 {mu}m. The authors developed an atomic force microscopy-based technique to measure the contact angle of micro- and nanodroplets deposited using a modified nanoscale dispensing tip. The obtained contact angle results were compared with those of a macrodroplet (2.1 mm diameter). It was found that the contact angle on various surfaces decreases with decreasing the droplet size.

  5. Effectiveness of variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals in lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wearable sensor system developed by our group, which measured lower limb angles using Kalman-filtering-based method, was suggested to be useful in evaluation of gait function for rehabilitation support. However, it was expected to reduce variations of measurement errors. In this paper, a variable-Kalman-gain method based on angle error that was calculated from acceleration signals was proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The proposed method was tested comparing to fixed-gain Kalman filter and a variable-Kalman-gain method that was based on acceleration magnitude used in previous studies. First, in angle measurement in treadmill walking, the proposed method measured lower limb angles with the highest measurement accuracy and improved significantly foot inclination angle measurement, while it improved slightly shank and thigh inclination angles. The variable-gain method based on acceleration magnitude was not effective for our Kalman filter system. Then, in angle measurement of a rigid body model, it was shown that the proposed method had measurement accuracy similar to or higher than results seen in other studies that used markers of camera-based motion measurement system fixing on a rigid plate together with a sensor or on the sensor directly. The proposed method was found to be effective in angle measurement with inertial sensors.

  6. Harnessing Genetic Variation in Leaf Angle to Increase Productivity of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Truong, Sandra K; McCormick, Ryan F; Rooney, William L; Mullet, John E

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency with which a plant intercepts solar radiation is determined primarily by its architecture. Understanding the genetic regulation of plant architecture and how changes in architecture affect performance can be used to improve plant productivity. Leaf inclination angle, the angle at which a leaf emerges with respect to the stem, is a feature of plant architecture that influences how a plant canopy intercepts solar radiation. Here we identify extensive genetic variation for leaf inclination angle in the crop plant Sorghum bicolor, a C4 grass species used for the production of grain, forage, and bioenergy. Multiple genetic loci that regulate leaf inclination angle were identified in recombinant inbred line populations of grain and bioenergy sorghum. Alleles of sorghum dwarf-3, a gene encoding a P-glycoprotein involved in polar auxin transport, are shown to change leaf inclination angle by up to 34° (0.59 rad). The impact of heritable variation in leaf inclination angle on light interception in sorghum canopies was assessed using functional-structural plant models and field experiments. Smaller leaf inclination angles caused solar radiation to penetrate deeper into the canopy, and the resulting redistribution of light is predicted to increase the biomass yield potential of bioenergy sorghum by at least 3%. These results show that sorghum leaf angle is a heritable trait regulated by multiple loci and that genetic variation in leaf angle can be used to modify plant architecture to improve sorghum crop performance.

  7. Harnessing Genetic Variation in Leaf Angle to Increase Productivity of Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Sandra K.; McCormick, Ryan F.; Rooney, William L.; Mullet, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency with which a plant intercepts solar radiation is determined primarily by its architecture. Understanding the genetic regulation of plant architecture and how changes in architecture affect performance can be used to improve plant productivity. Leaf inclination angle, the angle at which a leaf emerges with respect to the stem, is a feature of plant architecture that influences how a plant canopy intercepts solar radiation. Here we identify extensive genetic variation for leaf inclination angle in the crop plant Sorghum bicolor, a C4 grass species used for the production of grain, forage, and bioenergy. Multiple genetic loci that regulate leaf inclination angle were identified in recombinant inbred line populations of grain and bioenergy sorghum. Alleles of sorghum dwarf-3, a gene encoding a P-glycoprotein involved in polar auxin transport, are shown to change leaf inclination angle by up to 34° (0.59 rad). The impact of heritable variation in leaf inclination angle on light interception in sorghum canopies was assessed using functional-structural plant models and field experiments. Smaller leaf inclination angles caused solar radiation to penetrate deeper into the canopy, and the resulting redistribution of light is predicted to increase the biomass yield potential of bioenergy sorghum by at least 3%. These results show that sorghum leaf angle is a heritable trait regulated by multiple loci and that genetic variation in leaf angle can be used to modify plant architecture to improve sorghum crop performance. PMID:26323882

  8. Development of a three-dimensional angle errors detection and compensation system for two-dimensional stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang-Xian; Bian, Ya-Kui; Chen, Chen; Li, Rui-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In order to compensate three-dimensional (3D) angle errors of two-dimensional (2D) stage in motion, a 3D angle errors detection and compensation system using a modified DVD pick-up head has been developed in this paper. The modified DVD pick-up head, which consists of a commercial DVD pick-up head without objective lens and voice coil motor, is used as an angle sensor. The mechanism of the angle sensor is based on optical auto-collimation, and each sensor can detect two deflection angles of the stage simultaneously. Utilizing the angle error information obtained by two angle sensors which are set along X and Y moving direction respectively, the controlling system adjusts the nano-positioning stage by controlling the piezoelectric ceramic actuators' movement to compensate the angle errors of the stage. This system can achieve the measurement and compensation of yaw angle error, pitch angle error and roll angle error of the stage. Experimental results show that the angle detection range of this system is +/-110", the resolution is about 0.2", and the repeatability error is about 2″. After compensating, the 3D angle errors of 2D stage can be controlled within 3″. This system has the advantages of compact structure, low cost, etc.

  9. A highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm for drops on inclined surface based on ellipse-fitting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z N; Wang, S Y

    2015-02-01

    To improve the accuracy in the calculation of dynamic contact angle for drops on the inclined surface, a significant number of numerical drop profiles on the inclined surface with different inclination angles, drop volumes, and contact angles are generated based on the finite difference method, a least-squares ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to calculate the dynamic contact angle. The influences of the above three factors are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the dynamic contact angle errors, including the errors of the left and right contact angles, evaluated by the ellipse-fitting algorithm tend to increase with inclination angle/drop volume/contact angle. If the drop volume and the solid substrate are fixed, the errors of the left and right contact angles increase with inclination angle. After performing a tremendous amount of computation, the critical dimensionless drop volumes corresponding to the critical contact angle error are obtained. Based on the values of the critical volumes, a highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm is proposed and fully validated. Within nearly the whole hydrophobicity range, it can decrease the dynamic contact angle error in the inclined plane method to less than a certain value even for different types of liquids.

  10. LVAD Outflow Graft Angle and Thrombosis Risk.

    PubMed

    Aliseda, Alberto; Chivukula, Venkat Keshav; Mcgah, Patrick; Prisco, Anthony R; Beckman, Jennifer A; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Mokadam, Nahush A; Mahr, Claudius

    This study quantifies thrombogenic potential (TP) of a wide range of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) outflow graft anastomosis angles through state-of-the-art techniques: 3D imaged-based patient-specific models created via virtual surgery and unsteady computational fluid dynamics with Lagrangian particle tracking. This study aims at clarifying the influence of a single parameter (outflow graft angle) on the thrombogenesis associated with flow patterns in the aortic root after LVAD implantation. This is an important and poorly-understood aspect of LVAD therapy, because several studies have shown strong inter and intrapatient thrombogenic variability and current LVAD implantation strategies do not incorporate outflow graft angle optimization. Accurate platelet-level investigation, enabled by statistical treatment of outliers in Lagrangian particle tracking, demonstrates a strong influence of outflow graft anastomoses angle on thrombogenicity (platelet residence times and activation state characterized by shear stress accumulation) with significantly reduced TP for acutely-angled anastomosed outflow grafts. The methodology presented in this study provides a device-neutral platform for conducting comprehensive thrombogenicity evaluation of LVAD surgical configurations, empowering optimal patient-focused surgical strategies for long-term treatment and care for advanced heart failure patients.

  11. IMU-based joint angle measurement for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Seel, Thomas; Raisch, Jörg; Schauer, Thomas

    2014-04-16

    This contribution is concerned with joint angle calculation based on inertial measurement data in the context of human motion analysis. Unlike most robotic devices, the human body lacks even surfaces and right angles. Therefore, we focus on methods that avoid assuming certain orientations in which the sensors are mounted with respect to the body segments. After a review of available methods that may cope with this challenge, we present a set of new methods for: (1) joint axis and position identification; and (2) flexion/extension joint angle measurement. In particular, we propose methods that use only gyroscopes and accelerometers and, therefore, do not rely on a homogeneous magnetic field. We provide results from gait trials of a transfemoral amputee in which we compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU)-based methods to an optical 3D motion capture system. Unlike most authors, we place the optical markers on anatomical landmarks instead of attaching them to the IMUs. Root mean square errors of the knee flexion/extension angles are found to be less than 1° on the prosthesis and about 3° on the human leg. For the plantar/dorsiflexion of the ankle, both deviations are about 1°.

  12. Contact angle hysteresis and pinning at periodic defects in statics.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina; Nikolayev, Vadim S

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the theoretical prediction of the wetting hysteresis on nonideal solid surfaces in terms of the surface heterogeneity parameters. The spatially periodical chemical heterogeneity is considered. We propose precise definitions for both the advancing and the receding contact angles for the Wilhelmy plate geometry. It is well known that in such a system, a multitude of metastable states of the liquid meniscus occurs for each different relative position of the defect pattern on the plate with respect to the liquid level. As usual, the static advancing and receding angles are assumed to be a consequence of the preceding contact line motion in the respective direction. It is shown how to select the appropriate states among all metastable states. Their selection is discussed. The proposed definitions are applicable to both the static and the dynamic contact angles on heterogeneous surfaces. The static advancing and receding angles are calculated for two examples of periodic heterogeneity patterns with sharp borders: the horizontal alternating stripes of a different wettability (studied analytically) and the doubly periodic pattern of circular defects on a homogeneous base (studied numerically). The wetting hysteresis is determined as a function of the defect density and the spatial period. A comparison with the existing results is carried out.

  13. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  14. Determination Method of Bridge Rotation Angle Response Using MEMS IMU.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Hidehiko; Kinomoto, Takeshi; Miki, Chitoshi

    2016-11-09

    To implement steel bridge maintenance, especially that related to fatigue damage, it is important to monitor bridge deformations under traffic conditions. Bridges deform and rotate differently under traffic load conditions because their structures differ in terms of length and flexibility. Such monitoring enables the identification of the cause of stress concentrations that cause fatigue damage and the proposal of appropriate countermeasures. However, although bridge deformation monitoring requires observations of bridge angle response as well as the bridge displacement response, measuring the rotation angle response of a bridge subject to traffic loads is difficult. Theoretically, the rotation angle response can be calculated by integrating the angular velocity, but for field measurements of actual in-service bridges, estimating the necessary boundary conditions would be difficult due to traffic-induced vibration. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a method for determining the rotation angle response of an in-service bridge from its angular velocity, as measured by a inertial measurement unit (IMU). To verify our proposed method, field measurements were conducted using nine micro-electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) IMUs and two contact displacement gauges. The results showed that our proposed method provided high accuracy when compared to the reference responses calculated by the contact displacement gauges.

  15. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  16. Effects of temperature and conditioning on contact lens wetting angles.

    PubMed

    Knick, P D; Huff, J W

    1991-07-01

    Because wettability is not always examined under standard conditions, we investigated the temperature dependence of saline wettability on unconditioned and conditioned polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), and three silicone acrylate lens materials. Sessile drop contact angles were measured in a humidity chamber at 23 degrees C and 34 degrees C using laser-assisted contact angle goniometry. In separate experiments, saline-stored and preconditioned lenses were examined either with or without rinsing. Sessile drop contact angles at 34 degrees C were within 2 degrees to 5 degrees of the room temperature values for both conditioned and unconditioned lenses, demonstrating a negligible temperature dependence. At both temperatures, the conditioned PMMA, CAB, silafocon A, and pasifocon C lenses wet slightly better, by 1 degree to 12 degrees, than unconditioned lenses. However, this increase was only significant with PMMA and silafocon A (P less than 0.05) and reversed when the preconditioned lenses were rinsed repeatedly in saline and reexamined. The results suggest that for these materials: 1) in vitro saline contact angles do not approach those seen on the eye, and this discrepancy can not be explained by temperature or conditioning; and 2) conditioning does not increase material wettability but merely forms a temporary hydrophilic interface that is more wettable than the lens material.

  17. Determination Method of Bridge Rotation Angle Response Using MEMS IMU

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hidehiko; Kinomoto, Takeshi; Miki, Chitoshi

    2016-01-01

    To implement steel bridge maintenance, especially that related to fatigue damage, it is important to monitor bridge deformations under traffic conditions. Bridges deform and rotate differently under traffic load conditions because their structures differ in terms of length and flexibility. Such monitoring enables the identification of the cause of stress concentrations that cause fatigue damage and the proposal of appropriate countermeasures. However, although bridge deformation monitoring requires observations of bridge angle response as well as the bridge displacement response, measuring the rotation angle response of a bridge subject to traffic loads is difficult. Theoretically, the rotation angle response can be calculated by integrating the angular velocity, but for field measurements of actual in-service bridges, estimating the necessary boundary conditions would be difficult due to traffic-induced vibration. To solve the problem, this paper proposes a method for determining the rotation angle response of an in-service bridge from its angular velocity, as measured by a inertial measurement unit (IMU). To verify our proposed method, field measurements were conducted using nine micro-electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) IMUs and two contact displacement gauges. The results showed that our proposed method provided high accuracy when compared to the reference responses calculated by the contact displacement gauges. PMID:27834871

  18. Contact angle hysteresis and pinning at periodic defects in statics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina; Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the theoretical prediction of the wetting hysteresis on nonideal solid surfaces in terms of the surface heterogeneity parameters. The spatially periodical chemical heterogeneity is considered. We propose precise definitions for both the advancing and the receding contact angles for the Wilhelmy plate geometry. It is well known that in such a system, a multitude of metastable states of the liquid meniscus occurs for each different relative position of the defect pattern on the plate with respect to the liquid level. As usual, the static advancing and receding angles are assumed to be a consequence of the preceding contact line motion in the respective direction. It is shown how to select the appropriate states among all metastable states. Their selection is discussed. The proposed definitions are applicable to both the static and the dynamic contact angles on heterogeneous surfaces. The static advancing and receding angles are calculated for two examples of periodic heterogeneity patterns with sharp borders: the horizontal alternating stripes of a different wettability (studied analytically) and the doubly periodic pattern of circular defects on a homogeneous base (studied numerically). The wetting hysteresis is determined as a function of the defect density and the spatial period. A comparison with the existing results is carried out.

  19. Acquisition and analysis of angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Levine, Ross M.; Chen, Xin; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2014-02-18

    Angle-beam ultrasonic testing is a common practical technique used for nondestructive evaluation to detect, locate, and characterize a variety of material defects and damage. Greater understanding of the both the incident wavefield produced by an angle-beam transducer and the subsequent scattering from a variety of defects and geometrical features is anticipated to increase the reliability of data interpretation. The focus of this paper is on acquiring and analyzing propagating waves from angle-beam transducers in simple, defect-free plates as a first step in the development of methods for flaw characterization. Unlike guided waves, which excite the plate throughout its thickness, angle-beam bulk waves bounce back and forth between the plate surfaces, resulting in the well-known multiple “skips” or “V-paths.” The experimental setup consists of a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. Although laser vibrometry is now routinely used to record guided waves for which the frequency content is below 1 MHz, it is more challenging to acquire higher frequency bulk waves in the 1–10 MHz range. Signals are recorded on the surface of an aluminum plate that were generated from a 5 MHz, 65° refracted angle, shear wave transducer-wedge combination. Data are analyzed directly in the x-t domain, via a slant stack Radon transform in the τ-p (offset time-slowness) domain, and via a 2-D Fourier transform in the ω-k domain, thereby enabling identification of specific arrivals and modes. Results compare well to those expected from a simple ray tracing analysis except for the unexpected presence of a strong Rayleigh wave.

  20. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  1. Three paths toward the quantum angle operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazeau, Jean Pierre; Szafraniec, Franciszek Hugon

    2016-12-01

    We examine mathematical questions around angle (or phase) operator associated with a number operator through a short list of basic requirements. We implement three methods of construction of quantum angle. The first one is based on operator theory and parallels the definition of angle for the upper half-circle through its cosine and completed by a sign inversion. The two other methods are integral quantization generalizing in a certain sense the Berezin-Klauder approaches. One method pertains to Weyl-Heisenberg integral quantization of the plane viewed as the phase space of the motion on the line. It depends on a family of "weight" functions on the plane. The third method rests upon coherent state quantization of the cylinder viewed as the phase space of the motion on the circle. The construction of these coherent states depends on a family of probability distributions on the line.

  2. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  3. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  4. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: ..cap alpha.. = initial photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..cap alpha../sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..beta.. = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV.

  5. A heterodyne interferometer for angle metrology.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, M; Wang, X; Goullioud, R

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a compact, high-resolution, angle measurement instrument based on a heterodyne interferometer. Common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer set up, an optical mask is used to sample the laser beam reflecting back from four areas on a target surface. From the relative displacement measurements of the target surface areas, we can simultaneously determine angular rotations around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement beam propagation direction. The device is used in a testbed for a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw angle measurements of a flat mirror are performed. Angle noise measurement of the device shows 0.1 nrad/square root of Hz at 1 Hz, at a working distance of 1 m. The operation range and nonlinearity of the device when used with a flat mirror is approximately +/-0.15 mrad, and 3 microrad rms, respectively.

  6. A heterodyne interfe